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Sample records for bulgarian emergency response

  1. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. Key words: nuclear accident, emergency response, early warning system, air dispersion models, radioactive exposure dose. (Author)

  2. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses’estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, M.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. (Author)

  3. The Bulgarian Emergency Response System for dose assessment in the early stage of accidental releases to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakov, D; Veleva, B; Prodanova, M; Popova, T; Kolarova, M

    2009-02-01

    The Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) is being developed in the Bulgarian National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology since 1994. BERS is based on numerical weather forecast meteorological information and a numerical long-range dispersion model accounting for the transport, dispersion, chemical and radioactive transformations of pollutants. In the present paper, the further development of this system for a mixture of radioactive gaseous and aerosol pollutants is described. The basic module for the BERS, the numerical dispersion model EMAP, is upgraded with a "dose calculation block". Two scenarios for hypothetical accidental atmospheric releases from two NPPs, one in Western, and the other in Eastern Europe, are numerically simulated. The effective doses from external irradiation, from air submersion and ground shinning, effective dose from inhalation and absorbed dose by thyroid gland formed by 37 different radionuclides, significant for the early stage of a nuclear accident, are calculated as dose fields for both case studies and discussed.

  4. Application of the Bulgarian emergency response system in case of nuclear accident in environmental assessment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakov, Dimiter; Veleva, Blagorodka; Georgievs, Emilia; Prodanova, Maria; Slavov, Kiril; Kolarova, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The development of the Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) for short term forecast in case of accidental radioactive releases to the atmosphere has been started in the mid 1990's [1]. BERS comprises of two main parts - operational and accidental, for two regions 'Europe' and 'Northern Hemisphere'. The operational part runs automatically since 2001 using the 72 hours meteorological forecast from DWD Global model, resolution in space of 1.5o and in time - 12 hours. For specified Nuclear power plants (NPPs), 3 days trajectories are calculated and presented on NIMH's specialized Web-site (http://info.meteo.bg/ews/). The accidental part is applied when radioactive releases are reported or in case of emergency exercises. BERS is based on numerical weather forecast information and long-range dispersion model accounting for the transport, dispersion, and radioactive transformations of pollutants. The core of the accidental part of the system is the Eulerian 3D dispersion model EMAP calculating concentration and deposition fields [2]. The system is upgraded with a 'dose calculation module' for estimation of the prognostic dose fields of 31 important radioactive gaseous and aerosol pollutants. The prognostic doses significant for the early stage of a nuclear accident are calculated as follows: the effective doses from external irradiation (air submersion + ground shinning); effective dose from inhalation; summarized effective dose and absorbed thyroid dose [3]. The output is given as 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 hours prognostic dose fields according the updated meteorology. The BERS was upgraded to simulate the dispersion of nuclear materials from Fukushima NPP [4], and results were presented in NIMH web-site. In addition BERS took part in the respective ENSEMBLE exercises to model 131I and 137Cs in Fukushima source term. In case of governmental request for expertise BERS was applied for environmental impact assessment of hypothetical accidental transboundary

  5. The Bulgarian 'nationally responsible capital' on the eve of EU integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiril Alioshev Avramov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina las actitudes recientes de las élites económicas de Bulgaria hacia el proceso de ampliación europea y la integración de Bulgaria en la estructura de la UE. El acento del análisis recae sobre la actividad pública de los representantes de la llamada “Nationally responsable Capital" unidos en el Club búlgaro de Negocios "Renacimiento". La muestra explica la actitud de los "inversores estratégicos búlgaros" hacia la ampliación de la UE, ya que es simbólico para el gran capital búlgaro. Varias hipótesis se revisarán en el curso del análisis, en particular, qué las inversiones bulgaras pueden favorecer a los miembros búlgaros de la OTAN y también acercarse a  las  expectativas hacia su adhesión a la UE. Su retórica se basará en la calidad de su cooperación internacional con las grandes empresas extranjeras, como prueba de su legitimidad interna. Irán acompañadas por esfuerzos de lobbies continuo en busca de apoyo por parte de la administración para favorecer el capital “nacional”. Las conclusiones se basan en los resultados empíricos recientemente publicados de un estudio sobre la actitud de la empresa búlgara hacia la integración de la UE y el análisis del contenido de los discursos públicos, entrevistas e informes del grupo "Renacimiento" y de los miembros del grupo relacionados con el tema.____________ABSTRACT:This paper examines the recent attitudes of the Bulgarian economic elites towards the process of European enlargement and the integration of Bulgaria into the structure of EU. The accent of the analysis falls upon the public activity of the representatives of the so-called "nationally responsible capital" united in the Bulgarian Business Club "Renaissance". The sample is chosen to illustrate the attitudes of the "Bulgarian strategic investors" towards the EU enlargement, as it is symbolic for the Bulgarian large capital. Several hypotheses to be reviewed in the course of the

  6. Bulgarians: Costumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Walter W.

    This booklet presents background information and descriptions of Bulgarian national costumes. The document is part of an ethnic heritage unit intended for use by elementary and secondary social studies classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural awareness educational programs on Bulgaria. Costumes from 11 Bulgarian regions are…

  7. The Bulgarian Glory [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kachev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This poem was written specially for the concert “Bulgarian Symbols”, held on 19th of December 2010 in the Great Hall of the National Palace of Culture in Sofia. It marks the most important moments in the Bulgaria history.

  8. Bulgarian Scientific Periodicals: Actual Problems [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A few Bulgarian scientific periodicals are presented in secondary science litera-ture. Then all the other Bulgarian journals themselves should be considered as situated in marginal publishing field. Hence, reduce the visibility of the scien-tific articles that appear in these magazines has resulted to lost the world scien-tific recognition of authors of those papers. With changes in science policy this unfavorable situation can be improved. Necessary measures and mistakes in science policy in Bulgaria are described in this article.

  9. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  10. Hardship in Bulgarian Law

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    Silviya TSONEVA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the legal treatment of hardship(change of circumstances in Bulgarian law trying to show where it stands in comparison with other legislations (Germany, England, USA and international legal instruments (Unidroit Principles on International Commercial Contracts and Principles of European Contract Law. An overall picture of the different approaches to hardship is concisely presented. Hardship prerequisites and effects are analyzed with a stress on specific problems identified in some recent Bulgarian court decisions. Attention is drawn to certain. concepts and reasoning in other legal systems that may be helpful to Bulgarian theory and practice when dealing with hardship cases.

  11. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  12. Bulgarian emergency responce system for release of hazardous pollutants - design and first test of the preparedness mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganev, Kostadin; Todorova, Angelina; Jordanov, Georgi; Gadzhev, Georgi; Syrakov, Dimiter; Miloshev, Nikolai; Prodanova, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The NATO SfP N 981393 project aims at developing of a unified Balkan region oriented modelling system for operational response to accidental releases of harmful gases in the atmosphere, which would be able to: 1.Perform highly acurate and reliable risk analysis and assessment for selected "hot spots"; 2.Support the emergency fast decisions with short-term regional scale forecast of the propagation of harmful gasesin case of accidental release; 3.Perform, in an off-line mode, a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of the possible longer-term impacts on the environment and human health and make the results available to the authorities and the public. The present paper describes the set up and the testing of the system, mainly focusing on the risk analysis mode. The modeling tool used in the system is the US EPA Models-3 System: WRF, CMAQ and SMOKE (partly). The CB05 toxic chemical mechanism, including chlorine reactions, is employed. The emission input exploits the high-resolution TNO emission inventory. The meteorological pre-processor WRF is driven by NCAR Final Reanalysis data and performs calculations in 3 nested domains, covering respectively the regions of South-Eastern Europe, Bulgaria, and the area surrounding the particular site. The risk assessment for the region of "Vereja Him" factory, Jambol, Bulgaria is performed on the basis of one-year long model calculations. The calculations with CMAQ chemical transport model are performed for the two inner domains. An ammount of 25 tons of chlorine is released two times daily in the innermost domain, and sepаrate calculations are performed for every release. The results are averaged over one year in order to evaluate the probability of exceeding some regulatory treshold value in each grid point. The completion of this task in a relatively short period of time was made possible by using the newly developed Grid computational environment, which allows for shared use of facilities in the research community.

  13. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  14. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-09-30

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

  15. Bulgarians@cern.ch

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The happy Bulgarian family. From left to right, last row to first row: Ilka Antcheva, Georgi Antchev, Dimitri Borilkov, Ivana Hristova, Petiu Petev, Peicho Petkov, Borislav Pavlov, Peter Hristov, Mihail Tchijov, Stefan Piperov, Ekaterina Ivanova, Dimitar Kolev, Roumen Tzenov. Bobby is striding along with his white sneakers, black trousers belted high at the waist and a blue shirt buttoned up to the top. He comes to the coffee table and sits down on the chair crossing his legs. While speaking he fiddles with his glasses and his black curly hair dangles on the sides of his head. Borislav Pavlov or Bobby is a 22 year old Bulgarian summer Physics student at Sofia University and came to CERN to work on ORCA reconstruction software for the CMS experiment. “I will do my thesis on ORCA and it is so good that I can be here, work here where the projects actually happen and exchange experience with the people working here,” he says. “It is an honor for me.” Bulgaria joined CERN as a member state in 1999 but Bulgar...

  16. Bulgarian banking: looking for sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garabed Minassian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we trace and analyze the emergence of the crisis in the Bulgarian banking system as well as the behavior of the central bank and other macroeconomic institutions. The average annual rate of growth in the net profits of the commercial banks for the period 2002-2008 amounted to 31.6%, which encouraged and accounted for the increase in credits. After 2008, the pendulum began to swing back as the difficulties in collecting loan repayments increased, the strain in financial balances tightened and assistance and support from the regulators were requested. The level of the financial and operating income was maintained primarily because of the high interest rates on the loans, but the structure of their distribution shifted substantially. Administrative costs and depreciation were nearly frozen up, and impairment and provisions grew at the expense of profit. This work shows that macroeconomic policies allowed the expansion of the lending boom and encouraged its irrational development. Poor operation and poor quality of the institutions not only allowed but also enabled direction of investments to financing of inefficient production structures. Underestimating the negative consequences shoring up a dysfunctional institutional environment is deemed a form of irrationality; however, not one of the immediate economic players acted to override the economic and political environment. The financial and economic crisis currently affecting the country has its roots in the deficiencies of the domestic macroeconomic policies, and therefore, the efforts toward overcoming these failures should be directed at improved domestic macroeconomic management.

  17. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  18. National Mythology and Its Linguistical Resources: The Bulgarian Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretov, Nikolay

    This paper discusses the concept of Bulgarian national mythology, a secondary mythology that emerged around the late 18th century based on the fundamental opposition Chaos-Cosmos, near-far, up-down, good-evil, God-Satan, and human-non-human. The new mythology redefined self-images and images of the Other, the main figures, and narratives about…

  19. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  20. Bulgarian folk dances at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    On Sunday 29 August, the Bulgarian folklore dance group Rhythm visited CERN. After their visit to the ATLAS visitor centre and the SM18 hall, they performed a show in the Pump Room, introducing CERN people to the musical traditions of their country.   The visit of the Bulgarian dance group was organized by Zornitsa Zaharieva, a member of the Beams Department, and Svejina Dimitrova, Director of the Varna Astronomical Observatory. “The students were enthusiastic about the opportunity to visit CERN”, says Zornitsa. “The idea of the performance came from the dance group itself, who wanted to express their gratitude for being given this chance”. The group, comprising around 25 children aged between 11 and 16 from the city of Varna, was hosted by the CERN Dancing Club. For their show, the young dancers, choreographed by Tashka Pavlova, performed traditional dances and songs from different Bulgarian regions. “As a member of the CERN Dancing Club com...

  1. 150 Bulgarian students visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Between 27 March and 8 April 2010, 150 Bulgarian students from the Astronomical Observatory in Varna visited CERN as part of the “From Galileo to CERN” programme. Bulgarian students participating in the "From Galileo to CERN" educational programme. “It’s interesting to combine astronomy and particle physics”, explains Svejina Dimitrova, organiser of the programme and Director of Varna Astronomical Observatory. The three groups, each one comprising 50 students, first visited Pisa, Padua and other places in Italy  related to Galileo’s life. “Thanks to the visit, students understood telescopes and why Galileo is such an important scientist”, says Svejina. After Italy, they came to CERN for three days and visited several sites: Linac, the Computer Centre CCC, etc. Another group of Bulgarian students in their visit to CERN. “They became aware that particle physics is not only the...

  2. Data modelling for emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response is one of the most demanding phases in disaster management. The fire brigade, paramedics, police and municipality are the organisations involved in the first response to the incident. They coordinate their work based on welldefined policies and procedures, but they also need the m

  3. Polish-Bulgarian-Russian, Bulgarian-Polish-Russian or Russian-Bulgarian-Polish dictionary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Koseska-Toszewa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polish-Bulgarian-Russian, Bulgarian-Polish-Russian or Russian-Bulgarian-Polish dictionary? The trilingual dictionary (M. Duszkin, V. Koseska, J. Satoła and A. Tzoneva is being elaborated based on a working Polish-Bulgarian-Russian electronic parallel corpus authored by Maksim Duszkin, Violetta Koseska-Toszewa and Joanna Satoła-Staśkowiak, and works by A. Tzoneva. It is the first corpus comparing languages belonging to three different Slavic language groups: western, southern and eastern. Works on the dictionary are based on Gramatyka konfrontatywna bułgarsko-polska (Bulgarian-Polish confrontative grammar and the proposed there semantic-oriented interlanguage. Two types of classifiers have been introduced into the dictionary: classic and semantic. The trilingual dictionary will present a consistent and homogeneous set of facts of grammar and semantics. The Authors point out that in a traditional dictionary it is not clear for example whether aspect should be understood as imperfective / perfective form of a verb or as its meaning. Therefore in the dictionary forms and meaning are separated in a regular way. Imperfective verb form has two meanings: state and configuration of states and events culminating in state. Also perfective verb form has two meanings: event and configuration of states and events culminating in event. These meanings are described by the semantic classifiers, respectively, state and event, state1 and event1. The way of describing language units, mentioned in the article, gives a possibility to present language material (Polish, Bulgarian, Russian in any required order, hence the article’s title.

  4. Bulgarian Heroes (Patsov & Mechkov, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a book for the participation of Bulgaria in the First World War (1915-1916. The compilers have collected a large number of stories for martial feats of Bulgarian officers and soldiers at the fronts of the war. These stories were published in different sources during or after the war.

  5. The Bulgarian Experience of Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savova, Julieta

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of recent changes in Bulgarian secondary education looks at several major trends in: the structure of the formal education system; new curricula and conditions for implementation; financing and management of the system; and problems with school staffing. A period of transition characterized by some instability and occasional crises is…

  6. The Bulgarian Experience of Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savova, Julieta

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of recent changes in Bulgarian secondary education looks at several major trends in: the structure of the formal education system; new curricula and conditions for implementation; financing and management of the system; and problems with school staffing. A period of transition characterized by some instability and occasional crises is…

  7. A Feast (Poem [In Bulgarian

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    V. Kachev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This poem was written by Valentin Kachev in 1984 at the vineyard of Tsolo Todorov in Bashovitsa. Tsolo Todorov was one of the leaders of the Belogradchik uprising, murdered at the Belogradchik fortress in the summer of 1850. The poem has already been published in books in Bulgarian as well as in Russian.

  8. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  9. Flashes from the Past: Establishment of the Bulgarian national Bank as Central bank of Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Bojinov, Bojidar

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to outline the specifics related with the emergence and development of central banking in Bulgaria. Established in 1879 as an ordinary commercial bank, Bulgarian National Bank experienced a number of ups and downs in its 130 year history. In its evolutionary development, it became a central issue and Bank of Bulgaria in 1928. In the years of socialism, Bulgarian National Bank is experiencing its devolution development to become in the period 1971-1982 in the only bank in count...

  10. Web presentation of bilingual corpora (Slovak-Bulgarian and Bulgarian-Polish

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    Radovan Garabík

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Web presentation of bilingual corpora (Slovak-Bulgarian and Bulgarian-Polish In this paper we focus on the web-presentation of bilingual corpora in three Slavic languages and their possible applications. Slovak-Bulgarian and Bulgarian-Polish corpora are collected and developed as results of the collaboration in the frameworks of two joint research projects between Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, from one side, and from the other side: Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Sciences and Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, coordinate by authors of this paper.

  11. Multilingual digital resources with Bulgarian language

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    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multilingual digital resources with Bulgarian language The paper presents in brief Bulgarian language resources as a part of multilingual digital resources developed in the frame of some international projects, among them parallel annotated and aligned corpora, comparable corpora, morpho-syntactic specifications for corpora annotation and dictionaries encoding, lexicons, lexical databases, and electronic dictionaries.

  12. Bulgarian Verbs of Motion: Slavic Verbs in a Balkan Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Traci Speed

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the motion verb system of Bulgarian, focusing both on the structure of the Bulgarian motion verb itself, and on the information typically encoded in the Bulgarian verb of motion. It then compares the Bulgarian motion verb system with the motion verb systems of two other Slavic languages, Russian and Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian…

  13. The gender in Bulgarian proverbs

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    Uzeneva Elena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have chosen the paremiology as the object of this article because it is the area where phraseology and folklore are closely related. This fact makes the study of proverbs significant from the lingua-cultural point of view. The subject of the Bulgarian proverbs is an important source of interpretation because most proverbs are "prescriptions-stereotypes of folk self-consciousness" (Telija. We can see proverbs as cultural stereotypes reflected in common language. The analysis of different proverbs (more then 5000 makes it possible to draw valid conclusions about the dominating tendencies and assessments. We concentrated on proverbs connected with the gender issues. They reflect the social aspects of relationships between a man and a woman. The analysis was seriously hampered by the natural semantic richness of proverbs. Our article focuses on the inner form of proverbs. Our first obvious conclusion will be as follows: the gender factor does not play the leading role in the majority of the Bulgarian proverbs. We can see in some proverbs the reflection of the masculine mentality and the power of man, which in itself is not the dominant factor. The negative female stereotype exists alongside the male one. At the same time the female character does not always have negative connotations. Very often the feminine beauty, mind, positive housewife image and patience are in focus. In addition, the indisputable fact of the presence of the „female“ voice, in which sorrow and suffering dominate, and the female consciousness becomes apparent in the understanding of the world created by Bulgarian proverbs. They characterize her emotional side and decisiveness, as well as her expression of resistance. The above in-depth analysis allows us to make the conclusion about certain independence of women even in those past times which are reflected in the proverbs. Confirmation of our main conclusion can be found in some historical facts such as: a married woman

  14. The Bulgarian-Polish-Russian parallel corpus

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    Maksim Duškin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bulgarian-Polish-Russian parallel corpus The Semantics Laboratory Team of Institute of Slavic Studies of Polish Academy of Sciences is planning to begin work on the creation of a Bulgarian-Polish-Russian parallel corpus. The three selected languages are representatives of the main groups of Slavic languages: Bulgarian represents the southern group of Slavic languages, Polish – the western group of Slavic languages, Russian – the eastern group of Slavic languages. Our project will be the first parallel corpus of these three languages. The planned corpus will be based on material, dating from one period (the 20th century and will have a synchronous nature. The project will not constitute the sum of the separate corpora of selected languages. One of the problems with creating multilingual parallel corpora are different proportions of translated texts between the selected languages, for example, Polish literature is often translated into Bulgarian, but not vice versa. Bulgarian, Russian and Polish differ typologically – Bulgarian is an analytic language, Polish and Russian are synthetic. The parallel corpus should have compatible annotation, while taking into account the characteristic features of the selected languages. We hope that the Bulgarian-Polish-Russian parallel corpus will serve as a source of linguistic material of contrastive language studies and may prove to be a big help for linguists, translators, terminologists and students of linguistics. The results of our work will be available on the Internet.

  15. THE BIRD PATICA IN BULGARIAN

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    M. N. Belova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper observes some words for waterfowls (aquatic birds occurring exclusively in South Slavic languages: пат, патка, пате, патица 'duck, goose' and some of their derivatives. The root in these words is generally attributed to common Slavic pъt'bird', but the origin of the vowel timbre (a instead of ъ is unclear. Furthermore, this root could also be found in Eastern and rarely Western Slavic names for another bird 'куропатка' ('Perdix'.  Here all of the attempts for explaining the root vowel are summarized; also I propose a new convergence with the turkish root pat-/pač-, which could have had strong influence on the root vowel in a number of derivatives in Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian and Croatian.

  16. The Family Meeting - A Fantasy [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kachev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This short story by Valentin Kachev, a member both of the Union of the Bulgarian Writers and the Union of the Russian Writers, describes an imaginery meeting of Tsolo Todorov, one of the leaders of the Belogradchik uprising of 1850, with his grandson (the author. The tale was published in Russian. Here its translation into Bulgarian is presented. A painted portrait of Tsolo Todorov (Historic Museum, Belogradchik is enclosed.

  17. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency.

  18. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  19. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  20. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  1. ONE SEGMENT OF THE BULGARIAN-ENGLISH PAREMIOLOGICAL CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOTOVA M.Y.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The English proverbial parallels of the Russian-Bulgarian paremiological core are analysed in the article. The comparison of current Bulgarian proverbs and their English proverbial parallels is based upon the material of the author’s multi-lingual dictionary and her collection of Bulgarian-Russian proverbial parallels published as a result of her sociolinguistic paremiological experiment from 2003 (on the basis of 100 questionnaires filled by 100 Bulgarian respondents and supported in 2013 with the current Bulgarian contexts from the Bulgarian Internet. The number of 'alive' Bulgarian-English proverbial parallels, constructed from the paremiological questionnaires (pointed out by 70 % - 100 % respondents is 62, the biggest part of which belongs to the proverbial parallels with a similar inner form (35, i.e. the biggest part of the segment of the current Bulgarian-English paremiological core (reflecting the Russian paremiological minimum contains proverbial parallels with a similar inner form.

  2. Bulgarian Turkish emigration and return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, D

    1992-01-01

    The main factors which determined the 1989 migration of Turks in Bulgaria back to Turkey are discussed. Background history is provided. After World War I, Turks in bulgaria comprised 10% of the total population. Bulgarian policy had been, up to the 1980s to send Rumelian Turks back, but the policy after 1980 was one of a national revival process to integrate Turks into the developed socialist society. Muslim traditions, customs, and Turkish language were interfered with. International disfavor resulted. In May 1989, the Communist Party declared, in an effort to show democratic ideals, open borders. Thus began the new emigration wave. 369,839 people fled to the Turkish border. 43% of the 9.47 ethnic Turks in bulgaria went to Turkey within 4 months. The numbers decreased in November, and soon after the communist regime ended. New laws were adopted allowing Turks to assume their original Turkish names. The huge migration was clearly political, and as such, the emigrant Turks should be determined as refugees and asylum seekers. The provocation of ethnic Turks was used by the communist regime to solve potential social conflicts. Not only did Turks flee to escape from violence or for religious, cultural, and moral reasons but also due to free market initiatives begun in Turkey in the early 1980s which improved Turkish quality of life. Food and consumer goods were cheaper and economic advantages were perceived. Emigrants were primarily peasants with lower levels of education, professional qualifications, and labor skills. 154,937 (42%) returned to bulgaria and 58% stayed in Turkey to comprise 25% of the former Turkish population. During this period, tensions between countries was high.l Bulgarians actively encouraged emigration and Turkey welcomed it. The emigrants to Turkey were seen as foreigners (muhacir or gocmen) but were received with good will and were readily accepted into menial positions. Emigrants were confronted with political, linguistic, and cultural

  3. Song's Bare Feet [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pankova-Karadjov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a snapshot story of a young woman life in the North-West Bulgarian villages during the late 1930s. Venah Milova is on her way to visit her husband Yordan, who works at a windmill near Belogradchik. She has to walk 18 kilometres to get there, and to save her single pair of shoes, she tucks them in her bag and goes barefoot. Venah manages to hitchhike a ride in the carriage of the district constable and captivates him with her sense of humour and the words: I am a district person too. She honestly shares with him the difficulties of the poor peasant’s life her own and other families go through, hoping for a change. Impressed with the young woman’s conduct, her sincerity, confidence and her openly expressed vision, the district constable makes a special detour to deliver Venah to her destination. He then congratulates her husband Yordan for his beautiful, open-minded and hard-working wife. This is a true story, written out as part of “The history of my family” – started by Yordan, continued by their daughter Vetka Pankova and retold here by their granddaughter Rostislava Pankova-Karadjova.

  4. My Contribution to BulgarianScienceProblems in 2013 [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bulgarianscienceproblems is the only e-mail discussion list, located at yahoogroups.com, moderated by Dr. Lazarin Lazarov, and dealing with the problems of the Bulgarian science and higher education. Its subscribers are currently 5194. This paper lists partly my contribution to the public discussion of the actual situations and challenges of the Bulgarian science in 2013. University/science policy and management and the problems with the failure of the Bulgarian Science Fund are among the main topics considered and discussed.

  5. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  6. Lexical NP and VP quantifiers in Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kalpakchieva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lexical NP and VP quantifiers in Bulgarian The paper focuses on uniqueness, existential and universal quantification within the Bulgarian noun and verb phrase. Quantifiers scope is considered with respect to whether the quantifiers are used alone or in a group with other expressions. Another factor that affects the strength of quantifiers is the expression’s containing additional specifying functions or setting some circumstance or condition. Quantifiers within the verb phrase are particularly strongly affected by other conditions, while quantifiers within the subject NP have a broad scope and are not affected by the additional conditions of the situation described.

  7. Reforming Disaster and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    events ranging from the contamination of the Love Canal, the Cuban refugee crisis, the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Loma ... Prieta Earthquake, and Hurricane Andrew. In 1993, during the Clinton Administration, FEMA initiated reforms that both streamlined disaster and relief...deploy teams and resources to maximize the speed and effectiveness of the anticipated federal response and, when necessary, performs preparedness and

  8. Emergency department response to SARS, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Kung; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Chang

    2005-07-01

    How emergency departments of different levels and types cope with a large-scale contagious infectious disease is unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the response of 100 emergency departments regarding use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and implementation of infection control measures (ICMs) during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Taiwan. Emergency department workers in large hospitals were more severely affected by the epidemic. Large hospitals or public hospitals were more likely to use respirators. Small hospitals implemented more restrictive ICMs. Most emergency departments provided PPE (80%) and implemented ICMs (66%) at late stages of the outbreak. Instructions to use PPE or ICMs more frequently originated by emergency department administrators. The difficulty of implementing ICMs was significantly negatively correlated with their effectiveness. Because ability to prepare for and respond to emerging infectious diseases varies among hospitals, grouping infectious patients in a centralized location in an early stage of infection may reduce the extent of epidemics.

  9. Emergency Response Communications and Associated Security Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Channa, Muhammad Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The natural or man-made disaster demands an efficient communication and coordination among first responders to save life and other community resources. Normally, the traditional communication infrastructures such as land line or cellular networks are damaged and don't provide adequate communication services to first responders for exchanging emergency related information. Wireless ad hoc networks such as mobile ad hoc networks, wireless sensor networks and wireless mesh networks are the promising alternatives in such type of situations. The security requirements for emergency response communications include privacy, data integrity, authentication, key management, access control and availability. Various ad hoc communication frameworks have been proposed for emergency response situations. The majority of the proposed frameworks don't provide adequate security services for reliable and secure information exchange. This paper presents a survey of the proposed emergency response communication frameworks and the p...

  10. New Bulgarian Work on Psychology of Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyana D. Nyagolova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new Bulgarian work on Psychology of Creativity has been published recently. This book focuses on theoretical and methodological approaches to creativity. The results from a study of students' creativity are presented. They are related to the motives for success.

  11. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  12. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  13. Changes of Bulgarian Coastal Dune Landscape under Anthropogenic Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, A.; Young, R.; Stancheva, M.; Stanchev, H.

    2012-04-01

    At one time large sand dune formations were widely distributed along the Bulgarian coast. However, due to increased urbanization in the coastal zone, the areas of total dune landscape has been constantly reduced. Dunes presently comprise only 10% of the entire 412 km long coastline of Bulgaria: they embrace a total length of 38.57 km and a total area of 8.78 km2 Important tasks in dune protection are identification of landscape changes for a certain period of time and accurate delineation of sand dune areas. The present research traces sand dune changes along the Bulgarian Black Sea coast over a 27 year period (1983-2010). This period includes also the time of expanded tourist boom and overbuilding of the coastal zone, and respectively presents the largest dune changes and reductions. Based on the landscape change analyst in GIS environment the study also aims to explore the importance of different natural and human factors in driving the observed dune alterations and destruction. To detect and assess dune changes during the last 3 decades, we used data for sand dunes derived from several sources at different time periods in order to compare changes in shoreline positions, dune contours and areas: i) Topographic maps in 1:5,000 scale from 1983; ii) Modern Very High Resolution orthophotographs from 2006 and 2010; iii) QuickBird Very High Resolution satellite images from 2009; iv) Statistical information for population and tourist infrastructure is also used to consider the influence of human pressure and hotel developments on the dune dynamics. In addition, for more detailed description and visualization of main dune types, digital photos have been taken at many parts of the Bulgarian coast. The study was performed in GIS environment. Based on the results obtained the dunes along the Bulgarian coast were divided into three main groups with relation to the general factors responsible for their alterations: i) Dunes that have decreased in result of shoreline retreat

  14. Media Spaces, Emergency Response and Palpable Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten; Kristensen, Margit

    2009-01-01

    for technological support of emergency responders and outline important design issues and principles regarding the design. We finally reflect upon our findings in relation to Media Spaces, and describe a number of possibilities and related challenges, by the use of examples. We suggest that moving from symmetry......In this chapter we present and discuss a case on the development and use of technologies for emergency response, which shares important aspects with Media Spaces. We first describe the characteristics of emergency response, based on field and literature studies. We then present visions...... to asymmetry and from static to non-static spaces and more generally from closed to open-ended use situations and technological setups can bring Media Space research to bear on a large spectrum of future technology, which is outside traditional Media Spaces....

  15. Emergency Response: Elearning for Paramedics and Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on an innovative research project with academics, software developers, and organizational pilot sites to design and develop elearning software for an emergency response simulation with supporting collaborative tools. In particular, this article focuses on the research that the author has conducted to provide the theoretical…

  16. Opperational Systems for Emergency Preparedness and Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Baskett, R

    2003-11-10

    Operational systems predict the consequences of atmospheric releases of hazardous materials for real-time emergency response, pre-event planning, and post-incident assessment. Such systems provide federal, state, and local agencies, emergency planners and responders, public health officials, military personnel, and other users with critical information on which to base life-and-death decisions on safe zones for siting of incident command posts, sheltering-in-place or evacuation advisories, the need for protective equipment, and the utilization of hospital and health care resources. A range of operational modeling capabilities is required to support different types of release events, distance scales, and response times. Fast-response deployable models are used to perform hazard assessments and initial response functions, and can serve as a backup when connections to a reach-back center are not available. Higher-fidelity three-dimensional dispersion models, coupled to real-time observational data and numerical weather prediction model output, are used for real-time response and support expert quality-assured predictions and refined assessments. Computational fluid dynamics models, which explicitly resolve urban structures, are used for high fidelity applications including vulnerability analyses and planning studies. This paper will briefly discuss the types and capabilities of models used or under development for emergency response systems, customer products, supporting data, and a few representative examples of operational systems. Some selected research priorities are summarized in the final sections.

  17. European Citizenship and Youth in Bulgaria: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis between Bulgarians and Bulgarian Turks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Brusaporci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available European citizenship is a new concept, which has evolved with the process of European integration. Starting from the younger generations, the EU seeks to establish a modern and innovative view of citizenship through three fundamental elements - rights, identity and participation - that could lead to new ways of conceiving the relationship of institutions-citizens and citizenscitizens. The idea of European citizenship tends to overcome the historical idea of national states and national identity. It does this by reinforcing its supranational nature and developing an attitude of tolerance towards diversity and human/minority rights. Thus, to verify the impact European citizenship has on the younger generation in Bulgaria, this research is based on an inter-ethnic sample of 30 interviews (16 Bulgarians, 14 Bulgarian Turks and applies a qualitative comparative analysis method. This research seeks to answer these two main questions: 1 How do young Bulgarians perceive the concept of EU citizenship? 2 How do young Bulgarians perceive the new European citizenship in regard to the inter-ethnic relations in their own country? The study suggests that the EU’s attempt to promote European citizenship is underachieving. On the one hand, young Bulgarian people tend to be well exposed to European citizenship, irrespective of their ethnic belonging. On the other hand, the majority of them are sceptical of the tangible value of European citizenship for the reinforcement of a more encompassing and shared notion of diversity and minority rights.

  18. Preferences of Bulgarian consumers for quality, access and price attributes of healthcare services-result of a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, Thijs; Pavlova, Milena; Atanasova, Elka; Groot, Wim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the preferences of Bulgarian citizens regarding the provision of healthcare services. A survey was carried out in Bulgaria among a nationally representative sample of 1003 respondents. Both a discrete choice experiment and a self-explicated ranking of outpatient and inpatient service attributes were included in the survey. The data are analyzed to elicit the preferences of Bulgarian healthcare consumers for service attributes and to compare them with previous studies in Bulgaria and other countries in Central and Eastern Europe. The reputation and skills of the care provider appear to be relatively most important to the respondents, followed by the state of the equipment, the condition of the facility and the attitude of the staff. The fee-level and access-related attributes (waiting and traveling time) emerged as less important. Overall, consumers in Bulgaria value the quality of healthcare provision very highly. Yet, there are some statistically significant differences between socio-demographic groups. In general, Bulgarian healthcare consumers are willing to accept higher prices for the services they use, when this comes with improved quality of services. These findings comply with findings in previous studies in Bulgaria and in the region. Given the quality problems in the Bulgarian healthcare sector, our findings indicate that priority has to be given to the improvement of healthcare quality when the Bulgarian government invests in this sector. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Affirmation Modality in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Grygiel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Affirmation Modality in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian In the case of affirmation modality the speakers transform their utterances by stressing or attributing a positive value as an additional component added to the semantic structure of a proposition. This type of affirmative polarization is triggered in opposition to negation or hypothetically negative contexts. The goal of the present paper is twofold: on the one hand to compare and contrast affirmative periphrastic constructions in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian and, on the other hand, to ascertain what these constructions reveal regarding the organization of grammatical categories in general and the status of affirmation modality as a coherent and homogenous category with a linguistic validity.

  20. BULGARIAN STATE AND THE TURKS (1878-1908 / BULGARİSTAN EMARETİ VE TÜRKLER (1878–1908

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoc. Prof. Dr. Osman KÖSE

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Bulgaria emerged as an independent state in the Berlin treaty, which was signed after the 1877-1878 Ottoman-Russian war. After this, the Bulgarian administration began an anti-Muslim massacre campaign, like the Russians did before.The main aim of this article is to investigate the pressure, violence and massacres against the Muslim-Turks, organised by the Bulgarian gangs and the official administration. It is also proposed that the emigration of the Muslim-Turkish population began after this policy of violence.

  1. BULGARIAN COMPATIBILITY WITH NATO AIR POWER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    Nazi Germany on 1 March 1941, the Bulgarian government provided its airspace for the upcoming invasion of Yugoslavia and Greece. In December 1941...simulators, etc., which greatly reduce the cost of training and extend the expensive life cycle of fighters. It will also fill in the technological gap...build powerful industrial cooperation and enhance the exchange of modern technologies . Knowledge is everything in combat and knowing more than the

  2. Value of the internet in emergency response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

    1999-05-26

    Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

  3. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  4. Sacramento Regional Response Guide to Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    heat, radio waves, and microwaves which are low level radiation energy which is referred to as non- ionizing radiation. High energy radiation is...Response Plan" (California Office of Emergency Services, Updated February 2001), 5. 41 • Department of Fish and Game-lead agency for petroleum spills...radiation-binding and radiation-ridding gels, foam products, films and emulsions . The goal of radiation decontamination is to be sensitive to the

  5. Commitment and Detachment in English and Bulgarian Academic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassileva, Irena

    2001-01-01

    Examines similarities and differences in the degree of commitment and detachment in English, Bulgarian, and Bulgarian English research articles in linguistics. Analysis shows considerable difference in the overall distribution of hedges and boosters throughout the introductions, discussions, and conclusions of the articles, which may lead to…

  6. Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response - IPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodacek, A.; Boyd, D. L.; van Aardt, J.; Renschler, C. S.; McKeown, D. M.; Collins, H.; Duvvuri, S.; Pillai, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    The three-tiered disaster management approach, disaster planning, disaster response and disaster recovery, is ripe for innovation through integrated knowledge and technology transfer efforts between university researchers, technology companies, and public sector responders. We have formed a partnership, the Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response or IPLER, dedicated to innovation in disaster management by the appropriate application of remote sensing and geospatial technologies. The mission of the IPLER is to create a technology, policy, and business development incubator to facilitate interaction and innovation among university researchers, private sector service and product providers, and public sector emergency response decision makers. Our initial demonstration projects involve flood and wildland fire mapping. The initial results highlight the utility of integrated multispectral imaging and lidar sensing with terrain and hydrologic modeling for managing areas affected by the 2009 flooding of Cattaraugus Creek, NY, USA. Additionally, our processing flow for multispectral (mid- and longwave IR) remote sensing data of wildfire is an example of near realtime transformation of imaging data into simplified information products for use in wildland fire response.

  7. Achieving Reliable Communication in Dynamic Emergency Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N.; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%. PMID:22195075

  8. Development of the Bulgarian Sea Level Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas

    2013-04-01

    Systematic sea level measurements have been started in Bulgaria in the beginning of 20th century and nowadays there are 16 coastal sea level stations in operation. Operators of sea level stations are: National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (NIMH) - 6 stations, Cadastre Agency, Ministry of Regional Development and Public Works (CA) - 4 stations, Port Infrastructure (PI) - 5 stations and Institute of Oceanology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IO-BAS) - 1 station. Six of them are able to provide real time data. The sea level observations in the network of NIMH, performed at six main Bulgarian ports using standard poles, started in 1910. The program, implemented on the NIMH stations, includes daily measurements of the sea level with water gauges (poles). The position of a zero mark of the water gauge is checked once per year. The sea level network of the CA consists of 4 stations: Varna and Burgas (operational since 1928), Irakly and Ahtopol (since 1971). These stations are equipped with stilling-well tide gauges and with mechanical writing devices which draws sea level changes on paper. A mechanical paper writing instruments were installed in Varna and Burgas during 1928 and in 1971, a new paper writing instruments of type SUM (Russian) were installed in the stations of Irakly and Ahtopol. A set of five sea level stations in the ports of Balchik, Varna west, Pomorie, Burgas and Oil port Burgas was build during 2009 in the frame of Port Operational Marine Observing System (POMOS), equipped with high accuracy microwave instruments and operated by PI. In 2010 a new sea level station was set up in the IO-BAS coastal research base Shkorpolovtci. The station is equipped with high accuracy microwave instrument. These six stations are providing real time data. According to the decision of the Council of Ministers in 2012 sea level stations in Varna, Irakly, Burgas and Ahtopol will be operated jointly by Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and

  9. „Model of Effective Management of Bulgarian Public Administration Managing EU Funds“

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the possibilities of constructing a model for the effective management of the Bulgarian public administration responsible for managing the EU funds amid the global financial crisis by using McKinsey’s 7S model. The change of the management model of the public administration in charge of the absorption of EU funds in Bulgaria would increase the absorption rate of the funds while streamlining budgetary costs on the maintenance of the administration. The aim of the study is to...

  10. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response.

  11. Contrastive Analysis of Metatext. Expressing Polish "niemniej" in Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Katarzyna Kisiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrastive Analysis of Metatext. Expressing Polish niemniej in Bulgarian The author discusses possible ways of expressing meanings of Polish niemniej, tym niemniej and niemniej jednak in Bulgarian. A confrontative analysis of the equivalents gives grounds for a reflection on how to conduct a cross-linguistic examination of metatext. Two important questions are raised: whether it is methodologically justified to compare objects non-identical such as units and compositions, lexical and grammatical means, and what exactly equivalence within metatext class means. It is expected that analysis of metatext in Polish and Bulgarian will allow to discover mechanisms of creating metatextual units.

  12. Presentation of the verbs in Bulgarian-Polish electronic dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of the verbs in Bulgarian-Polish electronic dictionary This paper briefly discusses the presentation of the verbs in the first electronic Bulgarian-Polish dictionary that is currently being developed under a bilateral collaboration between IMI-BAS and ISS-PAS. Special attention is given to the digital entry classifiers that describe Bulgarian and Polish verbs. Problems related to the correspondence between natural language phenomena and their presentations are discussed. Some examples illustrate the different types of dictionary entries for verbs.

  13. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  14. Study of Ethnic Stereotype of Young Bulgarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ganeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic stereotypes and prejudices as terms were examined from the point of view of the social identity theory (Tajfel, 1981. The results from a carried out longitudinal survey of stereotype and prejudices of young people of Bulgarian origin (n=1154; 453 men and 701 women; average age 21.7 years in 6 time intervals: in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014, towards the in-group and the representatives of the main ethnic minorities: Turks, Roma and Jews, were presented. Through free associations, the relation between stereotypes and attitudes was studied in two social contexts: personal and community. The results show that the assessment of the minority groups is more positive in the former than in the latter context. The persons studied perceive most negatively the representatives of the Romani ethnos, more weakly negatively the Turks, and the attitudes towards the Jews are positive.

  15. Bulgarian Spatial Prefixes and Event Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pantcheva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I explore the combination possibilities of Bulgarian directional prefixes with various motion verbs. Adopting Ramchand’s (in press event decomposition, Zwarts’ (2005 vector space semantics for directional prepositions, and drawing on various discussions regarding the manner component in the verbal meaning, I propose an analysis that captures the distribution of Goal and Source prefixes. I show how this proposal accounts for the change in the syntactic behavior of prefixed motion verbs compared to their unprefixed counterparts. The proposal also explains the syntactic properties exhibited by verbs when prefixed by different prefixes. I offer a unified treatment of path structure and event structure and suggest that directional prepositions and directional prefixes are semantically identical and originate in the extended PP. The differences between them are due to the syntactic structure in which they participate.

  16. NBU Digital Collection “Bulgarian Cultural Heritage Materials”

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Our experience in maintaining digital collections is described, which urged us to go deep in the process and build centralized digitalization policy. It instigated developing new strategy, adopting new technological solutions and staff training. The emphasis falls is placed on our digital collection “Bulgarian Cultural Heritage Materials” as an example of a focused digitization at the New Bulgarian University (NBU) Library and our answer to modern trends in launching digital...

  17. Bulgarian-Polish Language Resources (Current State and Future Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulgarian-Polish Language Resources (Current State and Future Development The paper briefly reviews the first Bulgarian-Polish digital bilingual resources: corpora and dictionaries, which are currently developed under bilateral collaboration between IMI-BAS and ISS-PAS: joint research project “Semantics and contrastive linguistics with a focus on a bilingual electronic dictionary”, coordinated by L. Dimitrova (IMI-BAS and V. Koseska (ISS-PAS.

  18. Short radiological emergency response training program. [Radiological emergency response training program outline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted.

  19. [Oil and Hazardous Substance Spill Response Emergencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A major oil or hazardous substance spill may constitute an emergency situation requiring prompt actions by the Service to protect threatened natural resources. This...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1507 - Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1507 Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives. (a) The Emergency Response Plan (ERP) shall include... request and the District Manager may approve an alternative location in the ERP if mining involves two-entry systems or yield pillars in a longwall that would prohibit locating the refuge alternative out...

  1. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... Service is correcting a notice of interim directive that appeared in the Federal Register of June 6, 2013... Area Emergency Response revisions. This correction lists the Web site for the interim directive and...

  2. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  3. A Book on Bulgarian High Schools History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asen N. Kozhukharov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the book about the secondary education in Bulgaria during the period from the Bulgarian revival up to 1944, where the focus is on the government policy regarding the secondary education and the legislation of the secondary school as a part of the education system. The body of the book is supported with statistical data. There are three periods outlined within the development – the first one covers the time till the Liberation, from the Liberation until 1909 while the third one is from 1909 to 1944. The second period is characterized by a strive towards the leveling of the male and female secondary schools and their consolidation as a ground for higher education. During the third period the high school takes after the European one, it develops steadily and the short and ineffective changes do not bear any influence on the gradual expansion of the web of high schools (full – male, female, mixed or semigymnasium, with a real, half-classical or classical curriculum.

  4. Low-temperature ashing of Bulgarian lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douchanov, D.; Minkova, V.; Martinez-Alonso, A.; Palacios, J.M.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1993-12-01

    The characterization of mineral components of coals requires their isolation from organic matter, which would otherwise interfere with phase identification by means of physico-chemical techniques. Low-temperature ashing (LTA) using a cool oxygen plasma is a prospective method to oxidise coal organic matter at low temperatures while keeping the mineral constituents unaltered. In this work the authors used a microwave-excited plasma apparatus for the LTA treatment of lignite samples from the Maritza-Iztok (M-1-1; M-1-2) and Elhovo basins. Minerals were characterised in the LTA residues using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the LTA method are discussed. Results indicate that LTA performs well for the isolation of mineral matter, the ensuing methodology being adequate for the characterisation of Bulgarian lignites. The same mineral constituents (principally clay minerals, quartz, pyrite and carbonates) were identified in all the three studied samples, differences being mainly in their particle size, degree of crystallinity and distribution in the organic matter of coals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudi, Arvind

    2009-01-01

    Natural and man-made disasters have gained attention at all levels of policy-making in recent years. Emergency management tasks are inherently complex and unpredictable, and often require coordination among multiple organizations across different levels and locations. Effectively managing various knowledge areas and the organizations involved has…

  6. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; Barabási, Albert-László; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017680

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  7. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  8. Implementation of the Bulgarian-Polish online dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of the Bulgarian-Polish online dictionary The paper describes the implementation of an online Bulgarian-Polish dictionary as a technological tool for applications in digital humanities. This bilingual digital dictionary is developed in the frame of the joint research project “Semantics and Contrastive Linguistics with a focus on a bilingual electronic dictionary” between IMI-BAS and ISS-PAS, supervised by L. Dimitrova (IMI-BAS and V. Koseska-Toszewa (ISS-PAS. In addition, the main software tools for web-presentation of the dictionary are described briefly.

  9. Biography of Colonel Stefan Iliev (1930 [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kozhuharova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Colonel Stefan Iliev, a commander of the 15th Infantry Lom regiment (Belogradchik, is a Bulgarian hero, killed in the battlefield at Chervenata stena, near Bitola, on 26 March 1917. Here is the journal version of a very rare book, published in the printing house of Stamen Kamenov in Belogradchik in 1930. On the cover of the book an author is not given - it is an edition of the Belogradchik Society of the Reserve Non-Commissioned Officers. All details of the military career of this brave Bulgarian soldier are described. The book exists in two editions.

  10. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  11. Evolutionary emergence of responsive and unresponsive personalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.; Van Doorn, G.S.; Weissing, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    In many animal species, individuals differ consistently in suites of correlated behaviors, comparable with human personalities. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the fundamental factors structuring personality differences is the responsiveness of individuals to environmental stimuli. Whereas

  12. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  13. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  14. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  15. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in damage and destruction to local water supplies in Mississippi and Louisiana affecting millions of people. Immediately following the devastation, a multidisciplinary team of 30 EPA emergency response, research, and water program personnel joined force...

  16. 78 FR 68774 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Preliminary proposed rule language. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is making available preliminary proposed rule language that would...-0137, ``Prioritization of Recommended Actions to be Taken in Response to Fukushima Lessons Learned...

  17. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of the accidental course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having...

  18. Impact of institutional modernization and EU integration on Bulgarian farms

    OpenAIRE

    Bachev, Hrabrin

    2008-01-01

    This paper incorporates achievements of a new inter-disciplinary methodology of the New Institutional and Transaction Costs Economics (integrating Economics, Organization, Law, Sociology, Behavioral and Political Sciences) into analysis of Bulgarian agriculture, and assess impact of institutional modernization and EU integration on farm structures and sustainability. Firstly, the new institutional and transacting costs economics framework is briefly presented concentrating on: evolution o...

  19. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Bulgarian species of the genus Senecio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADEZHDA KOSTOVA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Bulgarian species from the genus Senecio were studied phytochemically and/or by GC-MS analysis. Senecivernine-N-oxide was isolated and identified by spectral data for the first time. Different types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity on murine lymphocytes. At a concentration of 100 µg/ml, the alkaloid retroisosenine showed immunosuppressive effect.

  20. Skippers of the Sky: A Story [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kachev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This story by Valentin Kachev, a Bulgarian writer, is for the first years of the astronomical observatory in Belogradchik. Then high school students were involved in recording the trajectories of the first artificial satellites of Earth. This information is transmitted by radio to the Soviet Space Center “Kosmos” in Moscow.

  1. Bulgarian agriculture in the conditions of the EU Common Agricultural Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela TODOROVA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural sectors of the former centrally planned economies, including Bulgaria were in a state of economic crises in the period after socialist governments fell. The former system disappeared almost overnight while new market structures had not yet emerged. The outcome of this transition shocks was a sharp decline in both agricultural output and the sector's GDP in the early 1990s. Some countries of the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE recovered from this initial decline much faster. The principle reason for the difference appears to be the more resolute adherence of CEE governments to reform policies throughout their economies. The purpose of this study is to get more knowledge about the structure and possibilities of Bulgarian agriculture after the transition period and last but not least, about the effects of the EU CAP on the Bulgarian economy and farmers.That is why were made some interviews, and besides, it was carried out a questionnaire survey in order to get a picture about how farmers act in a new environment called the Common Agricultural Policy of EU. For collecting information, as well as confirming or rejecting the investigation hypotheses chi-square analysis was applied.

  2. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    and visions as ways to bridge between fieldwork and literature studies on the one hand and the emerging computer based prototypes on the other. Our case concerns design of innovative interactive systems for support in emergency response, including patient identification and monitoring as well as construction......This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges...

  3. Enabling Communication in Emergency Response Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriel Herrera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective communication among first responders during response to natural and human-made large-scale catastrophes has increased tremendously during the last decade. However, most efforts to achieve a higher degree of effectiveness in communication lack synergy between the environment and the technology involved to support first responders operations. This article presents a natural and intuitive interface to support Stigmergy; or communication through the environment, based on intuitively marking and retrieving information from the environment with a pointer. A prototype of the system was built and tested in the field, however the pointing activity revealed challenges regarding accuracy due to limitations of the sensors used. The results obtained from these field tests were the basis for this research effort and will have the potential to enable communication through the environment for first responders operating in highly dynamical and inhospitable disaster relief environments.

  4. Review on emergency medical response against terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Wen; Liu, Yao; Jiang, Ming-Min

    2014-01-01

    Terrorism is a global issue and a constant international threat. As a result, anti-terrorism and emergency response strategies are tasks of critical importance that have a direct impact on the national security of every country in the world. This paper reviews new characteristics of international anti-terrorism measures and offers an in-depth reflection on emergency medical response countermeasures; additionally, this paper presents the goals of related research, which include: 1) to present a model of a highly efficient medical response command; 2) to introduce the pre-planning phases of the emergency medical response; 3) to establish a response system capable of handling various types of terror attacks; 4) to promote anti-terrorism awareness to the general public and emphasize its prevention; and 5) to continue basic investigations into emergency medical responses for various types of terrorist attacks (for example, the classifications and characteristics of new injuries, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of the resultant stress disorders, improved high-efficiency medical response measures and equipment, etc.).

  5. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  6. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); Chabane, J.M. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection) (France)

    2004-07-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives.

  7. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  8. Hospital preparedness and response in CBRN emergencies: TIER assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Carlo; Ingrassia, Pier L; Della Corte, Francesco; Carenzo, Luca; Sapori, Jean-Marc; Gabilly, Laurent; Segond, Fredrique; Grieger, Fiene; Arnod-Prin, Philippe; Larrucea, Xabier; Violi, Chrisitan; Lopez, Cédric; Djalali, Ahmadreza

    2017-10-01

    Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) emergencies need particular hospital preparedness and resources availability. Also, specific skills and capabilities are required for efficient response to these types of events. The aim of this study was to develop an assessment tool to evaluate hospital preparedness and response performance with respect to CBRN emergencies. An evaluation tool was developed using the Delphi technique. A panel of experts from 10 countries, both European and non-European, with more than 5 years of experience in research or practice in CBRN emergency management was involved in this study. The study was run online, and the experts were asked to evaluate a list of items on hospital preparedness and response in CBRN emergencies. A threshold of 85% agreement level was defined as the consensus of experts in this study. The first-round questionnaire was answered by 13 experts. Consensus on the preparedness section was reached for all 29 items during the first round and one item was also added by the experts. Consensus on the response performance indicators were reached in 51 out of the 59 items, during the first round, and eight items were modified and then approved in the second round by the experts. Hospitals need a specific level of preparedness to enable an effective response to CBRN emergencies. The assessment tool, developed through experts' consensus in this study, provides a standardized method for the evaluation of hospital preparedness and response performance with respect to CBRN emergencies. The feasibility and reliability of this assessment tool could be evaluated before and during simulated exercises in a standardized manner.

  9. Neologisms in bilingual digital dictionaries (on the example of Bulgarian-Polish dictionary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neologisms in bilingual digital dictionaries (on the example of Bulgarian-Polish dictionary The paper discusses the presentation of neologisms in the recent version of the Bulgarian-Polish digital dictionary. We also continue the discussion of important problems related to the classifiers of the verbs as headwords of the digital dictionary entries. We analyze some examples from ongoing experimental version of the Bulgarian-Polish digital dictionary.

  10. Exploratory analysis of real personal emergency response call conversations: considerations for personal emergency response spoken dialogue systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Victoria; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to derive data from real, recorded, personal emergency response call conversations to help improve the artificial intelligence and decision making capability of a spoken dialogue system in a smart personal emergency response system. The main study objectives were to: develop a model of personal emergency response; determine categories for the model's features; identify and calculate measures from call conversations (verbal ability, conversational structure, timing); and examine conversational patterns and relationships between measures and model features applicable for improving the system's ability to automatically identify call model categories and predict a target response. This study was exploratory and used mixed methods. Personal emergency response calls were pre-classified according to call model categories identified qualitatively from response call transcripts. The relationships between six verbal ability measures, three conversational structure measures, two timing measures and three independent factors: caller type, risk level, and speaker type, were examined statistically. Emergency medical response services were the preferred response for the majority of medium and high risk calls for both caller types. Older adult callers mainly requested non-emergency medical service responders during medium risk situations. By measuring the number of spoken words-per-minute and turn-length-in-words for the first spoken utterance of a call, older adult and care provider callers could be identified with moderate accuracy. Average call taker response time was calculated using the number-of-speaker-turns and time-in-seconds measures. Care providers and older adults used different conversational strategies when responding to call takers. The words 'ambulance' and 'paramedic' may hold different latent connotations for different callers. The data derived from the real personal emergency response recordings may help a spoken dialogue system

  11. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  12. Institutional failures and transaction costs of Bulgarian private research institutes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the reasons for poor performance of private research institutes in Bulgaria. In this regard the Institutional Economics methods are used. A connection between smart growth policy goals and Bulgarian membership in EU is made. The gaps in the institutional environment are identified as well as measures for their elimination are proposed. The main accent of the study is put on the identification of transaction costs, arisen as a result of the failures of the institutional envi...

  13. Bulgarian Standardization of Morris Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Margarita Dilova; Eva Papazova; Metodi Koralov

    2017-01-01

    ...Research Articles БЪЛГАРСКА СТАНДАРТИЗАЦИЯ НА СКАЛАТА ЗА СЕБЕОЦЕНКА НА МОРИС РОЗЕНБЕРГ Bulgarian Standardization of Morris Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale...

  14. Contemporary Marketing Tools Used from Bulgarian Private Dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakova S.; D. Kirov; D. Krastev

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the use of different marketing tools among dentists for the development of private dental practices. Material and methods: A phone call survey was conducted. The survey consisted of questions related to the use of different marketing tools used by dentists for the development of their practices. Results: The most used contemporary marketing tools from Bulgarian dentist are the presence of web site (24.3%) and social media advertisement (21.57%). The less used too...

  15. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  16. Consumer response to food labels in an emerging market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festila, Alexandra Florina; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates consumer response to food labels in an emerging market. More specifically, it measures the levels of awareness, objective and perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness of the most prominent food labels found in the Romanian market. An onli...

  17. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  18. 78 FR 34031 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Forest Service is issuing an interim directive to guide its employees in revised procedures for...

  19. 49 CFR 172.602 - Emergency response information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... material as required by §§ 172.202 and 172.203(k), the ICAO Technical Instructions, the IMDG Code, or the... and technical name of the hazardous material as required by §§ 172.202 and 172.203(k), the ICAO... in the document. Aboard aircraft, the ICAO “Emergency Response Guidance for Aircraft...

  20. Field exercises are useful for improving public health emergency responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Hope

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Emergencies resulting from disease outbreaks and extreme environmental events present significant challenges for health services.Context: Preparing to effectively manage emergencies is a core activity in public health units. Field exercises support consolidation of biopreparedness by testing plans, identifying weaknesses, providing training opportunities and developing surge capacity.Action: An extended field exercise to test response to a novel influenza strain was conducted in New South Wales, Australia in September 2008, eight months before the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic emerged. Lasting four days and involving over 300 participants, the exercise was set in the early response phase with the staggered presentation of 41 cases to 36 emergency departments in the health area. An additional 150 contacts were written into a complex scenario to test the public health response.Outcome: The subsequent pandemic emergence in mid-2009 offered a unique opportunity to assess the field exercise format for disaster preparedness. Most roles were adequately tested with recognized benefit during the actual pandemic response. However, the exercise did not adequately challenge the public health planning team that synthesizes surveillance data and forecasts risk, nor did it identify planning issues that became evident during the subsequent pandemic. Discussion: Field exercises offer the opportunity to rigorously test public health emergency preparedness but can be expensive and labour-intensive. Our exercise provided effective and timely preparation for the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic but showed that more emphasis needs to be placed on the role and training of the public health planning team.

  1. In-plant emergency response training: Technical matters and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, T.K.

    1997-02-01

    There are four key elements to any effective training program: knowledge, skill, attitude and behavior. Prior to commencement of any learning experience, there must be a knowledge objective. It is the responsibility of the trainer to provide students with the information needed to properly implement a specific task. All training can be boiled down to one thing -- behavior modification. Emergency response training is no exception. To have a well-trained team, all four elements must be present. Improving a training program`s effectiveness is the primary focus of this article. The emergency response provisions of the HAZWOPER legislation provide all companies that may be required to respond to hazardous materials emergencies with two options: train their own team or call in a qualified outside response team. There are advantages and disadvantages in either case. Training and equipping one`s own team is an expensive, time-consuming option, but it can decrease the response time and enhance the probability that a standard response procedure will be implemented.

  2. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and

  3. Quantifying Response of Chickpea Emergence to Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Torabi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the response of emergence to temperature in 4 chickpea cultivars (Beauvanij, Arman, Hashem and Jam using 12 sowing dates (one per month under Gorgan environmental conditions (northern Iran in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003. A dent-like function was used to quantify the response of emergence to temperature. Using this function, the cardinal temperatures (base, lower optimum and higher optimum and biological day requirement for emergence were determined for different percentiles. Ceiling temperature was taken constantly as 39 ˚C. There was no significant difference between cultivars for cardinal temperatures of 50% population and they were estimated as 4.5, 20.2 and 29.0 ˚C, respectively. Base temperature of 3.4 and 3.0 ˚C, lower optimum of 23.8 and 20 ˚C and higher optimum of 30.3 and 30.0 ˚C were estimated for 10 and 90% populations without significant difference between cultivars. Cultivar differences for biological day requirement of emergence were not significant for 10, 50 and 90% populations. Biological day requirement was estimated as 4.4, 6.1 and 7.9 days for 10, 50 and 90% populations, respectively. Chickpea emergence could be predicted for different percentiles using estimated parameters of this study and weather data.

  4. The Bulgarian National Corpus: Theory and Practice in Corpus Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Koeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses several key concepts related to the development of corpora and reconsiders them in light of recent developments in NLP. On the basis of an overview of present-day corpora, we conclude that the dominant practices of corpus design do not utilise adequately the technologies and, as a result, fail to meet the demands of corpus linguistics, computational lexicology and computational linguistics alike.We proceed to lay out a data-driven approach to corpus design, which integrates the best practices of traditional corpus linguistics with the potential of the latest technologies allowing fast collection, automatic metadata description and annotation of large amounts of data. Thus, the gist of the approach we propose is that corpus design should be centred on amassing large amounts of mono- and multilingual texts and on providing them with a detailed metadata description and high-quality multi-level annotation.We go on to illustrate this concept with a description of the compilation, structuring, documentation, and annotation of the Bulgarian National Corpus (BulNC. At present it consists of a Bulgarian part of 979.6 million words, constituting the corpus kernel, and 33 Bulgarian-X language corpora, totalling 972.3 million words, 1.95 billion words altogether. The BulNC is supplied with a comprehensive metadata description, which allows us to organise the texts according to different principles. The Bulgarian part of the BulNC is automatically processed (tokenised and sentence split and  annotated at several levels: morphosyntactic tagging, lemmatisation, word-sense annotation, annotation of noun phrases and named entities. Some levels of annotation are also applied to the Bulgarian-English parallel corpus with the prospect of expanding multilingual annotation both in terms of linguistic levels and the number of languages for which it is available. We conclude with a brief evaluation of the quality of the corpus and an outline of

  5. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpkins, A A

    2002-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  6. Research on Sensor Cooperation for Distributed Emergency Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoming Guo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With advantages of IOT (internet of things and sensor technique, a new communication mechanism between sensors is enhanced upon which distributed emergency response systems are built. This mechanism enables sensors to cooperate with each other in a decentralized way to improve efficiency in case of emergencies. During the process, the alert messages are exchanged among sensors cooperatively to prepare and implement monitoring activities. The system center won’t be overloaded by flooding messages. However, due to the lack of centralized information processing, there will be message loops and identity confusions, which would affect system’s reliability and credibility. For this problem, an approach called Decentralized Message Broadcasting Process is introduced to address the issue. In the approach, a message protocol is developed. The sensors are wrapped as device node services and work as message relay stations when they receive messages from others. Messages are utilized not only as information about event but also as reference to identify and filter. The requirement of reliability and credibility over the distributed emergency response system is achieved. Upon the approach, a platform is built for CEA’ SPON to support the decentralized earthquake emergency response research applications.

  7. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  8. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  9. Learning from Japan: strengthening US emergency care and disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Parveen; Arii, Maya; Kayden, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated in 2005, US health response systems for disasters-typically designed to handle only short-term mass-casualty events-are inadequately prepared for disasters that result in large-scale population displacements. Similarly, after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan found that many of its disaster shelters failed to meet international standards for long-term provision of basic needs and health care for the vulnerable populations that sought refuge in the shelters. Hospital disaster plans had not been tested and turned out to be inadequate, and emergency communication equipment did not function. We make policy recommendations that aim to improve US responses to mass-displacement disasters based on Japan's 2011 experience. First, response systems must provide for the extended care of large populations of chronically ill and vulnerable people. Second, policies should ensure that shelters meet or exceed international standards for the provision of food, water, sanitation, and privacy. Third, hospital disaster plans should include redundant communication systems and sufficient emergency provisions for both staff and patients. Finally, there must be routine drills for responses to mass-displacement disasters so that areas needing improvement can be uncovered before an emergency occurs.

  10. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  11. Bulgarian Seismological and GPS/GNSS networks-current status and practical implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Georgiev, Ivan; Dimitrova, Lilia; Slavcheva, Krasimira; Raykova, Plamena

    2016-04-01

    The scientific information is the latest and one of the best bedrock on which effective policy to combat and cope with natural disasters have to be built. Understanding, monitoring and information for future natural disasters are the way to assist the government and society. Different types of networks provide reliable information on various natural disasters. For example, one of the main priorities of the networks are directed to study seismicity of the Earth, its physical phenomena and fields - with an emphasis on tectonic movements and related risk processes, global changes, rotation and position of the Earth in space. Therefore seismological network using advanced electronic systems and digital seismographs transmission of signals from seismic stations to the centres and the registration, processing and archiving of information is carried out by a specialized computer system. Thus improve the monitoring and analysis of seismicity in the whole plan. Another type networks as permanent GPS/GNSS networks are associated with processing and data analysis, as well as monitoring of recent movements of the earth crust. In this study we focus on Seismological and GPS/GNSS networks on the territory in Bulgaria. At present NIGGG-BAS runs both Bulgarian seismological and GPS/GNSS networks. The Bulgarian seismological network - NOTSSI (National Operative Telemetric System for Seismological Information) was founded at the end of 1980. The network comprises today 15 permanent seismic stations spanning the entire territory of the country and two local net works that are deployed around the town of Provadia and Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant in Bulgaria. Since 2005-2006, real-time data exchange between Bulgaria and Greece, Romania, Serbia, Macedonia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Austria and other regional and national seismological data centers was implemented. NIGGG, respectively NOTSSI, is responsible for rapid earthquake determination, public information trough media, and information of

  12. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  13. Broadband Macroscopic Cortical Oscillations Emerge from Intrinsic Neuronal Response Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eGoldental

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Broadband spontaneous macroscopic neural oscillations are rhythmic cortical firing which was extensively examined during the last century, however, their possible origination is still controversial. In this work we show how macroscopic oscillations emerge in solely excitatory random networks and without topological constraints. We experimentally and theoretically show that these oscillations stem from the counterintuitive underlying mechanism - the intrinsic stochastic neuronal response failures. These neuronal response failures, which are characterized by short-term memory, lead to cooperation among neurons, resulting in sub- or several- Hertz macroscopic oscillations which coexist with high frequency gamma oscillations. A quantitative interplay between the statistical network properties and the emerging oscillations is supported by simulations of large networks based on single-neuron in-vitro experiments and a Langevin equation describing the network dynamics. Results call for the examination of these oscillations in the presence of inhibition and external drives.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility: Transparency, Ethics and Governance in Emerging Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Jones; Taghreed Badawoud; Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    In managing business in emerging markets, Corporate Social Responsibility [CSR] is an issue of growing worldwide concern. It adds to the complexity of the management task in this environment, contributing to risks faced in all business transactions – although it may not be seen in this precise terminology. Indeed, the concepts of CSR, Business Ethics and Corporate Governance – as discussed by Western governments, donor agencies and MBA students, for example – may be almost unknown in some of ...

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility: Transparency, Ethics and Governance in Emerging Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Jones; Taghreed Badawoud; Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    In managing business in emerging markets, Corporate Social Responsibility [CSR] is an issue of growing worldwide concern. It adds to the complexity of the management task in this environment, contributing to risks faced in all business transactions – although it may not be seen in this precise terminology. Indeed, the concepts of CSR, Business Ethics and Corporate Governance – as discussed by Western governments, donor agencies and MBA students, for example – may be almost unknown in some of ...

  16. EVALUATING EMERGENCY RESPONSE MODELS OF RADIOLOGICAL DISPERSION IN COMPLEX TERRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, L.L.; Pascoe, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Operational airborne releases of trace quantities of the radioactive noble gas Ar-41 from the HIFAR Nuclear Research Reactor located in Sydney, Australia are valuable for evaluating emergency response models incorporating radiological dispersion. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), where the reactor is located, has a network of meteorological stations and GR-150 environmental gamma dose detectors placed in complex terrain within a 5km radius ...

  17. Bulgarian sense-annotated corpus – between the tradition and novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Koeva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulgarian sense-annotated corpus – between the tradition and novelty The Bulgarian Sense-annotated Corpus (BulSemCor is compiled according to the general methodology established by the SemCor project. It is a subset of the Brown Corpus of Bulgarian semantically annotated with a corresponding synonym set (synset in the Bulgarian wordnet. Unlike the bulk of sense-annotated corpora where only (sets of content words are annotated, in BulSemCor each lexical unit has been assigned a sense. The main contributions achieved in the work on BulSemCor are briefly decides in the presented paper: definition of an annotation schema, compilation of an input corpus, development of a sense-annotated corpus, Bulgarian wordnet enlargement.

  18. Multidimensional identity among the youth Bulgarians in diaspora: Case study of Odessa, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Petko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present the results of research conducted in 2013, on the migration strategies among young Bulgarians from the historical Bulgarian diaspora in South Ukraine. The research is the result of a combined methodology - a survey among university students of Bulgarian origin in the city of Odessa and school graduates from high-schools with a Bulgarian Language education (city of Bolgrad and the village of Chiyshia, as well as individual interviews. The main results show a balanced ratio of those willing to temporarily migrate to the “Historic Motherland” (Bulgaria for education and work purposes, and those who do not declare any willingness for migration as such. The formation process of a certain malleable identities among the young representatives of the Bulgarian community in the Southwestern Ukraine is clearly evident from the represented results.

  19. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  20. Regional frequency response analysis under normal and emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevrani, Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, PO Box 416 (Iran); Ledwich, Gerard; Ford, Jason J. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Dong, Zhao Yang [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a frequency response analysis approach suitable for a power system control area in a wide range of operating conditions. The analytic approach uses the well-known system frequency response model for the turbine-governor and load units to obtain the mathematical representation of the basic concepts. Primary and supplementary frequency controls are properly considered and the effect of emergency control/protection schemes is included. Therefore, the proposed analysis/modeling approach could be grainfully used for the power system operation during the contingency and normal conditions. Time-domain nonlinear simulations with a power system example showed that the results agree with those predicted analytically. (author)

  1. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  2. Emerging concepts in T follicular helper cell responses to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Diana S; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ly, Ann; Ioannidis, Lisa J; Crompton, Peter D

    2017-02-01

    Antibody responses to malaria and candidate malaria vaccines are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated malaria episodes. Because T follicular helper (TFH) cells provide critical help to B cells to generate long-lived antibody responses, they have become the focus of recent studies of Plasmodium-infected mice and humans. The emerging data converge on common themes, namely, that malaria-induced TH1 cytokines are associated with the activation of (i) T-like memory TFH cells with impaired B cell helper function, and (ii) pre-TFH cells that acquire Th1-like features (T-bet expression, IFN-γ production), which impede their differentiation into fully functional TFH cells, thus resulting in germinal center dysfunction and suboptimal antibody responses. Deeper knowledge of TFH cells in malaria could illuminate strategies to improve vaccines through modulating TFH cell responses. This review summarizes emerging concepts in TFH cell responses to malaria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Offshore oil spill response practices and emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu; Cai, Qinhong; Lin, Weiyun; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu

    2016-09-15

    Offshore oil spills are of tremendous concern due to their potential impact on economic and ecological systems. A number of major oil spills triggered worldwide consciousness of oil spill preparedness and response. Challenges remain in diverse aspects such as oil spill monitoring, analysis, assessment, contingency planning, response, cleanup, and decision support. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current situations and impacts of offshore oil spills, as well as the policies and technologies in offshore oil spill response and countermeasures. Correspondingly, new strategies and a decision support framework are recommended for improving the capacities and effectiveness of oil spill response and countermeasures. In addition, the emerging challenges in cold and harsh environments are reviewed with recommendations due to increasing risk of oil spills in the northern regions from the expansion of the Arctic Passage.

  4. Gaia science alerts and the observing facilities of the Serbian-Bulgarian mini-network telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damljanović G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The astrometric European Space Agency (ESA Gaia mission was launched in December 19, 2013. One of the tasks of the Gaia mission is production of an astrometric catalog of over one billion stars and more than 500000 extragalactic sources. The quasars (QSOs, as extragalactic sources and radio emitters, are active galactic nuclei objects (AGNs whose coordinates are well determined via Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI technique and may reach sub-milliarcsecond accuracy. The QSOs are the defining sources of the quasi-inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF because of their core radio morphology, negligible proper motions (until sub-milliarcsecond per year, and apparent point-like nature. Compact AGNs, visible in optical domain, are useful for a direct link of the future Gaia optical reference frame with the most accurate radio one. Apart from the above mentioned activities, Gaia has other goals such as follow-up of transient objects. One of the most important Gaia's requirements for photometric alerts is a fast observation and reduction response, that is, submition of observations within 24 hours. For this reason we have developed a pipeline. In line with possibilities of our new telescope (D(cm/F(cm=60/600 at the Astronomical Station Vidojevica (ASV, of the Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade, we joined the Gaia-Follow-Up Network for Transients Objects (Gaia-FUN-TO for the photometric alerts. Moreover, in view of the cooperation with Bulgarian colleagues (in the frst place, SV, one of us (GD initiated a local mini-network of Serbian { Bulgarian telescopes useful for the Gaia-FUN-TO and other astronomical purposes. During the next year we expect a new 1.4 m telescope at ASV site. The speed of data processing (from observation to calibration server could be one day. Here, we present an overview of our activities in the Gaia-FUN-TO which includes establishing Serbian { Bulgarian mini-network (of five telescopes at three sites

  5. WMD first response: requirements, emerging technologies, and policy implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergino, E S; Hoehn, W E

    2000-06-19

    In the US today, efforts are underway to defend against the possible terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against US cities. These efforts include the development and adaptation of technologies to support prevention and detection, to defend against a possible attack, and, if these fail, to provide both mitigation responses and attribution for a WMD incident. Technologies under development span a range of systems, from early detection and identification of an agent or explosive, to diagnostic and systems analysis tools; and to forensic analysis for law enforcement. Also, many techniques and tools that have been developed for other applications are being examined to determine whether, with some modification, they could be of use by the emergency preparedness, public health, and law enforcement communities. However, anecdotal evidence suggests the existence of a serious disconnect between the technology development communities and these user communities. This disconnect arises because funding for technology development is derived primarily from sources (principally federal agencies) distant from the emergency response communities, which are predominantly state, county, or local entities. Moreover, the first responders with whom we have worked candidly admit that their jurisdictions have been given, or have purchased for them, a variety of technological devices, typically without consulting the emergency responders about their utility. In private discussions, emergency responders derisively refer to these as a closet full of useless toys. Technology developers have many new and relevant technologies currently in the development pipeline, but most have not been adequately vetted against the field needs or validated for field use. The Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology recently sponsored a two-day workshop to bring together

  6. ELABORATION OF THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE BULGARIAN HOTEL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Dabeva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to suggest some terms of reference for the elaboration of the superstructure of the Bulgarian hotel industry. The suggestions are based on the analysis of the superstructure at present. Its capacity, main types of accommodation establishments and their distribution by categories and territory are examined. An analysis is made of some resulting indices such as overnight stays and average stay. The main positive, respectively negative features of the superstructure have been analyzed. Concrete terms of reference have been given in order to overcome the problems specified.

  7. 10th Annual Meeting of the Bulgarian Section of SIAM

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Michail; Georgiev, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents recent research on Advanced Computing in Industrial Mathematics, which is one of the most prominent interdisciplinary areas and combines mathematics, computer science, scientific computations, engineering, physics, chemistry, medicine, etc. Further, the book presents the tools of Industrial Mathematics, which are based on mathematical models, and the corresponding computer codes, which are used to perform virtual experiments to obtain new data or to better understand the existing experimental results. The book gathers the peer-reviewed papers presented during the 10th Annual Meeting of the Bulgarian Section of SIAM (BGSIAM) from December 21 to 22, 2015 in Sofia, Bulgaria.

  8. Most Important Work Values in Bulgarian University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslava Bayrakova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify the most important work values of university students. For this purpose, data from an empirical study among students (N = 208, from different study programmes, are presented. Results obtained with the Bulgarian version of the questionnaire WIS/SVP (OS Bulgaria, 2007 revealed that in 2013 there were some gender significant differences in the respondents’ values. The students’ important values were Economic Security, Personal Development, Ability Utilization, Achievement and Advancement. The data could be used for vocational guidance.

  9. Optimal network solution for proactive risk assessment and emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianxing

    Coupled with the continuous development in the field industrial operation management, the requirement for operation optimization in large scale manufacturing network has provoked more interest in the research field of engineering. Compared with the traditional way to take the remedial measure after the occurrence of the emergency event or abnormal situation, the current operation control calls for more proactive risk assessment to set up early warning system and comprehensive emergency response planning. Among all the industries, chemical industry and energy industry have higher opportunity to face with the abnormal and emergency situations due to their own industry characterization. Therefore the purpose of the study is to develop methodologies to give aid in emergency response planning and proactive risk assessment in the above two industries. The efficacy of the developed methodologies is demonstrated via two industrial real problems. The first case is to handle energy network dispatch optimization under emergency of local energy shortage under extreme conditions such as earthquake, tsunami, and hurricane, which may cause local areas to suffer from delayed rescues, widespread power outages, tremendous economic losses, and even public safety threats. In such urgent events of local energy shortage, agile energy dispatching through an effective energy transportation network, targeting the minimum energy recovery time, should be a top priority. The second case is a scheduling methodology to coordinate multiple chemical plants' start-ups in order to minimize regional air quality impacts under extreme meteorological conditions. The objective is to reschedule multi-plant start-up sequence to achieve the minimum sum of delay time compared to the expected start-up time of each plant. All these approaches can provide quantitative decision support for multiple stake holders, including government and environment agencies, chemical industry, energy industry and local

  10. Two-Graph Building Interior Representation for Emergency Response Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, P.; Mahdjoubi, L.; Zverovich, V.; Fadli, F.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, in a rapidly developing urban environment with bigger and higher public buildings, disasters causing emergency situations and casualties are unavoidable. Preparedness and quick response are crucial issues saving human lives. Available information about an emergency scene, such as a building structure, helps for decision making and organizing rescue operations. Models supporting decision-making should be available in real, or near-real, time. Thus, good quality models that allow implementation of automated methods are highly desirable. This paper presents details of the recently developed method for automated generation of variable density navigable networks in a 3D indoor environment, including a full 3D topological model, which may be used not only for standard navigation but also for finding safe routes and simulating hazard and phenomena associated with disasters such as fire spread and heat transfer.

  11. TWO-GRAPH BUILDING INTERIOR REPRESENTATION FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boguslawski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in a rapidly developing urban environment with bigger and higher public buildings, disasters causing emergency situations and casualties are unavoidable. Preparedness and quick response are crucial issues saving human lives. Available information about an emergency scene, such as a building structure, helps for decision making and organizing rescue operations. Models supporting decision-making should be available in real, or near-real, time. Thus, good quality models that allow implementation of automated methods are highly desirable. This paper presents details of the recently developed method for automated generation of variable density navigable networks in a 3D indoor environment, including a full 3D topological model, which may be used not only for standard navigation but also for finding safe routes and simulating hazard and phenomena associated with disasters such as fire spread and heat transfer.

  12. Scientific Activity in Higher Education: Personal and Institutional Assessment [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Education and research belong together - this expresses the very university idea. Research should provide the new scientific results. These should be published. The system of scholarly journals is organized in two levels. The first level includes the primary research journals and scholarly journals with more expanded audience. The second level includes the secondary research journals. A few Bulgarian journals are presented there. Citation analysis is of an importance mainly because it is heavily used in science policy and research evaluation professionals. The most popular indicators in such considerations are the impact factor (IF, the immediacy index (II and the response time (t1. The meaning and application of these parameters are explained. The incorrect use of the impact factor in the Bulgarian evaluation practice is mentioned. The new indicators that would characterize quantitatively the scientific achievements of the researchers are proposed: efficiency e=nk, n and k - number of author's publications and thet citations, respectively, and personal impact factor PIF=q/m where q is the number of citations in a given year of m author's publications, published in two previous years. The problem of assessment of higher education institutions is considered in detail. The change of three indicators at least should be identified during the years. These are: S=Q/P (Q stands for the number of citations for a given year for the whole faculty N, which publishes in the year of question P publications, L/M and M/N, M,L - number of prospective/graduated students for a given school year.

  13. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth. PMID:28270586

  14. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Man Wah Chau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light, the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth.

  15. Behaviour of inorganic matter during heating of Bulgarian coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassileva, Christina G.; Vassilev, Stanislav V. [Central Laboratory of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 107, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2006-12-15

    Bulgarian subbituminous (Pernik, Bobov Dol) and bituminous (Balkan) coals were gradually heated under air from 100 {sup o}C to their fluid ash-fusion temperatures (1400-1600 {sup o}C) via 100 {sup o}C intervals and the behaviour of their inorganic matter (IM) was studied. The original minerals and newly formed inorganic phases in the oxidation and combustion products (OCPs) of these coals were identified and the behaviour of 33 minerals and phases was described. The coals studied reveal high detrital abundance and low authigenic mineralization with sulphide-sulphate, carbonate or mixed sulphide-sulphate and carbonate tendencies. The IM of coals is composed mainly of quartz, kaolinite, illite+muscovite, feldspars, pyrite, and calcite, while the other minerals identified have subordinate occurrence. The IM of OCPs includes various pre-existing minerals and newly formed phases. The latter phases are glass, quartz-cristobalite-tridymite, mullite, amorphous clay material, hematite-magnetite, anhydrite, and others originating from the heating of these coals or storage of their OCPs. The physico-chemical processes and temperatures that result in the formation of new phases in OCPs are described. The relationships between the ash-fusion behaviour and chemical and mineral composition of the coals are also discussed. A systematization of the physico-chemical transformations and some comparative characterizations, as well as prediction of certain technological and environmental problems related to the behaviour of IM during heating of Bulgarian lignites, subbituminous and bituminous coals are also described and summarized. (author)

  16. TRANSFORMATION IN BULGARIAN LABOR MARKET IN THE YEARS OF TRANSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venelin Terziev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the dependency of labor market on positive and negative effects of cyclic recurrence and economic development. Probable scenarios of the dynamics in employment and unemployment in dependence of changes in gross domestic product (GDP and productivity in conditions of recession and following the start of economic revival are analyzed in accordance to the open character of Bulgarian economy and the specificity of Bulgarian model of transition predetermined by the impacts of outer influences and additional inner ones on the labor market, which verification is on the basis of the data for state-of-art of labor market in years of transition to market economy. The factor predestining the level of unemployment are investigated on the basis of input flows unemployment relating to macroeconomic and other outer measures, as well as the impact which would lead to decrease in the average duration of unemployment. The accent is on the necessity of establishment of a consecutive and sustainable strategy of economic development having a clear vision about the structuring of economy and labor demand in middle-term aspect, as founding in the flexibility of labor market and employment in the country.

  17. Complex humanitarian emergencies: A review of epidemiological and response models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkle Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex emergencies (CEs have been the most common human-generated disaster of the past two decades. These internal conflicts and associated acts of genocide have been poorly understood and poorly managed. This article provides an epidemiological background and understanding of developing and developed countries, and chronic or smoldering countries′ CEs, and explains in detail the prevailing models of response seen by the international community. Even though CEs are declining in number, they have become more complex and dangerous. The UN Charter reform is expected to address internal conflicts and genocide but may not provide a more effective and efficient means to respond.

  18. Emergency Response Transport Forecasting Using Historical Wind Field Pattern Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Roger G.; Keislar, Robert E.

    2000-03-01

    Historical pattern matching, or analog forecasting, is used to generate short-term mesoscale transport forecasts for emergency response at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. A simple historical pattern-matching algorithm operating on a database from the spatially and temporally dense Eastern Idaho Mesonet is used to generate a wind field forecast, which then is input to an existing puff diffusion model. The forecasts are rated both by a team of meteorologists and by a computer scoring method. Over 60% of the forecasts are rated as acceptable. The forecasts also are compared with a persistence method, using both a subjective human evaluation and root-mean-square error calculations.

  19. Mobile Health Systems that Optimize Resources in Emergency Response Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Tammara; Gao, Tia

    2010-01-01

    During mass casualty incidents, a large number of patients need to be triaged accurately in order to save the maximum number of lives. Recently portable health systems have been developed that can gather patient's vital signs and wireless transmit this information to a central location for analysis. This research introduces a methodology to improve triage in mass casualty incidents by combining statistical optimization techniques with mobile health systems to manage resources using evidence based data. We combine data collected during a field test with data of patient's vital signs to simulate how mobile health systems can optimize resources in emergency response situations.

  20. Federal and State Responses to the Emergency Response Communications Program. Draft Report, March 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    comentarios relacionados con el informe titulado "Emergency Response Communications Program". Le agradecer6 estudie este informe y favor de enviarle...sus comentarios respecto al mismo directamente al Contraalmirante Venzke. Anexo I State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations EXECUTiVE 04AMBER...unconvinced that user requirements have really been developed. No real distinction is made between the way an emergency creates undue demands on the

  1. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

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    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  2. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  3. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  4. Fight or flight: the ethics of emergency physician disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserson, Kenneth V; Heine, Carlton E; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Moskop, John C; Baruch, Jay; Aswegan, Andrew L

    2008-04-01

    Most disaster plans depend on using emergency physicians, nurses, emergency department support staff, and out-of-hospital personnel to maintain the health care system's front line during crises that involve personal risk to themselves or their families. Planners automatically assume that emergency health care workers will respond. However, we need to ask: Should they, and will they, work rather than flee? The answer involves basic moral and personal issues. This article identifies and examines the factors that influence health care workers' decisions in these situations. After reviewing physicians' response to past disasters and epidemics, we evaluate how much danger they actually faced. Next, we examine guidelines from medical professional organizations about physicians' duty to provide care despite personal risks, although we acknowledge that individuals will interpret and apply professional expectations and norms according to their own situation and values. The article goes on to articulate moral arguments for a duty to treat during disasters and social crises, as well as moral reasons that may limit or override such a duty. How fear influences behavior is examined, as are the institutional and social measures that can be taken to control fear and to encourage health professionals to provide treatment in crisis situations. Finally, the article emphasizes the importance of effective risk communication in enabling health care professionals and the public to make informed and defensible decisions during disasters. We conclude that the decision to stay or leave will ultimately depend on individuals' risk assessment and their value systems. Preparations for the next pandemic or disaster should include policies that encourage emergency physicians, who are inevitably among those at highest risk, to "stay and fight."

  5. Translation equivalence of demonstrative pronouns in Bulgarian-Slovak parallel texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Translation equivalence of demonstrative pronouns in Bulgarian-Slovak parallel texts In this paper we describe our automatic analysis of several parallel Bulgarian-Slovak texts with the goal to obtain useful information about Slovak translation equivalents of (definite articles and demonstrative pronouns in Bulgarian. Rather than focusing on individual translation equivalents, we present a method for automatic extraction and visualization of the translations. This can serve as a guide for pinpointing interesting features in specific translated documents and could be extended for other parts of speech or otherwise identifiable textual units.

  6. Extraction and Presentation of Bilingual Correspondences from Slovak-Bulgarian Parallel Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Garabík

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction and Presentation of Bilingual Correspondences from Slovak-Bulgarian Parallel Corpus In this paper the results of the automatic extraction and presentation of bilingual correspondences from Slovak-Bulgarian Parallel corpus are described. The equivalent phrases are extracted from sentence and word level automatically aligned corpus, filtered, indexed and presented in a dictionary-like interface. The bilingual dictionary database contains 80 thousand phrase pairs consisting of approximately 350 thousand words (per each language. Counting unique word forms, the size is 31 thousand in the Slovak part of the dictionary, 26 thousand in the Bulgarian part.

  7. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  8. Bulgarian Scholars and Clerics in the European Politics at the end of the 14th Century and the beginning of the 15th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetana Cholova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The events in the last decades of the 14th century and the first of the 15th century related with the conquests of the Ottoman Empire changed the map of Europe. The Bulgarian scholars and clerics: the last patriarchs of Tarnovo - Theodosius and Euthymius, Cyprian – “Metropolitan of Kiev and Moscow and whole Russia”, Gregory Tsamblak – “Wallach-Moldovan Metropolitan” and “Metropolitan of Kiev, Russia and Lithuania”, Gregory the Bulgarian “Metropolitan of Kiev and Lithuania”, Constantine of Kostenets, etc. actively participated in the church and secular policies in Europe. Even though they were among the most passionate supporters of the mystical teachings of hesychasm, through their life they were also representatives of the so-called “political hesychasm”, as a response to the turning point of their time.

  9. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  10. Does Young Age Merit Increased Emergency Department Trauma Team Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes, James F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: To determine if increased trauma team response results in alterations in resource use in a population of children<6 years, especially in those least injured. Methods: We conducted a retrospective before and after study of children <6 years sustaining blunt trauma and meeting defined prehospital criteria. We compared hospitalization rates and missed injuries (injuries identified after discharge from the emergency department/hospital among patients with and without an upgraded trauma team response. We compared the computed tomography (CT rate and laboratory testing rate among minimally injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 6. Results: We enrolled 352 patients with 180 (mean age 2.7 ± 1.5 years in the upgrade cohort and 172 (mean age 2.6 ± 1.5 years in the no-upgrade cohort. Independent predictors of hospital admission in a regression analysis included: Glasgow Coma Scale <14 (odds ratio [OR]=11.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3, 56, ISS (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.33, 1.81, and evaluation by the upgrade trauma team (OR=5.66, 95% CI 3.14, 10.2. In the 275 patients with ISS < 6, CT (relative risk=1.34, 95% CI 1.09, 1.64 and laboratory tests (relative risk=1.71, 95% CI 1.39, 2.11 were more likely to be obtained in the upgrade cohort as compared to the no-upgrade cohort. We identified no cases of a missed diagnosis. Conclusion: Increasing the trauma team response based upon young age results in increased resource use without altering the rate of missed injuries. In hospitals with ED physicians capable of evaluating and treating injured children, increasing ED trauma team resources solely for young age of the patient is not recommended. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:569–575.

  11. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments’ Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Lee, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs, what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC. These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  12. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  13. Multivariate analysis of craniometric characters in Bulgarian chamois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Massei

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A craniometrical study was carried out to examine the skull characteristics of the Bulgarian chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra balcanica (1 to assess whether any difference between sexes is detectable and (2 to compare the Bulgarian material with other already described chamois populations occurring in other European regions. Results of multivariate analyses run on seven craniometrical characters showed sexual dimorphism in the Bulgarian sample. Discriminant Analysis performed on individuals from different populations showed that the positions of the samples in discriminant space were approximately congruent with their geographical position. Principal Component Analysis revealed that the main factor of variation among groups is a size factor. The structure of loadings on PC-II and PC-III and the amount of total variability expressed by these two components suggested also shape differences. Results from multivariate analyses carried out on the means of the characters confirmed these patterns. A dimensional cline for the genus Rupicapra is suggested, the north-east chamois populations showing the largest skulls and the south-west populations having the smallest sizes. Riassunto Analisi multivariata dei caratteri craniometrici ne1 camoscio bulgaro - Uno studio dei caratteri cranici del camoscio bulgaro (Rupicapra rupicapra balcanica è stato effettuato a1 fine di 1 valutare il grado di dimorfismo sessuale; 2 confrontare il campione bulgaro con altre popolazioni di camoscio europeo già descritte in letteratura. I risultati delle analisi multivariate effettuate su sette caratteri craniometrici hanno mostrato l'esistenza del dimorfismo sessuale nel camoscio bulgaro. L'analisi discriminante effettuata su individui appartenenti a diverse popolazioni ha mostrato che la posizione dei campioni nello spazio discriminante è congruente con la loro posizione geografica. L

  14. Emergency Response and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Lamb, R.

    2011-12-01

    Responding to catastrophic natural disasters requires information. When the flow of information on the ground is interrupted by crises such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, hurricanes, and floods, satellite imagery and aerial photographs become invaluable tools in revealing post-disaster conditions and in aiding disaster response and recovery efforts. USGS is a global clearinghouse for remotely sensed disaster imagery. It is also a source of innovative products derived from satellite imagery that can provide unique overviews as well as important details about the impacts of disasters. Repeatedly, USGS and its resources have proven their worth in assisting with disaster recovery activities in the United States and abroad. USGS has a well-established role in emergency response in the United States. It works closely with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) by providing first responders with satellite and aerial images of disaster-impacted sites and products developed from those images. The combination of the USGS image archive, coupled with its global data transfer capability and on-site science staff, was instrumental in the USGS becoming a participating agency in the International Charter Space and Major Disasters. This participation provides the USGS with access to international members and their space agencies, to information on European and other global member methodology in disaster response, and to data from satellites operated by Charter member countries. Such access enhances the USGS' ability to respond to global emergencies and to disasters that occur in the United States (US). As one example, the Charter agencies provided imagery to the US for over 4 months in response to the Gulf oil spill. The International Charter mission is to provide a unified system of space data acquisition and delivery to those affected by natural or man-made disasters. Each member space agency has committed resources to support the provisions of the Charter and

  15. Ebola Virus Disease: Ethics and Emergency Medical Response Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jecker, Nancy S; Dudzinski, Denise M; Diekema, Douglas S; Tonelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Caring for patients affected with Ebola virus disease (EVD) while simultaneously preventing EVD transmission represents a central ethical challenge of the EVD epidemic. To address this challenge, we propose a model policy for resuscitation and emergent procedure policy of patients with EVD and set forth ethical principles that lend support to this policy. The policy and principles we propose bear relevance beyond the EVD epidemic, offering guidance for the care of patients with other highly contagious, virulent, and lethal diseases. The policy establishes (1) a limited code status for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD. Limited code status means that a code blue will not be called for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD at any stage of the disease; however, properly protected providers (those already in full protective equipment) may initiate resuscitative efforts if, in their clinical assessment, these efforts are likely to benefit the patient. The policy also requires that (2) resuscitation not be attempted for patients with advanced EVD, as resuscitation would be medically futile; (3) providers caring for or having contact with patients with confirmed or suspected EVD be properly protected and trained; (4) the treating team identify and treat in advance likely causes of cardiac and respiratory arrest to minimize the need for emergency response; (5) patients with EVD and their proxies be involved in care discussions; and (6) care team and provider discretion guide the care of patients with EVD. We discuss ethical issues involving medical futility and the duty to avoid harm and propose a utilitarian-based principle of triage to address resource scarcity in the emergency setting.

  16. Emergency neurosurgery in Darwin: still the generalist surgeons' responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Tara; Treacy, Peter John; Mathieson, Matthew; Sandilands, Jessica; Weidlich, Stephanie; Read, David

    2015-09-01

    Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) is the only major hospital for the 'Top End' of Northern Territory and Western Australia. As retrieval distances exceed 2600 km, resident generalist surgeons undertake all emergency neurosurgery. Retrospective clinical study from RDH records and review of prospectively collected datasets from RDH Intensive Care Unit and National Critical Care Trauma Response Centre for all emergency neurosurgery patients between 2008 and 2013. Data were obtained from 161 patients with 167 admissions (73% male, 39% indigenous) who underwent 195 procedures (33 per year), including burr hole, craniotomy, cerebral and posterior fossa craniectomy, elevation fracture and ventricular drain. Trauma accounted for 68%, with alcohol as a known factor in 57%. Subdural haematoma (SDH) accounted for 53%. Severity of head injury at presentation correlated with outcome (R(2) = 0.12, P 24 h (P = 0.023) and specific diagnoses of acute SDH (P = 0.006), acute-on-chronic SDH (P = 0.053) and infection (P = 0.052). Indigenous patients were younger (40 versus 55 years, P < 0.001) and more likely to have alcohol as a factor in trauma cases (71% versus 49%, P = 0.027). Time from injury to hospital was high for accidents at a remote location (12.9 versus 1.3 h, P < 0.001); however, Glasgow Outcome Scales (P = 0.13) were no different to accident at metropolitan Darwin. General surgeons at RDH perform a wide range of emergency neurosurgical procedures primarily for trauma. Factors contributing to poor outcomes included remote location of trauma and delay in reaching the hospital. Outcomes at 3 months appear acceptable. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. The Haemus Mountains and the geopolitics of the first Bulgarian empire: An overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marinow Kirił

    2014-01-01

    ... border between Bulgaria and Byzantium. Although in later times this border moved further to the south, even for longer periods, still the mountain ridge remained the most lasting demarcation element in the Byzantine-Bulgarian relations...

  18. The diversity of lexical functions in Bulgarian and Russian: an approach to compatible digital comparative lexicography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Timoshenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of lexical functions in Bulgarian and Russian: an approach to compatible digital comparative lexicography This paper presents an approach to the creation of Russian-Bulgarian digital dictionary of collocations using the apparatus of lexical functions. The project is aimed not only at the high-quality translation and word sense disambiguation but also at the cross-linguistic analysis and at comparing the semantics and compatibility of the words in Slavic languages (here: Russian and Bulgarian by means of digital lexicographical data. Another important application is computer-assisted language learning: Bulgarian data can be incorporated in the educational project being developed for Russian and English at the Institute for Information Transmission Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  19. Which Place for Bulgarian Literature in the “World Republic of Letters”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Vrinat-Nikolov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the case of Bulgarian literature in France, Vrinat-Nikolov suggests that forming a general stereotype of the source-culture within the target-culture may be productive. She also argues for adopting a “foreignising” (L. Venuti, yet not “exoticising” strategy of translation, and implicitly links this translatology issue to the culturological concept of ‘self-colonisation’. Promoting Bulgarian literature abroad should rely on the cumulative effect of efforts by the different agents of the Bulgarian literary field, beginning with a translational strategy focused on recreating a poetics (after H. Meschonnic, which could enhance the appeal even of a literature as unappealing as Bulgarian literature in France.

  20. Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna B. Boberg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available New diseases in forest ecosystems have been reported at an increasing rate over the last century. Some reasons for this include the increased disturbance by humans to forest ecosystems, changed climatic conditions and intensified international trade. Although many of the contributing factors to the changed disease scenarios are anthropogenic, there has been a reluctance to control them by legislation, other forms of government authority or through public involvement. Some of the primary obstacles relate to problems in communicating biological understanding of concepts to the political sphere of society. Relevant response to new disease scenarios is very often associated with a proper understanding of intraspecific variation in the challenging pathogen. Other factors could be technical, based on a lack of understanding of possible countermeasures. There are also philosophical reasons, such as the view that forests are part of the natural ecosystems and should not be managed for natural disturbances such as disease outbreaks. Finally, some of the reasons are economic or political, such as a belief in free trade or reluctance to acknowledge supranational intervention control. Our possibilities to act in response to new disease threats are critically dependent on the timing of efforts. A common recognition of the nature of the problem and adapting vocabulary that describe relevant biological entities would help to facilitate timely and adequate responses in society to emerging diseases in forests.

  1. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Bhaya, Devaki; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2017-03-07

    Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth.IMPORTANCE The photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. exhibits phototaxis that is dependent on the incident light wavelength through the action of various photoreceptors. In natural environments, cells experience a set of highly dynamic and complex light inputs, yet how cells transduce

  2. Contemporary Trends in Pupils' Science Education [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tafrova-Grigorova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review paper outlines three of the main trends in the field of the modern science education: the development of scientific literacy, formation of key competences, and constructivist approach. The concept of science literacy is considered in its historical development and contemporary meaning. A brief review of the international and national experience and perspectives in the achievement of a greater scientific literacy among population is done. Several strategies in implementing the key competences approach at school are presented. Based on information and research evidence on international and national studies, this paper provides also a view on the state-of-art of the science classroom environment. Both Bulgarian teachers and students surveyed describe the present classroom environment of blended, traditional-constructivist type whereas their attitudes and desire are in favour of an entirely constructivist-based education.

  3. Old bulgarian architecture - an university of solar energy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrinova, Annie [Bulgarian Solar Energy Society, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-07-01

    The impressing involvement of the ancient Bulgarian houses in the surroundings and their composition reveal nearly all aspects of Solar Energy (SE) and energy efficiency(EE) tools' application. In this paper are concerned (and richly illustrated), namely: direct/indirect gains, thermal mass, convectional loops, sun spaces (atrium case), solar chimney, synthesis exterior/interior; etc. The joint effect is highly convincing in the SE and EE knowledge of ancient anonymous master-builder. The SE conception is obviously always well considered, readable, well planned and its combined effect is not accidental at all. Such investigation could be of great importance for a new meaning (not only in Bulgaria) to History of Architecture. Investigations like this could motivate a future unwritten yet Bioclimatic history of world architecture. (orig.)

  4. Contemporary Marketing Tools Used from Bulgarian Private Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakova S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of different marketing tools among dentists for the development of private dental practices. Material and methods: A phone call survey was conducted. The survey consisted of questions related to the use of different marketing tools used by dentists for the development of their practices. Results: The most used contemporary marketing tools from Bulgarian dentist are the presence of web site (24.3% and social media advertisement (21.57%. The less used tools are media advertisement (0.68% and the use of flyers (1.36%. Conclusion: Dentists are not well acquainted with the contemporary marketing tools. The internal marketing is most secure tool for attracting new patients. Internet technology gives opportunity for additional form of rapid communication and advertisement on a moderate price.

  5. The correspondence between Miodrag Vasiljević and Bulgarian Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jelena L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian ethnomusicologist and music pedagogue Miodrag A. Vasiljević corresponded with colleagues from neighboring Bulgaria between 1934 and 1962. This exchange of letters went through three phases. The first phase was linked with his stay in Skopje until the breakout of World War II; during the second phase - in the course of the 1940's - he was active in the Department for Folk Music at Radio Belgrade and he founded his method of music teaching on traditional Serbian music; in the third phase (the 1950's and beginning of 1960's Vasiljević aimed at a closer cooperation with Bulgarian musicians. All the phases are characterized by his pronounced interest in the folk music heritage of Balkan peoples. At the beginning that interest was focused on popularizing art music that was based on folk music. Later, he enthusiastically carried out his reforms of music teaching in Serbia, as well as improvements of methods in Serbian ethnomusicology.

  6. National Identity of Young Adolescents of Czech and Bulgarian Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ganeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the structure of national identity among young adolescents of Bulgarian and Czech origin. University students (N=161 completed the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure-Revised (MEIM-R (Phinney & Ong, 2007, four measures of psychological well-being and a measure of salience of ethnicity. Factor analyses of data for the two national groups yielded a two-factor structure that corresponded to two theoretical approaches to ethnic identity, as hypothesised. Similar patterns in magnitude of loadings were observed across groups, indicating that the MEIM-R could be used as a global composite index of national identity. National identity was related positively to measures of psychological well-being such as mastery, self-esteem and optimism, and negatively to measure of loneliness. MEIM-R scores were also moderately correlated with salience (the importance of a person's own national background in his or her life, across national groups.

  7. Pages from the Past: Part I [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stefanova Strigacheva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pages from the past are recollections written in 1970s by Ferdinanda - Venka Stefanova Strigacheva (1897-1976. A large period of time after 1910 is covered. She was born in the village of Targovishte, Belogradchik region. She graduated from the Secondary School for Girls in Vidin. Then she became a teacher. Later she studied agronomy in Wien and Berlin. Ferdinanda Strigacheva was an active and influential communist. However, when the communists became in power in Bulgaria in the autumn of 1944, she left aside from the policy disappointed from the actions of the Bulgarian Communist Party; nevertheless Strigacheva kept her loyality to the Party and beliefs into the communism. Strigacheva son Dr. Atanas Strigachev and his son Dr. Anton Strigachev prepared the text for publishing, mainly with changing the spelling into the modern one.

  8. Gardnerella vaginalis-associated bacterial vaginosis in Bulgarian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina T. Gergova

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in women of reproductive age. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of BV in Bulgarian pregnant and nonpregnant women from several age ranges and to compare three different laboratory methods for Gardnerella vaginalis detection in patents suffering from BV. METHODS: Between September 2011 and June 2012, 809 women of 16-40 years of age separated in two major groups: nonpregnant - 469 (355 with and 114 without symptoms and pregnant - 340 (213 and 127 respectively were enrolled for the study. The women underwent three different laboratory tests simultaneously: scoring of Gram staining of vaginal smear, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for G. vaginalis. RESULTS: The microscopic method detected high frequency of BV in symptomatic (57% whereas only a minority of asymptomatic subjects (14% were detected. G. vaginalisassociated BV was diagnosed in approximately equal proportions when evaluated with PCR and microscopic method for both pregnant and nonpregnant women. The comparative analysis of microscopic evaluation, culture and PCR assays demonstrated greater concurrence (about 90% between Gram staining and PCR detection for BV, than both methods compared to culture. The combination of microscopy and PCR turned out to be very reliable and repeatable for detecting G. vaginalis-associated BV. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comparative investigation on the epidemiology of G. vaginalisassociated BV in Bulgaria. The established highest frequency in the young Bulgarian women (21-30 years is alarming and should be considered in prophylaxis and reproductive programmes.

  9. The Bulgarian-Romanian language boundary: anthroponymical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Красимира [Krasimira] Колева [Koleva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bulgarian-Romanian language boundary: anthroponymical data The topic is Balkan anthroponymy. The area is the Lower Danube – the Bulgarian-Romanian language boundary. In this contact zone there is a distribution of family names, formed from urbonyms. They signal a specific regional belonging, and they show the link with the common area: the Danube river. We are referring to family names of the type: Vidinliev, Kalafatov, Beketov, Svishtovliev, Ruschukliev, Kalarashev, Tutrakanov, (meaning ‘from Vidin’, ‘from Calafat’, ‘from Bechet’, ‘from Svishtov’, ‘from Ruse’, ‘from Calarashi’, ‘from Tutrakan’. This phenomenon is widespread on both banks of the river.   Bułgarsko-rumuńska granica językowa. Dane antroponimiczne Artykuł dotyczy bałkańskiej antroponimii w regionie dolnego Dunaju, stanowiącego bułgarsko-rumuńską granicę i jednocześnie strefę kontaktu. W tym regionie częste są nazwiska derywowane od nazw miejscowości. Sygnalizują one pochodzenie, wskazując jednocześnie na rodowód miejscowy, tj. z regionu naddunajskiego. Są to nazwiska takie jak: Vidinliev, Kalafatov, Beketov, Svištovliev, Rusčukliev, Kalarašev, Tutrakanov (oznaczające: 'z Vidinu, z Kalafatu, z Svištova, z Ruse, z Kalaraši, z Tutrakanu'. Zjawisko to występuje po obu stronach Dunaju.

  10. Immunological markers contributing to successful aging in Bulgarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Elissaveta; Mihaylova, Anastasia; Ivanova, Milena; Michailova, Snejina; Penkova, Kalina; Baltadjieva, Daniela

    2004-04-01

    In order to clarify immunogenetic markers contributing to successful aging, HLA and cytokine gene profiles were analyzed in healthy elderly Bulgarians. Family segregation analysis was performed to define combined effect of haplotypes and immunophenotype profiles. The results of this study did not reveal any statistically significant allele and haplotype frequency differences between elderly and control group. In families with two generations longevity members we did not observed HLA alleles and haplotypes associated with autoimmunity. IL-10 genotype -1082G/A, -819 C/C, -592 C/C, related to the intermediate production, was positively associated, while genotype -1082A/A, -819 C/T, -592 C/A, related to the low level of production, was negatively associated with longevity in Bulgarians. This effect was modulated by IL-6 and IFNgamma genotypes associated with the low level of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Immunophenotypic studies indicated lower relative and absolute numbers of CD3+8+, CD8+28+ and CD8+57+ cells in elderly people. Analysis in families showed that although most pronounced in the elderly group, lower numbers of CD8+ T cells were also found in middle aged and young members of the families compared to the age matched controls. A progressive CD8+28+ cell subsets decline was seen with aging. In addition, we did not observed the 'immune risk phenotype' which is a marker of an increased inflammatory activity. Based on the results of this study, it seems reasonable to suggest that a combination of specific immunogenetic and immunophenotype profiles could contribute to the successful aging and to maintaining healthy status in elderly.

  11. The Ranking of the Institutions of Higher Education in Bulgaria: Status, Problems and Prospects [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boyadjieva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the main results from the first ranking system of Bulgarian higher education institutions. It adopts two perspectives: 1 from the point of view of higher education – What are the basic achievements, problems and perspectives of Bulgarian higher education as seen through the prism of the ranking system? 2 from the point of view of the ranking system – What are the strengths and weaknesses of the ranking systems and how it can be further developed and improved? The paper argues that ranking systems of higher education institutions are an inevitable result of massification, commercialization and growing competition in higher education. The analysis highlights the critical arguments against the first ranking system of Bulgarian higher education institutions and suggests some possibilities for its future development. On the basis of the results from the ranking system the paper outlines the main problems of the Bulgarian higher education. It discusses massification of Bulgarian higher education in the light of recent trends in other European countries and European educational policies. It is argued that Bulgarian higher education is in need of elaboration of strategic vision and new normative framework. It also needs changes, such as: establishment of new governance model and new model of financing of higher education; strengthening the relationship between teaching and research; development of the capacity of higher education institutions for innovative and strategic thinking; diversifying the system of higher education; development of strategic partnerships between higher education institutions and between them and non-academic partner.

  12. Emergency Response Damage Assessment using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandillon, Stephen; Yésou, Hervé; Schneiderhan, Tobias; de Boissezon, Hélène; de Fraipont, Paul

    2013-04-01

    During disasters rescue and relief organisations need quick access to reliable and accurate information to be better equipped to do their job. It is increasingly felt that satellites offer a unique near real time (NRT) tool to aid disaster management. A short introduction to the International Charter 'Space and Major Disasters', in operation since 2000 promoting worldwide cooperation among member space agencies, will be given as it is the foundation on which satellite-based, emergency response, damage assessment has been built. Other complementary mechanisms will also be discussed. The user access, triggering mechanism, an essential component for this user-driven service, will be highlighted with its 24/7 single access point. Then, a clear distinction will be made between data provision and geo-information delivery mechanisms to underline the user need for geo-information that is easily integrated into their working environments. Briefly, the path to assured emergency response product quality will be presented beginning with user requirements, expressed early-on, for emergency response value-adding services. Initiatives were then established, supported by national and European institutions, to develop the sector, with SERTIT and DLR being key players, providing support to decision makers in headquarters and relief teams in the field. To consistently meet the high quality levels demanded by users, rapid mapping has been transformed via workflow and quality control standardisation to improve both speed and quality. As such, SERTIT located in Alsace, France, and DLR/ZKI from Bavaria, Germany, join their knowledge in this presentation to report about recent standards as both have ISO certified their rapid mapping services based on experienced, well-trained, 24/7 on-call teams and established systems providing the first crisis analysis product in 6 hours after satellite data reception. The three main product types provided are then outlined: up-to-date pre

  13. Evaluation of Rugged Wireless Mesh Nodes for Use In Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L Young; Alan M Snyder

    2007-11-01

    During the summer of 2007, engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted a two-day evaluation of commercially available battery powered, wireless, self-forming mesh nodes for use in emergency response. In this paper, the author describes the fundamentals of this emerging technology, applciations for emergency response and specific results of the technology evaluation conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  14. A FTA-based method for risk decision-making in emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making problems in emergency response are usually risky and uncertain due to the limited decision data and possible evolvement of emergency scenarios. This paper focuses on a risk decisionmaking problem in emergency response with several distinct characteristics including dynamic...

  15. Utilizing SAR and Multispectral Integrated Data for Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, S.; Schvartzman, I.; Maman, S.; Marinoni, A.; Gamba, P.; Rotman, S. R.; Blumberg, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    the emergency response following an event.

  16. UTILIZING SAR AND MULTISPECTRAL INTEGRATED DATA FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Havivi

    2016-06-01

    complete scene for the emergency response following an event.

  17. Modeling and public health emergency responses: lessons from SARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, John W; Hupert, Nathaniel; McCauley, Mary M; Hatchett, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Modelers published thoughtful articles after the 2003 SARS crisis, but had limited if any real-time impact on the global response and may even have inadvertently contributed to a lingering misunderstanding of the means by which the epidemic was controlled. The impact of any intervention depends on its efficiency as well as efficacy, and efficient isolation of infected individuals before they become symptomatic is difficult to imagine. Nonetheless, in exploring the possible impact of quarantine, the product of efficiency and efficacy was varied over the entire unit interval. Another mistake was repeatedly fitting otherwise appropriate gamma distributions to times to event regardless of whether they were stationary or not, particularly onset-isolation intervals whose progressive reduction evidently contributed to SARS control. By virtue of their unknown biology, newly-emerging diseases are more challenging than familiar human scourges. Influenza, for example, recurs annually and has been modeled more thoroughly than any other infectious disease. Moreover, models were integrated into preparedness exercises, during which working relationships were established that bore fruit during the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic. To provide the most accurate and timely advice possible, especially about the possible impact of measures designed to control diseases caused by novel human pathogens, we must appreciate the value and difficulty of policy-oriented modeling. Effective communication of insights gleaned from modeling SARS will help to ensure that policymakers involve modelers in future outbreaks of newly-emerging infectious diseases. Accordingly, we illustrate the increasingly timely care-seeking by which, together with increasingly accurate diagnoses and effective isolation, SARS was controlled via heuristic arguments and descriptive analyses of familiar observations.

  18. On Conditions Instantiating Tip Effects of Epistemic and Evidential Meanings in Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Wiemer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with tip effects between evidential and epistemic components in the meaning potential of evidential markers in Bulgarian, the focus being on sentential adverbs with inferential functions. We justify (and start with the following assumptions: (i for any unit we should distinguish its stable semantic meaning from its pragmatic potential which can be favored (or disfavored by appropriate discourse conditions; (ii there is a trade off between evidential and epistemic meaning components that are related to each other on the basis of mutual or one-sided implicatures; (iii one-sided implicatures occur with certain hearsay markers whose epistemic implicatures can be captured as Generalized Conversational Implicatures (GCIs. On this basis, we show that (iv GCIs work also with inferential markers; they can be classified depending on which component (the inferential or the epistemic one can be downgraded more easily. A crucial factor favoring the inferential meaning is a perceptual basis of the inference. In general, (v the more complicated the reconstruction of the cognitive (or communicative basis leading to an inference, the clearer the epistemic function emerges while the evidential function remains in the background, and vice versa. The study is corpus-driven and also includes an attempt at classifying micro- and macro-contextual conditions that (disfavor a highlighting of the evidential function.

  19. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  20. Advanced airway management--a medical emergency response team perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, A G

    2010-09-01

    To determine the number of medical emergency response team (MERT) patients undergoing advanced airway management in the peri-evacuation phase and to determine the indications for airway interventions undertaken in flight. This was a retrospective study. Data was collected from patient report and mission debrief forms completed after each MERT mission during Operation HERRICK 10 (April-October 2009). All patients that received advanced airway interventions before or during evacuation were identified. MERTs were involved in the primary transfer of 534 patients during the period studied, 56 (10.5%) underwent advanced airway management, of which 31 (5.8% of total) were initiated by the MERT in the peri-evacuation phase. Twenty five cases (4.7%) underwent advanced airway management by other pre-hospital providers prior to MERT arrival. Of the 31 advanced airway interventions undertaken in-flight, cardiac arrest was the primary indication in only nine cases. The figure of 56 patients requiring advanced airway management is at the higher end of the range expected from the study of historical military data. This may reflect the doctrine of "intelligent tasking", that is sending this physician-led team to the most seriously injured casualties.

  1. Accident Emergency Response And Routing Software (AERARS using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Ramachandran,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AERARS is a response and routing software for accident emergency requirement. A method has been proposed in this project for using a genetic algorithm to find the shortest route between a source and adestination. It make use of genetic algorithms ability to search the opt solution from the population helping to solve spatially addressed problem. The numbers of accident spots are plotted in ArcGISenvironment and ten major accident spots are identified. The software package is designed with closest facility estimation and shortest route generation along with other basic software facilities in Visual Basic environment. Genetic algorithm provided a great optimality to the solutions. The closest facility tool helps to estimate the nearest hospital, ambulance, police station and fire station. The shortest route estimation tool generates shortest path between a locations to the hospital or ambulance spot. The various risk zonesare assessed and more safety measures can be taken to reduce the frequency of accident. The software efficiency can be further increased by incorporating GPS and satellite technology.

  2. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-04-16

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

  3. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  4. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity.

  5. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Neutron detectors are used in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  7. Contemporary Contrastive Studies of Polish, Bulgarian and Russian Neologisms versus Language Corpora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Satoła-Staśkowiak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary Contrastive Studies of Polish, Bulgarian and Russian Neologisms versus Language Corpora In the field of Slavonic linguistics contrastive studies of neologisms occupy little place, the newest words are insufficiently described and classified. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the need for contrastive description of the newest lexis and checking exclusively one of many possibilities of obtaining Polish, Bulgarian and Russian neologisms. Language corpora, as this possibility is in question, are not the only source from which the author obtains her research material, yet a growing interest in corpora has inspired her to also use this method. The author wants to show the reader to what degree language corpora can help in building the thesaurus of Polish, Bulgarian and Russian neologisms. Making an attempt to confront a collection of neologisms of contemporary Polish, Bulgarian and Russian language, the author points out the need to standardize the description (identical for each of the analysed languages, which she intends to propose in another publications on neologisms in Polish, Bulgarian and Russian language. The application of contrastive method to three different but related languages from the Slavonic group will help, in her opinion, to discover more mechanisms of new words coming into existence and examine the newest derivative processes and their productivity.

  8. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  9. Emergency department response to the deliberate release of biological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, J E

    2004-01-01

    Bioterrorism is the use of biological agents outside the arena of war. Its purpose is to disrupt civilian life. This article investigates the role of the emergency department in the event of an act of bioterrorism.

  10. Emergency Preparedness and Response: Information for Pregnant Women - Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alert Network (HAN) Responders Disaster Relief Volunteers Preventing Chain Saw Injuries During Tree Removal Electrical Safety and ... American Heart Association Have a kit of emergency supplies in your home; such as, clean towels, sheets, ...

  11. Triage systems: saturation in response to emergency rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Cubero Alpízar, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Strategies for the attention of users in emergency rooms in hospitals have become indispensable for the proper functioning of these services, due to increase in the growing demand for service delivery. In this context, a research project whose objective was to analyze the effectiveness of care systems worldwide hospital emergency arises.Method. All that was reviewed evidence published over the past 15 years, including staff observation applies to the system types triage and waitin...

  12. 78 FR 32296 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... recipients most severely affected by Hurricane Sandy: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New Jersey... Federal Register notice, bringing the total amount of Hurricane Sandy Emergency Relief funds allocated...

  13. THE BULGARIAN LEXICAL DATA IN THE SLAVIC LINGUISTIC ATLAS (Vol. 1. «Animal world». Vol. 2. «Livestock». Vol. 3. «Flora». Vol. 8. «Professions and social life»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavka Keremidchieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on lexical data presented in this study, there is proposed a projection of Bulgarian patois from OLA grid onto Slavic dialectal continuum. There are shown relationships between the Bulgarian and other Slavic dialects with the stress on distinctive lexemes peculiar to Bulgarian ones that define the specific character of the Bulgarian language on the lexical level.

  14. Community response grids: using information technology to help communities respond to bioterror emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T; Fleischmann, Kenneth R; Preece, Jennifer; Shneiderman, Ben; Wu, Philip Fei; Qu, Yan

    2007-12-01

    Access to accurate and trusted information is vital in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an emergency. To facilitate response in large-scale emergency situations, Community Response Grids (CRGs) integrate Internet and mobile technologies to enable residents to report information, professional emergency responders to disseminate instructions, and residents to assist one another. CRGs use technology to help residents and professional emergency responders to work together in community response to emergencies, including bioterrorism events. In a time of increased danger from bioterrorist threats, the application of advanced information and communication technologies to community response is vital in confronting such threats. This article describes CRGs, their underlying concepts, development efforts, their relevance to biosecurity and bioterrorism, and future research issues in the use of technology to facilitate community response.

  15. The Bulgarian Odonata database – current status, organisation and a case study new entries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kutsarov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulgarian Odonata database is analysed for the period of the last 10 years. All new entries are summarised in individual species graphs representing the trends in data compilations. Special attention is paid on the role of communities in this process with a single study case which is evident of how a small contribution could elucidate important new information on some underexplored areas. It is concluded that for the past 10 years mountain areas and large Bulgarian rivers have been understudied. These should be the priority target areas in the investigations undertaken in near future.

  16. Bulgarian Workers in Madrid: Legal Position and Performance on the Job Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Markova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the performance of illegal and legal Bulgarian immigrants on the Madrid job market, their propensity to integrate into the receiving society and their intention to return to Bulgaria. The performance of migrants is defined by their success in finding employment (and specifically by their first job and present job in the host country, by their competition with autochthonous workers for employment and by patterns of saving/ remittance sending. The article is based on a survey carried out in 2003/2004 on 202 Bulgarian immigrants residing in the Community of Madrid.

  17. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  18. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  19. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  20. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  1. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  2. Project Responder: technology needs for local emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beakley, Guy; Garwin, Thomas; Pollard, Neal A.; Singley, George T., III; Tuohy, Robert V.; Lupo, Jasper

    2003-09-01

    Since April 2001, the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has funded an effort by Hicks &Associates, Inc. and the Terrorism Research Center, Inc., aimed ultimately at improving local, state, and federal emergency responders" capabilities for mitigating the effects of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive/ incendiary (CBRNE) terrorism. This effort, titled "Project Responder," began by developing an understanding of how state and local responders view their current capabilities, shortfalls, and needs. This paper discusses some of the results of this first phase of the effort that has resulted in a comprehensive report titled "Emergency Responders" Needs, Goals, and Priorities." This paper addresses two of the capabilities from that report which we believe are of most interest to this conference. There are ten other capabilities discussed in the report, which may also be of interest.

  3. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, G. P. S.; Mackay, D. H.; Jardine, M. M.; Yeates, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    GPSG would like to thank the STFC for financial support. DHM would like to thank the STFC and the Leverhulme Trust for financial support. Simulations were carried out on a STFC/SRIF funded UKMHD cluster at St Andrews. We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal...

  4. Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER): An Innovative Emergency Management Tool in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Amy; Nakata, Nicole; Talbert, Todd; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Martinez, DeAndrea; Wolkin, Amy

    2017-09-01

    To demonstrate how inclusion of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) as a tool in Public Health Preparedness Capabilities: National Standards for State and Local Planning can increase public health capacity for emergency response. We reviewed all domestic CASPER activities (i.e., trainings and assessments) between fiscal years 2012 and 2016. Data from these CASPER activities were compared with respect to differences in geographic distribution, type, actions, efficacy, and usefulness of training. During the study period, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted 24 domestic in-person CASPER trainings for 1057 staff in 38 states. On average, there was a marked increase in knowledge of CASPER. Ninety-nine CASPERs were conducted in the United States, approximately half of which (53.5%) assessed preparedness; the others were categorized as response or recovery (27.2%) or were unrelated to a disaster (19.2%). CASPER trainings are successful in increasing disaster epidemiology skills. CASPER can be used by Public Health Emergency Preparedness program awardees to help build and sustain preparedness and response capabilities.

  5. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  6. Emergence of microbial networks as response to hostile environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eMadeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of microorganisms live in complex communities under varying conditions. One pivotal question in evolutionary biology is the emergence of cooperative traits and their sustainment in altered environments or in the presence of free-riders. Co-occurrence patterns in the spatial distribution of biofilms can help define species' identities, and systems biology tools are revealing networks of interacting microorganisms. However, networks of inter-dependencies involving micro-organisms in the planktonic phase may be just as important, with the added complexity that they are not bounded in space. An integrated approach linking imaging, ``Omics'' and modeling has the potential to enable new hypothesis and working models. In order to understand how cooperation can emerge and be maintained without abilities like memory or recognition we use evolutionary game theory as the natural framework to model cell-cell interactions arising from evolutive decisions. We consider a finite population distributed in a spatial domain (biofilm, and divided into two interacting classes with different traits. This interaction can be weighted by distance, and produces physical connections between two elements allowing them to exchange finite amounts of energy and matter. Available strategies to each individual of one class in the population are the propensities or ``willingness'' to connect any individual of the other class. Following evolutionary game theory, we propose a mathematical model which explains the patterns of connections which emerge when individuals are able to find connection strategies that asymptotically optimize their fitness. The process explains the formation of a network for efficiently exchanging energy and matter among individuals and thus ensuring their survival in hostile environments.

  7. Bulgarian Folk Music. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1997. (Romania and Bulgaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Mary

    This report focuses on rhythmic meters characteristic of Bulgarian folk music. Folk instruments, attire, music history, and methods of learning the folk traditional music and dances are presented. Students prepare a lecture/recital to showcase their learning of this unit. The project is intended for use in an undergraduate music history course for…

  8. Educational Practices of Bulgarians in the Period of Separatist Movement from the Ottoman Empire in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdogan, Arzu M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to provide an unpretentious sample and contribution to the evaluations that education and schooling politics played a leading role for Bulgarian nationalist movement to gain a mass dimension like other separatist movements. With this purpose in mind, the efforts were made to address to modern education in native…

  9. Admissions Policies as a Mechanism for Social Engineering: The Case of the Bulgarian Communist Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjieva, Pepka Alexandrova

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses admissions policies to higher education during the Communist regime in Bulgaria (1946-89). It argues that under the conditions of the Bulgarian Communist regime, admissions policies were not only a component of the higher education system--viewed as an institution--but part and parcel of the process through which power was…

  10. Setting of Russian Sonorant Consonants [L–L'] Pronunciation in a Bulgarian Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peneva N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to compare articulation-acoustic nature of Russian and Bulgarian sounds [l], [l'], to reveal typical difficulties faced by students producing these sounds, and development of some methods of neutralizing accent in Russian speach of Bulgarians. Special attention is paid to the description of articulation peculiarities of sonorant [l], [l'] in Russian and Bulgarian languages, identified both common and specific characteristics of these sounds. In the target audience represented by the Russists-students a listening was held to analyse their perception of hard [l] in identical Russian-Bulgarian lexical parallels, which showed the following results: for almost 68% of the target audience Bulgarian hard [l] sounds softer than Russian, for 22% of students they are identical in acoustic effect, and about 10% of the students could not answer the question. The analysis has revealed the difficulties that may be encountered by Bulgarians in a process of setting/correcting pronouncation of Russian consonants. They are connected primarily with differences of articulation of hard and soft consonants [l], [l'] in compared languages and phonologically undifferentiated Russian sonants [l], [l']. These mistakes are related to the pronunciation mistakes of the mixed type. The author supposes that to remove accent in Russian speech pronouncing fluent consonants [l], [l'], it is necessary to inform students about articulation peculiarities of these sounds in both languages, to make comments about possible deviations of these sounds prononciation, to draw attention to reasons of this deviations. As visual and audial measures of education, articulation schemes, tables and figures in special albums or books should be used as well as audio records of normative Russian speech. In the final the conclusion is made that listening of newscasters' speech, repeating of the examples, recording of own speech with analysis of made mistakes, listening for

  11. Emergent response allocation and outcome ratings in slot machine gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Simon; McCann, Kate; Griffiths, Joanne; Cox, Amanda; Crocker, Victoria

    2012-03-01

    The present study describes a contemporary behavior-analytic model of emergent simulated slot machine gambling. Three laboratory experiments investigated the conditions under which stimuli correlated with different slot machine payout probabilities come to have new, emergent functions without those functions being trained directly. After a successful test for verbal relations (A1-B1-C1 and A2-B2-C2), gamblers and nongamblers were exposed to a task in which high- and low-payout probability functions were established for two slot machines labeled with members of the derived relations (B1 and B2). In Experiment 1, participants provided ratings and chose between concurrently presented slot machines labeled with indirectly related stimuli (C1 and C2). In Experiments 2 and 3, participants made ratings and chose under conditions of nonreinforcement and matched payout probabilities, respectively. Across all three experiments, it was predicted that participants would make more selections of, and give higher liking ratings to, the slot machine indirectly related to the trained high-payout probability machine (C2) than the slot machine indirectly related to the trained low-payout probability machine (C1). Findings supported these predictions. The implications for behavior-analytic research on gambling and the development of verbally based interventions for disordered gambling are discussed.

  12. Web-Application for the Presentation of Bilingual Corpora (Focusing on Bulgarian as One of the Two Paired Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Web-Application for the Presentation of Bilingual Corpora (Focusing on Bulgarian as One of the Two Paired Languages This paper briefly presents a web-application for the presentation of bilingual aligned corpora focusing on Bulgarian as one the two paired languages. The focus is given to the description of the software tools and user interface. The software is developed in IMI-BAS and will be hosted on a server there. Some examples of the usage of the web-application for the presentation of a Bulgarian-Polish aligned corpus are included.

  13. Association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity emerges under stressful conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaerd, Daphne; Klumpers, Floris; van Wingen, Guido; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-05-15

    Increased amygdala reactivity in response to salient stimuli is seen in patients with affective disorders, in healthy subjects at risk for these disorders, and in stressed individuals, making it a prime target for mechanistic studies into the pathophysiology of affective disorders. However, whereas individual differences in neuroticism are thought to modulate the effect of stress on mental health, the mechanistic link between stress, neuroticism and amygdala responsivity is unknown. Thus, we studied the relationship between experimentally induced stress, individual differences in neuroticism, and amygdala responsivity. To this end, fearful and happy faces were presented to a large cohort of young, healthy males (n=120) in two separate functional MRI sessions (stress versus control) in a randomized, controlled cross-over design. We revealed that amygdala reactivity was modulated by an interaction between the factors of stress, neuroticism, and the emotional valence of the facial stimuli. Follow-up analysis showed that neuroticism selectively enhanced amygdala responses to fearful faces in the stress condition. Thus, we show that stress unmasks an association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity to potentially threatening stimuli. This effect constitutes a possible mechanistic link within the complex pathophysiology of affective disorders, and our novel approach appears suitable for further studies targeting the underlying mechanisms.

  14. 76 FR 72431 - Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Supplement 4 and FEMA... Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP- 1, Revision 1 (NUREG-0654), and the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program Manual (the...

  15. Three Essays on Law Enforcement and Emergency Response Information Sharing and Collaboration: An Insider Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph V.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation identifies what may be done to overcome barriers to information sharing among federal, tribal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and emergency responders. Social, technical, and policy factors related to information sharing and collaboration in the law enforcement and emergency response communities are examined. This…

  16. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weili; He, Bin

    2015-07-10

    In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP) was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  17. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Duan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  18. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews...... of communication and coordination problems observed during EM efforts and exercises, The system involves the use of a small set of message types designed to match the main categories of acts of communication in the domain of EM. Message tokens related to a sequence of message transactions fan he linked, and links......, Thus, users are able to define filters that capture, for instance, "unanswered requests sent out by me today" or "requests from me that have not been answered by an unconditional 'OK.'" Last, ne describe an associated preparedness plan module, which contains, for a given Ehl organization, its...

  19. Are archetypes transmitted or emergent? A response to Christian Roesler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Vallas, François

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the author argues that Jung's concept of archetype should not be reduced to an univocal definition. Jung himself proposed many definitions of this concept, some of them being partially or totally contradictory to others. A univocal and logical way of thinking can lead us to refute and reject part of those definitions, but a complex way of thinking, as proposed by Edgar Morin or Roy Bhaskar for example, can allow us to consider that those apparent contradictions in Jung's definitions of archetype reflect the complexity of the psychic reality. The main argument of the author is that Jung was missing the epistemological concept of emergence (which appeared in science at the time of his death) and that he tried to express it with the epistemological concepts of his time. © 2013, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  20. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  1. Encountering anger in the emergency department: identification, evaluations and responses of staff members to anger displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cheshin; A. Rafaeli; A. Eisenman

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs) occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines

  2. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, J.; Whitfield, R.

    1983-05-01

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations.

  3. Canadian biodosimetry capacity for response to radiation emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, D. [Defense Research and Development Canada-Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0Z4 (Canada)], E-mail: diana.wilkinson@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Segura, T.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L.; Mullins, D.; Lachapelle, S. [Defense Research and Development Canada-Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Qutob, S.; Thorleifson, E.; Wilkins, R. [Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, PL6303B Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 1C1 (Canada); Morrison, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada); Dolling, J.-A. [Genetics Department, Credit Valley Hospital, 2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga, Ont., L8S 4L8 (Canada); Boreham, D. [McMaster Institute of Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont., L5M 2N1 (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    In December 2001, Canada's response to the international political climate was launched by the creation of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological/Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI). The National Biological Dosimetry Response Plan (NBDRP), established through partnering the expertise of three federal departments and one university, was created in response to this initiative. The NBDRP objectives were to develop a network of laboratories with expertise to perform biological dosimetry by cytogenetics and to investigate new technologies that may be applicable in the development of the new biodosimetry program. Since the creation of the NBDRP, Canada has made significant progress in enhancing expertise and resources to be better prepared for radiological/nuclear events. Through participation in exercises, the existing capacities were tested and recommendations for improvements were made. This paper describes the results from two exercises. The first exercise was designed to test the culturing, analysis, and reporting procedures within a single laboratory, and the second exercise was intended to test the capacity of the NBDRP. Future exercises will further challenge the network resulting in an improved national response capability.

  4. Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C.L.

    1998-09-01

    Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

  5. The potential of aerial platforms in a ‘rapid’ emergency response context

    OpenAIRE

    Lemoine, Guido; SPRUYT Peter

    2013-01-01

    This report reflects on the potential use of aerial platforms in rapid emergency response contexts, typically following major disaster and crisis events. In Europe, a coordinated effort to provide mapping services to support emergency response operations after such events is part of the Copernicus programme, which facilitates the fast provision of thematic post-event map products based on satellite imagery. Increasingly imagery derived from aerial platforms are providing operational capacitie...

  6. Preserving lessons learned in disease outbreaks and other emergency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Samuel; Vukotich, Charles J

    2010-12-01

    Public health departments often miss the opportunity to both learn from outbreaks and disasters and share any 'lessons learned' with other public health partners. These missed opportunities inhibit the public health system's ability to improve, change and adapt in an organized way. In 2003, Western Pennsylvania experienced the largest documented hepatitis A outbreak in US history. The authors documented the key facets of both the outbreak and the response, and in the process developed improved methods for capturing the historical record in an efficient and comprehensive fashion. This process incorporates key aspects of oral history, along with typical public health parameters such as epidemic curves and environmental risk factors, and allows for creation of unique tools for documentation and sharing with diverse audiences. Learning from experience is an essential part of reducing mistakes, improving public health response, and the methods described herein show one way that 'lessons learned' can become a valuable teaching/training tool for students and practitioners.

  7. Emerging Vectors of Narratology: Toward Consolidation or Diversification? (A Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Rossholm

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a response to the questions asked by Franco Passalacqua and Federico Pianzola as a follow-up of the 2013 ENN conference. The discussions that originated at the conference  were rich and thought-provoking and so the editors of this special section of «Enthymema» decided to continue the dialogue about the state of the art and the future of narratology.

  8. Emerging Vectors of Narratology: Toward Consolidation or Diversification? (A Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Åke Skalin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a response to the questions asked by Franco Passalacqua and Federico Pianzola as a follow-up of the 2013 ENN conference. The discussions that originated at the conference  were rich and thought-provoking and so the editors of this special section of «Enthymema» decided to continue the dialogue about the state of the art and the future of narratology.

  9. Emergency response networks for disaster monitoring and detection from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Tanya; Sweeting, Martin N.; Vitanov, Ivan; Vitanov, Valentin I.

    2009-05-01

    Numerous man-made and natural disasters have stricken mankind since the beginning of the new millennium. The scale and impact of such disasters often prevent the collection of sufficient data for an objective assessment and coordination of timely rescue and relief missions on the ground. As a potential solution to this problem, in recent years constellations of Earth observation small satellites and in particular micro-satellites (techniques. For a large number of applications the resulting delay between image capture and delivery is not acceptable, in particular for rapid response remote sensing aiming at disaster monitoring and detection. In such cases almost instantaneous data availability is a strict requirement to enable an assessment of the situation and instigate an adequate response. Examples include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, flooding, forest fires and oil spills. The proposed solution to this issue are low-cost networked distributed satellite systems in low Earth orbit capable of connecting to terrestrial networks and geostationary Earth orbit spacecraft in real time. This paper discusses enabling technologies for rapid response disaster monitoring and detection from space such as very small satellite design, intersatellite communication, intelligent on-board processing, distributed computing and bio-inspired routing techniques.

  10. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-08-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  11. Automating Hyperspectral Data for Rapid Response in Volcanic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley G.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Chien, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    In a volcanic emergency, time is of the essence. It is vital to quantify eruption parameters (thermal emission, effusion rate, location of activity) and distribute this information as quickly as possible to decision-makers in order to enable effective evaluation of eruption-related risk and hazard. The goal of this work was to automate and streamline processing of spacecraft hyperspectral data, automate product generation, and automate distribution of products. Visible and Short-Wave Infrared Images of volcanic eruption in Iceland in May 2010." class="caption" align="right">The software rapidly processes hyperspectral data, correcting for incident sunlight where necessary, and atmospheric transmission; detects thermally anomalous pixels; fits data with model black-body thermal emission spectra to determine radiant flux; calculates atmospheric convection thermal removal; and then calculates total heat loss. From these results, an estimation of effusion rate is made. Maps are generated of thermal emission and location (see figure). Products are posted online, and relevant parties notified. Effusion rate data are added to historical record and plotted to identify spikes in activity for persistently active eruptions. The entire process from start to end is autonomous. Future spacecraft, especially those in deep space, can react to detection of transient processes without the need to communicate with Earth, thus increasing science return. Terrestrially, this removes the need for human intervention.

  12. Emergency response planning to reduce the impact of contaminated drinking water during natural disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig L. Patterson; Jeffrey Q. Adams

    2011-01-01

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people.Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water systems.Prior to an event,utilities and municipalities can use “What if”? scenarios to develop emergency operation,response,and recovery plans designed to reduce the severity of damage and destruction.Government agencies including the EPA are planning ahead to provide temporary supplies of potable water and small drinking water treatment technologies to communities as an integral part of emergency response activities that will ensure clean and safe drinking water.

  13. Guide 71 : Emergency preparedness and response requirements for the upstream petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This guide presents current emergency preparedness and response requirements for the upstream petroleum industry. It applies to any hazard related to upstream petroleum operations and describes requirements specific to sour wells, sour production facilities and gathering systems, high vapour pressure pipelines, spills of hydrocarbons and produced water, and hydrocarbon storage in caverns. The report describes initial planning requirements for specific emergency response plans (ERP) with reference to how an emergency planning zone is determined. It also describes requirements for corporate level ERPs. Compliance and enforcement programs for ERPs were also presented. 8 tabs., 2 figs., 6 appendices.

  14. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  15. A Vision-Based Emergency Response System with a Paramedic Mobile Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Il-Woong; Choi, Jin; Cho, Kyusung; Seo, Yong-Ho; Yang, Hyun Seung

    Detecting emergency situation is very important to a surveillance system for people like elderly live alone. A vision-based emergency response system with a paramedic mobile robot is presented in this paper. The proposed system is consisted of a vision-based emergency detection system and a mobile robot as a paramedic. A vision-based emergency detection system detects emergency by tracking people and detecting their actions from image sequences acquired by single surveillance camera. In order to recognize human actions, interest regions are segmented from the background using blob extraction method and tracked continuously using generic model. Then a MHI (Motion History Image) for a tracked person is constructed by silhouette information of region blobs and model actions. Emergency situation is finally detected by applying these information to neural network. When an emergency is detected, a mobile robot can help to diagnose the status of the person in the situation. To send the mobile robot to the proper position, we implement mobile robot navigation algorithm based on the distance between the person and a mobile robot. We validate our system by showing emergency detection rate and emergency response demonstration using the mobile robot.

  16. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms-1 in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4°C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders.

  17. Oil spill model development and application for emergency response system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper introduces systematically the developing principle ofCWCM 1.0 oil spill model based on Lagrange system and oil spill fate processes in environment, reviews two oil spill incidents of "East Ambassador" in Jiaozhou Bay and "Min Fuel 2" in the mouth of Pearl River, and designs the predict system simulating oil spill applied in contingency plans. It is indicated that CWCM 1.0 has met preliminarily the demands for functions of precision simulating and oil spill predicting, and can plan an important role to support oil spill response.

  18. Emerging strategic corporate social responsibility partnership initiatives in agribusiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pötz, Katharina Anna; Haas, Rainer; Balzarova, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained momentum in business practices and strategies. In the agribusiness sector, the need for CSR integration has recently triggered a number of private sector led initiatives that should contribute to sustainable...... we analyse the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative (SAI) platform and its principles. We conclude that over the past 5 years agribusiness corporations have become more pro-active in addressing sustainability concerns, and mainstream initiatives start to compete with the traditional niche markets...

  19. Airborne remote sensing for Deepwater Horizon oil spill emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroutil, Robert T.; Shen, Sylvia S.; Lewis, Paul E.; Miller, David P.; Cardarelli, John; Thomas, Mark; Curry, Timothy; Kudaraskus, Paul

    2010-08-01

    On April 28, 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) aircraft was deployed to Gulfport, Mississippi to provide airborne remotely sensed air monitoring and situational awareness data and products in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster. The ASPECT aircraft was released from service on August 9, 2010 after having flown over 75 missions that included over 250 hours of flight operation. ASPECT's initial mission responsibility was to provide air quality monitoring (i.e., identification of vapor species) during various oil burning operations. The ASPECT airborne wide-area infrared remote sensing spectral data was used to evaluate the hazard potential of vapors being produced from open water oil burns near the Deepwater Horizon rig site. Other significant remote sensing data products and innovations included the development of an advanced capability to correctly identify, locate, characterize, and quantify surface oil that could reach beaches and wetland areas. This advanced identification product provided the Incident Command an improved capability to locate surface oil in order to improve the effectiveness of oil skimmer vessel recovery efforts directed by the US Coast Guard. This paper discusses the application of infrared spectroscopy and multispectral infrared imagery to address significant issues associated with this national crisis. More specifically, this paper addresses the airborne remote sensing capabilities, technology, and data analysis products developed specifically to optimize the resources and capabilities of the Deepwater Horizon Incident Command structure personnel and their remediation efforts.

  20. Sustainability Ethics Emergency and Media Responsibility in the Consumption Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Bianchi de Araujo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is discussed the sustainable development and the importance of the environmental cause, in order to create models of development that consider the sustainability and environmental preservation for the future generations. The participation of all society is essential in this debate. The establishment of new habits that do not compromise the subsistence and the conscience of the real self-destruction possibility must be studied and analysed; they consist in challenging intentions, which detach the relevance and the moral duty of the media to restore a new ethics and a new way to understand the reality, as well as to divulge the impact of this different perception in the human life. Therefore occurs the requirement of a responsible compromise relating to the development, by way of understanding the biosphere as the social life basis, considering that, in these ecosystems, the human being is only one of the many species that live in an interdependence relationship.

  1. 78 FR 33467 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency; Correction AGENCY: Federal Transit... by Hurricane Sandy. This amount was in addition to the initial $2 billion allocation announced in the... allocation restoration FTA Section 5324 Emergency Relief Program Allocations for Hurricane Sandy, by...

  2. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ``lessons learned`` from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  3. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  4. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichton, M.T. E-mail: m.crichton@abdn.ac.uk; Flin, R

    2004-08-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams.

  5. [Consciousness and abilities on health emergency and the roles of emergency response among public at the communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Dong, Xao-mei; Wang, Sheng-yong; Tian, Jun-zhang; Ye, Ze-bing; Yang, Jian; Li, Guan-ming; Peng, Lin; Zhang, Si-heng

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the consciousness of health emergency and the abilities on self- and mutual medical aids among the public at the community level, as well as the community responses on health-related emergencies and other factors. Random equidistant sampling method was used to extract 617 households before choosing a family member sampled by Kish Grid method. All the members were investigated face to face on a questionnaire-"Health emergency and related ability regarding self and mutual medical aids of the residents". Data were entered into computer database by using software Epi Data 3.1 and were analyzed by SPSS 21.0. Among the 617 households under survey, 47.84% of the public had general awareness on health-related emergencies. Regarding the following items as:prevention and isolation strategies of infectious disease, on safely procedures of earthquake and fires, on prevention of food poisoning, on prevention and first aid of emerging infectious diseases etc., the rates of awareness were 65.04%, 62.92%, 43.62% and 18.79% respectively. Proportions of households which had the first aid supplies were:first aid medicine box as 56.08%; fire extinguisher as 43.60%; spare water and food as 39.40%; having facilities as ropes, whistles and smoke masks for escape were all less than 15%. Rates of awareness on the following items as: correct use of gas switch as 81.52%, knowing the location of the circuit with gear and the fire hydrant as 74.39% and 35.98% , respectively. The correct disposal rates of the residents on the following items were:electric shock and falls (89.63%), patients of infectious diseases (83.31%), gas poisoning (82.98%), suspected symptoms on infectious diseases(82.66%), explosion and burns (66.78%), scald (62.72%)and sprain (57.05%). Scores on the related abilities were as follows: emergency(7.65, out of 10 points), escape(3.55, out of 5 points), self- and mutual medical aids (10.71, out of 16 points). Proportions of having learned and applied of first aid

  6. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  7. Performance Determinants for Responsible Supply Chain Management in the European Emerging Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia Chirilă; Andreea Gangone; Mihaela Asandei; Mariana Cristina Ganescu

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the premise that there are numerous institutional and national factors influencing the performance of responsible supply chain management, the present article seeks to measure and quantify performance of the European emerging states by creating an index of performance of responsible supply chain management and to identify the factors that influence responsible supply chain management. The acquisition of this index was based on our own measurement methodology, starting from two c...

  8. Bulgarian singer Dyana presents PA Director Dickinson with her new CD on STS-90 launch day

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    David Dickinson, the acting director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Public Affairs Office at Kennedy Space Center, accepts a copy of Bulgarian singer Dyana Dafova's latest compact disc (CD) from her on behalf of NASA. The 525-foot tall Vehicle Assembly Building, where Space Shuttle orbiters are mated to their external tank/solid rocket booster stacks, looms in the background. Dyana is touring the United States to promote her CD, entitled 'Sounds of the Earth,' and was an invited guest of NASA for the launch of Columbia on STS-90, the Neurolab mission, earlier in the day. Columbia lifted off from Launch Pad 39B at 2:19 p.m. EDT. Dyana characterized the music on her CD as a new sound, incorporating jazz and new age classics, sung in a newly created language comprised of Bulgarian, English, Sanskrit, Aramski and Hebrew.

  9. Bulgarian wedding music between folk and chalg: Politics, markets and current directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Kerol

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the performative relationship among folklore, the market, and the state through an analysis of the politics of Bulgarian wedding music. In the socialist period wedding music was condemned by the state and excluded from the category folk but was adored by thousands of fans as a counter-cultural manifestation. In the post-socialist period wedding music achieved recognition in the West but declined in popularity in Bulgarian as fusion music's, such as chalga (folk/pop, arose and as musicians faced challenges vis-à-vis capitalism. As the state withdrew and became weaker private companies with profit-making agendas arose. Although it inspired chalga, wedding music began to be seen in contrast to it, as folk music. Recently, fatigue with chalga and nationalistic ideologies are revitalizing wedding music.

  10. Engineer Pavel Izotov in Service in the Russian Imperial Navy and the Bulgarian Fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asen N. Kozhukharov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of data from newly discovered archival collections in the Governmental Military History Archive(Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria and the Russian State Archive of the Naval Fleet (St. Petersburg, Russia, the article restores the biography and the highlights in the career of the marine engineer LTJG Pavel Izotov. The Bulgarian period of Pavel Izotov's career was reconstructed using general scientific methods: analysis, synthesis, comparison and consolidation. The study was based on the principle of historicism. The application of this principle allowed the comparison of the facts from the documents deposited in Bulgarian and Russian archives from this epoch with published accounts by the participants in the events, and furthermore with academic publications from the second half of the past century. It outlines his contributions to the development of shipbuilding, ship repairs, and the system of naval education in the Principality of Bulgaria in the period from 1882 to 1884.

  11. Machine componential analysis of Bulgarian kinship terminology and more on the problem of multiple solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pericliev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Machine componential analysis of Bulgarian kinship terminology and more on the problem of multiple solutions The Bulgarian kin terms of reference and address are subjected to componential analysis, using the sophisticated computer program KINSHIP. It is shown that an unconstrained and separate analysis of the two sets of terms yields an astronomical number of alternative componential models for each, threatening to compromise the componential method as a whole. However, after combining the set of reference and the set of address terms into a unitary kin term domain and applying the program to this new enlarged data set, further employing appropriate simplicity criteria on overall features (=dimensions and components of kin term definitions, yields a unique componential model. This result is evaluated in the context of a famous debate on the problems of multiple solutions of kinship systems. It is concluded that componential analysis properly used is an indispensable tool for revealing the structuring of semantic domains.

  12. Review of the Distribution of the Family Gobiidae (Pisces in the Bulgarian Danube Tributaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velislav Y. Zarev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to give in detailed information on the actual distribution of the species from family Gobiidae in the Bulgarian Danube tributaries. All known literature has been revised and with the new data collected is given complete and actual information on their distribution. In the period 2010-2012 were sampled a total of 41 sites alongside each one of the Bulgarian Danube tributaries. The sampling started from the river mouths to upstream in order to discover what is the southern (upstream distribution of each one goby species. Four goby species were recorded from the tributaries – the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus Pallas, 1814, the monkey goby (Neogobius fluviatilis, the racer goby (Neogobius gymnotrachelus and the tubenose goby (Proterorhinus marmoratus. Further analysis showed preference of mixed substrates and silt in addition of homogenous ones. The occurrence of gobies in the studied tributaries decreased inversely proportional to distance from Danube.

  13. Statistical study of emerging flux regions and the response of the upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao; Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    We statistically study the properties of emerging flux regions (EFRs) and response of the upper solar atmosphere to the flux emergence using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory.Parameters including total emerged flux,flux growth rate,maximum area,duration of the emergence and separation speed of the opposite polarities are adopted to delineate the properties of EFRs.The response of the upper atmosphere is addressed by the response of the atmosphere at different wavelengths (and thus at different temperatures).According to our results,the total emerged fluxes are in the range of (0.44-11.2)× 1019 Mx while the maximum area ranges from 17 to 182 arcsec2.The durations of the emergence are between 1 and 12 h,which are positively correlated to both the total emerged flux and the maximum area.The maximum distances between the opposite polarities are 7-25 arcsec and are also positively correlated to the duration.The separation speeds are from 0.05 to 1.08 km S-1,negatively correlated to the duration.The derived flux growth rates are (0.1-1.3) × 1019 Mxh-1,which are positively correlated to the total emerging flux.The upper atmosphere first responds to the flux emergence in the 1600(A) chromospheric line,and then tens to hundreds of seconds later,in coronal lines,such as the 171(A) (T = 105.8 K) and 211(A)(T = 106.3 K) lines almost simultaneously,suggesting the successive heating of the atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona.

  14. Ubiquitous robust communications for emergency response using multi-operator heterogeneous networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verikoukis Christos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of disasters in various places of the planet have caused an extensive loss of lives, severe damages to properties and the environment, as well as a tremendous shock to the survivors. For relief and mitigation operations, emergency responders are immediately dispatched to the disaster areas. Ubiquitous and robust communications during the emergency response operations are of paramount importance. Nevertheless, various reports have highlighted that after many devastating events, the current technologies used, failed to support the mission critical communications, resulting in further loss of lives. Inefficiencies of the current communications used for emergency response include lack of technology inter-operability between different jurisdictions, and high vulnerability due to their centralized infrastructure. In this article, we propose a flexible network architecture that provides a common networking platform for heterogeneous multi-operator networks, for interoperation in case of emergencies. A wireless mesh network is the main part of the proposed architecture and this provides a back-up network in case of emergencies. We first describe the shortcomings and limitations of the current technologies, and then we address issues related to the applications and functionalities a future emergency response network should support. Furthermore, we describe the necessary requirements for a flexible, secure, robust, and QoS-aware emergency response multi-operator architecture, and then we suggest several schemes that can be adopted by our proposed architecture to meet those requirements. In addition, we suggest several methods for the re-tasking of communication means owned by independent individuals to provide support during emergencies. In order to investigate the feasibility of multimedia transmission over a wireless mesh network, we measured the performance of a video streaming application in a real wireless metropolitan multi

  15. Guidance Manual for preparing Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammed, Kabiru [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan(NREPRP) describes the capabilities, responsibilities and authorities of government agencies and a conceptual basis for integrating the activities of these agencies to protect public health and safety. The NREPRP addresses issues related to actual or perceived radiation hazard requiring a national response in order to: i. Provide co-ordination of a response involving multi-jurisdictions or significant national responsibilities; or ii. Provide national support to state and local governments. The objective of this research is to establish Guidance Manual for preparing a timely, organized and coordinated emergency response plan for Authorities/agencies to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. The manual will not provide sufficient details for an adequate response. This level of details is contained in standard operating procedures that are being developed based on the plan developed. Base on the data obtain from integrated planning levels and responsibility sharing, the legal document of major government agencies participating in NREPRP form the legal basis for the response plan. Also the following documents should be some international legal binding documents. Base on the international safety requirement and some countries well developed NREPRP, we have drafted a guidance manual for new comer countries for easy development of their countries NREPRP. Also we have taken in to consideration lessons learn from most accident especially Fukushima accident.

  16. Transformations of the Dissident Behaviour. Politics in Post-1989 Bulgarian Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Licheva, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    The essay follows the changes in the literary works of the Bulgarian dissidents immediately after 1989. It tries to take into account the disillusionment and the distorted perceptions, but also the satisfaction of freedom, which it discusses as subject matters in the poetry of two dissident authors, who were also active politically – Blaga Dimitrova and Edvin Sugarev. The second major line of thought in the essay is a rereading of socialism in the writings of the younger gener...

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Bulgarian Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and/or Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Antoaneta Gateva; Zdravko Kamenov

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disturbances in women of reproductive age. Besides its well-known effects on reproductive health, it is also linked to increased cardiovascular risk in later life. The aim of this study is to investigate some classical cardiovascular risk factors in a crossectional study of Bulgarian women with PCOS and/or obesity. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of 375 women from an university endocrine clinic. We found ...

  18. Antitumor activity of Bulgarian herb Tribulus terrestris L. on human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetla Angelova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been intensively studied as a source of antitumor compounds. Due to the beneficial climate conditions Bulgarian herbs have high pharmacological potential. Currently, the antitumor effect of the Bulgarian medicinal plant Tribulus terrestris L. on human cancer cell lines is not studied. The main active compounds of the plant are the steroid saponins.The present study aims to analyze the effect on cell viability and apoptotic activity of total extract and saponin fraction of Bulgarian Tribulus terrestris L. on human breast cancer (MCF7 and normal (MCF10A cell lines. Antitumor effect was established by МТТ cell viability assay and assessment of apoptotic potential was done through analysis of genomic integrity (DNA fragmentation assay and analysis of morphological cell changes (Fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that total extract of the herb has a marked dose-dependent inhibitory effect on viability of MCF7 cells (half maximal inhibitory concentration is 15 μg/ml. Cell viability of MCF10A was moderately decreased without visible dose-dependent effect. The saponin fraction has increased inhibitory effect on breast cancer cells compared to total extract. Morphological changes and DNA fragmentation were observed as markers for early and late apoptosis predominantly in tumor cells after treatment. Apoptotic processes were intensified with the increase of treatment duration.The obtained results are the first showing selective antitumor activity of Bulgarian Tribulus terrestris L. on human cancer cells in vitro. Apoptotic processes are involved in the antitumor mechanisms induced by the herb. This results give directions for future investigations concerning detailed assessment of its pharmacological potential.

  19. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelia M. Stojanova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are presented.

  20. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Anelia M. Stojanova; Zoltán György; Zoltán László

    2011-01-01

    A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae) in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are prese...

  1. Regimes of Property Relations between Spouses according to the Bulgarian Family Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetalina PETKOVA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the three existing regimes of property relations between spouses according to Bulgarian family law. The prerequisites for the establishment (occurrence of each of the regimes, their nature, legal effects and termination are examined. Some studies of Bulgarian and foreign authors in relation to property arrangeme objects of the matrimonial property are discussed in details. The author offers a definition of the term "object" and compares the regulation of matrimonial property relations in the framework of previous family codes. The author also makes references to some Russian, German and Austrian legislation. Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to explain the nature of the three existing regimes of property relations between spouses according to Bulgarian family law. based on the author's research in the matrimonial property law and more specifically on a part of the Ph.D. thesis, which deals precisely with the regime of the joint matrimonial property. Approach: The following methods were used: observation, comparison and analysis of the case law. Results: An analysis is made of the main characteristics of the three property regimes between spouses according to Bulgarian family law. The author law. Implications: The marriage and its consequences for the spouses is a topic that engaged the society since the beginning of its existence. Since the dawn of humanity to present day the settlement of family relations was based on the idea that the m marriage. Normally, during the marriage each spouse accumulates different amounts of property. The matrimonial property law determines the distribution of this property between the spouses after the termination of the marriage or the joint matrimonial property. This paper contributes to a better understanding and realizations of the rights of each spouse. Family Code, the lack of case law and the decisive reform in th importance of the findings in this paper. It covers in

  2. Retinol, alpha-tocopherol and fatty acid content in Bulgarian black Sea fish species

    OpenAIRE

    Stancheva, M; Galunska, B.; Dobreva, A. D.; Merdzhanova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure and evaluate the total lipids, fatty acid profile, retinol content and alpha-tocopherol content in the edible tissue of four commercially important fish species from the Bulgarian Black sea: Sprat (Sprattus sprattus), Round Goby (Neogobius rattan), Black Sea Horse Mackerel (Trahurus medditeraneus ponticus) and Shad (Alosa pontica). Fat soluble vitamins were analyzed simultaneously usi...

  3. ALGORITHMIC TRAINING PROGRAM FOR SWIMMING I - IV CLASS IN THE BULGARIAN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petya Kutincheva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study consists in the application of an alternative program for swimming for 1-4 class in Bulgarian schools. The experiment was conducted with children (7-8 years old at two schools in Sofia with the styles crawl and back crawl. The results show that the developed programs can be used as for mandatory training and in elective. These forms are regulated under the governmental educational requirements for learning the physical education and sport (swimming.

  4. ERCB directive 071 : emergency preparedness and response requirements for the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-04-15

    In order to protect the public and environment from harm through responsible petroleum operations, the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) has a strict regulatory framework whose principles are embodied in ERCB directives. This report consisted of a directive that provides the planning requirements for emergency response plan (ERP) development that licensees are required to meet in order to gain ERCB approval for the ERP. The requirements for a corporate level ERP were also provided. In addition, the report provided the requirements that licensees are required to meet in order to effectively implement their plans and respond to an emergency including things such as public and local authority involvement in emergency preparedness and response; common requirements for site-specific ERPs; sour well site-specific drilling and/or completion ERPs; and, spill cooperative response plans. The report provided an introduction to the directive and its requirements, including licensee responsibility; requirements, enforcement, and expectations; purpose of emergency preparedness and response; what's new in directive 071; directive 071 requirements; and ERP application process for ERCB approval. Several appendices were also provided for non-compliance events; definitions for the purposes of directive 071; ERP approval application; evacuation requirements; assessment and ignition criteria flowchart; and first call communication forms. 10 tabs., 4 figs., 10 appendices.

  5. Corporate social responsibility, social contract, corporate personhood and human rights law: understanding the emerging responsibilities of modern corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Amao, Olufemi

    2008-01-01

    Copyright @ 2008 Olufemi Amao. The social contract theory has been advanced as a theoretical basis for explaining the emerging practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by corporations. Since the 17th century the social contract concept has also been used to justify human rights. The concept is the constitutional foundation of many western states starting with England, US and France. Business ethicists and philosophers have tried to construct and analyse the social responsibility o...

  6. 3-Monochloro-1,2-propandiol (3-MCPD) in soy sauce from the Bulgarian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova-Bagdassarian, Valentina; Tishkova, Julieta A; Vrabcheva, Terry M

    2013-01-01

    The 3-monochloro-1,2-propandiol (3-MCPD) levels in soy sauces which contained hydrolysed vegetable protein were evaluated for the Bulgarian market. For analysis of 3-MCPD, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was applied with a linear range of 0.03-2.00 μg mL⁻¹ and a limit of detection (LOD) of 2.3 μg kg⁻¹ and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 3.4 μg kg⁻¹. At these levels, the standard deviation was 5.1%, with recoveries between 81% and 102%. The method was applied to the analysis of 21 samples of soy sauce from the Bulgarian market. Results ranged from 3.7 to 185.6 μg kg⁻¹. Soy sauces produced from hydrolysed soy protein contained higher levels of 3-MCPD than naturally fermented sauces. In 38.4% of samples of Bulgarian origin, the 3-MCPD content was above the EU limit of 20 μg kg⁻¹. In all analysed samples, 33.3% had a 3-MCPD content above the EU limit.

  7. TEXTILE DESIGN ON THE BASE OF THE GOLDEN GEOMETRY AND BULGARIAN NATIONAL TRADITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILIEVA Julieta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Golden and Fibonacci geometry forms are symbols of beauty and harmony. The shapes and symbols in the national traditions are always a source of creative ideas. The paper presents textile designs on the base of creations from the Golden and Fibonacci geometry and Bulgarian national tradition. Fourteen textile design project are presented with the use of the Golden spiral in the Golden square, Fibonacci series tiling with equalitarian triangles named Fibonacci rose and the spiral square with four Golden spirals from the Golden and Fibonacci geometry, and the three turtles – symbols from Kolobar tradition in Bulgarian national culture. The forms from the Golden and Fibonacci geometry are used directly as ornaments, constructional elements for ornaments, or as frames for entered elements. The symbols from Kolobar tradition are used directly as ornaments. Every design is presented in suitable two, three or four color model. The used geometrical forms from the Golden geometry and the Bulgarian national tradition are the base for successful textile design using the mirror, radial and translated symmetry and the plain rhythms as result from their combinations. The design is more successful when the geometrical ornaments are combined with suitable colors according to the connections between colors and lines on the base of their meaning, the latest fashion trends, and national traditions.

  8. Collective identity and well-being of Bulgarian Roma adolescents and their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Bender, Michael; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2014-03-01

    In Europe and specifically in Bulgaria, Roma represent the largest indigenous ethnic minority exposed to severe discrimination, social exclusion, poverty, and compromised well-being. To improve their conditions, identifying sources of psychological well-being for Roma is theoretically relevant and practically important. This study investigated the relation between ethnic, familial, and religious identities as salient collective identity components for psychological well-being among 194 Roma adolescents (age: M = 16.11 years, SD = 1.36) and their mothers (age: M = 35.95 years, SD = 3.54). The results indicated that in line with marginalization models of acculturation, Roma youth and their mothers showed a low endorsement of both Bulgarian mainstream and Roma ethnic identity. The average scores of well-being were also low. For both groups, familial identity was stronger compared to Roma, Bulgarian, and religious identity. A path model showed that collective identity was a positive predictor of well-being in both adolescents and mothers and that the mothers' collective identity was a predictor of adolescent well-being. Bulgarian mainstream identity had the strongest relationship with collective identity. It is concluded that, for Roma youth and their mothers, family is an important identity domain as it represents the most salient identification source that is not challenged in their environment.

  9. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  10. Oil spill emergency response in the Barents Sea : issues of interorganizational coordination.

    OpenAIRE

    Sydnes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Papers 2, 3 and 4 of this thesis are not available in Munin: 2. Ivanova, M. and Sydnes, A.K.: 'Interorganizational coordination in oil spill emergency response: a case study of the Murmansk region of Northwest Russia', Geography (2010), 33 (3), pp. 139‒164. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1088937X.2010.545755 3. Sydnes, M. and Sydnes, A.K.: 'Oil spill emergency response in Norway: coordinating interorganizational complexity', Polar Geography (2011), 34 (4), pp. 299-329. Available at ht...

  11. USING GEO-DATA CORPORATELY ON THE RESPONSE PHASE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Demir Ozbek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Response phase of emergency management is the most complex phase in the entire cycle because it requires cooperation between various actors relating to emergency sectors. A variety of geo-data is needed at the emergency response such as; existing data provided by different institutions and dynamic data collected by different sectors at the time of the disaster. Disaster event is managed according to elaborately defined activity-actor-task-geodata cycle. In this concept, every activity of emergency response is determined with Standard Operation Procedure that enables users to understand their tasks and required data in any activity. In this study, a general conceptual approach for disaster and emergency management system is developed based on the regulations to serve applications in Istanbul Governorship Provincial Disaster and Emergency Directorate. The approach is implemented to industrial facility explosion example. In preparation phase, optimum ambulance locations are determined according to general response time of the ambulance to all injury cases in addition to areas that have industrial fire risk. Management of the industrial fire case is organized according to defined actors, activities, and working cycle that describe required geo-data. A response scenario was prepared and performed for an industrial facility explosion event to exercise effective working cycle of actors. This scenario provides using geo-data corporately between different actors while required data for each task is defined to manage the industrial facility explosion event. Following developing web technologies, this scenario based approach can be effective to use geo-data on the web corporately.

  12. Geographic Situational Awareness: Mining Tweets for Disaster Preparedness, Emergency Response, Impact, and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunying Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Social media data have emerged as a new source for detecting and monitoring disaster events. A number of recent studies have suggested that social media data streams can be used to mine actionable data for emergency response and relief operation. However, no effort has been made to classify social media data into stages of disaster management (mitigation, preparedness, emergency response, and recovery, which has been used as a common reference for disaster researchers and emergency managers for decades to organize information and streamline priorities and activities during the course of a disaster. This paper makes an initial effort in coding social media messages into different themes within different disaster phases during a time-critical crisis by manually examining more than 10,000 tweets generated during a natural disaster and referencing the findings from the relevant literature and official government procedures involving different disaster stages. Moreover, a classifier based on logistic regression is trained and used for automatically mining and classifying the social media messages into various topic categories during various disaster phases. The classification results are necessary and useful for emergency managers to identify the transition between phases of disaster management, the timing of which is usually unknown and varies across disaster events, so that they can take action quickly and efficiently in the impacted communities. Information generated from the classification can also be used by the social science research communities to study various aspects of preparedness, response, impact and recovery.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  14. Software Simulation for Preparing Emergency Response Teams in Dealing with Incidents within the Gas Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Rogage, Kay

    2011-01-01

    This research is working in collaboration with a UK gas infrastructure provider to conduct a collaborative study. It looks at an uncontrolled event that requires a response outside the routine that occurs as a result of transient work activity. The resulting response is required from multiple agencies: Emergency services, utilities, Local Authorities etc. Such category two responders are covered by various bodies as well as health and safety legislation: the UK Health and Safety Executive who...

  15. 44 CFR 352.26 - Arrangements for Federal response in the licensee offsite emergency response plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLANNING Federal Participation § 352.26 Arrangements for... services at Federal hospitals; and (5) Ensuring the creation and maintenance of channels of communication from commercial nuclear power plant licensees to State and local governments and to surrounding...

  16. Emergency Preparedness and Response in the School Setting--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Christine M.; Haynie, Kathey; Davis, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and response. School nurses are a vital part of the school team responsible for developing emergency response procedures for the…

  17. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module I. The Emergency Medical Technician, His Role, Responsibility, and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (EMT). Four units are presented: (1) role of the EMT, including the operation of an emerging medical services system; (2) the laws relevant to EMTs functioning in the field; (3) activities and responsibilities of an EMT…

  18. Logistics of emergency response vehicles : facility location, routing, and shift scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L. van den Berg (Pieter)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis discusses different aspects of the logistics of emergency response vehicles. In most parts, we consider providers of ambulance care in the Netherlands. However, also firefighters and air ambulance providers in both Canada and Norway are considered. Even though significant dif

  19. Design of a High Power Robotic Manipulator for Emergency Response to the Nuclear Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jongwon; Bae, Yeong-Geol; Kim, Myoung Ho; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An accident in a nuclear facility causes a great social cost. To prevent an unexpected nuclear accident from spreading to the catastrophic disaster, emergency response action in early stage is required. However, high radiation environment has been proved as a challenging obstacle for human workers to access to the accident site and take an action in previous accident cases. Therefore, emergency response robotic technology to be used in a nuclear accident site instead of human workers are actively conducted in domestically and internationally. Robots in an accident situation are required to carry out a variety of tasks depend on the types and patterns of accidents. An emergency response usually includes removing of debris, make an access road to a certain place and handling valves. These tasks normally involve high payload handling. A small sized high power robotic manipulator can be an appropriate candidate to deal with a wide spectrum of tasks in an emergency situation. In this paper, we discuss about the design of a high power robotic manipulator, which is capable of handling high payloads for an initial response action to the nuclear facility accident. In this paper, we presented a small sized high power robotic manipulator design. Actuator types of manipulator was selected and mechanical structure was discussed. In the future, the servo valve and hydraulic pump systems will be determined. Furthermore, control algorithms and test bed experiments will be also conducted.

  20. Emotional Intelligence in Library Disaster Response Assistance Teams: Which Competencies Emerged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence competencies and the personal attributes of library disaster response assistance team (DRAT) members. Using appreciative inquiry protocol to conduct interviews at two academic libraries, the study presents findings from emergent thematic coding of interview…

  1. A Quantitative Assessment of the Factors that Influence Technology Acceptance in Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional models for studying user acceptance and adoption of technology focused on the factors that identify and tested the relationships forged between the user and the technology in question. In emergency response, implementing technology without user acceptance may affect the safety of the responders and citizenry. Integrating the factors…

  2. Emotional Intelligence in Library Disaster Response Assistance Teams: Which Competencies Emerged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence competencies and the personal attributes of library disaster response assistance team (DRAT) members. Using appreciative inquiry protocol to conduct interviews at two academic libraries, the study presents findings from emergent thematic coding of interview…

  3. A data model for operational and situational information in emergency response: the Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Dilo, A.

    2010-01-01

    During emergency response a lot of dynamic information is created and needs to be studied and analysed in the decision-making process. However, this analysis of data is difficult and often not possible. A major reason for this is that a lot of information coming from the field operations is not arch

  4. Brief Report: Effects of Tact Training on Emergent Intraverbal Vocal Responses in Adolescents with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Richard J.; Hawkins, Emma; Dymond, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the emergence of intraverbal responses following tact training with three adolescents diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. Participants were taught to tact the name of a cartoon character (e.g., "What is the name of this monster?" ["Simon"]) and that character's preferred food (e.g., "What food does this monster…

  5. Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2005-09-28

    Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

  6. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    We report on experiences from a case study applying a constraint-based process-modelling and -simulation tool, dcrgraphs.net, to the modelling and rehearsal of railway emergency response plans with domain experts. The case study confirmed the approach as a viable means for domain experts to analyse...... and security processes in the danish public transport sector and their dependency on ICT....

  7. An Evacuation Emergency Response Model Coupling Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-10

    concentration contours coupled with the SMI evacuation model were calculated by using the MATHEW and ADPIC codes. The evacuation emergency response...2 M ATH EW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 ADPIC ...CDC 7600 computer within a matter of minutes MATHEW and ADPIC codes. These two models after the computer center is notified, are described briefly

  8. A data model for operational and situational information in emergency response: the Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Dilo, Arta

    2010-01-01

    During emergency response a lot of dynamic information is created and needs to be studied and analysed in the decision-making process. However, this analysis of data is difficult and often not possible. A major reason for this is that a lot of information coming from the field operations is not

  9. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  10. Can merging the roles of public health preparedness and emergency management increase the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency planning and response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielot, Nadja A; Horney, Jennifer A

    2014-03-10

    Some jurisdictions have reduced workforce and reallocated responsibilities for public health preparedness and emergency management to more efficiently use resources and improve planning and response. Key informant interviews were conducted in six counties in North Carolina (USA) to discuss perceptions of the challenges and opportunities provided by the new shared positions. Respondents feel that planning and response have improved, but that requirements related to activities or equipment that are eligible for funding (particularly on the public health side) can present an impediment to consolidating public health preparedness and emergency management roles. As the financial resources available for public health preparedness and emergency management continue to be reduced, the merging of the roles and responsibilities of public health preparedness and emergency management may present jurisdictions with an effective alternative to reducing staff, and potentially, readiness.

  11. Can Merging the Roles of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Management Increase the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Emergency Planning and Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja A. Vielot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some jurisdictions have reduced workforce and reallocated responsibilities for public health preparedness and emergency management to more efficiently use resources and improve planning and response. Key informant interviews were conducted in six counties in North Carolina (USA to discuss perceptions of the challenges and opportunities provided by the new shared positions. Respondents feel that planning and response have improved, but that requirements related to activities or equipment that are eligible for funding (particularly on the public health side can present an impediment to consolidating public health preparedness and emergency management roles. As the financial resources available for public health preparedness and emergency management continue to be reduced, the merging of the roles and responsibilities of public health preparedness and emergency management may present jurisdictions with an effective alternative to reducing staff, and potentially, readiness.

  12. Optimization of in-vivo monitoring program for radiation emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In case of radiation emergencies, internal exposure monitoring for the members of public will be required to confirm internal contamination of each individual. In-vivo monitoring technique using portable gamma spectrometer can be easily applied for internal exposure monitoring in the vicinity of the on-site area. In this study, minimum detectable doses (MDDs) for '1'3'4Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 131}I were calculated adjusting minimum detectable activities (MDAs) from 50 to 1,000 Bq to find out the optimal in-vivo counting condition. DCAL software was used to derive retention fraction of Cs and I isotopes in the whole body and thyroid, respectively. A minimum detectable level was determined to set committed effective dose of 0.1 mSv for emergency response. We found that MDDs at each MDA increased along with the elapsed time. 1,000 Bq for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 100 Bq for {sup 131}I were suggested as optimal MDAs to provide in-vivo monitoring service in case of radiation emergencies. In-vivo monitoring program for emergency response should be designed to achieve the optimal MDA suggested from the present work. We expect that a reduction of counting time compared with routine monitoring program can achieve the high throughput system in case of radiation emergencies.

  13. Factors responsible for the emergence of arboviruses; strategies, challenges and limitations for their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guodong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Gould, Ernest A

    2015-03-01

    Slave trading of Africans to the Americas, during the 16th to the 19th century was responsible for the first recorded emergence in the New World of two arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), yellow fever virus and dengue virus. Many other arboviruses have since emerged from their sylvatic reservoirs and dispersed globally due to evolving factors that include anthropological behaviour, commercial transportation and land-remediation. Here, we outline some characteristics of these highly divergent arboviruses, including the variety of life cycles they have developed and the mechanisms by which they have adapted to evolving changes in habitat and host availability. We cite recent examples of virus emergence that exemplify how arboviruses have exploited the consequences of the modern human lifestyle. Using our current understanding of these viruses, we also attempt to demonstrate some of the limitations encountered in developing control strategies to reduce the impact of future emerging arbovirus diseases. Finally, we present recommendations for development by an international panel of experts reporting directly to World Health Organization, with the intention of providing internationally acceptable guidelines for improving emerging arbovirus disease control strategies. Success in these aims should alleviate the suffering and costs encountered during recent decades when arboviruses have emerged from their sylvatic environment.

  14. Rapid response seismic networks in Europe: lessons learnt from the L'Aquila earthquake emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Strollo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The largest dataset ever recorded during a normal fault seismic sequence was acquired during the 2009 seismic emergency triggered by the damaging earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy. This was possible through the coordination of different rapid-response seismic networks in Italy, France and Germany. A seismic network of more than 60 stations recorded up to 70,000 earthquakes. Here, we describe the different open-data archives where it is possible to find this unique set of data for studies related to hazard, seismotectonics and earthquake physics. Moreover, we briefly describe some immediate and direct applications of emergency seismic networks. At the same time, we note the absence of communication platforms between the different European networks. Rapid-response networks need to agree on common strategies for network operations. Hopefully, over the next few years, the European Rapid-Response Seismic Network will became a reality.

  15. Emergency Response to Earthquake in Chile: Experience of a Cuban Field Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Carlos R

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the author's experiences in deploying and later establishing a Cuban field hospital in response to the major earthquake that struck Chile in February 2010. It also reveals the initial difficulties the medical team faced and how collaboration with local social, medical and military partners contributed to response efficiency, and highlights the importance of Cuba's international health cooperation, especially in emergency situations. Over 254 days, Cuban health professionals had 50,048 patient encounters (outpatient visits and hospitalizations), a daily average of 197. They performed 1778 surgeries (1427 major, 80.2% of total) and accumulated valuable experience in managing a field hospital in a disaster situation. KEYWORDS Earthquake, humanitarian aid, health care, emergency response, disaster medicine, logistics, Chile, Cuba.

  16. Do social media have a place in public health emergency response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David R; Dietz, J Eric; Stirratt, Amanda A; Coster, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain whether analyses of social media trends for various Twitter responses following a major disaster produce implications for improving the focus on public health resources and messaging to disaster victims. Radian6 and trend analyses were used to analyze 12-hour counts of Twitter data before, during, and after the March 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Radian6 was used to organize tweets into categories of preparedness, emergency response, and public health. Radian6 revealed that 49 percent of tweets were either positive or somewhat positive in sentiment about preparedness and only 7 percent were negative or somewhat negative. Trend analyses revealed a rapid onset of tweet activity associated with all keywords followed by mostly fast exponential decline. Analyses indicate that opportunities for improving public health awareness by leveraging social media communications exist for as much as 5 days after a disaster. Analyses suggest key times for public health social media communication to promote emergency response.

  17. The Emergence of Ethic Banks and Social Responsibility in Financing Local Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Barbu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the present offer of banking products and services in the developed countries as well in the emerging ones shows the extent to which they fulfill or not the principles specific to social responsibility and ethics in economics. Considering heightened competition, some institutions adopt new strategies based on the creation of new concepts where human finality is to replace economical finality. Thus, banking ethics and social responsibility are concepts which are found at the level of credit cooperative and ethical banks. Oriented mainly towards rural financing and financing social responsible projects, within the study, the two approaches complete and sustain each other.

  18. Resource conflict detection and removal strategy for nondeterministic emergency response processes using Petri nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingtian; Liu, Cong; Duan, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Correctness of an emergency response process specification is critical to emergency mission success. Therefore, errors in the specification should be detected and corrected at build-time. In this paper, we propose a resource conflict detection approach and removal strategy for emergency response processes constrained by resources and time. In this kind of emergency response process, there are two timing functions representing the minimum and maximum execution time for each activity, respectively, and many activities require resources to be executed. Based on the RT_ERP_Net, the earliest time to start each activity and the ideal execution time of the process can be obtained. To detect and remove the resource conflicts in the process, the conflict detection algorithms and a priority-activity-first resolution strategy are given. In this way, real execution time for each activity is obtained and a conflict-free RT_ERP_Net is constructed by adding virtual activities. By experiments, it is proved that the resolution strategy proposed can shorten the execution time of the whole process to a great degree.

  19. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Belgium 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Belgium for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  20. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Portugal 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Portugal for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  1. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Denmark 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Denmark for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  2. Stakeholder Attitudes Toward and Values Embedded in a Sensor-Enhanced Personal Emergency Response System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Yngve; Farshchian, Babak; Vilarinho, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical understanding of concerns that the application of a sensor-enhanced medical alert system, or personal emergency response (PER) system, raises from the perspective of care receivers (users) and care providers. Data were gathered in the context of a field trial...... emerging concerns: (i) form factor and ergonomics, (ii) system feedback and user control and (iii) sensor precision and trust. Based on feedback from stakeholder groups, we discuss potential value biases, or discriminating factors, embedded in the evaluated PER system. We also discuss the implications...... of our findings for a value-driven design agenda for future PER systems....

  3. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - United Kingdom 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in United Kingdom for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  4. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Spain 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Spain for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  5. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Slovak Republic 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Slovak Republic for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  6. Projectizing the development and/or maintenance process for emergency response/contingency plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. A. Francis

    2000-07-01

    The attainment of established goals and objects is essential and paramount for all successful projects in business and industry, including the development and/or maintenance of emergency response/contingency plans. The need for effective project management is an ongoing effort. As with any aspect of business, better ways of managing projects have been and are being developed. Those organizations that take the lead in implementing these capabilities consistently perform their projects better, and in the case of emergency management, provide better protection to employees, property, and the environment.

  7. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Italy 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Italy for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  8. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Greece 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Greece for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  9. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Czech Republic 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Czech Republic for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  10. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Luxembourg 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Luxembourg for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  11. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Norway 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Norway for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  12. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Italy 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Italy for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  13. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Poland 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Poland for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  14. Web-based emergency response exercise management systems and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, John W.; Mercer, Michael B.; Heath, Zach; Yang, Lynn I.

    2014-09-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for simulating portions of an emergency response exercise includes generating situational awareness outputs associated with a simulated emergency and sending the situational awareness outputs to a plurality of output devices. Also, the method includes outputting to a user device a plurality of decisions associated with the situational awareness outputs at a decision point, receiving a selection of one of the decisions from the user device, generating new situational awareness outputs based on the selected decision, and repeating the sending, outputting and receiving steps based on the new situational awareness outputs. Other methods, systems, and computer program products are included according to other embodiments of the invention.

  15. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - New Zealand 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in New Zealand for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  16. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Canada 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Canada for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  17. Commercial Airline In-Flight Emergency: Medical Student Response and Review of Medicolegal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Josh H; Richards, John R

    2016-01-01

    As the prevalence of air travel increases, in-flight medical emergencies occur more frequently. A significant percentage of these emergencies occur when there is no certified physician, nurse, or paramedic onboard. During these situations, flight crews might enlist the help of noncertified passengers, such as medical students, dentists, or emergency medical technicians in training. Although Good Samaritan laws exist, many health care providers are unfamiliar with the limited legal protections and resources provided to them after responding to an in-flight emergency. A 78-year-old woman lost consciousness and became pulseless onboard a commercial aircraft. No physician was available. A medical student responded and coordinated care with the flight crew, ground support physician, and other passengers. After receiving a packet (4 g) of sublingual sucrose and 1 L i.v. crystalloid, the patient regained pulses and consciousness. The medical student made the decision not to divert the aircraft based on the patient's initial response to therapy and, 45 min later, the patient had normal vital signs. Upon landing, she was met and taken by paramedics to the nearest emergency department for evaluation of her collapse. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians are the most qualified to assist in-flight emergencies, but they might not be aware of the medicolegal risks involved with in-flight care, the resources available, and the role of the flight crew in liability and decision making. This case, which involved a medical student who was not given explicit protection under Good Samaritan laws, illustrates the authority of the flight crew during these events and highlights areas of uncertainty in the legislation for volunteer medical professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Client and responder perceptions of a personal emergency response system: Lifeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallis, Wendy M; Silverthorne, Diane; Franklin, Jonathon; McClement, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A mixed methodology mail survey was used to gauge level of customer satisfaction with, and identify issues that may help improve, personal emergency response system service delivery. A total of 1,236 surveys were mailed out to subscribers of Victoria Lifeline (Canada; n = 618) and their designated responders (n = 618). Overall response rate was 50%. Significant predictors of subscriber and responder satisfaction were satisfaction with the service during an emergency and whether expectations of service were met. In addition, for responders, customer service also predicted satisfaction. Thematic analysis of subscriber and responder comments identified the need for improvement in several areas: equipment, cost of the service, training sessions for users, and communication between subscribers and service providers. Although more than 95% of subscribers and responders were satisfied with the service, the findings provide direction to personal emergency response service providers about ways in which their product and service delivery might be enhanced, and underscore the need for research examining the impacts of response systems on family caregivers and public policy regarding community care solutions.

  19. Mississippi Medical Reserve Corps: Moving Mississippi From Emergency Planning to Response Ready.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa C; Fifolt, Matthew; Mercer, Caroline; Pevear, Jesse; Wilson, Jonathan

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that might impact a Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteer's decision to respond to an emergency event. The 2 primary goals of this survey were to (1) establish realistic planning assumptions regarding the use of volunteers in health care emergency responses, and (2) determine whether barriers to volunteer participation could be addressed by MRC units to improve volunteer response rates. An anonymous online survey instrument was made available via Qualtrics through a customized URL. For the purpose of distribution, the Mississippi State Department of Health sent an electronic message that included the survey link to all MRC volunteers who were registered with the Mississippi Responder Management System (MRMS) as of September 2014. Approximately 15% of those surveyed indicated they would be available and able to deploy within 24 hours. The most common factors reported in terms of respondent decisions to deploy included risk to personal health (61.2%), length of deployment (58.8%), and the security of the deployment area (55.3%). In addition, 67% of respondents indicated that extended periods of deployment would have a negative financial impact on their lives. Respondents who have had training or previous deployment experience reported having greater knowledge of potential response roles, increased comfort in their ability to respond with the MRC, and increased confidence in responding to differing public health emergencies. Barriers to MRC volunteers being able to deploy should be addressed by each MRC unit. Issues such as risk to personal safety while on deployment, site security, and length of deployment should be considered by planners and those solutions communicated to MRC members during trainings. Emergency plans utilizing MRC volunteers will require significant evaluation to assess the risk of relying on an expected resource that could be severely limited during an actual emergency.

  20. Natural and anthropogenic impacts on historical heritage along the north Bulgarian Black Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, Preslav; Palazov, Atanas; Stancheva, Margarita; Stanchev, Hristo; Krastev, Anton; Shtirkov, Ilko

    2014-05-01

    Bulgaria is rich in the remains of past human settlements and activity. For example, along northern part of the Bulgarian coast, numerous underwater and coastal archaeological sites from different periods have been discovered - Prehistory, Antiquity (ancient Greek, Hellenistic, Roman), Mediaeval (Early Byzantium, Bulgarian). The most significant of them are: Durankulak archaeological complex with the largest Prehistoric necropolis in the world, Prehistoric necropolis at the area of Lake Shablenska Tuzla, Antique settlements Caron Limen and Bizone, archeological reserve Yalata, Antique and Medieval castle at Cape Kaliakra etc. As, this north part of Bulgarian coast has a huge archaeological potential there is a ground for thinking that the remains of other periods as well as a brand new, previously unknown sites can be discovered in the near future. This does not exclude the probability of being randomly found individual objects that largely can be prevented from archaeological contexts. Therefore it is important that these archeological sites are protected properly and preserved for future generations. In Bulgaria such sites and monuments are legally protected under the Law of cultural heritage and managed by the Ministry of culture and local authorities. However, today most objects and sites, as part of common European historical and cultural heritage are posed to a variety of potential impacts and treats, both natural and human-induced. This study discusses the implications of natural factors, (such as climate change, extreme waves, erosion and shoreline changes) and human contributions (coastal infrastructures, tourism and insufficient management by decision-makers) to coastal and underwater cultural heritage along the north portion of Bulgarian coast. Major natural processes that seriously affect on coastal and maritime heritage environment are direct physical impact by global climate changes, sea level rise and caused increase of waves and storms, acceleration

  1. TRANSITION OF BULGARIAN AGRICULTURE: PRESENT SITUATION, PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly BENCHEVA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the agrarian reform, the problems and results of the restructuring of Bulgarian agriculture during the transition period, also the impact of the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP on overall policies in the period of preparation for accession to the EU have been reviewed in this article. The analysis demonstrates that the problems of restructuring of agriculture in Bulgaria are more specifi c compared to those of the other Central and West European countries. They can be solved through a sound comprehensive analysis of the economic, fi nancial, organizational, demographic, psychological and political factors in the context of CAP.

  2. Response of vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea to pre- or post-emergence applied herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasilakoglou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad-leaved weeds constitute a serious problem in the production of winter legumes, but few selective herbicides controlling these weeds have been registered in Europe. Four field experiments were conducted in 2009/10 and repeated in 2010/11 in Greece to study the response of common vetch (Vicia sativa L., lentil (Lens culinaris Medik., chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and red pea (Lathyrus cicera L. to several rates of the herbicides pendimethalin, S-metolachlor, S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine and flumioxazin applied pre-emergence, as well as imazamox applied post-emergence. Phytotoxicity, crop height, total weight and seed yield were evaluated during the experiments. The results of this study suggest that common vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea differed in their responses to the herbicides tested. Pendimethalin at 1.30 kg ha-1, S-metolachlor at 0.96 kg ha-1 and flumioxazine at 0.11 kg ha-1 used as pre-emergence applied herbicides provided the least phytotoxicity to legumes. Pendimethalin at 1.98 kg ha-1 and both rates of S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine provided the greatest common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. control. Imazamox at 0.03 to 0.04 kg ha-1 could also be used as early post-emergence applied herbicide in common vetch and red pea without any significant detrimental effect.

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  4. Atmospheric Response to of an Active Region to new Small Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, D L; Green, L M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the atmospheric response to a small emerging flux region (EFR) that occurred in the positive polarity of Active Region 11236 on 23 \\,-\\ 24 June 2011. Data from the \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmopheric Imaging Assembly} (AIA), the \\textit{Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and Hinode's \\textit{EUV imaging spectrometer} (EIS) are used to determine the atmospheric response to new flux emerging into a pre-existing active region. Brightenings are seen forming in the upper photosphere, chromosphere, and corona over the EFR's location whilst flux cancellation is observed in the photosphere. The impact of the flux emergence is far reaching, with new large-scale coronal loops forming up to 43 Mm from the EFR and coronal upflow enhancements of approximately 10 km s$^{-1}$ on the north side of the EFR. Jets are seen forming in the chromosphere and the corona over the emerging serpentine field. This is the first time that coronal jets have been seen over the serpentine field.

  5. Emergency management: e-learning as an immediate response to veterinary training needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Alessandrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary training plays a crucial role in increasing effectiveness of veterinary response to epidemic and non-epidemic emergencies. Being able to assess learning needs and to deliver training is acknowledged as a strategic priority in veterinary public health activities. The validation of an e-learning system that is able to respond to the urgent needs of veterinary professionals to ensure the despatch of rapid teaching methods on emerging and re-emerging animal diseases and zoonoses was the core of a research project developed in the Mediterranean Basin between 2005 and 2009. The project validated a new transferable, sustainable and repeatable learning model, the main components of which are described. The model is applied to an emergency situation that occurred in Italy in 2008, when West Nile disease outbreaks were reported in northern Italy. Approximately 450 official veterinarians were trained, using an e-learning system that showed adaptability and effectiveness in transferring knowledge, skills and competence to face the situation. The case was used to validate the effectiveness of the model and proved that it can be applied in any emergency situation, i.e. every time that rapid dissemination of knowledge and skills is required.

  6. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. ['See and Treat' in the Emergency Department: legal aspects and professional nursing responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, Cristiano; Ghinaglia, Monica; Doneda, Renzo; Bollini, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The article aim to analyze the legal aspects of professional responsibility in the autonomous nursing care of a patient with a minor health problem treated in a See and Treat area of the Emergency Department through a literature review and an analyses of the Italian legislation about professional exercise. Recent studies have shown that the treatment of the emergency patients affected by minor health problems in separated areas of the A&E by skilled nurses proved to be effective in reducing time to medical examination and the overall time spent in the Emergency Department. Several studies have shown the positive effects of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) in terms of reduction of time to medical examination with an increase in patient satisfaction, maintaining an adequate level of quality in the care of patients with minor health problems. The introduction of a See and Treat area, together with the institution of advanced post-triage protocols, represents a possible answer to the overcrowding of the Emergency Department. The aim is the reduction of waiting times and proper allocation of both material and professional resources. The "See and Treat" nurse represents an expert nurse, with an adequate level of competence, who acts in respect to the clinical protocols shared between physicians and nurses. The Italian legislation is not in contrast with the introduction of the See and Treat nurse, on the contrary it offers opportunities for further professional development.

  8. Experiences of an Engineer working in Reactor Safety and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Consequence Management Home Team (FRMAC/CMHT) Assessment Scientist's roles, responsibilities incorporate the FRMAC with other federal, state, and local agencies during a nuclear/radiological emergency. Before the Consequence Management Response Team arrives on-site, the FRMAC/CMHT provides technical and logistical support to the FRMAC and to state, local, and tribal authorities following a nuclear/radiological event. The FRMAC/CMHT support includes analyzing event data, evaluating hazards that relate to protection of the public, and providing event information and data products to protective action decision makers. The Assessment Scientist is the primary scientist responsible for performing calculations and analyses and communicating results to the field during any activation of the FRMAC/CMHT assets. As such, the FRMAC/CMHT Assessment Scientist has a number of different roles and responsibilities to fill depending upon the type of response that is required. Additionally, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Consequence Assessment Team (CAT) Consequence Assessor roles, responsibilities involve hazardous materials operational emergency at SNL New Mexico facilities (SNL/NM) which include loss of control over radioactive, chemical, or explosive hazardous materials. When a hazardous materials operational emergency occurs, key decisions must be made in order to regain control over the hazards, protect personnel from the effects of the hazards, and mitigate impacts on operations, facilities, property, and the environment. Many of these decisions depend in whole or in part on the evaluation of potential consequences from a loss of control over the hazards. As such, the CAT has a number of different roles and responsibilities to fill depending upon the type of response that is required. Primary consequence-based decisions supported by the CAT during a hazardous materials operational

  9. Emergency response to nuclear, biological and chemical incidents:challenges and countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Long Li; Wen-Jun Tang; Ya-Kun Ma; Ji-Min Jia; Rong-Li Dang; Er-Chen Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Given the multiple terrorist attacks that have occurred in recent years in China, medical rescue teams and specialized incident assessment teams have been established by the government; however, medical rescue after nuclear, biological, and chemical incidents remains challenging and is often inefficient. In the present article, problems were analyzed regarding the assessment of responder countermeasures, training of professionals and the management of emergency medical incidents related to nuclear, biological and chemical attacks. Countermeasures, the establishment of response coordination, public education, practical training and exercise, and a professional consultant team or system should be the focus of emergency medical response facilities. Moreover, the government was offered professionals who are involved in managing nuclear, biological and chemical incidents.

  10. "Hits" emerge through self-organized coordination in collective response of free agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2016-10-01

    Individuals in free societies frequently exhibit striking coordination when making independent decisions en masse. Examples include the regular appearance of hit products or memes with substantially higher popularity compared to their otherwise equivalent competitors or extreme polarization in public opinion. Such segregation of events manifests as bimodality in the distribution of collective choices. Here we quantify how apparently independent choices made by individuals result in a significantly polarized but stable distribution of success in the context of the box-office performance of movies and show that it is an emergent feature of a system of noninteracting agents who respond to sequentially arriving signals. The aggregate response exhibits extreme variability amplifying much smaller differences in individual cost of adoption. Due to self-organization of the competitive landscape, most events elicit only a muted response but a few stimulate widespread adoption, emerging as "hits".

  11. Digital detectives and virtual volunteers: Integrating emergent online communities into disaster response operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Alisha

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration of altruistic behaviours by disaster survivors, and even those observing emergencies from afar, is well documented. Over the past few decades, government-sponsored crisis planning has evolved to include affiliated volunteer agencies, with a general acknowledgment of the need to plan for unaffiliated or spontaneous volunteers. Just as the understanding of the need for volunteers has grown, so too have the ways in which volunteers are able to donate their time and skills. The popularity of social media networks and online communities provide new ways for the public to get involved in disaster response. Public service agencies should be proactive in investigating these emerging platforms and understanding their impacts during crises. Established methods of integrating on-scene volunteers into post-disaster response operations can be used as templates for creating virtual volunteer programmes.

  12. In the Face of an Emergency: What Makes a Responsive and Resilient Society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montine L Walters

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to highlight the ways in which the response required to deal with terrorist threats of the 21st Century differs from that required to respond to threats the UK has faced in the past. In addition it will assess ways in which the UK may strengthen the population’s resilience and the ability of the population to respond to emergency incidents.

  13. Survey on methodologies in the risk assessment of chemical exposures in emergency response situations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinälä, Milla; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Wood, Maureen Heraty

    2013-01-01

    A scientifically sound assessment of the risk to human health resulting from acute chemical releases is the cornerstone for chemical incident prevention, preparedness and response. Although the general methodology to identify acute toxicity of chemicals has not substantially changed in the last....../corrosive chemicals will remain serious risks also in future the development of plausible scenarios for potential emerging risks is also needed. This includes risks from new mixtures and chemicals (e.g. nanoparticles)....

  14. Corporate social responsibility in multinational corporations : the realities of emerging markets

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The financial downturn in developed economies has led to South Africa and the rest of Africa’s economies to become increasingly attractive to foreign investors. The establishment of operations in an emerging market poses various challenges for multinationals, one of which is implementing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) effectively across all its subsidiaries. The objective of this study is to determine whether there are differences in expectations of CSR ...

  15. Capability-based task allocation in emergency-response environments: a coalition-formation approach

    OpenAIRE

    FATEMI, Afsaneh; Zamanifar, Kamran; NEMATBAKHSH, Naser

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses coalition formation, based on agent capabilities, centered on task allocation in emergency-response environments (EREs). EREs are environments that need fast task completion as their main requirement. We propose a team-based organization model, based on an existing organization model for adaptive complex systems. The model has some key characteristics that are beneficial for EREs: agents act in dynamic, open domains; agents collaborate in completing group tasks;...

  16. METALert - an emergency response system for China for heavy metals in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Ingeborg; Seuntjens, Piet; Dams, Jef; Desmet, Nele; Van Looy, Stijn; Raymaekers, Jens; Decorte, Lieve; Raben, Ingrid; Thijssen, Chris; Zhang, Hongzhen; Dong, Jingqi; Zhang, Qianwen

    2016-04-01

    The rapid industrialisation and economic growth of China has resulted in a mirrored increase of environmental issues and threats, which make the updating of the current environmental emergency response protocols very important. Heavy metal pollution accidents with high environmental risks are happening more frequently than ever in recent years. Despite efforts made by the authorites in respect to the formulation of sound policy, efficient technical methods and regulations for dealing with appropriate responses to emergency environmental incidents related to heavy metal pollution are still lacking. METALert is a generic Emergency Response System (ERS) for accidental pollution incidents caused by key heavy metal related industries in China and developed to support China in achieving its environmental targets. The METALert tool is based on environmental models for forecasting, simulation and visualisation of dispersion of heavy metal pollution in water, air and soil. The tool contains a generic database with scenarios for accidental release of metals in typical accidents related to the five key heavy metal industries in China. The tool can calculate the impact of an accident in water, air and soil and is evaluated and demonstrated for a river basin in the Chenzhou area, an important heavy metal mining area in China. The setup of the tool, the background models and the application in Chenzhou will be presented.

  17. Application of GIS to build earthquake emergency response system for urban area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤爱平; 谢礼立; 陶夏新

    2002-01-01

    A GIS based decision-making system is designed for earthquake emergency response for city governments. The system could be used for seismic hazard assessment, earthquake damage and losses evaluation, emergency response and post-earthquake recovering. The principle, design criteria, structure and functions of the system are described in detials. The system is composed of four parts: an information- and data-base, analytical modules, a decision-making subsystem and a user interface. The information- and data-base consists of 68 coverages, including historically and instrumentally recorded earthquakes, seismo-tectonic zones, active faults, potential source areas, isoseismals of scenario earthquake, soil profiles, characteristics of buildings, and all infrastructure systems such as: transportation network (roads and bridges, culverts), oil pipeline network, gas, water, electric-power, communication etc., distribution of citizens, rush-repair schemes of infrastructures and so on. There are also 28 analytical modules established in the system for generating isoseismals of scenario earthquake, site effects estimation, damage and losses evaluation and decision-making for rescue, relief, evacuation and other emergency response actions. As an illustration, the operation of this system for reoccurrence of a historical earthquake is demonstrated.

  18. Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

    2008-03-01

    Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

  19. The Emergence of the Dose–Response Concept in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Calabrese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A historical assessment of the origin of the dose–response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic dose–response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century.

  20. The Emergence of the Dose–Response Concept in Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    A historical assessment of the origin of the dose–response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic) dose–response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century. PMID:27929392

  1. Evaluation of lung tumor response to therapy: Current and emerging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2016-10-01

    Lung tumor response to therapy may be evaluated in most instances by morphological criteria such as RECIST 1.1 on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, those criteria are limited because they are based on tumoral dimensional changes and do not take into account other morphologic criteria such as density evaluation, functional or metabolic changes that may occur following conventional or targeted chemotherapy. New techniques such as dual-energy CT, PET-CT, MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI has to be considered into the new technical armamentarium for tumor response evaluation. Integration of all informations provided by the different imaging modalities has to be integrated and represents probably the future goal of tumor response evaluation. The aim of the present paper is to review the current and emerging imaging criteria used to evaluate the response of therapy in the field of lung cancer.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  3. Optimized polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of p53 gene applied to Bulgarian patients with invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, M E; Garanina, Z; Georgieva, E I

    2003-11-01

    During the last few decades a substantial amount of evidence has accumulated proving that the abrogation of the normal p53 pathway is a critical step in the initiation and progression of tumors. Decoding the genetic mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis requires screening for consistent genetic tumor alterations, including those concerning the p53 gene. Thus, practical, efficient, and inexpensive techniques for accurate determination of p53 mutational status are needed. Polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis is considered to be a useful tool to investigate the role of the p53 gene in the development and progression of human cancers. The sensitivity of the method can be increased considerably by varying the experimental conditions. Here we demonstrate a scheme of PCR-SSCP optimization for detection of p53 gene mutations of patients with various cancers. Optimal conditions for PCRSSCP of p53 exons 4-9 are reported. Such PCR-SSCP optimization could allow an increase in the sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique and facilitates screening of large series of patients to assess the clinical significance of p53 mutations in human cancers. Using the optimized PCR-SSCP analysis we screened Bulgarian patients with invasive breast cancer for p53 gene mutations and registered a 33.33% frequency of mutations. To date, there are no data concerning the p53 status of Bulgarian breast cancer patients. Screening for p53 gene mutations enables an accurate and routine determination of the p53 status of patients with cancer and may be applied in clinical oncology to cancer diagnosis, prediction of prognosis and response to treatment.

  4. Manual for best practice for emergency response procedures, part 1: causes and prevention of inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spencer, KC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available and other emergencies. Part 4 A checklist of best practice requirements for the prevention and management of inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies. A bibliography of relevant publications is also given. The conclusion reached............................................................................................................42 REFERENCES.........................................................................................................................42 BIBLIOGRAPHY...

  5. The Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers: advancing standardized evaluation of public health preparedness and response trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S; Sass, Marcia M; D'Ambrosio, Luann; Brown, Lisa M; Wendelboe, Aaron M; Peters, Karen E; Sobelson, Robyn K

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) across the United States. The PERLCs provide training to state, local, and tribal public health organizations to meet workforce development needs in the areas of public health preparedness and response, specialized training, education, and consultation. Using Donald Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model, the PERLC network established 4 evaluation working groups that developed evaluation criteria to address each level of the model. The purpose of the working groups was to inform and promote center-level and program-level evaluation across the PERLC network; identify common training evaluation methods and measures; and share materials, resources, and lessons learned with state, local, and tribal public health organizations for potential replication. The evaluation of education and training, irrespective of its modality (eg, in-person, online, webinars, seminars, symposia) can be accomplished using Kirkpatrick's 4-level taxonomy. The 4 levels aim to measure the following aspects of training programs: (1) trainees' reaction; (2) knowledge acquired, skills improved, or attitudes changed; (3) behavior changed; and (4) results or impact. To successfully evaluate emergency preparedness training, drills and exercises, it is necessary to understand the fundamental tenets of each level and how to apply each to measure training outcomes. The PERLC evaluators have adopted the basic schema of Kirkpatrick's 4-level model and applied its structure to a wide variety of preparedness and emergency response training and related activities. The PERLC evaluation working groups successfully developed and tested survey methods and instruments for each of the 4 levels of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model. Each can be used for replication by state, local, and tribal public health professionals.

  6. Basic exterior characteristics of body and head in Bulgarian scent hound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urošević Milivoje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A group of dogs known as hounds is widespread and highly appreciated among the hunters on the Balkans. Hounds are referred to as hunting dogs that engage in loud pursuit of game along its trail. These dogs do not need to se the game in order to pursue it and begin to bark once they stumble upon game trail. First serious research along with zootechnical measurement was conducted in 1905, at which occasion three large groups of hounds that inhabit the Balkans were described. This undertaking provided a solid foundation for further research and standardization of certain hound breeds. Though a lot of field work and standardization efforts were undertaken since then, there are still groups of hounds not encompassed in previous research work that are well-spread on the field and frequently utilized as hunting companions. One of the variety among these non-standardized breeds are Bulgarian scent hound, which differ from described hound breeds by certain exterior characteristics. In this paper, processed and analyzed some of the basic exterior features of body and head of the Bulgarian Scent Hound. Measurements were performed in 21 males and 15 females of following parameters, the height at withers, back height, loin height, chest circumference, body length, head length, skull length, nozzle length, head width and nozzle width. The average height of males is 54.60 and female 51.73 cm. Head length of males, on average, was 23.95 cm and females 23, 53 cm.

  7. Bulgarian Youth and Europe. Multivariate Psycho-cultural Study of the Mobility Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Matveev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the Bulgarian youths' mobility towards Europe. The investigation was carried out with 570 Bulgarian students. The data are presented as a questionnaire consisting of five parts. The first one deals with the motivations and is based on the Reversal Theory - predicting eight motivational states. The second part is based on the 2PAP theoretical model structuring the attitudes around four factors: Push, Pull, Anti Push and Anti Pull. The third one falls back on the Big Five Personality Test measuring five personality dimensions. And the concluding two parts are designed to obtain information about the degree of attraction and the intentions for mobility to the 25 destination countries of the European Union (EU. This has led to the hypothesis that a model of mobility exists based on these three theoretical models, as well as on emotional factors like attraction-repulsion to the country referred to. The hypothesis that was strongly supported by the statistical processing of the data will broaden our understanding of the youth's mobility. The present research is a part of a longitudinal study of the mobility intentions among young people. The investigation is of great interest from an educational, political and social point of view

  8. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years

  9. Emerging viral threats in Gabon: health capacities and response to the risk of emerging zoonotic diseases in Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgarel, M; Wauquier, N; Gonzalez, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are currently the major threat to public health worldwide and most EID events have involved zoonotic infectious agents. Central Africa in general and Gabon in particular are privileged areas for the emergence of zoonotic EIDs. Indeed, human incursions in Gabonese forests for exploitation purposes lead to intensified contacts between humans and wildlife thus generating an increased risk of emergence of zoonotic diseases. In Gabon, 51 endemic or potential endemic viral infectious diseases have been reported. Among them, 22 are of zoonotic origin and involve 12 families of viruses. The most notorious are dengue, yellow fever, ebola, marburg, Rift Valley fever and chikungunya viruses. Potential EID due to wildlife in Gabon are thereby plentiful and need to be inventoried. The Gabonese Public Health system covers geographically most of the country allowing a good access to sanitary information and efficient monitoring of emerging diseases. However, access to treatment and prevention is better in urban areas where medical structures are more developed and financial means are concentrated even though the population is equally distributed between urban and rural areas. In spite of this, Gabon could be a good field for investigating the emergence or re-emergence of zoonotic EID. Indeed Gabonese health research structures such as CIRMF, advantageously located, offer high quality researchers and facilities that study pathogens and wildlife ecology, aiming toward a better understanding of the contact and transmission mechanisms of new pathogens from wildlife to human, the emergence of zoonotic EID and the breaking of species barriers by pathogens.

  10. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    We make a comparative analysis for two filaments that showed quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) are carried out to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17-20 and September 29. The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4*10^21 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed within 3 days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2*10^20 Mx, about one ...

  11. Longitudinal Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response to Wildfire, Bastrop County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Katie R; Feldt, Bonnie A; Zane, David F; Haywood, Tracy; Jones, Russell W; Horney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    On September 4, 2011, a wildfire ignited in Bastrop County, Texas, resulting in losses of 34,068 acres of land and 1,645 homes and 2 deaths. At the request of the Texas Department of State Health Services Health Service Region 7 and the Bastrop County Office of Emergency Management, Community Assessments for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) were conducted in the weeks following the wildfire and again 3.5 years later to assess both the immediate and long-term public health and preparedness impacts of the wildfire. The objective of these assessments was to learn more about the trajectory of disaster recovery, including rebuilding, evacuation, household emergency planning, and mental and physical health outcomes among both adults and children. In 2015, households exposed to the 2011 wildfires were significantly more likely to have established a family meeting place and evacuation route, to have confidence in the local government's ability to respond to disaster, and to report symptoms of depression and higher stress. Longitudinal assessments using the CASPER method can provide actionable information for improved planning, preparedness, and recovery to public health and emergency management agencies and community residents.

  12. The admission systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts outcome in patients undergoing emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Anne; Chou, Wei-Han; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Yu-Jr; Fan, Shou-Zen; Chao, An-Shine

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) on emergency department admission and the prognostic significance of SIRS in patients undergoing emergency surgery. This is a retrospective study of 889 adults who were admitted as emergency cases and were operated on within 24 hours of admission. Data on patient demography, clinical information including comorbidities, categories of surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, SIRS score, postoperative outcomes including duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay, and mortality were collected. SIRS occurred in 43% of the patients and was associated with a significantly worse outcome in terms of duration of ventilator use (10.5 ± 15.4 vs. 3.5 ± 4.4 days, p surgery categories), SIRS was independently associated with higher mortality (adjusted odd ratio, 21.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.9-93.2), longer ventilator duration (adjusted coefficient, 7.8; 95% CI, 3.2-12.5), longer ICU stay (adjusted coefficient, 6.2; 95% CI, 2.6-9.8) and longer hospital stay (adjusted coefficient, 9.7; 95% CI, 7.5-11.9). The presence of SIRS at admission in patients receiving emergency surgery predicted worse outcomes and higher mortality rates. Copyright © 2013, Asian Surgical Association. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  13. The French responses organisation for dealing with radiological emergencies; L'organisation francaise de gestion des crises radiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boude, B. [Secretariat General de la Defense Nationale, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2006-07-15

    To meet the goal of population protection, the response that the authorities will have to implement in the event of a radiological emergency has to be organised. In a context of significant change at the beginning of this century, the response organisation was revised in depth. This article aims to describe the roles, structures and methods of action of the various parties involved in the current emergency response system. (author)

  14. Study of developing nuclear fabrication facility's integrated emergency response manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeh Yeong; Cho, Nam Chan; Han, Seung Hoon; Moon, Jong Han; Lee, Jin Hang [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Guem Young; Han, Ji Ah [Dongguk Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Public begin to pay attention to emergency management. Thus, public's consensus on having high level of emergency management system up to advanced country's is reached. In this social atmosphere, manual is considered as key factor to prevent accident or secure business continuity. Therefore, we first define possible crisis at KEPCO Nuclear Fuel (hereinafter KNF) and also make a 'Reaction List' for each crisis situation at the view of information-design. To achieve it, we analyze several country's crisis response manual and then derive component, indicate duties and roles at the information-design point of view. From this, we suggested guideline to make 'Integrated emergency response manual(IERM)'. The manual we used before have following few problems; difficult to applicate at the site, difficult to deliver information. To complement these problems, we searched manual elements from the view of information-design. As a result, we develop administrative manual. Although, this manual could be thought as fragmentary manual because it confined specific several agency/organization and disaster type.

  15. Treating the host response to emerging virus diseases: lessons learned from sepsis, pneumonia, influenza and Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedson, David S

    2016-11-01

    There is an ongoing threat of epidemic or pandemic diseases that could be caused by influenza, Ebola or other emerging viruses. It will be difficult and costly to develop new drugs that target each of these viruses. Statins and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been effective in treating patients with sepsis, pneumonia and influenza, and a statin/ARB combination appeared to dramatically reduce mortality during the recent Ebola outbreak. These drugs target (among other things) the endothelial dysfunction found in all of these diseases. Most scientists work on new drugs that target viruses, and few accept the idea of treating the host response with generic drugs. A great deal of research will be needed to show conclusively that these drugs work, and this will require the support of public agencies and foundations. Investigators in developing countries should take an active role in this research. If the next Public Health Emergency of International Concern is caused by an emerging virus, a "top down" approach to developing specific new drug treatments is unlikely to be effective. However, a "bottom up" approach to treatment that targets the host response to these viruses by using widely available and inexpensive generic drugs could reduce mortality in any country with a basic health care system. In doing so, it would make an immeasurable contribution to global equity and global security.

  16. Reflection on pastoral care in Africa: Towards discerning emerging pragmatic pastoral ministerial responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pastoral care takes different forms in responding to people’s needs in their context. Accordingly, over the centuries it has evolved in response to emerging needs. Historical developments in pastoral care are well-documented. However, pastoral care in Africa has a short and unsystematically documented history. Scholarly discussions on pastoral care concerning the continent tend to be considered under African theological frameworks. Notwithstanding the already existing weaknesses in African theological discussion, pastoral care in Africa has remained fragmented with diverse and seemingly knee-jerk approaches in guiding individuals who provide pastoral care. In view of this, this article firstly aims to provide a broad overview and initiate a discussion on the current challenges in pastoral care in Africa. Secondly, it aims to reveal some gaps worth pursuing by scholars in the discipline. Thirdly, it sheds some light on approaches employed by pastoral practitioners in pastoral ministry practice. In doing so, this article opens the lid on some perspectives adopted in ministry work on the frontlines, that is, providing pastoral care to people in their communities – particularly church communities. This article first outlines the problem to be addressed followed by an overview of pastoral care in Africa. It then proceeds to address potential research opportunities within the discipline. Finally, it highlights some emerging approaches in providing pastoral care in the communities. This article does not focus on one particular pastoral care issue, but gives an overview of the situation relative to pastoral care in Africa and the emerging responses.

  17. Two New Pieces of Emergency Response Equipment for use in Confined Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing two new pieces of emergency response equipment that recognize and address the constraints of a confined space environment. One piece of equipment is a respirator designed for use in a post fire environment. Traditional first responders generally use supplied air respirators - they provide cool, dry, safe breathing air to the first responder, and because they are supplied at above ambient pressure, the system is tolerant to a loose-fitting mask. Supplied air respirators have a limited supply of air, but because the traditional first responder intends to address the emergency from outside and then retreat, this limited air supply does not pose a serious problem. NASA uses a supplied oxygen respirator for first response to an emergency affecting air quality on the International Space Station. The air supply is rated for 15 minutes - ISS program managers sponsored a hardware development activity to provide the astronauts up to 8 hours of breathing protection after the supplied air system is exhausted. Size and weight limitations prevent the use of a supplied air system for 8 hours for six crew members. A trade study resulted in the selection of a filtering respirator system over a re-breather system; due to design simplicity, operational simplicity, and likely threats to air quality on ISS. The respirator cartridge that filters smoke particles, adsorbs organics and acid gases, and catalytically converts carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide has been qualified for use on ISS, and was delivered on STS-135, the final mission of the Space Shuttle Program.

  18. Researchers at the Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IMI-BAS - Attestation Analysis - Results and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tabov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2010 attestation of the academic staff of the Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, was carried out. The attestation procedures and the results of their applying in practice are both described in the present paper. The level-drop in IMI-BAS is alarming. The main reason for it is the brain-drain, we suppose.

  19. BULGARIANS IN THE TERRITORY OF THE KUBAN COSSACKS IN THE LATE OF XVIII - THE EARLY OF XX CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhabchik S. V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of the Russian-Slavic cultural, political and economic links is quite actual nowadays. At the turn of 18 – 20 centuries Russia was the only independent Slavic state that was a reason of special attention of foreign countries. The most intensive contacts in Slavic world can be found on a regional level. Both pre-revolutional and modern scientists actively explore such aspects as resettlement of Bulgarians to the Kuban, places of their compact location, main activities and further destiny of its members. There is a detailed specification of colonization of Bulagarian landowners from 18 until the beginning of 20 century in the article, based on the archive documents. Also described moments of first appearing of Bulgarians on the Russian territory and particularly in the Kuban. The article is focused on the main stages of economic familiarization and adaptation of settlers to the natural and social features of new locations. The conditions and forms of vital activities in labor, lifestyle, sociopolitical and cultural life that are typical for their social relations are marked in the article. There is also noted that main occupation of Bulgarian settlers was horticulture, where they achieved greatest successes thanks to mastery of artificial irrigation using a special mechanism for that (a big wheel with attached vessels; Hothouse economy, that allowed them to produce thermophilic crops; organization of teams, that assumed collective labor, labor relations and mutual support. To sum up, Bulgarian settlers harmoniously fitted into socio-cultural area of the Kuban region

  20. Application of multilingual corpus in contrastive studies (on the example of the Bulgarian-Polish-Lithuanian parallel corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dimitrova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Application of multilingual corpus in contrastive studies (on the example of the Bulgarian-Polish-Lithuanian parallel corpus In this paper we present applications of a trilingual corpus in language research. Comparative and contrastive studies of Polish and Bulgarian as well as Polish and Lithuanian have been already conducted, but up to the best of our knowledge no such studies exist for Bulgarian and Lithuanian. On the one hand, it is interesting to note that two Slavic languages are compared to a Baltic language (Lithuanian. On the other hand, the three languages are marginally present in the EU because of the later ascension of the three countries to the EU. The paper shortly describes the first electronic Bulgarian–Polish–Lithuanian experimental corpus, currently under development only for research. We also focus our attention on the morphosyntactic annotation of the parallel trilingual corpus according to the Corpus Encoding Standard: we present a review of the Part-of-Speech (POS classification of the participle in the three languages – Bulgarian, Polish, and Lithuanian in comparison to another POS, the adjective. We briefly discuss tagsets for corpus annotation from the point of view of possible unification in the future with some examples.

  1. The haemodynamic dilemma in emergency care: Is fluid responsiveness the answer? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwan, Mohammed H; Roshdy, Ashraf; Elsharkawy, Eman M; Eltahan, Salah M; Coats, Timothy J

    2017-03-06

    Fluid therapy is a common and crucial treatment in the emergency department (ED). While fluid responsiveness seems to be a promising method to titrate fluid therapy, the evidence for its value in ED is unclear. We aim to synthesise the existing literature investigating fluid responsiveness in ED. MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane library were searched for relevant peer-reviewed studies published from 1946 to present. A total of 249 publications were retrieved of which 22 studies underwent full-text review and eight relevant studies were identified. Only 3 studies addressed clinical outcomes - including 2 randomised controlled trials and one feasibility study. Five articles evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of fluid responsiveness techniques in ED. Due to marked heterogeneity, it was not possible to combine results in a meta-analysis. High quality, adequately powered outcome studies are still lacking, so the place of fluid responsiveness in ED remains undefined. Future studies should have standardisation of patient groups, the target response and the underpinning theoretic concept of fluid responsiveness. The value of a fluid responsiveness based fluid resuscitation protocol needs to be established in a clinical trial.

  2. Eye movements and hazard perception in police pursuit and emergency response driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundall, David; Chapman, Peter; Phelps, Nicola; Underwood, Geoffrey

    2003-09-01

    How do police cope with the visual demands placed on them during pursuit driving? This study compared the hazard ratings, eye movements, and physiological responses of police drivers with novice and with age-matched control drivers while viewing video clips of driving taken from police vehicles. The clips included pursuits, emergency responses, and control drives. Although police drivers did not report more hazards than the other participants reported, they had an increased frequency of electrodermal responses while viewing dangerous clips and a greater visual sampling rate and spread of search. However, despite an overall police advantage in oculomotor and physiological measures, all drivers had a reduced spread of search in nighttime pursuits because of the focusing of overt attention.

  3. Risk-Averse Evolutionary Game Model of Aviation Joint Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study effects of risk-averse attitude of both participators in aviation joint emergency response on the coevolution of cooperation mechanisms and individual preferences between airport and nonprofit organization. First, based on the current aviation joint emergency mechanism in China, we put forward two mechanisms to select the joint nonprofit organization, including reputation cooperation and bidding competition. Meanwhile, we consider two preferences including altruism and selfishness. Then we build replicator dynamics equations using the theory of conditional value-at-risk (CVaR taking risk aversion attitude into account. Finally, we introduce the factor of government and give all participators some suggestions. We show that the risk-averse attitude of the other game participator affects the one participator’s decision and the effects subject to some parameters.

  4. Factors influencing response to intravenous lacosamide in emergency situations: LACO-IV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Mercedes; Villanueva, Vicente; Mauri, José Angel; Suller, Ana; García, Carolina; López González, Franscisco Javier; Rodríguez Osorio, Xiana; Fernández Pajarín, Gustavo; Piera, Anna; Guillamón, Edelmira; Santafé, Consuelo; Castillo, Ascensión; Giner, Pau; Torres, Nerea; Escalza, Inés; Del Villar, Ana; García de Casasola, Maria Carmen; Bonet, Macarena; Noé, Enrique; Olmedilla, Nuria

    2014-07-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) and acute repetitive seizures (ARSs) frequently result in emergency visits. Wide variations in response are seen with standard antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Oral and intravenous (IV) formulations of lacosamide are approved as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. The aim of the retrospective multicenter observational study (LACO-IV) was to analyze data from a large cohort of patients with SE or ARSs of varying severity and etiology, who received IV lacosamide in the emergency setting. Patient clinical data were entered into a database; lacosamide use and efficacy and tolerability variables were analyzed. In SE, IV lacosamide tended to be used mainly in nonconvulsive status epilepticus as second- or third-line treatment. The proportion of patients with no seizures when IV lacosamide was the last drug administered was 76.5% (70.9% SE and 83.7% ARSs). The rate of seizure cessation ≤ 24 h after IV lacosamide administration was 57.1% (49.1% SE and 67.4% ARSs). Of the factors analyzed, a shorter latency from seizure onset to IV lacosamide infusion influenced treatment response significantly. A nonsignificant tendency towards a higher response was seen with lacosamide dose >200mg versus ≤ 200 mg. Analysis of response according to mechanism of action showed no significant differences in response to IV lacosamide in patients receiving prior sodium channel blocker (SCB) or non-SCB AEDs in the overall or SE population; however, in ARSs, a tendency towards a higher response was observed in those receiving non-SCB AEDs. The frequency and nature of adverse events observed were in line with those reported in other studies (somnolence being the most frequent). In the absence of randomized prospective controlled studies of IV lacosamide, our observations suggest that IV lacosamide may be a potential alternative for treatment of SE/ARSs when seizures fail to improve with standard AEDs or when AEDs are

  5. Development and evaluation of an integrated emergency response facility location model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Dong Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose and compare the performance of the “two” robust mathematical models, the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL and the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL models, to solve the emergency response facility and transportation problems in terms of the total logistics cost and robustness. Design/methodology/approach: The emergency response facilities include distribution warehouses (DWH where relief goods are stored, commodity distribution points (CDP, and neighborhood locations. Authors propose two robust models: the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL model where the demand of a CDP is covered by a main DWH or a backup CDP; the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL model where that of a CDP is covered by multiple DWHs. The performance of these models is compared with each other and to the Regular Facility Location (RFL model where a CDP is covered by one main DWH. The case studies with multiple scenarios are analyzed. Findings: The results illustrate that the RFL outperforms others under normal conditions while the RCFL outperforms others under the emergency conditions. Overall, the total logistics cost and robustness level of the RCFL outperforms those of other models while the performance of RFL and RIFL is mixed between the cost and robustness index. Originality/value: Two new emergency distribution approaches are modeled, and evaluated using case studies. In addition to the total logistics cost, the robustness index is uniquely presented and applied. The proposed models and robustness concept are hoped to shed light to the future works in the field of disaster logistics management.

  6. A UAV BASED CLOSE-RANGE RAPID AERIAL MONITORING SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As the occurrences and scales of disasters and accidents have been increased due to the global warming, the terrorists' attacks, and many other reasons, the demand for rapid responses for the emergent situations also has been thus ever-increasing. These emergency responses are required to be customized to each individual site for more effective management of the emergent situations. These requirements can be satisfied with the decisions based on the spatial changes on the target area, which should be detected immediately or in real-time. Aerial monitoring without human operators is an appropriate means because the emergency areas are usually inaccessible. Therefore, a UAV is a strong candidate as the platform for the aerial monitoring. In addition, the sensory data from the UAV system usually have higher resolution than other system because the system can operate at a lower altitude. If the transmission and processing of the data could be performed in real-time, the spatial changes of the target area can be detected with high spatial and temporal resolution by the UAV rapid mapping systems. As a result, we aim to develop a rapid aerial mapping system based on a UAV, whose key features are the effective acquisition of the sensory data, real-time transmission and processing of the data. In this paper, we will introduce the general concept of our system, including the main features, intermediate results, and explain our real-time sensory data georeferencing algorithm which is a core for prompt generation of the spatial information from the sensory data.

  7. Designing Mobile Applications for Emergency Response: Citizens Acting as Human Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marco; Onorati, Teresa; Aedo, Ignacio; Diaz, Paloma

    2016-03-19

    When an emergency occurs, citizens can be a helpful support for the operation centers involved in the response activities. As witnesses to a crisis, they initially can share updated and detailed information about what is going on. Moreover, thanks to the current technological evolution people are able to quickly and easily gather rich information and transmit it through different communication channels. Indeed, modern mobile devices embed several sensors such as GPS receivers, Wi-Fi, accelerometers or cameras that can transform users into well-equipped human sensors. For these reasons, emergency organizations and small and medium enterprises have demonstrated a growing interest in developing smart applications for reporting any exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we present a practical study about this kind of applications for identifying both limitations and common features. Based on a study of relevant existent contributions in this area and our personal direct experience in developing and evaluating emergency management solutions, our aim is to propose several findings about how to design effective and efficient mobile emergency notification applications. For this purpose we have exploited the basic sensors of modern mobile devices and the users' aptitude for using them. The evaluation consists of a practical and a theoretical part. In the practical part, we have simulated a traffic accident as closely as possible to a real scenario, with a victim lying on the ground near a car in the middle of a street. For the theoretical part, we have interviewed some emergency experts for collecting their opinions about the utility of the proposed solution. Results from this evaluation phase confirm the positive impact that EN application have for both operators' and citizens' perspective. Moreover, we collected several findings useful for future design challenges in the same area, as shown in the final redesign of the proposed application.

  8. Designing Mobile Applications for Emergency Response: Citizens Acting as Human Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Romano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When an emergency occurs, citizens can be a helpful support for the operation centers involved in the response activities. As witnesses to a crisis, they initially can share updated and detailed information about what is going on. Moreover, thanks to the current technological evolution people are able to quickly and easily gather rich information and transmit it through different communication channels. Indeed, modern mobile devices embed several sensors such as GPS receivers, Wi-Fi, accelerometers or cameras that can transform users into well-equipped human sensors. For these reasons, emergency organizations and small and medium enterprises have demonstrated a growing interest in developing smart applications for reporting any exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we present a practical study about this kind of applications for identifying both limitations and common features. Based on a study of relevant existent contributions in this area and our personal direct experience in developing and evaluating emergency management solutions, our aim is to propose several findings about how to design effective and efficient mobile emergency notification applications. For this purpose we have exploited the basic sensors of modern mobile devices and the users’ aptitude for using them. The evaluation consists of a practical and a theoretical part. In the practical part, we have simulated a traffic accident as closely as possible to a real scenario, with a victim lying on the ground near a car in the middle of a street. For the theoretical part, we have interviewed some emergency experts for collecting their opinions about the utility of the proposed solution. Results from this evaluation phase confirm the positive impact that EN application have for both operators’ and citizens’ perspective. Moreover, we collected several findings useful for future design challenges in the same area, as shown in the final redesign of the proposed application.

  9. Some Reliability Considerations of UGV for Remote-response in Nuclear Emergency Situation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In Fukushima disaster, a number of different UGVs, such as Packbots, Warriors, Quince, and Survey Runner, are used for monitoring, collecting data, inspection, and cleaning up. In utilizing UGVs in a nuclear emergency situation, one of serious problems is reliability of UGVs which is not sufficient yet for required mission completion. In this paper we surveyed failures and reliability of field UGVs and draw some important reliability considerations of UGVs for remote-response in a nuclear emergency situation. We think that the findings in this study will be helpful for developers or researchers of UGVs for nuclear emergency situations. We studied failures and reliability of UGVs used in search/rescue, military, and nuclear field by literature survey. The results showed that a state of art field UGVs can't be expected to complete an entire mission without failures, which leads to needs of reliability improvement of them. Though part of failure data from the surveyed studies were not enough detailed to get reliability matrix, some meaningful insights were found through analysis. Based on these insights, we draw some important considerations for reliability improvement of UGVs for an NPP emergency situation, and those reliability considerations are classified according to life cycle of a UGV for developers and researchers. Finally, there were not reported failures related to radiation environments in surveyed literature, but radiation tolerant control boards and sensors are easily anticipated in a NPP emergency situation. Therefore studies about the radiation-tolerant design and the use of radiation-tolerant components also should be considered for high reliability of UGVs for a NPP application.

  10. Territorial Dioceses and Ethnic Episcopies in the Structure of the Church Organization of the First Bulgarian Kingdom (Canonical Aspects

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    Archpriest Alexander Zadornov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of ethnic and territorial principles in the structure of ecclesiastical organizations is a well known fact in church history. Both principles are equally legitimate from the point of view of canonical law. The “ethnic principle” was based on legal norms of the so-called 34th Apostolic Rule, and contrary to the opinion of scholars of the 19th century, it was still in use after the era of the Ecumenical Councils. This fact must be considered by students of the history of Church organizations in the First Bulgarian Kingdom, too. The observations regarding the structure of church organizations in Simeonic Bulgaria make it possible to assume the coexistence of ethnic and territorial principles of church organizations in his kingdom. As is known, Slavonic church schools were established in the southwestern part of the First Bulgarian Kingdom after 886. They were aimed at training the Slavonic clergy for the Slavonic church organization. In 893, the Bulgarian King Simeon was elevated to the throne, and a Slavonic eparchy headed by St. Clement of Ohrid was established in the southwestern territories of the First Bulgarian Kingdom. As a result, heterogeneous church organizations were established in the region, and church structures of ethnic and territorial types appeared. They differ from each other by the language of their church services. Old Church Slavonic must have been used as a liturgical language in the ethnic Slavonic eparchy. Since direct historical evidence for such heterogeneous church structure in the First Bulgarian Kingdom is absent, new interpretations of sources made on the basis of canonical law can be of importance for Slavonic studies.

  11. S(PEEDKITS & Smart Packaging. Novel textile application to redesign the emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zanelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The essay aims to give an overview of the on-going S(PEEDKITS collaborative project, co-financed by European Union, under 7FP - Activity SEC- 2011.4.2-3. In particular the research activities carried out the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI are highlighted, both on the field of the Industrial Design and on Architectural Technology. The theme of designing new emergency response kits in situations of great disasters outlines a new frontier for the disciplines of Architectural Technology that aims to combine the traditional vocation of the components’ design with the innovative researches of technical textiles and lightweight construction.

  12. A two-stage optimization model for emergency material reserve layout planning under uncertainty in response to environmental accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Jiang, Dexun; Liu, Rentao; Wang, Peng

    2016-06-05

    In the emergency management relevant to pollution accidents, efficiency emergency rescues can be deeply influenced by a reasonable assignment of the available emergency materials to the related risk sources. In this study, a two-stage optimization framework is developed for emergency material reserve layout planning under uncertainty to identify material warehouse locations and emergency material reserve schemes in pre-accident phase coping with potential environmental accidents. This framework is based on an integration of Hierarchical clustering analysis - improved center of gravity (HCA-ICG) model and material warehouse location - emergency material allocation (MWL-EMA) model. First, decision alternatives are generated using HCA-ICG to identify newly-built emergency material warehouses for risk sources which cannot be satisfied by existing ones with a time-effective manner. Second, emergency material reserve planning is obtained using MWL-EMA to make emergency materials be prepared in advance with a cost-effective manner. The optimization framework is then applied to emergency management system planning in Jiangsu province, China. The results demonstrate that the developed framework not only could facilitate material warehouse selection but also effectively provide emergency material for emergency operations in a quick response.

  13. Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club. Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: Social media responses to the November 2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Ryan P; Rezaie, Salim R; Lin, Michelle

    2014-04-01

    The Annals November 2013 Journal Club issue marked one of the first collaborations with Academic Life in Emergency Medicine, a medical education blog, in an effort to promote a worldwide, transparent, online effort to perform critical appraisals of journal articles. The Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club was hosted on the blog for 1 week during November 18 to 24, 2013, with comments moderated on the blog and on Twitter. This summary article compiles the discussion and insights.

  14. Proceedings of the VI Serbian-Bulgarian Astronomical Conference, May 7 - 11 2008, Belgrade, Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.; Tsvetkov, M.; Popović, L. C.; Golev, V.

    2009-07-01

    The Sixth Serbian-Bulgarian Astronomical Conference was organized by Belgrade Astronomical Observatory, and held in Belgrade, in the building of Mathematical Faculty in Jagiceva Street, from 75th to 11th May 2008. Co-organizers were Mathematical Faculty, Astronomical Society "Rudjer Boskovic", Institute of Astronomy of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS), Space Research Institute of BAS and Department of Astronomy of the University of Sofia. Co-chairmen of the Scientific Organizing Committee were Milan Dimitrijevic and Milcho Tsvetkov and Co-vice chairmen Luka C. Popovic and Valeri Golev. Chair of the Local Organizing Committee was Andjelka Kovacevic. The conference [was] attended by 58 participants. From Serbia were 36, from Belgrade Astronomical Observatory, Mathematical Faculty, Faculty of Sciences from Nis, Institute of Physics from Zemum, High School for pedagogues of occupational studies from Aleksinac, Faculty of Sciences from Kragujevac, Mathematical Institute of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Astronomical Society "Rudjer Boskovic" and Astronomical Society "Magellanic Cloud." From Bulgaria were present 17 colleagues: Svetlana Boeva, Ana Borisova, Momchil Dechev, Peter Duchlev, Lostadinka Koleva, Georgi Petrov, Vasil Popov, Konstatin Stavrev, Katya Ysvetkova and Milcho Tsvetkov from Institute of Astronomy of BAS, Rumen Bogdanovski and Krasmimira Ianova from Space Research Institute of BAS, Georgi R. Ivanov, Georgi Petrov and Grigor Nikolov from Department of Astronomy, Sofia University "St Kliment Ohridski,", Yavor Chapanov from Central Laboratory for Geodesy of BAS and Petya Pavlova from Technical University of Sofia, Branch Plovdiv. Besides participants from Serbia and Bulgaria the Conference [was] attended [by] Vlado Milicevic from Canada, Jan Vondrak from Czech Republic, Aytap Sezer from Turkey and Tetyana Sergeeva and Alexandr Sergeev from Ukraine. On the Conference were presented 13 invited lectures, 22 short talks and 35 posters, in total

  15. Therapy of ovarian inactivity in postpartum Bulgarian Murrah buffaloes by PRID and Ovsynch estrus synchronization protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanimir Yotov; Anatoli Atanasov; Yordanka Ilieva

    2012-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the present study was to assess therapeutical effect of modified Ovsynch and PRID estrus synchronization protocols in Bulgarian Murrah buffalo with inactive ovaries during the low-breeding season. Methods:The study was carried out in 46 Bulgarian Murrah buffaloes with small inactive ovaries established by two consecutive transrectal ultrasonographies on Day 40 and 50 postpartum. At the start of the therapy the buffaloes were randomly divided into three groups. Group I (n=18) was treated by PRID-based protocol;Group II (n=18) was treated by Ovsynch based protocol and Group III (control;n=10) was injected intramuscular with saline at the same days as in the first two groups and fertile bull was introduced after that. The animals in the different groups were submitted to ultrasound examination at day of artificial insemination or bull introduction. Ovulation was determined 7 days post insemination by ultrasound. The pregnancy diagnosis was done 30 days after insemination. Mean diameter of the largest follicles at the start of therapy and the day of AI was registered. In the hormonal treated buffaloes estrus clinical sings, ovulation rate and pregnancy rate after AI were determined. In the control group pregnancy rate after spontaneous estrus was established. The mean diameter of the largest follicles determined on Days 40 and 50 after calving was not over 9 mm for all buffaloes. Results:At day of AI the average diameters of the preo-vulatory follicles in PRID and Ovsynch treated buffaloes were significantly (P<0.01) greater than these on Day 0. The cases of a clear uterine mucus discharge during the induced estrus were significant more (P<0.05) for Group I (94.4%) than Group II (66.7%). The pregnancy rate after AI (56.6%and 38.8%) in PRID and Ovsynch program was significant higher (P<0.05) than pregnancy rate after spontaneous estrus (10%) in the control group. Conclusions:the treatment of buffalo ovarian inactivity could start on Day 50

  16. From reactive to proactive use of social media in emergency response: A critical discussion of the Twitcident Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, F.K.; Diks, D.; Ferguson, J.E.; Wolbers, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the introduction and implementation of the pilot project Twitcident in an emergency response room setting. Twitcident is a web-based system for filtering, searching and analyzing data on real-world incidents or crises. Social media data is seen as important for emergency respon

  17. Physical and digital design of the BlueBio biomonitoring system prototype, to be used in emergency medical response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, M; Pedersen, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. Handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel on work a...

  18. Physical and Digital Design of the BlueBio Biomonitoring System Prototype, to be used in Emergency Medical Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, Margit; Pedersen, Jacob Frølund

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. The handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel at wo...

  19. Physical and Digital Design of the BlueBio Biomonitoring System Prototype, to be used in Emergency Medical Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, Margit; Pedersen, Jacob Frølund

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. The handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel at work...... of the current prototype....

  20. A 'mixed reality' simulator concept for future Medical Emergency Response Team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J; Guest, R; Mahoney, P; Lamb, D; Gibson, C

    2017-08-01

    The UK Defence Medical Service's Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) capability includes rapid-deployment Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERTs) comprising tri-service trauma consultants, paramedics and specialised nurses, all of whom are qualified to administer emergency care under extreme conditions to improve the survival prospects of combat casualties. The pre-deployment training of MERT personnel is designed to foster individual knowledge, skills and abilities in PHEC and in small team performance and cohesion in 'mission-specific' contexts. Until now, the provision of airborne pre-deployment MERT training had been dependent on either the availability of an operational aircraft (eg, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter) or access to one of only two ground-based facsimiles of the Chinook's rear cargo/passenger cabin. Although MERT training has high priority, there will always be competition with other military taskings for access to helicopter assets (and for other platforms in other branches of the Armed Forces). This paper describes the development of an inexpensive, reconfigurable and transportable MERT training concept based on 'mixed reality' technologies-in effect the 'blending' of real-world objects of training relevance with virtual reality reconstructions of operational contexts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  2. Encountering anger in the emergency department: identification, evaluations and responses of staff members to anger displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Cheshin; Anat, Rafaeli; Arie, Eisenman

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs) occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients' angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n = 38) were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n = 80 & n = 144). Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff's fear level. Staff's responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients' requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff's response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  3. Emergent authority and expert knowledge: psychiatry and criminal responsibility in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, Arlie; Ward, Tony

    2014-01-01

    In the UK context, the rise of the discipline and practice of forensic psychiatry is intimately connected with the concurrent development of principles and practices relating to criminal responsibility. In this article, we seek to chart the relationship between psychiatry and the principles and practices of criminal responsibility in the UK over the early modern, modern and late modern periods. With a focus on claims about authority and expert knowledge around criminal responsibility, we suggest that these claims have been in a state of perpetual negotiation and that, as a result, claims to authority over and knowledge about criminal non-responsibility on the part of psychiatrists and psychiatry are most accurately understood as emergent and contingent. The apparent formalism of legal discourse has tended to conceal the extent to which legal policy has been preoccupied with maintaining the primacy of lay judgments in criminal processes of evaluation and adjudication. While this policy has been somewhat successful in the context of the trial - particularly the murder trial - it has been undermined by administrative procedures surrounding the trial, including those that substitute treatment for punishment without, or in spite of, a formal determination of criminal responsibility.

  4. Development of an automated speech recognition interface for personal emergency response systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailidis Alex

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demands on long-term-care facilities are predicted to increase at an unprecedented rate as the baby boomer generation reaches retirement age. Aging-in-place (i.e. aging at home is the desire of most seniors and is also a good option to reduce the burden on an over-stretched long-term-care system. Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERSs help enable older adults to age-in-place by providing them with immediate access to emergency assistance. Traditionally they operate with push-button activators that connect the occupant via speaker-phone to a live emergency call-centre operator. If occupants do not wear the push button or cannot access the button, then the system is useless in the event of a fall or emergency. Additionally, a false alarm or failure to check-in at a regular interval will trigger a connection to a live operator, which can be unwanted and intrusive to the occupant. This paper describes the development and testing of an automated, hands-free, dialogue-based PERS prototype. Methods The prototype system was built using a ceiling mounted microphone array, an open-source automatic speech recognition engine, and a 'yes' and 'no' response dialog modelled after an existing call-centre protocol. Testing compared a single microphone versus a microphone array with nine adults in both noisy and quiet conditions. Dialogue testing was completed with four adults. Results and discussion The microphone array demonstrated improvement over the single microphone. In all cases, dialog testing resulted in the system reaching the correct decision about the kind of assistance the user was requesting. Further testing is required with elderly voices and under different noise conditions to ensure the appropriateness of the technology. Future developments include integration of the system with an emergency detection method as well as communication enhancement using features such as barge-in capability. Conclusion The use of an automated

  5. Training center and response to emergencies; Centro de treinamento e resposta a emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Paulo Manuel da; Endo, Nelson Yukio [PMS Consultoria em Engenharia de Seguranca e Ambiental S/C Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Accidents with installations and products have troubled companies and governmental authorities too, who are actuating so much by inspecting, and prevention of these events must be intensified. It is clear that all persons involved have to qualify for risks management of his activities and to response satisfactorily when accidents occur. For attending this necessity, a partnership with Petroleo Brasileiro S/A - PETROBRAS and PMS Consultoria em Engenharia de Seguranca e Ambiental S/C Ltda, was established to build and operate a Training Centre and Emergency Response. The philosophy of this project is that the major parts of accidents happen many times at the same conditions, and if the accidents representation will be in real conditions for training, in practice it is faster to control the events, and what is more important to avoid repeated accidents. Another purpose of the Centre is to integrate universities and industries, developing research and news technologies, for attending companies needs in this millennium. (author)

  6. Review of the source term algorithm for emergency response at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A.A.; O' Kula, K.R.; Hunter, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to verify the Source Term Setup Module of the Reactor Accident Program (RAP) which is used to perform environmental consequence assessments during emergency response situations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Source Term Setup Module is that portion of the program that estimates the source term based on either an input number of melted assemblies or a derived number of melted assemblies based on the Total Stack Activity Monitor (TSAM) response. In order to verify the code, the following items were completed: a review of isotope and fuel specific data by examining the original literature, a complete derivation of all equations employed in the module, and a comparison study of hand calculations with computer results.

  7. Review of the source term algorithm for emergency response at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A.A.; O`Kula, K.R.; Hunter, C.H.

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of this work was to verify the Source Term Setup Module of the Reactor Accident Program (RAP) which is used to perform environmental consequence assessments during emergency response situations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Source Term Setup Module is that portion of the program that estimates the source term based on either an input number of melted assemblies or a derived number of melted assemblies based on the Total Stack Activity Monitor (TSAM) response. In order to verify the code, the following items were completed: a review of isotope and fuel specific data by examining the original literature, a complete derivation of all equations employed in the module, and a comparison study of hand calculations with computer results.

  8. Emerging Powers and the Notion of International Responsibility: moral duty or shifting goalpost?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Michael Kenkel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of new powers and attendant shifts in the global balance of power have led to calls for UN Security Council reform. Established powers have often responded by linking increased influence in the international system with the assumption of more international responsibility by aspirant powers. Based on ethical and philosophical approaches from the individual and state levels, and a case study of Brazil, this article analyses the way in which the notion of responsibility is discursively constructed, demonstrating the manner in which it has been used as an ever-shifting goalpost to deny emerging powers participation at the highest levels of global strategic decision-making. Most often, this is done by equating “responsibility” with the ability and willingness to use robust military force.

  9. Community Colleges, Emergency Response, Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Community Colleges dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2006. It is described as 'Emergency Response'. The extent of these data is generally...

  10. Report: EPA Plans for Managing Counter Terrorism/ Emergency Response Equipment and Protecting Critical Assets Not Fully Implemented

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #09-P-0087, January 27, 2009. EPA has progressed in implementing the counter terrorism/emergency response (CT/ER) initiatives, but is behind schedule in implementing the Radiation Ambient Monitoring (RadNet) System.

  11. DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System -- Partnering in the Fight Against Emerging Infections, Fiscal Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2006 Mar; Atlanta, GA. 19. Comach, G., G. Sierra , A. Figuera, D. Guzman, M. Soler, C. Guevara, M. De...humans: Latest Advances on prevention, thera- pies and protective measures, 2006 June; Paris, France. 73. Laguna-Torres, V.A., N. Loayza, S. Mendoza

  12. Healthcare coalitions: the new foundation for national healthcare preparedness and response for catastrophic health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Brooke; Toner, Eric; Waldhorn, Richard; Franco, Crystal; Rambhia, Kunal; Norwood, Ann; Inglesby, Thomas V; O'Toole, Tara

    2009-06-01

    After 9/11 and the 2001 anthrax letters, it was evident that our nation's healthcare system was largely underprepared to handle the unique needs and large volumes of people who would seek medical care following catastrophic health events. In response, in 2002 Congress established the Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to strengthen the ability of U.S. hospitals to prepare for and respond to bioterrorism and naturally occurring epidemics and disasters. Since 2002, the program has resulted in substantial improvements in individual hospitals' disaster readiness. In 2007, the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) contracted with the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to conduct an assessment of U.S. hospital preparedness and to develop tools and recommendations for evaluating and improving future hospital preparedness efforts. One of the most important findings from this work is that healthcare coalitions-collaborative groups of local healthcare institutions and response agencies that work together to prepare for and respond to emergencies-have emerged throughout the U.S. since the HPP began. This article provides an overview of the HPP and the Center's hospital preparedness research for ASPR. Based on that work, the article also defines healthcare coalitions and identifies their structure and core functions, provides examples of more developed coalitions and common challenges faced by coalitions, and proposes that healthcare coalitions should become the foundation of a national strategy for healthcare preparedness and response for catastrophic health events.

  13. Factors affecting the United Nations' response to natural disasters: what determines the allocation of the Central Emergency Response Fund?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D; Oliveira, Thiago M; Kayden, Stephanie

    2017-01-30

    Natural disasters can overwhelm the domestic response of a country, leaving it dependent on external humanitarian relief. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) of the United Nations centralises humanitarian funding and thus allows for a rapid response. This study combined data to analyse the factors that affected the allocation of CERF funding to countries that suffered a natural disaster between 2007 and 2013. It generated descriptive statistics and information on relative risks, and performed regressions of CERF funding across countries. There were 4,346 disasters in total in 188 countries between 2007 and 2013. CERF provided USD 2.98 billion to 87 countries, comprising 3.3 per cent of their total humanitarian funding. CERF more frequently supplied aid to countries in North Africa and the Middle East, and to those that had suffered geophysical disasters. Appropriately, it funds vulnerable countries experiencing severe natural disasters, yet its funding may be affected by variables beyond severity and vulnerability. Further investigation is warranted, therefore.

  14. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Boccardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author’s group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  15. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Tonolo, Fabio Giulio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-07-02

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  16. Development of a rapid response plan for intraoperative emergencies: the Circulate, Scrub, and Technical Assistance Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, David; Betti, Diane; Scala, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Unplanned intraoperative events are inevitable and cause stress and inefficiency among staff. We believe that developing a technical rapid response team with explicitly defined, narrow roles would reduce the amount of chaos during such emergencies. This article provides a detailed description of the development and implementation of such a program. In-situ simulation of an intraoperative emergency was used for a formal assessment of the current practice. Debriefing sessions identified areas of improvement and solicited solutions. A multidisciplinary working group then developed and implemented the technical rapid response team based on the needs assessment. The program was designed to create a Circulating, Scrubbing, and Technical Assistance Team that helps with equipment, supplies, anesthesia, and communication. We anticipate the program will foster a culture of safety, and promote positive relationships and attitudes of the entire multidisciplinary team. In the future, research regarding patient outcomes and staff satisfaction and safety attitudes may help provide objective evidence of the benefits of the program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Design Concepts of Emergency Response Robot Platform K-R2D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sun Young; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    From the analysis for various mobile robots competed in DARPA Robotics Challenge, there are some drawbacks in using two or four legs because bipedal locomotion is not yet suitable for maintaining stability and quadrupedal locomotion is difficult to go through narrow aisles. Motivated by the above observations, we propose a K-R2D2 robot platform with three legs arranged in the form of a triangle like as R2-D2 robot which is a fictional robot character in the Star Wars movies. This robot has 3 legs with tracks in each sole of the leg. It is statically stable since there are three contact points to ground. In addition, three legs are also possible to design a structure walking stairs that can expand and contract in the vertical direction. This paper has presented the conceptual design, it is developed on the purpose of quick response instead of emergent workers to the extreme conditions disasters. This robot is emergency response robot platform KR2D2 with three legs, which is statically stable to walk or wheel depending on the terrains and move quickly as possible as on uneven terrain or stairs.

  18. Developing a conceptual framework to evaluate effectiveness of emergency response system for oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase of oil spill accidents has made significant impacts on life, property and the environment. Facing ever-increasing risk of disaster losses, how to cope with and response to large scale oil spill disaster effectively is becoming more and more important. And it is extremely onerous and arduous to develop a highly capable assessment technique to evaluate the effectiveness of emergency response system (ERS for oil spill. An ERS for oil spill is a complex and dynamic system comprising a number of elements, one of which fails to accomplish its function would result in potential adverse impacts on the whole system. Evaluating the effectiveness of the system requires the consideration of all failures identified in the system simultaneously. Aims to propose a decision-making framework, this paper uses failure mode effect and criticality analysis (FMECA to evaluate the effectiveness of ERS to make improvements in oil spill emergency management. It is achieved by analysing the components and bounds of the system, identification of generic failure modes which are considered as key factors of ERS for oil spill. And lastly a case study is demonstrated to validate the methodology framework.

  19. Environment Canada's emergency response program and terrorist related events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P.; Goldthorp, M.; Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div

    2003-07-01

    In recent years, significant steps were taken by the federal government to improve its ability to face a terrorist-related event. The provision of scientific and technical support by numerous research centres and laboratory facilities plays a part in meeting this requirement. From the beginning, the Emergencies Science and Technology Division (ESTD), on behalf of the Environmental Technology Centre of Environment Canada, has participated in this effort. The role played by ESTD as part of the federal government's response plan was described in this paper. Specifically, the presentation provides a synopsis of Environment Canada's emergency response program with the emphasis placed squarely on the scientific and technical support program. The tasks completed and those scheduled for the upcoming year were highlighted. Two programs were discussed regarding the completed tasks, namely: a program to select and acquire portable instruments for on-site detection of hazardous materials, and a program to develop state-of-the-art rapid laboratory analysis techniques for hazardous chemicals. The upcoming year will be devoted to investigating methods to decontaminate and restore the infrastructure following an incident. Federal government departments are working in partnership with the private sector in this endeavour. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Emergency response network design for hazardous materials transportation with uncertain demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shahanaghi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of hazardous materials play an essential role on keeping a friendly environment. Every day, a substantial amount of hazardous materials (hazmats, such as flammable liquids and poisonous gases, need to be transferred prior to consumption or disposal. Such transportation may result in unsuitable events for people and environment. Emergency response network is designed for this reason where specialist responding teams resolve any issue as quickly as possible. This study proposes a new multi-objective model to locate emergency response centers for transporting the hazardous materials. Since many real-world applications are faced with uncertainty in input parameters, the proposed model of this paper also assumes that reference and demand to such centre is subject to uncertainty, where demand is fuzzy random. The resulted problem formulation is modelled as nonlinear non-convex mixed integer programming and we used NSGAII method to solve the resulted problem. The performance of the proposed model is examined with several examples using various probability distribution and they are compared with the performance of other existing method.

  1. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  2. The effect of Bulgarian propolis against Trypanosoma cruzi and during its interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Pires Dantas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Propolis has shown activity against pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases in humans and animals. The ethanol (Et-Blg and acetone (Ket-Blg extracts from a Bulgarian propolis, with known chemical compositions, presented similar activity against tissue culture-derived amastigotes. The treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected skeletal muscle cells with Et-Blg led to a decrease of infection and of the intracellular proliferation of amastigotes, while damage to the host cell was observed only at concentration 12.5 times higher than those affecting the parasite. Ultrastructural analysis of the effect of both extracts in epimastigotes revealed that the main targets were the mitochondrion and reservosomes. Et-Blg also affected the mitochondrion-kinetoplast complex in trypomastigotes, offering a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Psychometric Properties in Bulgarian Adaptation of Lie Scale From M. Bond’s Defense Styles Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Stoyanova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results from the Bulgarian adaptation of Lie Scale from M. Bond’s questionnaire measuring defense styles and defensemechanisms. 994 subjects between 15 and 56 years participated in the study. All items had an optimal difficulty, and good discriminativepower. The factor structure of the scale was confirmed. Its reliability as internal consistency and test-retest reliability is acceptable. The normswere defined for the whole sample, not differentiated by social categories, because there were not any significant differences on the scalescore between the social categories of people. There were some significant differences on some items in gender, age sub-groups, familystatus, and occupation. These differences were consistent with some other authors’ findings when using some other scales measuring socialdesirability.

  4. Duct occurrence and characteristics for Bulgarian Black sea shore derived from ECMWF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkova, I.

    2015-12-01

    Non-standard propagation due to sharp gradients in tropospheric refraction is known to have significant impact on radar and communication systems working in microwave range. The formation of tropospheric ducts is the most severe deviation from the standard propagation conditions. The presented study reports results on the tropospheric ducts' occurrence and properties along the Bulgarian Black sea shore. The meteorology needed to reconstruct the refractivity profiles is derived from ECMWF current operational model, TL799L91, and refers to two-year period. Statistics of essential duct parameters for surface, surface-based and elevated ducts are reported for the summer months and overall duct statistics are given for the other seasons.

  5. Cross-Border Landscape: Construction of Natural Heritage and Local Development at Bulgarian-Serbian Borderlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Markov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Normally nature is examined as a phenomenon which is subject to natural laws; it belongs to the field of natural sciences. In constructivist perspective the environment is subsumed under the symbolism of humans’ tradition and culture. From such point of view the very notion of nature is unthinkable without taking into account its existence and understanding in a specific social, economic and cultural context of definite time, space and society. In the proposed paper I proceed from this paradigm in examination of a definite natural landscape which, however, is divided by the political border. The research attention is focused on a region of Bulgarian-Serbian borderlands – the area where the Erma River flows. The river takes its sources in Serbia and though it is not very long, it is notable for passing the Bulgarian-Serbian border twice, and for its two remarkable gorges – the Gorge of Tran in Bulgaria and the Gorge of Poganovo in Serbia. During the socialist period this border region was under strong military and police control. The crossing of the border was formally impossible; the borderlands remained peripheral industrially undeveloped areas and were putted under strong depopulation. However, the lands on either side of the border preserved its pristine nature. During the last two decades the preserved natural landscape and certain nature objects have been turned into more important landmarks and included in the value scale of local communities as symbols and heritage. In result, the above mentioned gorges have become more important part of strategic priorities in the local policies of revival of these economically undeveloped borderlands in the Western Bulgaria and Eastern Serbia. Nowadays the local efforts are uniting through different joint cross-border projects and activities in the sphere of nature preservation and eco-tourism.

  6. Seven Novel Mutations in Bulgarian Patients with Acute Hepatic Porphyrias (AHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragneva, Sonya; Szyszka-Niagolov, Monika; Ivanova, Aneta; Mateva, Lyudmila; Izumi, Rumiko; Aoki, Yoko; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP), and hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) are caused by mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), and coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) genes, respectively. This study aimed to identify mutations in seven Bulgarian families with AIP, six with VP, and one with HCP. A total of 33 subjects, both symptomatic (n = 21) and asymptomatic (n = 12), were included in this study. The identification of mutations was performed by direct sequencing of all the coding exons of the corresponding enzymes in the probands. The available relatives were screened for the possible mutations. A total of six different mutations in HMBS were detected in all seven families with AIP, three of which were previously described: c.76C>T [p.R26C] in exon 3, c.287C>T [p.S96F] in exon 7, and c.445C>T [p.R149X] in exon 9. The following three novel HMBS mutations were found: c.345-2A>C in intron 7-8, c.279-280insAT in exon 7, and c.887delC in exon 15. A total of three different novel mutations were identified in the PPOX gene in the VP families: c.441-442delCA in exon 5, c.917T>C [p.L306P] in exon 9, and c.1252T>C [p.C418R] in exon 12. A novel nonsense mutation, c.364G>T [p.E122X], in exon 1 of the CPOX gene was identified in the HCP family. This study, which identified mutations in Bulgarian families with AHP for the first time, established seven novel mutation sites. Seven latent carriers were also diagnosed and, therefore, were able to receive crucial counseling to prevent attacks.

  7. Ultrasonic evaluation of uterine involution in Bulgarian Murrah buffalo after administration of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Anatoli S; Dineva, Julieta D; Yotov, Stanimir A

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the time taken for complete uterine involution in Bulgarian Murrah buffaloes following normal parturition and oxytocin stimulated milking; and to establish the time course of the change in size of the uterine horns, the cervix and caruncles between parturition and involution by means of ultrasonography. There were 17 animals in the study aged 3-6 years and average parity of 2.17 ± 0.18. They were administered 20 IU oxytocin 15 min before each milking. Rectal palpation and transrectal ultrasonography were performed at 3 d intervals from Days 1 to 34 post partum. The involution of the non-gravid and gravid uterine horns, and the cervix was complete by Days 22 and 25 post partum when their diameters were 2.7 ± 0.4 cm, 2.8 ± 0.3 cm and 3.12 ± 0.4 cm, respectively. Caruncles underwent rapid regression until Day 10 post partum. It was not possible to determine the dimensions of the caruncles after that time. The cumulative percentage of animals whose uterus was located in the pelvic cavity increased from 24% at Day 10 post partum to 100% at Day 34 post partum. The combination of rectal palpation and transrectal ultrasonography provided a reliable method of evaluating changes in the uterus over time and determining the time of uterine involution. The present study showed that complete uterine involution, with the uterus located in the pelvic cavity, was achieved by Day 34 after parturition in all 17 Bulgarian Murrah buffaloes treated with oxytocin before milking.

  8. A dasymetric data supported earthquake disaster loss quick assessment method for emergency response in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving earthquake disaster loss estimation speed and accuracy is one of key factors in effective earthquake response and rescue. The presentation of exposure data by applying a dasymetric map approach has good potential for addressing this issue. With the support of 30'' × 30'' areal exposure data (population and building data in China, this paper presents a new two-phase earthquake disaster loss estimation method for emergency response situations. This method has two phases: a pre-earthquake phase and a co-earthquake phase. In the pre-earthquake phase, we pre-calculate the earthquake loss related to different seismic intensities and store them in a 30'' × 30'' grid format, which has four stages: determining the earthquake loss calculation factor, gridding possible damage matrixes, the building damage calculation and the people loss calculation. The dasymetric map approach makes this possible. Then, in the co-earthquake phase, there are two stages of estimating loss: generating a theoretical isoseismal map to depict the spatial distribution of the seismic intensity field; then, using the seismic intensity field to extract statistics of disaster loss from pre-calculated loss estimation data to obtain the final estimation results. The method is validated by four actual earthquakes that occurred in China. The method not only significant improves the speed and accuracy of loss estimation, but gives spatial distribution for the loss, which will be effective in aiding earthquake emergency response and rescue. Additionally, related pre-calculated earthquake loss estimation data in China could serve to provide disaster risk analysis before earthquakes happen. Currently, the pre-calculated loss estimation data and the two-phase estimation method are used by the China Earthquake Administration.

  9. Risk Assessment Methodology for Water utilities (RAM-W) : the foundation for emergency response planning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danneels, Jeffrey John

    2005-03-01

    Concerns about acts of terrorism against critical infrastructures have been on the rise for several years. Critical infrastructures are those physical structures and information systems (including cyber) essential to the minimum operations of the economy and government. The President's Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCIP) probed the security of the nation's critical infrastructures. The PCCIP determined the water infrastructure is highly vulnerable to a range of potential attacks. In October 1997, the PCCIP proposed a public/private partnership between the federal government and private industry to improve the protection of the nation's critical infrastructures. In early 2000, the EPA partnered with the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and Sandia National Laboratories to create the Risk Assessment Methodology for Water Utilities (RAM-W{trademark}). Soon thereafter, they initiated an effort to create a template and minimum requirements for water utility Emergency Response Plans (ERP). All public water utilities in the US serving populations greater than 3,300 are required to undertaken both a vulnerability assessment and the development of an emergency response plan. This paper explains the initial steps of RAM-W{trademark} and then demonstrates how the security risk assessment is fundamental to the ERP. During the development of RAM-W{trademark}, Sandia performed several security risk assessments at large metropolitan water utilities. As part of the scope of that effort, ERPs at each utility were reviewed to determine how well they addressed significant vulnerabilities uncovered during the risk assessment. The ERP will contain responses to other events as well (e.g. natural disasters) but should address all major findings in the security risk assessment.

  10. Quantitative sensory testing measures individual pain responses in emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy KJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Duffy, Katharyn L Flickinger, Jeffrey T Kristan, Melissa J Repine, Alexandro Gianforcaro, Rebecca B Hasley, Saad Feroz, Jessica M Rupp, Jumana Al-Baghli, Maria L Pacella, Brian P Suffoletto, Clifton W Callaway Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Background: Refining and individualizing treatment of acute pain in the emergency department (ED is a high priority, given that painful complaints are the most common reasons for ED visits. Few tools exist to objectively measure pain perception in the ED setting. We speculated that variation in perception of fixed painful stimuli would explain individual variation in reported pain and response to treatment among ED patients. Materials and methods: In three studies, we 1 describe performance characteristics of brief quantitative sensory testing (QST in 50 healthy volunteers, 2 test effects of 10 mg oxycodone versus placebo on QST measures in 18 healthy volunteers, and 3 measure interindividual differences in nociception and treatment responses in 198 ED patients with a painful complaint during ED treatment. QST measures adapted for use in the ED included pressure sensation threshold, pressure pain threshold (PPT, pressure pain response (PPR, and cold pain tolerance (CPT tests. Results: First, all QST measures had high inter-rater reliability and test–retest reproducibility. Second, 10 mg oxycodone reduced PPR, increased PPT, and prolonged CPT. Third, baseline PPT and PPR revealed hyperalgesia in 31 (16% ED subjects relative to healthy volunteers. In 173 (88% ED subjects who completed repeat testing 30 minutes after pain treatment, PPT increased and PPR decreased (Cohen’s dz 0.10–0.19. Verbal pain scores (0–10 for the ED complaint decreased by 2.2 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.9, 2.6 (Cohen’s dz 0.97 but did not covary with the changes in PPT and PPR (r=0.05–0.13. Treatment effects were greatest in ED subjects

  11. Epidemiology of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeczko, Timothy; Green, Jeffrey P; Panacek, Edward A

    2014-05-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend sepsis screening for adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), but the epidemiology of SIRS among adult emergency department (ED) patients is poorly understood. Recent emphasis on cost-effective, outcomes-based healthcare prompts the evaluation of the performance of large-scale efforts such as sepsis screening. We studied a nationally representative sample to clarify the epidemiology of SIRS in the ED and subsequent category of illness. This was a retrospective analysis of ED visits by adults from 2007 to 2010 in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). We estimated the incidence of SIRS using initial ED vital signs and a Bayesian construct to estimate white blood cell count based on test ordering. We report estimates with Bayesian modified credible intervals (mCIs). We used 103,701 raw patient encounters in NHAMCS to estimate 372,844,465 ED visits over the 4-year period. The moderate estimate of SIRS in the ED was 17.8% (95% mCI: 9.7 to 26%). This yields a national moderate estimate of approximately 16.6 million adult ED visits with SIRS per year. Adults with and without SIRS had similar demographic characteristics, but those with SIRS were more likely to be categorized as emergent in triage (17.7% versus 9.9%, pSIRS patients. Traumatic causes of SIRS comprised 10% of presentations; other traditional categories of SIRS were rare. SIRS is very common in the ED. Infectious etiologies make up only a quarter of adult SIRS cases. SIRS may be more useful if modified by clinician judgment when used as a screening test in the rapid identification and assessment of patients with the potential for sepsis. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(3):329-336.].

  12. The dendritic cell response to classic, emerging, and homeostatic danger signals. Implications for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; Gallucci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g., heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules). Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g., nucleic acids and lupus). For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g., nanomaterials) developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review "homeostatic danger signals," danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia, and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  13. Emerging Trends in Epigenetic Regulation of Nutrient Deficiency Response in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Gunjan; Pandey, Bipin K; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Giri, Jitender

    2016-03-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli largely affect the ionic balance of soil, which have a direct effect on growth and crop yield. Details are fast emerging on the genetic/molecular regulators, at whole-genome levels, of plant responses to mineral deficiencies in model and crop plants. These genetic regulators determine the root architecture and physiological adaptations for better uptake and utilization of minerals from soil. Recent evidence also shows the potential roles of epigenetic mechanisms in gene regulation, driven by minerals imbalance. Mineral deficiency or sufficiency leads to developmental plasticity in plants for adaptation, which is preceded by a change in the pattern of gene expression. Notably, such changes at molecular levels are also influenced by altered chromatin structure and methylation patterns, or involvement of other epigenetic components. Interestingly, many of the changes induced by mineral deficiency are also inheritable in the form of epigenetic memory. Unravelling these mechanisms in response to mineral deficiency would further advance our understanding of this complex plant response. Further studies on such approaches may serve as an exciting interaction model of epigenetic and genetic regulations of mineral homeostasis in plants and designing strategies for crop improvement.

  14. Examining the benefits of learning based on an audience response system when confronting emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; García, Ana Belén Sánchez; Montesinos, María José López; Jiménez, Juan José López

    2014-05-01

    This article presents an empirical study on the effectiveness of the use of an audience response system called SIstema De Respuesta inmediata de la Audiencia on a nursing course. A total of 130 students of mixed gender, age, and computer experience and educational background on a third-year course in nursing administration and management participated in the study. The benefits of an audience response system as regards learning how to confront emergency situations were studied. The innovative aspect of the proposal is twofold: (1) the use of a smartphone to respond to the questions and (2) the analysis of the students' response time when confronting critical situations while managing nursing resources. A positive impact on the students' performance was revealed in their final assessments. Our findings show that SIstema De Respuesta inmediata de la Audiencia increases student participation and aids in identifying and correcting misconceptions. The students found SIstema De Respuesta inmediata de la Audiencia to be very motivating and wanted it to be used in additional lectures. Further research is required to study the effectiveness of SIstema De Respuesta inmediata de la Audiencia for it to be widely used in other disciplines.

  15. The Trauma Patient Tracking System: implementing a wireless monitoring infrastructure for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan; C Ng, Thomas; Li, Dustin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Kang; Bergeron, William; Martin, Ron; Budinger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In mass trauma situations, emergency personnel are challenged with the task of prioritizing the care of many injured victims. We propose a trauma patient tracking system (TPTS) where first-responders tag all patients with a wireless monitoring device that continuously reports the location of each patient. The system can be used not only to prioritize patient care, but also to determine the time taken for each patient to receive treatment. This is important in training emergency personnel and in identifying bottlenecks in the disaster response process. In situations where biochemical agents are involved, a TPTS may be employed to determine sites of cross-contamination. In order to track patient location in both outdoor and indoor environments, we employ both Global Positioning System (GPS) and Television/ Radio Frequency (TVRF) technologies. Each patient tag employs IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi)/TCP/IP networking to communicate with a central server via any available Wi-Fi basestation. A key component to increase TPTS fault-tolerance is a mobile Wi-Fi basestation that employs redundant Internet connectivity to ensure that tags at the disaster scene can send information to the central server even when local infrastructure is unavailable for use. We demonstrate the robustness of the system in tracking multiple patients in a simulated trauma situation in an urban environment.

  16. Software-Defined Ultra-wideband Radio Communications: A New RF Technology for Emergency Response Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2009-10-19

    Reliable wireless communication links for local-area (short-range) and regional (long-range) reach capabilities are crucial for emergency response to disasters. Lack of a dependable communication system can result in disruptions in the situational awareness between the local responders in the field and the emergency command and control centers. To date, all wireless communications systems such as cell phones and walkie-talkies use narrowband radio frequency (RF) signaling for data communication. However, the hostile radio propagation environment caused by collapsed structures and rubble in various disaster sites results in significant degradation and attenuation of narrowband RF signals, which ends up in frequent communication breakdowns. To address the challenges of reliable radio communication in disaster fields, we propose an approach to use ultra-wideband (UWB) or wideband RF waveforms for implementation on Software Defined Radio (SDR) platforms. Ultra-wideband communications has been proven by many research groups to be effective in addressing many of the limitations faced by conventional narrowband radio technologies. In addition, LLNL's radio and wireless team have shown significant success in field deployment of various UWB communications system for harsh environments based on LLNL's patented UWB modulation and equalization techniques. Furthermore, using software defined radio platform for UWB communications offers a great deal of flexibility in operational parameters and helps the radio system to dynamically adapt itself to its environment for optimal performance.

  17. Developing a Real-Time Emergency ResponseSystem Using iOS as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Taiwan is located in the subtropical island monsoon climate area which also in the Eurasian plate and the Philippine intersectionplace. The natural disasters occur quite frequently in Taiwan. In recent years, global warming and climate abnormal phenomenahave become seriously. Extreme weather happens frequently.The common disasters will also directly or indirectly affect other disasters. If these disasters combine together the damage willbecame serious than a single disaster. The natural disasters may also be accompanied by a power outage, etc. so that the localdisaster can't notify the information immediately. Then lead to the disaster spread, causing significant loss of social and public andthe economy, in view of this paper, in order to avoid the limitations of a variety of irresistible when emergency issue happened thatcan informed the disaster information immediately. Therefore, the development version of iOS "Environmental DisasterManagement Information System Mobile Communications Software" (Emergency Response System Application hereinafter ERSAPP), allowing users can be quick and easy notification of the disaster losses, upload photo and request support in the affectedareas. Also due to the disaster area often located tough and no network environment as well as cell phone battery performance willbe discussed among this article.

  18. Building emergency public information structures for response: Lessons learned from New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Nancy

    2017-12-01

    For an effective response, emergency public information operations should be structured to facilitate the provision of timely, accurate, accessible information to the public. A frequent challenge in building a public information structure is identifying the potential staff to allow the operation to get big enough, fast enough. A plan for managing public information operations should define roles to fulfil basic functions (responding to media enquiries, writing materials, disseminating information, media and social media monitoring, community engagement and identifying and addressing rumours). This paper will offer tips for developing a plan and concept of operations for quickly assembling and maintaining public information operations. It will also describe the public information principles implemented during recent incidents in New York City, including the 2015 visit of Pope Francis to New York City. Having a coordinated, flexible model; a trained network of public information officers who are ready to staff public information roles as needed; and a structure that embeds social media into overall public information operations, will leave public information officers and their organisations more prepared to deal with the challenges and opportunities of communicating with the public during emergencies of varying types and sizes.

  19. Ambulance response time and emergency medical dispatcher program: a study in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, C H Mohd Shaharudin; Ismail, I Mohd; Mohsin, S S J Syed

    2008-11-01

    This study provided data by a simple method of acquiring information related to ambulance response time (ART) and determined whether it met the international standards of ART. Additionally, this paper also compared the duration of ART at this hospital before and after the implementation of an Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) program. The ART, which started when details like phone number of the caller, exact location of the incident and the nature of the main complaint were received and ended when the emergency team arrived at the scene of the incident. The parameters recorded include call processing time, time taken to prepare the team and time taken to travel to the scene. The results of the study revealed that the ART for the university hospital (HUSM) was at 913.2 +/- 276.5 seconds (mean +/- SD) and it was far below the international standard of ART as a benchmark of a good ambulance service. However, the study suggested that the EMD program that was recently implemented at the HUSM gave a significantly improvement to the ART score.

  20. Evaluation of management of communication in the actions of preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello Filho, Mauro Otto de Cavalcanti; Beserra, Marcela Tatiana Fernandes, E-mail: maurootto@cefet-rj.br, E-mail: maurootto@gmail.com, E-mail: mbeserra@cefet-rj.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Celso Sucknow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wasserman, Maria Angelica Vergara, E-mail: mwasserman@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wasserman, Julio Cesar de Faria Alvim, E-mail: geowass@vm.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The use of practices involving the use of ionizing radiation in diverse areas of knowledge increases every day. This growth warning about the increased probability of accidents, radiological and nuclear emergencies, with possible consequences for the public, workers and the environment. Within this scenario, it is clear that studies and reassessments of the emergency response actions, receive proposals for continuous improvement. The achievement of the objectives of the response must be sustained by tactical, operation and logistics optimized processes. The articulation through communication between the teams involved in the response must be adaptable to each accident or emergency, respecting its size. The objectives of this study is to perform an assessment on the management of communication in the actions of Preparedness and Response to Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies. This assessment is supported by best practices of the Incident Command System (ICS) and the Institute of Project Management (Project Management Institute-PMI). For this purpose, based on models referred were established performance indicators supported by the BSC (Balanced Scorecard). These indicators allowed to evaluate more objectively the performance of the communication processes associated with each phase of the response. The study resulted in the proposed model documents aiming to assist planning of communications exercises in preparation and response actions, supported and adapted the best practices of PMI. These methodologies were evaluated by real cases selected from radiological and nuclear emergencies published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  1. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response.

  2. Going against the Grain in an Urban Arizona High School: Secondary Preservice Teachers Emerging as Culturally Responsive Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Boozer, April; Clark, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This one year study examines the journey of two preservice urban high-school teachers in Arizona as they enact Culturally Responsive Teaching in a year-long student teaching residency. Factors that influenced their Culturally Responsive Teaching practices are discussed along themes that emerged from interviews and classroom observations.…

  3. Stigmatization of patients with epilepsy: a review of the current problem and assessment of the perceived stigma in Bulgarian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteva, E

    2012-10-01

    No study of stigmatization in patients with epilepsy has thus far been conducted in Bulgaria. Our aim was to assess the perceived stigma of Bulgarian patients with refractory epilepsy (RE) and the factors associated with stigmatization. A study based on questionnaires and a purposeful interview on clinical and social factors were conducted in 94 patients with RE and 70 patients with pharmacosensitive epilepsy (PSE). Stigmatization was found in 43.62% of the participants with RE and in 5.71% of those with PSE. Stigmatization was associated with depression and mental status impairment. In conclusion, stigmatization in Bulgarian patients with RE was confirmed. Stigmatization was frequently severe, especially in cases with concomitant personality and behavioral impairment and depression. The study participants explained the existence of stigmatization as being due to fear of seizures and due to inadequate education on the special features of the disease or on administering first aid during seizures.

  4. Comparison of two approaches for calculation of the geometric and inertial characteristics of the human body of the Bulgarian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Gergana; Toshev, Yuli

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of a representative anthropological investigation of 5290 individuals (2435 males and 2855 females) of the Bulgarian population at the age of 30-40 years (Yordanov et al. [1]) we proposed a 3D biomechanical model of human body of the average Bulgarian male and female and compared two different possible approaches to calculate analytically and to evaluate numerically the corresponding geometric and inertial characteristics of all the segments of the body. In the framework of the first approach, we calculated the positions of the centres of mass of the segments of human body as well as their inertial characteristics merely by using the initial original anthropometrical data, while in the second approach we adjusted the data by using the method based on regression equations. Wherever possible, we presented a comparison of our data with those available in the literature on other Caucasians and determined in which cases the use of which approach is more reliable.

  5. Geographic Discordance Between Patient Residence and Incident Location in Emergency Medical Services Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Renee Y; Dai, Mengtao; Wei, Ran; Sabbagh, Sarah; Mann, N Clay

    2017-01-01

    The location of a patient's residence is often used for emergency medical services (EMS) system planning. Our objective is to evaluate the association between patient residence and emergency incident zip codes for 911 calls. We used data from the 2013 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public-Release Research Dataset. We studied all 911 calls with a valid complaint by dispatch, identifying zip codes for both the residence and incident locations (n=12,376,784). The primary outcomes were geographic and distance discordances between patient residence and incident zip codes. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to determine geographic discordance between residence and incident zip codes by dispatch complaint, age, and sex. We also measured distances between locations with geospatial processing. The overall proportion of geographic discordance for all 911 calls was 27.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 27.7% to 27.8%) and the median distance discordance was 11.5 miles (95% CI 11.5 to 11.5 miles). Lower geographic discordance rates were found among patients aged 65 to 79 years (20.2%; 95% CI 20.1% to 20.2%) and 80 years and older (14.5%; 95% CI 14.5% to 14.6%). Motor vehicle crashes (63.5%; 95% CI 63.5% to 63.6%), industrial accidents (59.3%; 95% CI 58.0% to 60.6%), and mass casualty incidents (50.6%; 95% CI 49.6% to 51.5%) were more likely to occur outside a patient's residence zip code. Median network distance between home and incident zip centroid codes ranged from 8.6 to 23.5 miles. In NEMSIS, there was geographic discordance between patient residence zip code and call location zip code in slightly more than one quarter of EMS responses records. The geographic discordance rates between residence and incident zip codes were associated with dispatch complaints and age. Although a patient's residence might be a valid proxy for incident location for elderly patients, this relationship holds less true for other age groups and among

  6. First attempt to understand the effect of pingers on static fishing gear in Bulgarian Black Sea coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORNITSA ZAHARIEVA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic deterrent devices (pingers were used on static fishing gear called dalyans in an attempt to reduce bycatch of small cetaceans and/or to reduce depredation in the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Between April and July 2015 dalyans were equipped with harbour porpoise pingers in the northern part of the coast. Observations were carried out on regular bases on active (with pingers and on control dalyans (without pingers. The preliminary results were positive in reducing damages on fishing gear.

  7. A Sigmoid Functional Response Emerges When Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Start Killing Fresh Target Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2017-03-28

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing involves the formation of a synapse with a target cell, followed by delivery of perforin and granzymes. Previously, we derived a general functional response for CTL killing while considering that CTLs form stable synapses (i.e., single-stage) and that the number of conjugates remains at steady state. However, the killing of target cells sometimes requires multiple engagements (i.e., multistage). To study how multistage killing and a lack of steady state influence the functional response, we here analyze a set of differential equations as well as simulations employing the cellular Potts model, in both cases describing CTLs that kill target cells. We find that at steady state the total killing rate (i.e., the number of target cells killed by all CTLs) is well described by the previously derived double saturation function. Compared to single-stage killing, the total killing rate during multistage killing saturates at higher CTL and target cell densities. Importantly, when the killing is measured before the steady state is approached, a qualitatively different functional response emerges for two reasons: First, the killing signal of each CTL gets diluted over several targets and because this dilution effect is strongest at high target cell densities; this can result in a peak in the dependence of the total killing rate on the target cell density. Second, the total killing rate exhibits a sigmoid dependence on the CTL density when killing is a multistage process, because it takes typically more than one CTL to kill a target. In conclusion, a sigmoid dependence of the killing rate on the CTLs during initial phases of killing may be indicative of a multistage killing process. Observation of a sigmoid functional response may thus arise from a dilution effect and is not necessarily due to cooperative behavior of the CTLs. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era--a Conference at Harvard Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, David M; Whelan, Sean P

    2015-08-01

    Harvard Medical School convened a meeting of biomedical and clinical experts on 5 March 2015 on the topic of "Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era," with the goals of discussing the lessons from the recent Ebola outbreak and using those lessons as a case study to aid preparations for future emerging infections. The speakers and audience discussed the special challenges in combatting an infectious agent that causes sporadic outbreaks in resource-poor countries. The meeting led to a call for improved basic medical care for all and continued support of basic discovery research to provide the foundation for preparedness for future outbreaks in addition to the targeted emergency response to outbreaks and targeted research programs against Ebola virus and other specific emerging pathogens.

  9. Evidence-based communications strategies: NWPERLC response to training on effectively reaching limited English-speaking (LEP) populations in emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼAmbrosio, Luann; Huang, Claire E; Sheng Kwan-Gett, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and overcoming barriers to effective emergency preparedness and response is one of the objectives for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's network of 14 Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) and 9 Preparedness and Response Research Centers (PERRCs). This report describes how a PERLC and a PERRC colocated at the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice responded to Los Angeles County Department of Public Health's (DPH's) request to improve emergency communications with limited English-proficient (LEP) populations. Activities included an assessment of training needs of the DPH preparedness workforce, a training series on social media and community engagement, and a toolkit of evidence-based findings to improve LEP populations' emergency communications and community resilience. Most respondents to the training needs assessment considered themselves essential personnel during an emergency and stated that they have received proper training. Respondents would like to receive further emergency preparedness training, including additional clarity on their role during an emergency. The majority of participants rated the training series as excellent/very good and agreed that they will be able to apply the course content to their work. The percentage of participants who reported confidence in their knowledge and skills related to each course learning objective increased from the precourse survey to the postcourse survey. This article discusses how the colocation of PERRC and PERLC offers efficiencies and expertise to accomplish multicomponent evidence-based requests. The ability to translate research findings quickly into evidence-based training and best practice resources is a strategic benefit to public health practice agencies working on emergency preparedness. LA County DPH was able to use knowledge and lessons learned gained from this work to design and prioritize education and training offerings to improve the capacity

  10. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Peter Donald [Idaho National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  11. Joint research and development and exchange of technology on toxic material emergency response between LLNL and ENEA. 1985 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Caracciolo, R.

    1986-01-31

    For the past six years, the US Department of Energy, LLNL, and the ENEA, Rome, Italy, have participated in cooperative studies for improving a systems approach to an emergency response following nuclear accidents. Technology exchange between LLNL and the ENEA was initially confined to the development, application, and evaluation of atmospheric transport and diffusion models. With the emergence of compatible hardware configurations between LLNL and ENEA, exchanges of technology and ideas for improving the development and implementation of systems are beginning to emerge. This report describes cooperative work that has occurred during the past three years, the present state of each system, and recommendations for future exchanges of technology.

  12. Development and evaluation of a leadership training program for public health emergency response: results from a Chinese study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yihua

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the 9/11 attack and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, the development of qualified and able public health leaders has become a new urgency in building the infrastructure needed to address public health emergencies. Although previous studies have reported that the training of individual leaders is an important approach, the systemic and scientific training model need further improvement and development. The purpose of this study was to develop, deliver, and evaluate a participatory leadership training program for emergency response. Methods Forty-one public health leaders (N = 41 from five provinces completed the entire emergency preparedness training program in China. The program was evaluated by anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews held prior to training, immediately post-training and 12-month after training (Follow-up. Results The emergency preparedness training resulted in positive shifts in knowledge, self-assessment of skills for public health leaders. More than ninety-five percent of participants reported that the training model was scientific and feasible. Moreover, the response of participants in the program to the avian influenza outbreak, as well as the planned evaluations for this leadership training program, further demonstrated both the successful approaches and methods and the positive impact of this integrated leadership training initiative. Conclusion The emergency preparedness training program met its aims and objectives satisfactorily, and improved the emergency capability of public health leaders. This suggests that the leadership training model was effective and feasible in improving the emergency preparedness capability.

  13. The Dendritic Cell Response to Classic, Emerging, and Homeostatic Danger Signals. Implications for Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Matthew Gallo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g. heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules. Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g. nucleic acids and lupus. For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g. nanomaterials developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review homeostatic danger signals, danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  14. Filling the gap between disaster preparedness and response networks of urban emergency management: Following the 2013 Seoul Floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsun; Jung, Kyujin

    2015-01-01

    To examine the gap between disaster preparedness and response networks following the 2013 Seoul Floods in which the rapid transmission of disaster information and resources was impeded by severe changes of interorganizational collaboration networks. This research uses the 2013 Seoul Emergency Management Survey data that were collected before and after the floods, and total 94 organizations involving in coping with the floods were analyzed in bootstrap independent-sample t-test and social network analysis through UCINET 6 and STATA 12. The findings show that despite the primary network form that is more hierarchical, horizontal collaboration has been relatively invigorated in actual response. Also, interorganizational collaboration networks for response operations seem to be more flexible grounded on improvisation to coping with unexpected victims and damages. Local organizations under urban emergency management are recommended to tightly build a strong commitment for joint response operations through full-size exercises at the metropolitan level before a catastrophic event. Also, interorganizational emergency management networks need to be restructured by reflecting the actual response networks to reduce collaboration risk during a disaster. This research presents a critical insight into inverse thinking of the view designing urban emergency management networks and provides original evidences for filling the gap between previously coordinated networks for disaster preparedness and practical response operations after a disaster.

  15. Emergency response teams training in public health crisis: The seriousness of serious games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Vojislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The rapid development of multimedia technologies in the last twenty years has lead to the emergence of new ways of learning academic and professional skills, which implies the application of multimedia technology in the form of a software -“serious computer games”. Three-Dimensional Virtual Worlds. The basis of this game-platform is made of the platform of three-dimensional virtual worlds that can be described as communication systems in which participants share the same three-dimensional virtual space within which they can move, manipulate objects and communicate through their graphical representativesavatars. Medical Education and Training. Arguments in favor of these computer tools in the learning process are accessibility, repeatability, low cost, the use of attractive graphics and a high degree of adaptation to the user. Specifically designed avatars allow students to get adapted to their roles in certain situations, especially to those which are considered rare, dangerous or unethical in real life. Discussion. Drilling of major incidents, which includes the need to create environments for training, cannot be done in the real world due to high costs and necessity to utilize the extensive resources. In addition, it is impossible to engage all the necessary health personnel at the same time. New technologies intended for conducting training, which are also called “virtual worlds”, make the following possible: training at all times depending on user’s commitments; simultaneous simulations on multiple levels, in several areas, in different circumstances, including dozens of unique victims; repeated scenarios and learning from mistakes; rapid feedback and the development of non-technical skills which are critical for reducing errors in dynamic, high-risk environments. Conclusion. Virtual worlds, which should be the subject of further research and improvements, in the field of hospital emergency response training for mass

  16. BlueSky Cloud - rapid infrastructure capacity using Amazon's Cloud for wildfire emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haderman, M.; Larkin, N. K.; Beach, M.; Cavallaro, A. M.; Stilley, J. C.; DeWinter, J. L.; Craig, K. J.; Raffuse, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    During peak fire season in the United States, many large wildfires often burn simultaneously across the country. Smoke from these fires can produce air quality emergencies. It is vital that incident commanders, air quality agencies, and public health officials have smoke impact information at their fingertips for evaluating where fires and smoke are and where the smoke will go next. To address the need for this kind of information, the U.S. Forest Service AirFire Team created the BlueSky Framework, a modeling system that predicts concentrations of particle pollution from wildfires. During emergency response, decision makers use BlueSky predictions to make public outreach and evacuation decisions. The models used in BlueSky predictions are computationally intensive, and the peak fire season requires significantly more computer resources than off-peak times. Purchasing enough hardware to run the number of BlueSky Framework runs that are needed during fire season is expensive and leaves idle servers running the majority of the year. The AirFire Team and STI developed BlueSky Cloud to take advantage of Amazon's virtual servers hosted in the cloud. With BlueSky Cloud, as demand increases and decreases, servers can be easily spun up and spun down at a minimal cost. Moving standard BlueSky Framework runs into the Amazon Cloud made it possible for the AirFire Team to rapidly increase the number of BlueSky Framework instances that could be run simultaneously without the costs associated with purchasing and managing servers. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the features of BlueSky Cloud, describe how the system uses Amazon Cloud, and discuss the costs and benefits of moving from privately hosted servers to a cloud-based infrastructure.

  17. Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Communications with Health Care Providers: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchin Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care providers (HCPs play an important role in public health emergency preparedness and response (PHEPR so need to be aware of public health threats and emergencies. To inform HCPs, public health issues PHEPR messages that provide guidelines and updates, and facilitate surveillance so HCPs will recognize and control communicable diseases, prevent excess deaths and mitigate suffering. Public health agencies need to know that the PHEPR messages sent to HCPs reach their target audience and are effective and informative. Public health agencies need to know that the PHEPR messages sent to HCPs reach their target audience and are effective and informative. We conducted a literature review to investigate the systems and tools used by public health to generate PHEPR communications to HCPs, and to identify specific characteristics of message delivery mechanisms and formats that may be associated with effective PHEPR communications. Methods A systematic review of peer- and non-peer-reviewed literature focused on the following questions: 1 What public health systems exist for communicating PHEPR messages from public health agencies to HCPs? 2 Have these systems been evaluated and, if yes, what criteria were used to evaluate these systems? 3 What have these evaluations discovered about characterizations of the most effective ways for public health agencies to communicate PHEPR messages to HCPs? Results We identified 25 systems or tools for communicating PHEPR messages from public health agencies to HCPs. Few articles assessed PHEPR communication systems or messaging methods or outcomes. Only one study compared the effectiveness of the delivery format, device or message itself. We also discovered that the potential is high for HCPs to experience "message overload" given redundancy of PHEPR messaging in multiple formats and/or through different delivery systems. Conclusions We found that detailed descriptions of PHEPR messaging from

  18. ACTN3 and AMPD1 Polymorphism and Genotype Combinations in Bulgarian Athletes Performing Wingate Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Atanasov[1; Trayana Djarova[2; Michael Kalinski[3; Lubomir Petrov[4; Radka Kaneva[5; Sam Mugandani[6; Gregori Watson[7; Monem Jemni[8

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ACTN3 (ct-actinin-3) and AMPD1 (adenosine monophosphate deaminase) polymorphism and genotype combinations in Bulgarian athletes competing in various sports and the relation to peak power output. A mixed group of athletes (n = 52) competing at national and international level and a matching genetic control group (n = 109) of volunteers were recruited. Participants were genotyped for ACTN3 and AMPD1 by polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in ACTN3 genotype distribution between athletes performing Wingate test (38% RR, 46% RX, 16% XX) and controls (41.2% RR, 46% RX, 12.8% XX). AMPD1 distribution was (73% CC, 27% CT, 0% TT) and in controls (73.2% CC, 25% CT, 1.8% TT). Athletes performing Wingate test showed equal 33% frequency of RR/CC and RX/CC combination, and 12% RX/CT. Significantly higher (P 〈 0.05) peak power output (11.10 W kg1) was found in athletes with RX/CT combination compared to other combinations (range: 8.83-9.71 W kg-1) and in R-power (RR + RX) and C-power (CC + CT) dominant models (9.91 W kgl). Mean power was higher (P 〈 0.05) in RX/CT combination (8.93 W kg-1) compared to RR/CC (7.75 W kg-1) and RR/CT (7.95 W kgl). In conclusion, the low frequency of T AMPD1 allele in Bulgarian athletes might indicate that this mutant allele is related to the physical performance. The prevalence of R ACTN3 and C AMPD1 alleles suggests that they could contribute to anaerobic performance. Higher peak power in Wingate test is associated with RX/CT genotype combination and R- and C-power dominant models.

  19. ON THE ETYMOLOGY OF 20 WORDS. ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS TO «BULGARIAN ETYMOLOGICAL DICTIONARY»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Selimski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the origin, word formation patterns and primeval semantics of 20 Bulgarian  words in their alphabetical order. All these words have already been studied in «Bulgarian etymological dictionary». However, 6 of them were left as obscure (3. пекя / pekia ‘very good’; 4. пелдиса / peldissa  ‘pacify’;  12. рокмàк  / rokmak ‘rope (?’, 15. Соанàк / soanak ‘little time’; 18. сънда / synda ‘sit’; 20. сюмьòсан  / siumiosan  ‘maimed’,  and the other 7 have received explanations which  are not acceptable (2. митище / mitishte  ‘straw, chaff (?’; 6. плакна  / plakna ‘rinse’; 7. платник  / platnik ‘sickly’;  10. потирек / potirek  ‘belt’; 13. сетка / setka ‘net’; 14. сий / sii ‘this’; 17. сънàк / synak ‘moment’. The remaining 7 words are under consideration because they need certain additional explanations relating to their phonetic peculiarities (19. синор  /  sinor, сънър /  synyr ‘baulk, headland’, or concerning some word-formation and/or semantic particularities  (1. костàнски /  kostanski  ‘adjective from name of vil. Костанденец / Kostandenets’; 11. разтварям /  raztvariam ‘dissolve’;  16. суичмез  /  suich mez  ‘drunkard’. Some  of the discussed  words  can  be considered as calques from other languages: Russian  (5. изписвам /  izpisvam ‘discharge’, Croatian (9. покора/pokora ‘penance’ and Turkish (8. плява / pliava ‘galaxy’.

  20. Inventory of coastal protected areas and historical heritage sites (North Bulgarian coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Stancheva, Margarita; Stanchev, Hristo; Krastev, Anton; Peev, Preslav

    2015-04-01

    Coastal protected areas and historical heritage sites in Bulgaria are established by national policy instruments/laws and EU Directives to protect a wide range of natural and cultural resources along the coast. Within the framework of HERAS Project (Submarine Archaeological Heritage of the Western Black Sea Shelf), financed by European Union under the CBC Program Romania-Bulgaria, we made an inventory and identification of protected areas, nature reserves, monuments, parks and onshore historical sites along the North Bulgarian coast (NUTS III level). The adjacent coastline is 96 km long between cape Sivriburun to the border of Romania on the north and cape Ekrene on the south. Coastal zone here is mostly undeveloped and low urbanized compared to other coastal regions in Bulgaria. It comprises of large sand beaches, vast sand dunes, up to 70 m spectacular high limestone cliffs, coastal fresh-water lakes, wetlands etc. This coastal section includes also one of the most important wetlands and it is migration corridor for many protected birds in Bulgaria, that host one of the rarest ecosystem types with national and international conservational value. Added to ecosystem values, the region is also an archeologically important area, where numerous underwater and coastal archaeological sites from different periods have been discovered - Prehistory, Antiquity (ancient Greek, Hellenistic, Roman), Mediaeval (Early Byzantium, Bulgarian). Research was made within 2100 m zone from the coastline (in accordance with zones defined by the Black Sea Coastal Development Act) for territories with protected status in the framework of many national laws and EU Directives. The total area of this strip zone is 182, 6 km2 and around 67% is under protection. There are 11 unique NATURA 2000 protected areas (6 Special Protection Areas (SPAs) and 5 Sites of Communities Importance (SCI), 2 nature reserves and 1 Nature Park. Some of them are also onshore historical sites. In Bulgaria such sites

  1. A Multi-Element Approach to Location Inference of Twitter: A Case for Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Laylavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Twitter has played a major role in real-world events—especially in the aftermath of disasters and catastrophic incidents, and has been increasingly becoming the first point of contact for users wishing to provide or seek information about such situations. The use of Twitter in emergency response and disaster management opens up avenues of research concerning different aspects of Twitter data quality, usefulness and credibility. A real challenge that has attracted substantial attention in the Twitter research community exists in the location inference of twitter data. Considering that less than 2% of tweets are geotagged, finding location inference methods that can go beyond the geotagging capability is undoubtedly the priority research area. This is especially true in terms of emergency response, where spatial aspects of information play an important role. This paper introduces a multi-elemental location inference method that puts the geotagging aside and tries to predict the location of tweets by exploiting the other inherently attached data elements. In this regard, textual content, users’ profile location and place labelling, as the main location-related elements, are taken into account. Location-name classes in three granularity levels are defined and employed to look up the location references from the location-associated elements. The inferred location of the finest granular level is assigned to a tweet, based on a novel location assignment rule. The location assigned by the location inference process is considered to be the inferred location of a tweet, and is compared with the geotagged coordinates as the ground truth of the study. The results show that this method is able to successfully infer the location of 87% of the tweets at the average distance error of 12.2 km and the median distance error of 4.5 km, which is a significant improvement compared with that of the current methods that can predict the location

  2. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff

  3. Three-Dimensional Modeling and Indoor Positioning for Urban Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional modeling of building environments and indoor positioning is essential for emergency response in cities. Traditional ground-based measurement methods, such as geodetic astronomy, total stations, and global positioning system (GPS receivers, cannot meet the demand for high precision positioning and it is therefore essential to conduct multiple-angle data-acquisition and establish three-dimensional spatial models. In this paper, a rapid modeling technology is introduced, which includes multiple-angle remote sensing image acquisition based on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, an algorithm to remove linear and planar foregrounds before reconstructing the backgrounds, and a three-dimensional modeling (3DM framework. Additionally, an indoor 3DM technology is introduced based on building design drawings, and an indoor positioning technology is developed using iBeacon technology. Finally, a prototype system of the indoor and outdoor positioning-service system in an urban firefighting rescue scenario is introduced to demonstrate the value of the method proposed in this paper.

  4. Telehealth tools for public health, emergency, or disaster preparedness and response: a summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Edison, Karen; Flournoy, Larry; Korte, Brenda; Magruder, Charles; Miller, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances in telehealth development and adoption are increasing the spectrum of information and communication technologies that can be applied not only to individual patient care but more broadly to population health as well. Participants in this breakout session were asked to address, from their diverse perspectives, a series of questions relating to the current and potential uses of telehealth applications and networks for public health and emergency/disaster preparedness and response systems. Participants identified several gaps in current understanding and research emphasis. There is a clear need for more and larger outcome studies to assess the impact and cost benefit of telehealth applications in terms of improving public health at the population and community levels. In addition, more research is needed to demonstrate the ability of telehealth tools and technologies to facilitate and extend the reach of major national clinical and public health research initiatives. Perhaps most importantly, the National Institutes of Health should develop and/or strengthen strategic partnerships with other funding agencies with overlapping or complementary interests to accelerate interdisciplinary research in this rapidly evolving but relatively understudied and complex field.

  5. Linear variable filter optimization for emergency response chemical detection and discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Sylvia S.; Lewis, Paul E.

    2010-08-01

    Linear variable filter design and fabrication for LWIR is now commercially available for use in the development of remote sensing systems. The linear variable filter is attached directly to the cold shield of the focal plane array. The resulting compact spectrometer assemblies are completely contained in the Dewar system. This approach eliminates many of the wavelength calibration problems associated with current prism and grating systems and also facilitates the cost effective design and fabrication of aerial sensing systems for specific applications. This paper describes a study that was conducted with the following three objectives: 1) Determine if a multi-channel linear-variable-filter-based line scanner system can be used to discriminate a set of chemical vapors that represent a high probability of occurrence during a typical emergency response chemical incident; 2) Determine which multi-channel linear variable filter design is optimal; and 3) Determine the acceptable instrument noise equivalent spectral radiance for this application. A companion paper describes a separate study that was conducted to determine the concentration levels at which detection and discrimination can be achieved for the various chemicals based on the optimal filter design under various degrees of imperfect atmospheric correction.

  6. Doing the right thing: relief agencies, moral dilemmas and responsibility in political emergencies and war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, H

    1997-09-01

    In recent years a new generation of relief workers and relief agencies has become embroiled in the heat of civil wars and political emergencies, and the humanitarian community has had to revisit its fundamental principles and address the ethics of what it does. This paper sets out to continue this important debate by emphasising that ethical analysis should always be an essential part of humanitarian practice. The paper seeks to recognise the difficult moral choices relief agencies are facing today and gives some practical guidelines to relief agency staff when confronting the ethics of a given situation. In particular, it hopes to introduce some ethical principles into the debate about humanitarianism and contribute to the moral vocabulary which is being developed to improve relief agencies' ethical analysis. The paper starts by looking at the essential characteristics of a moral dilemma, and the way in which other types of tough choice can masquerade as moral dilemmas. It then introduces some basic moral principles surrounding the key ethical notions of action consequences and moral responsibility in an effort to show how relief agencies might begin to develop a process of ethical analysis in their work. Finally, it explores how relief agencies might develop a more intuitive form of ethical analysis based on an organisational conscience and moral role models.

  7. Considering the use of a personal emergency response system: an experience of frail, older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Eileen J; Ganong, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    The individual considerations of frail women who are elderly as to the use of personal emergency response systems (PERS) are discussed within this article, and they derived from a larger longitudinal study that explores the home care experience of older widows. Participants were 11 frail women (aged 81-94) who perceived a risk of "falling and not being found" and did not have a PERS. A descriptive phenomenological method was used to analyze PERS-related data obtained during interviews with each woman in her home. With regard to considering the use of a PERS, experiences were structured variously by "getting by fine without it," "waiting to get it until I really need it," "convincing myself that I might get it later," and "borrowing no more trouble than I already have." Consistent interventions by home care professionals may perhaps be needed to increase PERS utilization rates. To develop effective interventions, further descriptive research is deemed necessary to explore drawbacks and barriers to PERS use by older frail women.

  8. Socio-Environmental Issues of Marginal Territories within the Romanian-Bulgarian Cross-Border Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGIANA TOTH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The territorial system overlapping cross-border areas shapes a particularly dynamic and complex functional area. This paper synthesises several research outcomes regarding the social and environmental dysfunctions and opportunities defining the marginal territories that were emphasised during the ‘Analysis and diagnosis of the current situation in the cross-border area’, a phase of the project ‘Common Strategy of Sustainable Territorial Development of the Romanian-Bulgarian Cross-Border Area’ (SPATIAL. The main indicators concerning the population structure and movement highlight a series of problematic aspects within the cross-border area: population decline, significant rural population concentration on the Romanian side, demographic ageing, increase in the age dependency ratio, and a negative natural growth and migration rate. The analysis also indicates areas of socio-demographic potential that are marked by population growth, a significant young population presence that is convergent with an important share of active population. In this perspective, the spatial analysis also focused on identifying natural drivers affecting development and restrictive factors, on the environmental quality evaluation, as well as on establishing areas exposed to natural and technological risks. Therefore, delineating and analysing components underlying social and environmental processes were intended to determine those issues and opportunities considered to influence the evolution of this potentially functional area.

  9. Dynamics of macrozoobenthos in the Southern Bulgarian Black Sea coastal and open-sea areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STOYKOV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of analysis of 96 macrozoobenthic samples, collected on a seasonal basis in Bourgas Bay and in open-sea areas offshore Cape Emine (Bulgarian Black Sea in 1996 and 1998. In total 96 taxa were established, distributed in four groups: Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea and “Diversa”. The average density of populations was 1756 ind.m-2 with a predominating abundance of Polychaeta species. The average biomass estimated was 183.02 g.m-2, formed mainly by representatives of Mollusca. The latter species were measured together with the shells, which appraised their individual weights. Seven of the species found had a coefficient of constancy more than 50%. These were the most adapted species to the environmental conditions of the investigated areas. The quantitative and qualitative assessments in this study demonstrate an increasing tendency in the parameters obtained (density, biomass, species diversity in comparison with previous investigations in the early 1990-s, when intensive anthropogenic influence was widely perceived to misbalance the Black Sea ecosystem.The method of Warwick (1986 applied to characterize the water quality of the studied areas allowed us to define them as rather clean or moderately polluted aquatories.

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy – Changes of Basic Laboratory Parameters in Hiv-Infected Bulgarian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanova Yancheva Nina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection keeps on being a global problem because of its pandemic character and the impossibility for eradication. The combined antiretroviral therapy (АRТ remains the only treatment which has proven its effectiveness for maintaining the life of HIV positive patients. Because of long term (life time duration of this therapy, it is necessary to monitor patients for possible drug toxicity. The aim of our research is to evaluate the changes of basic laboratory examinations while conducting a long-term АRТ. We analyzed basic laboratory studies of 145 HIV-infected Bulgarian patients in the current research. The patients were separated into four groups according to their treatment regimen. They were on dispensary monitoring and were being treated in the Department for Patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency in the Specialized Hospital for Active Treatment of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases “Prof. Ivan Kirov” - Sofia. Our results showed that combined ART led to changes in blood count, alanin-aminotransferase (ALT, glucose and total cholesterol. Some of these changes are significant for some of the drugs administered. The current ART does not lead to severe toxicity and life-threatening conditions such as those which were observed in the first few years of ART introduction.

  11. Status of wild birds in Bulgarian zoos with regard to orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus type 1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M; Manvell, Ruth J; Goujgoulova, Gabriela V

    2010-03-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV) are pathogens of major economic and social importance, and the diseases they cause are often devastating, particularly in domestic poultry. Both viruses are naturally found in a wide variety of wild birds, particularly aquatic species, where asymptomatic infection typically occurs. Wild birds are therefore considered to be a natural reservoir for both viruses. Wild birds kept in captivity are in an environment that promotes transmission of infection with both influenza and Newcastle disease viruses. This report describes a survey for the detection of antibodies against Newcastle disease and avian influenza A viruses using the hemagglutination inhibition test in samples from 88 wild birds from 38 species in four Bulgarian zoos. Samples with positive results against NDV were also tested against avian paramyxovirus type 3 (APMV-3). Real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR was also performed to detect viral RNA of NDV and AIV among 127 wild birds from 57 species from the same zoos. In 13 samples from seven avian species (ten birds from the family Phasianidae, two from the family Numidae, and one from the family Columbidae), antibodies against APMV-1 were detected. Seven birds, whose sera were APMV-1 positive, had been vaccinated. The other six birds (five Phasianidae representatives and one of the Columbidae family) had no immunization history. No antibodies against both H5 and H7 AIV and against APMV-3 were detected, and no RNA of NDV and AIV were detected.

  12. Geomagnetic Field Variations as Determined from Bulgarian Archaeomagnetic Data. Part II: The Last 8000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, Mary; Jordanova, Neli; Karloukovski, Vassil

    The knowledge about past secular variations of the geomagnetic field is achieved on the basis of archaeomagnetic researches of which the Bulgarian studies form an extended data set. In Part I (Kovacheva and Toshkov, 1994), the methodology used in the Sofia palaeomagnetic laboratory was described and the secular variation curves for the last 2000 years were shown. In Part II (this paper), the basic characteristics of the prehistoric materials used in the archaeomagnetic studies are emphasised, particularly in the context of the rock magnetic studies used in connection with palaeointensity determinations. The results of magnetic anisotropy studies of the prehistoric ovens and other fired structures are summarised, including the anisotropy correction of the palaeointensity results for prehistoric materials, different from bricks and pottery. Curves of the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field during the last 8000 years in Bulgaria are given. The available directional and intensity values have been used to calculate the variation curve of the virtual dipole moment (VDM) for the last 8000 years based on different time interval averages. The path of virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions is discussed.

  13. SEGMENTATION OF MICROSCOPIC IMAGES OF BACTERIA IN BULGARIAN YOGHURT BY TEMPLATE MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatin Zlatev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of deviations in quality of yogurt is performed by approved methods set out in the Bulgarian national standard (BNS and its adjacent regulations. The basic method of evaluation of the microbiological quality of the product is the microscopic. The method is subjective and requires significant processing time of the samples. The precision of diagnosis is not high and depends on the qualifications of the expert. The systems for pattern recognition in the most natural way interpret this specific expert activity. The aim of this report is to assess the possibility of application of a method of processing and image analysis for determination of the microbiological quality of yogurt. Selected method is template matching. A comparative analysis is made of the methods for template matching. The comparative analysis of available algorithms showed that the known ones have certain disadvantages associated with their rapid-action, the use of simplified procedures, they are sensitive to rotation of the object in the template. It is developed algorithm that complement these known and overcome some of their disadvantages.

  14. Dynamics of macrozoobenthos in the Southern Bulgarian Black Sea coastal and open-sea areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STOYKOV

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of analysis of 96 macrozoobenthic samples, collected on a seasonal basis in Bourgas Bay and in open-sea areas offshore Cape Emine (Bulgarian Black Sea in 1996 and 1998. In total 96 taxa were established, distributed in four groups: Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea and “Diversa”. The average density of populations was 1756 ind.m-2 with a predominating abundance of Polychaeta species. The average biomass estimated was 183.02 g.m-2, formed mainly by representatives of Mollusca. The latter species were measured together with the shells, which appraised their individual weights. Seven of the species found had a coefficient of constancy more than 50%. These were the most adapted species to the environmental conditions of the investigated areas. The quantitative and qualitative assessments in this study demonstrate an increasing tendency in the parameters obtained (density, biomass, species diversity in comparison with previous investigations in the early 1990-s, when intensive anthropogenic influence was widely perceived to misbalance the Black Sea ecosystem. The method of Warwick (1986 applied to characterize the water quality of the studied areas allowed us to define them as rather clean or moderately polluted aquatories.

  15. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Bulgarian Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and/or Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoaneta Gateva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disturbances in women of reproductive age. Besides its well-known effects on reproductive health, it is also linked to increased cardiovascular risk in later life. The aim of this study is to investigate some classical cardiovascular risk factors in a crossectional study of Bulgarian women with PCOS and/or obesity. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of 375 women from an university endocrine clinic. We found significant differences in the indices of carbohydrate metabolism, blood pressure, lipid profile, rate of liver steatosis, and the levels liver enzymes and hematological results between the lean and obese PCOS women. Obese women without PCOS did not show significantly different results in their OGGT form obese PCOS women. Waist-to-stature-ratio (WSR correlated better with the baseline IRI levels and lipid profile than waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR that makes it a better marker for unfavorable metabolic profile.

  16. Room temperature zeolitization of boiler slag from a Bulgarian thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascova Radost D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and cost-effective method was applied for the synthesis of zeolite composites utilising wet bottom boiler slag from the Bulgarian coal-fired thermal power plant “Sviloza”, near the town of Svishtov. The method consisted of a prolonged alkali treatment at room temperature of this waste. Experimental techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses, are employed to characterize the initial slag and the final products with respect to their morphology, and elemental and mineral compositions. The composites synthesized in this way contained two Na-type zeolite phases: zeolite X (type FAU and zeolite Linde F (type EDI. The zeolited products and the starting slag were tested as adsorbents for a textile dye (Malachite Green from aqueous solutions. In comparison with the initial slag, the zeolite composite possessed substantially better adsorption properties: it almost completely adsorbs the dye in much shorter times. The results of this investigations revealed a new, easy and low cost route for recycling boiler slag into a material with good adsorption characteristics, which could find different applications, e.g., for purifying polluted waters, including those from the textile industry.

  17. A survey of hospitals to determine the prevalence and characteristics of healthcare coalitions for emergency preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Waldhorn, Richard E; Selck, Frederick; Mehta, Ambereen Kurwa; Franco, Crystal; Toner, Eric S

    2012-09-01

    Previous reports have identified the development of healthcare coalitions as the foundation for disaster response across the United States. This survey of acute care hospitals characterizes the current status of participation by US hospitals in healthcare coalitions for emergency preparedness planning and response. The survey results show the nearly universal nature of a coalition approach to disaster response. The results suggest a need for wide stakeholder involvement but also for flexibility in structure and organization. Based on the survey results, the authors make recommendations to guide the further development of healthcare coalitions and to improve local and national response to disasters.

  18. Development and application of a random walk model of atmospheric diffusion in the emergency response of nuclear accidents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Bing; LI Hong; FANG Dong

    2007-01-01

    Plume concentration prediction is one of the main contents of radioactive consequence assessment for early emergency response to nuclear accidents. Random characteristics of atmospheric diffusion itself was described, a random walk model of atmospheric diffusion (Random Walk) was introduced and compared with the Lagrangian puff model (RIMPUFF) in the nuclear emergency decision support system (RODOS) developed by the European Community for verification. The results show the concentrations calculated by the two models are quite close except that the plume area calculated by Random Walk is a little smaller than that by RIMPUFF. The random walk model for atmospheric diffusion can simulate the atmospheric diffusion in case of nuclear accidents, and provide more actual information for early emergency and consequence assessment as one of the atmospheric diffusion module of the nuclear emergency decision support system.

  19. On constant alert: lessons to be learned from Israel's emergency response to mass-casualty terrorism incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adini, Bruria; Peleg, Kobi

    2013-12-01

    In its short modern history, Israel has had to contend with numerous mass-casualty incidents caused by terrorism. As a result, it has developed practical national preparedness policies for responding to such events. Israel's Supreme Health Authority, a committee of the Ministry of Health, coordinates emergency management nationwide. All emergency personnel, health care providers, and medical facilities operate under national policies designed to ensure a swift and coordinated response to any incident, based on an "all hazards" approach that emphasizes core elements commonly encountered in mass-casualty incidents. Israel's emergency management system includes contingency planning, command and control, centrally coordinated response, cooperation, and capacity building. Although every nation is unique, many of the lessons that Israel has learned may be broadly applicable to preparation for mass-casualty incidents in the United States and other countries.

  20. The impact of a pre-hospital medical response unit on patient care and emergency department attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deasy, C

    2012-02-03

    A rapid response team was instigated in Cork to improve prehospital care and reduce unnecessary Emergency Department (ED) visits. This consisted of a Specialist Registrar (SpR) in Emergency Medicine and a Paramedic who attended all "999" calls in a designated rapid response vehicle on the allotted study days. Two hundred and sixty-three patients were seen on designated days between Jan 2004 and March 2006. Presentations seen included; road traffic accident (23%) collapse (12%), fall (10%) and seizure (8%). The majority of calls were to houses (36%). The most common medical intervention was intravenous cannulation (25%). Intravenous medications were administered in 21% of these patients--morphine sulphate was the most common drug given. It was possible to safely discharge 31% of patients on scene. In our experience skilled Emergency Medicine doctors attending at scene could provide advanced care and reduce ambulance transportation and patient attendance.

  1. Surveillance, response systems, and evidence updates on emerging zoonoses: the role of one health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, G V; Kasimanickam, Ramanathan K; Asokan, Vanitha

    2013-01-01

    Globally, emerging zoonotic diseases are increasing. Existing surveillance systems for zoonoses have substantial gaps, especially in developing countries, and the systems in place in the developed world require improvements. Resources and updates on evidence-based practice (EBP) for zoonoses are sparser in the veterinary literature as compared to the medical literature. Evidence updates for emerging zoonoses are either absent or rudimentary in both human and veterinary medicine. A 'one-health' concept, including a global signaling surveillance system for emerging zoonoses, will be essential for correct diagnoses, interventions, and public health strategies. An open access EBP platform supported by builders of EBP resources is urgently needed to counter emerging zoonoses.

  2. The Things We Care to See: The Effects of Rotated Protocol Immersion on the Emergence of Early Observing Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Dolleen-Day; Luke, Nicole; Greer, R. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    We tested the effect of a Rotated Protocol Immersion package on the emergence of observing responses as prerequisites for more complex verbal developmental capabilities. Three elementary aged students between the ages of 6 and 7 participated. They were diagnosed with autism spectrum disabilities. The treatment condition consisted of total…

  3. Variation in implementation of corporate social responsibility practices in emerging economies' firms: A survey of Chilean fruit exporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Villalobos, P.; Engler, A.

    2012-01-01

    As in many sectors in emerging economies, the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become important for exporting agri-food firms in view of their integration in global supply chains. The purpose of this research was to assess the implementation by Chilean fruit exporters of CSR

  4. Variation in implementation of corporate social responsibility practices in emerging economies' firms: A survey of Chilean fruit exporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Villalobos, P.; Engler, A.

    2012-01-01

    As in many sectors in emerging economies, the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become important for exporting agri-food firms in view of their integration in global supply chains. The purpose of this research was to assess the implementation by Chilean fruit exporters of CSR prac

  5. Report on the emergency response to the event on May 14, 1997, at the plutonuim reclamation facility, Hanford Site, Richland,Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoop, D.S.

    1997-08-20

    On the evening of May 14,1997, a chemical explosion Occurred at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) in the 200 West Area(200-W) of the Hanford Site. The event warranted the declaration of an Alert emergency, activation of the Hanford Emergency Response Organization (BRO), and notification of offsite agencies. As a result of the emergency declaration, a subsequent evaluation was conducted to assess: 9 the performance of the emergency response organization o the occupational health response related to emergency activities o event notifications to offsite and environmental agencies. Additionally, the evaluation was designed to: 9 document the chronology of emergency and occupational health responses and environmental notifications connected with the explosion at the facility 0 assess the adequacy of the Hanford Site emergency preparedness activities; response readiness; and emergency management actions, occupational health, and environmental actions 0 provide an analysis of the causes of the deficiencies and weaknesses in the preparedness and response system that have been identified in the evaluation of the response a assign organizational responsibility to correct deficiencies and weaknesses a improve future performance 0 adjust elements of emergency implementing procedures and emergency preparedness activities.

  6. InteractInteraction mechanism of emergency response in geological hazard perception and risk management: a case study in Zhouqu county

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuan; Zhao, Hongtao

    2017-04-01

    China is one of few several natural disaster prone countries, which has complex geological and geographical environment and abnormal climate. On August 8, 2010, a large debris flow disaster happened in Zhouqu Country, Gansu province, resulting in more than 1700 casualties and more than 200 buildings damaged. In order to percept landslide and debris flow, an early warning system was established in the county. Spatial information technologies, such as remote sensing, GIS, and GPS, play core role in the early warning system, due to their functions in observing, analyzing, and locating geological disasters. However, all of these spatial information technologies could play an important role only guided by the emergency response mechanism. This article takes the establishment of Zhouqu Country's Disaster Emergency Response Interaction Mechanism (DERIM) as an example to discuss the risk management of country-level administrative units. The country-level risk management aims to information sharing, resources integration, integrated prevention and unified command. Then, nine subsystems support DERIM, which included disaster prevention and emergency data collection and sharing system, joint duty system, disaster verification and evaluation system, disaster consultation system, emergency warning and information release system, emergency response system, disaster reporting system, plan management system, mass prediction and prevention management system. At last, an emergency command platform in Zhouqu Country built up to realize DERIM. The core mission of the platform consists of daily management of disaster, monitoring and warning, comprehensive analysis, information release, consultation and decision-making, emergency response, etc. Five functional modules, including module of disaster information management, comprehensive monitoring module (geological monitoring, meteorological monitoring, water conservancy and hydrological monitoring), alarm management module, emergency

  7. Heavy precipitation and the responses within emergency management - a new approach for emergency planning and disaster prevention by utilizing fire brigade operation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschker, Thomas; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    An increase of intense rainfall events in the center regions of Europe is one of the assumed effects of climate change. Climate scenarios indicate also large seasonal and regional differences concerning the magnitude. Structural damages and financial loss resulting from heavy precipitation depend on natural parameters such as topography and vegetation cover of the specific area, but also on socio-economic parameters such as urbanized and industrialized areas, population density and the presence of critical infrastructure. In particular mudflows and floods cause damages such as flooded basements and streets, undercutting of roads or spilled sewage drains. The emergency management has to consider these effects appropriately. Commonly, this is the responsibilities is taken by the fire brigades and civil protection units. Within their daily routines, numerous data is collected, but commonly not utilized for scientific purposes. In particular fire brigade operation data can be used accordingly to describe the intensity of the aftermath when heavy precipitation strikes a certain area. One application is described in this study based on a example in Offenbach, Germany. The civil protection in Germany is based on a federal system with a bottom-up command-structure and responsibility to the local community. Therefore it is not easy to collect the overall incident data for a widespread affected area. To examine particular local effects of heavy precipitation events it is necessary to match the meteorological data provided by the German Meteorological Service (DWD) with the incident data of all effected fire brigades, which sometimes is impeded by the usual resolution of meteorological data. In this study, a method of comprehensive evaluation of meteorological data and the operation data from local fire brigades has been developed for the Rhine-Main-Area. This area is one of the largest metropolitan regions in Germany with a very high density in population as well as

  8. Seedling Emergence and Phenotypic Response of Common Bean Germplasm to Different Temperatures under Controlled Conditions and in Open Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. DE RON

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and uniform seed germination and seedling emergence under diverse environmental conditions is a desirable characteristic for crops. Common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L. differ in their low temperature tolerance regarding growth and yield. Cultivars tolerant to low temperature during the germination and emergence stages and carriers of the grain quality standards demanded by consumers are needed for the success of the bean crop. The objectives of this study were i to screen the seedling emergence and the phenotypic response of bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled chamber and field conditions to display stress-tolerant genotypes with good agronomic performances and yield potential, and ii to compare the emergence of bean seedlings under controlled environment and in open field conditions to assess the efficiency of genebanks standard germination tests for predicting the performance of the seeds in the field. Three trials were conducted with 28 dry bean genotypes in open field and in growth chamber under low, moderate and warm temperature. Morpho-agronomic data were used to evaluate the phenotypic performance of the different genotypes. Cool temperatures resulted in a reduction of the rate of emergence in the bean genotypes, however, emergence and early growth of bean could be under different genetic control and these processes need further research to be suitably modeled. Nine groups arose from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA representing variation in emergence time and proportion of emergence in the controlled chamber and in the open field indicating a trend to lower emergence in large and extra-large seeded genotypes. Screening of seedling emergence and phenotypic response of the bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled growth chambers and under field conditions showed several genotypes, as landraces 272, 501, 593 and the cultivar Borlotto, with stress-tolerance at emergence and high

  9. Response to an emerging vector-borne disease: Surveillance and preparedness for Schmallenberg virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, H.C.; Elbers, A.R.W.; Conraths, F.J.; Holsteg, M.; Hoereth-Boentgen, D.; Gethmann, J.; Schaik, van G.

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance for new emerging animal diseases from a European perspective is complicated by the non-harmonised approach across Member States for data capture, recording livestock populations and case definitions. In the summer of 2011, a new vector-borne Orthobunyavirus emerged in Northern Europe an

  10. 78 FR 8691 - Notice of Availability of Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... reimbursed under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act, 42 U.S.C... under section 401 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170... a 100 percent Federal share: Bronx, Kings, Orange, Nassau, New York, Putnam, Queens, Richmond...

  11. A collaborative large spatio-temporal data visual analytics architecture for emergence response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, D.; Li, J.; Cao, H.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The unconventional emergency, usually outbreaks more suddenly, and is diffused more quickly, but causes more secondary damage and derives more disaster than what it is usually expected. The data volume and urgency of emergency exceeds the capacity of current emergency management systems. In this paper, we propose a three-tier collaborative spatio-temporal visual analysis architecture to support emergency management. The prototype system, based on cloud computation environment, supports aggregation of massive unstructured and semi-structured data, integration of various computing model sand algorithms; collaborative visualization and visual analytics among users with a diversity of backgrounds. The distributed data in 100TB scale is integrated in a unified platform and shared with thousands of experts and government agencies by nearly 100 models. The users explore, visualize and analyse the big data and make a collaborative countermeasures to emergencies.

  12. Transcriptomic response of maize primary roots to low temperatures at seedling emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fenza, Mauro; Hogg, Bridget; Grant, Jim

    2017-01-01

    Background Maize (Zea mays) is a C4 tropical cereal and its adaptation to temperate climates can be problematic due to low soil temperatures at early stages of establishment. Methods In the current study we have firstly investigated the physiological response of twelve maize varieties, from a chilling condition adapted gene pool, to sub-optimal growth temperature during seedling emergence. To identify transcriptomic markers of cold tolerance in already adapted maize genotypes, temperature conditions were set below the optimal growth range in both control and low temperature groups. The conditions were as follows; control (18 °C for 16 h and 12 °C for 8 h) and low temperature (12 °C for 16 h and 6 °C for 8 h). Four genotypes were identified from the condition adapted gene pool with significant contrasting chilling tolerance. Results Picker and PR39B29 were the more cold-tolerant lines and Fergus and Codisco were the less cold-tolerant lines. These four varieties were subjected to microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed genes under chilling conditions. Exposure to low temperature during establishment in the maize varieties Picker, PR39B29, Fergus and Codisco, was reflected at the transcriptomic level in the varieties Picker and PR39B29. No significant changes in expression were observed in Fergus and Codisco following chilling stress. A total number of 64 genes were differentially expressed in the two chilling tolerant varieties. These two varieties exhibited contrasting transcriptomic profiles, in which only four genes overlapped. Discussion We observed that maize varieties possessing an enhanced root growth ratio under low temperature were more tolerant, which could be an early and inexpensive measure for germplasm screening under controlled conditions. We have identified novel cold inducible genes in an already adapted maize breeding gene pool. This illustrates that further varietal selection for enhanced chilling tolerance is possible in

  13. Parental responses to child experiences of trauma following presentation at emergency departments: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria; Creswell, Cathy; Butler, Ian; Christie, Hope; Halligan, Sarah L

    2016-11-07

    Parents are often children's main source of support following fear-inducing traumatic events, yet little is known about how parents provide that support. The aim of this study was to examine parents' experiences of supporting their child following child trauma exposure and presentation at an emergency department (ED). Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. The setting for this study was two National Health Service EDs in England. 20 parents whose child experienced a traumatic event and attended an ED between August 2014 and October 2015. Parents were sensitive to their child's distress and offered reassurance and support for their child to resume normal activities. However, parental beliefs often inhibited children's reinstatement of pretrauma routines. Support often focused on preventing future illness or injury, reflective of parents' concerns for their child's physical well-being. In a minority of parents, appraisals of problematic care from EDs contributed to parents' anxiety and perceptions of their child as vulnerable post-trauma. Forgetting the trauma and avoidance of discussion were encouraged as coping strategies to prevent further distress. Parents highlighted their need for further guidance and support regarding their child's physical and emotional recovery. This study provides insight into the experiences of and challenges faced by parents in supporting their child following trauma exposure. Perceptions of their child's physical vulnerability and treatment influenced parents' responses and the supportive strategies employed. These findings may enable clinicians to generate meaningful advice for parents following child attendance at EDs post-trauma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Physiological Synchronization in Emergency Response Teams: Subjective Workload, Drivers and Empaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Marra, David E; Perna, Claire; Castro, Julian; Gomez, Maribeth; Peressini, Anthony F

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral and physiological synchronization have important implications for work teams with regard to workload management, coordinated behavior and overall functioning. This study extended previous work on the nonlinear statistical structure of GSR series in dyads to larger teams and included subjective ratings of workload and contributions to problem solving. Eleven teams of 3 or 4 people played a series of six emergency response (ER) games against a single opponent. Seven of the groups worked under a time pressure instruction at the beginning of the first game. The other four groups were not given that instruction until the beginning of the fourth game. The optimal lag length for the teams, which appeared to be phase-locked, was substantially shorter than that obtained previously for loosely-coupled dyads. There was a complex nonlinear effect from the time pressure manipulation on the autocorrelation over time that reflected workload and fatigue dynamics that were operating. The R2 values for linear and nonlinear statistical models differed by less than .01. The average amount of influence from one ER team member to another was 4.5-4.7% of the variance in GSR readings. ER team members were classified as drivers and empaths, based on the autocorrelations and transfer influences to and from other players in the GSR time series. Empaths were rated by their peers as making more types of positive contributions to the problem solving discussions than others, and drivers received the lowest ratings. Larger Lyapunov exponents that were calculated from the GSR time series were positively correlated with individuals' ratings of subjective workload and were negatively correlated with leadership indicators. Several directions for further research are outlined.

  15. Aerobic lineage of the oxidative stress response protein rubrerythrin emerged in an ancient microaerobic, (hyperthermophilic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Cardenas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubrerythrins (RBRs are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily (FLSF. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin. In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyperthermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the aerobic-type lineage subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE. It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with whiffs of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one.

  16. Redox Modulation Matters: Emerging Functions for Glutaredoxins in Plant Development and Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutian Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (GRXs are small ubiquitous glutathione (GSH-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the reversible reduction of protein disulfide bridges or protein-GSH mixed disulfide bonds via a dithiol or monothiol mechanism, respectively. Three major classes of GRXs, with the CPYC-type, the CGFS-type or the CC-type active site, have been identified in many plant species. In spite of the well-characterized roles for GRXs in Escherichia coli, yeast and humans, the biological functions of plant GRXs have been largely enigmatic. The CPYC-type and CGFS-type GRXs exist in all organisms, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, whereas the CC-type class has thus far been solely identified in land plants. Only the number of the CC-type GRXs has enlarged dramatically during the evolution of land plants, suggesting their participation in the formation of more complex plants adapted to life on land. A growing body of evidence indicates that plant GRXs are involved in numerous cellular pathways. In this review, emphasis is placed on the recently emerging functions for GRXs in floral organ development and disease resistance. Notably, CC-type GRXs have been recruited to participate in these two seemingly unrelated processes. Besides, the current knowledge of plant GRXs in the assembly and delivery of iron-sulfur clusters, oxidative stress responses and arsenic resistance is also presented. As GRXs require GSH as an electron donor to reduce their target proteins, GSH-related developmental processes, including the control of flowering time and the development of postembryonic roots and shoots, are further discussed. Profiling the thiol redox proteome using high-throughput proteomic approaches and measuring cellular redox changes with fluorescent redox biosensors will help to further unravel the redox-regulated physiological processes in plants.

  17. Profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome following non-emergent intestinal surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Bhani K; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2013-09-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an uncommon but severe complication in surgical patients. While SIRS is well known, it is poorly described in the pediatric population. The goal of this study was to describe the incidence of profound SIRS following non-emergent intestinal surgery in children and to identify potential risk factors. A retrospective review was conducted for patients 0-19 years of age following intestinal surgery and/or lysis of adhesions from 01/01/1999-02/28/2012. Children were excluded for preoperative instability or frank bowel perforation. Patients were then placed in a post-operative SIRS or non-SIRS group as defined by the 2005 International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference Guidelines (6. B. Goldstein, B. Giroir, A. Randolph, and Sepsis International Consensus Conference on Pediatric, 'International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference: Definitions for Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction in Pediatrics', Pediatr Crit Care Med, 6 (2005), 2-8.). SIRS was identified in 17 of the 381 patients. Logistic regression analysis was performed and showed heart disease, kidney disease, PN dependence, and intestinal obstruction to be predictive of post-operative SIRS. This study represents one of the first reports to identify a previously poorly described process of significant SIRS after intestinal surgery in children. Both systemic organ failure and intestinal dysfunction are strong risk factors for post-operative SIRS in children. Potentially, these pre-existing conditions may lead to disruption of normal intestinal flora or barrier function, which in turn may predispose these children to dramatic SIRS episodes after intestinal surgery. Understanding how these factors lead to SIRS will be critical to developing prevention strategies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in United States emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Asher, Shellie L; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged U.S. emergency departments (EDs) to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to U.S. acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how U.S. EDs, emergency physicians (EPs), emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to U.S. EPs, emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to U.S. EDs in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD.

  19. Emergency response service personnel and the critical incident stress debriefing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shannon L

    2005-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the potential for work-related stress associated with employment in the emergency service field. However, little research has considered effective interventions that may be used to mediate the effects of this work-related stress. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) is one intervention that is currently employed with emergency service workers. However, the efficacy of this intervention is currently the source of much debate. The present discussion reviews the available literature regarding the effectiveness of CISD for use with emergency service workers and concludes that at this time, for this population, the call for the removal of current programs using CISD is unwarranted.

  20. Enabling Advanced Automation in Spacecraft Operations with the Spacecraft Emergency Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Julie; Fox, Jeffrey A.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    True autonomy is the Holy Grail of spacecraft mission operations. The goal of launching a satellite and letting it manage itself throughout its useful life is a worthy one. With true autonomy, the cost of mission operations would be reduced to a negligible amount. Under full autonomy, any problems (no matter the severity or type) that may arise with the spacecraft would be handled without any human intervention via some combination of smart sensors, on-board intelligence, and/or smart automated ground system. Until the day that complete autonomy is practical and affordable to deploy, incremental steps of deploying ever-increasing levels of automation (computerization of once manual tasks) on the ground and on the spacecraft are gradually decreasing the cost of mission operations. For example, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) has been flying spacecraft with low cost operations for several years. NASA-GSFC's SMEX (Small Explorer) and MIDEX (Middle Explorer) missions have effectively deployed significant amounts of automation to enable the missions to fly predominately in 'light-out' mode. Under light-out operations the ground system is run without human intervention. Various tools perform many of the tasks previously performed by the human operators. One of the major issues in reducing human staff in favor of automation is the perceived increased in risk of losing data, or even losing a spacecraft, because of anomalous conditions that may occur when there is no one in the control center. When things go wrong, missions deploying advanced automation need to be sure that anomalous conditions are detected and that key personal are notified in a timely manner so that on-call team members can react to those conditions. To ensure the health and safety of its lights-out missions, NASA-GSFC's Advanced Automation and Autonomy branch (Code 588) developed the Spacecraft Emergency Response System (SERS). The SERS is a Web-based collaborative environment that enables