WorldWideScience

Sample records for bulge giants probing

  1. Chemical similarities between Galactic bulge and local thick disk red giant stars

    OpenAIRE

    Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.; Alves-Brito, A.; Cunha, K.; B. Barbuy; Bessell, M. S.; Chiappini, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Ramirez, I.; Smith, V.V.; Yong, D.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the Milky Way bulge and its relationship with the other Galactic populations is still poorly understood. The bulge has been suggested to be either a merger-driven classical bulge or the product of a dynamical instability of the inner disk. To probe the star formation history, the initial mass function and stellar nucleosynthesis of the bulge, we performed an elemental abundance analysis of bulge red giant stars. We also completed an identical study of local thin disk, thick d...

  2. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  3. Galactic bulge M giants. II. Content and structure of the bulge between b = -3 deg and -12 deg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JHKL colors and CO and H2O indices for a sample of 250 M giants derived from surveys along the minor axis of the Galaxy at latitudes between -3 deg and -12 deg are presented and studied. The bolometric magnitudes for the stars are calculated. The effects of latitude on the colors, magnitudes, and indices are examined. The bolometric luminosity function for each bulge field is provided and the influence of latitude on luminosity is analyzed. Long-period variables in the bulge, the search for IRAS sources in the surveyed fields, and the IR surface brightness of the bulge are discussed. 74 refs

  4. Kinematics and abundances of K giants in the nuclear bulge of the Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial velocities have been determined for 53 K giants in Baade's window, which belong to the nuclear bulge population and have abundances derived from low resolution spectra. Additional radial velocities for an overlapping sample of 71 bulge K giants show the same dependence of velocity dispersion on abundance; in both samples, the lower velocity dispersion of the metal-rich giants is found to be significant at a level above 90 percent. Extant data support the hypothesis that both M giants and IRAS bulge sources follow steep density laws similar to that which has been predicted for the metal-rick K giants. The abundance distribution of 88 K giants in Baade's window is noted to be notably well fitted by the simple, closed box model of chemical evolution. 85 refs

  5. Heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu in 56 Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Swaelmen, M; Hill, V; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu in 56 bulge giants (red giant branch and red clump) with metallicities ranging from -1.3 dex to 0.5 dex. Methods. We obtained high-resolution spectra of our giant stars using the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. We inspected four bulge fields along the minor axis. Results. We measure the chemical evolution of heavy elements, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. Conclusions. The [Ba, La, Ce, Nd/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] ratios decrease with increasing metallicity, in which aspect they differ from disc stars. In our metal-poor bulge stars, La and Ba are enhanced relative to their thick disc counterpart, while in our metal-rich bulge stars La and Ba are underabundant relative to their disc counterpart. Therefore, this contrast between bulge and discs trends indicates that bulge and (solar neighbourhood) thick disc stars could behave differently. An increase in [La, Nd/Eu] with increasing m...

  6. Detached Red Giant Eclipsing Binary Twins: Rosetta Stones to the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Nataf, David M; Pinsonneault, Marc H

    2012-01-01

    We identify 34 highly-probable detached, red giant eclipsing binary pairs among 315 candidates in Devor's catalog of $\\sim$10,000 OGLE-II eclipsing binaries. We estimate that there should be at least 200 such systems in OGLE-III. We show that spectroscopic measurements of the metallicities and radial-velocity-derived masses of these systems would independently constrain both the age-metallicity and helium-metallicity relations of the Galactic Bulge, potentially breaking the age-helium degeneracy that currently limits our ability to characterize the Bulge stellar population. Mass and metallicity measurements alone would be sufficient to immediately validate or falsify recent claims about the age and helium abundance of the Bulge. A spectroscopic survey of these systems would constrain models of Milky Way assembly, as well as provide significant auxiliary science on research questions such as mass loss on the red giant branch. We discuss the theoretical uncertainties in stellar evolution models that would need ...

  7. The metallicity distribution of bulge clump giants in Baade's Window

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, V; Gomez, A; Zoccali, M; Schultheis, M; Babusiaux, C; Royer, F; Barbuy, B; Arenou, F; Minniti, D; Ortolani, S

    2011-01-01

    We seek to constrain the formation of the Galactic bulge by means of analysing the detailed chemical composition of a large sample of red clump stars in Baade's window. We measure [Fe/H] in a sample of 219 bulge red clump stars from R=20000 resolution spectra obtained with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at the VLT, using an automatic procedure, differentially to the metal-rich local reference star muLeo. For a subsample of 162 stars, we also derive [Mg/H] from spectral synthesis around the MgI triplet at 6319A. The Fe and Mg metallicity distributions are both asymmetric, with median values of +0.16 and +0.21 respectively. The iron distribution is clearly bimodal, as revealed both by a deconvolution (from observational errors) and a Gaussian decomposition. The decomposition of the observed Fe and Mg metallicity distributions into Gaussian components yields two populations of equal sizes (50% each): a metal-poor component centred around [Fe/H]=-0.30 and [Mg/H]=-0.06 with a large dispersion and a narrow metal-rich component cen...

  8. Longitude distribution of bulge M giants - the mass and large-scale structure of the spheroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Star counts obtained from a survey of late-type giants along b = -6 deg confirm the extreme rarity of carbon stars relative to M giants in the bulge and the large excess of M stars near the galactic meridian over that expected from the disk. The results constrain the axial ratio of the bulge to between 0.6 and 0.8, and suggest that the usual representation of the spheroid using an R exp 1/4 law with an effective radius of 1/3 solar radius is inadequate to explain the large stellar density in the bulge. A simple mass model of the Galaxy and an observationally determined M/L ratio are used to determine the external appearance of the galactic spheroid. The absolute magnitude of the spheroid is found to be -20.3 + or - 0.3. The luminosity and size of the galactic bulge indicate that the Milky Way may be closer in morphology to NGC 4565 than to M31. 83 refs

  9. Bulge Formation by the Coalescence of Giant Clumps in Primordial Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2008-01-01

    Gas-rich disks in the early universe are highly turbulent and have giant star-forming clumps. Models suggest the clumps form by gravitational instabilities, and if they resist disruption by star formation, then they interact, lose angular momentum, and migrate to the center to form a bulge. Here we study the properties of the bulges formed by this mechanism. They are all thick, slowly rotating, and have a high Sersic index, like classical bulges. Their rapid formation should also give them relatively high alpha-element abundances. We consider fourteen low-resolution models and four high-resolution models, three of which have supernova feedback. All models have an active halo, stellar disk, and gaseous disk, three of the models have a pre-existing bulge and three others have a cuspy dark matter halo. All show the same basic result except the one with the highest feedback, in which the clumps are quickly destroyed and the disk thickens too much. The coalescence of massive disk clumps in the center of a galaxy i...

  10. Zinc abundances in Galactic bulge field red giants: implications for DLA systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; da Silveira, C R; Hill, V; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A

    2015-01-01

    Zinc in stars is an important reference element because it is a proxy to Fe in studies of damped Lyman-alpha systems, permitting a comparison of chemical evolution histories of bulge stellar populations and DLAs. In terms of nucleosynthesis, it behaves as an alpha element because it is enhanced in metal-poor stars. The aim of this work is to derive the iron-peak element Zn abundances in 56 bulge giants from high resolution spectra. These results are compared with data from other bulge samples, as well as from disk and halo stars, and damped Lyman-alpha systems, in order to better understand the chemical evolution in these environments. High-resolution spectra were obtained using FLAMES+UVES on the Very Large Telescope. We find [Zn/Fe]=+0.24+-0.02 in the range -1.3 -0.1, it shows a spread of -0.60 < [Zn/Fe] < +0.15, with most of these stars having low [Zn/Fe]<0.0. These low zinc abundances at the high metallicity end of the bulge define a decreasing trend in [Zn/Fe] with increasing metallicities. A c...

  11. Zinc abundances in Galactic bulge field red giants: Implications for damped Lyman-α systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Friaça, A. C. S.; da Silveira, C. R.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Zinc in stars is an important reference element because it is a proxy to Fe in studies of damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs), permitting a comparison of chemical evolution histories of bulge stellar populations and DLAs. In terms of nucleosynthesis, it behaves as an alpha element because it is enhanced in metal-poor stars. Abundance studies in different stellar populations can give hints to the Zn production in different sites. Aims: The aim of this work is to derive the iron-peak element Zn abundances in 56 bulge giants from high resolution spectra. These results are compared with data from other bulge samples, as well as from disk and halo stars, and damped Lyman-α systems, in order to better understand the chemical evolution in these environments. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using FLAMES+UVES on the Very Large Telescope. We computed the Zn abundances using the Zn i lines at 4810.53 and 6362.34 Å. We considered the strong depression in the continuum of the Zn i 6362.34 Å line, which is caused by the wings of the Ca i 6361.79 Å line suffering from autoionization. CN lines blending the Zn i 6362.34 Å line are also included in the calculations. Results: We find [Zn/Fe] = +0.24 ± 0.02 in the range -1.3 < [Fe/H] < -0.5 and [Zn/Fe] = + 0.06 ± 0.02 in the range -0.5 < [Fe/H] < -0.1, whereas for [Fe/H] ≥ -0.1, it shows a spread of -0.60 < [Zn/Fe] < + 0.15, with most of these stars having low [Zn/Fe] < 0.0. These low zinc abundances at the high metallicity end of the bulge define a decreasing trend in [Zn/Fe] with increasing metallicities. A comparison with Zn abundances in DLA systems is presented, where a dust-depletion correction was applied for both Zn and Fe. When we take these corrections into account, the [Zn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] of the DLAs fall in the same region as the thick disk and bulge stars. Finally, we present a chemical evolution model of Zn enrichment in massive spheroids, representing a typical classical bulge evolution

  12. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  13. High resolution spectroscopic analysis of seven giants in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6723

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Zoccali, M.; Vásquez, S.; Ripepi, V.; Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Globular clusters associated with the Galactic bulge are important tracers of stellar populations in the inner Galaxy. High resolution analysis of stars in these clusters allows us to characterize them in terms of kinematics, metallicity, and individual abundances, and to compare these fingerprints with those characterizing field populations. Aims: We present iron and element ratios for seven red giant stars in the globular cluster NGC 6723, based on high resolution spectroscopy. Methods: High resolution spectra (R ~ 48 000) of seven K giants belonging to NGC 6723 were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope. Photospheric parameters were derived from ~130 Fe i and Fe ii transitions. Abundance ratios were obtained from line-to-line spectrum synthesis calculations on clean selected features. Results: An intermediate metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.98 ± 0.08 dex and a heliocentric radial velocity of vhel = -96.6 ± 1.3 km s-1 were found for NGC 6723. Alpha-element abundances present enhancements of [O/Fe] = 0.29 ± 0.18 dex, [Mg/Fe] = 0.23 ± 0.10 dex, [Si/Fe] = 0.36 ± 0.05 dex, and [Ca/Fe] = 0.30 ± 0.07 dex. Similar overabundance is found for the iron-peak Ti with [Ti/Fe] = 0.24 ± 0.09 dex. Odd-Z elements Na and Al present abundances of [Na/Fe] = 0.00 ± 0.21 dex and [Al/Fe] = 0.31 ± 0.21 dex, respectively. Finally, the s-element Ba is also enhanced by [Ba/Fe] = 0.22 ± 0.21 dex. Conclusions: The enhancement levels of NGC 6723 are comparable to those of other metal-intermediate bulge globular clusters. In turn, these enhancement levels are compatible with the abundance profiles displayed by bulge field stars at that metallicity. This hints at a possible similar chemical evolution with globular clusters and the metal-poor of the bulge going through an early prompt chemical enrichment.

  14. High resolution spectroscopic analysis of seven giants in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6723

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas-Arriagada, A; Vásquez, S; Ripepi, V; Musella, I; Marconi, M; Grado, A; Limatola, L

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters associated with the Galactic bulge are important tracers of stellar populations in the inner Galaxy. High resolution analysis of stars in these clusters allows us to characterize them in terms of kinematics, metallicity, and individual abundances, and to compare these fingerprints with those characterizing field populations. We present iron and element ratios for seven red giant stars in the globular cluster NGC~6723, based on high resolution spectroscopy. High resolution spectra ($R\\sim48~000$) of seven K giants belonging to NGC 6723 were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Photospheric parameters were derived from $\\sim130$ FeI and FeII transitions. Abundance ratios were obtained from line-to-line spectrum synthesis calculations on clean selected features. An intermediate metallicity of [Fe/H]$=-0.98\\pm0.08$ dex and a heliocentric radial velocity of $v_{hel}=-96.6\\pm1.3~km s^{-1}$ were found for NGC 6723. Alpha-element abundances present enhancements of $[O/...

  15. MACHO Project Analysis of the Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events with Clump Giants as Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowski, P; Vandehei, T; Griest, K; Alcock, C; Alves, D R; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Minniti, D; Nelson, C; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Welch, D L

    2002-03-06

    We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This class of events allows one to obtain robust conclusions because relatively bright clump stars are not strongly affected by blending. We discuss: (1) the selection of ''giant'' events, (2) the distribution of event durations, (3) the anomalous character of event durations and optical depth in the MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.1,-3{sup o}.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of {tau} = (2.0 {+-} 0.4) x10{sup -6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3{sup o}.9, -3{sup o}.8), and present a map of the spatial distribution of the optical depth. When field 104 is removed from the sample, the optical depth drops to {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, which is in excellent agreement with infrared-based models of the central Galactic region.

  16. Probing cosmic plasma with giant radio pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratiev, V I; Soglasnov, V A; Kovalev, Y Y; Bartel, N; Cannon, W; Novikov, A Y

    2007-01-01

    VLBI observations of the Crab pulsar with the 64-m radio telescope at Kalyazin (Russia) and the 46-m radio telescope of the Algonquin Radio Observatory (Canada) at 2.2 GHz and single-dish observations of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 with the GBT (USA) at 2.1 GHz were conducted to probe the interstellar medium and study the properties of giant pulses. The VLBI data were processed with a dedicated software correlator, which allowed us to obtain the visibility of single giant pulses. Two frequency scales of 50 and 450 kHz were found in the diffraction spectra of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar. The location of the scattering region was estimated to be close to the outer edge of the nebula. No correlation was found between the power spectra of giant pulses at left- and right-hand circular polarization. We explain this lack of correlation through the influence of the strong magnetic field on circularly polarized emission in the region close to the Crab pulsar. Combining the measurement of the decorrelation ba...

  17. Temperatures and metallicities of M giants in the galactic Bulge from low-resolution K-band spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Schultheis, M; Nandakumar, G

    2016-01-01

    With the existing and upcoming large multi-fibre low-resolution spectrographs, the question arises how precise stellar parameters such as Teff and [Fe/H] can be obtained from low-resolution K-band spectra with respect to traditional photometric temperature measurements. Until now, most of the effective temperatures in galactic Bulge studies come directly from photometric techniques. Uncertainties in interstellar reddening and in the assumed extinction law could lead to large systematic errors. We aim to obtain and calibrate the relation between Teff and the $\\rm ^{12}CO$ first overtone bands for M giants in the galactic Bulge covering a wide range in metallicity. We use low-resolution spectra for 20 M giants with well-studied parameters from photometric measurements covering the temperature range 3200 < Teff < 4500 K and a metallicity range from 0.5 dex down to -1.2 dex and study the behaviour of Teff and [Fe/H] on the spectral indices. We find a tight relation between Teff and the $\\rm ^{12}CO(2-0)$ ba...

  18. Chemical evolution of fluorine in the bulge. High-resolution K-band spectra of giants in three fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, H.; Ryde, N.; Harper, G. M.; Cunha, K.; Schultheis, M.; Eriksson, K.; Kobayashi, C.; Smith, V. V.; Zoccali, M.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Possible main formation sites of fluorine in the Universe include asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the ν-process in Type II supernova, and/or Wolf-Rayet stars. The importance of the Wolf-Rayet stars has theoretically been questioned and they are probably not needed in modeling the chemical evolution of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. It has, however, been suggested that Wolf-Rayet stars are indeed needed to explain the chemical evolution of fluorine in the bulge. The molecular spectral data, needed to determine the fluorine abundance, of the often used HF-molecule has not been presented in a complete and consistent way and has recently been debated in the literature. Aims: We intend to determine the trend of the fluorine-oxygen abundance ratio as a function of a metallicity indicator in the bulge to investigate the possible contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars. Additionally, we present here a consistent HF line list for the K- and L-bands including the often used 23 358.33 Å line. Methods: High-resolution near-infrared spectra of eight K giants were recorded using the spectrograph CRIRES mounted at the VLT. A standard setting was used that covered the HF molecular line at 23 358.33 Å. The fluorine abundances were determined using spectral fitting. We also re-analyzed five previously published bulge giants observed with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini using our new HF molecular data. Results: We find that the fluorine-oxygen abundance in the bulge probably cannot be explained with chemical evolution models that only include AGB stars and the ν-process in supernovae Type II, that is a significant amount of fluorine production in Wolf-Rayet stars is most likely needed to explain the fluorine abundance in the bulge. For the HF line data, we find that a possible reason for the inconsistencies in the literature, where two different excitation energies were used, is two different definitions of the zero-point energy for the HF molecule and therefore

  19. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick;

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  20. Handheld, giant magnetoresistive-sensor-based eddy current probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, S. K.; Palmer, D. D.

    2012-05-01

    The minimum crack length detectable with conventional eddy current probes increases dramatically as the thickness of metal through which the inspection is performed increases. The skin depth phenomenon is unavoidable, and demands low frequency inspection, hindering sensitivity. However, one time derivative introduced by Faraday's Law can be avoided by using giant magnetoresistive sensors to detect eddy currents instead of conventional coils, improving sensitivity. The theory will be explained, along with some probe designs and the observed benefits in sensitivity.

  1. Using 3D Spectroscopy to Probe the Orbital Structure of Composite Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Erwin, Peter; Thomas, Jens; Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Rusli, Stephanie; Nowak, Nina; Beckman, John E; Beltrán, Juan Carlos Vega

    2014-01-01

    Detailed imaging and spectroscopic analysis of the centers of nearby S0 and spiral galaxies shows the existence of "composite bulges", where both classical bulges and disky pseudobulges coexist in the same galaxy. As part of a search for supermassive black holes in nearby galaxy nuclei, we obtained VLT-SINFONI observations in adaptive-optics mode of several of these galaxies. Schwarzschild dynamical modeling enables us to disentangle the stellar orbital structure of the different central components, and to distinguish the differing contributions of kinematically hot (classical bulge) and kinematically cool (pseudobulge) components in the same galaxy.

  2. High-resolution abundance analysis of red giants in the metal-poor bulge globular cluster HP~1

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Vemado, A; Ernandes, H; Ortolani, S; Saviane, I; Bica, E; Minniti, D; Dias, B; Momany, Y; Hill, V; Zoccali, M; Siqueira-Mello, C

    2016-01-01

    The globular cluster HP~1 is projected at only 3.33 degrees from the Galactic center. Together with its distance, this makes it one of the most central globular clusters in the Milky Way. It has a blue horizontal branch (BHB) and a metallicity of [Fe/H]~-1.0. This means that it probably is one of the oldest objects in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can reveal the nucleosynthesis pattern of the first stars as well as the early chemical enrichment and early formation of stellar populations. High-resolution spectra obtained for six stars were analyzed to derive the abundances of the light elements C, N, O, Na, and Al, the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, and the heavy elements Sr, Y , Zr, Ba, La, and Eu.} High-resolution spectra of six red giants that are confirmed members of the bulge globular cluster HP~1 were obtained with the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. The spectroscopic parameter derivation was based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of FeI...

  3. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  4. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  5. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J. [Uppsala Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction.

  6. Bulge growth through disk instabilities in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The role of disk instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disk galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges. This secular growth of bulges in modern disk galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudo-bulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disk instabilities at high redshift (z>1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (10^10 to a few 10^11 Msun of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift disks are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 10^8-10^9 Msun of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disk evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms, on short timescales. The giant clumps can...

  7. Extracting interstellar diffuse absorption bands from cool star spectra: Application to bulge clump giants in Baade's window

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Babusiaux, Carine; Puspitarini, Lucky; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Hill, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Interstellar diffuse bands are usually extracted from hot star spectra because they are characterized by smooth continua. It introduces a strong limitation on the number of available targets, and reduces potential studies of the IS matter and the use of absorptions for cloud mapping. We have developed a new automatic fitting method appropriate to interstellar absorptions in spectra of cool stars that possess stellar atmospheric parameters. We applied this method to the extraction of three DIBs in high resolution VLT FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra of red clump stars from the bulge. By combining all stellar synthetic spectra, HITRAN-LBLRTM atmospheric transmission spectra and diffuse band empirical absorption profiles, we determine the 6196, 6204, and 6284 A DIB strength toward the 219 target stars and discuss the sources of uncertainties. In order to test the sensitivity of the DIB extraction, we intercompare the three results and compare the DIB equivalent widths with the reddening derived from an independent extinct...

  8. Chemistry of the Galactic Bulge: New Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, Manuela; Hill, Vanessa; Barbuy, Beatriz; Lecureur, Aurelie; Minniti, Dante; Renzini, Alvio; Gonzalez, Oscar; Gómez, Ana; Ortolani, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    VLT-FLAMES observations provide by far the largest sample of high dispersion spectra of Bulge red giants available. Five years of work on these 900 spectra have yielded the abundances of different elements in the Milky Way Bulge, and new results on its formation. The results so far include the Bulge metallicity distribution, the Bulge metallicity gradient, the metallicity dependence on kinematics, the history of enrichment with alpha-elements, as well as the lithium abundance. The evidence collected on Milky Way Bulge chemical enrichment supports a rapid early formation scenario, and the metallicity gradient argues against formation via secular bar evolution.

  9. Galactic bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Peletier, Reynier; Gadotti, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This book consists of invited reviews on Galactic Bulges written by experts in the field. A central point of the book is that, while in the standard picture of galaxy formation a significant amount of the baryonic mass is expected to reside in classical bulges, the question what is the fraction of galaxies with no classical bulges in the local Universe has remained open. The most spectacular example of a galaxy with no significant classical bulge is the Milky Way. The reviews of this book attempt to clarify the role of the various types of bulges during the mass build-up of galaxies, based on morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations, and connecting their properties at low and high redshifts. The observed properties are compared with the predictions of the theoretical models, accounting for the many physical processes leading to the central mass concentration and their destruction in galaxies. This book serves as an entry point for PhD students and non-specialists and as a reference work for researchers...

  10. Probing FSR star cluster candidates in bulge/disk directions with 2MASS colour-magnitude diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bica, Eduardo; Camargo, Denilso

    2007-01-01

    We analyse 20 star cluster candidates projected mostly in the bulge direction ($|\\ell|<60^\\circ$). The sample contains all candidates in that sector classified by \\citet{FSRcat} with quality flags denoting high probability of being star clusters. Bulge contamination in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) is in general important, while at lower Galactic latitudes disk stars contribute as well. Properties of the candidates are investigated with 2MASS CMDs and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs) built with field star decontaminated photometry. To uncover the nature of the structures we decontaminate the CMDs from field stars using tools that we previously developed to deal with objects in dense fields. We confirm in all cases excesses in the RDPs with respect to the background level, as expected from the method the candidates were originally selected. CMDs and RDPs taken together revealed 6 open clusters, 5 uncertain cases that require deeper observations, while 9 objects are possibly field density fluctu...

  11. Fluorine Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, K; Gibson, B K

    2008-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) abundances are derived in a sample of 6 bulge red giants in Baade's Window. These giants span a factor of 10 in metallicity and this is the first study to define the behavior of 19F with metallicity in the bulge. The bulge results show an increase in F/O with increasing oxygen. This trend overlaps what is found in the disk at comparable metallicities, with the most oxygen-rich bulge target extending the disk trend. The increase in F/O in the disk arises from 19F synthesis in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars through stellar winds. The lack of an s-process enhancement in the most fluorine-rich bulge giant in this study, suggests that WR stars represented a larger contribution than AGB stars to 19F production in the bulge when compared to the disk. If this result for fluorine is combined with the previously published overall decline in the O/Mg abundance ratios in metal-rich bulge stars, it suggests that WR winds played a role in shaping chemical evolut...

  12. Giant machine set to probe secrets of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    "Deep underground on the Franco-Swiss border someone will throw a switch next year to start one of the most ambitious experiments in history, probing the secrets of the universe and possibly finding new dimensions." (2/3 page)

  13. Giant machine set to probe secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Deep underground on the Franco-Swiss border someone will throw a switch next year to start one of the most ambitious experiments in history, probing the secrets of the universe and possibly finding new dimensions." (1 page)

  14. Constraining the structure and formation of the Galactic bulge from a field in its outskirts. FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra of $\\sim400$ red giants around $(l,b)=(0\\degr,-10\\degr)$

    CERN Document Server

    Uttenthaler, Stefan; Nataf, David M; Robin, Annie C; Lebzelter, Thomas; Chen, B

    2012-01-01

    The presence of two stellar populations in the Milky Way bulge has been reported recently. We aim at studying the abundances and kinematics of stars in the outer bulge, thereby providing additional constraints on models of its formation. Spectra of 401 red giant stars in a field at (l,b)=(0{\\deg},-10{\\deg}) were obtained with FLAMES at the VLT. Stars of luminosities down to below the two bulge red clumps (RCs) are included. From these spectra we measure general metallicities, abundances of Fe and the alpha-elements, and radial velocities (RV) of the stars. These measurements as well as photometric data are compared to simulations with the Besancon and TRILEGAL models of the Galaxy. We confirm the presence of two populations among our sample stars: i) a metal-rich one at [M/H] ~+0.3, comprising about 30% of the sample, with low RV dispersion and low alpha-abundance, and ii) a metal-poor population at [M/H] ~-0.6 with high RV dispersion and high alpha-abundance. The metal-rich population could be connected to t...

  15. Probing Magnetic Fields using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S; Kantharia, N G

    2013-01-01

    We present the first spectropolarimetric radio observations that apply Rotation Measure (RM) Synthesis to interferometric data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 610 MHz. Spectropolarimetry requires measurement of a large number of instrumental systematics so that their effects can be calibrated - a technical problem that is currently being faced by the upcoming SKA pathfinders. Our fully-calibrated data allow for the peak Faraday depth and polarisation fraction to be measured for sub-mJy compact sources in the field of M51 at 610 MHz. The diffuse extended emission in the interacting galaxy pair is shown to be depolarised below the sensitivity limit. A survey of linear polarisation with the GMRT is now feasible and could be used to place constraints on the prevailing depolarisation mechanisms at low frequencies - improving polarised source count estimates and constraining the RM-grid observable with next generation facilities such as the SKA.

  16. The Calcium Triplet metallicity calibration for galactic bulge stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, S; Hill, V; Gonzalez, O A; Saviane, I; Rejkuba, M; Battaglia, G

    2015-01-01

    We present a new calibration of the Calcium II Triplet equivalent widths versus [Fe/H], constructed upon K giant stars in the Galactic bulge. This calibration will be used to derive iron abundances for the targets of the GIBS survey, and in general it is especially suited for solar and supersolar metallicity giants, typical of external massive galaxies. About 150 bulge K giants were observed with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT, both at resolution R~20,000 and at R~6,000. In the first case, the spectra allowed us to perform direct determination of Fe abundances from several unblended Fe lines, deriving what we call here high resolution [Fe/H] measurements. The low resolution spectra allowed us to measure equivalent widths of the two strongest lines of the near infrared Calcium II triplet at 8542 and 8662 A. By comparing the two measurements we derived a relation between Calcium equivalent widths and [Fe/H] that is linear over the metallicity range probed here, -1<[Fe/H]<+0.7. By adding a small second or...

  17. The Asymptotic Giant Branch and the Tip of the Red Giant Branch as Probes of Star Formation History: The Nearby Dwarf Irregular Galaxy KKH 98

    OpenAIRE

    Melbourne, J.; Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J.; Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D.C.; Girardi, Leo; Dolphin, A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D=2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR bright stars reaching over 1 magnitude below the Tip of the Red Giant Branch. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the ...

  18. OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048Lb: a Giant Planet Orbiting a Low-mass Bulge Star Discovered by High-cadence Microlensing Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Jung, Y K; Albrow, M D; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Cha, S -M; Kim, D -J; Lee, Y; Park, B -G; Shin, I -G; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of an extrasolar planet detected from the combined data of a microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048 acquired by two microlensing surveys. Despite that the short planetary signal occurred in the very early Bulge season during which the lensing event could be seen for just about an hour, the signal was continuously and densely covered. From the Bayesian analysis using models of the mass function, matter and velocity distributions combined with the information of the angular Einstein radius, it is found that the host of the planet is located in the Galactic bulge. The planet has a mass $0.72_{-0.07}^{+0.65}\\ M_{\\rm J}$ and it is orbiting a low-mass M-dwarf host with a projected separation $d_\\perp=0.73 \\pm 0.08$ AU. The discovery of the planet demonstrates the capability of the current high-cadence microlensing lensing surveys in detecting and characterizing planets.

  19. Formation of Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, J; Silk, Joseph; Bouwens, Rychard J.

    1998-01-01

    Bulges, often identified with the spheroidal component of a galaxy, have a complex pedigree. Massive bulges are generally red and old, but lower mass bulges have broader dispersions in color that may be correlated with disk colors. This suggests different formation scenarios. I will review possible formation sequences for bulges, describe the various signatures that distinguish these scenarios, and discuss implications for the high redshift universe.

  20. What planetary nebulae tell us about helium and the CNO elements in Galactic bulge stars

    OpenAIRE

    Buell, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) models of bulge stars are calculated using a synthetic model. The goal is to infer typical progenitor masses and compositions by reproducing the typical chemical composition and central star masses of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic bulge. The AGB tip luminosity and the observation that the observed lack of bright carbon stars in the bulge are matched by the models. Five sets of galactic bulge PNe were analyzed to find typical abundan...

  1. Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters as Probes of Particle Acceleration in Turbulent Regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Brunetti

    2011-12-01

    Giant radio halos in galaxy clusters probe mechanisms of particle acceleration connected with cluster merger events. Shocks and turbulence are driven in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) during clusters mergers and may have a deep impact on the non-thermal properties of galaxy clusters. Models of turbulent (re)acceleration of relativistic particles allow good correspondence with present observations, from radio halos to -ray upper limits, although several aspects of this complex scenario still remain poorly understood. After providing basic motivations for turbulent acceleration in galaxy clusters, we discuss relevant aspects of the physics of particle acceleration by MHD turbulence and the expected broad-band non-thermal emission from galaxy clusters. We discuss (in brief) the most important results of turbulent (re)acceleration models, the open problems, and the possibilities to test models with future observations. In this respect, further constraints on the origin of giant nearby radio halos can also be obtained by combining their (spectral and morphological) properties with the constraints from -ray observations of their parent clusters.

  2. Giant dipole resonance width as a probe for nuclear deformation at finite excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Pandit, Deepak; Mondal, Debasish; Mukhopadhyay, S; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, Srijit; De, A; Banerjee, S R

    2013-01-01

    The systematic study of the correlation between the experimental giant dipole resonance (GDR) width and the average deformation of the nucleus at finite excitation is presented for the mass region A ~ 59 to 208. We show that the width of the GDR (\\Gamma) and the quadrupole deformation of the nucleus do not follow a linear relation, as predicted earlier, due to the GDR induced quadrupole moment and the correlation also depends on the mass of the nuclei. The different empirical values of extracted from the experimental GDR width match exceptionally well with the thermal shape fluctuation model. As a result, this universal correlation between and \\Gamma provides a direct experimental probe to determine the nuclear deformation at finite temperature and angular momentum in the entire mass region.

  3. MOA-2011-BLG-262Lb: A sub-Earth-mass moon orbiting a gas giant primary or a high velocity planetary system in the galactic Bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M host ∼ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product ML πrel where ML is the lens system mass and πrel is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large πrel), then ML is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, μrel = 19.6 ± 1.6 mas yr–1, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, there is an alternate solution that has a lower proper motion and fits the data almost as well. This solution is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of Mhost=0.12−0.06+0.19 M⊙ and mcomp=18−10+28 M⊕, at a projected separation of a⊥=0.84−0.14+0.25 AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.

  4. The Asymptotic Giant Branch and the Tip of the Red Giant Branch as Probes of Star Formation History: The Nearby Dwarf Irregular Galaxy KKH 98

    CERN Document Server

    Melbourne, J; Dalcanton, J; Ammons, S M; Max, C; Koo, D C; Girardi, Leo; Dolphin, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D=2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR bright stars reaching over 1 magnitude below the Tip of the Red Giant Branch. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the Red Clump and the Main Sequence turn-off for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate age (0.5 - 5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10^-4 Mo yr^-1) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main sequence populations (age &...

  5. Can giant radio halos probe the merging rate of galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Cassano, R; Giocoli, C; Ettori, S

    2016-01-01

    Radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters probe a direct link between cluster mergers and giant radio halos (RH), suggesting that these sources can be used as probes of the cluster merging rate with cosmic time. In this paper we carry out an explorative study that combines the observed fractions of merging clusters (fm) and RH (fRH) with the merging rate predicted by cosmological simulations and attempt to infer constraints on merger properties of clusters that appear disturbed in X-rays and of clusters with RH. We use morphological parameters to identify merging systems and analyze the currently largest sample of clusters with radio and X-ray data (M500>6d14 Msun, and 0.2

  6. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2013-11-29

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. 2013 Gooneratne et al.

  7. OGLE 2008--BLG--290: An accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a Galactic Bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Fouque, P; Dong, S; Gould, A; Udalski, A; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Bramich, D M; Novati, S Calchi; Cassan, A; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Dominik, M; Prester, D Dominis; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Jorgensen, U G; Kozlowski, S; Kubas, D; Lee, C -H; Marquette, J -B; Mathiasen, M; Menzies, J; Monard, L A G; Nishiyama, S; Papadakis, I; Street, R; Sumi, T; Williams, A; Yee, J C; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Cook, K H; Donatowicz, J; Kains, N; Kane, S R; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Zub, M; DePoy, D L; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Lee, C -U; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Kubiak, M; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Abe, F; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Gilmore, A C; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; ~Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A V; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Nagaya, M; Ohnishi, K; Okumura, T; Perrott, Y; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sweatman, W; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Allan, A; Bode, M F; Burgdorf, M J; Clay, N; Fraser, S N; Hawkins, E; Kerins, E; Lister, T A; Mottram, C J; Saunders, E S; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Wheatley, P J; Anguita, T; Bozza, V; Harpsoe, K; Hinse, T C; Hundertmark, M; Kjaergaard, P; Liebig, C; Mancini, L; Masi, G; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Thone, C C; Riffeser, A; ~Seitz, S; Bender, R

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing is not only a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. In high magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows a determination of the angular size of the source and additionally a measurement of its limb darkening. When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczynski point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. In the case of microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification of about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darke...

  8. MOA-2011-BLG-262Lb: A sub-Earth-mass moon orbiting a gas giant primary or a high velocity planetary system in the galactic Bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Batista, V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H. [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Bennett, C. S. [Department of Physics, Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Beaulieu, J.-P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Donatowicz, J. [Technische Universität Wien, Wieder Hauptst. 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Fukui, A., E-mail: bennett@nd.edu [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M {sub host} ∼ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M{sub L} π{sub rel} where M{sub L} is the lens system mass and π{sub rel} is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large π{sub rel}), then M{sub L} is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, μ{sub rel} = 19.6 ± 1.6 mas yr{sup –1}, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, there is an alternate solution that has a lower proper motion and fits the data almost as well. This solution is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M{sub host}=0.12{sub −0.06}{sup +0.19} M{sub ⊙} and m{sub comp}=18{sub −10}{sup +28} M{sub ⊕}, at a projected separation of a{sub ⊥}=0.84{sub −0.14}{sup +0.25} AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.

  9. Polar-bulge galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnikov, V P; Mosenkov, A V; Sotnikova, N Ya; Bizyaev, D V

    2015-01-01

    Based on SDSS data, we have selected a sample of nine edge-on spiral galaxies with bulges whose major axes show a high inclination to the disk plane. Such objects are called polar-bulge galaxies. They are similar in their morphology to polar-ring galaxies, but the central objects in them have small size and low luminosity. We have performed a photometric analysis of the galaxies in the g and r bands and determined the main characteristics of their bulges and disks. We show that the disks of such galaxies are typical for the disks of spiral galaxies of late morphological types. The integrated characteristics of their bulges are similar to the parameters of normal bulges. The stellar disks of polar-bulge galaxies often show large-scale warps, which can be explained by their interaction with neighboring galaxies or external accretion from outside.

  10. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  11. A Sub-Earth-Mass Moon Orbiting a Gas Giant Primary or a High Velocity Planetary System in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Bennett, C S; Suzuki, D; Beaulieu, J -P; Udalski, A; Donatowicz, J; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukunaga, D; Fukui, A; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Tsurumi, N; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Koo, J -R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Choi, M Zub J Y; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Han, C; Henderson, C B; McGregor, D; Lee, C -U; Pogge, R W; Shin, I -G; Yee, J C; Szymaski, M K; Skowron, J; Poleski, R; Kozowski, S; Wyrzykowski, L; Kubiak, M; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzyski, G; Soszyski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Tsapras, Y; Street, R A; Dominik, M; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Hundertmark, M; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Dekany, I; Gonzalez, O A; Heyrovsky, D; Kandori, R; Kerins, E; Lucas, P W; Minniti, D; Nagayama, T; Rejkuba, M; Robin, A C; Saito, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M_host ~ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The data are well fit by this exomoon model, but an alternate star+planet model fits the data almost as well. Nevertheless, these results indicate the potential of microlensing to detect exomoons, albeit ones that are different from the giant planet moons in our solar system. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M pi_rel, where M is the lens system mass and pi_rel is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large pi_rel), then M is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, mu_rel = 19.6 +- 1.6 mas/yr, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data f...

  12. Eyes, Bulging (Proptosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... causing bulging also presses on the optic nerve. Causes The most common cause is Graves disease, which ...

  13. A model for the diffusion of fluorescent probes in the septate giant axon of earthworm. Axoplasmic diffusion and junctional membrane permeability.

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, P. R.; Ramanan, S V

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion of the three fluorescent probes dichlorofluorescein, carboxyfluorescein, and Lucifer Yellow within the septate median giant axon of the earthworm was monitored using fluorometric methods. A diffusion model was derived that allowed computation of the apparent axoplasmic diffusion coefficient, junctional membrane permeability (septal membranes), and plasma membrane permeability for each probe. Dichlorofluorescein and carboxyfluorescein have similar apparent axoplasmic diffusion co...

  14. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10-4 Msun yr-1) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  15. The hydraulic bulge tester in fracture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory and practice of hydrostatic bulge testing of thin diaphragms is reviewed. Circular, elliptical and rectangular orifices are considered in terms of pressure vs height of dome plots, strain-distributions etc. Differences in modes of failure (location of necks, existence or not of pressure peaks) between circular and rectangular diaphragms are highlighted both for metals and polymers. The use of the bulger to construct forming limit diagrams (FLD) and fracture forming limit diagrams (FFLD) is described. How bulging is used for both fracture initiating and propagation studies is indicated, particularly as it may relate to the prospect for results from a 'giant' bulger of 1 m diameter orifice to be used for investigating thick plate. (author)

  16. The formation of the Galactic bulge of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman K.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We aim to determine if the bulge formed via mergers as predicted by Cold Dark Matter (CDM theory, or from disk instabilities, as suggested by its boxy shape, or both processes. We are observing about 28,000 bulge stars in fields that span longitudes of − 31 to + 26° and latitudes of − 5° to − 10°, targeting mostly red clump giants and we are measuring stellar velocities and chemical abundances. We have almost concluded our observations and have analysed data of 23,000 stars. We find a cylindrical rotation profile for the bulge which blends smoothly out into the disk and from the [Fe/H] results we find the bulge to be comprised of separate components, with an underlying slowly rotating metal poor subsample which we believe to be the inner halo stars and metal weak thick disk. We find only a small [Fe/H] gradient with latitude in the bulge, of − 0.07dex/kpc. This weak gradient does not necessarily support a merger origin for our bulge and the composite nature of the bulge is consistent with formation out of the thin disk as per instability formation models.

  17. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  18. Abundance Ratios in the Galactic Bulge and Super Metal-Rich Type II Nucle osynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Fulbright, J P; McWilliam, A; Fulbright, Jon P.; William, Andrew Mc

    2004-01-01

    We present abundance results from our Keck/HIRES observations of giants in the Galactic Bulge. We confirm that the metallicity distribution of giants in the low-reddening bulge field Baade's Window can be well-fit by a closed-box enrichment model. We also confirm previous observations that find enhanced [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe] and [Ca/Fe] for all bulge giants, including those at super-solar metallicities. However, we find that the [O/Fe] ratios of metal-rich bulge dwarfs decrease with increasing metallicity, contrary to what is expected if the enhancements of the other $\\alpha$-elements is due to Type II supernovae enrichment. We suggest that the decrease in oxygen production may be due to mass loss in the pre-supernova evolution of metal-rich progenitors.

  19. Giant dipole resonance width as a probe for nuclear deformation at finite excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Pandit, Deepak; Dey, Balaram; Mondal, Debasish; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, Srijit; De, A.; Banerjee, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic study of the correlation between the experimental giant dipole resonance (GDR) width and the average deformation of the nucleus at finite excitation is presented for the mass region A ~ 59 to 208. We show that the width of the GDR (\\Gamma) and the quadrupole deformation of the nucleus do not follow a linear relation, as predicted earlier, due to the GDR induced quadrupole moment and the correlation also depends on the mass of the nuclei. The different empirical values of extr...

  20. The lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhua, Zhu; Guoliang, Lv; Zhaojun, Wang; Jun, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge, we have made a detailed study of thermal pulse - asymptotic giant branch stars by using a population synthesis code. The effects of the oxygen overabundance and the mass loss rate on the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars in the Galactic bulge are discussed. We find that the oxygen overabundance which is about twice as large as that in the solar neighbourhood (close to the present observations) is ins...

  1. The lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Chun-Hua; Lv Guo-Liang; Wang Zhao-Jun; Zhang Jun

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the lack of carbon stars in the Galactic bulge, we have made a detailed study of thermal pulseasymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars by using a population synthesis code. The effects of the oxygen overabundance and the mass loss rate on the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars in the Galactic bulge are discussed. We find that the oxygen overabundance which is about twice as large as that in the solar neighbourhood (close to the present observations) is insufficient to explain the rareness of carbon stars in the bulge. We suggest that the large mass loss rate may serve as a controlling factor in the ratio of the number of carbon stars to that of oxygen stars.

  2. Probing Nuclear Symmetry Energy with Giant Dipole Resonances in Finite Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Li-gang; MA Zhong-yu

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the centroid energies of the isovector giant dipole resonance of finite nuclei and the symmetry energy has been studied.It is found the excitation energies of the dipole resonance in finite nuclei are correlated linearly with the symmetry energy at and below the saturation density.This linear correlation leads to the symmetry energy at the saturation density at the interval 33.0 MeV ≤ S(ρ_0) ≤ 37.0 MeV,and the symmetry energy at ρ=0.1 fm~(-3) at the interval 21.2-22.5 MeV.It is proposed that a precise measurement of the dipole mode in nuclei could set up an important constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter.

  3. Probing the clumping structure of giant molecular clouds through the spectrum, polarisation and morphology of X-ray reflection nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, Margherita; Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new method for probing global properties of clump populations in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the case where these act as X-ray reflection nebulae (XRNe), based on the study of the clumping's overall effect on the reflected X-ray signal, in particular on the Fe K-α line's shoulder. We consider the particular case of Sgr B2, one of the brightest and most massive XRN in the Galactic center (GC) region. We parametrise the gas distribution inside the cloud using a simple clumping model with theslope of the clump mass function (α), the minimum clump mass (mmin), the fraction of the cloud's mass contained in clumps (fDGMF), and the mass-size relation of individual clumps as free parameters, and investigate how these affect the reflected X-ray spectrum. In the case of very dense clumps, similar to those presently observed in Sgr B2, these occupy a small volume of the cloud and present a small projected area to the incoming X-ray radiation. We find that these contribute negligibly to the scattered X-rays. Clump populations with volume-filling factors of >10-3 do leave observational signatures, that are sensitive to the clump model parameters, in the reflected spectrum and polarisation. Future high angular resolution X-ray observations could therefore complement the traditional optical and radio observations of these GMCs, and prove to be a powerful probe in the study of their internal structure. Clumps in GMCs should further be visible both as bright spots and regions of heavy absorption in high resolution X-ray observations. We therefore also study the time-evolution of the X-ray morphology, under illumination by a transient source, as a probe of the 3D distribution and column density of individual clumps by future X-ray observatories.

  4. The black hole mass-bulge mass correlation: bulges versus pseudo-bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Jian

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scaling relations between the supermassive black holes mass (M_bh) and the host bulge mass in elliptical galaxies, classical bulges, and pseudo-bulges. We use two-dimensional image analysis software BUDDA to obtain the structural parameters of 57 galaxies with dynamical M_bh measurement, and determine the bulge K-band luminosities (L_bul,K), stellar masses (M_s), and dynamical masses (M_d). The updated M_bh-L_bul,K, M_bh-M_s, and M_bh-M_d correlations for elliptical galaxies and classical bulges give M_bh~0.006M_s or 0.003M_d. The most tight relationship is log(M_bh/M_sun)=a+b log(M_d/10^11 M_sun), with a=8.46+/-0.05, b=0.90+/-0.06, and intrinsic scatter 0.27 dex. The pseudo-bulges follow their own relations, they harbor an order of magnitude smaller black holes than those in the same massive classical bulges, i.e. M_bh~0.0003M_s or 0.0002M_d. Besides the M_bh-\\sigma (bulge stellar velocity dispersion) relation, these bulge type dependent M_bh-M_bul scaling relations provide information for...

  5. Probing interstellar extinction near the 30 Doradus nebula with red giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Girardi, Leo

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the interstellar extinction in a field of 3' x 3' located about 6' SW of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Hubble Space Telescope observations in the U, B, V, I and Halpha bands reveal patchy extinction in this field. The colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) shows an elongated stellar sequence, almost parallel to the main sequence (MS), which is in reality made up of stars of the red giant clump (RC) spread across the CMD by the uneven levels of extinction in this region. Since these objects are all at the same distance from us and share very similar physical properties, we can derive quantitatively both the extinction law in the range 3000 - 8000 Angstrom and the absolute extinction towards about 100 objects, setting statistically significant constraints on the dust grains properties in this area. We find an extinction curve considerably flatter than the standard Galactic one and than those obtained before for the LMC. The derived value of Rv = 5.6 +/- 0.3 implies that in this region ...

  6. Probing interstellar extinction in the Tarantula Nebula with red giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, N.; Girardi, L.; Sabbi, E.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the properties of the interstellar extinction in a field of 3‧ × 3‧ located about 6‧ SW of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations with with the WFPC 2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope in the U, B, V , I and H bands show the presence of patchy extinction in this field. In particular, the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) reveals an elongated stellar sequence, running almost parallel to the main sequence (MS), which is in reality made up of stars belonging to the red giant clump (RC) and spread across the CMD by the considerable and uneven extinction in this region. This allows us to derive in a quantitative way both the extinction law in the range 3 000-8 000 Å and the values of the absolute extinction towards more than 100 objects, thereby setting statistically significant constraints on the properties of the extinction in this area. We find an extinction curve considerably flatter than the standard Galactic one and than those derived before towards a sample of sight lines in the LMC. The value of RV = 5.6 that we find implies that in this region large grains dominate. Comparing the extinction towards the individual RC stars and a similar number of stars in the upper MS reveals that the latter span a narrower range of E(B - V) values, contrary to what has been found elsewhere in the LMC. We are now extending these studies to 30 Doradus itself and to a large portion of the Tarantula nebula using existing HST observations at ultraviolet, optical and near infrared wavelengths.

  7. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  8. Probing the clumping structure of Giant Molecular Clouds through the spectrum, polarisation and morphology of X-ray Reflection Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Margherita; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a method for probing global properties of clump populations in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) in the case where these act as X-ray reflection nebulae (XRNe), based on the study of the clumping's overall effect on the reflected X-ray signal, in particular on the Fe K-alpha line's shoulder. We consider the particular case of Sgr B2, one of the brightest and most massive XRN in our Galaxy. We parametrise the gas distribution inside the cloud using a simple clumping model, with the slope of the clump mass function (alpha), the minimum clump mass (m_{min}), the fraction of the cloud's mass contained in clumps (f_{DGMF}), and the mass-size relation of individual clumps as free parameters, and investigate how these affect the reflected X-ray spectrum. In the case of very dense clumps, similar to those presently observed in Sgr B2, these occupy a small volume of the cloud and present a small projected area to the incoming X-ray radiation. We find that these contribute negligibly to the scattered X-rays. Clu...

  9. Composition of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliam, A; William, Andrew Mc

    2003-01-01

    We present detailed abundance results for 9 Galactic bulge stars in Baade's Window, based on HIRES (R=45,000--60,000) spectra taken with the Keck I telescope. The alpha elements show non-uniform enhancements relative to the Solar neighborhood trends: Mg and Si are enhanced in all our bulge stars by $\\sim$0.5--0.3 dex, showing a slight decrease with increasing [Fe/H]. Oxygen is enhanced in most bulge stars, similar to the Galactic halo, but the [O/Fe] ratios suddenly decline beginning at [Fe/H]=$-$0.5 dex, with a slope consistent with no oxygen production in the bulge for [Fe/H]$\\geq

  10. Lithium abundances along the RGB: FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra of a large sample of low-mass Bulge stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lebzelter, Thomas; Busso, Maurizio; Schultheis, Mathias; Aringer, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Context: A small number of K-type giants on the red giant branch (RGB) is known to be very rich in lithium (Li). This fact is not accounted for by standard stellar evolution theory. The exact phase and mechanism of Li enrichment is still a matter of debate. Aims: Our goal is to probe the abundance of Li along the RGB, from its base to the tip, to confine Li-rich phases that are supposed to occur on the RGB. Methods: For this end, we obtained medium-resolution spectra with the FLAMES spectrograph at the VLT in GIRAFFE mode for a large sample of 401 low-mass RGB stars located in the Galactic bulge. The Li abundance was measured in the stars with a detectable Li 670.8 nm line by means of spectral synthesis with COMARCS model atmospheres. Results: Thirty-one stars with a detectable Li line were identified, three of which are Li-rich according to the usual criterion ($\\log\\epsilon({\\rm Li})>1.5$). The stars are distributed all along the RGB, not concentrated in any particular phase of the red giant evolution (e.g....

  11. Visualization of lipid domains of lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles using an environment-sensitive membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klymchenko, Andrey; Oncul, Sule; Didier, Pascal;

    2009-01-01

    vesicles show that the probe dual emission drastically changes with the lipid bilayer phase, which can be correlated with the difference in their hydration. Using two-photon excitation microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles, the F2N12S probe was found to bind both Ld and Lo phases, allowing visualization....... Taking into account the high selectivity of F2N12S for the cell plasma membranes and its suitability for both single- and two-photon excitation, applications of this probe to study membrane lateral heterogeneity in biological membranes are foreseen....... of the individual phases from the fluorescence intensity ratio of its two emission bands. By using a linearly polarized excitation light, a strong photoselection was observed for F2N12S in the Lo phase, indicating that its fluorophore is nearly parallel to the lipid chains of the bilayer. In contrast...

  12. Polarization in microlensing towards the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Ingrosso, G; De Paolis, F; Jetzer, Ph; Nucita, A A; Strafella, F; Zakharov, A F

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing, when finite size source effects are relevant, provides an unique tool for the study of source star stellar atmospheres through an enhancement of a characteristic polarization signal. This is due to the differential magnification induced during the crossing of the source star. In this paper we consider a specific set of reported highly magnified, both single and binary exoplanetary systems, microlensing events towards the Galactic bulge and evaluate the expected polarization signal. To this purpose, we consider several polarization models which apply to different types of source stars: hot, late type main sequence and cool giants. As a result we compute the polarization signal P,which goes up to P=0.04% for late type stars and up to a few percent for cool giants, depending on the underlying physical polarization processes and atmosphere model parameters. Given a I band magnitude at maximum magnification of about 12, and a typical duration of the polarization signal up to 1 day, we c...

  13. PROPER MOTIONS IN THE GALACTIC BULGE: PLAUT'S WINDOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vieira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper motion study of a eld of 20' x20' inside Plaut's low extinction window (l,b=(0 ;-8 , has been completed. Relative proper motions and photographic BV photometry have been derived for -21; 000 stars reaching to V - 20:5 mag, based on the astrometric reduction of 43 photographic plates, spanning over 21 years of epoch di erence. Proper motion errors are typically 1 mas yr-1. Cross-referencing with the 2MASS catalog yielded a sample of - 8700 stars, from which predominantly disk and bulge subsamples were selected photometrically from the JH color-magnitude diagram. The two samples exhibited di erent proper-motion distributions, with the disk displaying the expected re ex solar motion. Galactic rotation was also detected for stars between -2 and -3 kpc from us. The bulge sample, represented by red giants, has an intrinsic proper motion dispersion of (l; b = (3:39; 2:91 = (0:11; 0:09 mas yr-1, which is in good agreement with previous results. A mean distance of 6:37+0:87 -0:77 kpc has been estimated for the bulge sample, based on the observed K magnitude of the horizontal branch red clump. The metallicity [M=H] distribution was also obtained for a subsample of 60 bulge giants stars, based on calibrated photometric indices. The observed [M=H] shows a peak value at [M=H]-0:1 with an extended metal poor tail and around 30% of the stars with supersolar metallicity. No change in proper motion dispersion was observed as a function of [M=H]. We are currently in the process of obtaining CCD UBV RI photometry for the entire proper-motion sample of - 21; 000 stars.

  14. Bulge Formation via Mergers in Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Alyson M

    2015-01-01

    The latest generation of cosmological simulations are on the verge of being able to resolve the structure of bulges for the first time. Hence, we review the current state of bulge formation in cosmological simulations, and discuss open questions that can be addressed in the near future by simulators, with a particular focus on merger-driven bulge growth. Galaxy mergers have long been assumed to produce classical bulges in disk galaxies. Under this bulge-formation model, though, the high rates of mergers in Cold Dark Matter galaxy formation theory predict many more classical bulges than are observed. Furthermore, simulations of galaxy formation continue to generally produce too massive of bulges. Feedback offers a promising avenue for reducing merger-driven bulge growth by maintaining high gas fractions in galaxies and ejecting low-angular momentum gas driven to the centers of galaxies. After reviewing the results of relevant research that has been published to date, we use cosmological simulations to explore ...

  15. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Uttenthaler, S; Wood, P R; Lebzelter, T; Aringer, B; Schultheis, M; Ryde, N

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to $T_{\\rm eff}\\approx3100$ K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly sub-solar mean metallicity and only few stars with super-solar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O$<$1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios...

  16. The Structure of the Milky Way's Bar Outside the Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Wegg, Christopher; Portail, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    While it is incontrovertible that the inner Galaxy contains a bar, its structure near the Galactic plane has remained uncertain, where extinction from intervening dust is greatest. We investigate here the Galactic bar outside the bulge, the long bar, using red clump giant (RCG) stars from UKIDSS, 2MASS, VVV, and GLIMPSE. We match and combine these surveys to investigate a wide area in latitude and longitude, |b|<9deg and |l|<40deg. We find: (1) The bar extends to l~25deg at |b|~5deg from the Galactic plane, and to l~30deg at lower latitudes. (2) The long bar has an angle to the line-of-sight in the range (28-33)deg, consistent with studies of the bulge at |l|<10deg. (3) The scale-height of RCG stars smoothly transitions from the bulge to the thinner long bar. (4) There is evidence for two scale heights in the long bar. We find a ~180pc thin bar component reminiscent of the old thin disk near the sun, and a ~45pc super-thin bar component which exists predominantly towards the bar end. (5) Constructing...

  17. A high-velocity bulge RR Lyrae variable on a halo-like orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Kunder, Andrea; Hawkins, Keith; Poleski, Radek; Storm, Jesper; Johnson, Christian I; Shen, Juntai; Li, Zhao-Yu; Cordero, Maria Jose; Nataf, David M; Bono, Giuseppe; Walker, Alistair R; Koch, Andreas; De Propris, Roberto; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal K; Soszynski, Igor; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Pietrukowicz, Pawel; Skowron, Jan; Kozlowski, Szymon; Mroz, Przemyslaw

    2015-01-01

    We report on the RR Lyrae variable star, MACHO 176.18833.411, located toward the Galactic bulge and observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR), which has the unusual radial velocity of -372 +- 8 km/s and true space velocity of -482 +- 22 km/s relative to the Galactic rest frame. Located less than 1 kpc from the Galactic center and toward a field at (l,b)=(3,-2.5), this pulsating star has properties suggesting it belongs to the bulge RR Lyrae star population yet a velocity indicating it is abnormal, at least with respect to bulge giants and red clump stars. We show that this star is most likely a halo interloper and therefore suggest that halo contamination is not insignificant when studying metal-poor stars found within the bulge area, even for stars within 1 kpc of the Galactic center. We discuss the possibility that MACHO 176.18833.411 is on the extreme edge of the bulge RR Lyrae radial velocity distribution, and also consider a more exotic scenario in which it...

  18. Clumpy Disc and Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J; Tissera, P; Michel-Dansac, L

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of hydrodynamical/Nbody controlled simulations of isolated gas rich galaxies that self-consistently include SN feedback and a detailed chemical evolution model, both tested in cosmological simulations. The initial conditions are motivated by the observed star forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3. We find that the presence of a multiphase interstellar media in our models promotes the growth of disc instability favouring the formation of clumps which in general, are not easily disrupted on timescales compared to the migration time. We show that stellar clumps migrate towards the central region and contribute to form a classical-like bulge with a Sersic index, n > 2. Our physically-motivated Supernova feedback has a mild influence on clump survival and evolution, partially limiting the mass growth of clumps as the energy released per Supernova event is increased, with the consequent flattening of the bulge profile. This regulation does not prevent the building of a classical-like bulge even for the most ...

  19. VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC BULGE FOUND BY THE APOGEE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite its importance for understanding the nature of early stellar generations and for constraining Galactic bulge formation models, at present little is known about the metal-poor stellar content of the central Milky Way. This is a consequence of the great distances involved and intervening dust obscuration, which challenge optical studies. However, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), a wide-area, multifiber, high-resolution spectroscopic survey within Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, is exploring the chemistry of all Galactic stellar populations at infrared wavelengths, with particular emphasis on the disk and the bulge. An automated spectral analysis of data on 2403 giant stars in 12 fields in the bulge obtained during APOGEE commissioning yielded five stars with low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≤ –1.7), including two that are very metal-poor [Fe/H] ∼ –2.1 by bulge standards. Luminosity-based distance estimates place the 5 stars within the outer bulge, where 1246 of the other analyzed stars may reside. A manual reanalysis of the spectra verifies the low metallicities, and finds these stars to be enhanced in the α-elements O, Mg, and Si without significant α-pattern differences with other local halo or metal-weak thick-disk stars of similar metallicity, or even with other more metal-rich bulge stars. While neither the kinematics nor chemistry of these stars can yet definitively determine which, if any, are truly bulge members, rather than denizens of other populations co-located with the bulge, the newly identified stars reveal that the chemistry of metal-poor stars in the central Galaxy resembles that of metal-weak thick-disk stars at similar metallicity.

  20. Elliptical Galaxies and Bulges of Disc Galaxies: Summary of Progress and Outstanding Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    Bulge components of disc galaxies are the high-density centers interior to their outer discs. Once thought to be equivalent to elliptical galaxies, their observed properties and formation histories turn out to be richer and more varied than those of ellipticals. This book reviews progress in many areas of bulge studies. Two advances deserve emphasis: (1) Observations divide bulges into "classical bulges" that look indistinguishable from ellipticals and "pseudobulges" that are discier and (except in S0s) more actively star-forming than are ellipticals. Classical bulges and ellipticals are thought to form by major galaxy mergers. Discy pseudobulges are a product of the slow ("secular") evolution of galaxy discs. Nonaxisymmetries such as bars and oval distortions transport some disc gas toward the center, where it starbursts and builds a dense central component that is discier in structure than are classical bulges. Secular evolution explains many regular structures (e.g., rings) seen in galaxy discs. It is a new area of galaxy evolution work that complements hierarchical clustering. (2) Studies of high-redshift galaxies reveal that their discs are so gas-rich that they are violently unstable to the formation of mass clumps that sink to the center and merge. This is an alternative channel for the formation of classical bulges. This chapter summarizes big-picture successes and unsolved problems in the formation of bulges and ellipticals and their coevolution (or not) with supermassive black holes. I present an observer's perspective on simulations of cold dark matter galaxy formation including baryonic physics. Our picture of the quenching of star formation is becoming general and secure at redshifts z 1000 in mass but that differ from each other as we observe over that whole range. A related difficulty is how hierarchical clustering makes so many giant, bulgeless galaxies in field but not cluster environments. I present arguments that we rely too much on star

  1. Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. IV. Two bulge populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, T; Meléndez, J; Gould, A; Feltzing, S; Asplund, M; Johnson, J A; Lucatello, S; Yee, J C; Ramírez, I; Cohen, J G; Thompson, I; Gal-Yam, A; Sumi, T; Bond, I A

    2011-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] Based on high-resolution (R~42000 to 48000) and high signal-to-noise (S/N~50 to 150) spectra obtained with UVES/VLT, we present detailed elemental abundances (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ba) and stellar ages for 26 microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. The analysis is based on equivalent width measurements and standard 1-D LTE MARCS model stellar atmospheres. We also present NLTE Li abundances based on line synthesis of the 7Li line at 670.8 nm. We show that the bulge metallicity distribution (MDF) is double-peaked; one peak at [Fe/H]= -0.6 and one at [Fe/H]=+0.3, and with a dearth of stars around solar metallicity. This is in contrast to the MDF derived from red giants in Baade's window, which peaks at this exact value. A simple significance test shows that it is extremely unlikely to have such a gap in the microlensed dwarf star MDF if the dwarf stars are drawn from the giant star MDF. To resolve this issue we discuss several possibilities, but we can n...

  2. The Controversial Star-Formation History and Helium Enrichment of the Milky Way Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Nataf, David M

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the Milky Way bulge is thoroughly studied, with a plethora of measurements from virtually the full suite of instruments available to astronomers. It is thus perhaps surprising that alongside well-established results lies some substantial uncertainty in its star-formation history. Cosmological models predict the bulge to host the Galaxy's oldest stars for [Fe/H]$\\lesssim -1$, and this is demonstrated by RR Lyrae stars and globular cluster observations. There is consensus that bulge stars with [Fe/H]$\\lesssim0$ are older than $t \\approx10$ Gyr. However, at super-solar metallicity, there is a substantial unresolved discrepancy. Data from spectroscopic measurements of the main-sequence turnoff and subgiant branch, the abundances of asymptotic giant branch stars, the period distribution of Mira variables, the chemistry and central-star masses of planetary nebulae, all suggest a substantial intermediate-age population ($t \\approx 3$ Gyr). This is in conflict with predictions from cosmologi...

  3. Probing the Cosmic Ray Population of the Giant Elliptical Galaxy M87 with Observed TeV Gamma-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Pfrommer, C; Pfrommer, Christoph; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the cosmic ray proton (CRp) population within the giant elliptical galaxy M87 using the TeV gamma-ray detection of the HEGRA collaboration. In our scenario, the gamma-rays are produced by decaying pions which result from hadronic CRp interactions with thermal gas of the interstellar medium of M87. By comparing the gamma-ray emission to upper limits of EGRET, we constrain the spectral index of the CRp population to alpha(GeV,TeV) < 2.275 within our scenario. Both the expected radial gamma-ray profile and the required amount of CRp support this hadronic scenario. The accompanying radio mini-halo of hadronically originating cosmic ray electrons is outshone by the synchrotron emission of the relativistic jet of M87 by one order of magnitude. According to our predictions, the future GLAST mission should allow us to test this hadronic scenario.

  4. Stellar Sources in the ISOGAL Inner Galactic Bulge Field (=00, =-10)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Κ. Ojha; A. Omont; S. Ganesh; G. Simon; Μ. Schultheis

    2000-06-01

    ISOGAL is a survey at 7 and 15 μm with ISOCAM of the inner galactic disk and bulge of our Galaxy. The survey covers ∼ 22 deg2 in selected areas of the central = ± 30 degree of the inner Galaxy. In this paper, we report the study of a small ISOGAL field in the inner galactic bulge (=0°, =-1°, area = 0.033deg2). Using the multicolor near-infrared data (IJK) of DENIS (DEep Near Infrared Southern Sky Survey) and mid-infrared ISOGAL data, we discuss the nature of the ISOGAL sources. The various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the paper. While most of the detected sources are red giants (RGB tip stars), a few of them show an excess in J-K and K-[15] colors with respect to the red giant sequence. Most of them are probably AGB stars with large mass-loss rates.

  5. The macho project: 45 candidate microlensing events from the first-year Galactic bulge data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] Allsman, R.A. [Supercomputing Facility, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 0200 (Australia)] Alves, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] Axelrod, T.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, Weston, A.C.T. 2611 (Australia); Cook, K.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] Freeman, K.C. [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, Weston, A.C.T. 2611 (Australia); Guern, J.; Lehner, M.J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)] Marshall, S.L. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] Park, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] Perlmutter, S. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] Peterson, B.A. [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)] Pratt, M.R. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    We report the detection of 45 candidate microlensing events in fields toward the Galactic bulge. These come from the analysis of 24 fields containing 12.6 million stars observed for 190 days in 1993. Many of these events are of extremely high signal-to-noise ratio and are remarkable examples of gravitational microlensing. The distribution of peak magnifications is shown to be consistent with the microlensing interpretation of these events. Using a subsample of 1.3 million {open_quotes}clump giant{close_quotes} stars whose distance and detection efficiency are well known, we find 13 events and estimate the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic bulge as {tau}{sub bulge}=3.9{sub {minus}1.2}{sup +1.8}{times}10{sup {minus}6} averaged over an area of {approximately}12deg{sup 2} centered at Galactic coordinates l=2.55{degree} and b=3.64{degree}. This is similar to the value reported by the OGLE collaboration and is marginally higher than current theoretical models for {tau}{sub bulge}. The optical depth is also seen to increase significantly for decreasing {vert_bar}b{vert_bar}. These results demonstrate that obtaining large numbers of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge is feasible, and that the study of such events will have important consequences for the structure of the Galaxy and its dark halo. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  6. 3-Dimensional dynamics of the galactic bulge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto Vicencio, Mario Humberto

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is part of a project which attempts to unveil the structure of the galactic bulge of our galaxy through the study of the kinematics of stars in low foreground extinction windows.Thus, in order to effectively constraint the phase-space distribution function of the galactic bulge, we have

  7. The bulge-disc decomposition of AGN host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, V. A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Mortlock, A.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Rosario, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are indistinguishable from the general galaxy population except that beyond z ≃ 1.5 they have significantly higher bulge fractions. Even including nuclear sources in our modelling, the probability of this result arising by chance is ˜1 × 10-5, alleviating concerns that previous, purely single Sérsic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This data set also allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity. Our analysis of the bulge and disc fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.

  8. The age of the young bulge-like population in the stellar system Terzan5: linking the Galactic bulge to the high-z Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Lanzoni, B; Origlia, L; Rich, R M; Mucciarelli, A; -,

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic bulge is dominated by an old, metal rich stellar population. The possible presence and the amount of a young (a few Gyr old) minor component is one of the major issues debated in the literature. Recently, the bulge stellar system Terzan 5 was found to harbor three sub-populations with iron content varying by more than one order of magnitude (from 0.2 up to 2 times the solar value), with chemical abundance patterns strikingly similar to those observed in bulge field stars. Here we report on the detection of two distinct main sequence turn-off points in Terzan 5, providing the age of the two main stellar populations: 12 Gyr for the (dominant) sub-solar component and 4.5 Gyr for the component at super-solar metallicity. This discovery classifies Terzan 5 as a site in the Galactic bulge where multiple bursts of star formation occurred, thus suggesting a quite massive progenitor possibly resembling the giant clumps observed in star forming galaxies at high redshifts. This connection opens a new route ...

  9. The structure of the Milky Way's bar outside the bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    While it is incontrovertible that the inner Galaxy contains a bar, its structure near the Galactic plane has remained uncertain, where extinction from intervening dust is greatest. We investigate here the Galactic bar outside the bulge, the long bar, using red clump giant (RCG) stars from United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Vista Variables in the Via Lactea and Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire. We match and combine these surveys to investigate a wide area in latitude and longitude, |b| ≤ 9° and |l| ≤ 40°. We find (i) the bar extends to l ˜ 25° at |b| ˜ 5° from the Galactic plane, and to l ˜ 30° at lower latitudes; (ii) the long bar has an angle to the line-of-sight in the range (28°-33°), consistent with studies of the bulge at |l| thin bar component reminiscent of the old thin disc near the Sun, and a ˜45 pc superthin bar components which exist predominantly towards the bar end; (v) constructing parametric models for the red clump magnitude distributions, we find a bar half-length of 5.0 ± 0.2 kpc for the two-component bar, and 4.6 ± 0.3 kpc for the thin bar component alone. We conclude that the Milky Way contains a central box/peanut bulge which is the vertical extension of a longer, flatter bar, similar as seen in both external galaxies and N-body models.

  10. Proper Motions in the Galactic Bulge: Plaut's Window

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Katherine; Mendez, Rene A; Rich, R Michael; Girard, Terrence M; Korchagin, Vladimir I; van Altena, William; Majewski, Steven R; Bergh, Sidney van den

    2007-01-01

    A proper motion study of a field of 20' x 20' inside Plaut's low extinction window (l,b)=(0 deg,-8 deg), has been completed. Relative proper motions and photographic BV photometry have been derived for ~21,000 stars reaching to V~20.5 mag, based on the astrometric reduction of 43 photographic plates, spanning over 21 years of epoch difference. Proper motion errors are typically 1 mas/yr and field dependent systematics are below 0.2 mas/yr. Cross-referencing with the 2MASS catalog yielded a sample of ~8,700 stars, from which predominantly disk and bulge subsamples were selected photometrically from the JH color-magnitude diagram. The two samples exhibited different proper-motion distributions, with the disk displaying the expected reflex solar motion as a function of magnitude. Galactic rotation was also detected for stars between ~2 and ~3 kpc from us. The bulge sample, represented by red giants, has an intrinsic proper motion dispersion of (sigma_l,sigma_b)=(3.39, 2.91)+/-(0.11,0.09) mas/yr, which is in good...

  11. The metal content of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, M.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Ortolani, S.; Renzini, A.; Bica, E.; Momany, Y.; Pasquini, L.; Minniti, D.; Rich, R. M.

    2004-08-01

    High resolution spectra of five stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528 were obtained at the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph. Out of the five stars, two of them showed evidence of binarity. The target stars belong to the horizontal and red giant branch stages, at 4000 elemental ratios for this template bulge cluster, as a basis for the fundamental calibration of metal-rich populations. The present analysis provides a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.1±0.2 and the α-elements O, Mg and Si, show [α/Fe] ≈ +0.1, whereas Ca and Ti are around the solar value or below, resulting in an overall metallicity Z ≈ Z⊙. Observations collected both at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal and La Silla, Chile (ESO programme 65.L-0340) and with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA Inc. under contract to NASA. Tables \\ref{targets}, \\ref{logobs}, \\ref{tablines} and Fig. \\ref{chart} are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  12. Signatures of bulge triaxiality from kinematics in Baade's window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1994-01-01

    We study a sample of 62 Baade's Window, (l,b) = (1, -4)deg, K giants that have published proper motions, radial velocity, and metallicity. Using R(sub 0) = 8 kpc, we construct the velocity ellipsoids, namely the 3x3 velocity dispersion tensors, for the metal rich stars ((Fe/H) greater than or equal to 0) and metal poor stars ((Fe/H) less than or equal to -0.2). After diagonalizing the tensor, we find a vertex deviation characteristic of a nonaxisymmetric system. Eigenvalues for the two velocity ellipsoids (sigma(sub 1), sigma(sub 2), sigma(sub 3)) are (126, 89, 65) +/- 13 km/s for the metal rich sample and (154, 77, 83) +/- 25 km/s for the metal poor sample with their long axes pointing to two nearly perpendicular directions (l(sub v), b(sub v)) = (-65 +/- 9 deg, +14 +/- 9 deg) and (l(sub v), b(sub v)) = (25 +/- 14 deg, -11 +/- 14 deg), respectively. The vertex deviations of the velocity ellipsoids cannot be consistently explained by any oblate model. We are able to reject the hypothesis that the metal poor and metal rich populations are drawn from the same distribution at better than the 97% confidence level. We populate orbits in a realistic bar potential with a Gaussian velocity distribution, allowing us to simulate and interpret observations. We conclude that the data are consistent with a triaxial bulge pointing towards (l,b) with l less than 0 deg and b = 0 deg as suggested by earlier work on gas dynamics and the observed light distribution. We also predict that low latitude (absolute value of b less than or equal to 4 deg) bulge fields should show the vertex deviation more strongly and would therefore be the best locations for future proper motion studies. In the classification scheme of Athanassoula et al. (1983) the metal rich stars appear to occupy the B-family orbits which rotate in the prograde sense in the rest frame and have boxy shapes that are aligned with and supporting the bar. The metal poor stars in the sample lag behind the metal rich bulge and

  13. Globular clusters in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Bica, E; Barbuy, B

    2015-01-01

    A view of the Galactic bulge by means of their globular clusters is necessary for a deep understanding of its formation and evolution. Connections between the globular cluster and field star properties in terms of kinematics, orbits, chemical abundances and ages should shed light on different stellar population components. Based on spatial distribution and metallicity, we define a probable best list of bulge clusters, containing 43 entries. Future work on newly discovered objects, mostly from the VVV survey, is suggested. These candidates might alleviate the issue of missing clusters on the far side of the bulge. We discuss the reddening law affecting the cluster distances towards the center of the Galaxy, and conclude that the most suitable total-to-selective absorption value appears to be R$_{\\rm V}$=3.2, in agreement with recent analyses. An update of elemental abundances for bulge clusters is provided.

  14. The hydraulic bulge tester in fracture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the behavior of different metals under biaxial hydraulic bulging was studied in terms of fracture mechanics. Three different materials, namely: SIC aluminium, mild steel and copper were examined and their fracture behavior was assessed by introducing starter cracks in the test pieces in different ways before bulging. The pressure-volume relationships were obtained and the crack growth rates were measured during bulging at different elliptical die ratios (1,1.5,2 and 3). It was found that increasing the die ratio, with everything else remaining as before, resulted in a remarkable reduction to the volume and increase in the pressure and subsequently an increase in the crack growth rates of all materials. Double Edge Notched (DEN) specimen experiments were also conducted on the three materials to measure their fracture toughness and the results compared with those obtained from bulging experiments. (author)

  15. Galaxy Bulges and Elliptical Galaxies - Lecture Notes

    CERN Document Server

    Gadotti, Dimitri A

    2012-01-01

    Our knowledge on the central components of disk galaxies has grown substantially in the past few decades, particularly so in the last. This frantic activity and the complexity of the subject promote confusion in the community. In these notes, I discuss the concept of galactic bulge and its different flavors. I also address fundamental scaling relations and the bulge-elliptical galaxy connection, their central black holes and formation models. In particular, I aim at conveying three important notions: (i): box/peanuts are just the inner parts of bars; (ii): the physical reality of two different families of bulges is evident; and (iii): at the high mass end, at least, classical bulges are not just scaled down ellipticals surrounded by disks.

  16. Globular Clusters in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, E.; Ortolani, S.; Barbuy, B.

    2016-06-01

    A view of the Galactic bulge by means of their globular clusters is fundamental for a deep understanding of its formation and evolution. Connections between the globular cluster and field star properties in terms of kinematics, orbits, chemical abundances, and ages should shed light on different stellar population components. Based on spatial distribution and metallicity, we define a probable best list of bulge clusters, containing 43 entries. Future work on newly discovered objects, mostly from the VVV survey, is suggested. These candidates might alleviate the issue of missing clusters on the far side of the bulge. We discuss the reddening law affecting the cluster distances towards the centre of the Galaxy, and conclude that the most suitable total-to-selective absorption value appears to be R V=3.2, in agreement with recent analyses. An update of elemental abundances for bulge clusters is provided.

  17. Theoretical Models of the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared images from the COBE satellite presented the first clear evidence that our Milky Way galaxy contains a boxy shaped bulge. Recent years have witnessed a gradual paradigm shift in the formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge. Bulges were commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy mergers. However, it has become increasingly clear that the main body of the Milky Way bulge is not a classical bulge made by previous major mergers, instead it appears to be a bar seen somewhat end-on. The Milky Way bar can form naturally from a precursor disk and thicken vertically by the internal firehose/buckling instability, giving rise to the boxy appearance. This picture is supported by many lines of evidence, including the asymmetric parallelogram shape, the strong cylindrical rotation (i.e., nearly constant rotation regardless of the height above the disk plane), the existence of an intriguing X-shaped structure in the bulge, and perhaps the metallicity gradients. We review the major theor...

  18. Light, Alpha, and Fe-Peak Element Abundances in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Christian I; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kunder, Andrea; Koch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l,b)=(+5.25,-3.02) and (0,-12). The (+5.25,-3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high resolution (R~20,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N>70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the ESO archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did not show strong TiO absorption bands. The present work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H]>-0.5. In particular, the bulge [alpha/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick...

  19. What planetary nebulae tell us about helium and the CNO elements in Galactic bulge stars

    CERN Document Server

    Buell, James F

    2012-01-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) models of bulge stars are calculated using a synthetic model. The goal is to infer typical progenitor masses and compositions by reproducing the typical chemical composition and central star masses of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic bulge. The AGB tip luminosity and the observation that the observed lack of bright carbon stars in the bulge are matched by the models. Five sets of galactic bulge PNe were analyzed to find typical abundances and central star of planetary nebulae (CSPN) masses. These global parameters were matched by the AGB models. These sets are shown to be consistent with the most massive CSPN having the largest abundances of helium and heavy elements. The CSPN masses of the most helium rich (He/H$\\ga$0.130 or $Y\\ga0.34$) PNe are estimated to be between 0.58 and 0.62$ {\\rm M}_{\\sun}$. The oxygen abundance in form $\\log{\\rm (O/H)}+12$ of these highest mass CSPN is estimated to be $\\approx$8.85. TP-AGB models with ZAMS masses between 1.2 ...

  20. The Gaia-ESO survey: Metal-rich bananas in the bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Angus A; Molloy, Matthew; Kordopatis, Georges; Smith, M C; Shen, J; Gilmore, G; Randich, S; Bensby, T; Francois, P; Koposov, S E; Recio-Blanco, A; Bayo, A; Carraro, G; Casey, A; Costado, T; Franciosini, E; Hourihane, A; de Laverny, P; Lewis, J; Lind, K; Magrini, L; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sacco, G G; Worley, C; Zaggia, S; Mikolaitis, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the kinematics of $\\sim 2000$ giant stars in the direction of the Galactic bulge, extracted from the Gaia-ESO survey in the region $-10^\\circ \\lesssim \\ell \\lesssim 10^\\circ$ and $-11^\\circ \\lesssim b \\lesssim -3^\\circ$. We find distinct kinematic trends in the metal rich ($\\mathrm{[M/H]}>0$) and metal poor ($\\mathrm{[M/H]}<0$) stars in the data. The velocity dispersion of the metal-rich stars drops steeply with latitude, compared to a flat profile in the metal-poor stars, as has been seen previously. We argue that the metal-rich stars in this region are mostly on orbits that support the boxy-peanut shape of the bulge, which naturally explains the drop in their velocity dispersion profile with latitude. The metal rich stars also exhibit peaky features in their line-of-sight velocity histograms, particularly along the minor axis of the bulge. We propose that these features are due to stars on resonant orbits supporting the boxy-peanut bulge. This conjecture is strengthened through the comparison ...

  1. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Metal-rich Bananas in the Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angus A.; Evans, N. W.; Molloy, Matthew; Kordopatis, Georges; Smith, M. C.; Shen, J.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Bensby, T.; Francois, P.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A.; Costado, T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C.; Zaggia, S.; Mikolaitis, Š.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the kinematics of ˜2000 giant stars in the direction of the Galactic bulge, extracted from the Gaia-ESO survey in the region -10^\\circ ≲ {\\ell }≲ 10^\\circ and -11^\\circ ≲ b≲ -3^\\circ . We find distinct kinematic trends in the metal-rich ([{{M}}/{{H}}]\\gt 0) and metal-poor ([{{M}}/{{H}}]\\lt 0) stars in the data. The velocity dispersion of the metal-rich stars drops steeply with latitude, compared to a flat profile in the metal-poor stars, as has been seen previously. We argue that the metal-rich stars in this region are mostly on orbits that support the boxy–peanut shape of the bulge, which naturally explains the drop in their velocity dispersion profile with latitude. The metal-rich stars also exhibit peaky features in their line of sight velocity histograms, particularly along the minor axis of the bulge. We propose that these features are due to stars on resonant orbits supporting the boxy–peanut bulge. This conjecture is strengthened through the comparison of the minor axis data with the velocity histograms of resonant orbits generated in simulations of buckled bars. The “banana” or 2:1:2 orbits provide strongly bimodal histograms with narrow velocity peaks that resemble the Gaia-ESO metal-rich data.

  2. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Metal-rich Bananas in the Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angus A.; Evans, N. W.; Molloy, Matthew; Kordopatis, Georges; Smith, M. C.; Shen, J.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Bensby, T.; Francois, P.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A.; Costado, T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C.; Zaggia, S.; Mikolaitis, Š.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the kinematics of ∼2000 giant stars in the direction of the Galactic bulge, extracted from the Gaia-ESO survey in the region -10^\\circ ≲ {\\ell }≲ 10^\\circ and -11^\\circ ≲ b≲ -3^\\circ . We find distinct kinematic trends in the metal-rich ([{{M}}/{{H}}]\\gt 0) and metal-poor ([{{M}}/{{H}}]\\lt 0) stars in the data. The velocity dispersion of the metal-rich stars drops steeply with latitude, compared to a flat profile in the metal-poor stars, as has been seen previously. We argue that the metal-rich stars in this region are mostly on orbits that support the boxy–peanut shape of the bulge, which naturally explains the drop in their velocity dispersion profile with latitude. The metal-rich stars also exhibit peaky features in their line of sight velocity histograms, particularly along the minor axis of the bulge. We propose that these features are due to stars on resonant orbits supporting the boxy–peanut bulge. This conjecture is strengthened through the comparison of the minor axis data with the velocity histograms of resonant orbits generated in simulations of buckled bars. The “banana” or 2:1:2 orbits provide strongly bimodal histograms with narrow velocity peaks that resemble the Gaia-ESO metal-rich data.

  3. Dynamical Modelling of the Galactic Bulge and Bar: Pattern Speed, Stellar, and Dark Matter Mass Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Portail, Matthieu; Wegg, Christopher; Ness, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We construct a large set of dynamical models of the galactic bulge, bar and inner disk using the Made-to-Measure method. Our models are constrained to match the red clump giant density from a combination of the VVV, UKIDSS and 2MASS infrared surveys together with stellar kinematics in the bulge from the BRAVA and OGLE surveys, and in the entire bar region from the ARGOS survey. We are able to recover the bar pattern speed and the stellar and dark matter mass distributions in the bar region, thus recovering the entire galactic effective potential. We find a bar pattern speed of $39.0 \\pm 3.5 \\,\\rm{km\\,s^{-1}\\,kpc^{-1}}$, placing the bar corotation radius at $6.1 \\pm 0.5 \\, \\rm{kpc}$ and making the Milky Way bar a typical fast rotator. We evaluate the stellar mass of the long bar and bulge structure to be $M_{\\rm{bar/bulge}} = 1.88 \\pm 0.12 \\times 10^{10} \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$, larger than the mass of disk in the bar region, $M_{\\rm{inner\\ disk}} = 1.29\\pm0.12 \\times 10^{10} \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$. The total dynamical...

  4. The formation of galaxy bulges: Spectrophotometric constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugniel, Ph.; Maubon, G.; Simien, F.

    2001-01-01

    We have measured Mg2, Fe 5270 and Fe 5335 spectrophotometric indices (LICK system) in the bulge of 89 galaxies, mostly spirals from the Héraudeau (\\cite{her96}) sample. The indices are reduced to a null velocity dispersion and normalized to an aperture of 0.2 h-1 kpc. The mean errors are 0.009 mag on Mg2, and 0.3 Å on the iron indices. These measurements almost double the amount of similar data already available on spiral galaxies. Our data confirm the existence of the relation between Mg2, and sigma0, the central stellar velocity dispersion; we find an even tighter relation between Mg2, and Vmrot, the maximum rotational velocity of the galaxy, deduced from HI observations. For the most massive bulges, these correlations may be interpreted as a mass-metallicity relation. However, the presence of young stellar populations, traced by the detection of [OIII] lambda 5007 Å, emission, provides clear evidence that age effects do play a role. Since the contribution of the young population is anti-correlated to the mass of the galaxy, it continues the Mg2, vs. sigma0 , relation toward the low-sigma0, region and globally increases its slope. We also present evidence for a new positive correlation between Fe indices and sigma0, and for a significant correlation between the line-strength indices and the total or disk luminosity. We propose to model the whole sequence of bulges within the folowing framework: bulges are composed of a primary population formed prior to the disk, during the initial collapse, and of a secondary population formed during its evolution. The whole family of bulges can be classified into three classes: (A) the bulges dominated by young populations are generally small, have ionized gas, low velocity dispersion and low line strengths; (B) the bulges dominated by the primary population lie along the mass-metallicity sequence defined for elliptical galaxies; and (C) the bulges where the secondary population is significant are less Mg-over-abundant than

  5. Red giant seismology: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The CoRoT and Kepler missions provide us with thousands of red-giant light curves that allow a very precise asteroseismic study of these objects. Before CoRoT and Kepler, the red-giant oscillation patterns remained obscure. Now, these spectra are much more clear and unveil many crucial interior structure properties. For thousands of red giants, we can derive from seismic data precise estimates of the stellar mass and radius, the evolutionary status of the giants (with a clear difference between clump and RGB stars, the internal differential rotation, the mass loss, the distance of the stars... Analyzing this amount of information is made easy by the identification of the largely homologous red-giant oscillation patterns. For the first time, both pressure and mixed mode oscillation patterns can be precisely depicted. The mixed-mode analysis allows us, for instance, to probe directly the stellar core. Fine details completing the red-giant oscillation pattern then provide further information on the interior structure, including differential rotation.

  6. The Demographics of galactic bulges in the SDSS database

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Keunho; Jeong, Hyunjin; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Smith, Rory; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2016-01-01

    We present a new database of our two-dimensional bulge-disk decompositions for 14,233 galaxies drawn from SDSS DR12 in order to examine the properties of bulges residing in the local universe ($0.005 < z < 0.05$). We performed decompositions in $g$ and $r$ bands by utilizing the {\\sc{galfit}} software. The bulge colors and bulge-to-total ratios are found to be sensitive to the details in the decomposition technique, and hence we hereby provide full details of our method. The $g-r$ colors of bulges derived are almost constantly red regardless of bulge size except for the bulges in the low bulge-to-total ratio galaxies ($B/T_{\\rm r} \\lesssim 0.3$). Bulges exhibit similar scaling relations to those followed by elliptical galaxies, but the bulges in galaxies with lower bulge-to-total ratios clearly show a gradually larger departure in slope from the elliptical galaxy sequence. The scatters around the scaling relations are also larger for the bulges in galaxies with lower bulge-to-total ratios. Both the depa...

  7. Are there carbon stars in the Bulge ?

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Y. K.

    1998-01-01

    The bulge carbon stars have been a mystery since their discovery, because they are about 2.5mag too faint to be regarded as genuine AGB stars, if located inside the metal-rich bulge (m-M=14.5mag). Part of the mystery can be solved if these carbon stars are related to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (SDG; m-M=17.0mag). They are in that case not old and metal-rich, but young, ~0.1 Gyr, with SMC-like metallicity. The sigma_RV=113+/-14 km/s radial velocity dispersion of the stars appears to be consi...

  8. Metal-poor stars towards the Galactic bulge: A population potpourri⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive chemical abundance analysis of five red giants and two horizontal branch (HB) stars towards the southern edge of the Galactic bulge, at (l, b) ~ (0°,-11°). Based on high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan/MIKE spectrograph, we derived up to 23 chemical element abundances and identify a mixed bag of stars, representing various populations in the central regions of the Galaxy. Although cosmological simulations predict that the inner Galaxy was host to the first stars in the Universe, we see no chemical evidence of the ensuing massive supernova explosions: all of our targets exhibit halo-like, solar [Sc/Fe] ratios, which is in contrast to the low values predicted from Population III nucleosynthesis. One of the targets is a CEMP-s star at [Fe/H] = -2.52 dex, and another target is a moderately metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -1.53 dex) CH star with strong enrichment in s-process elements (e.g., [Ba/Fe] = 1.35). These individuals provide the first contenders of these classes of stars towards the bulge. Four of the carbon-normal stars exhibit abundance patterns reminiscent of halo star across a metallicity range spanning -2.0 to -2.6 dex, i.e., enhanced α-elements and solar Fe-peak and neutron-capture elements, and the remaining one is a regular metal-rich bulge giant. The position, distance, and radial velocity of one of the metal-poor HB stars coincides with simulations of the old trailing arm of the disrupted Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. While their highly uncertain proper motions prohibit a clear kinematic separation, the stars' chemical abundances and distances suggest that these metal-poor candidates, albeit located towards the bulge, are not of the bulge, but rather inner halo stars on orbits that make them pass through the central regions. Thus, we caution similar claims of detections of metal-poor stars as true habitants of the bulge. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas

  9. Light, alpha, and Fe-peak element abundances in the galactic bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l, b) = (+5.25,–3.02) and (0,–12). The (+5.25,–3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000), high signal-to-noise ration (S/N ≳ 70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the European Southern Observatory archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did not show strong TiO absorption bands. This work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H] ≳ –0.5. In particular, the bulge [α/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk, and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high-velocity populations. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae may be required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 M ☉ are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. For most elements, the NGC 6553 stars exhibit abundance trends nearly identical to comparable metallicity bulge field stars

  10. Are Bulges and Disks Real? Decomposing Spectral Data Cubes Into Their Astrophysical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, Michael; Tabor, Martha; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cappellari, Michele; Johnston, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Decomposing galaxies photometrically into bulge and disk components is now a well-established technique, but it remains unclear how distinct and real these components are, and how they relate to each other. To address these questions, we have been developing novel techniques to extract the various structural components from integral field unit (IFU) spectral observations of galaxies, in order to study simultaneously their spectral and spatial properties.As a first approach, by spatially decomposing each wavelength in a spectral data cube, we can discover how much light comes from the separate components as a function of wavelength, and hence derive unprecedentedly high quality spectra of bulge and disk for detailed analysis of their stellar populations.In addition, we have decomposed spectral data cubes by fitting the spectrum at each location with the sum of two components, with the spectral properties left entirely free to fit both kinematic and stellar population properties, subject only to the constraint that the relative flux contributions match those of a conventional bulge-disk decomposition.Initial results applied to MaNGA and other IFU surveys show the power of these techniques when applied to such high quality data. The first method allows us to understand the formation sequence of bulges and disks, with, for example, bulges showing the younger stellar populations in S0 galaxies, implying that this was where the last gasp of star formation occurred. The second technique reveals subtle population gradients within individual components, but also confirms that the decomposition into separate components is a credible procedure, as the resulting bulges and disks have entirely plausible kinematic properties that are in no way imposed by the decomposition.Although our initial application of these decomposition techniques has been to studying bulges and disks in S0 galaxies, the methods have much wider application to the spectral data cubes that MaNGA and other

  11. Near-Infrared Properties of Metal-poor Globular Clusters in the Galactic Bulge Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, S. -H.; Kim, J. -W.; Shin, I. -G.; Chung, C.; Lim, D. -W.; Park, J. -H.; Kim, H. -I.; Han, W.; Sohn, Y. -J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. J, H, and K' images obtained from the near-infrared imager CFHTIR on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to derive the morphological parameters of the red giant branch (RGB) in the near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams for 12 metal-poor globular clusters in the Galactic bulge direction. Using the compiled data set of the RGB parameters for the observed 12 clusters, in addition to the previously studied 5 clusters, we discuss the properties of the RGB morphology for the clusters...

  12. Bulge formation in disk galaxies with MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2014-01-01

    The formation of galaxies and their various components can be stringent tests of dark matter models and of gravity theories. In the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model, spheroids are formed through mergers in a strongly hierarchical scenario, and also in the early universe through dynamical friction in clumpy galaxies. More secularly, pseudo-bulges are formed by the inner vertical resonance with bars. The high efficiency of bulge formation is in tension with observations in the local universe of a large amount of bulge-less spiral galaxies. In the present work, the formation of bulges in very gas-rich galaxies, as those in the early universe, is studied in the Milgrom's MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), through multi-grid simulations of the non-linear gravity, including the gas dissipation, star formation and feedback. Clumpy disks are rapidly formed, as in their Newtonian equivalent systems. However, the dynamical friction is not as efficient, in the absence of dark matter halos, and the clumps have no t...

  13. Pixel Lensing Search For Bright Microlensing Events and Variables in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A; Gould, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method to search for gravitational microlensing toward the Galactic bulge that employs a small camera rather than a conventional telescope and probes new regions of parameter space. The small aperture (~65 mm) permits detection of stellar flux variations corresponding to magnitudes 715. The large pixel size (~10") and ~(6 deg)^2 field of view allows observation of the entire bulge with a few pointings. With this large pixel size (and with the even larger 30" PSF that we advocate) most bulge stars are unresolved, so one is in the regime of pixel lensing: microlensing and other forms of stellar variation are detected from the difference of pixel counts in successive images. We identify three principal uses of such a search. First, the observations are analogous to normal pixel lensing observations of the bulge of M31, but are carried out under conditions where the detected events can be followed up in detail. This permits crucial checks on the systematics of the M31 searches. Second, the searc...

  14. Chemistry of the Most Metal-poor Stars in the Bulge and the z > 10 Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Metal-poor stars in the Milky Way are local relics of the epoch of the first stars and the first galaxies. However, a low metallicity does not prove that a star formed in this ancient era, as metal-poor stars form over a range of redshift in different environments. Theoretical models of Milky Way formation have shown that at constant metallicity, the oldest stars are those closest to the center of the Galaxy on the most tightly-bound orbits. For that reason, the most metal-poor stars in the bulge of the Milky Way provide excellent tracers of the chemistry of the high-redshift universe. We report the dynamics and detailed chemical abundances of three stars in the bulge with [Fe/H] $\\lesssim-2.7$, two of which are the most metal-poor stars in the bulge in the literature. We find that with the exception of scandium, all three stars follow the abundance trends identified previously for metal-poor halo stars. These three stars have the lowest [Sc II/Fe] abundances yet seen in $\\alpha$-enhanced giant stars in the G...

  15. The Controversial Star-Formation History and Helium Enrichment of the Milky Way Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, David M.

    2016-06-01

    The stellar population of the Milky Way bulge is thoroughly studied, with a plethora of measurements from virtually the full suite of instruments available to astronomers. It is thus perhaps surprising that alongside well-established results lies some substantial uncertainty in its star-formation history. Cosmological models predict the bulge to host the Galaxy's oldest stars for [Fe/H] ≲ -1, and this is demonstrated by RR Lyrae stars and globular cluster observations. There is consensus that bulge stars with [Fe/H] ≲ 0 are older than t ≈ 10 Gyr. However, at super-solar metallicity, there is a substantial unresolved discrepancy. Data from spectroscopic measurements of the main-sequence turnoff and subgiant branch, the abundances of asymptotic giant branch stars, the period distribution of Mira variables, the chemistry and central-star masses of planetary nebulae, all suggest a substantial intermediate-age population (t ≈ 3 Gyr). This is in conflict with predictions from cosmologically motivated chemical evolution models and photometric studies of the main-sequence turnoff region, which both suggest virtually no stars younger than t ≈ 8 Gyr. A possible resolution to this conflict is enhanced helium-enrichment, as this would shift nearly all of the age estimates in the direction of decreasing discrepancy.

  16. Red galaxies with pseudo-bulges in the SDSS: closer to disk galaxies or to classical bulges?

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, B; Antón, S; Gomes, J M; Papaderos, P

    2015-01-01

    Pseudo-bulges are expected to markedly differ from classical, quasi-monolithically forming bulges in their star formation history (SFH) and chemical abundance patterns. To test this simple expectation, we carry out a comparative structural and spectral synthesis analysis of 106 red, massive galaxies issued from the SDSS, subdivided into bulgeless, pseudo-bulge and classical bulge galaxies according to their photometric characteristics, and further obeying a specific selection to minimize uncertainties in the analysis and ensure an unbiased derivation and comparison of SFHs. Our 2D photometry analysis suggests that disks underlying pseudo-bulges typically have larger exponential scale lengths than bulgeless galaxies, despite similar integral disk luminosities. Spectral synthesis models of the stellar emission within the 3" SDSS fiber aperture reveal a clear segregation of bulgeless and pseudo-bulge galaxies from classical bulges on the luminosity-weighted planes of age-metallicity and mass-metallicity, though ...

  17. Explaining the Formation of Bulges with MOND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Françoise

    In the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, bulges easily form through galaxy mergers, either major or minor, or through clumpy discs in the early universe, where clumps are driven to the center by dynamical friction. Also pseudobulges, with a more discy morphology and kinematics, can form more slowly through secular evolution of a bar, where resonant stars are elevated out of the plane, in a peanut/box shape. As a result, in CDM cosmological simulations, it is very difficult to find a bulgeless galaxy, while they are observed very frequently in the local universe. A different picture emerges in alternative models of the missing mass problem. In MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics), galaxy mergers are much less frequent, since the absence of dark matter halos reduces the dynamical friction between two galaxies. Also, while clumpy galaxies lead to rapid classical bulge formation in CDM, the inefficient dynamical friction with MOND in the early-universe galaxies prevents the clumps to coalesce together in the center to form spheroids. This leads to less frequent and less massive classical bulges. Bars in MOND are more frequent and stronger, and have a more constant pattern speed, which modifies significantly the pseudobulge morphology. The fraction of pseudobulges is expected to be dominant in MOND.

  18. Explaining the formation of bulges with MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2015-01-01

    In the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, bulges easily form through galaxy mergers, either major or minor, or through clumpy disks in the early universe, where clumps are driven to the center by dynamical friction. Also pseudo-bulges, with a more disky morphology and kinematics, can form more slowly through secular evolution of a bar, where resonant stars are elevated out of the plane, in a peanut/box shape. As a result, in CDM cosmological simulations, it is very difficult to find a bulgeless galaxy, while they are observed very frequently in the local universe. A different picture emerges in alternative models of the missing mass problem. In MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics), galaxy mergers are much less frequent, since the absence of dark matter halos reduces the dynamical friction between two galaxies. Also, while clumpy galaxies lead to rapid classical bulge formation in CDM, the inefficient dynamical friction with MOND in the early-universe galaxies prevents the clumps to coalesce together in the center...

  19. Are there carbon stars in the Bulge?

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y K

    1998-01-01

    The bulge carbon stars have been a mystery since their discovery, because they are about 2.5mag too faint to be regarded as genuine AGB stars, if located inside the metal-rich bulge (m-M=14.5mag). Part of the mystery can be solved if these carbon stars are related to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (SDG; m-M=17.0mag). They are in that case not old and metal-rich, but young, ~0.1 Gyr, with SMC-like metallicity. The sigma_RV=113+/-14 km/s radial velocity dispersion of the stars appears to be consistent with bulge membership. On the other hand, a similar velocity dispersion could be the result from an induced star formation event when the SDG crosses the galactic midplane. It is suggested that the carbon stars are tracers of such an event and that they therefore are located at distances related to the SDG. However, the majority of the carbon stars are not member of the SDG, nor are they similar to the C-stars which are member of the SDG. The radial velocities can be used to determine a possible membership to the SD...

  20. On the kinematic separation of field and cluster stars across the bulge globular NGC 6528

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagioia, E. P.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma-Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Milone, A. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Dall' Ora, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Aparicio, A.; Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofìsica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Calamida, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00044 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gilmozzi, R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Matsunaga, N. [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 10762-30, Mitake, Kiso-machi, Kiso-gun, 3 Nagano 97-0101 (Japan); Walker, A., E-mail: eplagioia@roma2.infn.it [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2014-02-10

    We present deep and precise multi-band photometry of the Galactic bulge globular cluster NGC 6528. The current data set includes optical and near-infrared images collected with ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The images cover a time interval of almost 10 yr, and we have been able to carry out a proper-motion separation between cluster and field stars. We performed a detailed comparison in the m {sub F814W}, m {sub F606W} – m {sub F814W} color-magnitude diagram with two empirical calibrators observed in the same bands. We found that NGC 6528 is coeval with and more metal-rich than 47 Tuc. Moreover, it appears older and more metal-poor than the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6791. The current evidence is supported by several diagnostics (red horizontal branch, red giant branch bump, shape of the sub-giant branch, slope of the main sequence) that are minimally affected by uncertainties in reddening and distance. We fit the optical observations with theoretical isochrones based on a scaled-solar chemical mixture and found an age of 11 ± 1 Gyr and an iron abundance slightly above solar ([Fe/H] = +0.20). The iron abundance and the old cluster age further support the recent spectroscopic findings suggesting a rapid chemical enrichment of the Galactic bulge.

  1. Secular- and merger-built bulges in barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mendez-Abreu, J; Corsini, E M; Aguerri, J A L

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) We study the incidence, as well as the nature, of composite bulges in a sample of 10 face-on barred galaxies to constrain the formation and evolutionary processes of the central regions of disk galaxies. We analyze the morphological, photometric, and kinematic properties of each bulge. Then, by using a case-by-case analysis we identify composite bulges and classify every component into a classical or pseudobulge. In addition, bar-related boxy/peanut (B/P) structures were also identified and characterised. We find only three galaxies hosting a single-component bulge (two pseudobulges and one classical bulge). We find evidence of composite bulges coming in two main types based on their formation: secular-built and merger- and secular-built. We call secular-built to composite bulges made of entirely by structures associated with secular processes such as pseudo bulges, central disks, or B/P bulges. We find four composite bulges of this kind in our sample. On the other hand, merger- and secular-built b...

  2. Electric giant resonances in sup 4 sup 0 Ca and sup 4 sup 8 Ca probed with electron and proton scattering coincidence experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Strauch, S

    1999-01-01

    Excitation and particle decay of electric giant resonances in sup 4 sup 0 Ca and sup 4 sup 8 Ca are studied with electron and proton beams. Recent results of a sup 4 sup 8 Ca(e,e'n) measurement performed at the S-DALINAC in Darmstadt with kinematics that selectively populate electric monopole, dipole and quadrupole excitations are presented. The extracted B(E1) strength distribution is in good agreement with photo nuclear data and the predictions of microscopic calculations. The summed B(E2+E0) strength distribution, however disagrees with the result of these calculations. The neutron emission of the giant dipole resonance in sup 4 sup 8 Ca shows a large fraction of direct decay to sup 4 sup 7 Ca hole states. In addition, isoscalar giant monopole resonance strength in sup 4 sup 0 Ca was extracted from (e,e'alpha sub 0) and (e,e'alpha sub 1) angular correlations. A study of the quadrupole strength in the alpha sub 0 decay channel of sup 4 sup 0 Ca with a (p,p'alpha) coincidence measurement reiterates the unsol...

  3. Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    We review the interior structure and evolution of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and giant exoplanets with particular emphasis on constraining their global composition. Compared to the first edition of this review, we provide a new discussion of the atmospheric compositions of the solar system giant planets, we discuss the discovery of oscillations of Jupiter and Saturn, the significant improvements in our understanding of the behavior of material at high pressures and the consequences for interior and evolution models. We place the giant planets in our Solar System in context with the trends seen for exoplanets.

  4. Chemical evolution of the inner 2 degrees of the Milky Way bulge: [alpha/Fe] trends and metallicity gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Ryde, N; Grieco, V; Matteucci, F; Rich, R M; Uttenthaler, S

    2015-01-01

    The structure, formation, and evolution of the Milky Way bulge is a matter of debate. Important diagnostics for discriminating between bulge models include alpha-abundance trends with metallicity, and spatial abundance and metallicity gradients. Due to the severe optical extinction in the inner Bulge region, only a few detailed investigations have been performed of this region. Here we aim at investigating the inner 2 degrees by observing the [alpha/Fe] element trends versus metallicity, and by trying to derive the metallicity gradient. [alpha/Fe] and metallicities have been determined by spectral synthesis of 2 micron spectra observed with VLT/CRIRES of 28 M-giants, lying along the Southern minor axis at (l,b)=(0,0), (0,-1), and (0,-2). VLT/ISAAC spectra are used to determine the effective temperature of the stars. We present the first connection between the Galactic Center and the Bulge using similar stars, high spectral resolution, and analysis techniques. The [alpha/Fe] trends in all our 3 fields show a l...

  5. The Demographics of galactic bulges in the SDSS database

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Keunho; Oh, Sree; Jeong, Hyunjin; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Smith, Rory; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new database of our two-dimensional bulge-disk decompositions for 14,233 galaxies drawn from SDSS DR12 in order to examine the properties of bulges residing in the local universe ($0.005 < z < 0.05$). We performed decompositions in $g$ and $r$ bands by utilizing the {\\sc{galfit}} software. The bulge colors and bulge-to-total ratios are found to be sensitive to the details in the decomposition technique, and hence we hereby provide full details of our method. The $g-r$ colors of b...

  6. Which bulges are favoured by barred S0 galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Barway, Sudhanshu; Vaghmare, Kaustubh; Kembhavi, Ajit K

    2016-01-01

    S0 galaxies are known to host classical bulges with a broad range of size and mass, while some such S0s are barred and some not. The origin of the bars has remained as a long-standing problem -- what made bar formation possible in certain S0s? By analysing a large sample of S0s with classical bulges observed by the Spitzer space telescope, we find that most of our barred S0s host comparatively low-mass classical bulges, typically with bulge-to-total ratio ($B/T$) less than $0.5$; whereas S0s with more massive classical bulges than these do not host any bar. Furthermore, we find that amongst the barred S0s, there is a trend for the longer and massive bars to be associated with comparatively bigger and massive classical bulges -- possibly suggesting bar growth being facilitated by these classical bulges. In addition, we find that the bulge effective radius is always less than the bar effective radius --indicating an interesting synergy between the host classical bulge and bars being maintained while bar growth ...

  7. Gravitational lensing interpretation of the giant luminous arc in Abell 370: A new probing of the mass-to-light ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From our photometric and spectroscopic data on the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 (z=0.374), we suggest that the giant luminous arc observed in this cluster could be the result of gravitational lensing of a background galaxy by the cluster center. Thanks to the observational constraints, we have modeled this lensing effect to fit all the arc structure. This leads to a new determination of the mass-to-light ratio which is compared to the one obtained from the virial theorem and the velocity dispersion

  8. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE GALACTIC BULGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zoccali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance as the only galactic spheroid fully resolved in stars, our knowledge of the Galacticbulge has been historically quite poor. This was mainly due to the stellar crowding, to the heavy interstellar absorption in the plane, and to the foreground disk contamination. However, in the last few years, with the use of near IR detectors, 8 meter class (or space based telescopes, and the advent of multi-object spectrographs, we have learnt how to minimize the above e ects. This paper reviews the basic properties (structural parameters, age, chemical content of the Galactic bulge, as determined in the last 4{5 years.

  9. Bulges of disk galaxies at intermediate redshifts. I. Samples with and without bulges in the Groth Strip Survey

    OpenAIRE

    L. Domínguez Palmero; M. Balcells; Erwin, P; Prieto, M.; Cristóbal Hornillos, D.; Eliche Moral, María del Carmen; Guzmán, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context. Analysis of bulges to redshifts of up to z∽1 have provided ambiguous results as to whether bulges as a class are old structures akin to elliptical galaxies or younger products of the evolution of their host disks. Aims. We aim to define a sample of intermediate-z disk galaxies harbouring central bulges, and a complementary sample of disk galaxies without measurable bulges. We intend to provide colour profiles for both samples, as well as measurements of nuclear, disk, and global colo...

  10. Bulge-driven Fueling of Seed Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KwangHo; Ricotti, Massimo; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Bogdanović, Tamara; Wise, John H.

    2016-02-01

    We examine radiation-regulated accretion onto intermediate-mass and massive black holes (BHs) embedded in a bulge component. Using spherically symmetric one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, we track the growth of BHs accreting from a cold, neutral gas reservoir with temperature {T}∞ ={10}4 K. We find that the accretion rate of BHs embedded in bulges is proportional to {r}{{B,eff}}/{r}{{B}}, where rB,eff is the increased effective Bondi radius that includes the gravitational potential of the bulge, and rB is the Bondi radius of the BH. The radiative feedback from the BH suppresses the cold accretion rate to ˜1% of the Bondi rate when a bulge is not considered. However, we find that the BH fueling rate increases rapidly when the bulge mass Mbulge is greater than the critical value of ˜106 M⊙ and is proportional to {r}{{B,eff}}/{r}{{B}}≃ {M}{{bulge}}/{M}{{BH}}, where {M}{{BH}} is the BH mass. Since the critical bulge mass is independent of the central BH mass, the growth rate of BHs with masses {M}{{BH}}={10}2, 104, and 106 M⊙ exhibits distinct dependencies on the bulge-to-BH mass ratio. Our results imply that light seed BHs (≲102 M⊙), which might be the remnants of the Pop III stars, cannot grow through accretion coevally with the early assembly of the bulge of the host galaxies until the bulge reaches the critical mass. However, massive BH seeds (≳105 M⊙), which may form via direct collapse, are more likely to be embedded in a supercritical bulge, and thus can grow efficiently coupling to the host galaxies and driving the early evolution of the MBH-σ relationship.

  11. Milky Way demographics with the VVV Survey III. Evidence for a Great Dark Lane in the 157 Million Star Bulge Color-Magnitude Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Minniti, D; Gonzalez, O A; Zoccali, M; Rejkuba, M; Alonso-Garcia, J; Benjamin, R; Catelan, M; Dekany, I; Emerson, J P; Hempel, M; Lucas, P W; Schultheis, M

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of IR surveys are revealing and quantifying Galactic features, providing an improved 3-D interpretation of our own Galaxy. We present an analysis of the global distribution of dust clouds in the bulge using the near-IR photometry of 157 million stars from the VVV Survey. We investigate the color magnitude diagram of the Milky Way bulge which shows a red giant clump of core He burning stars that is split in two color components, with a mean color difference of (Z-Ks)=0.55 magnitudes equivalent to A_V=2.0 magnitudes. We conclude that there is an optically thick dust lane at intermediate latitudes above and below the plane, that runs across several square degrees from l=-10 deg to l=+10 deg. We call this feature the "Great Dark Lane". Although its exact distance is uncertain, it is located in front of the bulge. The evidence for a large-scale great dark lane within the Galactic bulge is important in order to constrain models of the barred Milky Way bulge and to compare our galaxy with external...

  12. Bars rejuvenating bulges? Evidence from stellar population analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Paula

    2011-01-01

    We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in Gadotti (2009b) and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age vs. metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than ~ 4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M_Sun while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulg...

  13. Stellar Ages through the Corners of the Boxy Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, E; Renzini, A; Brown, T M; Gonzalez, O; Minniti, D; Debattista, Victor P; Mayer, L

    2013-01-01

    In some scenarios for the formation of the Milky Way bulge the stellar population at the edges of the boxy bulge may be younger than those on the minor axis, or close to the Galactic center. So far the only bulge region where deep color-magnitude diagrams have been obtained is indeed along the minor axis. To overcome this limitation, we aim at age-dating the bulge stellar populations far away from the bulge minor axis. Color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions have been obtained from deep near-IR VLT/HAWK-I images taken at the two Southern corners of the boxy bulge, i.e., near the opposite edges of the Galactic bar. The foreground disk contamination has been statistically removed using a pure disk field observed with the same instrument and located approximately at similar Galactic latitudes of the two bulge fields, and 30deg in longitude away from the Galactic center. For each bulge field, mean reddening and distance are determined using the position of red clump stars, and the metallicity distributi...

  14. Bulge-driven Fueling of Seed Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Park, KwangHo; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Bogdanović, Tamara; Wise, John H

    2015-01-01

    We examine radiation-regulated accretion onto intermediate-mass and massive black holes (BHs) embedded in a bulge component. Using spherically symmetric one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, we track the growth of BHs accreting from a cold, neutral gas reservoir with temperature T=10^4 K. We find that the accretion rate of BHs embedded in bulges is proportional to r_{B,eff}/r_B, where r_{B,eff} is the increased effective Bondi radius that includes the gravitational potential of the bulge, and r_B is the Bondi radius of the BH. The radiative feedback from the BH suppresses the cold accretion rate to ~1 percent of the Bondi rate when a bulge is not considered. However, we find that the BH fueling rate increases rapidly when the bulge mass M_bulge is greater than the critical value of 10^6 M_sun and is proportional to M_bulge. Since the critical bulge mass is independent of the central BH mass M_{BH}, the growth rate of BHs with masses of 10^2, 10^4, and 10^6 M_sun exhibits distinct dependencies o...

  15. Colors of intermediate z bulges in the goya Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Domínguez-Palmero

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronology of bulge and disk formation is a major unsolved issue in galaxy forma- tion, which impacts on our global understand- ing of the Hubble sequence. We present col- ors of the nuclear regions of intermediate- redshift disk galaxies, with the aim of obtain- ing empirical information of ages of bulges at 0:1 < z < 1:3.

  16. Numerical analysis of ECT signals for bulge and dent type defect on SG tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic numerical analysis of Eddy current non-destructive testing signals for bulge and dent type defect on steam generator tube is presented. The bulge defect can be found near tube sheet and is mainly caused by explosive tube expansion. The dent defect can appear near tube support plate and is mainly caused by thermal expansion of the plate. The INCONEL600 tube which is adopted in Uljin-4 NPP in Korea is used as an analysis model. The Bobbin probe is used for obtaining the impedance signals. For the numerical analysis the electromagnetic governing equation for Eddy current problem is derived from Maxwell's equation, and by performing the finite element formulation 3-D finite element code with brick element is developed. For the interpretation of simulated results and comparison the numerical results with experimental ones, the numerically simulated signals are adjusted by using the ASME standard 100% through hole defect signal. To see the effect of the defect on the impedance signal, parametric case study is performed and the results are presented in this paper. Also the impedance signals of bulge and dent defect with additional volumetric defect is presented. The results in this paper can be helpful for the analysis and interpretation of the field impedance signals obtained during the examination of the steam generator in NPP. (orig.)

  17. The bulge luminosity for low-mass black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yanfei; Ho, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We study the scaling between bulge magnitude and central black hole (BH) mass in galaxies with virial BH masses 10^7 solar mass. Specfically, bulges span a much wider range of bulge luminosity, and on average the luminosity is larger, at fixed black hole mass. The trend holds both for the active galaxies from Bentz et al. and the inactive sample of Gultekin et al. and cannot be explained by differences in stellar populations, as it persists when we use dynamical bulge masses. Put another way, the ratio between bulge and BH mass is much larger than $\\sim 1000$ for our sample. This is consistent with recent suggestions that black hole mass does not scale with the pseudobulge luminosity. The low-mass scaling relations appear to flatten, consistent with predictions from Volonteri & Natarajan for massive seed BHs.

  18. Natures of a clump-origin bulge: a pseudobulge-like but old metal-rich bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Bulges in spiral galaxies have been supposed to be classified into two types: classical bulges or pseudobulges. Classical bulges are thought to form by galactic merger with bursty star formation, whereas pseudobulges are suggested to form by secular evolution due to spiral arms and a barred structure funneling gas into the galactic centre. Noguchi (1998, 1999) suggested another bulge formation scenario, `clump-origin bulge'. He demonstrated using a numerical simulation that a galactic disc suffers dynamical instability to form clumpy structures in the early stage of disc formation since the premature disc is expected to be highly gas-rich, then the clumps are sucked into the galactic centre by dynamical friction and merge into a single bulge at the centre. This bulge formation scenario expected happen only at the high-redshift is different from the galactic merger and the secular evolution. Therefore, clump-origin bulges may have their own unique properties. We perform a high-resolution N-body/smoothed partic...

  19. Variable stars in the MACHO bulge database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, P. J.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H., Drake, A.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Peterson, B. A.; Pratt, M. R.; Rodgers, A. W.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.

    1998-10-01

    The MACHO Project has been monitoring large fields in the direction of the Galactic bulge, the LMC and SMC for over 6 years. The nightly observations of this microlensing survey provide very large databases for astronomers. The MACHO database contains {approximately}5 Terabytes of data as of mid-1998. For comparison, the HST Archive contains about {approximately}2 Tb, and the Sloan. Digital Sky Survey will reach {approximately}1.0 Tb. Our database can be used to attack a variety of astrophysical problems, and has produced results relevant to microlensing, galactic structure, and stellar evolution. Of particular importance are the large numbers of variable stars (tens of thousands) found as byproducts of the microlensing search. In years to come, the microlensing databases will play a dominant role in variable star science. Important science can still be done with limited resources, even in places with no access to large telescopes (all you need is computer).

  20. The Density of Dark Matter in the Galactic Bulge and Implications for Indirect Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-01-01

    A recent study, making use of the number of horizontal branch stars observed in infrared photometric surveys and kinematic measurements of M-giant stars from the BRAVA survey, combined with N-body simulations of stellar populations, has presented a new determination of the dark matter mass within the bulge-bar region of the Milky Way. That study constrains the total mass within the $\\pm 2.2 \\times \\pm 1.4 \\times \\pm 1.2$ kpc volume of the bulge-bar region to be ($1.84 \\pm 0.07) \\times 10^{10} \\, M_{\\odot}$, of which 9-30% is made up of dark matter. Here, we use this result to constrain the the Milky Way's dark matter density profile, and discuss the implications for indirect dark matter searches. Although uncertainties remain significant, these results favor dark matter distributions with a cusped density profile. For example, for a scale radius of 20 kpc and a local dark matter density of 0.4 GeV/cm$^3$, density profiles with an inner slope of 0.69 to 1.40 are favored, approximately centered around the stand...

  1. THE BULGE RADIAL VELOCITY ASSAY (BRAVA). II. COMPLETE SAMPLE AND DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new radial velocity measurements from the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay, a large-scale spectroscopic survey of M-type giants in the Galactic bulge/bar region. The sample of ∼4500 new radial velocities, mostly in the region –10° < l < +10° and b ≈ –6°, more than doubles the existent published data set. Our new data extend our rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile to +20°, which is ∼2.8 kpc from the Galactic center. The new data confirm the cylindrical rotation observed at –6° and –8° and are an excellent fit to the Shen et al. N-body bar model. We measure the strength of the TiOε molecular band as a first step toward a metallicity ranking of the stellar sample, from which we confirm the presence of a vertical abundance gradient. Our survey finds no strong evidence of previously unknown kinematic streams. We also publish our complete catalog of radial velocities, photometry, TiO band strengths, and spectra, which is available at the Infrared Science Archive as well as at UCLA.

  2. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury I: Bright UV Stars in the Bulge of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfield, Philip; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Bressan, Alessandro; Lang, Dustin; Williams, Benjamin F; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Howley, Kirsten M; Lauer, Tod R; Bell, Eric F; Bianchi, Luciana; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew; Dorman, Claire E; Gilbert, Karoline M; Kalirai, Jason; Larsen, Søren S; Olsen, Knut A G; Rix, Hans-Walter; Seth, Anil C; Skillman, Evan D; Weisz, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' \\times 6.5' area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of \\sim4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars and AGB-manqu\\'e stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manqu\\'e (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {\\alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the RGB is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch st...

  3. Probing the deep end of the Milky Way with \\emph{Kepler}: Asteroseismic analysis of 854 faint Red Giants misclassified as Cool Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, S; Huber, D; Regulo, C; Stello, D; Beck, P G; Houmani, K; Salabert, D

    2016-01-01

    Asteroseismology has proven to be an excellent tool to determine not only the global stellar properties with a good precision but also to infer stellar structure, dynamics, and evolution for a large sample of Kepler stars. Prior to the launch of the mission the properties of Kepler targets were inferred from broadband photometry, leading to the Input Catalog (KIC Brown et al. 2011). The KIC was later revised in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog (Huber et al. 2014), based on literature values and an asteroseismic analysis of stars which were unclassified in the KIC. Here we present an asteroseismic analysis of 45,400 stars which were classified as dwarfs in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog. We found that around 2% of the sample shows acoustic modes in the typical frequency range that put them in the red-giant category rather than cool dwarfs. We analyse the asteroseismic properties of these stars, derive their surface gravities, masses, and radii and present updated effective temperatures and distances. We ...

  4. Mapping a stellar disk into a boxy bulge: The outside-in part of the Milky Way bulge formation

    CERN Document Server

    Di Matteo, P; Gomez, A; van Damme, L; Combes, F; Halle, A; Semelin, B; Lehnert, M D; Katz, D

    2014-01-01

    By means of idealized, dissipationless N-body simulations which follow the formation and subsequent buckling of a stellar bar, we study the characteristics of boxy/peanut-shaped bulges and compare them with the properties of the stellar populations in the Milky Way bulge. The main results of our modeling, valid for the general family of boxy/peanut shaped bulges, are the following: (i) because of the redistribution of stars in the disk initiated at the epoch of bar formation, it is the whole stellar disk, from the innermost regions to the outer Lindblad resonance of the stellar bar, that is mapped into a boxy bulge; (ii) the contribution of stars to the local bulge density depends on their birth radius: stars born in the innermost disk tend to dominate the innermost regions of the boxy bulge, while stars originating closer to the OLR dominate the outer regions of the boxy/peanut structure; (iii) stellar birth radii are imprinted in the bulge kinematics, the larger the birth radii of stars ending up in the bul...

  5. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire E. [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howley, Kirsten M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Astronomical Institute, University of Utrecht, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-08-20

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' Multiplication-Sign 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of {approx}4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manque stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manque (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  6. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' × 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of ∼4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manqué stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manqué (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or α abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  7. Non linear finite element simulation of complex bulge forming processes

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Donald, Bryan J

    2000-01-01

    Bulge forming is a manufacturing process that is becoming increasingly important as a technology that can be used to produce seamless, lightweight and near-net-shape industrial components. The process is being increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries where the demands for increased structural strength and decreased vehicle weight make it a very attractive manufacturing method. This work is concerned with increasing knowledge of the deformation mechanisms during bulg...

  8. MACHO RR lyrae in the inner halo and bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, A.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Peterson, B. A.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Rodgers, A. W.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.

    1998-10-01

    The RR Lyrse in the bulge have been proposed to be the oldest populations in the Milky Way, tracers of how the galaxy formed. We study here the distribution of ?{approximately}1600 bulge RR Lyrae stars found by the MACHO Project. The RR Lyrae with 0.4 ? R ? 3 kpc show a density law that is well fit by the extension of the metal-poor stellar halo present in the outer regions of the Milky Way.

  9. Is the Galactic bulge devoid of planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Penny, Matthew T; Clanton, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of 31 microlensing exoplanet hosts, we investigate whether or not the distances to these systems conform to the Galactic distribution of planets expected from a model. We derive the expected distribution of distances from a simulated microlensing survey, correcting (roughly) for the dominant selection effects that affect the detection sensitivity to planets as a function of their distance, and compare with the observed distribution using Anderson-Darling (AD) hypothesis testing. We find that the AD test rejects the hypothesis that the observed sample is drawn from our model distribution of distances with p-value $5.0\\times10^{-4}$. Interestingly, we find that an AD test can not reject ($p=0.18$) the hypothesis that the observed sample is drawn from a model distribution where only disk stars host planets (i.e., a model where there are no bulge planets), though AD tests of the relative proper motion distributions indicate tension with this extreme hypothesis. Allowing the relative abundance of pl...

  10. SuperMassive Black Holes in Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Sarzi, M; Shields, J C; Rudnick, G; Ho, L C; McIntosh, D H; Filippenko, A V; Sargent, W L W; Sarzi, Marc; Rix, Hans-Walter; Shields, Joseph C.; Rudnick, Greg; Ho, Luis C.; Intosh, Daniel H. Mc; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2001-01-01

    We present spatially extended gas kinematics at parsec-scale resolution for the nuclear regions of four nearby disk galaxies, and model them as rotation of a gas disk in the joint potential of the stellar bulge and a putative central black hole. The targets were selected from a larger set of long-slit spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Survey of Nearby Nuclei with STIS (SUNNS). They represents the 4 galaxies (of 24) that display symmetric gas velocity curves consistent with a rotating disk. We derive the stellar mass distribution from the STIS acquisition images adopting the stellar mass-to-light ratio normalized so as to match ground-based velocity dispersion measurements over a large aperture. Subsequently, we constrain the mass of a putative black hole by matching the gas rotation curve, following two distinct approaches. In the most general case we explore all the possible disk orientations, alternatively we constrain the gas disk orientation from the dust-lane morphology at s...

  11. Hiding its age: the case for a younger bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, M; Snaith, O; Calamida, A

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the age of the bulge has led to two contradictory results. On the one side, the color-magnitude diagrams in different bulge fields seem to indicate a uniformly old ($>$10 Gyr) population. On the other side, individual ages derived from dwarfs observed through microlensing events seem to indicate a large spread, from $\\sim$ 2 to $\\sim$ 13 Gyr. Because the bulge is now recognised as being mainly a boxy peanut-shaped bar, it is suggested that disk stars are one of its main constituents, and therefore also stars with ages significantly younger than 10 Gyr. Other arguments as well point to the fact that the bulge cannot be exclusively old, and in particular cannot be a burst population, as it is usually expected if the bulge was the fossil remnant of a merger phase in the early Galaxy. In the present study, we show that given the range of metallicities observed in the bulge, a uniformly old population would be reflected into a significant spread in color at the turn-off which is not observed. ...

  12. Extinction maps toward the Milky Way bulge: Two-dimensional and three-dimensional tests with apogee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheis, M. [Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de Côte d' Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Zasowski, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Allende Prieto, C. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Calle Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, F.; Chiappini, C. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Beaton, R. L.; García Pérez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Beers, T. C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Ge, J. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hearty, F.; Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holtzman, J. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Muna, D. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nidever, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shetrone, M., E-mail: mathias.schultheis@oca.eu, E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Galactic interstellar extinction maps are powerful and necessary tools for Milky Way structure and stellar population analyses, particularly toward the heavily reddened bulge and in the midplane. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining reliable extinction measures and distances for a large number of stars that are independent of these maps, tests of their accuracy and systematics have been limited. Our goal is to assess a variety of photometric stellar extinction estimates, including both two-dimensional and three-dimensional extinction maps, using independent extinction measures based on a large spectroscopic sample of stars toward the Milky Way bulge. We employ stellar atmospheric parameters derived from high-resolution H-band Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectra, combined with theoretical stellar isochrones, to calculate line-of-sight extinction and distances for a sample of more than 2400 giants toward the Milky Way bulge. We compare these extinction values to those predicted by individual near-IR and near+mid-IR stellar colors, two-dimensional bulge extinction maps, and three-dimensional extinction maps. The long baseline, near+mid-IR stellar colors are, on average, the most accurate predictors of the APOGEE extinction estimates, and the two-dimensional and three-dimensional extinction maps derived from different stellar populations along different sightlines show varying degrees of reliability. We present the results of all of the comparisons and discuss reasons for the observed discrepancies. We also demonstrate how the particular stellar atmospheric models adopted can have a strong impact on this type of analysis, and discuss related caveats.

  13. The Star-Forming Histories of the Nucleus, Bulge, and Inner Disk of NGC 5102: Clues to the Evolution of a Nearby Lenticular Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Davidge, T J

    2014-01-01

    Long slit spectra recorded with GMOS on Gemini South are used to examine the star-forming history of the lenticular galaxy NGC 5102. Structural and supplemental photometric information are obtained from archival Spitzer [3.6] images. Comparisons with model spectra point to luminosity-weighted metallicities that are consistent with the colors of resolved red giant branch stars in the disk. The nucleus has a luminosity-weighted age at visible wavelengths of ~1 Gyr, and the integrated light is dominated by stars that formed over a time period of only a few hundred Myr. For comparison, the luminosity-weighted ages of the bulge and disk are ~2 Gyr and ~10 Gyr, respectively. The g'-[3.6] colors of the nucleus and bulge are consistent with the spectroscopically-based ages. In contrast to the nucleus, models that assume star-forming activity spanning many Gyr provide a better match to the spectra of the bulge and disk than simple stellar population models. Isophotes in the bulge have a disky shape, hinting that the b...

  14. Investigation into the factors that influence inverse bulging effect during sheet hydro-mechanical deep drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The factors that influence inverse bulging effect during sheet hydro-mechanical deep drawing are especially researched in this paper. According to the different inverse bulging process, two modes can be singled: the initial inverse bulging (IIB and the local inverse bulging (LIB. IIB includes two parameters: inverse bulging height ratio (HIb/t and inverse bulging pressure ratio (PIb/t. LIB is influenced by IIB and has a direct relationship with liquid chamber pressure in the forming process. The optimal inverse bulging parameters of hemispherical bottom cylindrical part and flat bottom cylindrical part are obtained by numerical simulation. Process parameters including the clearance between the punch and the blank holder and the blank holder entrance radius that have a large influence on inverse bulging effect are optimized, so as to make inverse bulging effect behave better in hydroforming process. Finally, the accuracy of the numerical simulation results was verified by experiments.

  15. The 3D structure of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Zoccali, M

    2016-01-01

    We review the observational evidences concerning the three-dimensional structure of the Galactic bulge. Although the inner few kpc of our Galaxy are normally referred to as {\\it the bulge}, all the observations demonstrate that this region is dominated by a bar, i.e., the bulge is a bar. The bar has a boxy/peanut (X\\--shaped) structure in its outer regions, while it seems to become less and less elongated in its innermost region. A thinner and longer structure departing from the main bar has also been found, although the observational evidences that support the scenario of two separate structures has been recently challenged. Metal poor stars ([Fe/H]$\\lesssim -0.5$ dex) trace a different structure, and also have different kinematics.

  16. Counterparts to the Nuclear Bulge X-ray source population

    CERN Document Server

    Gosling, Andrew J; Blundell, Katherine M; Lucas, Phil

    2008-01-01

    We present an initial matching of the source positions of the Chandra Nuclear Bulge X-ray sources to the new UKIDSS-GPS near-infrared survey of the Nuclear Bulge. This task is made difficult by the extremely crowded nature of the region, despite this, we find candidate counterparts to ~50% of the X-ray sources. We show that detection in the J-band for a candidate counterpart to an X-ray source preferentially selects those candidate counterparts in the foreground whereas candidate counterparts with only detections in the H and K-bands are more likely to be Nuclear Bulge sources. We discuss the planned follow-up for these candidate counterparts.

  17. Near-Infrared Bulge-Disk Correlations of Lenticular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barway, Sudhanshu; Kembhavi, Ajit K; Mayya, Y D

    2008-01-01

    We consider the luminosity and environmental dependence of structural parameters of lenticular galaxies in the near-infrared K band. Using a two-dimensional galaxy image decomposition technique, we extract bulge and disk structural parameters for a sample of 36 lenticular galaxies observed by us in the K band. By combining data from the literature for field and cluster lenticulars with our data, we study correlations between parameters that characterise the bulge and the disk as a function of luminosity and environment. We find that scaling relations such as the Kormendy relation, photometric plane and other correlations involving bulge and disk parameters show a luminosity dependence. This dependence can be explained in terms of galaxy formation models in which faint lenticulars (M_T > -24.5) formed via secular formation processes that likely formed the pseudobulges of late-type disk galaxies, while brighter lenticulars (M_T < -24.5) formed through a different formation mechanism most likely involving maj...

  18. Myelographic differentiation of bulging disk from herniated disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the many causes producing lower back pain herniated nucleus pulposus and bulging disk have occupied large percentages and uniformly showed defect on lateral aspect of contrast filled thecal sac. But it is essential to differentiate each conditions from the other because of their different treatment methods. Differentiation at metrizamide myelography between a diffusely bulging disk (unlikely to cause nerve root compression) and a herniated disk is based on the curvature, extent, and multiplicity of the extradural deformity of the anterolateral margin of the contrast filled sac and on the presence of fusiform widening of the most distal part of the affected nerve root. The deformities caused by a bulging disk are round, usually symmetrical (although occasionally more prominent on one side), do not extend above or below the disk space, and can show multiple level involvement; the nerve root is uniform in caliber and normal in size (although some of severe bulging show fusiform sidening of the most distal part of the affected nerve root). The deformities caused by a herniated disk is angular and extends cephadol and/or caudal to the level of the disk space; the affected nerve root is usually widened in its most distal visible part. A consecutive series of 50 patients with low back pain and no past history of back surgery who did metrizamide myelography underwent spine CT and/or laminectomy. Using the criteria listed above for differentiation of bulging from herniated disk on metrizamide myelography, the myelographic diagnosis was correct in 32 (22 patients) of 34 (24 patients) (95%) surgically and/or computed tomographically confirmed bulging disks and in all 26 (100%) surgically and/or computed tomographically confirmed herniated disks.

  19. Chemodynamical analysis of bulge stars for simulated disc galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rahimi; Kawata, D.; Brook, Chris B.; Gibson, Brad K.

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the kinematics and chemistry of the bulge stars of two simulated disc galaxies using our chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. First we compare stars that are born inside the galaxy with those that are born outside the galaxy and are accreted into the centre of the galaxy. Stars that originate outside of the bulge are accreted into it early in its formation within 3 Gyrs so that these stars have high [alpha/Fe] as well as having a high total energy reflecting their accretion t...

  20. Spin-up of massive classical bulges during secular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kanak; Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2016-04-01

    Context. Classical bulges in spiral galaxies are known to rotate, but the origin of this observed rotational motion is not well understood. It has been shown recently that a low-mass classical bulge (ClB) in a barred galaxy can acquire rotation by absorbing a significant fraction of the angular momentum emitted by the bar. Aims: Our aim here is to investigate whether bars can also spin up more massive ClBs during the secular evolution of the bar, and to study the kinematics and dynamics of these ClBs. Methods: We use a set of self-consistent N-body simulations to study the interaction of ClBs with a bar that forms self-consistently in the disk. We use orbital spectral analysis to investigate the angular momentum gain by the classical bulge stars. Results: We show that the ClBs gain on average 2-6% of the disk's initial angular momentum within the bar region. Most of this angular momentum gain occurs via low-order resonances, particularly 5:2 resonant orbits. A density wake forms in the ClB which corotates and aligns with the bar at the end of the evolution. The spin-up process creates a characteristic linear rotation profile and mild tangential anisotropy in the ClB. The induced rotation is small in the centre, but is significant beyond ~2 bulge half mass radii, where it leads to mass-weighted V/σ ~ 0.2, and reaches a local Vmax/σin ~ 0.5 at around the scale of the bar. The resulting V/σ is tightly correlated with the ratio of the bulge size to the bar size. In all models, a box/peanut bulge forms suggesting that composite bulges may be common. Conclusions: Bar-bulge resonant interaction in barred galaxies can provide some spin-up of massive ClBs, but the process appears to be less efficient than for low-mass ClBs. Further angular momentum transfer due to nuclear bars or gas inflow would be required to explain the observed rotation if it is not primordial.

  1. Ongoing massive star formation in the bulge of M51

    OpenAIRE

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Panagia, N.; Scuderi, S.; Romaniello, M.; Spaans, M.; de Wit, W.J.M.; Krishner, R.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the HST-WFPC2 observations of the inner kpc of the interacting galaxy M51 in six bands from 2550 to 8140 Angstrom. The images show an oval shaped area ("bulge") of 11x16 arcsec or 450x650 pc around the nucleus, dominated by a smooth population of old stars with overimposed dust lanes. We found 30 bright point-like sources in the bulge of M51; many of these are bright in the UV. They are located in elongated "strings" which follow the general pattern of the dust lanes. The spectral ...

  2. Reconciling the Galactic Bulge Turnoff Age Discrepancy with Enhanced Helium Enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Nataf, David M

    2011-01-01

    We show that the factor $\\sim$2 discrepancy between spectroscopic and photometric age determinations of the Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff can be naturally explained by positing an elevated helium enrichment for the bulge relative to that assumed by standard isochrones. We obtain an upper bound on the helium enrichment parameter of the bulge $({\\Delta}Y/{\\Delta}Z)_{\\rm{Bulge}} \\lesssim 5.0$ given the requirement that the spectroscopic and photometric ages be consistent and the limiting condition of instantaneous star formation. The corresponding mean age for the bulge is $t_{\\rm{Bulge}} \\approx 10$ Gyr. We discuss phenomenological evidence that the bulge may have had a chemical evolution that is distinct from the solar neighborhood in this manner, and we make several testable predictions. Should this emerging picture of the bulge as helium-enhanced hold, it will require the development of new isochrones, new model atmospheres, and modified analysis and cosmological interpretation of the integrated light...

  3. Abundances of Baade's Window Giants from Keck/HIRES Spectra: I. Stellar Parameters and [Fe/H] Values

    CERN Document Server

    Fulbright, J P; Rich, R M; Fulbright, Jon. P.; William, Andrew Mc

    2006-01-01

    We present the first results of a new abundance survey of the Milky Way bulge based on Keck/HIRES spectra of 27 K-giants in the Baade's Window ($l = 1$, $b = -4$) field. The spectral data used in this study are of much higher resolution and signal-to-noise than previous optical studies of Galactic bulge stars. The [Fe/H] values of our stars, which range between -1.29 and $+0.51$, were used to recalibrate large low resolution surveys of bulge stars. Our best value for the mean [Fe/H] of the bulge is $-0.10 \\pm 0.04$. This mean value is similar to the mean metallicity of the local disk and indicates that there cannot be a strong metallicity gradient inside the solar circle. The metallicity distribution of stars confirms that the bulge does not suffer from the so-called ``G-dwarf'' problem. This paper also details the new abundance techniques necessary to analyze very metal-rich K-giants, including a new Fe line list and regions of low blanketing for continuum identification.

  4. What Is Giant Cell Arteritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... What Is Giant Cell Arteritis? Giant Cell Arteritis Symptoms Who Is At Risk for Giant Cell Arteritis? Giant Cell Arteritis Diagnosis ...

  5. The X-shaped Bulge of the Milky Way revealed by WISE

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way bulge has a boxy/peanut morphology and an X-shaped structure. This X-shape has been revealed by the `split in the red clump' from star counts along the line of sight toward the bulge, measured from photometric surveys. This boxy, X-shaped bulge morphology is not unique to the Milky Way and such bulges are observed in other barred spiral galaxies. N-body simulations show that boxy and X-shaped bulges are formed from the disk via dynamical instabilities. It has also been proposed that the Milky Way bulge is not X-shaped, but rather, the apparent split in the red clump stars is a consequence of different stellar populations, in an old classical spheroidal bulge. We present a WISE image of the Milky Way bulge, produced by downsampling the publicly available "unWISE" coadds. The WISE image of the Milky Way bulge shows that the X-shaped nature of the Milky Way bulge is self-evident and irrefutable. The X-shape morphology of the bulge in itself and the fraction of bulge stars that comprise orbits withi...

  6. Scientific Value of a Saturn Atmospheric Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Atreya, S. K.; Spilker, T. R.; Coustenis, A.; Atkinson, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric entry probe mISSions to the giant planets can uniquely discriminate between competing theories of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. This provides for important comparative studies of the gas and ice giants, and to provide a laboratory for studying the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, and interiors of all the planets including Earth. The giant planets also represent a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems. As outlined in the recent Planetary Decadal Survey, a Saturn Probe mission - with a shallow probe - ranks as a high priority for a New Frontiers class mission [1].

  7. The disc origin of the Milky Way bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Di Matteo, P

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic bulge, that is the prominent out-of-plane over-density present in the inner few kiloparsecs of the Galaxy, is a complex structure, as the morphology, kinematics, chemistry and ages of its stars indicate. To understand the nature of its main components -- those at [Fe/H] >~ -1 dex -- it is necessary to make an inventory of the stellar populations of the Galactic disc(s), and of their borders : the chemistry of the disc at the solar vicinity, well known from detailed studies of stars over many years, is not representative of the whole disc. This finding, together with the recent revisions of the mass and sizes of the thin and thick discs, constitutes a major step in understanding the bulge complexity. N-body models of a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge formed from a thin disc through the intermediary of a bar have been successful in interpreting a number of global properties of the Galactic bulge, but they fail in reproducing the detailed chemo-kinematic relations satisfied by its components and their morp...

  8. The Metallicity Distribution of the Milky Way Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, M

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic bulge of the Milky Way is made up of stars with a broad range of metallicity, -3.0 < [Fe/H] < 1 dex. The mean of the Metallicity Distribution Function (MDF) decreases as a function of height z from the plane and, more weakly, with galactic radius. The most metal rich stars in the inner Galaxy are concentrated to the plane and the more metal poor stars are found predominantly further from the plane, with an overall vertical gradient in the mean of the MDF of about -0.45 dex/kpc. This vertical gradient is believed to reflect the changing contribution with height of different populations in the inner-most region of the Galaxy. The more metal rich stars of the bulge are part of the boxy/peanut structure and comprise stars in orbits which trace out the underlying X-shape. There is still a lack of consensus on the origin of the metal poor stars ([Fe/H] < -0.5) in the region of the bulge. Some studies attribute the more metal poor stars of the bulge to the thick disk and stellar halo that are p...

  9. The Metallicity Distribution of the Milky Way Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, M.; Freeman, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge of the Milky Way is made up of stars with a broad range of metallicity, -3.0 function decreases as a function of height z from the plane and, more weakly, with galactic radius R GC. The most metal-rich stars in the inner Galaxy are concentrated to the plane and the more metal-poor stars are found predominantly further from the plane, with an overall vertical gradient in the mean of the metallicity distribution function of about - 0.45 dex kpc-1. This vertical gradient is believed to reflect the changing contribution with height of different populations in the innermost region of the Galaxy. The more metal-rich stars of the bulge are part of the boxy/peanut structure and comprise stars in orbits which trace out the underlying X-shape. There is still a lack of consensus on the origin of the metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] function of the bulge, and identifying if there is a unique bulge population which has formed separately from the disk and halo, has important consequences for identifying the relevant processes in the formation and evolution of the Milky Way.

  10. MAPPING THE X-SHAPED MILKY WAY BULGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the distribution of the red clump (RC) stars throughout the Galactic bulge using Two Micron All Sky Survey data. We mapped the position of the RC in 1 deg2 fields within the area |l| ≤ 8.05 and 3.05 ≤ |b| ≤ 8.05, for a total of 170 deg2. The single RC seen in the central area splits into two components at high Galactic longitudes in both hemispheres, produced by two structures at different distances along the same line of sight. The X-shape is clearly visible in the Z-X plane for longitudes close to the l = 00 axis. Crude measurements of the space densities of RC stars in the bright and faint RC populations are consistent with the adopted RC distances, providing further supporting evidence that the X-structure is real, and that there is approximate front-back symmetry in our bulge fields. We conclude that the Milky Way bulge has an X-shaped structure within |l| ∼0, seen almost edge-on with respect to the line of sight. Additional deep near-infrared photometry extending into the innermost bulge regions combined with spectroscopic data is needed in order to discriminate among the different possibilities that can cause the observed X-shaped structure.

  11. Type-Ia Supernova-driven Galactic Bulge Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shikui; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Joung, M Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Stellar feedback in galactic bulges plays an essential role in shaping the evolution of galaxies. To quantify this role and facilitate comparisons with X-ray observations, we conduct 3D hydrodynamical simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code, FLASH, to investigate the physical properties of hot gas inside a galactic bulge, similar to that of our Galaxy or M31. We assume that the dynamical and thermal properties of the hot gas are dominated by mechanical energy input from SNe, primarily Type Ia, and mass injection from evolved stars as well as iron enrichment from SNe. We study the bulge-wide outflow as well as the SN heating on scales down to ~4 pc. An embedding scheme that is devised to plant individual SNR seeds, allows to examine, for the first time, the effect of sporadic SNe on the density, temperature, and iron ejecta distribution of the hot gas as well as the resultant X-ray morphology and spectrum. We find that the SNe produce a bulge wind with highly filamentary density structures and patch...

  12. Chemistry of the Most Metal-poor Stars in the Bulge and the z ≳ 10 Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Andrew R.; Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-08-01

    Metal-poor stars in the Milky Way are local relics of the epoch of the first stars and the first galaxies. However, a low metallicity does not prove that a star formed in this ancient era, as metal-poor stars form over a range of redshift in different environments. Theoretical models of Milky Way formation have shown that at constant metallicity, the oldest stars are those closest to the center of the Galaxy on the most tightly bound orbits. For that reason, the most metal-poor stars in the bulge of the Milky Way provide excellent tracers of the chemistry of the high-redshift universe. We report the dynamics and detailed chemical abundances of three stars in the bulge with [{Fe}/{{H}}]≲ -2.7, two of which are the most metal-poor stars in the bulge in the literature. We find that with the exception of scandium, all three stars follow the abundance trends identified previously for metal-poor halo stars. These three stars have the lowest [Sc ii/Fe] abundances yet seen in α-enhanced giant stars in the Galaxy. Moreover, all three stars are outliers in the otherwise tight [Sc ii/Fe]-[Ti ii/Fe] relation observed among metal-poor halo stars. Theoretical models predict that there is a 30% chance that at least one of these stars formed at z≳ 15, while there is a 70% chance that at least one formed at 10≲ z≲ 15. These observations imply that by z˜ 10, the progenitor galaxies of the Milky Way had both reached [{Fe}/{{H}}]˜ -3.0 and established the abundance pattern observed in extremely metal-poor stars. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  14. Giant gravitons in non-supersymmetric backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider giant gravitons as probes of a class of ten-dimensional solutions of type-IIB supergravity which arise as lifts of solutions of U(1)3 gauged N=2 supergravity in five-dimensions. Surprisingly it is possible to solve exactly for minimum energy configurations of these spherical D3-brane probes in the compact directions, even in backgrounds which preserve no supersymmetry. The branes behave as massive charged particles in the five non-compact dimensions. As an example we probe geometries which are believed to represent the supergravity background of coherent states of giant gravitons. We comment on the apparently repulsive nature of the naked singularities in these geometries. (author)

  15. Bulges of disk galaxies at intermediate redshifts. I. Samples with and without bulges in the Groth Strip Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez-Palmero, L; Erwin, P; Prieto, M; Cristobal-Hornillos, D; Eliche-Moral, M C; Guzmán, R

    2008-01-01

    We aim to define a sample of intermediate-z disk galaxies harbouring central bulges, and a complementary sample of disk galaxies without measurable bulges. We intend to provide colour profiles for both samples, as well as measurements of nuclear, disk, and global colours, which may be used to constrain the relative ages of bulges and disks. We select a diameter-limited sample of galaxies in images from the HST/WFPC2 Groth Strip survey, which is divided into two subsamples of higher and lower inclination to assess the role of dust in the measures quantities. Mergers are visually identified and excluded. We take special care to control the pollution by ellipticals. The bulge sample is defined with a criterion based on nuclear surface brightness excess over the inward extrapolation of the exponential law fitted to the outer regions of the galaxies. We extract colour profiles on the semi-minor axis least affected by dust in the disk, and measure nuclear colours at 0.85 kpc from the centre over those profiles. Dis...

  16. Near-Infrared photometry and spectroscopy of NGC 6539 and UKS 1: two intermediate metallicity Bulge Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Origlia, L; Rich, R M; Ferraro, F R

    2005-01-01

    Using the SofI imager at ESO/NTT and NIRSPEC spectrograph at KeckII, we have obtained J,K images and echelle spectra covering the range 1.5 - 1.8 micron for the intermediate metallicity Bulge globular clusters NGC6539 and UKS1. We find [Fe/H]=-0.76 and -0.78, respectively, and an average alpha-enhancement of +0.44 dex and +0.31 dex, consistent with previous measurements of metal rich Bulge clusters, and favoring the scenario of rapid chemical enrichment. We also measure very low 12C/13C=4.5 +/-1 isotopic ratios in both clusters, suggesting that extra-mixing mechanisms due to cool bottom processing are at work during the evolution along the Red Giant Branch. Finally, we measure accurate radial velocities of =+31 +/-4Km/s and =+57 +/-6Km/s and velocity dispersion of about 8 Km/s and 11 Km/s for NGC6539 and UKS1, respectively.

  17. Constraints on the Formation of the Galactic Bulge from Na, Al, and Heavy Element Abundances in Plaut's Field

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Christian I; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Fulbright, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    We report chemical abundances of Na, Al, Zr, La, Nd, and Eu for 39 red giant branch (RGB) stars and 23 potential inner disk red clump stars located in Plaut-s low extinction window. We also measure lithium for a super Li-rich RGB star. The abundances were determined by spectrum synthesis of high resolution (R~25,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N~50-100 pixel-1) spectra obtained with the Blanco 4m telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. For the bulge RGB stars, we find a general increase in the [Na/Fe] and [Na/Al] ratios with increasing metallicity, and a similar decrease in [La/Fe] and [Nd/Fe]. Additionally, the [Al/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] abundance trends almost identically follow those of the {\\alpha}-elements, and the [Zr/Fe] ratios exhibit relatively little change with [Fe/H]. The consistently low [La/Eu] ratios of the RGB stars indicate that at least a majority of bulge stars formed rapidly (<1 Gyr) and before the main s-process could become a significant pollution source. In contrast, we find that the pot...

  18. Stellar populations of classical and pseudo-bulges for a sample of isolated spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the stellar population synthesis results for a sample of 75 bulges in isolated spiral Sb-Sc galaxies, using the spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the STARLIGHT code. We find that both pseudo-bulges and classical bulges in our sample are predominantly composed of old stellar populations, with mean mass-weighted stellar age around 10 Gyr. While the stellar population of pseudo-bulges is, in general, younger than that of classical bulges, the difference is not significant, which indicates that it is hard to distinguish pseudo-bulges from classical bulges, at least for these isolated galaxies, only based on their stellar populations. Pseudo-bulges have star formation activities with relatively longer timescale than classical bulges, indicating that secular evolution is more important in this kind of systems. Our results also show that pseudo-bulges have a lower stellar velocity dispersion than their classical counterparts, which suggests that classical bulges are mo...

  19. Metal-poor stars towards the Galactic bulge - a population potpourri

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Andreas; Preston, George W; Thompson, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive chemical abundance analysis of five red giants and two horizontal branch (HB) stars towards the southern Galactic bulge, at (l,b)$\\sim$(0$^{\\rm o}$,-11$^{\\rm o}$). Based on high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan/MIKE spectrograph, we derived up to 23 chemical element abundances and identify a mixed bag of stars, representing various populations in the central regions of the Galaxy. Although cosmological simulations predict that the inner Galaxy was host to the first stars in the Universe, we see no chemical evidence of the ensuing massive supernova explosions: all of our targets exhibit halo-like, solar [Sc/Fe] ratios, which is in contrast to the low values predicted from Population III nucleosynthesis. One of the targets is a CEMP-s star at [Fe/H]=-2.52 dex, and another one is a moderately metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-1.53 dex) CH star with strong enrichment in s-process elements (e.g., [Ba/Fe]=1.35). These individuals provide the first contenders of these classes of stars ...

  20. A remarkable sample of new symbiotic stars towards the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Miszalski, Brent; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are the longest orbital period interacting binaries, where nova-like outbursts are generated by the accretion of a high mass loss rate red giant wind onto a white dwarf companion. Long-term photometric monitoring surveys such as OGLE and MACHO are ideal platforms to identify nova-like events in symbiotic stars, however there are only a handful of known systems within the small footprint of these surveys. We introduce a systematic Halpha emission line object survey for new symbiotic stars covering 35 deg^2 towards the Galactic Bulge that combines deep 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy with OGLE and MACHO photometry. This powerful combination has uncovered nearly two dozen new symbiotic stars, more than a dozen probable symbiotic stars, and several other unusual Halpha emission line stars. While we don't find any nova-like activity, the lightcurves do exhibit semi-regular and Mira pulsations, orbital variations and slower changes due to dust. Here we introduce a few of the new symbiotics, including H1-45...

  1. On the age of Galactic bulge microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2015-01-01

    Recent results by Bensby and collaborators on the ages of microlensed stars in the Galactic bulge have challenged the picture of an exclusively old stellar population. However, these age estimates have not been independently confirmed. In this paper we verify these results by means of a grid-based method and quantify the systematic biases that might be induced by some assumptions adopted to compute stellar models. We explore the impact of increasing the initial helium abundance, neglecting the element microscopic diffusion, and changing the mixing-length calibration in theoretical stellar track computations. We adopt the SCEPtER pipeline with a novel stellar model grid for metallicities [Fe/H] from -2.00 to 0.55 dex, and masses in the range [0.60; 1.60] Msun from the ZAMS to the helium flash at the red giant branch tip. We show for the considered evolutionary phases that our technique provides unbiased age estimates. Our age results are in good agreement with Bensby and collaborators findings and show 16 star...

  2. Squashed giants: bound states of giant gravitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider giant gravitons in the maximally supersymmetric type IIB plane-wave, in the presence of a constant NSNS B-field background. We show that in response to the background B-field the giant graviton would take the shape of a deformed three-sphere, the size and shape of which depend on the B-field, and that the giant becomes classically unstable once the B-field is larger than a critical value Bcr. In particular, for the B-field which is (anti-)self-dual under the SO(4) isometry of the original giant S3, the closed string metric is that of a round S3, while the open string metric is a squashed three-sphere. The squashed giant can be interpreted as a bound state of a spherical three-brane and circular D-strings. We work out the spectrum of geometric fluctuations of the squashed giant and study its stability. We also comment on the gauge theory which lives on the brane (which is generically a noncommutative theory) and a possible dual gauge theory description of the deformed giant. (author)

  3. Effect of tube size on electromagnetic tube bulging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The commercial finite code ANSYS was employed for the simulation of the electromagnetic tube bulging process. The finite element model and boundary conditions were thoroughly discussed. ANSYS/EMAG was used to model the time varying electromagnetic field in order to obtain the radial and axial magnetic pressure acting on the tube. The magnetic pressure was then used as boundary conditions to model the high velocity deformation of various length tube with ANSYS/LSDYNA. The time space distribution of magnetic pressure on various length tubes was presented. Effect of tube size on the distribution of radial magnetic pressure and axial magnetic pressure and high velocity deformation were discussed. According to the radial magnetic pressure ratio of tube end to tube center and corresponding dimensionless length ratio of tube to coil, the free electromagnetic tube bulging was studied in classification. The calculated results show good agreements with practice.

  4. The effect of massive disks on bulge isophotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monet, D. G.; Schechter, P. L.; Richstone, D. O.

    1981-04-01

    Massive disks produce flattened equipotentials. Unless the stars in a galaxy bulge are preferentially hotter in the z direction than in the plane, the isophotes will be at least as flat as the equipotentials. The comparison of two galaxy models having flat rotation curves with the available surface photometry for five external galaxies does not restrict the mass fraction which might reside in the disk. However, star counts in our own Galaxy indicate that unless the disk terminates close to the solar circle, no more than half the mass within that circle lies in the disk. The remaining half must lie either in the bulge or, more probably, in a third dark, round, dynamically distinct component.

  5. High precision microlensing maps of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Kerins, E; Marshall, D J

    2008-01-01

    We present detailed maps of the microlensing optical depth and event density over an area of 195 sq. deg towards the Galactic bulge. The maps are computed from synthetic stellar catalogues generated from the Besancon Galaxy Model, which comprises four stellar populations and a three-dimensional extinction map calibrated against the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey. The optical depth maps have a resolution of 15 arcminutes, corresponding to the angular resolution of the extinction map. We compute optical depth and event density maps for all resolved sources above I=19, for unresolved (difference image) sources magnified above this limit, and for bright standard candle sources in the bulge. We show that the resulting optical depth contours are dominated by extinction effects, exhibiting fine structure in stark contrast to previous theoretical optical depth maps. Optical depth comparisons between Galactic models and optical microlensing survey measurements cannot safely ignore extinction or assume it to be smooth. We s...

  6. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Brendan P

    2016-01-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order adaptive optics systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young ($\\approx$5--300~Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1--3.0~\\Msun, the overall occurrence rate of 5--13~\\Mjup \\ companions at orbital distances ...

  7. Bulging of cans containing plutonium residues. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1994, two cans in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Plutonium Facility were found to be bulging as a result of the generation of gases form the plutonium ash residues contained in the cans. This report describes the chronology of this discovery, the response actions that revealed other pressurized cans, the analysis of the causes, the short-term remedial action, a followup inspection of the short-term storage packages, and a review of proposed long-term remedial options

  8. Bulging of cans containing plutonium residues. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Wood, D.H.; Condit, R.H.; Shikany, S.D.

    1996-03-01

    In 1994, two cans in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Plutonium Facility were found to be bulging as a result of the generation of gases form the plutonium ash residues contained in the cans. This report describes the chronology of this discovery, the response actions that revealed other pressurized cans, the analysis of the causes, the short-term remedial action, a followup inspection of the short-term storage packages, and a review of proposed long-term remedial options.

  9. Determination of flow stress by the hydraulic bulge test

    OpenAIRE

    J. Slota; Spišák, E.

    2008-01-01

    In sheet metal forming operations the mechanical properties of the sheet metal (stress-strain curve, flow stress) greatly influence metal flow and product quality. Accurate determination of the stress-strain relationship is important in process simulation by finite element method. In this paper the sheet thickness gradation in different points of the hemisphere formed in the bulge test is analysed, both theoretically and experimentally. A precise determination of sheet thickness at the pole i...

  10. Study of extremely reddened AGB stars in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Esteban, F M

    2015-01-01

    Context. Extremely reddened AGB stars lose mass at high rates of >10^-5 Msun/yr. This is the very last stage of AGB evolution, in which stars in the mass range 2.0--4.0 Msun (for solar metallicity) should have been converted to C stars already. The extremely reddened AGB stars in the Galactic bulge are however predominantly O-rich, implying that they might be either low-mass stars or stars at the upper end of the AGB mass range. Aims. To determine the mass range of the most reddened AGB stars in the Galactic bulge. Methods. Using Virtual Observatory tools, we constructed spectral energy distributions of a sample of 37 evolved stars in the Galactic bulge with extremely red IRAS colours. We fitted DUSTY models to the observational data to infer the bolometric fluxes. Applying individual corrections for interstellar extinction and adopting a common distance, we determined luminosities and mass-loss rates, and inferred the progenitor mass range from comparisons with AGB evolutionary models. Results. The observed ...

  11. ISO Mid-Infrared spectroscopy of Galactic Bulge AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Blommaert, J A D L; Okumura, K; Ganesh, S; Omont, A; Cami, J; Glass, I S; Habing, H J; Schultheis, M; Simon, G; Van Loon, J T; Blommaert, Joris A.D.L.; Groenewegen, Martin A.T.; Okumura, Koryo; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Omont, Alain; Cami, Jan; Glass, Ian S.; Habing, Harm J.; Schultheis, Mathias; Simon, Guy; Loon, Jacco Th. van

    2006-01-01

    To study the nature of Bulge AGB stars and in particular their circumstellar dust, we have analysed mid-infrared spectra obtained with the ISOCAM CVF spectrometer in three Bulge fields. The ISOCAM 5-16.5 micron CVF spectra were obtained as part of the ISOGAL infrared survey of the inner Galaxy. A classification of the shape of the 10 micron dust feature was made for each case. The spectra of the individual sources were modelled using a radiative transfer model. Different combinations of amorphous silicates and aluminium-oxide dust were used in the modelling. Spectra were obtained for 29 sources of which 26 are likely to be Bulge AGB stars. Our modelling shows that the stars suffer mass loss rates in the range of 10^{-8} - 5 x 10^{-7} Msun / yr, which is at the low end of the mass-loss rates experienced on the Thermally Pulsing AGB. The luminosities range from 1,700 to 7,700 Lsun as expected for a population of AGB stars with Minit of 1.5 - 2Msun. In agreement with the condensation sequence scenario, we find t...

  12. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob van der Kant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process.

  13. GAMA: Stellar Mass Assembly in Galaxy Bulges and Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Driver, Simon P.; Lange, Rebecca; Robotham, Aaron; Kelvin, Lee; GAMA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has to date obtained spectra, redshifts, and 21-band multi-facility photometry for over 200,000 galaxies in five survey regions that total nearly 300 square degrees on sky. We consider here a low-redshift (zteam. In order to quantify the separate bulge and disk properties of these galaxies, we apply a large-scale automated procedure for fitting images with 2D, multi-component structure models, including evaluation of fit convergence using a grid of input parameter values for each galaxy. From this analysis, we calculate the total bulge and disk contributions to the local galaxy stellar mass budget and derive mass-size relations for both pure spheroid/disk systems and the separate bulge/disk components of multi-component galaxies. We further examine the fraction of total stellar mass assembled in spheroid and disk structures as a function of galaxy environment, where environment is quantified on multiple scales from membership in large-scale filaments to groups/clusters and down to local pairings. We then discuss the effect of environmental conditions on the mechanisms of stellar mass assembly, including the implied balance between merger accumulation and in situ mass growth in different environment regimes.

  14. The Black Hole - Bulge Mass Relation in Megamaser Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Läsker, Ronald; Seth, Anil; van de Ven, Glenn; Braatz, James A; Henkel, Christian; Lo, K Y

    2016-01-01

    We present HST images for nine megamaser disk galaxies with the primary goal of studying photometric BH-galaxy scaling relations. The megamaser disks provide the highest-precision extragalactic BH mass measurements, while our high-resolution HST imaging affords us the opportunity to decompose the complex nuclei of their late-type hosts in detail. Based on the morphologies and shapes of the galaxy nuclei, we argue that most of these galaxies' central regions contain secularly evolving components (pseudo-bulges), and in many cases we photometrically identify co-existing "classical" bulge components as well. Using these decompositions, we draw the following conclusions: (1) The megamaser BH masses span two orders of magnitude ($10^6$ -- $10^8 M_\\odot$) while the stellar mass of their spiral host galaxies are all $\\sim 10^{11} M_\\odot$ within a factor of three; (2) the BH masses at a given bulge mass or total stellar mass in the megamaser host spiral galaxies tend to be lower than expected, when compared to an ex...

  15. YOUNG STARS IN AN OLD BULGE: A NATURAL OUTCOME OF INTERNAL EVOLUTION IN THE MILKY WAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center of our disk galaxy, the Milky Way, is dominated by a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge. Numerous studies of the bulge based on stellar photometry have concluded that the bulge stars are exclusively old. The perceived lack of young stars in the bulge strongly constrains its likely formation scenarios, providing evidence that the bulge is a unique population that formed early and separately from the disk. However, recent studies of individual bulge stars using the microlensing technique have reported that they span a range of ages, emphasizing that the bulge may not be a monolithic structure. In this Letter we demonstrate that the presence of young stars that are located predominantly nearer to the plane is expected for a bulge that has formed from the disk via dynamical instabilities. Using an N-body+ smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a disk galaxy forming out of gas cooling inside a dark matter halo and forming stars, we find a qualitative agreement between our model and the observations of younger metal-rich stars in the bulge. We are also able to partially resolve the apparent contradiction in the literature between results that argue for a purely old bulge population and those that show a population comprised of a range in ages; the key is where to look

  16. Dynamos of giant planets

    OpenAIRE

    F. H. Busse; Simitev, R.

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity v...

  17. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Saha

    2008-06-01

    Nanodielectrics is an emerging area of research because of its potential application in energy storage and transducers. One-dimensional metallic nanostructures with localized electronic wave functions show giant dielectric constant. Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal nanowires, which shows giant permittivity is also discussed.

  18. An Observational Guide to Identifying Pseudobulges and Classical Bulges in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David B

    2015-01-01

    In this review our aim is to summarize the observed properties of pseudobulges and classical bulges. We utilize an empirical approach to studying the properties of bulges in disk galaxies, and restrict our analysis to statistical proper- ties. A clear bimodality is observed in a number of properties including morphology, structural properties, star formation, gas content & stellar population, and kinematics. As well as summarizing known methods to identify pseudobulges and classical bulges we also show new results, including absorption line indices that can be used to identify different bulge types. We conclude by summarizing those properties that isolate pseudobulges from classical bulges. Our intention is to describe a practical, easy to use, list of criteria for identifying bulge types.

  19. Effect of temperature on vacuum hot bulge forming of BT20 titanium alloy cylindrical workpiece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Temperature is one of the key parameters for BT20 titanium alloy cylindrical workpiece manufactured by vacuum hot bulge forming. A two-dimensional nonlinear thermo-mechanical coupled FE model was established. Numerical simulation of vacuum hot bulge forming process of titanium alloy cylindrical workpiece was carried out using FE analysis software MSC Marc. The effects of temperature on vacuum hot bulge forming of BT20 titanium alloy cylindrical workpiece were analyzed by numerical simulation.The simulated results show that the Y-direction displacement and the equivalent plastic strain of the workpiece increase with increasing bulge temperature. The residual stress decreases with increasing bulge temperature. The optimal temperature range of BT20 titanium alloy during vacuum hot bulge forming is 750-850 ℃. The corresponding experiments were carried out. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental results.

  20. Research on aluminum alloy sheet thermoplastic deformation behavior based upon warm bulging test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Gaoshen; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lang, Lihui; Alexandrov, Sergei

    2016-02-01

    The rate of fluid pressure variation is a crucial factor to indicate the forming speed and the pressure rate is applied to be one factor that can influence the deformation of material in warm sheet hydroforming. In this study, warm bulging test was conducted to obtain bulging pressure-height curves with different temperatures and pressure rates. Fitting the bulging pressure-equivalent strain curves obtained using bulging test with surface fitting method, the fitted equation of bulging pressure on equivalent strain and pressure rate was achieved, and the fitting result shows a good accordance with experimental and calculated values. Then, the relation between pressure rate and strain rate was obtained. The results of warm bulging test indicated that the deformation behavior of metal material is sensitive to pressure rate, which is of great significance for warm sheet hydroforming.

  1. Polarization profiles for selected microlensing events towards the galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Nucita, A A; De Paolis, F; Strafella, F; Calchi-Novati, S; Jetzer, Ph; Zakharov, A F

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing, in case of relevant finite source size effects, provides an unique tool for the study of stellar atmospheres through the enhancement of a characteristic polarization signal. Here, we consider a set of highly magnified events and show that for different types of source stars (as hot, late type main sequence and cool giants) showing that the polarization strength may be of $\\simeq 0.04$ percent for late type stars and up to a few percent for cool giants.

  2. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. I: fast evolution vs secular processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Croton, D. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy disks and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code SAGE. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disk instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model mostly reproduces the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar disks, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disk fraction. Bulge type also affects the star formation rate and colour at a given luminosity. The model predicts a population of merger-driven red ellipticals that dominate both the low-mass and high-mass ends of the galaxy population, and span all dynamical ages; merger-driven bulges in disk galaxies are dynamically old and do not interfere with subsequent evolution of the star-forming component. Instability-driven bulges dominate the population at intermediate galaxy masses, especially thriving in massive disks. The model green valley is exclusively populated by instability-driven bulge hosts. Through the present implementation the mass accretion history is perceivable in the galaxy structure, morphology and colours.

  3. The growth of discs and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation - I. Fast evolution versus secular processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, C.; Mutch, S. J.; Croton, D. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy discs and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code, Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disc instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model mostly reproduces the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar discs, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disc fraction. Bulge type also affects the star formation rate and colour at a given luminosity. The model predicts a population of merger-driven red ellipticals that dominate both the low-mass and high-mass ends of the galaxy population, and span all dynamical ages; merger-driven bulges in disc galaxies are dynamically old and do not interfere with subsequent evolution of the star-forming component. Instability-driven bulges dominate the population at intermediate galaxy masses, especially thriving in massive discs. The model green valley is exclusively populated by instability-driven bulge hosts. Through the present implementation, the mass accretion history is perceivable in the galaxy structure, morphology and colours.

  4. Young stars in an old bulge: a natural outcome of internal evolution in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, M; Bensby, T; Feltzing, S; Roskar, R; Cole, D R; Johnson, J A; Freeman, K

    2014-01-01

    The center of our disk galaxy, the Milky Way, is dominated by a boxy/peanut-shaped bulge. Numerous studies of the bulge based on stellar photometry have concluded that the bulge stars are exclusively old. The perceived lack of young stars in the bulge strongly constrains its likely formation scenarios, providing evidence that the bulge is a unique population that formed early and separately from the disk. However, recent studies of individual bulge stars using the microlensing technique have reported that they span a range of ages, emphasizing that the bulge may not be a monolithic structure. In this letter we demonstrate that the presence of young stars that are located predominantly near the plane is expected for a bulge that has formed from the disk via dynamical instabilities. Using an N-body+SPH simulation of a disk galaxy forming out of gas cooling inside a dark matter halo and forming stars, we find a qualitative agreement between our model and the observations of young metal-rich stars in the bulge. W...

  5. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. I: fast evolution vs secular processes

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Croton, Darren J; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy disks and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code SAGE. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disk instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model can successfully reproduce the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar disks, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disk fraction. Bulge type also affe...

  6. BULGELESS GIANT GALAXIES CHALLENGE OUR PICTURE OF GALAXY FORMATION BY HIERARCHICAL CLUSTERING ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand the prevalence of bulgeless galaxies in the nearby field, we dissect giant Sc-Scd galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry and Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy. We use the HET High Resolution Spectrograph (resolution R ≡ λ/FWHM ≅ 15, 000) to measure stellar velocity dispersions in the nuclear star clusters and (pseudo)bulges of the pure-disk galaxies M 33, M 101, NGC 3338, NGC 3810, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946. The dispersions range from 20 ± 1 km s-1 in the nucleus of M 33 to 78 ± 2 km s-1 in the pseudobulge of NGC 3338. We use HST archive images to measure the brightness profiles of the nuclei and (pseudo)bulges in M 101, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946 and hence to estimate their masses. The results imply small mass-to-light ratios consistent with young stellar populations. These observations lead to two conclusions. (1) Upper limits on the masses of any supermassive black holes are M. ∼6 Msun in M 101 and M. ∼6 Msun in NGC 6503. (2) We show that the above galaxies contain only tiny pseudobulges that make up ∼circ > 150 km s-1, including M 101, NGC 6946, IC 342, and our Galaxy, show no evidence for a classical bulge. Four may contain small classical bulges that contribute 5%-12% of the light of the galaxy. Only four of the 19 giant galaxies are ellipticals or have classical bulges that contribute ∼1/3 of the galaxy light. We conclude that pure-disk galaxies are far from rare. It is hard to understand how bulgeless galaxies could form as the quiescent tail of a distribution of merger histories. Recognition of pseudobulges makes the biggest problem with cold dark matter galaxy formation more acute: How can hierarchical clustering make so many giant, pure-disk galaxies with no evidence for merger-built bulges? Finally, we emphasize that this problem is a strong function of environment: the Virgo cluster is not a puzzle, because more than 2/3 of its stellar mass is in merger remnants.

  7. Bulgeless Giant Galaxies Challenge Our Picture of Galaxy Formation by Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Drory, Niv; Bender, Ralf; Cornell, Mark E.

    2010-11-01

    To better understand the prevalence of bulgeless galaxies in the nearby field, we dissect giant Sc-Scd galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry and Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy. We use the HET High Resolution Spectrograph (resolution R ≡ λ/FWHM ~= 15, 000) to measure stellar velocity dispersions in the nuclear star clusters and (pseudo)bulges of the pure-disk galaxies M 33, M 101, NGC 3338, NGC 3810, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946. The dispersions range from 20 ± 1 km s-1 in the nucleus of M 33 to 78 ± 2 km s-1 in the pseudobulge of NGC 3338. We use HST archive images to measure the brightness profiles of the nuclei and (pseudo)bulges in M 101, NGC 6503, and NGC 6946 and hence to estimate their masses. The results imply small mass-to-light ratios consistent with young stellar populations. These observations lead to two conclusions. (1) Upper limits on the masses of any supermassive black holes are M • 150 km s-1, including M 101, NGC 6946, IC 342, and our Galaxy, show no evidence for a classical bulge. Four may contain small classical bulges that contribute 5%-12% of the light of the galaxy. Only four of the 19 giant galaxies are ellipticals or have classical bulges that contribute ~1/3 of the galaxy light. We conclude that pure-disk galaxies are far from rare. It is hard to understand how bulgeless galaxies could form as the quiescent tail of a distribution of merger histories. Recognition of pseudobulges makes the biggest problem with cold dark matter galaxy formation more acute: How can hierarchical clustering make so many giant, pure-disk galaxies with no evidence for merger-built bulges? Finally, we emphasize that this problem is a strong function of environment: the Virgo cluster is not a puzzle, because more than 2/3 of its stellar mass is in merger remnants. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford

  8. Effect of processing parameters on bulge-forming Polycarbonate parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhen-xiu; WU Jing; LIU Zhi; LI Xiao-dong; Z. R. Wang

    2007-01-01

    According to the data of the experiment made in mechauical tensile of Polycarbonate in high temperature, experiments were done to polycarbonate sheet by hot gas pressure bulge-forming. It was found that selecting and combination of the processing parameters were vital to the quality. In the experiments and numerical simulation with the software of DYNAFORM, the processing parameters have been studied. The results showed that the method of discontinuous pressure and pressure preservation advantage the forming; when temperature and pressure meet the forming conditions, the longer time of pressure preservation promotes sufficient forming.

  9. Detailed abundance analysis of a metal-poor giant in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ryde, N; Rich, R M; Thorsbro, B; Schultheis, M; Origlia, L; Chatzopoulos, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to SgrA*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high resolution (R~24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K=10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic Center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about 26 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar-bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new linelist in the K band, finds [Fe/H]~-1.0 and [alpha/Fe]~+0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude tha...

  10. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Iannuzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disk galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrised up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the midplane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically-symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second bucklin...

  11. Dynamics of the Galactic Bulge using Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, S F; Kálnay, A J; Saha, P; Zhao, H S; Beaulieu, Sylvie F.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Kalnajs, Agris J.; Saha, Prasenjit; Zhao, HongSheng

    2000-01-01

    Evidence for a bar at the center of the Milky Way triggered a renewed enthusiasm for dynamical modelling of the Galactic bar-bulge. Our goal is to compare the kinematics of a sample of tracers, planetary nebulae, widely distributed over the bulge with the corresponding kinematics for a range of models of the inner Galaxy. Three of these models are N-body barred systems arising from the instabilities of a stellar disk (Sellwood, Fux and Kalnajs), and one is a Schwarzschild system constructed to represent the 3D distribution of the COBE/DIRBE near-IR light and then evolved as an N-body system for a few dynamical times (Zhao). For the comparison of our data with the models, we use a new technique developed by Saha (1998). The procedure finds the parameters of each model, i.e. the solar galactocentric distance R_o in model units, the orientation angle phi, the velocity scale (in km/s per model unit), and the solar tangential velocity which best fit the data.

  12. Stellar Populations of Bulges in 14 Cluster Disc Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, L; Pizzella, A; Méndez-Abreu, J; Corsini, E M; Coccato, L; Saglia, R P; Sarzi, M; Bertola, F

    2008-01-01

    Photometry and long-slit spectroscopy are presented for 14 S0 and spiral galaxies of the Fornax, Eridanus and Pegasus cluster, and NGC 7582 group. The structural parameters of the galaxies are derived from the R-band images by performing a two-dimensional photometric decomposition of the surface-brightness distribution. This is assumed to be the sum of the contribution of a bulge and disc component characterized by elliptical and concentric isophotes with constant (but possibly different) ellipticity and position angles. The rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are measured from the spectra obtained along the major axis of galaxies. The radial profiles of the Hb, Mg, and Fe line-strength indices are presented too. Correlations between the central values of Mgd, , Hb, and sigma are found. The age, metallicity and alpha/Fe enhancement of the stellar population in the center and at the radius where bulge and disc give the same contribution to the total surface brightness are obtained using stellar po...

  13. Two Pseudobulges in the "Boxy Bulge" Galaxy NGC 5746

    CERN Document Server

    Barentine, John C

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy formation and growth under the {\\Lambda}CDM paradigm is expected to proceed in a hierarchical, bottom-up fashion by which small galaxies grow into large galaxies; this mechanism leaves behind large "classical bulges" kinematically distinct from "pseudobulges" grown by internal, secular processes. We use archival data (Spitzer 3.6 \\mum wavelength, Hubble Space Telescope H-band, Two Micron All Sky Survey Ks-band, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri-band) to measure composite minor- and major-axis surface brightness profiles of the almost-edgeon spiral galaxy NGC 5746. These light profiles span a large range of radii and surface brightnesses to reveal an inner, high surface brightness stellar component that is distinct from the well-known boxy bulge. It is well fitted by S\\'ersic functions with indices n = 0.99 \\pm 0.08 and 1.17 \\pm 0.24 along the minor and major axes, respectively. Since n < 2, we conclude that this innermost component is a secularly-evolved pseudobulge that is distinct from the boxy pse...

  14. OGLE Atlas of Classical Novae I. Galactic Bulge Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Mroz, P; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Kozlowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Skowron, J

    2015-01-01

    Classical novae eruptions are possible sources of lithium formation and gamma-rays emission. The remnant systems of novae eruptions can also become Type Ia supernovae. The contribution of novae to these phenomena depends on nova rates that are not well established for the Galaxy. Here, we directly measure the Galactic bulge nova rate of $13.9 \\pm 2.6$ yr$^{-1}$. This measurement is much more accurate than any previous measurement of this kind thanks to multiple years of bulge monitoring by the OGLE survey. Our sample consists of 39 novae eruptions, $\\sim$1/3 of which are OGLE-based discoveries. The long-term monitoring allows us to not only measure the nova rate but also to study in detail the light curves of 39 eruptions and over 80 post-nova candidates. We measured orbital periods for 9 post-novae and 9 novae, in 14 cases we procured the first estimates. The OGLE survey is very sensitive to the frequently erupting recurrent novae. We did not found any object similar to M31 2008-12a, which erupts once a year...

  15. Mapping Directly Imaged Giant Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Veselin B

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing number of directly imaged giant exoplanets the current atmosphere models are often not capable of fully explaining the spectra and luminosity of the sources. A particularly challenging component of the atmosphere models is the formation and properties of condensate cloud layers, which fundamentally impact the energetics, opacity, and evolution of the planets. Here we present a suite of techniques that can be used to estimate the level of rotational modulations these planets may show. We propose that the time--resolved observations of such periodic photometric and spectroscopic variations of extrasolar planets due to their rotation can be used as a powerful tool to probe the heterogeneity of their optical surfaces. We address and discuss the following questions: a) what planet properties can be deduced from the light curve and/or spectra, and in particular can we determine rotation periods, spot--coverage, spot colors, spot spectra; b) what is the optimal configuration of instrument/wavelen...

  16. Stellar Populations of Late-Type Bulges at z=1 in the HUDF

    CERN Document Server

    Hathi, N P; Pasquali, A; Malhotra, S; Rhoads, J E; Pirzkal, N; Windhorst, R A; Xu, C

    2008-01-01

    We take advantage of the exceptional depth of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) images and the deep GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) grism spectroscopy to explore the stellar populations of 34 bulges belonging to late-type galaxies at z=0.8-1.3. We selected these galaxies based on the presence of a noticeable Balmer break (at 4000 A) in their GRAPES spectra, and by visual inspection of the HUDF images. The narrow extraction of these GRAPES spectra around the galaxy center enable us to study the spectrum of the bulges in these late-type galaxies. The 4000 A break in the bulges spectra allows us to estimate the bulges redshifts and stellar ages. We first used the HUDF images to measure bulges color and Sersic index, and then we analyze the bulges spectra by fitting stellar population models. Our results show that, (1) the average age of late-type bulges in our sample is ~1.3 Gyr and stellar masses are in the range of log(M)=6.5-10 solar, (2) late-type bulges are younger and less massive com...

  17. Breast tissue bulge and lesion visibility during stereotactic biopsy – A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: During mammography guided stereotactic breast biopsy a bulge of tissue can form in the paddle needle biopsy aperture. This bulge has been estimated to have a height of up to 30% of the breast itself. During clinical biopsy we have noticed that lesions can appear to be less visible when tissue bulges are evident. This can make biopsy more difficult in some cases. Objectives: This experiment investigates how lesion visibility varies with breast bulge magnitude. Method: Using a phantom to represent breast and breast bulge, lesion visibility was assessed using a two alternative forced choice methodology. To mimic clinical conditions, imaging was performed on a full field digital mammography system with the biopsy paddle attached using an automatic exposure device. Organ dose (breast) was estimated. Results: As breast bulge increases lesion visibility decreases; organ dose increases as breast bulge magnitude increases. Conclusion: Consideration should be given to the impact of breast bulge magnitude and lesion visibility when performing image guided biopsy. Advances in knowledge: The authors found no similar studies and the results of this study demonstrate a potential clinical risk

  18. Bulge formation and necking in a polymer tube under dynamic expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Britta; Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, Alan

    2008-01-01

    imposed loading are prescribed: (i) a pressure that increases linearly with time and (ii) a change in enclosed volume that increases linearly with time. For both loading conditions, an axisymmetric bulge develops on the tube followed by necking in the bulge. The necks propagate in both the circumferential...

  19. β-Bulges: extensive structural analyses of β-sheets irregularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craveur, Pierrick; Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Rebehmed, Joseph; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2013-10-01

    β-Sheets are quite frequent in protein structures and are stabilized by regular main-chain hydrogen bond patterns. Irregularities in β-sheets, named β-bulges, are distorted regions between two consecutive hydrogen bonds. They disrupt the classical alternation of side chain direction and can alter the directionality of β-strands. They are implicated in protein-protein interactions and are introduced to avoid β-strand aggregation. Five different types of β-bulges are defined. Previous studies on β-bulges were performed on a limited number of protein structures or one specific family. These studies evoked a potential conservation during evolution. In this work, we analyze the β-bulge distribution and conservation in terms of local backbone conformations and amino acid composition. Our dataset consists of 66 times more β-bulges than the last systematic study (Chan et al. Protein Science 1993, 2:1574-1590). Novel amino acid preferences are underlined and local structure conformations are highlighted by the use of a structural alphabet. We observed that β-bulges are preferably localized at the N- and C-termini of β-strands, but contrary to the earlier studies, no significant conservation of β-bulges was observed among structural homologues. Displacement of β-bulges along the sequence was also investigated by Molecular Dynamics simulations. PMID:23904395

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point to...... mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development of...

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company....... Findings point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The...

  2. The chemical evolution of the Galactic Bulge seen through micro-lensing events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucatello S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Galactic bulges are central to understanding galaxy formation and evolution. Here we report on recent studies using micro-lensing events to obtain spectra of high resolution and moderately high signal-to-noise ratios of dwarf stars in the Galactic bulge. Normally this is not feasible for the faint turn-off stars in the Galactic bulge, but micro-lensing offers this possibility. Elemental abundance trends in the Galactic bulge as traced by dwarf stars are very similar to those seen for dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood. We discuss the implications of the ages and metallicity distribution function derived for the micro-lensed dwarf stars in the Galactic bulge.

  3. Elliptical Galaxies and Bulges of Disk Galaxies: Summary of Progress and Outstanding Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Kormendy, John

    2015-01-01

    This is the summary chapter of a review book on galaxy bulges. Bulge properties and formation histories are more varied than those of ellipticals. I emphasize two advances: 1 - "Classical bulges" are observationally indistinguishable from ellipticals, and like them, are thought to form by major galaxy mergers. "Disky pseudobulges" are diskier and more actively star-forming (except in S0s) than are ellipticals. Theys are products of the slow ("secular") evolution of galaxy disks: bars and other nonaxisymmetries move disk gas toward the center, where it starbursts and builds relatively flat, rapidly rotating components. This secular evolution is a new area of galaxy evolution work that complements hierarchical clustering. 2 - Disks of high-redshift galaxies are unstable to the formation of mass clumps that sink to the center and merge - an alternative channel for the formation of classical bulges. I review successes and unsolved problems in the formation of bulges+ellipticals and their coevolution (or not) with...

  4. Disk and Bulge Morphology of WFPC2 galaxies The HST Medium Deep Survey database

    CERN Document Server

    Ratnatunga, K U; Ostrander, E J; Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ostrander, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative morphological and structural parameters are estimated for galaxies detected in HST observations of WFPC2 survey fields. A modeling approach based on maximum likelihood has been developed for two-dimensional decomposition of faint under-sampled galaxy images into components of disk and bulge morphology. Decomposition can be achieved for images down to F814W (I) hour. We discuss details of the fitting procedure, and present the observed distributions of magnitude, color, effective half-light radius, disk and bulge axis ratios, bulge/(disk+bulge) flux ratio, bulge/disk half-light radius ratio and surface brightness. We also discuss the various selection limits on the measured parameters. The Medium Deep Survey catalogs and images of random pure parallel fields and other similar archival primary WFPC2 fields have been made available via the Internet with a searchable browser interface to the database at http://archive.stsci.edu/mds/

  5. Why the Milky Way's bulge is not only a bar formed from a cold thin disk

    CERN Document Server

    Di Matteo, P; Haywood, M; Combes, F; Lehnert, M D; Ness, M; Snaith, O N; Katz, D; Semelin, B

    2014-01-01

    By analyzing a N-body simulation of a bulge formed simply via a bar instability mechanism operating on a kinematically cold stellar disk, and by comparing the results of this analysis with the structural and kinematic properties of the main stellar populations of the Milky Way bulge, we conclude that the bulge of our Galaxy is not a pure stellar bar formed from a pre-existing thin stellar disk, as some studies have recently suggested. On the basis of several arguments emphasized in this paper, we propose that the bulge population which, in the Milky Way, is observed not to be part of the peanut structure corresponds to the old galactic thick disk, thus implying that the Milky Way is a pure thin+thick disk galaxy, with only a possible limited contribution of a classical bulge.

  6. Properties of Disks and Bulges of Spiral and Lenticular Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Oohama, N; Fukugita, M; Yasuda, N; Nakamura, O

    2009-01-01

    A bulge-disk decomposition is made for 737 spiral and lenticular galaxies drawn from a SDSS galaxy sample for which morphological types are estimated. We carry out the bulge-disk decomposition using the growth curve fitting method. It is found that bulge properties, effective radius, effective surface brightness, and also absolute magnitude, change systematically with the morphological sequence; from early to late types, the size becomes somewhat larger, and surface brightness and luminosity fainter. In contrast disks are nearly universal, their properties remaining similar among disk galaxies irrespective of detailed morphologies from S0 to Sc. While these tendencies were often discussed in previous studies, the present study confirms them based on a large homogeneous magnitude-limited field galaxy sample with morphological types estimated. The systematic change of bulge-to-total luminosity ratio, $B/T$, along the morphological sequence is therefore not caused by disks but mostly by bulges. It is also shown ...

  7. Precise Black Hole Masses From Megamaser Disks: Black Hole-Bulge Relations at Low Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, J E; Kim, M; Kuo, C Y; Braatz, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Condon, J J; Lo, K Y; Henkel, C; Reid, M J

    2010-01-01

    The black hole (BH)-bulge correlations have greatly influenced the last decade of effort to understand galaxy evolution. Current knowledge of these correlations is limited predominantly to high BH masses (M_BH> 10^8 M_sun) that can be measured using direct stellar, gas, and maser kinematics. These objects, however, do not represent the demographics of more typical L< L* galaxies. This study transcends prior limitations to probe BHs that are an order of magnitude lower in mass, using BH mass measurements derived from the dynamics of H_2O megamasers in circumnuclear disks. The masers trace the Keplerian rotation of circumnuclear molecular disks starting at radii of a few tenths of a pc from the central BH. Modeling of the rotation curves, presented by Kuo et al. (2010), yields BH masses with exquisite precision. We present stellar velocity dispersion measurements for a sample of nine megamaser disk galaxies based on long-slit observations using the B&C spectrograph on the Dupont telescope and the DIS spe...

  8. A TWO-PHASE SCENARIO FOR BULGE ASSEMBLY IN ΛCDM COSMOLOGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze and compare the bulges of a sample of L * spiral galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations in a cosmological context, using two different codes, P-DEVA and GASOLINE. The codes regulate star formation in very different ways, with P-DEVA simulations inputting low star formation efficiency under the assumption that feedback occurs on subgrid scales, while the GASOLINE simulations have feedback that drives large-scale outflows. In all cases, the marked knee shape in mass aggregation tracks, corresponding to the transition from an early phase of rapid mass assembly to a later slower one, separates the properties of two populations within the simulated bulges. The bulges analyzed show an important early starburst resulting from the collapse-like fast phase of mass assembly, followed by a second phase with lower star formation, driven by a variety of processes such as disk instabilities and/or mergers. Classifying bulge stellar particles identified at z = 0 into old and young according to these two phases, we found bulge stellar sub-populations with distinct kinematics, shapes, stellar ages, and metal contents. The young components are more oblate, generally smaller, more rotationally supported, with higher metallicity and less alpha-element enhanced than the old ones. These results are consistent with the current observational status of bulges, and provide an explanation for some apparently paradoxical observations, such as bulge rejuvenation and metal-content gradients observed. Our results suggest that bulges of L * galaxies will generically have two bulge populations that can be likened to classical and pseudo-bulges, with differences being in the relative proportions of the two, which may vary due to galaxy mass and specific mass accretion and merger histories.

  9. A TWO-PHASE SCENARIO FOR BULGE ASSEMBLY IN {Lambda}CDM COSMOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obreja, A.; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R.; Brook, C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Cantoblanco Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Serrano, F. J.; Domenech-Moral, M.; Serna, A. [Departamento de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E-03202 Elche (Spain); Molla, M. [Departamento de Investigacion Basica, CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Stinson, G., E-mail: aura.obreja@uam.es [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-01-20

    We analyze and compare the bulges of a sample of L {sub *} spiral galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations in a cosmological context, using two different codes, P-DEVA and GASOLINE. The codes regulate star formation in very different ways, with P-DEVA simulations inputting low star formation efficiency under the assumption that feedback occurs on subgrid scales, while the GASOLINE simulations have feedback that drives large-scale outflows. In all cases, the marked knee shape in mass aggregation tracks, corresponding to the transition from an early phase of rapid mass assembly to a later slower one, separates the properties of two populations within the simulated bulges. The bulges analyzed show an important early starburst resulting from the collapse-like fast phase of mass assembly, followed by a second phase with lower star formation, driven by a variety of processes such as disk instabilities and/or mergers. Classifying bulge stellar particles identified at z = 0 into old and young according to these two phases, we found bulge stellar sub-populations with distinct kinematics, shapes, stellar ages, and metal contents. The young components are more oblate, generally smaller, more rotationally supported, with higher metallicity and less alpha-element enhanced than the old ones. These results are consistent with the current observational status of bulges, and provide an explanation for some apparently paradoxical observations, such as bulge rejuvenation and metal-content gradients observed. Our results suggest that bulges of L {sub *} galaxies will generically have two bulge populations that can be likened to classical and pseudo-bulges, with differences being in the relative proportions of the two, which may vary due to galaxy mass and specific mass accretion and merger histories.

  10. Seismology of Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick; Schmider, Francois-Xavier; Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Seismology applied to giant planets could drastically change our understanding of their deep interiors, as it has happened with the Earth, the Sun, and many main-sequence and evolved stars. The study of giant planets' composition is important for understanding both the mechanisms enabling their formation and the origins of planetary systems, in particular our own. Unfortunately, its determination is complicated by the fact that their interior is thought not to be homogeneous, so that spectroscopic determinations of atmospheric abundances are probably not representative of the planet as a whole. Instead, the determination of their composition and structure must rely on indirect measurements and interior models. Giant planets are mostly fluid and convective, which makes their seismology much closer to that of solar-like stars than that of terrestrial planets. Hence, helioseismology techniques naturally transfer to giant planets. In addition, two alternative methods can be used: photometry of the solar light ref...

  11. Giants in Transmedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Kõiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss transmedia narratives based on giant lore, which is described by means of examples from folkloristics and transmedia dissemination. Giant lore, particularly the epic Kalevipoeg, a core text of Estonian culture, has generated numerous transmedially circulating texts and various contemporary forms. Through their connections with media, texts about giants continue to participate in the national cultural space; in previous eras, they have been carriers of Estonian identity or, alternatively, have held an important place in the creation of local identities. The latter can be observed today in printed matter, advertisements, and products marketed to the homeland public. However, texts about giants can also be used as a self-characterising image directed beyond national space. The article provides a closer look at ways in which stories connected with Kalevipoeg and Suur Tõll are engaged in different levels of media, as well as necessary contextual cultural knowledge for understanding contemporary media clips.

  12. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author)

  13. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  14. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris van Zyl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant peritoneal loose bodies are rare lesions, originating from auto-amputated appendices epiploicae. They may cause urinary or gastrointestinal obstruction and, should the radiologist not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions.Familiarity with their characteristic computed tomographic features is essential to prevent unnecessary surgery in the asymptomatic patient. We present a case of a 70-year-old man diagnosed with two giant peritoneal loose bodies.

  15. Giant adrenal myelolipoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Gwendolyn; Gupta Rajib; Kandalkar Bhuvaneshwari

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare benign tumor composed of adipose and hematopoietic tissue. Most tumors are small in size and incidentally detected. We report a case of giant adrenal myelolipoma weighing 2200 gms which was diagnosed on radiology as a liposarcoma. This case is unusual in view of the large size and presence of bony spicules. To the best of our knowledge, not more than 10 giant adrenal myelolipoma cases have been reported in literature.

  16. Gamma rays from the galactic bulge and large extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intriguing feature of extra dimensions is the possible production of Kaluza-Klein gravitons by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung, in the course of core collapse of massive stars, with gravitons then being trapped around the newly born neutron stars and decaying into two gamma rays, making neutron stars gamma-ray sources. We strengthen the limits on the radius of compactification of extra dimensions for a small number n of them, or alternatively the fundamental scale of quantum gravity, considering the gamma-ray emission of the whole population of neutron stars sitting in the Galactic bulge, instead of the closest member of this category. For n=1 the constraint on the compactification radius is R<400 μm

  17. Lensing of unresolved stars towards the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Alard, C

    1996-01-01

    Previous calculations of the rates and optical depths due to microlensing only considered resolved stars. However, if a faint unresolved star lens is close enough to a resolved star, the event will be seen by the microlensing experiments and attributed to the bighter star. The blending biases the duration, making the contribution of the unresolved stars very significant for short events. This contribution is confused with lensing by brown dwarfs. The exact rates of these blended events are extremly sensitive to the limiting magnitude achieved in the microlensing search. Appropriate calculations of the optical depth and rates are provided here, and illustrated in the case of the DUO and OGLE experiments. The additional contribution of unresolved stars is very significant and probably explains the high optical depth and rates observed towards the Galactic Bulge. The blended unresolved event can be identified using either the color shift or the light curve shape. However, neither of these two methods is apropria...

  18. Variability of Optical Counterparts in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, Christopher T; Johnson, C B; Baldwin, A; Jonker, P G; Nelemans, G; Torres, M A P; Maccarone, T; Steeghs, D; Greiss, S; Heinke, C; Bassa, C G; Collazzi, A; Villar, A; Gabb, M; Gossen, L

    2014-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey. Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from $\\sim2$ hr to 8 days over the $\\frac{3}{4}$ of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the lightcurve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. $87\\%$ of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. $24\\%$ of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and di...

  19. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, Francesca; Athanassoula, E.

    2015-07-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disc galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrized up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the mid-plane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second buckling and find that this phenomenon spurs an additional set of even deeper minima in the fourth moment. Finally, we show how the results evolve when inclining the disc away from perfectly edge-on and face-on. The behaviour of stars born during the course of the simulations is discussed and confronted to that of the pre-existing disc. The general aim of our study is providing a handle to identify boxy/peanut structures and their properties in latest generation Integral Field Unit observations of nearby disc galaxies.

  20. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Chiara; Piconcelli, Enrico; Menci, Nicola; Aussel, Herve'; Lamastra, Alessandra; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution the transformation of young star-forming galaxies into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched, is often explained by invoking a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead to the black hole "suicide" for starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, since outflows previously observed in quasars are associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occur in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdBI to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. We detect broad wings of the CO line, with velocities up to 750 km/s and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. Such broad CO wings trace a giant molecular o...

  1. NMR Analysis of RNA Bulged Structures: Tabu Search Application in NOE Signal Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulges are the most frequently occurring RNA secondary structural elements of high functional importance. At present, they are known to participate in the process of RNA folding, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. It has been shown that bulges can induce destabilization in RNA duplexes and the extent of the destabilization depends on many factors such as the size of the bulge, the nature of the bulge bases, and the flanking residues. However, relatively very little is known about these structural elements. Only several studies have been performed to address the preferred conformations of bulged residues in DNA and RNA duplexes. The knowledge of spatial structure of RNA bulges in solution requires application of NMR spectroscopy. A considerable part of NMR analytical process of RNA fragment is based on automatic methods. However, manual assistance is still essential in resonance assignment. Thus, there has been a great need to introduce automatic procedures also at this level. We propose a tabu search algorithm being a tool for an automatic resonance assignment. The assignment is determined by NOE pathways, which can be constructed in aromatic/anomeric region of 2D NOESY spectrum generated during NMR experiment. Computational tests demonstrate performance of the tabu search applied to the experimental spectra of RNA bulged duplexes. (author)

  2. The EMBLA Survey - Metal-poor stars in the Galactic bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Louise M.; Asplund, Martin; Keller, Stefan C.; Casey, Andrew R.; Yong, David; Lind, Karin; Frebel, Anna; Hays, Austin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Bessell, Michael S.; Casagrande, Luca; Marino, Anna F.; Nataf, David M.; Owen, Christopher I.; Da Costa, Gary S.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tisserand, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Cosmological models predict the oldest stars in the Galaxy should be found closest to the centre of the potential well, in the bulge. The EMBLA Survey successfully searched for these old, metal-poor stars by making use of the distinctive SkyMapper photometric filters to discover candidate metal-poor stars in the bulge. Their metal-poor nature was then confirmed using the AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. Here we present an abundance analysis of 10 bulge stars with -2.8 <[Fe/H]<- 1.7 from MIKE/Magellan observations, in total determining the abundances of 22 elements. Combining these results with our previous high-resolution data taken as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey, we have started to put together a picture of the chemical and kinematic nature of the most metal-poor stars in the bulge. The currently available kinematic data is consistent with the stars belonging to the bulge, although more accurate measurements are needed to constrain the stars' orbits. The chemistry of these bulge stars deviates from that found in halo stars of the same metallicity. Two notable differences are the absence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor bulge stars, and the alpha-element abundances exhibit a large intrinsic scatter and include stars which are underabundant in these typically enhanced elements.

  3. Bulge and Clump Evolution in Hubble Ultra Deep Field Clump Clusters, Chains and Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Fernandez, Maria Ximena; Lemonias, Jenna Jo

    2008-01-01

    Clump clusters and chain galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field are examined for bulges in the NICMOS images. Approximately 50% of the clump clusters and 30% of the chains have relatively red and massive clumps that could be young bulges. Magnitudes and colors are determined for these bulge-like objects and for the bulges in spiral galaxies, and for all of the prominent star-formation clumps in these three galaxy types. The colors are fitted to population evolution models to determine the bulge and clump masses, ages, star-formation rate decay times, and extinctions. The results indicate that bulge-like objects in clump cluster and chain galaxies have similar ages and 2 to 5 times larger masses compared to the star-formation clumps, while the bulges in spirals have ~6 times larger ages and 20 to 30 times larger masses than the clumps. All systems appear to have an underlying red disk population. The masses of star-forming clumps are typically in a range from 10^7 to 10^8 Msun; their ages have a wide range ar...

  4. The Molecular Gas Density in Galaxy Centers and How It Connects to Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David B; Drory, Niv; Combes, Francoise; Blitz, Leo; Wong, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present gas density, star formation rate, stellar masses, and bulge disk decompositions for a sample of 60 galaxies. Our sample is the combined sample of BIMA SONG, CARMA STING, and PdBI NUGA surveys. We study the effect of using CO-to-H_2 conversion factors that depend on the CO surface brightness, and also that of correcting star formation rates for diffuse emission from old stellar populations. We estimate that star formation rates in bulges are typically lower by 20% when correcting for diffuse emission. We find that over half of the galaxies in our sample have molecular gas surface density >100 M_sun pc^-2. We find a trend between gas density of bulges and bulge Sersic index; bulges with lower Sersic index have higher gas density. Those bulges with low Sersic index (pseudobulges) have gas fractions that are similar to that of disks. We also find that there is a strong correlation between bulges with the highest gas surface density and the galaxy being barred. However, we also find that c...

  5. Superplasticity and Superplastic Bulging Behavior of ZrO2/Ni Nanocomposite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Shui; LV Hongjun; ZHANG Kaifeng

    2011-01-01

    ZrO2/Ni nanocomposite was produced by pulse electrodeposition and its superplastic properties were investigated by the tensile and bulging tests. The as-deposited nickel matrix has a narrow grain size distribution with a mean grain size of 45 nm. A maximum elongation of 605% was observed at 723 K and a strain rate of 1.67 × 10-3s-1 by tensile test. Superplastic bulging tests were subsequently performed using dies with diameters of 1 mm and 5 mm respectively based on the optimal superplastic forming temperature. The effects of forming temperature and gas pressure on bulging process were experimentally investigated. The results indicated that ZrO2/Ni nanocomposite samples can be readily bulged at 723 K with H/d value (defined as dome apex height over the die diameter) larger than 0.5, indicating that the nanocomposite has good bulging ability. SEM and TEM were used to examine the microstructure of the as-deposited and bulged samples. The observations showed that significant grain coarsening occurs during superplastic bulging, and the microstructure is found to depend on the forming temperature.

  6. Demographics of galactic bulges in the local universe through optical windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keunho; Oh, Sree; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung

    2016-01-01

    We present our results of two-dimensional bulge-disk decompositions for 14,659 galaxies drawn from SDSS DR12 in order to examine properties of bulges residing in the local universe (0.005 0.2) show almost constant (g-r) colors regardless of their size. We also investigated the scaling relations (Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations), which ellipticals are generally known to follow, for all of our sample bulges. Specifically, we have found that low B/T (0.1population on the tilt with Hβ absorption line strengths and found that a significant tilt (at least more than ~ 30 % of the tilt) mainly arises from the effect of young stellar population in bulges. This implies that bulges are basically virialized systems irrespective of their size and thus the scatters about the scaling relations are a result of the presence of young stellar population preferentially in low B/T bulges. Drawn from our results, bulges seem very similar to ellipticals, although they are thought to be formed through the different formation mechanisms.

  7. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Das

    2013-03-01

    Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but low in star formation and hence low in surface brightness. They often have bright bulges that are similar to those found in early type galaxies. The bulges can host low luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that have relatively low mass black holes. GLSB galaxies are usually isolated systems and are rarely found to be interacting with other galaxies. In fact many GLSB galaxies are found under dense regions close to the edges of voids. These galaxies have very massive dark matter halos that also contribute to their stability and lack of evolution. In this paper we briefly review the properties of this unique class of galaxies and conclude that both their isolation and their massive dark matter halos have led to the low star formation rates and the slower rate of evolution in these galaxies.

  8. Stellar populations of bulges in galaxies with a low surface-brightness disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Pizzella, A.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Coccato, L.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2015-03-01

    The radial profiles of the Hβ, Mg, and Fe line-strength indices are presented for a sample of eight spiral galaxies with a low surface-brightness stellar disc and a bulge. The correlations between the central values of the line-strength indices and velocity dispersion are consistent to those known for early-type galaxies and bulges of high surface-brightness galaxies. The age, metallicity, and α/Fe enhancement of the stellar populations in the bulge-dominated region are obtained using stellar population models with variable element abundance ratios. Almost all the sample bulges are characterized by a young stellar population, on-going star formation, and a solar α/Fe enhancement. Their metallicity spans from high to sub-solar values. No significant gradient in age and α/Fe enhancement is measured, whereas only in a few cases a negative metallicity gradient is found. These properties suggest that a pure dissipative collapse is not able to explain formation of all the sample bulges and that other phenomena, like mergers or acquisition events, need to be invoked. Such a picture is also supported by the lack of a correlation between the central value and gradient of the metallicity in bulges with very low metallicity. The stellar populations of the bulges hosted by low surface-brightness discs share many properties with those of high surface-brightness galaxies. Therefore, they are likely to have common formation scenarios and evolution histories. A strong interplay between bulges and discs is ruled out by the fact that in spite of being hosted by discs with extremely different properties, the bulges of low and high surface-brightness discs are remarkably similar.

  9. Why the Milky Way's bulge is not only a bar formed from a cold thin disk

    OpenAIRE

    Di Matteo, P; Gomez, A.; Haywood, M.; Combes, F; Lehnert, M. D.; Ness, M.; Snaith, O. N.; Katz, D.; Semelin, B.

    2014-01-01

    By analyzing a N-body simulation of a bulge formed simply via a bar instability mechanism operating on a kinematically cold stellar disk, and by comparing the results of this analysis with the structural and kinematic properties of the main stellar populations of the Milky Way bulge, we conclude that the bulge of our Galaxy is not a pure stellar bar formed from a pre-existing thin stellar disk, as some studies have recently suggested. On the basis of several arguments emphasized in this paper...

  10. Retrieving Bulge and Disk Parameters and Asymptotic Magnitudes from the Growth Curves of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, S; Shimasaku, K; Yagi, M; Weinberg, D H; Okamura, Sadanori; Yasuda, Naoki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Weinberg, David H.

    1998-01-01

    We show that the growth curves of galaxies can be used to determine their bulge and disk parameters and bulge-to-total luminosity ratios, in addition to their conventional asymptotic magnitudes, provided that the point spread function is accurately known and signal-to-noise ratio is modest (S/N$\\gtrsim30$). The growth curve is a fundamental quantity that most future large galaxy imaging surveys will measure. Bulge and disk parameters retrieved from the growth curve will enable us to perform statistical studies of luminosity structure for a large number of galaxies.

  11. The Giraffe Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS) II. Metallicity distributions and alpha element abundances at fixed Galactic latitude

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O A; Vasquez, S; Hill, V; Rejkuba, M; Valenti, E; Rojas-Arriagada, A; Renzini, A; Babusiaux, C; Minniti, D; Brown, T M

    2015-01-01

    High resolution (R$\\sim$22,500) spectra for 400 red clump giants, in four fields within $\\rm -4.8^{\\circ} \\lesssim b \\lesssim -3.4^{\\circ}$ and $\\rm -10^{\\circ} \\lesssim l \\lesssim +10^{\\circ}$, were obtained within the GIRAFFE Inner Bulge Survey (GIBS) project. To this sample we added another $\\sim$ 400 stars in Baade's Window, observed with the identical instrumental configuration. We constructed the metallicity distributions for the entire sample, as well as for each field individually, in order to investigate the presence of gradients or field-to-field variations in the shape of the distributions. The metallicity distributions in the five fields are consistent with being drawn from a single parent population, indicating the absence of a gradient along the major axis of the Galactic bar. The global metallicity distribution is well fitted by two Gaussians. The metal poor component is rather broad, with a mean at $\\rm =-0.31$ dex and $\\sigma=0.31$ dex. The metal-rich one is narrower, with mean $\\rm =+0.26$ a...

  12. Decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With energies of the order of 10 to 20 MeV giant resonances are the fastest known vibrations of a many-body system. Their typical widths of a few MeV show that these resonances are strongly damped. It is clearly of interest to study the nature of the damping mechanism. For that purpose it is important that excitation energies associated with giant resonances in general are sufficiently high to allow for decay by emission of nucleons or α- particles or -in heavy nuclei- by fission. In other words, giant resonances rank among the few known structures embedded in the nuclear continuum. This makes it possible and interesting to study their properties by coincidence experiments where excitation by inelastic scattering and decay by particle emission are simultaneously registered. It is the purpose of this article to review the brief history of such experiments, their analysis and interpretation. 219 refs, figs and tabs

  13. Spectrophotometry of Planetary Nebulae in the Bulge of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2004-03-01

    We introduce crowded-field integral field (3D) spectrophotometry as a useful technique for the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies. The spectroscopy of individual extragalactic stars, which is now feasible with efficient instruments and large telescopes, is confronted with the observational challenge of accurately subtracting the bright, spatially and wavelength-dependent nonuniform background of the underlying galaxy. As a methodological test, we present a pilot study with selected extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPNe) in the bulge of M31, demonstrating how 3D spectroscopy is able to improve the limited accuracy of background subtraction that one would normally obtain with classical slit spectroscopy. It is shown that because of the absence of slit effects, 3D spectroscopy is a most suitable technique for spectrophometry. We present spectra and line intensities for five XPNe in M31, obtained with the MPFS instrument at the Russian 6 m Bolshoi Teleskop Azimutal'nij, INTEGRAL at the William Herschel Telescope , and PMAS at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. The results for two of our targets, for which data are available in the literature, are compared with previously published emission-line intensities. The three remaining PNe have been observed spectroscopically for the first time. One object is shown to be a previously misidentified supernova remnant. Our monochromatic Hα maps are compared with direct Fabry-Pérot and narrowband filter images of the bulge of M31, verifying the presence of filamentary emission of the interstellar medium in the vicinity of our objects. We present an example of a flux-calibrated and continuum-subtracted filament spectrum and demonstrate how the interstellar medium component introduces systematic errors in the measurement of faint diagnostic PN emission lines when conventional observing techniques are employed. It is shown how these errors can be eliminated with 3D spectroscopy, using the full two

  14. Nuclear orientation experiments on giant moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear orientation experiments performed on very dilute alloys of PdMn, PdCo show that the Mn impurity has a giant moment of 7.5 μsub(B), that the Co impurity is in a singlet Kondo state at very low temperature. Magnetization experiments performed on the same alloys give a good check of the purity of the sample which is confirmed by a neutron analysis. The effects of magnetic interactions on the N.O probe are discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  16. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Bandyopadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seborrheic keratosis (SK is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man.

  17. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    OpenAIRE

    Debabrata Bandyopadhyay; Abanti Saha; Vivek Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a...

  18. Superstars and Giant Gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, R C; Myers, Robert C.; Tafjord, Oyvind

    2001-01-01

    We examine a family of BPS solutions of ten-dimensional type IIb supergravity. These solutions asymptotically approach AdS_5 X S^5 and carry internal `angular' momentum on the five-sphere. While a naked singularity appears at the center of the anti-de Sitter space, we show that it has a natural physical interpretation in terms of a collection of giant gravitons. We calculate the distribution of giant gravitons from the dipole field induced in the Ramond-Ramond five-form, and show that these sources account for the entire internal momentum carried by the BPS solutions.

  19. An innocent giant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Singh Solanki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy.

  20. Giant cutaneous horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaresan M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old male presented with a giant cutaneous horn over the left leg. Cutaneous horn was excised and primary closure of the defect was done under spinal anesthesia. Histopathology showed underlying seborrheic keratosis. Cutaneous horn has been noticed on top of many clinical conditions of diverse etiology, such as actinic keratoses, wart, molluscum contagiosum, seborrheic keratoses, keratoacanthoma, basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. We report a patient with giant cutaneous horn on the leg successfully treated by excision and wound closure.

  1. Before the Bar: Kinematic Detection of a Spheroidal Metal-poor Bulge Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunder, Andrea; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Storm, J.; Nataf, D. M.; De Propris, R.; Walker, A. R.; Bono, G.; Johnson, C. I.; Shen, Juntai; Li, Z.-Y.

    2016-04-01

    We present 947 radial velocities of RR Lyrae variable stars in four fields located toward the Galactic bulge, observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR). We show that these RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) exhibit hot kinematics and null or negligible rotation and are therefore members of a separate population from the bar/pseudobulge that currently dominates the mass and luminosity of the inner Galaxy. Our RRLs predate these structures and have metallicities, kinematics, and spatial distribution that are consistent with a “classical” bulge, although we cannot yet completely rule out the possibility that they are the metal-poor tail of a more metal-rich ([{Fe}/{{H}}]∼ -1 dex) halo–bulge population. The complete catalog of radial velocities for the BRAVA-RR stars is also published electronically.

  2. Accounting for selection effects in the BH-bulge relations: No evidence for cosmological evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The redshift evolution of the black hole - bulge relations is an essential observational constraint for models of black hole - galaxy coevolution. In addition to the observational challenges for these studies, conclusions are complicated by the influence of selection effects. We demonstrate that there is presently no statistical significant evidence for cosmological evolution in the black hole-bulge relations, once these selection effects are taken into account and corrected for. We present a fitting method, based on the bivariate distribution of black hole mass and galaxy property, that accounts for the selection function in the fitting and is therefore able to recover the intrinsic black hole - bulge relation unbiased. While prior knowledge is restricted to a minimum, we at least require knowledge of either the sample selection function and the mass dependence of the active fraction, or the spheroid distribution function and the intrinsic scatter in the black hole - bulge relation. We employed our fitting r...

  3. APOGEE Kinematics I: Overview of the Kinematics of the Galactic Bulge as Mapped by APOGEE

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, M; Johnson, J A; Athanassoula, E; Majewski, S R; Perez, A E Garcia; Bird, J; Nidever, D; Schneider, Donald P; Sobeck, J; Frinchaboy, P; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar kinematics across the Galactic bulge and into the disk at positive longitudes from the SDSS-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way. APOGEE includes extensive coverage of the stellar populations of the bulge along the mid-plane and near-plane regions. From these data, we have produced kinematic maps of 10,000 stars across longitudes 0 deg -0.5 have dispersion and rotation profiles that are similar to that of N-body models of boxy/peanut bulges. There is a smooth kinematic transition from the thin bar and boxy bulge (l,|b|) -1.0, and the chemodynamics across (l,b) suggests the stars in the inner Galaxy with [Fe/H] > -1.0 have an origin in the disk.

  4. Before the Bar: Kinematic Detection of A Spheroidal Metal-Poor Bulge Component

    CERN Document Server

    Kunder, Andrea; Storm, J; Nataf, D M; De Propris, R; Walker, A R; Bono, G; Johnson, C I; Shen, J; Li, Z Y

    2016-01-01

    We present 947 radial velocities of RR Lyrae variable stars in four fields located toward the Galactic bulge, observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR). We show that these RR Lyrae stars exhibit hot kinematics and null or negligible rotation and are therefore members of a separate population from the bar/pseudobulge that currently dominates the mass and luminosity of the inner Galaxy. Our RR Lyrae stars predate these structures, and have metallicities, kinematics, and spatial distribution that are consistent with a "classical" bulge, although we cannot yet completely rule out the possibility that they are the metal-poor tail of a more metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1 dex) halo-bulge population. The complete catalog of radial velocities for the BRAVA-RR stars is also published electronically.

  5. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Young, Richard D.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or "bulging factors" that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in graphs of the bulging factor as a function of the applied load and as a function of geometric parameters that include the shell radius, the shell thickness and the crack length. The computed bulging factors are compared with solutions based on linear shallow shell theory, and with semi-empirical solutions that approximately account for the nonlinear deformation in the vicinity of the crack. The effect of biaxial loads on the computed bulging factors is also discussed.

  6. EXPLORING THE UNUSUALLY HIGH BLACK-HOLE-TO-BULGE MASS RATIOS IN NGC 4342 AND NGC 4291: THE ASYNCHRONOUS GROWTH OF BULGES AND BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Li, Zhiyuan; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Jones, Christine [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-str. 1, 85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Guo, Qi [Partner Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Schindler, Sabine, E-mail: abogdan@cfa.harvard.edu [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-07-10

    We study two nearby early-type galaxies, NGC 4342 and NGC 4291, that host unusually massive black holes relative to their low stellar mass. The observed black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios of NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 are 6.9{sup +3.8}{sub -2.3}% and 1.9% {+-} 0.6%, respectively, which significantly exceed the typical observed ratio of {approx}0.2%. As a consequence of the exceedingly large black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios, NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 are Almost-Equal-To 5.1{sigma} and Almost-Equal-To 3.4{sigma} outliers from the M{sub .}-M{sub bulge} scaling relation, respectively. In this paper, we explore the origin of the unusually high black-hole-to-bulge mass ratio. Based on Chandra X-ray observations of the hot gas content of NGC 4342 and NGC 4291, we compute gravitating mass profiles, and conclude that both galaxies reside in massive dark matter halos, which extend well beyond the stellar light. The presence of dark matter halos around NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 and a deep optical image of the environment of NGC 4342 indicate that tidal stripping, in which {approx}> 90% of the stellar mass was lost, cannot explain the observed high black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios. Therefore, we conclude that these galaxies formed with low stellar masses, implying that the bulge and black hole did not grow in tandem. We also find that the black hole mass correlates well with the properties of the dark matter halo, suggesting that dark matter halos may play a major role in regulating the growth of the supermassive black holes.

  7. Elemental abundances in AGB stars and the formation of the Galactic bulge

    OpenAIRE

    Wood P.R.; Ryde N.; Lebzelter T.; Blommaert J.A.D.L.; Uttenthaler S.; Schultheis M.; Aringer B.

    2012-01-01

    We obtained high-resolution near-IR spectra of 45 AGB stars located in the Galactic bulge. The aim of the project is to determine key elemental abundances in these stars to help constrain the formation history of the bulge. A further aim is to link the photospheric abundances to the dust species found in the winds of the stars. Here we present a progress report of the analysis of the spectra.

  8. Flank bulge following supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A report of 2 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Andrea G.; Pace, Kenneth T.; Honey, R. John D’A.

    2013-01-01

    Damage to intercostal nerves during surgical procedures has been associated with a postoperative flank bulge, due to denervation of the anterolateral abdominal wall musculature. This complication has not been reported following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We are aware of 3 cases, but have details on 2 cases of postoperative flank bulge following supracostal PCNL which are reported here. We also suggest how this complication could potentially be minimized. PMID:24032069

  9. Inverse Approach to Evaluate the Tubular Material Parameters Using the Bulging Test

    OpenAIRE

    Yulong Ge; Xiaoxing Li; Lihui Lang

    2015-01-01

    Tubular material parameters are required for both part manufactory process planning and finite element simulations. The bulging test is one of the most credible ways to detect the property parameters for tubular material. The inverse approach provides more effective access to the accurate material evaluation than with direct identifications. In this paper, a newly designed set of bulging test tools is introduced. An inverse procedure is adopted to determine the tubular material properties in ...

  10. Mechanical Analysis of Dead Load Crown and Structure Parameter of Hydraulic Elastic Bulging Roll

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chang-cai; LI Wei-min; LIU Zhu-bai

    2003-01-01

    The dead load crown of hydraulic elastic bulging roll was discussed using the theory of elastically supported beam, and the dead load experiment was carried out. The theoretical calculation is consistent with the experimental result. The structure parameters for the thickness of roll sleeve, the length of the oil groove and the crown of roll were discussed. The fundamental principle of determining the parameters was put forward. The theoretical basis of the application of the hydraulic elastic bulging roll was established.

  11. The Galactic Bulge Survey: outline and X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonker, P G; Nelemans, G; Steeghs, D; Torres, M A P; Maccarone, T J; Hynes, R I; Greiss, S; Clem, J; Dieball, A; Mikles, V J; Britt, C T; Gossen, L; Collazzi, A C; Wijnands, R; Zand, J J M In 't; Mendez, M; Rea, N; Kuulkers, E; Ratti, E M; van Haaften, L M; Heinke, C; Ozel, F; Groot, P J; Verbunt, F

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) and we provide the Chandra source list for the region that has been observed to date. Among the goals of the GBS are constraining the neutron star equation of state and the black hole mass distribution via the identification of eclipsing neutron star and black hole low-mass X-ray binaries. The latter goal will, in addition, be obtained by significantly enlarging the number of black hole systems for which a black hole mass can be derived. Further goals include constraining X-ray binary formation scenarios, in particular the common envelope phase and the occurrence of kicks, via source-type number counts and an investigation of the spatial distribution of X-ray binaries, respectively. The GBS targets two strips of 6x1 degrees (12 square degrees in total), one above (1

  12. Characterization of the winter midwestern particulate nitrate bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Marc L; Poirot, Richard L; Schichtel, Bret A; Maim, William C

    2009-09-01

    A previously unobserved multi-state region of elevated particulate nitrate concentration was detected as a result of the expansion of the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network of remote-area particulate matter (PM) speciation monitoring sites into the midwestern United States that began in 2002. Mean winter ammonium nitrate concentrations exceed 4 microg/m3 in a region centered in Iowa, which makes it responsible for as much as half of the particle light extinction. Before these observations, particulate nitrate in the United States was only observed to be a dominant component of the fine PM (PM2.5) in parts of California and some urban areas. Comparisons of the spatial patterns of particulate nitrate with spatial patterns of ammonia and nitrogen oxide emissions suggest that the nitrate bulge is the result of the high emissions of ammonia associated with animal agriculture in the Midwest. Nitrate episodes at several locations in the eastern United States are shown to be associated with transport pathways over the Midwest, suggesting long-range transport of either ammonia or ammonium nitrate. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling conducted by others on data from the Midwest shows the relative importance of atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid in the production of PM2.5. This is a particular concern as the sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are reduced, which increases the amount of ammonia available for ammonium nitrate production. PMID:19785273

  13. Star Clusters in Pseudo-Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Di Nino, Daiana; Stiavelli, Massimo; Carollo, C Marcella; Scarlata, Claudia; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the properties of the star-cluster systems around pseudo-bulges of late-type spiral galaxies using a sample of 11 galaxies with distances from 17 to 37 Mpc. Star clusters are identified from multiband HST ACS and WFPC2 imaging data by combining detections in 3 bands (F435W and F814W with ACS and F606W with WFPC2). The photometric data are then compared to population synthesis models to infer the masses and ages of the star clusters. Photometric errors and completeness are estimated by means of artificial source Monte Carlo simulations. Dust extinction is estimated by considering F160W NICMOS observations of the central regions of the galaxies, augmenting our wavelength coverage. In all galaxies we identify star clusters with a wide range of ages, from young (age 100-250 Myr), more massive, red clusters. Some of the latter might likely evolve into objects similar to the Milky Way's globular clusters. We compute the specific frequencies for the older clusters with respect to the galaxy an...

  14. Identification of 5 Interacting Binaries in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, C T; Hynes, R I; Jonker, P G; Maccarone, T J; Greiss, S; Steeghs, D; Groot, P; Knigge, C; Dieball, A; Nelemans, G; Mikles, V J; Gossen, L

    2013-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves, spectroscopy, and classification of five X-ray sources in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey [CXOGBS J174009.1-284725 (CX5), CXOGBS J173935.7-272935 (CX18), CXOGBS J173946.9-271809 (CX28), CXOGBS J173729.1-292804 (CX37), CXOGBS J174607.6-261547 (CX561)]. These objects were selected based on bright optical counterparts which were quickly found to have emission lines in their optical spectra. This paper presents an illustration of GBS optical follow-up, targeting emission line objects. Of these five objects, four exhibit photometric variability in the Sloan r' band. CX5 shows a tentative period of 2.1 hours and is clearly an Intermediate Polar (IP). CX28 and CX37 both exhibit flickering with no clear period. Both are suggested to also be IPs. CX18 was observed to undergo 2 dwarf nova outbursts. Finally, CX561 shows no detectable variability, although its characteristics would be consistent with either a quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binary or Cataclysmic Variable.

  15. A Search for Novae in the Bulge of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, T. A.; Jacoby, G. H.; Corbett, D. L.; Denham, M.; RBSE Nova Search Team

    1999-12-01

    We present the initial results of a program currently underway to search for nova in local group galaxies with the KPNO 0.9-meter telescope. The long-term goal is to accurately determine if the nova rate varies for galaxies of different Hubble type. Ciardullo et al. claim that nova rates are very similar when normalized to the total galaxy K-band luminosity. However, Della Valle et al. claim the rates are different by up to a factor of four, with early-type galaxies being deficient in novae. Here we present novae found from eighteen epochs of observations of the bulge of M31. The observations span from September 1995 to July 1999. The results presented here are part of an NSF-funded research-based science education program (RBSE) operated by NOAO, wherein middle- and high-school science students learn astronomy and inquiry-based learning skills by participating in actual research. The novae presented here were discovered by students participating in the RBSE program.

  16. Spectroscopic bulge-disc decomposition: a new method to study the evolution of lenticular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, E J; Merrifield, M R; Bedregal, A G

    2012-01-01

    A new method for spectroscopic bulge-disc decomposition is presented, in which the spatial light profile in a two-dimensional spectrum is decomposed wavelength-by-wavelength into bulge and disc components, allowing separate one-dimensional spectra for each component to be constructed. This method has been applied to observations of a sample of nine S0s in the Fornax Cluster in order to obtain clean high-quality spectra of their individual bulge and disc components. So far this decomposition has only been fully successful when applied to galaxies with clean light profiles, consequently limiting the number of galaxies that could be separated into bulge and disc components. Lick index stellar population analysis of the component spectra reveals that in those galaxies where the bulge and disc could be distinguished, the bulges have systematically higher metallicities and younger stellar populations than the discs. This correlation is consistent with a picture in which S0 formation comprises the shutting down of s...

  17. A new look at the kinematics of the bulge from an N-body model

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, A; Stefanovitch, N; Haywood, M; Combes, F; Katz, D; Babusiaux, C

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged) By using an N-body simulation of a bulge that was formed via a bar instability mechanism, we analyse the imprints of the initial (i.e. before bar formation) location of stars on the bulge kinematics, in particular on the heliocentric radial velocity distribution of bulge stars. Four different latitudes were considered: $b=-4^\\circ$, $-6^\\circ$, $-8^\\circ$, and $-10^\\circ$, along the bulge minor axis as well as outside it, at $l=\\pm5^\\circ$ and $l=\\pm10^\\circ$. The bulge X-shaped structure comprises stars that formed in the disk at different locations. Stars formed in the outer disk, beyond the end of the bar, which are part of the boxy peanut-bulge structure may show peaks in the velocity distributions at positive and negative heliocentric radial velocities with high absolute values that can be larger than 100 $\\rm km$ $\\rm s^{-1}$, depending on the observed direction. In some cases the structure of the velocity field is more complex and several peaks are observed. Stars formed in the inner disk, t...

  18. DEMOGRAPHICS OF BULGE TYPES WITHIN 11 Mpc AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an inventory of galaxy bulge types (elliptical galaxy, classical bulge, pseudobulge, and bulgeless galaxy) in a volume-limited sample within the local 11 Mpc sphere using Spitzer 3.6 μm and Hubble Space Telescope data. We find that whether counting by number, star formation rate, or stellar mass, the dominant galaxy type in the local universe has pure disk characteristics (either hosting a pseudobulge or being bulgeless). Galaxies that contain either a pseudobulge or no bulge combine to account for over 80% of the number of galaxies above a stellar mass of 109 Msun. Classical bulges and elliptical galaxies account for ∼1/4, and disks for ∼3/4 of the stellar mass in the local 11 Mpc. About 2/3 of all star formation in the local volume takes place in galaxies with pseudobulges. Looking at the fraction of galaxies with different bulge types as a function of stellar mass, we find that the frequency of classical bulges strongly increases with stellar mass, and comes to dominate above 1010.5 Msun. Galaxies with pseudobulges dominate at 109.5-1010.5 Msun. Yet lower-mass galaxies are most likely to be bulgeless. If pseudobulges are not a product of mergers, then the frequency of pseudobulges in the local universe poses a challenge for galaxy evolution models.

  19. The Chemical Composition of the Galactic Bulge and Implications for its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliam, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The average bulge [Fe/H] and [Mg/H] are +0.06 and +0.17 dex, respectively, in Baade's Window, roughly 0.2 dex higher than the thin disk and ~0.7 dex higher than the local thick disk metallicity. This suggests a higher effective yield in the bulge, perhaps due to more efficient retention of supernova ejecta. The bulge vertical [Fe/H] gradient, at ~0.5 dex/kpc, appears to be due to a changing mixture of sub-populations (near +0.3 dex and -0.3 dex and one possibly near -0.7 dex) with latitude. The bulge is enhanced in O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Al relative to the sun, with [alpha/Fe]=+0.15 dex at [Fe/H]=0.0 dex. Below [Fe/H]~-0.5 dex, the bulge and local thick disk compositions are very similar, but small [Mg/Fe] and possibly [/Fe] enhancements, low [La/Eu] ratios and large [Cu/Fe], relative to the thick disk suggest slightly higher SFR in the bulge. However, these composition differences could simply be due to measurement errors and non-LTE effects. Unfortunately, comparison with the thick disk near solar [Fe/H] su...

  20. The origin of the split red clump in the Galactic bulge of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, M; Athanassoula, E; Wylie-de-Boer, E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Lewis, G F; Yong, D; Asplund, M; Lane, R R; Kiss, L L; Ibata, R

    2012-01-01

    Near the minor axis of the Galactic bulge, at latitudes b -0.5 in the two higher-latitude fields, but not in the field at b = -5 degrees. Stars with [Fe/H] < -0.5 do not show the split. We compare the spatial distribution and kinematics of the clump stars with predictions from an evolutionary N-body model of a bulge that grew from a disk via bar-related instabilities. The density distribution of the peanut-shaped model is depressed near its minor axis. This produces a bimodal distribution of stars along the line of sight through the bulge near its minor axis, very much as seen in our observations. The observed and modelled kinematics of the two groups of stars are also similar. We conclude that the split red clump of the bulge is probably a generic feature of boxy/peanut bulges that grew from disks, and that the disk from which the bulge grew had relatively few stars with [Fe/H] < -0.5

  1. The EMBLA Survey -- Metal-poor stars in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Louise M; Keller, Stefan C; Casey, Andrew R; Yong, David; Lind, Karin; Frebel, Anna; Hays, Austin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Bessell, Michael S; Casagrande, Luca; Marino, Anna F; Nataf, David M; Owen, Christopher I; Da Costa, Gary S; Schmidt, Brian P; Tisserand, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological models predict the oldest stars in the Galaxy should be found closest to the centre of the potential well, in the bulge. The EMBLA Survey successfully searched for these old, metal-poor stars by making use of the distinctive SkyMapper photometric filters to discover candidate metal-poor stars in the bulge. Their metal-poor nature was then confirmed using the AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. Here we present an abundance analysis of 10 bulge stars with -2.8<[Fe/H]<-1.7 from MIKE/Magellan observations, in total determining the abundances of 22 elements. Combining these results with our previous high-resolution data taken as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey, we have started to put together a picture of the chemical and kinematic nature of the most metal-poor stars in the bulge. The currently available kinematic data is consistent with the stars belonging to the bulge, although more accurate measurements are needed to constrain the stars' orbits. The chemistry of these bulge stars deviates from that ...

  2. Finite Size Giant Magnon

    CERN Document Server

    Ramadanovic, Bojan

    2008-01-01

    The quantization of the giant magnon away from the infinite size limit is discussed. We argue that this quantization inevitably leads to string theory on a Z_M-orbifold of S^5. This is shown explicitly and examined in detail in the near plane-wave limit.

  3. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id...

  4. A giant ureteric calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-07-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  5. A giant ureteric calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved.

  6. Giant urethral calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Kotkar, Kunal; Thakkar, Ravi; Songra, MC

    2011-01-01

    Primary urethral calculus is rarely seen and is usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We present a case of giant urethral calculus secondary to a urethral stricture in a man. The patient was treated with calculus extraction with end to end urethroplasty.

  7. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jemec, B; Løvgreen Nielsen, P; Jemec, G B;

    1999-01-01

    The giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. Only nine cases have been previously described in the literature, and one additional case without recurrence during the first 3.5 years of observation is presented stressing that the rate of...

  8. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  9. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  10. Supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. I. Bulge luminosities from dedicated near-infrared data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Läsker, Ronald; Van de Ven, Glenn [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Ferrarese, Laura, E-mail: laesker@mpia.de [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E2E7 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to secure, refine, and supplement the relation between central supermassive black hole masses, M {sub •}, and the bulge luminosities of their host galaxies, L {sub bul}, we obtained deep, high spatial resolution K-band images of 35 nearby galaxies with securely measured M {sub •}, using the wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope. A dedicated data reduction and sky subtraction strategy was adopted to estimate the brightness and structure of the sky, a critical step when tracing the light distribution of extended objects in the near-infrared. From the final image product, bulge and total magnitudes were extracted via two-dimensional profile fitting. As a first order approximation, all galaxies were modeled using a simple Sérsic-bulge+exponential-disk decomposition. However, we found that such models did not adequately describe the structure that we observed in a large fraction of our sample galaxies which often include cores, bars, nuclei, inner disks, spiral arms, rings, and envelopes. In such cases, we adopted profile modifications and/or more complex models with additional components. The derived bulge magnitudes are very sensitive to the details and number of components used in the models, although total magnitudes remain almost unaffected. Usually, but not always, the luminosities and sizes of the bulges are overestimated when a simple bulge+disk decomposition is adopted in lieu of a more complex model. Furthermore, we found that some spheroids are not well fit when the ellipticity of the Sérsic model is held fixed. This paper presents the details of the image processing and analysis, while we discuss how model-induced biases and systematics in bulge magnitudes impact the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} relation in a companion paper.

  11. Bulge Growth and Quenching Since Z=2.5 in Candels/3D-HST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Phillip; Wuyts, Stijn; Somerville, Rachel S.; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Genzel, Reinhard; Bell, Eric F.; Brammer, Gabe; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lutz, Dieter; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Primack, Joel R.; Rosario, David J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Tacconi, Linda J.; van Dokkum, Peter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the deep high-resolution imaging of all 5 CANDELS fields, and accurate redshift informationprovided by 3D-HST, we investigate the relation between structure and stellar populations fora mass-selected sample of 6764 galaxies above 1010 M, spanning the redshift range 0.5 z 2.5.For the first time, we fit 2-dimensional models comprising a single Sersic fit and two-component (i.e.,bulge + disk) decompositions not only to the H-band light distributions, but also to the stellar massmaps reconstructed from resolved stellar population modeling. We confirm that the increased bulgeprominence among quiescent galaxies, as reported previously based on rest-optical observations, remainsin place when considering the distributions of stellar mass. Moreover, we observe an increaseof the typical Sersic index and bulge-to-total ratio (with median BT reaching 40-50) among starforminggalaxies above 1011 M. Given that quenching for these most massive systems is likely tobe imminent, our findings suggest that significant bulge growth precedes a departure from the starformingmain sequence. We demonstrate that the bulge mass (and ideally knowledge of the bulge andtotal mass) is a more reliable predictor of the star-forming versus quiescent state of a galaxy thanthe total stellar mass. The same trends are predicted by the state-of-the-art semi-analytic model bySomerville et al. In the latter, bulges and black holes grow hand in hand through merging andordisk instabilities, and AGN-feedback shuts off star formation. Further observations will be requiredto pin down star formation quenching mechanisms, but our results imply they must be internal to thegalaxies and closely associated with bulge growth.

  12. EXPLORING THE UNUSUALLY HIGH BLACK-HOLE-TO-BULGE MASS RATIOS IN NGC 4342 AND NGC 4291: THE ASYNCHRONOUS GROWTH OF BULGES AND BLACK HOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study two nearby early-type galaxies, NGC 4342 and NGC 4291, that host unusually massive black holes relative to their low stellar mass. The observed black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios of NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 are 6.9+3.8–2.3% and 1.9% ± 0.6%, respectively, which significantly exceed the typical observed ratio of ∼0.2%. As a consequence of the exceedingly large black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios, NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 are ≈5.1σ and ≈3.4σ outliers from the M.-Mbulge scaling relation, respectively. In this paper, we explore the origin of the unusually high black-hole-to-bulge mass ratio. Based on Chandra X-ray observations of the hot gas content of NGC 4342 and NGC 4291, we compute gravitating mass profiles, and conclude that both galaxies reside in massive dark matter halos, which extend well beyond the stellar light. The presence of dark matter halos around NGC 4342 and NGC 4291 and a deep optical image of the environment of NGC 4342 indicate that tidal stripping, in which ∼> 90% of the stellar mass was lost, cannot explain the observed high black-hole-to-bulge mass ratios. Therefore, we conclude that these galaxies formed with low stellar masses, implying that the bulge and black hole did not grow in tandem. We also find that the black hole mass correlates well with the properties of the dark matter halo, suggesting that dark matter halos may play a major role in regulating the growth of the supermassive black holes.

  13. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Quanz, S P; Biller, B; Bonavita, M; Desidera, S; Delorme, P; Hagelberg, J; Maire, A -L; Boccaletti, A; Beuzit, J -L; Buenzli, E; Carson, J; Covino, E; Feldt, M; Girard, J; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Lagrange, A -M; Mesa, D; Messina, S; Montagnier, G; Mordasini, C; Mouillet, D; Schlieder, J E; Segransan, D; Thalmann, C; Zurlo, A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence of stellar, BD and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars, with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From RV observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJup has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). It consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the RV measured companion mass function for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program and the complementary archive datasets that probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. We developed a MC...

  14. Multispin giant magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate giant magnons from classical rotating strings in two different backgrounds. First we generalize the solution of Hofman and Maldacena and investigate new magnon excitations of a spin chain which are dual to a string on RxS5 with two nonvanishing angular momenta. Allowing string dynamics along the third angle in the five sphere, we find a dispersion relation that reproduces the Hofman and Maldacena one and the one found by Dorey for the two spin case. In the second part of the paper we generalize the two 'spin' giant magnon to the case of β-deformed AdS5xS5 background. We find agreement between the dispersion relation of the rotating string and the proposed dispersion relation of the magnon bound state on the spin chain

  15. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  16. Comparing the properties of the X-shaped bulges of NGC 4710 and the Milky Way with MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O. A.; Gadotti, D. A.; Debattista, V. P.; Rejkuba, M.; Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Coccato, L.; Minniti, D.; Ness, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Our view of the structure of the Milky Way and, in particular, its bulge is obscured by the intervening stars, dust, and gas in the disc. While great progress in understanding the bulge has been achieved with past and ongoing observations, the comparison of its global chemodynamical properties with respect to those of bulges seen in external galaxies has yet to be accomplished. Aims: We used the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument installed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to obtain spectral and imaging coverage of NGC 4710. The wide area and excellent sampling of the MUSE integral field spectrograph allows us to investigate the dynamical properties of the X-shaped bulge of NGC 4710 and compare it with the properties of the X-shaped bulge of the Milky Way. Methods: We measured the radial velocities, velocity dispersion, and stellar populations using a penalised pixel full spectral fitting technique adopting simple stellar populations models, on a 1' × 1' area centred on the bulge of NGC 4710. We constructed the velocity maps of the bulge of NGC 4710 and investigated the presence of vertical metallicity gradients. These properties were compared to those of the Milky Way bulge and to a simulated galaxy with a boxy-peanut bulge. Results: We find the line-of-sight velocity maps and 1D rotation curves of the bulge of NGC 4710 to be remarkably similar to those of the Milky Way bulge. Some specific differences that were identified are in good agreement with the expectations from variations in the bar orientation angle. The bulge of NGC 4710 has a boxy-peanut morphology with a pronounced X-shape, showing no indication of any additional spheroidally distributed bulge population, in which we measure a vertical metallicity gradient of 0.35 dex/kpc. Conclusions: The general properties of NGC 4710 are very similar to those observed in the Milky Way bulge. However, it has been suggested that the Milky Way bulge has an additional component that is

  17. Giant Otters in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk C.

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  18. Ice Giant Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  19. Giant Mediastinal Teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkay Albayrak

    2013-01-01

    The most of mediastinal germ cell tumors are teratomas. The main purpose of the treatment of immature and mature teratomas is completly resection of the mass. However, surgical problems may be occur due to proximity with vital structures. In this case, subtotal resection can be performed. Recurrence is rare, and the prognosis is usually very good. In this report, a case of the giant mediastinal mature cystic teratoma that applied subtotal resection due to pericardial adhesions is presented.

  20. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  1. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  2. Lipomas gigantes Giants lipomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Accetta

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors report two cases of giants lipomas in the gluteal region with 3,9 and 3,1 kg. They make a brief epidemiological presentation and consider diagnosis and treatment. They believe that CT scan is the best image method, as it provides more information about size and relationship with surrounding structures. They are against biopsies and lipoaspiration but stand up for the total exeresis as the best option of treatment.

  3. Anisotropic Models for Globular Clusters, Galactic Bulges and Dark Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, P H

    2013-01-01

    Spherical systems with a polytropic equation of state are of great interest in astrophysics. They are widely used to describe neutron stars, red giants, white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, main sequence stars, galactic halos and globular clusters of diverse sizes. In this paper we construct analytically a family of self-gravitating spherical models in the post-Newtonian approximation of general relativity. These models present interesting cusps in their density profiles which are appropriate for the modeling of galaxies and dark matter halos. The systems described here are anisotropic in the sense that their equiprobability surfaces in velocity space are non-spherical, leading to an overabundance of radial or circular orbits, depending on the parameters of the model in consideration. Among the family, we find the post-Newtonian generalization of the Plummer and Hernquist models. A close inspection of their equation of state reveals that these solutions interpolate smoothly between a polytropic sphere in the asymptoti...

  4. A new look at the kinematics of the bulge from an N-body model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A.; Di Matteo, P.; Stefanovitch, N.; Haywood, M.; Combes, F.; Katz, D.; Babusiaux, C.

    2016-05-01

    By using an N-body simulation of a bulge that was formed via a bar instability mechanism, we analyse the imprints of the initial (i.e. before bar formation) location of stars on the bulge kinematics, in particular on the heliocentric radial velocity distribution of bulge stars. Four different latitudes were considered: b = -4°, -6°, -8°, and -10°, along the bulge minor axis as well as outside it, at l = ± 5° and l = ± 10°. The bulge X-shaped structure comprises stars that formed in the disk at different locations. Stars formed in the outer disk, beyond the end of the bar, which are part of the boxy peanut-bulge structure may show peaks in the velocity distributions at positive and negative heliocentric radial velocities with high absolute values that can be larger than 100 km s-1, depending on the observed direction. In some cases the structure of the velocity field is more complex and several peaks are observed. Stars formed in the inner disk, the most numerous, contribute predominantly to the X-shaped structure and present different kinematic characteristics. They display a rather symmetric velocity distribution and a smaller fraction of high-velocity stars. The stellar stream motion, which is induced by the bar changes with the star initial position, can reach more than 40 km s-1 for stars that originated in the external disk, depending on the observed direction. Otherwise it is smaller than approximately 20 km s-1. In all cases, it decreases from b = -4° to -10°. Our results may enable us to interpret the cold high-velocity peak observed in the APOGEE commissioning data, as well as the excess of high-velocity stars in the near and far arms of the X-shaped structure at l = 0° and b = -6°. When compared with real data, the kinematic picture becomes more complex due to the possible presence in the observed samples of classical bulge and/or thick disk stars. Overall, our results point to the existence of complex patterns and structures in the bulge

  5. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5{+-}5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4{+-}8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7{+-}6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and

  6. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5±5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4±8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7±6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and accentuated

  7. Bulges and disks in the local Universe. Linking the galaxy structure to star formation activity

    CERN Document Server

    Morselli, L; Erfanianfar, G; Concas, A

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy morphology and star formation activity are strictly linked, in the way that bulge-dominated galaxies are in general quiescent, while disk dominated galaxies are actively star-forming. In this paper, we study the properties of bulges and disks as a function of the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) plane. Our sample is built on the SDSS DR7 catalogue, and the bulge-disk decomposition is the one of Simard et al. (2011). We find that at a given stellar mass the Main Sequence (MS) is populated by galaxies with the lowest B/T ratios. The B/T on the MS increases with increasing stellar mass, thus confirming previous results in literature. In the upper envelop of the MS, the average B/T is higher than that of MS counterparts at fixed stellar mass. This indicates that starburst galaxies have a significant bulge component. In addition, bulges above the MS are characterised by blue colours, whereas, if on the MS or below it, they are mostly red and dead. The disks ...

  8. Composite Stellar Populations and Element by Element Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge and Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Baitian; Davis, A Bianca

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the integrated-light characteristics of the Milky Way (MW) bulge and to what extent they match those of elliptical galaxies in the local universe. We model composite stellar populations with realistic abundance distribution functions (ADFs), tracking the trends of individual elements as a function of overall heavy element abundance as actually observed in MW bulge stars. The resultant predictions for absorption feature strengths from the MW bulge mimic elliptical galaxies better than solar neighborhood stars do, but the MW bulge does not match elliptical galaxies, either. Comparing bulge versus elliptical galaxies, Fe, Ti, and Mg trend about the same for both but C, Na, and Ca seem irreconcilably different. Exploring the behavior of abundance compositeness leads to the concepts of "red lean" where a narrower ADF appears more metal rich than a wide one, and "red spread" where the spectral difference between wide and narrow ADFs increases as the ADF peak is moved to more metal-rich values. T...

  9. A case against an X-shaped structure in the Milky Way young bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT. A number of recent papers have claimed the discovery of an X-shape structure in the bulge of our Galaxy in the population of the red clumps. AIMS. We endeavor to analyze the stellar density of bulge stars in the same regions using a different stellar population that is characteristic of the young bulge ($\\lesssim 5$ Gyr). Particularly, we use F0-F5 main-sequence stars with distances derived through photometric parallax. METHODS. We extract these stars from extinction-corrected color-magnitude diagrams in the near-infrared of VISTA-VVV data in some bulge regions and calculate the densities along the line of sight. We take the uncertaintity in the photometric parallax and the contamination of other sources into account, and we see that these errors do not avoid the detection of a possible double peak along some lines of sight as expected for a X-shape bulge if it existed. RESULTS. Only a single peak in the density distribution along the line of sight is observed, so apparently there is no X-shape struc...

  10. The First Detection of Blue Straggler Stars in the Milky Way Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, William I; Anderson, Jay; Rich, R Michael; Smith, T Ed; Brown, Thomas M; Bond, Howard E; Livio, Mario; Minniti, Dante; Renzini, Alvio; Zoccali, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    We report the first detections of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) in the bulge of the Milky Way galaxy. Proper motions from extensive space-based observations along a single sight-line allow us to separate a sufficiently clean and well-characterized bulge sample that we are able to detect a small population of bulge objects in the region of the color-magnitude diagram commonly occupied young objects and blue strgglers. However, variability measurements of these objects clearly establish that a fraction of them are blue stragglers. Out of the 42 objects found in this region of the color-magnitude diagram, we estimate that at least 18 are genuine BSS. We normalize the BSS population by our estimate of the number of horizontal branch stars in the bulge in order to compare the bulge to other stellar systems. The BSS fraction is clearly discrepant from that found in stellar clusters. The blue straggler population of dwarf spheroidals remains a subject of debate; some authors claim an anticorrelation between the normali...

  11. The number of tidal dwarf satellite galaxies in dependence of bulge index

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We show that a significant correlation (up to 5sigma) emerges between the bulge index, defined to be larger for larger bulge/disk ratio, in spiral galaxies with similar luminosities in the Galaxy Zoo 2 of SDSS and the number of tidal-dwarf galaxies in the catalogue by Kaviraj et al. (2012). In the standard cold or warm dark-matter cosmological models the number of satellite galaxies correlates with the circular velocity of the dark matter host halo. In generalized-gravity models without cold or warm dark matter such a correlation does not exist, because host galaxies cannot capture in-falling dwarf galaxies due to the absence of dark-matter-induced dynamical friction. However, in such models a correlation is expected to exist between the bulge mass and the number of satellite galaxies, because bulges and tidal-dwarf satellite galaxies form in encounters between host galaxies. This is not predicted by dark matter models in which bulge mass and the number of satellites are a priori uncorrelated because higher b...

  12. Clues to the Formation of Lenticular Galaxies Using Spectroscopic Bulge-Disk Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Evelyn J; Merrifield, Michael R; Bedregal, Alejandro G

    2013-01-01

    Lenticular galaxies have long been thought of as evolved spirals, but the processes involved to quench the star formation are still unclear. By studying the individual star formation histories of the bulges and disks of lenticulars, it is possible to look for clues to the processes that triggered their transformation from spirals. To accomplish this feat, we present a new method for spectroscopic bulge-disk decomposition, in which a long-slit spectrum is decomposed into two one-dimensional spectra representing purely the bulge and disk light. We present preliminary results from applying this method to lenticular galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters, in which we show that the most recent star formation activity in these galaxies occurred within the bulges. We also find that the star formation timescales of the bulges are longer than the disks, and that more massive galaxies take longer to lose their gas during the transformation. These results point towards slow processes, such as ram-pressure stripping o...

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS bulge, disk and total stellar mass estimates (Mendel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, J. T.; Simard, L.; Palmer, M.; Ellison, S. L.; Patton, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of bulge, disk, and total stellar mass estimates for ~660000 galaxies in the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS) Release 7. These masses are based on a homogeneous catalog of g- and r-band photometry described by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), which we extend here with bulge+disk and Sersic profile photometric decompositions in the SDSS u, i, and z bands. We discuss the methodology used to derive stellar masses from these data via fitting to broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and show that the typical statistical uncertainty on total, bulge, and disk stellar mass is ~0.15 dex. Despite relatively small formal uncertainties, we argue that SED modeling assumptions, including the choice of synthesis model, extinction law, initial mass function, and details of stellar evolution likely contribute an additional 60% systematic uncertainty in any mass estimate based on broadband SED fitting. We discuss several approaches for identifying genuine bulge+disk systems based on both their statistical likelihood and an analysis of their one-dimensional surface-brightness profiles, and include these metrics in the catalogs. Estimates of the total, bulge and disk stellar masses for both normal and dust-free models and their uncertainties are made publicly available here. (4 data files).

  14. A CATALOG OF BULGE, DISK, AND TOTAL STELLAR MASS ESTIMATES FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of bulge, disk, and total stellar mass estimates for ∼660,000 galaxies in the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS) Release 7. These masses are based on a homogeneous catalog of g- and r-band photometry described by Simard et al., which we extend here with bulge+disk and Sérsic profile photometric decompositions in the SDSS u, i, and z bands. We discuss the methodology used to derive stellar masses from these data via fitting to broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and show that the typical statistical uncertainty on total, bulge, and disk stellar mass is ∼0.15 dex. Despite relatively small formal uncertainties, we argue that SED modeling assumptions, including the choice of synthesis model, extinction law, initial mass function, and details of stellar evolution likely contribute an additional 60% systematic uncertainty in any mass estimate based on broadband SED fitting. We discuss several approaches for identifying genuine bulge+disk systems based on both their statistical likelihood and an analysis of their one-dimensional surface-brightness profiles, and include these metrics in the catalogs. Estimates of the total, bulge and disk stellar masses for both normal and dust-free models and their uncertainties are made publicly available here

  15. Extremely metal-poor stars from the cosmic dawn in the bulge of the Milky Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, L M; Casey, A R; Asplund, M; Keller, S C; Yong, D; Nataf, D M; Poleski, R; Lind, K; Kobayashi, C; Owen, C I; Ness, M; Bessell, M S; Da Costa, G S; Schmidt, B P; Tisserand, P; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; Mróz, P

    2015-11-26

    The first stars are predicted to have formed within 200 million years after the Big Bang, initiating the cosmic dawn. A true first star has not yet been discovered, although stars with tiny amounts of elements heavier than helium ('metals') have been found in the outer regions ('halo') of the Milky Way. The first stars and their immediate successors should, however, preferentially be found today in the central regions ('bulges') of galaxies, because they formed in the largest over-densities that grew gravitationally with time. The Milky Way bulge underwent a rapid chemical enrichment during the first 1-2 billion years, leading to a dearth of early, metal-poor stars. Here we report observations of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way bulge, including one star with an iron abundance about 10,000 times lower than the solar value without noticeable carbon enhancement. We confirm that most of the metal-poor bulge stars are on tight orbits around the Galactic Centre, rather than being halo stars passing through the bulge, as expected for stars formed at redshifts greater than 15. Their chemical compositions are in general similar to typical halo stars of the same metallicity although intriguing differences exist, including lower abundances of carbon. PMID:26560034

  16. Giant oilfields and civil conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Yu-Hsiang; Michaels, Guy

    2012-01-01

    We use new data to examine the effects of giant oilfield discoveries around the world since 1946. On average, these discoveries increase per capita oil production and oil exports by up to 50 percent. But these giant oilfield discoveries also have a dark side: they increase the incidence of internal armed conflict by about 5-8 percentage points. This increased incidence of conflict due to giant oilfield discoveries is especially high for countries that had already experienced armed conflicts o...

  17. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits . III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Chauvin, G.; Vigan, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Desidera, S.; Delorme, P.; Hagelberg, J.; Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Buenzli, E.; Carson, J.; Covino, E.; Feldt, M.; Girard, J.; Gratton, R.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Montagnier, G.; Mordasini, C.; Mouillet, D.; Schlieder, J. E.; Segransan, D.; Thalmann, C.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence and distribution of stellar, brown dwarf (BD), and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From radial velocity observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJupiter has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. Aims: We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). This model consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the radial velocity measured CMF for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program (NaCo-LP) and the complementary archive datasets, which probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the outcome of a given survey, depending on the shape of the orbital parameter distributions (mass, semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination). Comparing the predictions with the results of the observations, we calculate the likelihood of different models and which models can be ruled out. Results: Current observations are consistent with the proposed model for the CMF, as long as a sufficiently small outer truncation radius (≲100 AU) is introduced for the planet separation distribution. Some regions of parameter space can be excluded by the observations. Conclusions: We conclude that the results of the direct imaging surveys searching for substellar companions around Sun-like stars are consistent with a combined substellar mass spectrum of planets and BDs. This mass distribution has a minimum between 10 and 50 MJupiter, in agreement

  18. Isovector giant dipole resonance in relativistic Thomas-Fermi formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symmetry energy plays a crucial role in study of nuclear structure. As we know, only in the light mass region the nucleus with the same number of proton and neutron are stable, but as the mass number increases the stability of the nucleus favor for a more asymmetric system. So symmetry energy plays a vital role in the nuclear structure. There is no direct way to measure the symmetry energy in a precise manner, so we need indirect way like giant resonance to the measure the symmetry energy. Also various theoretical models give a wide range of uncertainty in estimation of symmetry energy (J) and its slope (L). Symmetry energy has not only central role in infinite nuclei but it has a significant role in infinite nuclear matter system. Giant dipole resonance is one of the most powerful probe to study the nuclear structure physics. Specifically Isovector modes of the giant resonance gives an unique way to study the symmetry energy, because this mode of the giant resonance concerned to the vibration of proton and neutron in out of phase. We can put constraint on the nuclear symmetry energy coefficient by measuring the Isovector giant dipole excitation energy

  19. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  20. Analysis of materials properties of niobium tube from the results of a virtual bulge test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. S.; Sumption, Michael; Lim, H.; Collings, E. W.

    2012-06-01

    Hydroforming has been selected as a technique for the seamless fabrication of multicell superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities. For the successful application of this technique to cavity fabrication, it is essential to understand deformation behavior of tubes under hydroforming conditions. Input to the finite-element modeling (FEM) which generally precedes the actual hydroforming process requires the constitutive properties of the tube material. This information may be obtained from the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The present paper provides an example of this activity. In order to verify the steps to be taken in analyzing future bulge-test data a circular argument recovers the original constitutive properties from the results of an FEM-based "virtual bulge test".

  1. Long-Lived Spiral Structure for Galaxies with Intermediate Size Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Kanak

    2016-01-01

    Spiral structure in disk galaxies is modeled with nine collisionless N-body simulations including live disks, halos, and bulges with a range of masses. Two of these simulations make long-lasting and strong two-arm spiral wave modes that last for $\\sim5$ Gyr with constant pattern speed. These two had a light stellar disk and the largest values of the Toomre $Q$ parameter in the inner region at the time the spirals formed, suggesting the presence of a Q-barrier to wave propagation resulting from the bulge. The relative bulge mass in these cases is about 10\\%. Models with weak two-arm spirals had pattern speeds that followed the radial dependence of the Inner Lindblad Resonance.

  2. Discovery of Five New R. Coronae Borealis Stars in the MACHO Galactic Bulge Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewshi, A; Clayton, G C; Welch, D; Gordon, K D; Minniti, D; Cook, K

    2005-06-16

    We have identified five new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Galactic bulge using the MACHO Project photometry database, raising the total number of known Galactic RCB stars to about 40. We have obtained spectra to confirm the identifications. The fact that four out of the five newly identified RCB stars are ''cool'' (T{sub eff} < 6000 K) rather than ''warm'' (T{sub eff} > 6000 K) suggests that the preponderance of warm RCB stars among the existing sample is a selection bias. These cool RCB stars are redder and fainter than their warm counterparts and may have been missed in surveys done with blue plates. Based on the number of new RCB stars discovered in the MACHO bulge fields, there may be {approx}250 RCB stars in the reddened ''exclusion'' zone toward the bulge.

  3. Stellar Population Gradients in Bulges along the Hubble Sequence: I. The Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gorgas, J; Goudfrooij, P

    2007-01-01

    This is the first paper presenting our long-term project aimed at studying the nature of bulges through the analysis of their stellar population gradients. We present deep spectroscopic observations along the minor axis and the data reduction for a sample of 32 bulges of edge-on spiral galaxies. We explain in detail our procedures to measure their dynamical parameters (rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles) and line-strength indices, including the conversion to the Lick/IDS system. Tables giving the values of the dynamical parameters and line-strength indices at each galactocentric radius are presented (in electronic form) for each galaxy of the sample. The derived line-strength gradients from this dataset will be analyzed in a forthcoming paper to set constraints on the different scenarios for the formation of the bulges.

  4. A Fossil Bulge Globular Cluster revealed by VLT Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolani, Sergio; Momany, Yazan; Saviane, Ivo; Bica, Eduardo; Jilkova, Lucie; Salerno, Gustavo Malta; Jungwiert, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The globular cluster HP1 is projected on the bulge, very close to the Galactic center. The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) Demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) allowed to acquire high resolution deep images that, combined with first epoch New Technology Telescope (NTT) data, enabled to derive accurate proper motions. The cluster and bulge field stellar contents were disentangled by means of this process, and produced unprecedented definition in the color-magnitude diagrams for this cluster. The metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -1.0 from previous spectroscopic analysis is confirmed, which together with an extended blue horizontal branch, imply an age older than the halo average. Orbit reconstruction results suggest that HP1 is spatially confined within the bulge.

  5. Red Variables in Globular Clusters: Comparison with the Bulge and the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Matsunaga, N; Tanabé, T; Fukushi, H; Ita, Y

    2005-01-01

    We are conducting a project aimed at surveys and repeated observations of red variables (or long-period variables) in globular clusters. Using the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared facility located at South Africa, we are observing 145 globular clusters that are accessible from the site. In this contribution, we present our observations and preliminary results. We have discovered many red variables, especially in the Bulge region, whose memberships to the clusters remain to be confirmed. Using a sample of all red variables (both already known and newly discovered ones) in globular clusters except those projected to the Bulge region, we produce a log P-K diagram and compare it with those for the Bulge and the Large Magellanic Cloud. A prominent feature is that the bright part of overtone-pulsators' sequence (B+ and C') is absent.

  6. Red variables in globular clusters . Comparison with the Bulge and the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, N.; Nakada, Y.; Tanabé, T.; Fukushi, H.; Ita, Y.

    We are conducting a project aimed at surveys and repeated observations of red variables (or long-period variables) in globular clusters. Using the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared facility located at South Africa, we are observing 145 globular clusters that are accessible from the site. In this contribution, we present our observations and preliminary results. We have discovered many red variables, especially in the Bulge region, whose memberships to the clusters remain to be confirmed. Using a sample of all red variables (both already known and newly discovered ones) in globular clusters except those projected to the Bulge region, we produce a log P-K diagram and compare it with those for the Bulge and the Large Magellanic Cloud. A prominent feature is that the bright part of overtone-pulsators' sequence (B+ and C\\prime) is absent. We discuss its implication on the evolution of red variables.

  7. BULGE AND CLUMP EVOLUTION IN HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD CLUMP CLUSTERS, CHAINS AND SPIRAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clump clusters and chain galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) are examined for bulges in Near-Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer images. Approximately 50% of the clump clusters and 30% of the chains have relatively red and massive clumps that could be young bulges. Magnitudes and colors are determined for these bulgelike objects and for the bulges in spiral galaxies, and for all of the prominent star formation clumps in these three galaxy types. The colors are fitted to population evolution models to determine the bulge and clump masses, ages, star formation rate decay times, and extinctions. The results indicate that bulgelike objects in clump clusters and chain galaxies have similar ages and two to five times larger masses compared to the star formation clumps, while the bulges in spirals have roughly six times larger ages and 20 to 30 times larger masses than the clumps. All systems appear to have an underlying red disk population. The masses of star-forming clumps are typically in a range from 107 to 108 M sun; their ages have a wide range around ∼102 Myr. Ages and extinctions both decrease with redshift. Star formation is probably the result of gravitational instabilities in the disk gas, in which case the large clump mass in the UDF is the result of a high gas velocity dispersion, 30 km s-1 or more, combined with a high gas mass column density, ∼100 M sun pc-2. Because clump clusters and chains dominate disk galaxies beyond z ∼ 1, the observations suggest that these types represent an early phase in the formation of modern spiral galaxies, when the bulge and inner disk formed.

  8. The Chemical Composition of Red Giant Branch Stars in the Galactic Globular Clusters NGC 6342 and NGC 6366

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Hsyu, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for red giant branch stars in the Galactic bulge globular clusters NGC 6342 and NGC 6366. The velocities and abundances are based on measurements of high resolution (R > 20,000) spectra obtained with the MMT-Hectochelle and WIYN-Hydra spectrographs. We find that NGC 6342 has a heliocentric radial velocity of +112.5 km/s (sigma = 8.6 km/s), NGC 6366 has a heliocentric radial velocity of -122.3 km/s (sigma = 1.5 km/s), and that both clusters ...

  9. Pixel Color Magnitude Diagrams for Semi-resolved Stellar Populations: The Star Formation History of Regions within the Disk and Bulge of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of stellar populations has, by and large, been developed for two limiting cases: spatially resolved stellar populations in the color–magnitude diagram, and integrated light observations of distant systems. In between these two extremes lies the semi-resolved regime, which encompasses a rich and relatively unexplored realm of observational phenomena. Here we develop the concept of pixel color–magnitude diagrams (pCMDs) as a powerful technique for analyzing stellar populations in the semi-resolved regime. pCMDs show the distribution of imaging data in the plane of pixel luminosity versus pixel color. A key feature of pCMDs is that they are sensitive to all stars, including both the evolved giants and the unevolved main sequence stars. An important variable in this regime is the mean number of stars per pixel, {N}{{pix}}. Simulated pCMDs demonstrate a strong sensitivity to the star formation history (SFH) and have the potential to break degeneracies between age, metallicity and dust based on two filter data for values of {N}{{pix}} up to at least 104. We extract pCMDs from Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of M31 and derive SFHs with seven independent age bins from 106 to 1010 year for both the crowded disk and bulge regions (where {N}{{pix}}≈ 30{--}{10}3). From analyzing a small region of the disk we find a SFH that is smooth and consistent with an exponential decay timescale of 4 Gyr. The bulge SFH is also smooth and consistent with a 2 Gyr decay timescale. pCMDs will likely play an important role in maximizing the science returns from next generation ground and space-based facilities.

  10. Mechanical problems of superplastic fill-forming bulge solved by one-dimensional tensile and two-dimensional free bulging constitutive equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the strong structural sensitivity of superplasticity, the deformation rule must be affected by stress-state. It is necessary to prove whether one-dimensional tensile constitutive equation can be directly generalized to deal with the two-dimensional mechanical problems or not. In this paper, theoretical results of fill-forming bulge have been derived from both one-dimensional tensile and two-dimensional bulging constitutive equation with variable m value. By comparing theoretical analysis and experimental results made on typical superplastic alloy Zn-wt22%Al, it is shown that one-dimensional tensile constitutive equation cannot be directly generalized to deal with two-dimensional mechanical questions. A method to correct deviation between theoretical and experimental results is also proposed.

  11. Identification of a novel HIV-1 TAR RNA bulge binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    B. Baker; Muckenthaler, M; Vives, E.; Blanchard, A.; Braddock, M; Nacken, W.; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-01-01

    The Tat protein binds to TAR RNA to stimulate the expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome. Tat is an 86 amino acid protein that contains a short region of basic residues (aa49-aa57) that are required for RNA binding and TAR is a 59 nucleotide stem-loop with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem. TAR is located at the 5' end of all viral RNAs. In vitro, Tat specifically interacts with TAR by recognising the sequence of the bulge and upper stem, with no requiremen...

  12. M-Theory Giant Gravitons with C field

    CERN Document Server

    Camino, J M

    2002-01-01

    We find giant graviton configurations of an M5-brane probe in the D=11 supergravity background generated by a stack of non-threshold (M2,M5) bound states. The M5-brane probe shares three directions with the background and wraps a two-sphere transverse to the bound states. For a particular value of the worldvolume gauge field of the PST formalism, there exist solutions of the equations of motion for which the M5-brane probe behaves as a wave propagating in the (M2,M5) background. We have checked that the probe breaks the supersymmetry of the background exactly as a massless particle moving along the trajectory of its center of mass.

  13. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  14. Giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a very unusual case of giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma presenting as a large solitary pulmonary mass. This was successfully managed with surgical resection. Histological examination revealed that the mass was positive for GLUT-1 receptor, a marker for infantile hemangioma. To our knowledge only a few cases of pulmonary hemangioma have been described previously in the literature. Pulmonary hemangiomas are very rare lesions, most of them presenting as a pulmonary mass. This case emphasizes the fact that this rare lesion should be considered in the differential of an enhancing pulmonary mass in an infant. (orig.)

  15. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  16. Rotation of Giant Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5 and $5\\,M_\\odot$, taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the exc...

  17. Multispin Giant Magnons

    OpenAIRE

    Bobev, N. P.; Rashkov, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate giant magnons from classical rotating strings in two different backgrounds. First we generalize the solution of Hofman and Maldacena and investigate new magnon excitations of a spin chain which are dual to a string on $R\\times S^5$ with two non-vanishing angular momenta. Alowing string dynamics along the third angle in the five sphere, we find a dispersion relation that reproduces the Hofman and Maldacena and the one found by Dorey for the two spin case. In the second part of t...

  18. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  19. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C L; Griest, K; Popowski, P; Cook, K H; Drake, A J; Minniti, D; Myer, D G; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    2005-06-16

    The authors present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout the fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and they find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper they give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. They also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.

  20. Comparing the properties of the X-shaped bulges of NGC 4710 and the Milky Way with MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O A; Debattista, V P; Rejkuba, M; Valenti, E; Zoccali, M; Coccato, L; Minniti, D; Ness, M

    2016-01-01

    We used the new ESO VLT instrument MUSE to obtain spectral and imaging coverage of NGC 4710. The wide area and excellent sampling of the MUSE integral field spectrograph allows us to investigate the dynamical properties of the X-shaped bulge of NGC 4710 and compare it with the properties of the Milky Way's own X-shaped bulge. We measured the radial velocities, velocity dispersion, and stellar populations using a penalized pixel full spectral fitting technique adopting simple stellar populations models, on a 1' x 1' area centred on the bulge of NGC 4710. We have constructed the velocity maps of the bulge of NGC 4710 and we investigated the presence of vertical metallicity gradients. These properties were compared to those of the Milky Way bulge and as well as to a simulated galaxy with boxy/peanut bulge. We find the line-of-sight velocity maps and 1D rotation curves of the bulge of NGC 4710 to be remarkably similar to those of the Milky Way bulge. Some specific differences that were identified are in good agre...

  1. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Lavvas, P. [Groupe de Spectroscopie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique UMR CNRS 7331, Université Reims Champagne-Ardenne, F-51687 Reims (France); Cho, J. Y-K., E-mail: tommi@lpl.arizona.edu [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can potentially

  2. Giant Pandas and Their Conservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GarethDavey

    2004-01-01

    IT is paradoxical that themost well-known conservation symbol in the world,the giant panda, is a criti-cally endangered species.The estimated 1,600 thatremain live in the high-altitude for-ests of southwest China (within theprovinces of Sichuan, Gansu andShaanxi). Giant pandas are popularand elicit affection and admiration

  3. Famine Threatens the Giant Panda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Large swathes of arrow bamboo groves at and above 2,700 meters in the Piankou Nature Reserve in Sichuan's Mianyang are producing purple blooms, and some groves have started to wither and die. An absence of bamboo means famine for giant pandas living there. Sichuan has consequently activated its giant panda contingency plan.

  4. Bulge mass is king: The dominant role of the bulge in determining the fraction of passive galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bluck, Asa F L; Ellison, Sara L; Moreno, Jorge; Simard, Luc; Patton, David R; Starkenburg, Else

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the origin of galaxy bimodality by quantifying the relative role of intrinsic and environmental drivers to the cessation (or `quenching') of star formation in over half a million local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. Our sample contains a wide variety of galaxies at z=0.02-0.2, with stellar masses of 8 < log(M*/M_sun) < 12, spanning the entire morphological range from pure disks to spheroids, and over four orders of magnitude in local galaxy density and halo mass. We utilise published star formation rates and add to this recent GIM2D photometric and stellar mass bulge + disk decompositions from our group. We find that the passive fraction of galaxies increases steeply with stellar mass, halo mass, and bulge mass, with a less steep dependence on local galaxy density and bulge-to-total stellar mass ratio (B/T). At fixed internal properties, we find that central and satellite galaxies have different passive fraction relationships. For centrals, we conclude that there is less variat...

  5. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavuray Teli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals.

  6. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P B; Santhosh, R; Amar, D N; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  7. Kinetics of bulge bases in small RNAs and the effect of pressure on it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Lehmann, Jean; Libchaber, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Due to their self-catalytic properties, small RNAs with bulge bases are hypothesized to be primordial molecules which could form elementary translation systems. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the binding propensity of small RNAs by calculating the free energy barrier corresponding to the looped out conformations of bulge bases, which presumably act as the binding sites for ligands in these small RNAs. We find that base flipping kinetics can proceed at atmospheric pressure but with a very small propensity. Furthermore, the free energy barrier associated with base flipping depends on the stacking with neighboring bases. Next, we studied the base flipping kinetics with pressure. We find that the free energy associated with base looping out increases monotonically as the pressure is increased. Furthermore, we calculate the mean first-passage time of conformational looping out of the bulge base using the diffusion of reaction coordinate associated with the base flipping on the underlying free energy surface. We find that the mean first-passage time associated with bulge looping out increases slowly upon increasing pressures P up to 2000 atm but changes dramatically for P>2000 atm. Finally, we discuss our results in the light of the role of hydration shell of water around RNA. Our results are relevant for the RNA world hypothesis. PMID:22916118

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Bulge Forming of Laser Welding Dimple Jacket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisi ZHONG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The stress-strain states of the model of laser welded dimple jacket is analyzed using ANSYS/LS-DYNA in order to determine the relation between bulging height and pressure and to achieve the controllability of pressure distension of the jacket. It is shown that in the same conditions, the bulging height increases with the increasing of the bulging pressure and the space of honeycomb. And it will decrease when the thickness of jacket plate changing larger. A table showing the relation between bulging height and pressure is obtained. An experiment using a test panel is conducted to certify the reliability of finite element analysis. It turns out that the data of finite element analysis is coincident with experimental data, which support finite element method based ANSYS/LS-DYNA can be an efficient way to research the laser welded dimple jacket. The relation table is useful as guidance for the fabrication process.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9704

  9. The growth of galactic bulges through mergers in LCDM haloes revisited. I. Present-day properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, Jesus; Firmani, Claudio; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We use the combined data-sets of the Millennium I and II N-body cosmological simulations to revisit the impact of mergers in the growth of bulges in central galaxies in the LCDM scenario. To do so, we seed galaxies within the growing CDM haloes at each epoch using empirical relations to assign stellar and gaseous masses, and an analytical treatment to estimate the transfer of stellar mass to the bulge after a galaxy merger. Our results show that this model roughly reproduces the observed correlation between the bulge-to-total (B/T) mass ratio and stellar mass in present-day central galaxies as well as their observed demographics, although low-mass B/T < 0.1 (bulgeless) galaxies might be scarce relative to the observed abundance. In our merger-driven scenario, bulges have a composite stellar population made of (i) stars acquired from infalling satellites, (ii) stars transferred from the primary disc due to the strong merger-induced perturbations, and (iii) newly formed stars in starbursts trigger...

  10. The growth of galactic bulges through mergers in LCDM haloes revisited. II. Morphological mix evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Lacerna, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The mass aggregation and merger histories of present-day distinct haloes selected from the cosmological Millennium Simulations I and II are mapped into stellar mass aggregation and galaxy merger histories of central galaxies by using empirical stellar-to-halo and stellar-to-gas mass relations. The growth of bulges driven by the galaxy mergers/interactions is calculated using analytical recipes. The predicted bulge demographics at redshift z~0 is consistent with observations (Zavala+2012). Here we present the evolution of the morphological mix (traced by the bulge-to-total mass ratio, B/T) as a function of mass up to z=3. This mix remains qualitatively the same up to z~1: B/T0.45 at large masses. At z>1, the fractions of disc-dominated and bulgeless galaxies increase strongly, and by z~2 the era of pure disc galaxies is reached. Bulge-dominated galaxies acquire such a morphology, and most of their mass, following a downsizing trend. Since our results are consistent with several recent observational studies of ...

  11. The Age and Structure of the Galactic Bulge from Mira Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Catchpole, Robin M; Feast, Michael W; Hughes, Shaun M G; Irwin, Mike; Alard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We report periods and JHKL observations for 648 oxygen-rich Mira variables found in two outer bulge fields at b=-7 degrees and l=+/-8 degrees and combine these with data on 8057 inner bulge Miras from the OGLE, Macho and 2MASS surveys, which are concentrated closer to the Galactic centre. Distance moduli are estimated for all these stars. Evidence is given showing that the bulge structure is a function of age. The longer period Miras (log P > 2.6, age about 5 Gyr and younger) show clear evidence of a bar structure inclined to the line of sight in both the inner and outer regions. The distribution of the shorter period (metal-rich globular cluster age) Miras, appears spheroidal in the outer bulge. In the inner region these old stars are also distributed differently from the younger ones and possibly suggest a more complex structure. These data suggest a distance to the Galactic centre, R0, of 8.9 kpc with an estimated uncertainty of 0.4 kpc. The possible effect of helium enrichment on our conclusions is discus...

  12. Peanuts, brezels and bananas: food for thought on the orbital structure of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Portail, M; Gerhard, O

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have discovered the presence of a Box/Peanut or X-shape structure in the Galactic bulge. Such Box/Peanut structures are common in external disc galaxies, and are well-known in N-body simulations where they form following the buckling instability of a bar. From studies of analytical potentials and N-body models it has been claimed in the past that Box/Peanut bulges are supported by "bananas", or x1v1 orbits. We present here a set of N-body models where instead the peanut bulge is mainly supported by brezel-like orbits, allowing strong peanuts to form with short extent relative to the bar length. This shows that stars in the X-shape do not necessarily stream along banana orbits which follow the arms of the X-shape. The brezel orbits are also found to be the main orbital component supporting the peanut shape in our recent Made-to-Measure dynamical models of the Galactic bulge. We also show that in these models the fraction of stellar orbits that contribute to the X-structure account for 40-45...

  13. Mapping the outer bulge with RRab stars from the VVV Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gran, F; Saito, R K; Zoccali, M; Gonzalez, O A; Navarrete, C; Catelan, M; Ramos, R Contreras; Elorrieta, F; Eyheramendy, S; Jordán, A

    2016-01-01

    The VISTA Variables in the V\\'ia L\\'actea (VVV) is a near-IR time-domain survey of the Galactic bulge and southern plane. One of the main goals of this survey is to reveal the 3D structure of the Milky Way through their variable stars. Particularly the RR Lyrae stars have been massively discovered in the inner regions of the bulge ($-8^\\circ \\lesssim b \\lesssim -1^\\circ$) by optical surveys such as OGLE and MACHO but leaving an unexplored window of more than $\\sim 47$ sq deg ($-10.0^\\circ \\lesssim \\ell \\lesssim +10.7^\\circ$ and $-10.3^\\circ \\lesssim b \\lesssim -8.0^\\circ$) observed by the VVV Survey. Our goal is to characterize the RR Lyrae stars in the outer bulge in terms of their periods, amplitudes, Fourier coefficients, and distances, in order to evaluate the 3D structure of the bulge in this area. The distance distribution of RR Lyrae stars will be compared to the one of red clump stars that is known to trace a X-shaped structure in order to determine if these two different stellar populations share the...

  14. Stellar density profile and mass of the Milky Way Bulge from VVV data

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, E; Gonzalez, O A; Minniti, D; Alonso-Garcia, J; Marchetti, E; Hempel, M; Renzini, A; Rejkuba, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first stellar density profile of the Milky Way bulge reaching latitude $b=0^\\circ$. It is derived by counting red clump stars within the colour\\--magnitude diagram constructed with the new PSF-fitting photometry from VISTA Variables in the V\\'\\i a L\\'actea (VVV) survey data. The new stellar density map covers the area between $|l|\\leq 10^\\circ$ and $|b|\\leq 4.5^\\circ$ with unprecedented accuracy, allowing to establish a direct link between the stellar kinematics from the Giraffe Inner Bulge Spectroscopic Survey (GIBS) and the stellar mass density distribution. In particular, the location of the central velocity dispersion peak from GIBS matches a high overdensity in the VVV star count map. By scaling the total luminosity function (LF) obtained from all VVV fields to the LF from Zoccali et al.(2003), we obtain the first fully empirical estimate of the mass in stars and remnants of the Galactic bulge. The Milky Way bulge stellar mass within ($|b|<9.5^\\circ$, $|l|<10^\\circ$) is $2.0\\pm0.3\\ti...

  15. A two-phase scenario for bulge assembly in LCDM cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Obreja, A; Brook, C; Martínez-Serrano, F J; Doménech-Moral, M; Serna, A; Mollá, M; Stinson, G

    2012-01-01

    We analyze and compare the bulges of a sample of L* spiral galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations in a cosmological context, using two different codes, P-DEVA and GASOLINE. The codes regulate star formation in very different ways, with P-DEVA simulations inputing low star formation efficiency under the assumption that feedback occurs on subgrid scales, while the GASOLINE simulations have feedback which drives large scale outflows. In all cases, the marked knee-shape in mass aggregation tracks, corresponding to the transition from an early phase of rapid mass assembly to a later slower one, separates the properties of two populations within the simulated bulges. The bulges analyzed show an important early starburst resulting from the collapse-like fast phase of mass assembly, followed by a second phase with lower star formation, driven by a variety of processes such as disk instabilities and/or mergers. Classifying bulge stellar particles identified at z=0 into old and young according to these two phases, we f...

  16. COSMIC-LAB: Terzan 5 as a fossil remnant of the Galactic bulge formation epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Massari, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The formation and evolution of galaxy bulges is one of the most debated topics in the modern astrophysics. One approach to address this issue is to look at the Galactic bulge since it is the closest. According to some theoretical models, our bulge may have built up from the merger of substructures formed from the fragmentation of a gaseous disk in the early phases of Galactic evolution. We may have discovered the remnant of one of these substructures in the stellar system Terzan 5. In fact, Terzan 5 hosts two stellar populations with quite different iron abundances, thus suggesting it once was far more massive than today. Moreover, its peculiar chemistry strikingly resembles that observed in the Galactic bulge. In this Thesis we performed a detailed photometric and spectroscopic analysis of this cluster to determine its formation and evolution. Form the photometric point of view we built a high-resolution differential reddening map in the direction of the system and we measured relative proper motions to sepa...

  17. Extremely metal-poor stars from the cosmic dawn in the bulge of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, L M; Asplund, M; Keller, S C; Yong, D; Nataf, D M; Poleski, R; Lind, K; Kobayashi, C; Owen, C I; Ness, M; Bessell, M S; Da Costa, G S; Schmidt, B P; Tisserand, P; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; Mróz, P

    2015-01-01

    The first stars are predicted to have formed within 200 million years after the Big Bang, initiating the cosmic dawn. A true first star has not yet been discovered, although stars with tiny amounts of elements heavier than helium ('metals') have been found in the outer regions ('halo') of the Milky Way. The first stars and their immediate successors should, however, preferentially be found today in the central regions ('bulges') of galaxies, because they formed in the largest over-densities that grew gravitationally with time. The Milky Way bulge underwent a rapid chemical enrichment during the first 1-2 billion years, leading to a dearth of early, metal-poor stars. Here we report observations of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way bulge, including one star with an iron abundance about 10,000 times lower than the solar value without noticeable carbon enhancement. We confirm that the most metal-poor bulge stars are on tight orbits around the Galactic Centre, rather than being halo stars passing through...

  18. Bursty stellar populations and obscured active galactic nuclei in galaxy bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Vivienne; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Heckman, Tim; Charlot, Stéphane; Lemson, Gerard; Brinchmann, Jarle; Reichard, Tim; Pasquali, Anna

    2007-10-01

    We investigate trends between the recent star formation history and black hole growth in galaxy bulges in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The galaxies lie at 0.01 4.0 kpc diameter of the galaxy. We find strong trends between black hole growth, as measured by dust-attenuation-corrected [O III] luminosity, and the recent star formation history of the bulges. 56 per cent of the bulges are quiescent with no signs of recent or ongoing star formation and, while almost half of all active galactic nuclei (AGN) lie within these bulges, they contribute only ~10 per cent to the total black hole growth in the local Universe. At the other extreme, the AGN contained within the ~4 per cent of galaxy bulges that are undergoing or have recently undergone the strongest starbursts, contribute at least 10-20 per cent of the total black hole growth. Much of this growth occurs in AGN with high amounts of dust extinction and thus the precise numbers remain uncertain. The remainder of the black hole growth (>60 per cent) is contributed by bulges with more moderate recent or ongoing star formation. The strongest accreting black holes reside in bulges with a wide range in recent star formation history. We conclude that our results support the popular hypothesis for black hole growth occurring through gas inflow into the central regions of galaxies, followed by a starburst and triggering of the AGN. However, while this is a significant pathway for the growth of black holes, it is not the dominant one in the present-day Universe. More unspectacular processes are apparently responsible for the majority of this growth. In order to arrive at these conclusions we have developed a set of new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectral indicators, designed to allow a detailed study of stellar populations which have undergone recent enhanced star formation. Working in the rest-frame wavelength range 3750-4150 Å, ideally suited to many recent and ongoing spectroscopic surveys at low and high

  19. Unveiling the Boxy Bulge and Bar of the Andromeda Spiral Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, R. L.; Athanassoula, E.; Majewski, S. R.; Guhathakurta, P.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Patterson, R. J.; Bureau, M.

    2005-12-01

    For the past 50 years a number of studies have suggested that the center of M31 may be barred. These optical studies, however, have been hampered by the highly inclined (i=77.5o) disk of M31 and the obscuring effects of its embedded dust, which strongly influence the observed isophotal structure of the M31 center. We analyze a new near-infrared survey of M31 by the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) 6X program. These data, covering the full extent of the optical disk, present a view of the central structure of M31 almost completely unfettered by dust. This new portrait vividly reveals a central bulge dominating the near infrared light profile from 3 to 1000 arcsecs along the semi-major axis, and with a number of interesting properties: (1) prominent boxy isophotes across the extent of the bulge, (2) a position angle inclined by about 10o from that of the M31 disk, (3) strong isophotal twisting in the innermost regions of the bulge, and (4) the presence of ansae symmetrically extending beyond the bulge along the position angle of the galaxy disk. In other highly inclined disks such properties have been associated with the presence of central bars obscured by projection effects. In the case of M31, these features have been well reproduced in a fully self consistent N-body simulation of a barred galaxy with a boxy bulge. The models further suggest the existence of an additional classical bulge component at the center of M31, and imply that the bar itself extends beyond the observationally established extent of the boxy bulge. This publication makes use of data products from 2MASS, which is a joint project of U Mass and IPAC/CalTech, funded by NASA and the NSF. This work was supported by NSF grants AST-0307842 and AST-0307966, as well as a SIM Key Project grant, NASA/JPL contract 1228235. MFS acknowledges support from NASA/JPL contract 1234021. This work was also partially supported by the Celerity Foundation. EA thanks the INSU/CNRS, the Région PACA and the University

  20. RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP BRIGHTNESS AND NUMBER COUNTS IN 72 GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the broadest and most precise empirical investigation of red giant branch bump (RGBB) brightness and number counts ever conducted. We implement a new method and use data from two Hubble Space Telescope globular cluster (GC) surveys to measure the brightness and star counts of the RGBB in 72 GCs. The median measurement precision is 0.018 mag in the brightness and 31% in the number counts, respectively, reaching peak precision values of 0.005 mag and 10%. The position of the main-sequence turnoff and the number of horizontal branch stars are used as comparisons where appropriate. Several independent scientific conclusions are newly possible with our parameterization of the RGBB. Both brightness and number counts are shown to have second parameters in addition to their strong dependence on metallicity. The RGBBs are found to be anomalous in the GCs NGC 2808, 5286, 6388, and 6441, likely due to the presence of multiple populations. Finally, we use our empirical calibration to predict the properties of the Galactic bulge RGBB. The updated RGBB properties for the bulge are shown to differ from the GC-calibrated prediction, with the former having lower number counts, a lower brightness dispersion, and a brighter peak luminosity than would be expected from the latter. This discrepancy is well explained by the Galactic bulge having a higher helium abundance than expected from GCs, ΔY ∼ +0.06 at the median metallicity.

  1. Localized bulging in an inflated cylindrical tube of arbitrary thickness - the effect of bending stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y. B.; Liu, J. L.; Francisco, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    We study localized bulging of a cylindrical hyperelastic tube of arbitrary thickness when it is subjected to the combined action of inflation and axial extension. It is shown that with the internal pressure P and resultant axial force F viewed as functions of the azimuthal stretch on the inner surface and the axial stretch, the bifurcation condition for the initiation of a localized bulge is that the Jacobian of the vector function (P , F) should vanish. This is established using the dynamical systems theory by first computing the eigenvalues of a certain eigenvalue problem governing incremental deformations, and then deriving the bifurcation condition explicitly. The bifurcation condition is valid for all loading conditions, and in the special case of fixed resultant axial force it gives the expected result that the initiation pressure for localized bulging is precisely the maximum pressure in uniform inflation. It is shown that even if localized bulging cannot take place when the axial force is fixed, it is still possible if the axial stretch is fixed instead. The explicit bifurcation condition also provides a means to quantify precisely the effect of bending stiffness on the initiation pressure. It is shown that the (approximate) membrane theory gives good predictions for the initiation pressure, with a relative error less than 5%, for thickness/radius ratios up to 0.67. A two-term asymptotic bifurcation condition for localized bulging that incorporates the effect of bending stiffness is proposed, and is shown to be capable of giving extremely accurate predictions for the initiation pressure for thickness/radius ratios up to as large as 1.2.

  2. First detection of the white dwarf cooling sequence of the galactic bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamida, A.; Sahu, K. C.; Anderson, J.; Casertano, S.; Brown, T.; Sokol, J.; Bond, H. E.; Ferguson, H.; Livio, M.; Valenti, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R.; Pietrinferni, A. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo—INAF, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Salaris, M. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Ferraro, I. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma—INAF, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Clarkson, W., E-mail: calamida@stsci.edu [University of Michigan-Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI 48128 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope data of the low-reddening Sagittarius window in the Galactic bulge. The Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search field (∼3'× 3'), together with three more Advanced Camera for Surveys and eight Wide-Field Camera 3 fields, were observed in the F606W and F814W filters, approximately every two weeks for 2 yr, with the principal aim of detecting a hidden population of isolated black holes and neutron stars through astrometric microlensing. Proper motions were measured with an accuracy of ≈0.1 mas yr{sup –1} (≈4 km s{sup –1}) at F606W ≈ 25.5 mag, and better than ≈0.5 mas yr{sup –1} (≈20 km s{sup –1}) at F606W ≈ 28 mag, in both axes. Proper-motion measurements allowed us to separate disk and bulge stars and obtain a clean bulge color-magnitude diagram. We then identified for the first time a white dwarf (WD) cooling sequence in the Galactic bulge, together with a dozen candidate extreme horizontal branch stars. The comparison between theory and observations shows that a substantial fraction of the WDs (≈30%) are systematically redder than the cooling tracks for CO-core H-rich and He-rich envelope WDs. This evidence would suggest the presence of a significant number of low-mass WDs and WD-main-sequence binaries in the bulge. This hypothesis is further supported by the finding of two dwarf novae in outburst, two short-period (P ≲ 1 day) ellipsoidal variables, and a few candidate cataclysmic variables in the same field.

  3. Identification of a novel HIV-1 TAR RNA bulge binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B; Muckenthaler, M; Vives, E; Blanchard, A; Braddock, M; Nacken, W; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-08-25

    The Tat protein binds to TAR RNA to stimulate the expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome. Tat is an 86 amino acid protein that contains a short region of basic residues (aa49-aa57) that are required for RNA binding and TAR is a 59 nucleotide stem-loop with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem. TAR is located at the 5' end of all viral RNAs. In vitro, Tat specifically interacts with TAR by recognising the sequence of the bulge and upper stem, with no requirement for the loop. However, in vivo the loop sequence is critical for activation, implying a requirement for accessory cellular TAR RNA binding factors. A number of TAR binding cellular factors have been identified in cell extracts and various models for the function of these factors have been suggested, including roles as coactivators and inhibitors. We have now identified a novel 38 kD cellular factor that has little general, single-stranded or double-stranded RNA binding activity, but that specifically recognises the bulge and upper stem region of TAR. The protein, referred to as BBP (bulge binding protein), is conserved in mammalian and amphibian cells and in Schizosaccharomyces pombe but is not found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. BBP is an effective competitive inhibitor of Tat binding to TAR in vitro. Our data suggest that the bulge-stem recognition motif in TAR is used to mediate cellular factor/RNA interactions and indicates that Tat action might be inhibited by such competing reactions in vivo. PMID:8078772

  4. Giant magnetofossils and hyperthermal events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liao; Roberts, Andrew P.; Williams, Wyn; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Jovane, Luigi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize magnetic minerals with precisely controlled size, morphology, and stoichiometry. These cosmopolitan bacteria are widely observed in aquatic environments. If preserved after burial, the inorganic remains of magnetotactic bacteria act as magnetofossils that record ancient geomagnetic field variations. They also have potential to provide paleoenvironmental information. In contrast to conventional magnetofossils, giant magnetofossils (most likely produced by eukaryotic organisms) have only been reported once before from Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55.8 Ma) sediments on the New Jersey coastal plain. Here, using transmission electron microscopic observations, we present evidence for abundant giant magnetofossils, including previously reported elongated prisms and spindles, and new giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, not only during the PETM, but also shortly before and after the PETM. Moreover, we have discovered giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals from the equatorial Indian Ocean during the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum (˜40 Ma). Our results indicate a more widespread geographic, environmental, and temporal distribution of giant magnetofossils in the geological record with a link to "hyperthermal" events. Enhanced global weathering during hyperthermals, and expanded suboxic diagenetic environments, probably provided more bioavailable iron that enabled biomineralization of giant magnetofossils. Our micromagnetic modelling indicates the presence of magnetic multi-domain (i.e., not ideal for navigation) and single domain (i.e., ideal for navigation) structures in the giant magnetite particles depending on their size, morphology and spatial arrangement. Different giant magnetite crystal morphologies appear to have had different biological functions, including magnetotaxis and other non-navigational purposes. Our observations suggest that hyperthermals provided ideal conditions for

  5. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn;

    2015-01-01

    , and 25% versus 44% required unplanned additional surgery, respectively. Complications were noted in 25% and 67% of the patients, respectively. Cosmetic result was satisfying in 76% of patients without difference between the groups. No malignant transformation was found during a mean follow-up of 11......Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications......, and malignant transformation. Of 35 patients, 25 underwent surgery. Curettage was most frequently used (64%) followed by excision and tissue expansion (20%). Six percent of the patients treated with curettage, and 78% of the patients who received excision surgery required more than 1 planned procedure...

  6. Two giant stellar complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  7. One-dimensional tensile constitutive equation cannot be directly generalized to deal with two-dimensional bulging mechanical problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玉泉; 刘术梅

    2002-01-01

    Superplastic forming has been extensively applied to manufacture parts and components with complex shapes or high-precisions. However, superplastic formation is in multi-stress state. In a long time, uniaxial tensile constitutive equation has been directly generalized to deal with multi-stress state. Whether so doing is feasible or not needs to be proved in theory. This paper first summarizes the establishing processes of superplastic tensile and bulging constitutive equation with variable m, and, using the analytical expressions of equivalent stress ? and equivalent strain rateof free bulge based on the fundamentals of continuum medium plastic mechanics, derives the analytical expressions of optimum loading rules for superplastic free bulge. By comparing the quantitative results on typical superplastic alloy ZnAl22, it is shown that one-dimensional tensile constitutive equations cannot be directly generalized to deal with two-dimensional bulging quantitative mechanical problems; only superplastic bulging constitutive equation based on bulging stress state can be used to treat the quantitative mechanical problems of bulge.

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behaviour of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as {N}, likewise for effective radius we use {R}. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of {N}. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of {R} (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-05-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behavior of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as N, likewise for effective radius we use R. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of N. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of R (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  10. Giant clumps in the FIRE simulations: a case study of a massive high-redshift galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Feldmann, Robert; Keres, Dusan; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of massive star-forming galaxies at high redshift is often dominated by giant clumps of mass ~10^8-10^9 Msun and size ~100-1000 pc. Previous studies have proposed that giant clumps might have an important role in the evolution of their host galaxy, particularly in building the central bulge. However, this depends on whether clumps live long enough to migrate from their original location in the disc or whether they get disrupted by their own stellar feedback before reaching the centre of the galaxy. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) project that implement explicit treatments of stellar feedback and ISM physics to study the properties of these clumps. We follow the evolution of giant clumps in a massive (stellar mass ~10^10.8 Msun at z=1), discy, gas-rich galaxy from redshift z>2 to z=1. Even though the clumpy phase of this galaxy lasts over a gigayear, individual gas clumps are short-lived, with mean lifetime of massive clumps of ~2...

  11. Landscape of the lost giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  12. Collective motion and giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains 15 papers devoted to problems of giant collective excitations of nuclei, heavy-ion induced reactions and their bearing on various aspects of nuclear structure. In some of them the numerical data are given. (A.S.)

  13. Modified siRNA Structure With a Single Nucleotide Bulge Overcomes Conventional siRNA-mediated Off-target Silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Dua, Pooja; Yoo, Jae Wook; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-01-01

    Off-target gene silencing is a major concern when using RNA interference. Imperfect pairing of the antisense strand with unintended mRNA targets is one of the main causes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) off-target silencing. To overcome this, we have developed “bulge-siRNA,” a modified siRNA backbone structure with a single nucleotide (nt) bulge placed in the antisense strand. We found that siRNAs with a bulge at position 2 of the antisense strand were able to discriminate better between per...

  14. Are giant resonances harmonic vibrations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant resonances are understood as the first quantum of collective vibrations. The non-linear response of a quantum anharmonic oscillator is investigated as a model for the excitation of giant resonances in heavy ion collisions. It is shown that the introduction of small anharmonicities and non-linearities can double the predicted cross section for the excitation of the two-phonon states. (R.P.)

  15. Rotation rates of giant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotation rates and macroturbulence dispersion of 14 G and K giants were measured using Fourier reduction of spectral-line profiles. The high-spectral-resolution, high-signal-to-noise observations were taken with the Coude Echelle Spectrometer of the European Southern Observatory. Good agreement was found between the present results and previous investigations, showing that no large systematic differences are introduced by using different spectrographs and detectors. The results generally confirm the low rotation seen for cool giants. 14 refs

  16. Kuiper Prize: Giant Planet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-10-01

    The study of giant planet atmospheres is near and dear to me, for several reasons. First, the giant planets are photogenic; the colored clouds are great tracers, and one can make fantastic movies of the atmosphere in motion. Second, the giant planets challenge us with storms that last for hundreds of years and winds that blow faster the farther you go from the sun. Third, they remind us of Earth with their hurricanes, auroras, and lightning, but they also are the link to the 200 giant planets that have been discovered around other stars. This talk will cover the past, present, and future (one hopes) of giant planet research. I will review the surprises of the Voyager and Galileo eras, and will discuss what we are learning now from the Cassini orbiter. I will review the prospects for answering the outstanding questions like: Where's the water? What is providing the colors of the clouds? How deep do the features extend? Where do the winds get their energy? What is the role of the magnetic field? Finally, I will briefly discuss how extrasolar giant planets compare with objects in our own solar system.

  17. Giant pulses from the Crab pulsar: A wide-band study

    CERN Document Server

    Karuppusamy, R; van Straten, W

    2010-01-01

    The Crab pulsar is well-known for its anomalous giant radio pulse emission. Past studies have concentrated only on the very bright pulses or were insensitive to the faint end of the giant pulse luminosity distribution. With our new instrumentation offering a large bandwidth and high time resolution combined with the narrow radio beam of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), we seek to probe the weak giant pulse emission regime. The WSRT was used in a phased array mode, resolving a large fraction of the Crab nebula. The resulting pulsar signal was recorded using the PuMa II pulsar backend and then coherently dedispersed and searched for giant pulse emission. After careful flux calibration, the data were analysed to study the giant pulse properties. The analysis includes the distributions of the measured pulse widths, intensities, energies, and scattering times. The weak giant pulses are shown to form a separate part of the intensity distribution. The large number of giant pulses detected were used t...

  18. Solving the long-standing discrepancy in the Microlensing Optical Depth Toward the Galactic Bulge by correcting the stellar number count

    CERN Document Server

    Sumi, T

    2016-01-01

    We find that significant incompleteness in stellar number counts results in a significant overestimate of the microlensing optical depth $\\tau$ and event rate per star per year $\\Gamma$ toward the Galactic bulge from the first two years of MOA-II survey. We find that the completeness in Red Clump Giant (RCG) counts $f_{\\rm RC}$ decreases proportional to the galactic latitude $b$, as $f_{\\rm RC}=(0.63\\pm0.11)-(0.052\\pm0.028)\\times b$, ranging 1-0.7 at $b=-6^\\circ\\sim-1.5^\\circ$. This caused overestimates in $\\tau$ and $\\Gamma$. The previous measurements with all source by Difference Image Analysis (DIA) by MACHO and MOA-I suffer the same bias due to their relatively poor seeing. On the other hand, the measurements with RCG sample by OGLE-II, MACHO and EROS were free from this bias because they seldomected only the events associated to the resolved stars. Thus, the incompleteness both in the number of events and stellar number count cancel out. We estimate $\\tau$ and $\\Gamma$ by correcting this incompleteness. ...

  19. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  20. Probing Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Asnani, Himanshu; Weissman, Tsachy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal probing of states of a channel by transmitter and receiver for maximizing rate of reliable communication. The channel is discrete memoryless (DMC) with i.i.d. states. The encoder takes probing actions dependent on the message. It then uses the state information obtained from probing causally or non-causally to generate channel input symbols. The decoder may also take channel probing actions as a function of the observed channel output and use the channel state information thus acquired, along with the channel output, to estimate the message. We refer to the maximum achievable rate for reliable communication for such systems as the 'Probing Capacity'. We characterize this capacity when the encoder and decoder actions are cost constrained. To motivate the problem, we begin by characterizing the trade-off between the capacity and fraction of channel states the encoder is allowed to observe, while the decoder is aware of channel states. In this setting of 'to observe or not to o...

  1. Giant Magnetized Outflows from the Centre of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Haverkorn, M; Purcell, C; Gaensler, B M; Bernardi, G; Kesteven, M J; Poppi, S; 10.1038/nature11734

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a super-massive black hole. Recent Fermi space telescope observations have revealed regions of \\gamma-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre, the so-called Fermi bubbles. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report on the detection of two giant, linearly-polarized radio Lobes, containing three ridge-like sub-structures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The Lobes each extend ~60 deg, bear a close correspondence to the Fermi bubbles, are located in the Galactic bulge, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 \\mu G. Our data signal that the radio Lobes originate in a bi-conical, star-formation (rather than black hole) driven outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 pc that transports a massive magnetic energy...

  2. Gravity modes as a way to distinguish between hydrogen- and helium-burning red giant stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedding, Timothy R.; Mosser, Benoit; Huber, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    . Asteroseismology offers a way forward, being a powerful tool for probing the internal structures of stars using their natural oscillation frequencies. Here we report observations of gravity-mode period spacings in red giants that permit a distinction between evolutionary stages to be made. We use high...

  3. Rotation of Giant Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kissin, Yevgeni

    2015-01-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5 and $5\\,M_\\odot$, taking into account mass loss on the giant branches and the partitioning of angular momentum between the outer and inner envelope. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag as well as the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles $\\Omega(r)$ is considered in the deep convective envelope, ranging from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force on the inward pumping of angular momentum, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core ro...

  4. Giant high occipital encephalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Encephaloceles are rare embryological mesenchymal developmental anomalies resulting from inappropriate ossification in skull through with herniation of intracranial contents of the sac. Encephaloceles are classified based on location of the osseous defect and contents of sac. Convexity encephalocele with osseous defect in occipital bone is called occipital encephalocele. Giant occipital encephaloceles can be sometimes larger than the size of baby skull itself and they pose a great surgical challenge. Occipital encephaloceles (OE are further classified as high OE when defect is only in occipital bone above the foramen magnum, low OE when involving occipital bone and foramen magnum and occipito-cervical when there involvement of occipital bone, foramen magnum and posterior upper neural arches. Chiari III malformation can be associated with high or low occipital encephaloceles. Pre-operatively, it is essential to know the size of the sac, contents of the sac, relation to the adjacent structures, presence or absence of venous sinuses/vascular structures and osseous defect size. Sometimes it becomes imperative to perform both CT and MRI for the necessary information. Volume rendered CT images can depict the relation of osseous defect to foramen magnum and provide information about upper neural arches which is necessary in classifying these lesions.

  5. Bringing Low the Giants

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Their work goes on unseen, because they a hundred metres beneath your feet. But while the race against the clock to build the LHC has begun on the surface, teams underground are feverishly engaged to dismantle LEP and its experiments. Four months after the start of dismantling, the technical coordinators of the different experiments discuss the progress of work. Little men attack the giant ALEPH. The barrel and its two endcaps have been removed to the end of the cavern and stripped of their cables. The breaking up of the detector can now begin. At ALEPH, counting rooms removed all in one go Jean-Paul Fabre, technical coordinator at ALEPH:'After making safe the structure, the first step was to remove the wiring and cables. Some 210 cubic metres were brought out. Then the counting rooms all round the detector were taken out. They were brought up from the cavern all in one go, up through the shaft, which is 10 metres wide and 150 metres deep. They made it with 15 centimetres to spare. They have been emptied of...

  6. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes. PMID:22425154

  7. Deformation behavior of A6063 tube with initial thickness deviation in free hydraulic bulging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lian-fa; GUO Cheng; DENG Yang

    2006-01-01

    Experiment on seamless tubes of aluminum alloy A6063 with initial thickness deviation of 0-20% was conducted through a free hydraulic bulging with tube ends free. The influence of initial thickness deviation on the cross-section profile, thickness distribution, maximum internal pressure and maximum radial expansion was investigated. FEM simulation was also performed in order to examine and help explaining the experimental results. The results indicate that the internal pressure and maximum internal pressure appear to be little influenced by the initial thickness deviation, and that the cross-section profile of the bulged tube changes diversely and can not be a perfect circle. The results also suggest that the increase in initial thickness deviation may lead to a remarkable decrease in maximum radial expansion, and a rapid increase in thickness deviation and the center eccentricity of the inner and outer profiles.

  8. Mechanical properties measurement of silicon nitride thin films using the bulge test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun Kee; Ko, Seong Hyun; Han, Jun Soo; Park, HyunChul

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical properties of silicon nitride films are investigated. Freestanding films of silicon nitride are fabricated using the MEMS technique. The films were deposited onto (100) silicon wafers by LPCVD (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition). Square and rectangular membranes are made by anisotropic etching of the silicon substrates. Then the bulge test for silicon nitride film was carried out. The thickness of specimens was 0.5, 0.75 and 1μm respectively. By testing both square and rectangular membranes, the reliability and valiant-ness of bulge test with regard to the shape of specimens was investigated. Also considering residual stress in the films, one can evaluate the Young's modulus from experimental load-deflection curves. Young's modulus of the silicon nitride films was about 232GPa. The residual stress is below 100MPa.

  9. Bladder Bulge: Unifying Old and New Sonographic Bladder Wall Abnormalities in Ureterolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Bomann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As long as CT remains the first line imaging modality in suspected ureterolithiasis, emergency physicians will continue to perform the majority of renal colic ultrasound studies in a search for hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis, however, is not always present and emergency physicians may not find it as useful as would be expected. Through this case series of seven patients, we present what we believe to be commonly present and easily acquired sonographic bladder wall findings in ureterolithiasis. These abnormalities are not routinely taught in emergency ultrasound and have not been reported in the emergency medicine literature. One variant, in fact, may be a novel finding unto itself. Due to their similar appearance, we propose to unify these findings under the name “bladder bulge.” This sign can be seen on axial views as an inward bulging or focal thickening of the bladder wall on the affected side, at the uretovesical junction.

  10. The Millennium Galaxy Catalogue: The severe attenuation of bulge flux by dusty spiral discs

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, Simon P

    2007-01-01

    Using the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue we quantify the dependency of the disc and bulge luminosity functions on galaxy inclination. Using a contemporary dust model we show that our results are consistent with galaxy discs being optically thick in their central regions (tau_B^f=3.8+/-0.7). As a consequence the measured B-band fluxes of bulges can be severely attenuated by 50% to 95% depending on disc inclination. We argue that a galaxy's optical appearance can be radically transformed by simply removing the dust, e.g. during cluster infall, with mid-type galaxies becoming earlier, redder, and more luminous. Finally we derive the mean photon escape fraction from the integrated galaxy population over the 0.1micron to 2.1 micron range, and use this to show that the energy of starlight absorbed by dust (in our model) is in close agreement with the total far-IR emission.

  11. Structure of the Galactic Bulge: Is the Milky Way a Double-barred Galaxy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Shogo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Tetsuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    Using the data of the IRSF/SIRIUS infrared survey along the Galactic plane ( l {<=} 10.{sup 0}5 at b = +1{sup 0}), we find a distinct structure, which is probably a secondary bar, inside the primary bar of our Galaxy. The apparent magnitude peak of Bulge red clump stars changes continuously from K{sub S} {approx} 13.5 (l = -10{sup 0}) to K{sub S} {approx} 12.3 (l = +10{sup 0}), and this can be explained by the bar structure of the Galactic Bulge. However, the apparent magnitude changes by only {approx} 0.1 mag over the central 8{sup 0}, and this indicates that there is a distinct structure inside the primary bar. In the process of the distance derivation, we have used the infrared extinction law in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands toward the Galactic center newly determined from our survey.

  12. Structure of the Galactic Bulge: Is the Milky Way a Double-barred Galaxy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the data of the IRSF/SIRIUS infrared survey along the Galactic plane ( l ≤ 10.05 at b = +10), we find a distinct structure, which is probably a secondary bar, inside the primary bar of our Galaxy. The apparent magnitude peak of Bulge red clump stars changes continuously from KS ∼ 13.5 (l = -100) to KS ∼ 12.3 (l = +100), and this can be explained by the bar structure of the Galactic Bulge. However, the apparent magnitude changes by only ∼ 0.1 mag over the central 80, and this indicates that there is a distinct structure inside the primary bar. In the process of the distance derivation, we have used the infrared extinction law in the J, H, and KS bands toward the Galactic center newly determined from our survey

  13. Analysis of photometric uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic Bulge microlensing survey data

    CERN Document Server

    Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; Szymański, M K; Mróz, P; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M; Soszyński, I

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical assessment of both, observed and reported, photometric uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic bulge microlensing survey data. This dataset is widely used for the detection of variable stars, transient objects, discovery of microlensing events, and characterization of the exo-planetary systems. Large collections of RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids discovered by the OGLE project toward the Galactic bulge provide light curves based on this dataset. We describe the method of analysis, and provide the procedure, which can be used to update preliminary photometric uncertainties, provided with the light curves, to the ones reflecting the actual observed scatter at a given magnitude and for a given CCD detector of the OGLE-IV camera.This is of key importance for data modeling, in particular, for the correct estimation of the goodness of fit.

  14. On the Shoulders of Giants: Properties of the Stellar Halo and the Milky Way Mass Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kafle, Prajwal R; Lewis, Geraint F; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-01-01

    Halo stars orbit within the potential of the Milky Way and hence their kinematics can be used to understand the underlying mass distribution. However, the inferred mass distribution depends sensitively upon assumptions made on the density and the velocity anisotropy profiles of the tracers. Also, there is a degeneracy between the parameters of the halo and that of the disk or bulge. Here, we decompose the Galaxy into bulge, disk and dark matter halo and then model the kinematic data of the halo BHB and K-giants from the SEGUE. Additionally, we use the gas terminal velocity curve and the Sgr A$^*$ proper motion. With $R_\\odot = 8.5$kpc, our study reveals that the density of the stellar halo has a break at $17.2^{+1.1}_{-1.0}$ kpc, and an exponential cut-off in the outer parts starting at $97.7^{+15.6}_{-15.8}$kpc. Also, we find the velocity anisotropy is radially biased with $\\beta_s= 0.4\\pm{0.2}$ in the outer halo. We measure halo virial mass $M_{\\text{vir}} = 0.80^{+0.31}_{-0.16} \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$, c...

  15. Measuring Distances and Probing the Unresolved Stellar Populations of Galaxies Using Infrared Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Tonry, John L.; Barris, Brian J.; Thompson, Rodger I.; Liu, Michael C.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Ajhar, Edward A.; Blakeslee, John P

    2002-01-01

    To empirically calibrate the IR surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distance scale and probe the properties of unresolved stellar populations, we measured fluctuations in 65 galaxies using NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. The early-type galaxies in this sample include elliptical and S0 galaxies and spiral bulges in a variety of environments. Absolute fluctuation magnitudes in the F160W (1.6 micron) filter were derived for each galaxy using previously-measured I-band SBF and Cepheid vari...

  16. Giant hydronephrosis and secondary pyelonephritis induced by Salmonella dublin in a Holstein calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipur Bazargani, T; Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Ashrafi, I; Abbassi, A M

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis occurs as a congenital or an acquired condition following obstruction of the urinary tract. In this study, a four month old male Holstein calf with emaciation, growth retardation and a poor dry scruffy hair coat was examined because of remarkable distention of right abdomen. At necropsy, right kidney was hydronephrotic as a very big fluid-filled round pelvis with the presence of multilocular cysts bulged from the cortical surface. With sectioning, more than 10 L of bloody fluid poured out from this sac. Microscopic examination showed severe atrophy of cortical tissue and fibrosis of the medulla. Also, the dilated pelvis was composed of fibrinous exudate and necrosis of epithelium associated with multifocal aggregations of neutrophils and bacterial microcolonies. In a culture and serotyping of isolated bacteria, Salmonella dublin was determined. In conclusion, S. dublin induced pyelonephritis secondary to congenital giant hydronephrosis is the first report in cattle in the world. PMID:27175163

  17. Giant hydronephrosis and secondary pyelonephritis induced by Salmonella dublin in a Holstein calf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipur Bazargani, T; Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Ashrafi, I; Abbassi, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis occurs as a congenital or an acquired condition following obstruction of the urinary tract. In this study, a four month old male Holstein calf with emaciation, growth retardation and a poor dry scruffy hair coat was examined because of remarkable distention of right abdomen. At necropsy, right kidney was hydronephrotic as a very big fluid-filled round pelvis with the presence of multilocular cysts bulged from the cortical surface. With sectioning, more than 10 L of bloody fluid poured out from this sac. Microscopic examination showed severe atrophy of cortical tissue and fibrosis of the medulla. Also, the dilated pelvis was composed of fibrinous exudate and necrosis of epithelium associated with multifocal aggregations of neutrophils and bacterial microcolonies. In a culture and serotyping of isolated bacteria, Salmonella dublin was determined. In conclusion, S. dublin induced pyelonephritis secondary to congenital giant hydronephrosis is the first report in cattle in the world.

  18. Pulsating variable stars in the MACHO bulge database: the semiregular variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, D.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.A. [and others

    1997-11-01

    We review the pulsating stars contained in the top 24 fields of the MACHO bulge database, with special emphasis on the red semireg-ular stars. Based on period, amplitude and color cuts, we have selected a sample of 2000 semireguku variables with 15 < P < 100 days. Their period-luminosity relation is studied, as well ss their spatial distribution. We find that they follow the bar, unlike the RR Lyrae in these fields.

  19. Chemical abundances in a high-velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Xu, S.; Kunder, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass variable high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic center. Wide-area surveys such as APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities higher than 350 km s-1. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass RR Lyrae star that is located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~-400 km s-1. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derived abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allowed us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances combined suggest that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star might have been stripped from a stellar cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. 3D Spectrophotometry of Planetary Nebulae in the Bulge of M31

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, M. M.; Becker, T; Kelz, A.; Schmoll, J.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce crowded field integral field (3D) spectrophotometry as a useful technique for the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies. As a methodological test, we present a pilot study with selected extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPN) in the bulge of M31, demonstrating how 3D spectroscopy is able to improve the limited accuracy of background subtraction which one would normally obtain with classical slit spectroscopy. It is shown that due to the absence of slit effects, 3...

  1. The Youth Bulge in Egypt: An Intersection of Demographics, Security, and the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan LaGraffe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Arab Spring, Egyptians revolted against decades of poor governance and failed institutions. A wide range of grievances contributed to the eventual fall of the Mubarak regime, and most of these grievances were influenced by the demographic composition of the Egyptian population. This paper argues that the youth bulge in Egypt played a major role in the political transition and as such serves as the prime example of the intersection of demographics, security, and the Arab Spring.

  2. The Youth Bulge in Egypt: An Intersection of Demographics, Security, and the Arab Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Dan LaGraffe

    2012-01-01

    During the Arab Spring, Egyptians revolted against decades of poor governance and failed institutions. A wide range of grievances contributed to the eventual fall of the Mubarak regime, and most of these grievances were influenced by the demographic composition of the Egyptian population. This paper argues that the youth bulge in Egypt played a major role in the political transition and as such serves as the prime example of the intersection of demographics, security, and the Arab Spring.

  3. Red Variables in Globular Clusters: Comparison with the Bulge and the LMC

    OpenAIRE

    Matsunaga, N; Nakada, Y; Tanabe, T; Fukushi, H.; Ita, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We are conducting a project aimed at surveys and repeated observations of red variables (or long-period variables) in globular clusters. Using the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared facility located at South Africa, we are observing 145 globular clusters that are accessible from the site. In this contribution, we present our observations and preliminary results. We have discovered many red variables, especially in the Bulge region, whose memberships to the clusters remain to be confirmed. Using a samp...

  4. Genetically Induced Cell Death in Bulge Stem Cells Reveals Their Redundancy for Hair and Epidermal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Set...

  5. TWO RED CLUMPS AND THE X-SHAPED MILKY WAY BULGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared photometry, we find two red clump (RC) populations coexisting in fields toward the Galactic bulge at latitudes |b|>5.05, ranging over ∼130 in longitude and 200 in latitude. These RC peaks indicate two stellar populations separated by ∼2.3 kpc; at (l, b) = (+1, - 8) the two RCs are located at 6.5 and 8.8 ± 0.2 kpc. The double-peaked RC is inconsistent with a tilted bar morphology. Most of our fields show the two RCs at roughly constant distance with longitude, also inconsistent with a tilted bar; however, an underlying bar may be present. Stellar densities in the two RCs change dramatically with longitude: on the positive longitude side the foreground RC is dominant, while the background RC dominates negative longitudes. A line connecting the maxima of the foreground and background populations is tilted to the line of sight by ∼200±40, similar to claims for the tilt of a Galactic bar. The distance between the two RCs decreases toward the Galactic plane; seen edge-on the bulge is X-shaped, resembling some extragalactic bulges and the results of N-body simulations. The center of this X is consistent with the distance to the Galactic center, although better agreement would occur if the bulge is 2-3 Gyr younger than 47 Tuc. Our observations may be understood if the two RC populations emanate, nearly tangentially, from the Galactic bar ends, in a funnel shape. Alternatively, the X, or double funnel, may continue to the Galactic center. From the Sun, this would appear peanut/box shaped, but X-shaped when viewed tangentially.

  6. The Black Hole–Bulge Mass Relation in Megamaser Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läsker, Ronald; Greene, Jenny E.; Seth, Anil; van de Ven, Glenn; Braatz, James A.; Henkel, Christian; Lo, K. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images for nine megamaser disk galaxies with the primary goal of studying photometric BH-galaxy scaling relations. The megamaser disks provide the highest-precision extragalactic BH mass measurements, while our high-resolution HST imaging affords us the opportunity to decompose the complex nuclei of their late-type hosts in detail. Based on the morphologies and shapes of the galaxy nuclei, we argue that most of these galaxies’ central regions contain secularly evolving components (pseudo-bulges), and in many cases we photometrically identify co-existing “classical” bulge components as well. Using these decompositions, we draw the following conclusions. (1) The megamaser BH masses span two orders of magnitude (106–{10}8 {M}ȯ ) while the stellar mass of their spiral host galaxies are all ˜ {10}11 {M}ȯ within a factor of three. (2) The BH masses at a given bulge mass or total stellar mass in the megamaser host spiral galaxies tend to be lower than expected when compared to an extrapolation of the BH-bulge relation based on early-type galaxies. (3) The observed large intrinsic scatter of BH masses in the megamaser host galaxies raises the question of whether scaling relations exist in spiral galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 12185.

  7. Black hole starvation and bulge evolution in a Milky Way-like galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, Silvia; Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Madau, Piero; Bellovary, Jillian; Governato, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    We present a new zoom-in hydrodynamical simulation, `ErisBH', which features the same initial conditions, resolution, and sub-grid physics as the close Milky Way-analogue `Eris' (Guedes et al. 2011), but it also includes prescriptions for the formation, growth and feedback of supermassive black holes. This enables a detailed study of black hole evolution and the impact of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in a late-type galaxy. At z = 0, the main galaxy of ErisBH hosts a central black hole of 2.6 × 106 M⊙, which correlates to the bulge mass and the galaxy's central velocity dispersion similarly to what is observed in the Milky Way and in pseudobulges. During its evolution, the black hole grows mostly through mergers with black holes brought in by accreted satellite galaxies and very little by gas accretion (due to the modest amount of gas that reaches the central regions). AGN feedback is weak and it affects only the central 1-2 kpc. Yet, it limits the growth of the bulge, which results in a rotation curve that, in the inner ˜ 10 kpc, is flatter than that of Eris. We find that ErisBH is more prone to instabilities than Eris, due to its smaller bulge and larger disc. At z ˜ 0.3, an initially small bar grows to be of a few disc scalelengths in size. The formation of the bar causes a small burst of star formation in the inner few hundred pc, provides new gas to the central black hole and causes the bulge to have a boxy/peanut morphology by z = 0.

  8. Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies - I. Bulge luminosities from dedicated near-infrared data

    OpenAIRE

    Läsker, Ronald; Ferrarese, Laura; van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to secure, refine and supplement the relation between central Supermassive Black Hole masses (Mbh), and the bulge luminosities of their host galaxies, (Lbul), we obtained deep, high spatial resolution K-band images of 35 nearby galaxies with securely measured Mbh, using the wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). A dedicated data reduction and sky subtraction strategy was adopted to estimate the brightness and structure of the sky, a critical step w...

  9. A Radiation-Hydrodynamical Model for Supermassive Black Hole-to-Bulge Mass Relation and Quasar Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Umemura, Masayuki

    2001-01-01

    As a potential mechanism to build up supermassive black holes (BHs) in a spheroidal system, we consider the radiation drag effect by bulge stars, which extracts angular momentum from interstellar gas and thus allows the gas to accrete onto the galactic center. With incorporating radiation hydrodynamical equation with simple stellar evolution, it is shown that the BH-to-bulge mass ratio, $f_{BH}$, is basically determined by a fundamental constant, that is, the energy conversion efficiency for ...

  10. Orientation-specific cis complementation by bulge- and loop-mutated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 TAR RNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Braddock, M; Powell, R; Sutton, J.; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-01-01

    Tat activates human immunodeficiency type 1 gene expression by binding to TAR RNA. TAR comprises a partially base paired stem and hexanucleotide loop with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem. In vitro, Tat binds to the bulge and upper stem, with no requirement for the loop. However, in vivo, loop sequences are critical for activation, implying that a loop binding cellular factor may be involved in the activation pathway. Given that activation appears to be a two-component system comprisin...

  11. Mechanics of membrane bulging during cell-wall disruption in Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kristopher E.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2011-04-01

    The bacterial cell wall is a network of sugar strands crosslinked by peptides that serve as the primary structure for bearing osmotic stress. Despite its importance in cellular survival, the robustness of the cell wall to network defects has been relatively unexplored. Treatment of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli with the antibiotic vancomycin, which disrupts the crosslinking of new material during growth, leads to the development of pronounced bulges and eventually of cell lysis. Here, we model the mechanics of the bulging of the cytoplasmic membrane through pores in the cell wall. We find that the membrane undergoes a transition between a nearly flat state and a spherical bulge at a critical pore radius of ~20 nm. This critical pore size is large compared to the typical distance between neighboring peptides and glycan strands, and hence pore size acts as a constraint on network integrity. We also discuss the general implications of our model to membrane deformations in eukaryotic blebbing and vesiculation in red blood cells.

  12. Mapping the Three-Dimensional "X-Shaped Structure" in Models of the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations have shown that the X-shaped structure in the Milky Way bulge can naturally arise from the bar instability and buckling instability. To understand the influence of the buckling amplitude on the morphology of the X-shape, we analyze three self-consistent numerical simulations of barred galaxies with different buckling amplitudes (strong, intermediate and weak). We derive the three-dimensional density with an adaptive kernel smoothing technique. The face-on iso-density surfaces are all elliptical, while in the edge-on view, the morphology of buckled bars transitions with increasing radius, from a central boxy core to a peanut bulge and then to an extended thin bar. Based on these iso-density surfaces at different density levels, we find no clear evidence for a well-defined structure shaped like a letter X. The X-shaped structure is more peanut-like, whose visual perception is probably enhanced by the pinched inner concave iso-density contours. The peanut bulge can reproduce qualitatively t...

  13. Brightness variations of the northern 630nm intertropical arc and the midnight pressure bulge over Eritrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Wiens

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The nightglow brightness at 630nm from the thermospheric O(1D layer was monitored nightly at Asmara, Eritrea (15.4° N, 39.9° E, 7° N dip with an all-sky imager. Averages of north-south strips of the images enabled contour plots of brightness on a latitude vs. local time grid. The contours show the movement of the intertropical arc southward before midnight, staying just north of Asmara after midnight, and gradually brightening to a maximum at 02:00h local civil time, 02:00 LT, after which it disappears before dawn. It is argued that all features of the plots can be explained by known mechanisms capable of driving ions along magnetic field lines, including the fountain effect, summer to winter transequatorial winds, and the midnight pressure bulge.

    The 02:00 LT brightness maximum is the most striking and the most persistent feature in the data. The persistence of the location of the 02:00 LT brightening is attributed to a pressure bulge centered on the geographic equator at midnight and extending to higher latitudes with increasing local time in both the winter and the summer hemispheres. The bulge is shown to be stronger near solstice than near equinox, confirming earlier work.

  14. Chemical abundances in a high velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Camilla Juul; Koch, Andreas; Xu, Siyi; Kunder, Andrea; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, variable, high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic centre. Wide-area surveys like APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities larger than 350 km/s. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass, RR Lyrae star, located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~ -400 km/s. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derive abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allow us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, combining its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances suggests that the star was accelerated from the out...

  15. Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies - I. Bulge luminosities from dedicated near-infrared data

    CERN Document Server

    Läsker, Ronald; van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to secure, refine and supplement the relation between central Supermassive Black Hole masses (Mbh), and the bulge luminosities of their host galaxies, (Lbul), we obtained deep, high spatial resolution K-band images of 35 nearby galaxies with securely measured Mbh, using the wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). A dedicated data reduction and sky subtraction strategy was adopted to estimate the brightness and structure of the sky, a critical step when tracing the light distribution of extended objects in the near-infrared. From the final image product, bulge and total magnitudes were extracted via two-dimensional profile fitting. As a first order approximation, all galaxies were modeled using a simple Sersic-bulge + exponential-disk decomposition. However, we found that such models did not adequately describe the structure that we observe in a large fraction of our sample galaxies which often include cores, bars, nuclei, inner disks, spiral arms, rings and envelope...

  16. The Large-Scale Extinction Map of the Galactic Bulge from the MACHO Project Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Popowski, P; Becker, A; Popowski, Piotr; Cook, Kem; Becker, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We present a (V-R)-based reddening map of about 43 square degrees of the Galactic bulge/bar. The map is constructed using template image photometry from the MACHO microlensing survey, contains 9717 resolution elements, and is based on (V-R)-color averages of the entire color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in 4 by 4 arc-minute tiles. The conversion from the observed color to the reddening follows from an assumption that CMDs of all bulge fields would look similar in the absence of extinction. Consequently, the difference in observed color between various fields originates from varying contribution of the disk extinction summed along different lines of sight. We check that our (V-R) colors correlate very well with visual extinction derived by Stanek in Baade's Window. We show that a dusty disk obeying a cosec|b| extinction law, E(V-R) = 0.0274 cosec|b|, provides a good approximation to the extinction toward the MACHO bulge/bar fields. The large-scale (V-R)-color and visual extinction map presented here will be made ...

  17. DISCOVERY OF A PAIR OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN AN INVISIBLE CLUSTER BEYOND THE GALACTIC BULGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of a pair of extremely reddened classical Cepheid variable stars located in the Galactic plane behind the bulge, using near-infrared (NIR) time-series photometry from the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea Survey. This is the first time that such objects have ever been found in the opposite side of the Galactic plane. The Cepheids have almost identical periods, apparent brightnesses, and colors. From the NIR Leavitt law, we determine their distances with ∼1.5% precision and ∼8% accuracy. We find that they have a same total extinction of A(V)≃32 mag, and are located at the same heliocentric distance of 〈d〉=11.4±0.9 kpc, and less than 1 pc from the true Galactic plane. Their similar periods indicate that the Cepheids are also coeval, with an age of ∼48±3 Myr, according to theoretical models. They are separated by an angular distance of only 18.″3, corresponding to a projected separation of ∼1 pc. Their position coincides with the expected location of the Far 3 kpc Arm behind the bulge. Such a tight pair of similar classical Cepheids indicates the presence of an underlying young open cluster that is both hidden behind heavy extinction and disguised by the dense stellar field of the bulge. All our attempts to directly detect this “invisible cluster” have failed, and deeper observations are needed. (letters)

  18. The Formation of Bulges, Discs and Two Component Galaxies in the CANDELS Survey at z < 3

    CERN Document Server

    Margalef-Bentabol, Berta; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, Will; Duncan, Kenneth; Ferguson, Harry C; Koekemoer, Anton M; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel R

    2016-01-01

    We examine a sample of 1495 galaxies in the CANDELS fields to determine the evolution of two component galaxies, including bulges and discs, within massive galaxies at the epoch 1 < z < 3 when the Hubble sequence forms. We fit all of our galaxies' light profiles with a single S\\'ersic fit, as well as with a combination of exponential and S\\'ersic profiles. The latter is done in order to describe a galaxy with an inner and an outer component, or bulge and disc component. We develop and use three classification methods (visual, F-test and the RFF) to separate our sample into 1-component galaxies (disc/spheroids-like galaxies) and 2-component galaxies (galaxies formed by an 'inner part' or bulge and an 'outer part' or disc). We then compare the results from using these three different ways to classify our galaxies. We find that the fraction of galaxies selected as 2-component galaxies increases on average 50 per cent from the lowest mass bin to the most massive galaxies, and decreases with redshift by a fa...

  19. Stellar variability in low-extinction regions towards the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Dominici, T P; Medina-Tanco, G A; Teixeira, R G; Benevides-Soares, P

    1999-01-01

    Intensive monitoring of low-extinction windows towards the galactic bulge has provided in the last years valuable information for studies about the dynamics, kinematics and formation history of this part of the galaxy, mainly by characterizing the bulge stellar populations (Paczy\\'nski, 1996). Since 1997, we have been conducting an intensive photometric-astrometric survey of the galactic bulge, with the monitoring of about 120000 stars in 12 windows uniformly distributed in galactic latitude and longitude (Blanco & Terndrup, 1989 e Blanco, 1988) never before submitted to this kind of survey. For this purpose, we have used the IAG/USP CCD Meridian Circle of the Abrahão de Moraes Observatory. The main objective of this work is the identification and classification of variable objects. In this work we present the set up and development of the necessary tools for a project like this and the posterior analysis of our data. We briefly describe the construction of a program to organize and detect variables amon...

  20. The Effects of Gas on Morphological Transformation in Mergers: Implications for Bulge and Disk Demographics

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Cox, Thomas J; Hernquist, Lars; Jogee, Shardha; Keres, Dusan; Ma, Chung-Pei; Robertson, Brant; Stewart, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    Transformation of disks into spheroids via mergers is a well-accepted element of galaxy formation models. However, recent simulations have shown that bulge formation is suppressed in increasingly gas-rich mergers. We investigate the global implications of these results in a cosmological framework, using independent approaches: empirical halo-occupation models (where galaxies are populated in halos according to observations) and semi-analytic models. In both, ignoring the effects of gas in mergers leads to the well-known over-production of spheroids at low masses: low and intermediate-mass galaxies are inescapably predicted to be bulge-dominated (B/T~0.5 at <10^10 M_sun, with almost no 'bulgeless' systems), even if they have avoided major mergers. Including the different physical behavior of gas in mergers immediately leads to a dramatic change: bulge formation is suppressed in low-mass galaxies, which are observed to be gas-rich (giving B/T~0.1 at <10^10 M_sun, with a number of bulgeless galaxies in goo...

  1. Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The Distance Scale Galactic Bulge - LMC - SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Udalski, A

    1998-01-01

    We analyze the mean luminosity of three samples of field RRab Lyr stars observed in the course of the OGLE microlensing experiment: 73 stars from the Galactic bulge and 110 and 128 stars from selected fields in the LMC and SMC, respectively. The fields are the same as in the recent distance determination to the Magellanic Clouds with the red clump stars method by Udalski et al (1998). We determine the relative distance scale d_{GB}:d_{LMC}:d_{SMC} equal to: (0.194+/-0.010):1.00:(1.30+/-0.08). We calibrate our RR Lyr distance scale with the recent calibration of Gould and Popowski (1998) based on statistical parallaxes. We obtain the following distance moduli to the Galactic bulge, LMC and SMC: m-M=14.53+/-0.15, m-M=18.09+/-0.16 and m-M=18.66+/-0.16 mag. We use the RR Lyr mean V-band luminosity at the Galactic bulge metallicity as the reference brightness and analyze the mean, I-band luminosity of the red clump stars in objects with different ages and metallicities. We add to our analysis the metal poor Carina...

  2. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of 2A 1822-371 - A bulge on the accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, K. O.; Cordova, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the 5.57-hour modulation of the X-ray source 2A 1822-371 is caused by the combined effects of (1) an occultation of the emitting region by a companion star, and (2) a bulge on the accretion disk surrounding the X-ray source. It is speculated that the changing aspect of the X-ray-heated inner face of the bulge with orbital phase may also contribute to the modulation at UV and optical wavelengths. The bulge's position angle suggests it to have been the result of turbulence caused by the impact of a gas stream transferring matter from the companion, and 2A 1822-371 is held to provide the most direct indication extant of such a structure in an accretion disk. It is speculated that comparison of high-time resolution UV observations with optical and X-ray light curves will allow further deductions as to the size, structure and location of the far-UV emitting region.

  3. The morphologies of massive galaxies from z~3 - Witnessing the 2 channels of bulge growth

    CERN Document Server

    Huertas-Company, Marc; Mei, Simona; Shankar, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Daddi, Emanuele; Barro, Guillermo; Cabrera-Vives, Guillermo; Cattaneo, Andrea; Dimauro, Paola; Gravet, Romaric

    2015-01-01

    [abridged] We quantify the morphological evolution of z~0 massive galaxies ($M*/M_\\odot\\sim10^{11}$) from z~3 in the 5 CANDELS fields. The progenitors are selected using abundance matching techniques to account for the mass growth. The morphologies strongly evolve from z~3. At z3-4) and small effective radii ($R_e$~1 kpc) pointing towards an early formation through gas-rich mergers or VDI. Between z~ 2.5 and z~0, they rapidly increase their size by a factor of ~4-5, become all passive but their global morphology remains unaltered. The structural evolution is independent of the gas fractions, suggesting that it is driven by ex-situ events. The remaining 60% experience a gradual morphological transformation, from clumpy disks to more regular bulge+disks systems, essentially happening at z>1. It results in the growth of a significant bulge component (n~3) for 2/3 of the systems possibly through the migration of clumps while the remaining 1/3 keeps a rather small bulge (n~1.5-2). The transition phase between dist...

  4. The WFC3 Galactic Bulge Treasury Program: A First Look at Resolved Stellar Population Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas M; Zoccali, Manuela; Renzini, Alvio; Ferguson, Henry C; Anderson, Jay; Smith, Ed; Bond, Howard E; Minniti, Dante; Valenti, Jeff A; Casertano, Stefano; Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; VandenBerg, Don A; Valenti, Elena

    2008-01-01

    [Abridged] When WFC3 is installed on HST, the community will have powerful new tools for investigating resolved stellar populations. The WFC3 Galactic Bulge Treasury program will obtain deep imaging on 4 low-extinction fields. These non-proprietary data will enable a variety of science investigations not possible with previous data sets. To aid in planning for the use of these data and for future proposals, we provide an introduction to the program, its photometric system, and the associated calibration effort. The observing strategy is based upon a new 5-band photometric system spanning the UV, optical, and near-infrared. With these broad bands, one can construct reddening-free indices of Teff and [Fe/H]. Besides the 4 bulge fields, the program will target 6 fields in well-studied star clusters, spanning a wide range of [Fe/H]. The cluster data serve to calibrate the indices, provide population templates, and correct the transformation of isochrones into the WFC3 photometric system. The bulge data will shed ...

  5. Milky Way mass galaxies with X-shaped bulges are not rare in the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Laurikainen, E; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, A; Herrera-Endoqui, M

    2014-01-01

    Boxy/Peanut/X-shaped (B/P/X) bulges are studied using the 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), and the Ks-band images from the Near-IR S0 galaxy Survey (NIRS0S). They are compared with the properties of barlenses, defined as lens-like structures embedded in bars. Based on observations and recent simulation models we show evidence that barlenses are the more face-on counterparts of B/P/X-shaped bulges. Using unsharp masks 18 new X-shaped structures were identified, covering a large range of galaxy inclinations. The similar masses and red B-3.6 micron colors of the host galaxies, and the fact that the combined axial ratio distribution of the host galaxy disks is flat, supports the interpretation that barlenses and X-shapes are physically the same phenomenon. Our detailed 2D multi-component decompositions for 30 galaxies, fitting the barlens/X-shape with a separate component indicate very small or non-existent classical bulges. Taking into account that the structures ...

  6. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal and Circumferential Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or bulging factors that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal and circumferential cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in the form of contour plots of the bulging factor as a function of two nondimensional parameters: the shell curvature parameter, lambda, which is a function of the shell geometry, Poisson's ratio, and the crack length; and a loading parameter, eta, which is a function of the shell geometry, material properties, and the applied internal pressure. These plots identify the ranges of the shell curvature and loading parameters for which the effects of geometric nonlinearity are significant. Simple empirical expressions for the bulging factor are then derived from the numerical results and shown to predict accurately the nonlinear response of shells with longitudinal and circumferential cracks. The numerical results are also compared with analytical solutions based on linear shallow shell theory for thin shells, and with some other semi-empirical solutions from the literature, and limitations on the use of these other expressions are suggested.

  7. The Battle of the Bulge: Decay of the Thin, False Cosmic String

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M B; Yajnik, U A; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-01-01

    We consider the decay of cosmic strings that are trapped in the false vacuum in a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 3+1 dimensions. We restrict our analysis to the case of thin-walled cosmic strings which occur when large magnetic flux trapped inside the string. Thus the string looks like a tube of fixed radius, at which it is classically stable. The core of the string contains magnetic flux in the true vacuum, while outside the string, separated by a thin wall, is the false vacuum. The string decays by tunnelling to a configuration which is represented by a bulge, where the region of true vacuum within, is ostensibly enlarged. The bulge can be described as the meeting, of a kink soliton anti-soliton pair, along the length of the string. It can be described as a bulge appearing in the initial string, starting from the string of small, classically stable radius, expanding to a fat string of large, classically unstable (to expansion) radius and then returning back to the string of small radius along its lengt...

  8. A close look at secular evolution: Boxy/peanut bulges reduce gas inflow to the central kiloparsec

    CERN Document Server

    Fragkoudi, F; Bosma, A

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we investigate the effect of boxy/peanut (b/p) bulges on bar-induced gas inflow to the central kiloparsec, which plays a crucial role on the evolution of disc galaxies. We carry out hydrodynamic gas response simulations in realistic barred galaxy potentials, including or not the geometry of a b/p bulge, to investigate the amount of gas inflow induced in the different models. We find that b/p bulges can reduce the gas inflow rate to the central kiloparsec by more than an order of magnitude, which leads to a reduction in the amount of gas available in the central regions. We also investigate the effect of the dark matter halo concentration on these results, and find that for maximal discs, the effect of b/p bulges on gas inflow remains significant. The reduced amount of gas reaching the central regions due to the presence of b/p bulges could have significant repercussions on the formation of discy- (pseudo-) bulges, on the amount of nuclear star formation and feedback, on the fuel reservoir for A...

  9. The Milky Way without X: An alternative interpretation of the double red clump in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young-Wook; Chung, Chul

    2015-01-01

    The presence of two red clumps (RCs) in high latitude fields of the Milky Way bulge is interpreted as evidence for an X-shaped structure originated from the bar instability. Here we show, however, that this double RC phenomenon is more likely to be another manifestation of multiple populations observed in globular clusters (GCs) in the metal-rich regime. As in the bulge GC Terzan 5, the helium enhanced second generation stars (G2) in the classical bulge component of the Milky Way are placed on the bright RC, which is about 0.5 mag brighter than the normal RC originated from the first generation stars (G1), producing the observed double RC. In a composite bulge, where a classical bulge can coexist with a boxy pseudo bulge, our models can also reproduce key observations, such as the dependence of the double RC feature on metallicity and Galactic latitude and longitude. If confirmed by Gaia trigonometric parallax distances, this would indicate that the Milky Way bar is not sufficiently buckled to form the X-shap...

  10. THE NATURE OF GROWING BULGES WITHIN z < 1.3 GALAXY DISKS IN THE GOODS-N FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze central surface brightness μ0, nuclear and global colors of intermediate redshift disk galaxies. On an apparent-diameter-limited sample of 398 galaxies from ACS/HST (Advanced Camera for Surveys in the Hubble Space Telescope) The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North (GOODS-N), we find 131 galaxies with bulges and 214 without. Up to z ∼ 0.8, blue, star-forming nuclei are found in galaxies with low μ0 only; all high-μ0 nuclei show red, passive colors, so that nuclear and global (U - B) colors strongly correlate with central surface brightness, as found in the local universe. At 0.8 < z < 1.3, a fraction of ∼27% of the high surface brightness nuclei show blue colors, and positive nuclear color gradients. The associated nuclear star formation must lead to bulge growth inside disks. Population modeling suggests that such blue bulges evolve into local pseudobulges rather than classical bulges. We do not find evidence for rejuvenation of classical bulges at the sampled z. High luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) become common at 0.8 < z < 1.3, perhaps pointing to a role of AGNs in the growth or star formation truncation of bulges.

  11. Giant cell arteritis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pravin Patil,1 Niral Karia,2 Shaifali Jain,3 Bhaskar Dasgupta1 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Ophthalmology, 3Department of Radiology, Southend University Hospital, Westcliff, Essex, United Kingdom Abstract: Giant cell arteritis is the most common vasculitis in Caucasians. Acute visual loss in one or both eyes is by far the most feared and irreversible complication of giant cell arteritis. This article reviews recent guidelines on early recognition of systemic, cranial, and ophthalmic manifestations, and current management and diagnostic strategies and advances in imaging. We share our experience of the fast track pathway and imaging in associated disorders, such as large-vessel vasculitis. Keywords: giant cell arteritis, diagnosis, treatment, polymyalgia rheumatica

  12. Giant Condyloma Acuminatum of Rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condyloma acuminatum, a benign disease caused by a filtrable virus, occurs predominantly in the perianal and genital areas. The lesions are noninvasive but are subject to recurrence. In rare instances, a more aggressive from of this disease, known as 'giant condyloma acuminatum' or 'Buschke-Lowenstein tumor', occurs. In this form, infiltration of the lesion into surrounding structures takes place. This tumor has been reported to occur principally in the genitourinarv tract. The authors experienced a case of giant condyloma acuminatum originating from rectum in 67 years old male patient which recurred 3 months after electrofulguration.

  13. Giant fields in southwest Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-20

    According to Petroleos Mexicanos southeastern Mexico's Isthmus Saline basin holds five new giant fields - Tonala-El Burro, El Plan, Cinco Presidentes, Oraggio, and Magallanes - producing oil and gas from Tertiary sandstones. Numerous normal faults resulting from salt intrusion have given rise to multiple blocks, each with its own reservoir conditions. Previously discovered basins in the area include the Macuspana, which holds three giant gas- and condensate-producing fields: Jose Colomo, Chilapilla, and Hormiquero. The 3100-mi/sup 2/ Campeche marine platform, extending offshore nearby, contains the Cantarell complex, Mexico's most productive hydrocarbon province.

  14. Imaging of giant pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present five proven giant pituitary adenomas studied by CT and MRI, and review the clinical and imaging findings. Our aim was to examine the radiologic appearances and to search for criteria useful in distinguishing these tumors from other sellar and suprasellar tumours, mainly craniopharyngioma. The main differences from small adenomas were high prevalence of macrocysts, a more invasive behaviour and a clinical picture dominated by mass effect rather than endocrine disturbance. Factors supporting the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma in a giant intra- and suprasellar mass include: infrasellar extension, absence of calcification and presence of low-signal cysts on T1-weighted images. (orig.) (orig.)

  15. Charting the Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  16. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeem Alsubaie; Almalki, Mussa H.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  17. Giant lumbosacral schwannoma in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Rashim Kataria; Dhruba Jyoti Kurmi; Jayanti Mehta; Virendra Deo Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Small spinal intradural extramedullary schwannoma are a common occurrence in the middle aged. However, giant schwannoma in pediatric age group is rare. We report one such case of giant extradural lumbosacral schwannoma in an 8-year-old child. Clinical features, histopathology and management of giant schwannoma is discussed and the present literature reviewed.

  18. Michigan has a sleeping giant

    CERN Multimedia

    Brock, Raymond; Nichols, Sue

    2007-01-01

    "That giant is 750 miles of fiber optic cable that lassoes its three biggest research universities and Van Andel Institute to the future. Its mission: to uncover the nature of the Big Bang by connecton U.S. physicists to their huge experiment ATLAS in Geneva.." (4 pages)

  19. A Giant or a Dwarf?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Herman

    2005-01-01

    EU may appear to be a giant when it can act on behalf of a united Europe, but usually it is hampered by conflicting member state interests. The EU economic and administrative resources for foreign and trade policy are quite small (on level with one of its major member states) and the hopes in many...

  20. Giant lipomas of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Giant lipomas of the hand are very rare and may cause compressions and other complications. Thus, they require a careful preoperative evaluation in order to make a proper differential diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 8-11

  1. Giant superior mesenteric artery aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Temiz, Ahmet; Bostan, Mehmet; Şatıroğlu, Ömer; Çetin, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2011-01-01

    Aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare condition and most of them are symptomatic. Gradu­ally increasing abdominal pain, intestinal ischemic symp­toms and rupture are the most common symptoms. We herein report a giant SMA aneurysm detected in a patient with complaint of abdominal discomfort.

  2. Damping of multiphonon giant resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Dinh Dang, N; Arima, A

    2000-01-01

    The phonon damping model (PDM) is applied to derive the equations that describe the damping of three-, and n -phonon giant resonances. As examples of the application of this approach, the results of numerical calculations for the double giant resonance (DGDR) (n=2) and triple giant dipole resonance (TGDR) (n=3) in sup 9 sup 0 Zr, sup 1 sup 2 sup 0 Sn and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb are discussed and compared with those obtained by folding independent giant dipole resonances (GDRs) (the folding results). For the DGDR in the double magic nucleus sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb, we found that these results are very close to the folding results. In the open-shell nuclei sup 9 sup 0 Zr and sup 1 sup 2 sup 0 Sn, a clear deviation from the folding results is observed in calculations in agreement with the experimental trend. The results for the integrated strength and energy of TGDR are found to be much closer to the folding results in all three nuclei. The TGDR widths in the open shell nuclei are found to be larger than the folding r...

  3. Guiding the Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination joint European project that is conducted at the 1-m ESO telescope by a consortium of 20 astronomical institutes. More information Further information about EIS is available at http://www.eso.org/eis. From this site, it is possible to visit the EIS release page and to browse through pictures of the distant Universe and of individual objects, some of which will be observed with the VLT in the future. Notes [1] The home institutes of the astronomers involved in EIS include the European Southern Observatory, Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy), Leiden Observatory (The

  4. Mapping the outer bulge with RRab stars from the VVV Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, F.; Minniti, D.; Saito, R. K.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Navarrete, C.; Catelan, M.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Elorrieta, F.; Eyheramendy, S.; Jordán, A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) is a near-IR time-domain survey of the Galactic bulge and southern plane. One of the main goals of this survey is to reveal the 3D structure of the Milky Way through their variable stars. In particular, enormous numbers of RR Lyrae stars have been discovered in the inner regions of the bulge (-8° ≲ b ≲ -1°) by optical surveys such as OGLE and MACHO, but leaving an unexplored window of more than ~47 sq deg (-10.0° ≲ ℓ ≲ + 10.7° and - 10.3° ≲ b ≲ -8.0°) observed by the VVV Survey. Aims: Our goal is to characterize the RR Lyrae stars in the outer bulge in terms of their periods, amplitudes, Fourier coefficients, and distances in order to evaluate the 3D structure of the bulge in this area. The distance distribution of RR Lyrae stars will be compared to that of red clump stars, which is known to trace a X-shaped structure, in order to determine whether these two different stellar populations share the same Galactic distribution. Methods: A search for RR Lyrae stars was performed in more than ~47 sq deg at low Galactic latitudes (-10.3° ≲ b ≲ -8.0°). In the procedure the χ2 value and analysis of variance (AoV) statistic methods were used to determine the variability and periodic features of the light curves, respectively. To prevent misclassifications, the analysis was performed only on the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab) owing to similarities found in the near-IR light curve shapes of contact eclipsing binaries (W UMa) and first overtone RR Lyrae stars (RRc). On the other hand, the red clump stars of the same analyzed tiles were selected, and cuts in the color-magnitude diagram were applied and the maximum distance restricted to ~20 kpc in order to construct a similar catalog in terms of distances and covered area compared to the RR Lyrae stars. Results: We report the detection of more than 1000 RR Lyrae ab-type stars in the VVV Survey located in the outskirts of the Galactic bulge

  5. Giant hydronephrosis mimicking progressive malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidenreich Axel

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of giant hydronephroses are rare and usually contain no more than 1–2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. We report a remarkable case of giant hydronephrosis mimicking a progressive malignant abdominal tumour. Case presentation A 78-year-old cachectic woman presented with an enormous abdominal tumour, which, according to the patient, had slowly increased in diameter. Medical history was unremarkable except for a hysterectomy >30 years before. A CT scan revealed a giant cystic tumour filling almost the entire abdominal cavity. It was analysed by two independent radiologists who suspected a tumour originating from the right kidney and additionally a cystic ovarian neoplasm. Subsequently, a diagnostic and therapeutic laparotomy was performed: the tumour presented as a cystic, 35 × 30 × 25 cm expansive structure adhesive to adjacent organs without definite signs of invasive growth. The right renal hilar vessels could finally be identified at its basis. After extirpation another tumourous structure emerged in the pelvis originating from the genital organs and was also resected. The histopathological examination revealed a >15 kg hydronephrotic right kidney, lacking hardly any residual renal cortex parenchyma. The second specimen was identified as an ovary with regressive changes and a large partially calcified cyst. There was no evidence of malignant growth. Conclusion Although both clinical symptoms and the enormous size of the tumour indicated malignant growth, it turned out to be a giant hydronephrosis. Presumably, a chronic obstruction of the distal ureter had caused this extraordinary hydronephrosis. As demonstrated in our case, an accurate diagnosis of giant hydronephrosis remains challenging due to the atrophy of the renal parenchyma associated with chronic obstruction. Therefore, any abdominal cystic mass even in the absence of other evident pathologies should include the differential diagnosis of a

  6. Chemical and kinematical properties of galactic bulge stars surrounding the stellar system Terzan 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a study aimed at determining the kinematical and chemical properties of Terzan 5, we present the first characterization of the bulge stars surrounding this puzzling stellar system. We observed 615 targets located well beyond the tidal radius of Terzan 5 and found that their radial velocity distribution is well described by a Gaussian function peaked at (v rad) = +21.0 ± 4.6 km s–1 with dispersion σ v = 113.0 ± 2.7 km s–1. This is one of the few high-precision spectroscopic surveys of radial velocities for a large sample of bulge stars in such a low and positive latitude environment (b = +1.°7). We found no evidence of the peak at (v rad) ∼ +200 km s–1 found in Nidever et al. Strong contamination of many observed spectra by TiO bands prevented us from deriving the iron abundance for the entire spectroscopic sample, introducing a selection bias. The metallicity distribution was finally derived for a subsample of 112 stars in a magnitude range where the effect of the selection bias is negligible. The distribution is quite broad and roughly peaked at solar metallicity ([Fe/H] ≅ +0.05 dex) with a similar number of stars in the super-solar and in the sub-solar ranges. The population number ratios in different metallicity ranges agree well with those observed in other low-latitude bulge fields, suggesting (1) the possible presence of a plateau for |b| < 4° in the ratio between stars in the super-solar (0 < [Fe/H] <0.5 dex) and sub-solar (–0.5 < [Fe/H] <0 dex) metallicity ranges; (2) a severe drop in the metal-poor component ([Fe/H] <–0.5) as a function of Galactic latitude.

  7. Chemical and Kinematical Properties of Galactic Bulge Stars Surrounding the Stellar System Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Origlia, L.; Rich, R. M.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Ibata, R.; Lovisi, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Reitzel, D.

    2014-08-01

    As part of a study aimed at determining the kinematical and chemical properties of Terzan 5, we present the first characterization of the bulge stars surrounding this puzzling stellar system. We observed 615 targets located well beyond the tidal radius of Terzan 5 and found that their radial velocity distribution is well described by a Gaussian function peaked at langv radrang = +21.0 ± 4.6 km s-1 with dispersion σ v = 113.0 ± 2.7 km s-1. This is one of the few high-precision spectroscopic surveys of radial velocities for a large sample of bulge stars in such a low and positive latitude environment (b = +1.°7). We found no evidence of the peak at langv radrang ~ +200 km s-1 found in Nidever et al. Strong contamination of many observed spectra by TiO bands prevented us from deriving the iron abundance for the entire spectroscopic sample, introducing a selection bias. The metallicity distribution was finally derived for a subsample of 112 stars in a magnitude range where the effect of the selection bias is negligible. The distribution is quite broad and roughly peaked at solar metallicity ([Fe/H] sime +0.05 dex) with a similar number of stars in the super-solar and in the sub-solar ranges. The population number ratios in different metallicity ranges agree well with those observed in other low-latitude bulge fields, suggesting (1) the possible presence of a plateau for |b| Observatory, proposal numbers 087.D-0716(B), 087.D-0748(A), and 283.D-5027(A), and at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. CO J = 2-1 EMISSION FROM EVOLVED STARS IN THE GALACTIC BULGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observe a sample of eight evolved stars in the Galactic bulge in the CO J = 2-1 line using the Submillimeter Array with angular resolution of 1''-4''. These stars have been detected previously at infrared wavelengths, and several of them have OH maser emission. We detect CO J = 2-1 emission from three of the sources in the sample: OH 359.943 +0.260, [SLO2003] A12, and [SLO2003] A51. We do not detect the remaining five stars in the sample because of heavy contamination from the galactic CO emission. Combining CO data with observations at infrared wavelengths constraining dust mass loss from these stars, we determine the gas-to-dust ratios of the Galactic bulge stars for which CO emission is detected. For OH 359.943 +0.260, we determine a gas mass-loss rate of 7.9 (±2.2) × 10–5 M ☉ yr–1 and a gas-to-dust ratio of 310 (±89). For [SLO2003] A12, we find a gas mass-loss rate of 5.4 (±2.8) × 10–5 M ☉ yr–1 and a gas-to-dust ratio of 220 (±110). For [SLO2003] A51, we find a gas mass-loss rate of 3.4 (±3.0) × 10–5 M ☉ yr–1 and a gas-to-dust ratio of 160 (±140), reflecting the low quality of our tentative detection of the CO J = 2-1 emission from A51. We find that the CO J = 2-1 detections of OH/IR stars in the Galactic bulge require lower average CO J = 2-1 backgrounds.

  9. Milky Way demographics with the VVV survey. I. The 84-million star colour-magnitude diagram of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, R K; Dias, B; Hempel, M; Rejkuba, M; Alonso-Garcia, J; Barbuy, B; Catelan, M; Emerson, J P; Gonzalez, O A; Lucas, P W; Zoccali, M; 10.1051/0004-6361/201219448

    2012-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) bulge is a fundamental Galactic component for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, in particular our own. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea is a deep near-IR survey mapping the Galactic bulge and southern plane. Data taken during 2010-11 covered 315 deg2 in the bulge area in the JHKs bands. We used VVV data for the whole bulge area as a single and homogeneous data set to build for the first time a single colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the entire Galactic bulge. Photometric data in the JHKs bands were combined to produce a single and huge data set containing 173.1M+ sources in the three bands. Selecting only the data points flagged as stellar, the total number of sources is 84.0M+. We built the largest CMDs published up to date, containing 173.1+ million sources for all data points, and more than 84.0 million sources accounting for the stellar sources only. The CMD has a complex shape, mostly owing to the complexity of the stellar population and th...

  10. Dissecting the Red Sequence: The Bulge and Disc Colours of Early-Type Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Head, Jacob T C G; Hudson, Micheal J; Smith, Russel J

    2014-01-01

    We explore the internal structure of red sequence galaxies in the Coma cluster across a wide range of luminosities ($-17>M_g>-22$) and cluster-centric radii ($0bulge-disc decomposition of galaxies in deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope $u,g,i$ imaging using GALFIT. Rigorous filtering is applied to identify an analysis sample of 200 galaxies which are well described by an `archetypal' S0 structure (central bulge + outer disc). We consider internal bulge and/or disc colour gradients by allowing component sizes to vary between bands. Gradients are required for $30\\%$ of analysis sample galaxies. Bulge half-light radii are found to be uncorrelated with galaxy luminosity ($R_e \\sim 1$ kpc, $n\\sim2$) for all but the brightest galaxies ($M_g<-20.5$). The S0 discs are brighter (at fixed size, or smaller at fixed luminosity) than those of star-forming spirals. A similar colour-magnitude relation is found for both bulges and discs. The global red sequence for ...

  11. The zCOSMOS Redshift Survey: evolution of the light in bulges and discs since z~0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Tasca, L A M; Fevre, O Le; Ilbert, O; Lilly, S J; Zamorani, G; Lopez-Sanjuan, C; Ho, L C; Bardelli, S; Cattaneo, A; Cucciati, O; Farrah, D; Iovino, A; Koekemoer, A M; Liu, C T; Massey, R; Renzini, A; Taniguchi, Y; Welikala, N; Zucca, E; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J P; Mainieri, V; Scodeggio, M; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Caputi, K; de la Torre, S; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Guzzo, L; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Kovavc, K; Lamareille, F; Borgne, J -F Le; Brun, V Le; Maier, C; Mignoli, M; Pello, R; Peng, Y; Montero, E Perez; Rich, R M; Tanaka, M; Vergani, D; Bordoloi, R; Cappi, A; Cimatti, A; Coppa, G; McCracken, H J; Moresco, M; Pozzetti, L; Sanders, D; Sheth, K

    2014-01-01

    We studied the chronology of galactic bulge and disc formation by analysing the relative contributions of these components to the B-band rest-frame luminosity density at different epochs. We present the first estimate of the evolution of the fraction of rest-frame B-band light in galactic bulges and discs since redshift z~0.8. We performed a bulge-to-disc decomposition of HST/ACS images of 3266 galaxies in the zCOSMOS-bright survey with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.7 < z < 0.9. We find that the fraction of B-band light in bulges and discs is $(26 \\pm 4)%$ and $(74 \\pm 4)%$, respectively. When compared with rest-frame B-band measurements of galaxies in the local Universe in the same mass range ($10^{9} M_{\\odot}\\lessapprox M \\lessapprox 10^{11.5} M_{\\odot}$), we find that the B-band light in discs decreases by ~30% from z~0.7-0.9 to z~0, while the light from the bulge increases by ~30% over the same period of time. We interpret this evolution as the consequence of star formation and mass assemb...

  12. Structure and dynamics of galaxies with a low surface-brightness disc - II. Stellar populations of bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, L; Pizzella, A; Bontà, E Dalla; Coccato, L; Méndez-Abreu, J; Cesetti, M

    2012-01-01

    The radial profiles of the Hb, Mg, and Fe line-strength indices are presented for a sample of eight spiral galaxies with a low surface-brightness stellar disc and a bulge. The correlations between the central values of the line-strength indices and velocity dispersion are consistent to those known for early-type galaxies and bulges of high surface-brightness galaxies. The age, metallicity, and alpha/Fe enhancement of the stellar populations in the bulge-dominated region are obtained using stellar population models with variable element abundance ratios. Almost all the sample bulges are characterized by a young stellar population, on-going star formation, and a solar alpha/Fe enhancement. Their metallicity spans from high to sub-solar values. No significant gradient in age and alpha/Fe enhancement is measured, whereas only in a few cases a negative metallicity gradient is found. These properties suggest that a pure dissipative collapse is not able to explain formation of all the sample bulges and that other ph...

  13. Kinematics of the X-shaped Milky Way Bulge: Expectations from a Self-consistent N-body Model

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Yujing; Li, Zhao-Yu; Mao, Shude; Smith, Martin C; Rich, R Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Liu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We explore the kinematics (both the radial velocity and the proper motion) of the vertical X-shaped feature in the Milky Way with an N-body bar/bulge model. From the solar perspective, the distance distribution of particles is double-peaked in fields passing through the X-shape. The separation and amplitude ratio between the two peaks qualitatively match the observed trends towards the Galactic bulge. We confirm clear signatures of cylindrical rotation in the pattern of mean radial velocity across the bar/bulge region. We also find possible imprints of coherent orbital motion inside the bar structure in the radial velocity distribution along l=0 degree, where the near and far sides of the bar/bulge show excesses of approaching and receding particles. The coherent orbital motion is also reflected in the slight displacement of the zero-velocity-line in the mean radial velocity, and the displacement of the maximum/minimum in the mean longitudinal proper motion across the bulge region. We find some degree of anis...

  14. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a three-dimensional model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We find that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation of the result obtained with the real trajectory of the cluster. Bulge-shocking destruction rates for clusters with perigalacticons in the inner Galactic region are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential than those in the axisymmetric potential. For the majority of clusters with high orbital eccentricities (e > 0.5), their total bulge+disk destruction rates are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential.

  15. Orientation-specific cis complementation by bulge- and loop-mutated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 TAR RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, M; Powell, R; Sutton, J; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-12-01

    Tat activates human immunodeficiency type 1 gene expression by binding to TAR RNA. TAR comprises a partially base paired stem and hexanucleotide loop with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem. In vitro, Tat binds to the bulge and upper stem, with no requirement for the loop. However, in vivo, loop sequences are critical for activation, implying that a loop binding cellular factor may be involved in the activation pathway. Given that activation appears to be a two-component system comprising a Tat-bulge interaction and a cellular factor-loop interaction, we considered that it might be possible to spatially separate the two components and retain activation. We have constructed a series of double TAR elements comprising various combinations of mutated TAR structures. Defective TARs with nucleotide substitutions in either the bulge or the loop complemented each other to give wild-type activation. However, the complementation was orientation specific, requiring the intact Tat binding site to reside on the 5'-proximal TAR. These data suggest that provided the wild-type orientation of the bulge and loop elements is retained, there is no requirement for them to coexist on the same TAR structure. PMID:7966633

  16. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Edmundo; Pichardo, Bárbara [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F. (Mexico); Velázquez, Héctor [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 877, 22800 Ensenada (Mexico)

    2014-10-01

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a three-dimensional model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We find that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation of the result obtained with the real trajectory of the cluster. Bulge-shocking destruction rates for clusters with perigalacticons in the inner Galactic region are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential than those in the axisymmetric potential. For the majority of clusters with high orbital eccentricities (e > 0.5), their total bulge+disk destruction rates are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential.

  17. Stochastic Correlation Model of Galactic Bulge Velocity Dispersions and Central Black Holes Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the cosmological model in which a part of the Universe \\Omega_h\\sim 10^-5 is in the form of primordial black holes with mass \\sim 10^5M_\\odot. These primordial black holes would be centers for growing protogalaxies which experienced multiple mergers with ordinary galaxies. This process of galaxies formation is accompanied by the merging of central black holes in the galactic nuclei. It is shown that recently discovered correlations between the central black holes and bulges of gal...

  18. Bulge, Bubble, and Y: How a RNA Exonuclease Repairs DNA, in Detail

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Yuan Hsiao; Woei-Horng Fang; Chia-Chia Lee; Yi-Ping Chen; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for preservation of genome integrity. However, it is not clear how DNA are selected and processed at broken ends by exonucleases during repair pathways. Here we show that the DnaQ-like exonuclease RNase T is critical for Escherichia coli resistance to various DNA-damaging agents and UV radiation. RNase T specifically trims the 3' end of structured DNA, including bulge, bubble, and Y-structured DNA, and it can work with Endonuclease V to restore the deaminat...

  19. On the Black Hole - Bulge Mass Ratios in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We present estimated ratios of the central black hole mass to the bulgemass (Mbh/Mbulge) for 15 Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). It is found thatNLS1s apparently have lower mass ratios: the average mass ratio is about 1 × 10-4with a spread of 2, which is one order of magnitude lower than for Broad Line AGNsand quiescent galaxies. This lower value, as compared to that established essentiallyfor all other types of galaxies, can be accounted for by an underestimation of theblack hole masses and an overestimation of the bulge masses in the NLS1s.

  20. Bulge-Disk Decompositions and Structural Bimodality of Ursa Major Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Michael; Courteau, Stephane; Tully, R. Brent

    2008-01-01

    We present bulge and disk (B/D) decompositions of existing K'-band surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disk-only fits of Tully et al. (1996). The 1996 disk fits were used by Tully & Verheijen (1997) for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new 1D B/D decompositions yield disk structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and ev...

  1. A Vertical Resonance Heating Model for X- or Peanut-Shaped Galactic Bulges

    OpenAIRE

    Quillen, Alice C.; Minchev, Ivan; Sharma, Sanjib; Qin, Yu-Jing; Di Matteo, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We explore a second order Hamiltonian vertical resonance model for X-shaped or peanut-shaped galactic bulges. The X-shape is caused by the 2:1 vertical Lindblad resonance with the bar, with two vertical oscillation periods per orbital period in the bar frame. We examine N-body simulations and find that due to the bar slowing down and disk thickening during bar buckling, the resonance and associated peanut-shape moves outward. The peanut-shape is consistent with the location of the vertical re...

  2. Variable stars towards the bulge of M31: the AGAPE catalogue

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, R.; Auriere, M.; Baillon, P.; Bouquet, A.; Coupinot, G.; Coutures, Ch.; Ghesquiere, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gillieron, D.; Gondolo, P.; Hecquet, J.; Kaplan, J; Kim, A.; Du, Y. Le; Melchior, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the AGAPE astrometric and photometric catalogue of 1579 variable stars in a 14'x10' field centred on M31. This work is the first survey devoted to variable stars in the bulge of M31. The R magnitudes of the objects and the B-R colours suggest that our sample is dominated by red long-period variable stars (LPV), with a possible overlap with Cepheid-like type II stars. Twelve nova candidates are identified. Correlations with other catalogues suggest that 2 novae could be recurrent no...

  3. Battle of the bulge: Decay of the thin, false cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-11-01

    We consider the decay of cosmic strings that are trapped in the false vacuum in a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 3+1 dimensions. This paper is the 3+1-dimensional generalization of the 2+1-dimensional decay of false vortices which we have recently completed . We restrict our analysis to the case of thin-walled cosmic strings which occur when large magnetic flux is trapped inside the string. Thus the string looks like a tube of fixed radius, at which it is classically stable. The core of the string contains magnetic flux in the true vacuum, while outside the string, separated by a thin wall, is the false vacuum. The string decays by tunneling to a configuration which is represented by a bulge, where the region of true vacuum within is ostensibly enlarged. The bulge can be described as the meeting of a kink soliton-antisoliton pair along the length of the string. It can be described as a bulge appearing in the initial string, starting from the string of small, classically stable radius, expanding to a fat string of large, classically unstable (to expansion) radius and then returning back to the string of small radius along its length. This configuration is the bounce point of a corresponding O(2) symmetric instanton, which we can determine numerically. Once the bulge appears it explodes in real time. The paired soliton and antisoliton recede from each other along the length of the string with a velocity that quickly approaches the speed of light, leaving behind a fat tube. At the same time the radius of the fat tube that is being formed expands (transversely) as it is no longer classically stable, converting false vacuum to the true vacuum with ever-diluting magnetic field within. The rate of this expansion is determined by the energy difference between the true vacuum and the false vacuum. Our analysis could be applied to a network of cosmic strings formed in the very early Universe or vortex lines in a superheated superconductor.

  4. New Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Bulge region with l>0deg - II

    CERN Document Server

    Boumis, P; Xilouris, E M; Mavromatakis, F; Kapakos, E; Papamastorakis, J; Goudis, C D

    2006-01-01

    The presentation of new results from an [O III] 5007 A survey in a search for planetary nebulae (PNe) in the galactic bulge is continued. A total of 60 objects, including 19 new PNe, have been detected in the remaining 34 per cent of the survey area, while 41 objects are already known. Deep Halpha+[N II] CCD images as well as low resolution spectra have been acquired for these objects. Their spectral signatures suggest that the detected emission originates from photoionized nebulae. In addition, absolute line fluxes have been measured and the electron densities are given. Accurate optical positions and optical diameters are also determined.

  5. Structure of the Galactic Bulge: Is the Milky Way a Double-barred Galaxy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; IRSF/SIRIUS Team

    2006-12-01

    Using the data of the IRSF/SIRIUS infrared survey along the Galactic plane (| l | red clump stars changes continuously from KS ~ 13.5 (l = -10°) to KS ~ 12.3 (l = +10°), and this can be explained by the bar structure of the Galactic Bulge. However, the apparent magnitude changes by only ~ 0.1 mag over the central 8°, and this indicates that there is a distinct structure inside the primary bar. In the process of the distance derivation, we have used the infrared extinction law in the J, H, and KS bands toward the Galactic center newly determined from our survey.

  6. The Distance to the Galactic Center Derived From Infrared Photometry of Bulge Red Clump Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Kato, Daisuke; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Naoi, Takahiro; Sugitani, Koji; Tamura, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the near infrared observations of bulge red clump stars near the Galactic center, we have determined the galactocentric distance to be R_0 = 7.52 +- 0.10 (stat) +- 0.35 (sys) kpc. We observed the red clump stars at |l| < 1.0 deg and 0.7 deg < |b| < 1.0 deg with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera in the H and Ks bands. After extinction and population corrections, we obtained (m - M)_0 = 14.38 +- 0.03 (stat) +- 0.10 (sys). The statistical error is dominated by the un...

  7. Sub-Saturn Planet MOA-2008-BLG-310Lb: Likely To Be In The Galactic Bulge

    OpenAIRE

    Janczak, Julia; Fukui, A; Dong, Subo; Monard, B.; Kozlowski, Szymon; Gould, A.; Beaulieu, J.P.; Kubas, Daniel; Marquette, J. B.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Bennett, D.P.; Collaboration, the MOA; Collaboration, the MicroFUN; collaboration, the MiNDSTEp

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of sub-Saturn-mass planet MOA-2008-BLG-310Lb and argue that it is the strongest candidate yet for a bulge planet. Deviations from the single-lens fit are smoothed out by finite-source effects and so are not immediately apparent from the light curve. Nevertheless, we find that a model in which the primary has a planetary companion is favored over the single-lens model by \\Delta\\chi^2 ~ 880 for an additional three degrees of freedom. Detailed analysis yields a planet/sta...

  8. Bulge-Disk Decomposition of 659 Spiral and Lenticular Galaxy Brightness Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Baggett, W. E.; Baggett, S. M.; Anderson, K. S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present one of the largest homogeneous sets of spiral and lenticular galaxy brightness profile decompositions completed to date. The 659 galaxies in our sample have been fitted with a deVaucouleurs' law for the bulge component and an inner-truncated exponential for the disk component. Of the 659 galaxies in the sample, 620 were successfully fit with the chosen fitting functions. The fits are generally well-defined, with more than 90% having RMS deviations from the observed profile of less ...

  9. Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225x60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the

  10. Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Giardini, C.

    2011-05-01

    Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225×60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the

  11. Red Giants in Eclipsing Binaries as a Benchmark for Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Meredith L.

    2016-04-01

    Red giants with solar-like oscillations are astrophysical laboratories for probing the Milky Way. The Kepler Space Telescope revolutionized asteroseismology by consistently monitoring thousands of targets, including several red giants in eclipsing binaries. Binarity allows us to directly measure stellar properties independently of asteroseismology. In this dissertation, we study a subset of eight red giant eclipsing binaries observed by Kepler with a range of orbital periods, oscillation behavior, and stellar activity. Two of the systems do not show solar-like oscillations at all. We use a suite of modeling tools to combine photometry and spectroscopy into a comprehensive picture of each star's life. One noteworthy case is a double red giant binary. The two stars are nearly twins, but have one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes, likely due to stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171 day eccentric orbit. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. The other seven systems are all red giant branch stars (shell-H-burning) with main sequence companions. The two non-oscillators have the strongest magnetic signatures and some of the strongest lifetime tidal forces with nearly-circular 20–34 day orbits. One system defies this trend with oscillations and a 19 day orbit. The four long-period systems (>100 days) have oscillations, more eccentric orbits, and less stellar activity. They are all detached binaries consistent with coevolution. We find the asteroseismic scaling laws are approximately correct, but fail the most for stars that are least like the Sun by systematically overestimating both mass and radius. Strong magnetic activity and tidal effects often occur in tandem and act to suppress solar-like oscillations. These red giant binaries offer an

  12. Reinforcing the link between the double red clump and the X-shaped bulge of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O. A.; Zoccali, M.; Debattista, V. P.; Alonso-García, J.; Valenti, E.; Minniti, D.

    2015-11-01

    The finding of a double red clump in the luminosity function of the Milky Way bulge has been interpreted as evidence for an X-shaped structure. Recently, an alternative explanation has been suggested, where the double red clump is an effect of multiple stellar populations in a classical spheroid. In this Letter we provide an observational assessment of this scenario and show that it is not consistent with the behaviour of the red clump across different lines of sight, particularly at high distances from the Galactic plane. Instead, we confirm that the shape of the red clump magnitude distribution closely follows the distance distribution expected for an X-shaped bulge at critical Galactic latitudes. We also emphasize some key observational properties of the bulge red clump that should not be neglected in the search for alternative scenarios. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002.

  13. What Do Statistics Reveal About the Black Hole versus the Bulge Mass Correlation and Co-evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Chien Y

    2010-01-01

    Observational data show that the correlation between supermassive black holes (MBH) and galaxy bulge (Mbulge) masses follows a nearly linear trend, and that the correlation is strongest with the bulge rather than the total stellar mass (Mgal). With increasing redshift, the ratio Gamma=MBH/Mbulge relative to z=0 also seems to be larger for MBH >~ 10^{8.5} Msol. This study looks more closely at statistics to better understand the creation and observations of the MBH-Mbulge correlation. It is possible to show that if galaxy merging statistics can drive the correlation, minor mergers are responsible for causing a *convergence to linearity* most evident at high masses, whereas major mergers have a central limit convergence that more strongly *reduces the scatter*. This statistical reasoning is agnostic about galaxy morphology. Therefore, combining statistical prediction (more major mergers ==> tighter correlation) with observations (bulges = tightest correlation), would lead one to conclude that more major mergers...

  14. Reinforcing the link between the double red clump and the X-shaped bulge of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O A; Debattista, Victor P; Alonso-García, J; Valenti, E; Minniti, D

    2015-01-01

    The finding of a double red clump in the luminosity function of the Milky Way bulge has been interpreted as evidence for an X-shaped structure. Recently, an alternative explanation has been suggested, where the double red clump is an effect of multiple stellar populations in a classical spheroid. In this letter we provide an observational assessment of this scenario and show that it is not consistent with the behaviour of the red clump across different lines of sight, particularly at high distances from the Galactic plane. Instead, we confirm that the shape of the red clump magnitude distribution closely follows the distance distribution expected for an X-shaped bulge at critical Galactic latitudes. We also emphasize some key observational properties of the bulge red clump that should not be neglected in the search for alternative scenarios.

  15. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  16. An X-ray Spectroscopic Study of the Hot Interstellar Medium Toward the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Hagihara, Toshishige; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Takei, Yoh; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Yao, Yangsen; Wang, Q Daniel; McCammon, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic study of the hot gas toward the Galactic bulge along the 4U 1820-303 sight line by a combination analysis of emission and absorption spectra. In addition to the absorption lines of OVII Kalpha, OVII Kbeta, OVIII Kalpha and NeIX Kalpha by Chandra LTGS as shown by previous works, Suzaku detected clearly the emission lines of OVII, OVIII, NeIX and NeX from the vicinity. We used simplified plasma models with constant temperature and density. Evaluation of the background and foreground emission was performed carefully, including stellar X-ray contribution based on the recent X-ray observational results and stellar distribution simulator. If we assume that one plasma component exists in front of 4U1820-303 and the other one at the back, the obtained temperatures are T= 1.7 +/- 0.2 MK for the front-side plasma and T=3.9(+0.4-0.3) MK for the backside. This scheme is consistent with a hot and thick ISM disk as suggested by the extragalactic source observations and an X-ray bulge aro...

  17. An observer's view of simulated galaxies: disc-to-total ratios, bars, and (pseudo-)bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Cecilia; Jonsson, Patrik; White, Simon D M

    2010-01-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of Milky Way mass galaxies to study the relative importance of the main stellar components, discs, bulges, and bars, at z=0. The main aim of this work is to understand if estimates of the structural parameters of these components determined from kinematics (as usually done in simulations) agree well with those obtained using a photometric bulge/disc/bar decomposition (as done in observations). To perform such a comparison, we produced synthetic observations of the simulation outputs with the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code SUNRISE and used the BUDDA code to make 2D photometric decompositions of the resulting images. We find that the kinematic disc-to-total ratio (D/T) estimates are systematically and significantly lower than the photometric ones. While the maximum D/T ratios obtained with the former method are of the order of 0.2, they are typically >0.4, and can be as high as 0.7, according to the latter. The photometric decomposition shows ...

  18. Bulge-Disk Decompositions and Structural Bimodality of Ursa Major Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Tully, R Brent

    2008-01-01

    We present bulge and disk (B/D) decompositions of existing K'-band surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disk-only fits of Tully et al. (1996). The 1996 disk fits were used by Tully & Verheijen (1997) for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new 1D B/D decompositions yield disk structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and evidence for structural bimodality of UMa galaxies is maintained. Our B/D software for the decomposition of 1D surface brightness profiles of galaxies uses a non-linear minimization scheme to recover the best fitting Sersic bulge and exponential disk while accounting for the possible presence of a compact nucleus and spiral arms and for the effects of seeing and disk truncations. In agreement with Tully & Verheijen, we find that the distribution of near-infrared disk central surface brightnesses is bimodal with an F...

  19. Bulge-disc decompositions and structural bimodality of Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Courteau, Stéphane; Tully, R. Brent

    2009-02-01

    We present bulge and disc (B/D) decompositions of existing K' surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major (UMa) cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disc-only fits of Tully et al. The 1996 disc fits were used by Tully & Verheijen for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new one-dimensional B/D decompositions yield disc structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and evidence for structural bimodality of UMa galaxies is maintained. Our B/D software for the decomposition of one-dimensional surface brightness profiles of galaxies uses a non-linear minimization scheme to recover the best-fitting Sérsic bulge and the exponential disc while accounting for the possible presence of a compact nucleus and spiral arms and for the effects of seeing and disc truncations. In agreement with Tully & Verheijen, we find that the distribution of near-infrared disc central surface brightnesses is bimodal with an F-test confidence of 80 per cent. There is also strong evidence for a local minimum in the luminosity function at . A connection between the brightness bimodality and a dynamical bimodality, based on new HI linewidths, is identified. The B/D parameters are presented in Table 1.

  20. TR3 is preferentially expressed by bulge epithelial stem cells in human hair follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lin; Yang, Ruifeng; Liu, Shujing; Lyle, Stephen; Cotsarelis, George; Xiang, Leihong; Zhang, Litao; Li, Bin; Wan, Miaojian; Xu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    TR3 is an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and it plays a pivotal role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. The expression and function of TR3 in skin have not been well investigated. Using a cDNA expression assay, we discover that TR3 is significantly enriched in human telogen bulge compared with anagen bulb. Immunohistochemical staining confirms that TR3 is highly expressed in the bulge region of human hair follicles and it colocalizes with cytokeratin 15 (K15), an epithelial stem cell marker. To study the function of TR3 in the effect of androgens in keratinocytes, we treat HaCaT keratinocytes and primary human keratinocytes with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T). The treated keratinocytes show a dose-dependent growth reduction to DHT and T. DHT increases the expression of TR3 in keratinocytes, associated with a concomitant increase of BAD and decrease of Bcl-2 expression. Knockdown TR3 expression by siRNA blocks the inhibitory effect of DHT on keratinocyte proliferation. Our results demonstrate that TR3 is localized to the stem cell compartment in the human hair follicles. Androgen increases TR3 expression in cultured keratinocytes. Our data suggest that TR3 mediates at least part of the inhibitory effect of androgens on keratinocytes. PMID:26707825

  1. High-resolution mapping of dust via extinction in the M31 bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Q. D.; Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Saha, Abhijit; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Groves, Brent A.

    2016-06-01

    We map the dust distribution in the central 180 arcsec (˜680 pc) region of the M31 bulge, based on HST WFC3 and ACS observations in ten bands from near-ultraviolet (2700 Å) to near-infrared (1.5 μm). This large wavelength coverage gives us great leverage to detect not only dense dusty clumps, but also diffuse dusty molecular gas. We fit a pixel-by-pixel spectral energy distributions to construct a high-dynamic-range extinction map with unparalleled angular resolution (˜0.5 arcsec, i.e. ˜2 pc) and sensitivity (the extinction uncertainty, δAV ˜ 0.05). In particular, the data allow to directly fit the fractions of starlight obscured by individual dusty clumps, and hence their radial distances in the bulge. Most of these clumps seem to be located in a thin plane, which is tilted with respect to the M31 disc and appears face-on. We convert the extinction map into a dust mass surface density map and compare it with that derived from the dust emission as observed by Herschel. The dust masses in these two maps are consistent with each other, except in the low-extinction regions, where the mass inferred from the extinction tends to be underestimated. Further, we use simulations to show that our method can be used to measure the masses of dusty clumps in Virgo cluster early-type galaxies to an accuracy within a factor of ˜2.

  2. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, R. S.; Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Sick, J. N.

    2008-10-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS and WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (V_{rot}>200 km s^{-1}) have very extended stellar envelopes with μ(r) ˜ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (V_{rot}˜100 km s^{-1}) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be created by disk heating through the bombardment of small dark matter sub-halos. We find that galaxies show varying amounts of halo substructure.

  3. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de Jong, Roelof S; Sick, Jonathan N

    2007-01-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS&WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (Vrot>200 km/s) have very extended stellar envelopes with mu(r) ~ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (Vrot 100 km/s) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be creat...

  4. The VST Photometric Halpha Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Bulge (VPHAS+)

    CERN Document Server

    Drew, J E; Greimel, R; Irwin, M J; Yoldas, A Kupcu; Lewis, J; Barentsen, G; Eisloeffel, J; Farnhill, H J; Martin, W E; Walsh, J R; Walton, N A; Mohr-Smith, M; Raddi, R; Sale, S E; Wright, N J; Groot, P; Barlow, M J; Corradi, R L M; Drake, J J; Fabregat, J; Frew, D J; Gaensicke, B T; Knigge, C; Mampaso, A; Morris, R A H; Naylor, T; Parker, Q A; Phillipps, S; Ruhland, C; Steeghs, D; Unruh, Y C; Vink, J S; Wesson, R; Zijlstra, A A

    2014-01-01

    The VST Photometric Halpha Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Bulge (VPHAS+) is surveying the southern Milky Way in u, g, r, i and Halpha at 1 arcsec angular resolution. Its footprint spans the Galactic latitude range -5 < b < +5 at all longitudes south of the celestial equator. Extensions around the Galactic Centre to Galactic latitudes +/-10 bring in much of the Galactic Bulge. This ESO public survey, begun on 28th December 2011, reaches down to 20th magnitude (10-sigma) and will provide single-epoch digital optical photometry for around 300 million stars. The observing strategy and data pipelining is described, and an appraisal of the segmented narrowband Halpha filter in use is presented. Using model atmospheres and library spectra, we compute main-sequence (u - g), (g - r), (r - i) and (r - Halpha) stellar colours in the Vega system. We report on a preliminary validation of the photometry using test data obtained from two pointings overlapping the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. An example of the ...

  5. Looking for imprints of the first stellar generations in metal-poor bulge field stars

    CERN Document Server

    Siqueira-Mello, C; Barbuy, B; Freeman, K; Ness, M; Depagne, E; Cantelli, E; Pignatari, M; Hirschi, R; Frischknecht, U; Meynet, G; Maeder, A

    2016-01-01

    Context. Efforts to look for signatures of the first stars have concentrated on metal-poor halo objects. However, the low end of the bulge metallicity distribution has been shown to host some of the oldest objects in the Milky Way and hence this Galactic component potentially offers interesting targets to look at imprints of the first stellar generations. As a pilot project, we selected bulge field stars already identified in the ARGOS survey as having [Fe/H] ~ -1 and oversolar [alpha/Fe] ratios, and we used FLAMES-UVES to obtain detailed abundances of key elements that are believed to reveal imprints of the first stellar generations. Aims. The main purpose of this study is to analyse selected ARGOS stars using new high-resolution (R~45,000) and high-signal-to-noise (S/N >100) spectra. We aim to derive their stellar parameters and elemental ratios, in particular the abundances of C, N, the alpha-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the neutron-capture s-process dominated elements Y, Z...

  6. Population synthesis of ultracompact X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    van Haaften, L M; Voss, R; Toonen, S; Zwart, S F Portegies; Yungelson, L R; van der Sluys, M V

    2013-01-01

    [abridged] Aims. We model the number and properties of ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) in the Galactic Bulge. The objective is to learn about the formation of UCXBs and their evolution, such as the onset of mass transfer and late-time behavior. Methods. The binary population synthesis code SeBa and stellar evolutionary tracks are used to model the UCXB population. The luminosity behavior of UCXBs is predicted using long-term X-ray observations of the known UCXBs and the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results. In our model, the majority of UCXBs initially have a helium burning star donor. In the absence of a mechanism that destroys old UCXBs, we predict (0.2 - 1.9) x 10^5 UCXBs in the Galactic Bulge, mostly at orbital periods longer than 60 min (a large number of long-period systems also follows from the observed short-period UCXB population). About 5 - 50 UCXBs should be brighter than 10^35 erg/s, mostly persistent sources with orbital periods shorter than 30 min and with degenerate helium and ca...

  7. From Discs to Bulges: effect of mergers on the morphology of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rahul; Fontanot, Fabio; Moster, Benjamin P; Karman, Wouter; Somerville, Rachel S

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of mergers on the morphology of galaxies by means of the simulated merger tree approach first proposed by Moster et al. This method combines N-body cosmological simulations and semi-analytic techniques to extract realistic initial conditions for galaxy mergers. These are then evolved using high resolution hydrodynamical simulations, which include dark matter, stars, cold gas in the disc and hot gas in the halo. We show that the satellite mass accretion is not as effective as previously thought, as there is substantial stellar stripping before the final merger. The fraction of stellar disc mass transferred to the bulge is quite low, even in the case of a major merger, mainly due to the dispersion of part of the stellar disc mass into the halo. We confirm the findings of Hopkins et al., that a gas rich disc is able to survive major mergers more efficiently. The enhanced star formation associated with the merger is not localised to the bulge of galaxy, but a substantial fraction takes place i...

  8. Galaxy Bulge Formation: Interplay with Dark Matter Halo and Central Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, B X; Zhao, H S; Xu, Bing-Xiao; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple scenario where the formation of galactic bulges was regulated by the dark halo gravity and regulated the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Assuming the angular momentum is low, we suggest that bulges form in a runaway collapse due to the "gravothermal" instability once the central gas density or pressure exceeds certain threshold (Xu & Zhao 2007). We emphasize that the threshold is nearly universal, set by the background NFW dark matter gravity $g_{DM} \\sim 1.2 \\times 10^{-8}{\\rm cm} {\\rm sec}^{-2}$ in the central cusps of halos. Unlike known thresholds for gradual formation of galaxy disks, we show that the universal "halo-regulated" star formation threshold for spheroids matches the very high star formation rate and star formation efficiency shown in high-redshift observations of central starburst regions. The starburst feedback also builds up a pressure shortly after the collapse. This large pressure could both act outward to halt further infall of gas from larger scale...

  9. High-Resolution Mapping of Dust via Extinction in the M31 Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Hui; Wang, Q D; Lauer, Tod R; Olsen, Knut A G; Saha, Abhijit; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Groves, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    We map the dust distribution in the central 180" (~680 pc) region of the M31 bulge, based on HST/WFC3 and ACS observations in ten bands from near-ultraviolet (2700 A) to near-infrared (1.5 micron). This large wavelength coverage gives us great leverage to detect not only dense dusty clumps, but also diffuse dusty molecular gas. We fit a pixel-by-pixel spectral energy distributions to construct a high-dynamic-range extinction map with unparalleled angular resolution (~0.5" , i.e., ~2 pc) and sensitivity (the extinction uncertainty, \\delta A_V~0.05). In particular, the data allow to directly fit the fractions of starlight obscured by individual dusty clumps, and hence their radial distances in the bulge. Most of these clumps seem to be located in a thin plane, which is tilted with respect to the M31 disk and appears face-on. We convert the extinction map into a dust mass surface density map and compare it with that derived from the dust emission as observed by Herschel . The dust masses in these two maps are co...

  10. Novel scanning electron microscope bulge test technique integrated with loading function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuanwei; Xie, Huimin, E-mail: liuzw@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Zhanwei, E-mail: liuzw@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Membranes and film-on-substrate structures are critical elements for some devices in electronics industry and for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems devices. These structures are normally at the scale of micrometer or even nanometer. Thus, the measurement for the mechanical property of these membranes poses a challenge over the conventional measurements at macro-scales. In this study, a novel bulge test method is presented for the evaluation of mechanical property of micro thin membranes. Three aspects are discussed in the study: (a) A novel bulge test with a Scanning Electron Microscope system realizing the function of loading and measuring simultaneously; (b) a simplified Digital Image Correlation method for a height measurement; and (c) an imaging distortion correction by the introduction of a scanning Moiré method. Combined with the above techniques, biaxial modulus as well as Young's modulus of the polyimide film can be determined. Besides, a standard tensile test is conducted as an auxiliary experiment to validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Variations of the selective extinction across the galactic bulge implications for the galactic bar

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new method to investigate the coefficient of the selective extinction, based on two band photometry. This method uses red clump stars as a means to construct the reddening curve. We apply this method to the OGLE color-magnitude diagrams to investigate the variations of the selective extinction towards various parts of the Galactic bulge. We find that A_{_V}/E_{_{V-I}} coefficient is within the errors the same for l=\\pm 5\\deg OGLE fields. Therefore, the difference of \\sim 0.37\\;mag in the extinction adjusted apparent magnitude of the red clump stars in these fields (Stanek et al.~1994, 1995) cannot be assigned to a large-scale gradient of the selective extinction coefficient. This strengthens the implication of this difference as indicator of the presence of the bar in our Galaxy. However using present data we cannot entirely exclude the possibility of \\sim 0.2\\;mag/mag variations of the selective extinction coefficient on the large scales across the bulge.

  12. Deformation Characterization of Friction-Stir-Welded Tubes by Hydraulic Bulge Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Q.; Hu, Z. L.; Pan, X.; Zuo, X. Q.

    2014-10-01

    In this article, the large-diameter thin-walled aluminum alloy tubes were produced using a hybrid process combining friction-stir welding (FSW) and spinning. For this novel process, rolled aluminum alloy sheets with a thickness about 2-3 times the wall thickness of target tube, were FSW to form cylinders, and then the cylinders were subjected to spinning to get thin-walled aluminum alloy tubes. Both experimental and simulation study were conducted to investigate the deformation characterization of the FSW tube during hydraulic bulge testing, and the stress and strain states and thickness distribution of the FSW tube were investigated. It was found that the common defects of FSW tube can be significantly improved by specific welding devices. The ductility of the tube is considerably improved with nearly two times higher bulge ratio than as-spun tube after annealing treatment at 300°C. But the annealed tube still shows a high nonuniform wall thickness distribution due to the inhomogeneous deformation characteristics. With increasing deformation of the tube, the gap between the hoop and axial stress for the weld and base metal (BM) decreases. However, the hoop and axial stress of the weld are always greater than those of the BM at the same pressure.

  13. Stochastic non-circular motion and outflows driven by magnetic activity in the Galactic bulge region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches ≳0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternative to the bar-potential-driven model for the parallelogram shape of the central molecular zone. This is a natural extension into the central few 100 pc of the magnetic activity, which is observed as molecular loops at radii from a few 100 pc to 1 kpc. Furthermore, the time-averaged net gas flow is directed outward, whereas the flows are highly time dependent, which we discuss from a viewpoint of the outflow from the bulge.

  14. XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectroscopic studies of unidentified X-ray sources towards the Galactic bulge: 1RXS J180556.1-343818 and 1RXS J173905.2-392615

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideyuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    With XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, for the first time, we acquired broad-band spectra of two unidentified X-ray sources towards the Galactic bulge: 1RXS J180556.1-343818 and 1RXS J173905.2-392615. The 1RXS J180556.1-343818 spectrum in the 0.3-7 keV band was explained by X-ray emission that originated from an optically-thin thermal plasma with temperatures of 0.5 and 1.8 keV. The estimated absorption column density of NH ˜ 4 × 1020 cm-2 was significantly smaller than the Galactic H I column density towards the source. A candidate for its optical counterpart, HD 321269, was found within 4″. In terms of the X-ray properties and the positional coincidence, it is quite conceivable that 1RXS J180556.1-343818 is an active G giant. We also found a dim X-ray source that was positionally consistent with 1RXS J173905.2-392615. Assuming that the X-ray spectrum can be reproduced with an absorbed, optically-thin thermal plasma model with kT = 1.6 keV, the X-ray flux in the 0.5-8 keV band was 8.7 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2, fainter by a factor of ˜7 than that of 1RXS J173905.2-392615 during the ROSAT observation. The follow-up observations we conducted revealed that these two sources would belong to the Galactic disk, rather than the Galactic bulge.

  15. [Giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberione, F; Caire, F; Fischer-Lokou, D; Gueye, M; Moreau, J J

    2007-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign, uncommon lesions (1% of all intracranial tumors). Their localization is intradiploic in 25% of cases, and exceptionally subtentorial. We report here a rare case of giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst. A 74-year old patient presented with recent diplopia and sindrome cerebellar. CT scan and MR imaging revealed a giant osteolytic extradural lesion of the posterior fossa (5.2 cm x 3.8 cm) with a small area of peripheral enhancement after contrast injection. Retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy allowed a satisfactory removal of the tumor, followed by an acrylic cranioplasty. The outcome was good. Neuropathological examination confirmed an epidermoid cyst. We review the literature and discuss our case. PMID:18008017

  16. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutin Natalya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists. This article was reviewed by Igor B. Zhulin and Laksminarayan M. Iyer. For the full reviews, see the Reviewers’ reports section.

  17. Giant viruses come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms. PMID:26999382

  18. Idiopathic giant right atrial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2-year-old boy with an incidental finding of massive cardiomegaly on a chest X-ray was diagnosed with a giant right atrial aneurysm upon further investigation with echocardiography. The patient underwent successful surgical reduction of the right atrium and closure of the patent foramen ovale to prevent thromboembolic complications and to lower the risk of atrial arrhythmias. The resected atrium had paper-thin walls and pathological features of interstitial fibrosis with endocardial thickening

  19. The Black Hole Mass-Bulge Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei From Reverberation Mapping and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.;

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between black hole mass and bulge luminosity for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with reverberation-based black hole mass measurements and bulge luminosities from two-dimensional decompositions of Hubble Space Telescope host galaxy images. We find that the slope...... of the relationship for AGNs is 0.76-0.85 with an uncertainty of ~0.1, somewhat shallower than the M BH vprop L 1.0±0.1 relationship that has been fit to nearby quiescent galaxies with dynamical black hole mass measurements. This difference is somewhat perplexing, as the AGN black hole masses include an overall...

  20. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.