WorldWideScience

Sample records for buildup

  1. Mars base buildup scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station

  2. From detached to attached buildup complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, B.; Elvebakk, G.; Andreassen, K.; Stemmerik, Lars; Colpaert, A.; Samuelsberg, T.J.

    warm-water carbonate structures. Three-dimensional maps of Upper Palaeozoic carbonate buildups document their geomorphology, distribution and size through time. The lateral and vertical growth of carbonate buildups has been reconstructed, revealing how their distribution changed over time and with...

  3. Am-241 buildup in nematode organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of Am-241 intake into earthworm organisms from chernozem leached in their presence in soil contaminated with this radionuclide is studied. The data on Am-241 buildup values during long-time radionuclide intake into earthworm organisms from soil are given. It s shown that Am-241 buildup in earthworm organisms do not exceed its concentration in soil for the whole observation period (as Am-241 presents in soil in state unavailable for animals). Intensive extraction of the radionuclide from the organisms is observed when earthworm contacts with soil are stopped

  4. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  5. Buildup factors for broad gamma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with buildup factors for the photon number and the exposure in broad conical beams penetrating through iron slabs. Using the Monte Carlo method, the dependence on the thickness of the slabs is calculated for various geometrical configurations of the 137Cs radiation source, the slab and the detector. The same dependence has also been measured for 137Cs and 60Co. The results show the dependence of the buildup factor B on the collimation angle α (B increases with increasing α), on the distance a between the source and the slab (B increases with increasing a), and on the distance b between the detector and the slab (B decreases with increasing b). Comparison of the obtained results with those from model configurations shows that in the latter case errors may range up to nearly 100%. (author)

  6. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    CERN Document Server

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  7. Evaluation of activity build-up experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintaining radioactivity low at system surfaces in BWR-plants is of importance for minimizing doses to staff working with maintenance work at the plants according to the ALARA, As Low As Reasonable Achievable, principle. The composition and microstructures of metal oxides that are formed on system piping surfaces are of great importance for the activity levels in BWR, which are in turn closely related to water chemistry environments. An experimental system has been built at Studsvik Nuclear AB to study activity build-up as a function of different experimental parameters. Up to now, the influence of different concentrations of iron, nickel and zinc species have been studied under simulated BWR-conditions. The objective of this report is to identify parameters that may be of importance for activity build-up. This has been done through evaluation of the experimental data collected so far within the project frame. It may provide an improved understanding about the nature of various activity changes observed. It is also helpful for designing further experimental studies. The importance of precipitation and dissolution reactions in the oxide/water interface for activity build-up has been pointed out in the report. This has been highlighted through correlation of data from activity release studies to the dissolution rate of oxide (NiFe2O4) in the oxide/water interface which in turn has been correlated to the corrosion rate of stainless steel in BWR-environments

  8. Hypergol Systems: Design, Buildup, and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David; Rathgeber, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    This course was developed by personnel at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility in conjunction with the NASA Safety Training Center (NSTC). The NSTC was established in May 1991 by the NASA Headquarters Safety Directorate to provide up-to-date, high-quality, NASA specific safety training on location at NASA centers, or simultaneously to multiple centers over the Video Teleconferencing System (ViTS). Our desire is to establish and maintain a strong, long-lasting relationship with all NASA centers in order to fulfill your safety training needs on a cost-effective basis. Our ultimate goal is to provide a positive contribution to safe operations at NASA. NSTC Course 055 is a 2-day course discussing the safe usage of hypergols (hydrazine fuels and nitrogen tetroxide). During the course we will identify the hazards associated with hypergols including toxicity, reactivity, fire, and explosion. Management of risk is discussed in terms of the primary engineering controls design, buildup, and operation; and secondary controls personal protective equipment and detectors/monitors. The emphasis is on the design and buildup of compatible systems and the safe operation of these systems by technicians and engineers.

  9. Radioactivity build-up and decontamination (part 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a decontamination method of radioactive corrosion products in BWR primary coolant system, the radioactivity buildup after the decontamination was investigated for 304 stainless steel using a test loop simulating a BWR condition for 400 hours. The results show that; (1) Removal of the chromium in crud may be necessary to supress the activity re-buildup and the validity of Oxidation-reduction method with this process was proved. (2) The most significant activity re-buildup was shown when the original surface layer was exposed after complete removal of the crud. The exposure of chromium rich surface layer may account for the acceralation of activity buildup. (3) The re-buildup was supressed when a pre-filming by H2O2 (8 ppm 140 0C 24 hr) was applied after the electro-polishing up to the original surface layer. This supressing effect was also seen on new SUS304 surface. (author)

  10. CURRENT BUILDUP IN EMERGING SERPENTINE FLUX TUBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere during active-region formation involves the transport of the magnetic field from the solar convection zone through the lowest layers of the solar atmosphere, through which the plasma β changes from >1 to <1 with altitude. The crossing of this magnetic transition zone requires the magnetic field to adopt a serpentine shape also known as the sea-serpent topology. In the frame of the resistive flux-emergence model, the rising of the magnetic flux is believed to be dynamically driven by a succession of magnetic reconnections which are commonly observed in emerging flux regions as Ellerman bombs. Using a data-driven, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulation of flux emergence occurring in active region 10191 on 2002 November 16-17, we study the development of 3D electric current sheets. We show that these currents buildup along the 3D serpentine magnetic-field structure as a result of photospheric diverging horizontal line-tied motions that emulate the observed photospheric evolution. We observe that reconnection can not only develop following a pinching evolution of the serpentine field line, as usually assumed in two-dimensional geometry, but can also result from 3D shearing deformation of the magnetic structure. In addition, we report for the first time on the observation in the UV domain with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) of extremely transient loop-like features, appearing within the emerging flux domain, which link several Ellermam bombs with one another. We argue that these loop transients can be explained as a consequence of the currents that build up along the serpentine magnetic field.

  11. Metal transfer and build-up in friction and cutting

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, V D

    1956-01-01

    Metal Transfer and Build-up in Friction and Cutting aims to systematize our knowledge of the metal build-up, to describe some of the investigations past and present carried out in SFTI (Tomsk), and to make an effort to explain a number of the phenomena in cutting, scratching, and sliding from the point of view of metal transfer theory. The book opens with a chapter on the temperature of the rubbing interface of two solids. This temperature is needed in order to elucidate the nature of the formation of a build-up in scratching, cutting, and sliding. Separate chapters follow on the seizure phen

  12. Calculation of γ shielding buildup factor for certain light concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure buildup factors up to 40 mean free paths in ranging from 0.015 MeV to 15 MeV photon energy were calculated by using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 for light concrete used in certain nuclear power plant. The calculation took into account effect of Bremsstrahlung, fluorescence and coherent (Rayleigh) scattering on the buildup factor. Then, the corresponding fitting parameters of the G-P fitting formula were presented by the geometrical progression approximation fitting formula. The method can get the y shielding buildup factors for any shielding thickness of the concrete and any photon energy. (authors)

  13. Computation of exposure build-up factors in teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The G-P fitting method has been used to compute the exposure build-up factor of teeth [enamel outer surface (EOS), enamel middle (EM), enamel dentin junction towards enamel (EDJE), enamel dentin junction towards dentin (EDJD), dentin middle (DM) and dentin inner surface (DIS)] for a wide energy range (0.015-15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free paths. The dependence of exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy, penetration depth, electron density and effective atomic number has also been studied. The computed exposure build-up factor is useful to estimate the relative dose distribution in different regions of teeth.

  14. Computation of exposure build-up factors in teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjunatha, H.C., E-mail: manjunathhc@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056, Karnataka (India); Rudraswamy, B. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056, Karnataka (India)

    2011-01-15

    The G-P fitting method has been used to compute the exposure build-up factor of teeth [enamel outer surface (EOS), enamel middle (EM), enamel dentin junction towards enamel (EDJE), enamel dentin junction towards dentin (EDJD), dentin middle (DM) and dentin inner surface (DIS)] for a wide energy range (0.015-15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free paths. The dependence of exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy, penetration depth, electron density and effective atomic number has also been studied. The computed exposure build-up factor is useful to estimate the relative dose distribution in different regions of teeth.

  15. Prediction of sulphide build-up in filled sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Amir M; Faramarzi, Asaad; Mahmoodian, Mojtaba; Tee, Kong Fah

    2014-08-01

    Millions of dollars are being spent worldwide on the repair and maintenance of sewer networks and wastewater treatment plants. The production and emission of hydrogen sulphide has been identified as a major cause of corrosion and odour problems in sewer networks. Accurate prediction of sulphide build-up in a sewer system helps engineers and asset managers to appropriately formulate strategies for optimal sewer management and reliability analysis. This paper presents a novel methodology to model and predict the sulphide build-up for steady state condition in filled sewer pipes. The proposed model is developed using a novel data-driven technique called evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR) and it involves the most effective parameters in the sulphide build-up problem. EPR is a hybrid technique, combining genetic algorithm and least square. It is shown that the proposed model can provide a better prediction for the sulphide build-up as compared with conventional models. PMID:24956763

  16. Approximating formula for gamma-ray multilayer buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we test the model by the point isotropic buildup factor data of much thicker shields of 40 mfp. Since the new technique was developed by Hirayama to calculate the buildup factor of very thick shields by the EGS4, it is now possible to use the EGS4 calculation to test the present model for these thick shields. (J.P.N.)

  17. Modeling electron heat transport during magnetic field buildup in SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for spheromak magnetic field buildup and electron thermal transport, including a thermal diffusivity associated with magnetic turbulence during helicity injection is applied to a SSPX equilibrium, with a maximum final magnetic field of 1.3 T. Magnetic field-buildup times of 1.0 X 10-3, 5.0 X 10-4 and 1.0 X 10-4 s were used in the model to examine their effects on electron thermal transport. It is found that at transport run time of 4 x 10-3 s, the fastest buildup-time results in the highest final temperature profile, with a core temperature of 0.93 kev while requiring the lowest input energy at 140 KJ. The results show that within the model the most rapid buildup rate generates the highest electron temperature at the fastest rate and at the lowest consumption of energy. However, the peak power requirements are large (> 600 MW for the fastest buildup case examined)

  18. Chemical composition dependence of exposure buildup factors for some polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Tejbir [Department of Physics, S.D.D.I.E.T., Barwala, District Panchkula, Haryana 134 118 (India)], E-mail: tejbir.s@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Naresh [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 402 (India)], E-mail: naresh20dhiman@yahoo.com; Singh, Parjit S. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)], E-mail: dr_parjit@hotmail.com

    2009-01-15

    Exposure buildup factors for some polymers such as poly-acrylo-nitrile (PAN), poly-methyl-acrylate (PMA), poly-vinyl-chloride (PVC), synthetic rubber (SR), tetra-fluro-ethylene (Teflon) have been computed using the G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015-15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free paths (mfp). The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected polymers with incident photon energy at the fixed penetration depths has been studied, mainly emphasizing on chemical composition (equivalent atomic number) of the selected polymers. It has been observed that for the lower penetration depths (below 10 mfp), the exposure buildup factor decreases with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers at all the incident photon energies. However, at the penetration depth of 10 mfp and incident photon energy above 3 MeV, the exposure buildup factor becomes almost independent of the equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers. Further, above the fixed penetration depth of 15 mfp of the selected polymers and above the incident photon energy of 3 MeV, reversal in the trend has been observed, i.e., the exposure buildup factor increases with the increase in equivalent atomic number.

  19. Energy absorption build-up factors in teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric progression fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption build-up factor of teeth [enamel outer surface, enamel middle, enamel dentin junction towards enamel, enamel dentin junction towards dentin, dentin middle and dentin inner surface] for wide energy range (0.015-15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free path. The dependence of energy absorption build-up factor on incident photon energy, penetration depth, electron density and effective atomic number has also been studied. The energy absorption build-up factors increases with the penetration depth and electron density of teeth. So that the degree of violation of Lambert-Beer (I = I0e-μt ) law is less for least penetration depth and electron density. The energy absorption build-up factors for different regions of teeth are not same hence the energy absorbed by the different regions of teeth is not uniform which depends on the composition of the medium. The relative dose of gamma in different regions of teeth is also estimated. Dosimetric implication of energy absorption build-up factor in teeth has also been discussed. The estimated absorption build up factors in different regions of teeth may be useful in the electron spin resonance dosimetry. (author)

  20. Energy absorption and exposure build-up factors in hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) of hydroxyapatite (HA) and cortical bone have been computed for total photon interaction in the wide energy range of 1 keV–100 GeV using WinXCom. The variations of effective atomic number and electron density with energy of HA are compared with that of cortical bone. GP. fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption and exposure build-up factor of HA for wide energy range (0.015 MeV–15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40mean free path. The computed absorption build-up factor is used to estimate specific absorbed fraction of energy (φ) and relative dose of photon in HA. Build-up factor increases with increase of penetration depth. The results of the present paper will also help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also will be useful in dosimetry and diagnostics.

  1. Dynamical analysis of the buildup process near resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, J; Villavicencio, Jorge; Romo, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The time evolution of the buildup process inside a double-barrier system for off-resonance incidence energies is studied by considering the analytic solution of the time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with cutoff plane wave initial conditions. We show that the buildup process exhibits invariances under arbitrary changes on the system parameters, which can be successfully described by a simple and easy-to-use one-level formula. We find that the buildup of the off-resonant probability density is characterized by an oscillatory pattern modulated by the resonant case which governs the duration of the transient regime. This is evidence that off-resonant and resonant tunneling are two correlated processes, whose transient regime is characterized by the same transient time constant of two lifetimes.

  2. Dose buildup factor formula for double-layered shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation shielding, health physics, and radioactive waste management, it is very important to know buildup factors for various materials and their combinations used as multilayer shields. In this work, a general formula that computes buildup factors for double-layer shields was developed on the basis of Monte Carlo photon transport using the MCNP code. Formulas for buildup factors for double-layer shields have been developed in the past with various degrees of success and limitations. The GP formula is excellent but applies to single-layer materials only. In this work, gamma-ray dose buildup factors for double-layer shields have been computed using the MCNP code. A point monoenergetic isotropic source was used with energy from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The source was placed at the center of the first spherical materials, surrounded by a second one. Detectors were placed on the surface of the second material and used to tally the photon flux in a six-energy-group structure. The shielding materials considered were water, lead, steel, concrete, and some of their combinations for double-layered shields ranging in thickness from 1 to 10 mean free paths (mfp)

  3. Improvement of Photon Buildup Factors for Radiological Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.G. Schirmers

    2006-07-01

    Slant-path buildup factors for photons between 1 keV and 10 MeV for nine radiation shielding materials (air, aluminum, concrete, iron, lead, leaded glass, polyethylene, stainless steel, and water) are calculated with the most recent cross-section data available using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods. Discrete ordinates calculations use a 244-group energy structure that is based on previous research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), but extended with the results of this thesis, and its focused studies on low-energy photon transport and the effects of group widths in multigroup calculations. Buildup factor calculations in discrete ordinates benefit from coupled photon/electron cross sections to account for secondary photon effects. Also, ambient dose equivalent (herein referred to as dose) buildup factors were analyzed at lower energies where corresponding response functions do not exist in literature. The results of these studies are directly applicable to radiation safety at LANL, where the dose modeling tool Pandemonium is used to estimate worker dose in plutonium handling facilities. Buildup factors determined in this thesis will be used to enhance the code's modeling capabilities, but should be of interest to the radiation shielding community.

  4. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We simulate electron cloud build-up in a grooved vacuum chamber including the effect of space charge from the electrons. We identify conditions for e-cloud suppression and make contact with previous estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for grooved surfaces.

  5. Improved SVR Model for Multi-Layer Buildup Factor Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of point kernel method applied in gamma ray dose rate calculations in shielding design and radiation safety analysis is limited by the accuracy of buildup factors used in calculations. Although buildup factors for single-layer shields are well defined and understood, buildup factors for stratified shields represent a complex physical problem that is hard to express in mathematical terms. The traditional approach for expressing buildup factors of multi-layer shields is through semi-empirical formulas obtained by fitting the results of transport theory or Monte Carlo calculations. Such an approach requires an ad-hoc definition of the fitting function and often results with numerous and usually inadequately explained and defined correction factors added to the final empirical formula. Even more, finally obtained formulas are generally limited to a small number of predefined combinations of materials within relatively small range of gamma ray energies and shield thicknesses. Recently, a new approach has been suggested by the authors involving one of machine learning techniques called Support Vector Machines, i.e., Support Vector Regression (SVR). Preliminary investigations performed for double-layer shields revealed great potential of the method, but also pointed out some drawbacks of the developed model, mostly related to the selection of one of the parameters describing the problem (material atomic number), and the method in which the model was designed to evolve during the learning process. It is the aim of this paper to introduce a new parameter (single material buildup factor) that is to replace the existing material atomic number as an input parameter. The comparison of two models generated by different input parameters has been performed. The second goal is to improve the evolution process of learning, i.e., the experimental computational procedure that provides a framework for automated construction of complex regression models of predefined

  6. Simulation on Buildup of Electron Cloud in Proton Circular Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Kai-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beam are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerator. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detail processes on the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by ...

  7. Dark solitons in laser radiation build-up dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R

    2016-03-01

    We reveal the existence of slowly decaying dark solitons in the radiation build-up dynamics of bright pulses in all-normal dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers, numerically modeled in the framework of a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The evolution of noise perturbations to quasistationary dark solitons is examined, and the significance of background shape and soliton-soliton collisions on the eventual soliton decay is established. We demonstrate the role of a restoring force in extending soliton interactions in conservative systems to include the effects of dissipation, as encountered in laser cavities, and generalize our observations to other nonlinear systems. PMID:27078358

  8. Electron cloud build-up study for DAPHNE

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccarezza, C; Bellodi, G; Drago, A; Ohmi, K; Pivi, M; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank; Zobov, M

    2005-01-01

    After the first experimental observations compatible with the presence of the electron cloud effect in the DAFNE positron ring, a more systematic study has been performed regarding the e-cloud build-up and related instability. The measured field map of the magnetic field has been taken into account in the simulation for elements present in the four 10 m long bending sections, representing 40% of the whole positron ring. The simulation results obtained with different codes are presented and compared with the recent experimental observations performed on the beam instabilities and the vacuum behavior of the positron ring.

  9. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  10. Study of chemical element composition dependency of exposure buildup factors in concrete shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma ray exposure buildup factor mainly dependent on the composition of which it is made therefore the effect of elemental composition has been studied for concrete shielding. The buildup factors are derived by G-P fitting formula in the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV up to penetration depth of 40 mfp. The exposure buildup factors of the concretes shielding shows sharp variation beyond 3 MeV photon energy for penetration depth above 10 mfp. (author)

  11. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Theory and Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a broad-brush survey of the phenomenology, history and importance of the electron-cloud effect (ECE). We briefly discuss the simulation techniques used to quantify the electron-cloud (EC) dynamics. Finally, we present in more detail an effective theory to describe the EC density build-up in terms of a few effective parameters. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC.

  12. Orbit averaged radial buildup code for tandem mirror geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial Fokker-Planck (RFP) model of A. Futch was modified to treat plasma buildup in the tandem mirror plug and center cell with a self-consistent model (TOARBUC). Two major changes have been made to the original version of this code. First, the center cell is treated as having separate electron and ion confining potentials with the ion potential having the opposite sign of that in a conventional mirror. Second, a two-electron-temperature treatment derived by R. Cohen was included in the present model to allow the plug and center cell to have different T/sub e/'s as observed in the experiment. The following sections explain these changes in greater detail

  13. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Theory and Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-10-08

    We present a broad-brush survey of the phenomenology, history and importance of the electron-cloud effect (ECE). We briefly discuss the simulation techniques used to quantify the electron-cloud (EC) dynamics. Finally, we present in more detail an effective theory to describe the EC density build-up in terms of a few effective parameters. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC.

  14. Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build-Up Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Economically viable and reliable building systems and tool sets are being sought, examined, and tested for extraterrestrial habitat and infrastructure buildup....

  15. Calculation of gamma ray buildup factors for a very thick slab with angular eigenvalue method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The buildup factors of gamma rays are still widely used in the practical shielding calculations. Although the early compilation of buildup factors was published back to 50's, it is still a tedious, though straightforward, task even for state-of-the-art computers. The most recent database of buildup factors covers the distance up to 40 mean free paths. The angular eigenvalue method, which was proposed by one of the author (A.S.) to calculate the transmission of gamma rays through a homogeneous slab, is based fundamentally on the invariant embedding method. This method has been applied to obtain the gamma ray buildup factors in homogeneous medium. It was found that the buildup factors were easily obtained for the distance over 40 mean free paths. (author)

  16. Influence of build-up factor in the gamma radiography of thick samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of broad beam gamma rays with matter is affected by the build-up factor, as thickness increases. Cobalt-60 and iridium-192 gamma rays build-up factors have been obtained experimentally for iron and aluminium, using radiographic film as a detector. Comparisons are made with results from a Monte Carlo method and with results from experimental methods. In addition, build-up factor components were calculated from data obtained with a Ge(Li) detector, for certain photon energy ranges. The build-up factor is, then, introduced into gammagraphic calculations, the important factors being exposure factor and equivalence radiographic factor. Experiments were also made with uranium and lead, demonstrating the influence of build-up factor in the gammagraphy process

  17. Historical buildup of oil spill response capability in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the large oil spill that occurred in 1971 as an impetus, Japan's Maritime Pollution and Disaster Prevention Law was amended in 1973 and subsequently in 1976. The amendments required owners of vessels and petroleum facilities to retain designated quantities of boom, sorbent, dispersant, and other items to minimize impact from spills. A large oil spill caused by a ruptured crude oil storage tank in 1974 led to the enactment of additional legislation: the Petroleum Complex Disaster Prevention Law. Under this, petroleum facilities are required to maintain designated quantities of oil boom, oil boom deploying vessels, skimming boats, and the like. These legislative measures, together with voluntary efforts, have contributed to a sound buildup of the nation's oil spill response force. However, the response capability including stockpiled materials and equipment has been designed primarily to cope with incidents in closed waters such as inland seas, bays, and ports, and hence not for a oil spill in open seas as large as that from the Exxon Valdez. As one of the measures under the 1990 International Convention for Oil Spill Preparedness, Response and Cooperation, the Government of Japan has entrusted the Petroleum Association of Japan with an oil spill response capability reinforcement project to cope with a large oil spill should one occur in Japanese waters or nearby seas. Under the scheme, during the 5 year period beginning in 1991, the Petroleum Association of Japan is scheduled to build up, using subsidies from the government, stockpiles of cleanup equipment and materials and to augment the existing response capability

  18. A new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes a new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields. The formula combines the buildup factors of single-layer shields with products and quotients. The feasibility of the formula for reproducing the buildup factors was tested by using point isotropic buildup factors calculated with the SN1D discrete ordinates code as reference data. The dose buildup factors of single-, double-, and multilayer shields composed of water, aluminum, iron, and lead were calculated for a spherical geometry in the energy range between 10 MeV and 40 keV and for total thicknesses of up to 30 mean free paths. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the bound electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent scattering), the coherent scattering, the pair production, and the secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. The tests have shown that the approximating formula reproduces the reference data of double-layer shields very well for most cases. With the same parameters and with a new physical consideration that takes into account in a global way the degradation of the gamma-ray energy spectrum, the buildup factors of three- and five-layer shields were also very well reproduced

  19. Characterizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon build-up processes on urban road surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Liu, An; Li, Dunzhu; Zhang, Lixun; Guan, Yuntao

    2016-07-01

    Reliable prediction models are essential for modeling pollutant build-up processes on urban road surfaces. Based on successive samplings of road deposited sediments (RDS), this study presents empirical models for mathematical replication of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) build-up processes on urban road surfaces. The contaminant build-up behavior was modeled using saturation functions, which are commonly applied in US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM). Accurate fitting results were achieved in three typical urban land use types, and the applicability of the models was confirmed based on their acceptable relative prediction errors. The fitting results showed high variability in PAH saturation value and build-up rate among different land use types. Results of multivariate data and temporal-based analyses suggested that the quantity and property of RDS significantly influenced PAH build-up. Furthermore, pollution sources, traffic parameters, road surface conditions, and sweeping frequency could synthetically impact the RDS build-up and RDS property change processes. Thus, changes in these parameters could be the main reason for variations in PAH build-up in different urban land use types. PMID:27086074

  20. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05–3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style. - Highlights: • The shielding properties of three Jordanian construction styles were evaluated. • Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate energy buildup factors. • The obtained data were calculated in the energy range 0.05–3 MeV, up to 40 mfp. • An iterative method was used to estimate the buildup factors for multilayer styles

  1. Energy absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials and their tissue equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The generated energy......-absorption buildup factor data have been studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, diagnostics and therapy. The tissue equivalence of TLD materials is also discussed....

  2. Application of Monte Carlo code EGS4 to calculate gamma exposure buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure buildup factors up to 40 mean free paths ranging from 0.015 MeV to 15 MeV photon energy were calculated by using the Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 for ordinary concrete. The calculation involves PHOTX cross section library, a point isotropic source, infinite uniform medium model and a particle splitting method and considers the Bremsstrahlung, fluorescent effect, correlative (Rayleigh) scatter. The results were compared with the relevant data. Results show that the data of the buildup factors calculated by the Monte Carlo code EGS4 was reliable. The Monte Carlo method can be used widely to calculate gamma-ray exposure buildup factors. (authors)

  3. Absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of flattened versus unflattened megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Puysseleyr, Annemieke; Lechner, Wolfgang; De Neve, Wilfried; Georg, Dietmar; De Wagter, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of conventional (FF) versus flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams. The absorbed dose in the build-up region of static 6 and 10MV FF and FFF beams was measured using radiochromic film and extrapolation chamber dosimetry for single beams with a variety of field sizes, shapes and positions relative to the central axis. Removing the flattening filter generally resulted in slightly higher relative build-up doses. No considerable impact on the depth of maximum dose was found. PMID:27020966

  4. Study of influence of buildup factor form on simulated radiographic image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Predrag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study presented in this paper is the analysis of influence of different buildup factor forms on a simulated radiographic image. Simulated radiographic images are obtained by means of the ray-tracing technique. Scattered photons are modelled using the generally accepted geometric progression form, linear form and tabulated data of buildup factors. Simulated images were compared to the reference results obtained by Monte Carlo calculation. The best agreement to Monte Carlo simulated images is achieved for the geometric progression form of buildup factor.

  5. Modeling of gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors using response surface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buildup factors are always useful for practical computations in gamma-ray shield design. Generally point kernel method being easier to handle is adopted for shielding calculations. This method models a gamma ray directly at the evaluation point without scattering which is multiplied by buildup factors to obtain the gamma dose rate. The American Nuclear Society Standard Committee working group (ANSI/ANS-6.4.3-1991) has compiled the energy absorption and exposure buildup factors from 1 mean free path to 40 mean free paths as a standard reference data base for a large number of elements including water, air and concrete. Literature study reveals that there is a substantially significant disagreement in the buildup factor data by different approximating formulae. In view of this, it is required to compute or predict the buildup factor for those materials. The buildup factor data have been computed by various codes. Some of the codes are ASFIT (Gopinath and Sakamoto et al, 1971), PALLAS (Takeuchi and Tanaka, 1984) and EGS4 (Nelson et al, 1985). Taylor (1954), Berger (1956), Capo (1958) have fitted Goldstein and Wilkins (1954) data to construct parametric buildup factor formulae. Harimaet et al. (1986) has developed geometric progress fitting formula for the ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 (ANSI, 1991). The energy absorption buildup factor is defined as the photon buildup factor in which the quantity of interest is the absorbed or deposited energy in the shield medium and the detector response function is that of absorption in the material. Geometric progression buildup factor formula was simplified using the new modeling (fitting algorithm) of gamma ray energy absorption buildup factor. Advantage of having the simplification of buildup factor formula provides the easiness of usage of point kernel method based gamma shielding in the sense that analytic expression of collided flux can be easily constructed. Furthermore, that analytical expression of collided flux can be optimized to

  6. Opacity Build-up in Impulsive Relativistic Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Silva, Eduardo do Couto e

    2007-09-28

    Opacity effects in relativistic sources of high-energy gamma-rays, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or Blazars, can probe the Lorentz factor of the outflow as well as the distance of the emission site from the source, and thus help constrain the composition of the outflow (protons, pairs, magnetic field) and the emission mechanism. Most previous works consider the opacity in steady state. Here we study the effects of the time dependence of the opacity to pair production ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) in an impulsive relativistic source, which may be relevant for the prompt gamma-ray emission in GRBs or flares in Blazars. We present a simple, yet rich, semi-analytic model for the time and energy dependence of the optical depth, {tau}{gamma}{gamma}, in which a thin spherical shell expands ultra-relativistically and emits isotropically in its own rest frame over a finite range of radii, R{sub 0} {le} R {le} R{sub 0}+{Delta}R. This is particularly relevant for GRB internal shocks. We find that in an impulsive source ({Delta}R {approx}< R{sub 0}), while the instantaneous spectrum (which is typically hard to measure due to poor photon statistics) has an exponential cutoff above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1(T) where t{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}1) = 1, the time integrated spectrum (which is easier to measure) has a power-law high-energy tail above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1* {approx} {var_epsilon}1({Delta}T) where {Delta}T is the duration of the emission episode. Furthermore, photons with energies {var_epsilon} > {var_epsilon}1* are expected to arrive mainly near the onset of the spike in the light curve or flare, which corresponds to the short emission episode. This arises since in such impulsive sources it takes time to build-up the (target) photon field, and thus the optical depth {tau}{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}) initially increases with time and {var_epsilon}1(T) correspondingly decreases with time, so that photons of energy {var_epsilon} > {var

  7. Variation of energy absorption build-up factor with penetration depth for some titanium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Lovedeep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The buildup factor is an important characteristic that need to be studied and determined prior to using a material clinically in radiation treatment and protection. Energy absorption buildup factors for some titanium compounds like Titanium dioxide (TiO2, Titanium Carbide (TiC, Titanium Nitride (TiN and Titanium Silicate (TiSi2 has been calculated using the G.P. fitting technique upto penetration depth of 40 mean free path (mfp and in an energy range from 0.015 to 15.0 MeV. The variation of absorption buildup factors with penetration depth for the selected compounds of titanium has been studied. It has been found that the maximum value of energy absorption buildup factors shifts to the intermediate incident photon energy regions with the increase in penetration depth of the selected compounds of titanium.

  8. Effect of prefilming on 58Co radioactivity build-up on zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explicate deposition and release on fuel cladding in BWR, Co-58 radioactivity build-up on zircaly and the hydrothermal formation of spinel type oxide from hydroxide has been investigated experimentary in simulated BWR primary coolant system. (1) Co-58 radioactivity build-up was inhibited by pre-filming under strong oxidizing condition. (2) Cr ion was selectively deposited among Fe, Cr, Ni and Co ion on zircaly test pieces. (3) About 60 % of 58Co build-up amount existed among Cr-deposit, about 40 % of 58Co build-up amount existed among ZrO2-film. (4) Compared with Co complex Oxide, Ni complex oxide was hard to form. (author)

  9. Radionuclide buildup in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] heat transport system cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work reported in this paper was to measure the radionuclide buildup in primary heat transport system cell No. 3 at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and to compare the results with predicted values from a model based on experimental studies and experience at similar reactors. The information obtained is used for maintenance planning and to enhance ability to assess radionuclide buildup in the future at FFTF and in other reactors

  10. The effect of stimulus context on the buildup to stream segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonathanSussman-Fort

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stream segregation is the process by which the auditory system disentangles the mixture of sound inputs into discrete sources that cohere across time. The length of time required for this to occur is termed the ‘buildup’ period. In the current study, we used the buildup period as an index of how quickly sounds are segregated into constituent parts. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that stimulus context impacts the timing of the buildup and, therefore, affects when stream segregation is detected. To measure the timing of the buildup we recorded the Mismatch Negativity component (MMN of event-related brain potentials (ERPs, during passive listening, to determine when the streams were neurophysiologically segregated. In each condition, a pattern of repeating low (L and high (H tones (L-L-H was presented in trains of stimuli separated by silence, with the H tones forming a simple intensity oddball paradigm and the L tones serving as distractors. To determine the timing of the buildup, probe tones occurred in two positions of the trains, early (within the buildup period and late (past the buildup period. The context was manipulated by presenting roving versus non-roving frequencies across trains in two conditions. MMNs were elicited by intensity probe tones in the Non-Roving condition (early and late positions and the Roving condition (late position only indicating that neurophysiologic segregation occurred faster in the Non-Roving condition. This suggests a shorter buildup period when frequency was repeated from train to train. Overall, our results demonstrate that the dynamics of the environment influence the way in which the auditory system extracts regularities from the input. The results support the hypothesis that the buildup to segregation is highly dependent upon stimulus context and that the auditory system works to maintain a consistent representation of the environment when no new information suggests that reanalyzing the scene

  11. Data library of gamma-ray buildup factors for point isotropic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray buildup factors for a point isotropic source have been calculated as a function of atomic number of heavy elements and source energies over an energy range from 0.015 MeV to 15 MeV, for penetration depths up to 40 mfp, bu the PALLAS-PL,SP-Br code. These data include the contribution of bremsstrahlung, annihilation radiation and fluorescence X-ray. The calculated absorbed-dose, exposure and dose-equivalent buildup factors are tabulated for molybdenum, tin, tungsten, lead and uranium, which are practical interest shield materials, lanthanum and gadolinium which are important materials for obtaining buildup factors by interpolation with the atomic number. In the case of high atomic number materials, inclusion of brems-strahlung source has great influence on the buildup factors for high source energies and that of fluorescence X-ray gives spectracular effects on those for low energies close to the K edge of attenuation cross section. Furthermore, the geometrical-progression (G-P) parameters have been determined for these buildup factors in order to obtain the values of buildup factors at arbitrary distances and energies. (author)

  12. Analysis of the build-up of semi and non volatile organic compounds on urban roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna

    2011-04-01

    Vehicular traffic in urban areas may adversely affect urban water quality through the build-up of traffic generated semi and non volatile organic compounds (SVOCs and NVOCs) on road surfaces. The characterisation of the build-up processes is the key to developing mitigation measures for the removal of such pollutants from urban stormwater. An in-depth analysis of the build-up of SVOCs and NVOCs was undertaken in the Gold Coast region in Australia. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multicriteria Decision tools such as PROMETHEE and GAIA were employed to understand the SVOC and NVOC build-up under combined traffic scenarios of low, moderate, and high traffic in different land uses. It was found that congestion in the commercial areas and use of lubricants and motor oils in the industrial areas were the main sources of SVOCs and NVOCs on urban roads, respectively. The contribution from residential areas to the build-up of such pollutants was hardly noticeable. It was also revealed through this investigation that the target SVOCs and NVOCs were mainly attached to particulate fractions of 75-300 μm whilst the redistribution of coarse fractions due to vehicle activity mainly occurred in the >300 μm size range. Lastly, under combined traffic scenario, moderate traffic with average daily traffic ranging from 2300 to 5900 and average congestion of 0.47 were found to dominate SVOC and NVOC build-up on roads. PMID:21444102

  13. Assessing uncertainty in pollutant build-up and wash-off processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-05-01

    Assessing build-up and wash-off process uncertainty is important for accurate interpretation of model outcomes to facilitate informed decision making for developing effective stormwater pollution mitigation strategies. Uncertainty inherent to pollutant build-up and wash-off processes influences the variations in pollutant loads entrained in stormwater runoff from urban catchments. However, build-up and wash-off predictions from stormwater quality models do not adequately represent such variations due to poor characterisation of the variability of these processes in mathematical models. The changes to the mathematical form of current models with the incorporation of process variability, facilitates accounting for process uncertainty without significantly affecting the model prediction performance. Moreover, the investigation of uncertainty propagation from build-up to wash-off confirmed that uncertainty in build-up process significantly influences wash-off process uncertainty. Specifically, the behaviour of particles <150 μm during build-up primarily influences uncertainty propagation, resulting in appreciable variations in the pollutant load and composition during a wash-off event. PMID:26840516

  14. Electron contamination and build-up doses in conformal radiotherapy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsell, A R; Wilkinson, J M

    1999-01-01

    The dose in the build-up region depends upon the primary photon beam, backscattered radiation from the patient and contamination radiation from outside the patient. In this paper, a model based on measured data is proposed which allows the build-up dose for arbitrarily shaped treatment fields to be determined. The dose in the build-up region is assumed to comprise a primary photon component and a contamination component that is a function of the field size and shape. This contamination component, for modelling purposes, is subdivided into contributions that correspond to elements of 1 cm by 1 cm cross-sectional area at the plane of the isocentre. The magnitude of these components has been obtained by fitting measured data to an exponential function. The exponent was found to vary linearly with depth for energies between 4 MV and 20 MV. The coefficient decreased linearly with depth at 4, 6 and 8 MV, but exhibited a broad build-up region at 20 MV. The primary component, in the build-up region, could be approximated by a 100 - (100 - PSD) e(-mu d) function, where PSD is the primary surface dose. The values obtained during the fitting procedure were used to calculate dose in the build-up region for arbitrarily shaped fields. Good agreement was found in each case. PMID:10071874

  15. Understanding the build-up of SMBH and Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Francisco; Georgakakis, Antonis; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akylas, Thanassis; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Castello, N.

    2015-09-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  16. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in radiotherapy x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper presents the results of a series of calculations to determine buildup factors for ordinary concrete, baryte concrete, lead, steel, and iron in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 0.125 to 25.125 MeV at 0.250 MeV intervals.Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials.Results: The computation of the primary broad beams using buildup factors data was done for nine published megavoltage photon beam spectra ranging from 4 to 25 MV in nominal energies, representing linacs made by the three major manufacturers. The first tenth value layer and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these nine primary megavoltage photon beam spectra.Conclusions: The results, compared with published data, show the ability of these buildup factor data to predict shielding transmission curves for the primary radiation beam. Therefore, the buildup factor data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to perform computation of broad beam transmission for barriers in radiotherapy shielding x-ray facilities

  18. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, An [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Cooperative Research and Education Centre for Environmental Technology, Kyoto University–Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Guan, Yuntao, E-mail: guanyt@tsinghua.edu.cn [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse.

  19. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse

  20. Depositional evolution of lower permian Palaeoaplysina build-ups, Kapp duner formation, Bjørnøya, Arctic Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmerik, L.; Larson, P. A.; Larssen, G. B.; Mørk, A.; Simonsen, B. T.

    1994-09-01

    The Lower Permian Kapp Duner Formation on Bjørnøya includes an approximately 45 m thick Palaeoaplysina build-up complex. This complex is composed of stacked cycles of thin (0-1 m thick) restricted shelf mudstones and thicker (< 10 m thick) build-ups of Palaeoaplysina wackestone to boundstone capped by subaerial exposure surfaces. In the lower part of the complex, the build-ups are tabular and laterally more widespread than the lenticular build-ups found in the upper part of the complex. The depositional cycles most likely formed in response to fourth-order glacio-eustatic fluctuations in sea level, while the history of the build-up complex is controlled by longer-term, third-order fluctuations in relative sea level. The position of the build-up complex is structurally controlled.

  1. On spatial stabilization of dielectric barrier discharge microfilaments by residual heat build-up in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráhel, Jozef; Szalay, Zsolt; Čech, Jan; Morávek, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Microfilaments of dielectric barrier discharge are known for their multiple re-appearance at the same spot on dielectrics. This effect of localized re-appearance is driven by residual excited species and ions, surface charge deposited on the dielectric and the local temperature build-up resulting in the local increase of reduced electric field E/ ΔN. To assess the magnitude of the latter, the breakdown voltage vs. temperature up to 180 °C was carefully measured at coplanar DBD and used as an input into the numerical simulation of heat build-up by the train of discharge pulses. An average reduction of breakdown voltage was found to be 20 V/K. The model predicted a quasi-stable microfilament temperature into which the thermal build-up rapidly converges. Its magnitude agreed well with the reported rotational temperature of similar electrode configuration. The impact of quasi-stable temperature on microfilament formation dynamics is further discussed.

  2. Build-Up Of Actinides In Irradiated Fuel Rods Of The ETRR-1 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ETRR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ETRR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% '235U enrichment for ETRR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated

  3. Coupling of helicity and power for spheromak buildup and sustainment in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Woodruff, S.; Fowler, T. K.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; Bulmer, R. H.; McLean, H. S.

    2001-10-01

    Coaxial gun-injected power provides buildup and sustainment in SSPX. Current flowing along the open field lines in the spheromak edge dissipates power in electrode sheaths, the resistive edge, and coupling to plasma turbulence. In this paper we compare both power and helicity balance models to calculate plasma buildup. Because both power and helicity are rapidly dissipated in the sheaths and edge resistance, the power and helicity input providing for buildup is modeled from the observed increase in gun impedance above a current threshold. Measurements of the gun voltage and current provide information on the gun impedance. From Thomson scattering measurements of the electron temperature and the CORSICA mhd equilibrium, estimates can be made for the edge dissipation and ηJ^2 resistive losses within the spheromak core. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  4. The variation of contrast and build-up factor by scattered radiations in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An equation considering the influence of scattered radiation in radiography is suggested. In experiment with Ir-192 to a carbon steel step wedge, the trend of estimated build-up factors shows increasing with thickness and changes to decreasing for larger thicknesses. Comparing the measured contrast to the calculated one which is obtained without considering the effect of scattered radiations, it is shown that the measured contrast is lower than the calculated one. On the other hand, in the experiment with poly-energetic X-ray, the trend of estimated build-up factors shows decreasing with thickness and then changes to increasing for larger thickness. The measured contrast is also higher than the calculated one for smaller thickness and then changes to lower compared to the calculated with increment of thickness. It is found that the peculiar behaviors of build-up factors and contrast with X-ray has been caused by considering the linear absorption coefficient as a constant.

  5. Limit equilibrium analysis of translational failure of landfills under different leachate buildup conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Xuede

    2008-01-01

    Excessive leachate levels in landfills can be a major triggering mechanism for translational failure. The scope of this paper is to present the development of the calculation methods for limit equilibrium analysis of translational failure of landfills and the effects of parametric variation on the factor of safety (FS) of landfills under different leachate buildup conditions. During the development of the calculation methods, 4 leachate buildup conditions are considered. The FS for an interface with high friction angle and low apparent cohesion generally drops much more quickly when leachate levels are increased than that for an interface under inverse conditions. The critical interface of a muitilayer liner system with the lowest FS for the entire waste mass can shift from one to another with changes in the leachate levels. The different interfaces of a multilayer liner will have different FS-values under different leachate buildup conditions.

  6. Investigations of mass attenuation coefficients and exposure buildup factors of some low-Z building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Low cost materials show better shielding effectiveness than concrete for E > 1 MeV. ► Correlation between Zeff and EBF for shielding effectiveness. ► Buildup factors are necessary to study shielding properties of materials. - Abstract: To check the gamma ray shielding properties of selected low-Z building materials such as Soil-I, Soil-II, Dolomite, Gypsum, Igneous Rock and Lime Stone, some parameters of dosimetric interest have been investigated in the energy range 0.015–15 MeV. The photon interactions with the samples have been discussed mainly in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number and exposure buildup factor. From the present investigations, it has been concluded that the values of exposure buildup factors are very large in the medium energy region and Soil-I acts as best gamma ray shielding material among the selected samples.

  7. Change in surface SP caused by pressure buildup observed at the Nigorikawa geothermal area; Nigorikawa chiiki ni okeru atsuryoku buildup ji no shizen den`i henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasukawa, K.; Yano, Y.; Matsushima, N.; Ishido, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Takahashi, M.; Suzuki, I.; Aoyama, K.; Kuwano, T.

    1996-10-01

    To examine the effect of change of subsurface flow system on the surface SP (self potential), SP measurements were carried out before and after the pressure buildup and drawdown during the periodic inspection at Nigorikawa area. Relation between the SP distribution and the observed data was also examined by 2-D numerical simulation. Tendency was found that the SP increased gradually with the production near the production well, decreased during the pressure buildup, and increased again during the drawdown. There were some points having the reverse tendency in the surrounding area. Behavior during the pressure buildup and drawdown was not clear. The resistivity near the ground surface was low ranging between 2 and 5 ohm/m within the Nigorikawa basin. The variation of SP was not so large when compared with the measuring error. The SP profiles on the secondary section passing in the center of caldera at the production stop and at one week after the production start were well corresponded with the profiles under natural conditions which were reproduces using the 2-D model. It was considered that the SP profile before the production stop was affected by the production. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Analysis of Performance on Spring-Supported Thrust Pads Inclusive of One-Dimensional Pressure Build-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In the paper, a solution of one dimensional fore-region pressure build-up is put forward. The performance of spring-supported thrust bearing is carried out with 3-dimensional thermo-elasto hydrodynamic (TEHD) lubrication theory inclusive of inlet pressure build-up, thermal-elastic distortion of pad and thermal effect. The effects of fore-region pressure build-up and the variation of some operating conditions on the performance of the pad are studied.

  9. Variation of energy absorption build-up factor with penetration depth for some titanium compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Lovedeep; Rani Pooja; Ghumman SS

    2016-01-01

    The buildup factor is an important characteristic that need to be studied and determined prior to using a material clinically in radiation treatment and protection. Energy absorption buildup factors for some titanium compounds like Titanium dioxide (TiO2), Titanium Carbide (TiC), Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Silicate (TiSi2) has been calculated using the G.P. fitting technique upto penetration depth of 40 mean free path (mfp) and in an energy range from 0.015 to 15.0 MeV. The variation...

  10. A method of the sensitivity analysis of build-up and decay of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To make sensitivity analysis of build-up and decay of actinides, mathematical methods related to this problem have been investigated in detail. Application of time-dependent perturbation technique and Bateman method to sensitivity analysis is mainly studied. For the purpose, a basic equation and its adjoint equation for build-up and decay of actinides are systematically solved by introducing Laplace and modified Laplace transforms and their convolution theorems. Then, the mathematical method of sensitivity analyses is formulated by the above technique; its physical significance is also discussed. Finally, application of eigenvalue-method is investigated. Sensitivity coefficients can be directly calculated by this method. (auth.)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. Results: An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. Conclusions: The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  12. The needs for prediction and real-time monitoring for the flare build-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svestka, Z.

    1979-01-01

    Similarities between plasma instabilities occurring in the magnetospheric tail and in active regions on the Sun are discussed. Intense observations of the flare build-up processes on the Sun planned for May and June 1980 as a part of the Solar Maximum Year are described.

  13. Implications for flare build-up and heating from observations made by OSO-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the EUV and soft X-ray emission in the event on January 19, 1972 are discussed in terms of the slow (passive) and fast (active) phases of flare evolution that were previously discussed. The implications are summarized for a flare build-up model which was derived-from these observations.

  14. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  15. A study of the energy absorption and exposure buildup factors of some anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human radiation exposure is increasing due to radiation development in science and technology. The development of radioprotective agents is important for protecting patients from the side effects of radiotherapy and for protecting the public from unwanted irradiation. Radioprotective agents are used to reduce the damage caused by radiation in healthy tissues. There are several classes of radioprotective compounds that are under investigation. Analgesics and anti-inflammatory compounds are being considered for treating or preventing the effects of damage due to radiation exposure, or for increasing the chance of survival after exposure to a high dose of radiation. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of some analgesic and anti-inflammatory compounds by evaluating buildup factors. The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) were calculated to select compounds in a 0.015–15 MeV energy region up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth elements were also investigated. Significant variations in both EABF and EBF values were observed for several compounds at the moderate energy region. At energies below 0.15 MeV, EABF and EBF values increased with decreasing equivalent atomic number (Zeq) of the samples. In addition, EABF and EBF were the largest for ibuprofen, aspirin, paracetamol, naproxen and ketoprofen at 0.05 and 0.06 MeV, respectively, and the EABF value was 0.1 MeV for aceclofenac. From these results, we concluded that the buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac compared to other materials. - Highlights: • Buildup factors of anti-inflammatory drugs have been calculated by a G-P fitting method. • Zeff of diclofenac was observed higher than other compounds. • It was found that buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac and diclofenac. • It would be appealing to use aceclofenac and diclofenac as radioprotective

  16. Investigation of cobalt buildup behavior and suppression by zinc injection on stainless steel under HWC conditions using simultaneous continuous measurements of corrosion and cobalt buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In boiling water reactor (BWR) plants, cobalt-60 (60Co) is the main source of radiation exposure, and it builds up on oxide films of structural materials. The 60Co buildup is caused by its incorporation into the oxide films. In the BWR plants using hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to mitigate the oxidative environment, Zn injection has been applied to reduce the 60Co incorporation. In this work, we studied the incorporation mechanism of 60Co into the oxide films on type 316 stainless steel and the suppression mechanism of 60Co incorporation. In order to discriminate between coprecipitation and adsorption of 60Co incorporation under HWC conditions, we measured the corrosion amount of the base metal and the 60Co buildup amount, using simultaneous continuous measurements for 500 h. The 60Co incorporation increased with time both with and without Zn injections. We found that the time dependencies of 60Co incorporation with and without Zn have one and two regions, respectively. In the initial stage for both, 60Co was incorporated mainly by coprecipitation. After 100 h without Zn, 60Co was incorporated by both coprecipitation and adsorption. These results mean that Zn suppressed both coprecipitation and adsorption of 60Co. (author)

  17. Simulations of the electron cloud buildups and suppressions in Tevatron and main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effects of the electron cloud on Main Injector intensity upgrades, simulations of the cloud buildup were carried out using POSINST and compared with ECLOUD. Results indicate that even assuming an optimistic 1.3 maximum secondary electron yield, the electron cloud remains a serious concern for the planned future operational mode with 500 bunches, 3e11 proton per bunch. Electron cloud buildup can be mitigated in various ways. We consider a plausible scenario involving solenoids in straight section and a single clearing strip electrode (like SNEG in Tevatron) held at a potential of 500V. Simulations with parameters corresponding to Tevatron and Main Injector operating conditions at locations where special electron cloud detectors have been installed have been carried out and are in satisfactory agreement with preliminary measurements

  18. New and Modified Equations for Planning Two-Buildup Directional and Horizontal Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Tengfei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-buildup directional and horizontal well is usually used for the type trajectory that the target zone is accurate but build rate is not. In the past and at present, the petroleum engineers use the Karlsson method and equations to design the two-buildup directional and horizontal well. But through rigid derivation and analysis, we have found some places that need to be improved. This study has put forward new and modified equations on the basis of Karlsson method. The new method considers the maximum and minimum build rates expected in the first and second curves and supposes that the upper and lower bound trajectory are all two-build up trajectory type. This study also has considered the difference of the maximum and minimum build rates expected in the second curve and the first curve. The new and modified method and equations are tested through two examples.

  19. Corrosion product transport and radiation field buildup modelling in the BWR primary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data obtained from several operating BWRs with a variety of water quality and operating history have been evaluated. The shutdown radiation fields measured at the recirculation piping were found initially to increase over a wide range of buildup rates, but they generally level off in about 5 years of operation. The radiation levels in some plants remain in the vicinity of 100 mR/h during their history. Based on the observed data and known chemical/physical phenomena, major corrosion product transport mechanisms have been hypothesized and a mathematical model of corrosion product transport and radiation field buildup in the BWR primary system has been developed. Calculations using the model are capable of reproducing the observed data well within the experimental uncertainties and confirm that the radiation fields in the operating plants can be controlled and reduced by plant operational practices. (author)

  20. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on radiation field buildup in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of boiling water reactor (BWR) plants worldwide are currently operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). In some reactors, when switching from normal water chemistry (NWC) to HWC, an increase in the recirculation piping dose rates has been observed. Understanding the key factors which affect the dose rate increase is the subject of our current investigation. Laboratory experiments have been conducted under controlled chemistry conditions to examine the rates of 60Co deposition and the characteristic of oxide films formed on stainless steel surfaces. The activity buildup data obtained from two operating BWRs are carefully reviewed and discussed in this paper. Based on both laboratory and reactor data, a plausible mechanism of enhanced activity buildup under HWC conditions is hypothesized. (orig.)

  1. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level waste, leads to hydrogen gas generation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous modeling studies used a constant H2 generation rate. However, iron corrosion and H2 generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as water chemistry, water availability, and water contact area. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas pressure buildup and water consumption. Results indicate that if H2 generation rates are dynamically calculated based on a chemistry model, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup are much smaller compared to a simulation in which the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanism is neglected

  2. Gamma-ray energy absorption and exposure buildup factor studies in some human tissues with endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Dogan, Bekir [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ingec, Metin [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ekinci, Neslihan; Ozdemir, Yueksel [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Human tissues with endometriosis have been analyzed in terms of energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Chemical compositions of the tissue samples were determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Possible conclusions were drawn due to significant variations in EABF and EBF for the selected tissues when photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition changed. Buildup factors so obtained may be of use when the method of choice for treatment of endometriosis is radiotherapy.

  3. Gamma-ray energy absorption and exposure buildup factor studies in some human tissues with endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human tissues with endometriosis have been analyzed in terms of energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Chemical compositions of the tissue samples were determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Possible conclusions were drawn due to significant variations in EABF and EBF for the selected tissues when photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition changed. Buildup factors so obtained may be of use when the method of choice for treatment of endometriosis is radiotherapy.

  4. Calculation and measurement of build-up factors in divergent gamma radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and the results are presented of the calculation and experimental determination of build-up factors in a broad divergent gamma radiation beam passing through a planar layer of material. A computer program based on the Monte Carlo method is described as is the experimental configuration used. The dependence was determined of the build-up factor on the beam collimation angle, the distance of the source and the distance of the detector from the layer to be radiographed. No dependence was confirmed on the detector diameter. The measurements conducted confirmed agreement with the calculated results within the maximum error limit of +-10%. The results of calculation and measurements are shown in graphs

  5. Correlation between Co-60 and X-ray exposures on radiation-induced charge buildup in silicon-on-insulator buried oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large differences in charge buildup in SOI buried oxides can result between x-ray and Co-60 irradiations. The effects of bias configuration and substrate type on charge buildup and hardness assurance issues are explored

  6. State Interests and Symbolism in India’s Nuclear Build-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    India’s nuclear build-up, which culminated in the 1998 nuclear tests and India’s subsequent self-declaration as a nuclear power, bears several puzzles for academic research in the field of strategic studies, as it appears difficult to identify clear strategic motives behind it. In its relations to arch rival Pakistan, the introduction of nuclear weapons was strategically rather counter productive for India, as the equalising effects of these weapons diminished much of India’s overwhelming sup...

  7. A belief analysis of the build-up to the 2003 Iraq War

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Salim Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    This project aims to analyse the build-up to the 2003 Iraq war from a doxastic perspective, taking the nuclear and terror belief propositions as the paradigm of the professed rationale for the war. The Bush administration expressed a belief in favour of the given rationale under conditions epistemically inadequate to warrant belief. I will explore the concept of belief in relation to acceptance and faith in a bid to highlight the distinctive character of belief. The research aims to examine a...

  8. Secondary side TSP deposit buildup: lab test investigation focused on electrokinetic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barale, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M., E-mail: Morgan.Barale@areva.com [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre, Le Creusot (France); Ryckelynck, N.; Clinard, M-H.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group, Paris (France); Corredera, G. [Electricite de France, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation, Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-07-01

    Deposit buildup which caused the clogging of the 'foils' of the upper tube-support-plates (TSP) inside a PWR steam generator of French NPPs in 2006 presents certain similarities with deposits observed in lab tests performed in secondary coolant chemistry at the Technical Centre of AREVA NP in 2002. The mechanism of TSP clogging seems not to present obvious phenomenological links with the fouling of the free span of SG since deposits buildup is quite uniform and is currently related to a surface boiling effect due to the surface heat flux. A specific mechanism could account for TSP clogging. In particular, electrokinetic effects were investigated by EDF-CEIDRE and AREVA NP SAS in the framework of a lab test program started in 2007. The electrokinetic approach is to consider that the coupling of local hydrodynamic and surface electrochemistry could lead to the formation of a very localized and heterogeneous deposit at the leading edge between both TSP and SG tubing material. Electrokinetic effects can lead to the oxidation and/or the precipitation of ferrous ions and to a variation of the electrokinetic potential which can produce strong attraction of iron oxide colloids. These electrokinetic effects are dependent of the T/H and local hydrodynamic conditions and surface electrochemistry explaining. The objective of this EDF-AREVA lab test program is to investigate the role of secondary chemistry coolant (pH, DH, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}, amine, redox) and of the nature of materials (SS, Ni base alloy) on deposit buildup. Properties of oxide surface and zeta potential of oxidized metallic materials have been also determined at temperature to understand their potential contribution on mechanism of TSP clogging in secondary side chemistry coolant. In this paper, a set of specific experiments carried out in this frame have been presented and discussed, paying particular attention to the effects of electrokinetic considerations and surface charges at oxide

  9. Optimal Pile Arrangement for Minimizing Excess Pore Water Pressure Build-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Saadati, Meysam; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    2013-01-01

    constitutive model for sandy soil, strength and stiffness reduction, and pile-soil interaction. The Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model coupled with Byrne pore pressure build-up model have been employed in the analysis. Numerical analysis results show that pile groups have significant influence on the dynamic...... response of sandy soil as they reduce the amount of excess pore pressure development during seismic shaking and may even prevent liquefaction....

  10. Shielded button electrodes for time-resolved measurements of electron cloud buildup

    OpenAIRE

    Crittenden, James A.; Billing, Michael G.; Li, Yulin; Palmer, Mark A.; Sikora, John P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded button electrodes sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors, derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design, have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time...

  11. Simulations of electron cloud build-up and saturation in the APS

    OpenAIRE

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R. A.; Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.

    2002-01-01

    In studies with positron beams in the Advanced Photon Source, a dramatic amplification was observed in the electron cloud for certain bunch current and bunch spacings. In modeling presented previously, we found qualitative agreement with the observed beam-induced multipacting condition, provided reasonable values were chosen for the secondary electron yield parameters, including the energy distribution. In this paper, we model and discuss the build-up and saturation process observed ove...

  12. Electron Cloud Buildup Characterization Using Shielded Pickup Measurements and Custom Modeling Code at CESRTA

    OpenAIRE

    Crittenden, James A.; Sikora, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experimental program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup, applying various mitigation techniques in custom vacuum chambers. Among these are two 1.1-m-long sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions. These chambers are equipped with pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of small holes in the top of the chambe...

  13. Secondary side TSP deposit buildup: lab test investigation focused on electrokinetic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposit buildup which caused the clogging of the 'foils' of the upper tube-support-plates (TSP) inside a PWR steam generator of French NPPs in 2006 presents certain similarities with deposits observed in lab tests performed in secondary coolant chemistry at the Technical Centre of AREVA NP in 2002. The mechanism of TSP clogging seems not to present obvious phenomenological links with the fouling of the free span of SG since deposits buildup is quite uniform and is currently related to a surface boiling effect due to the surface heat flux. A specific mechanism could account for TSP clogging. In particular, electrokinetic effects were investigated by EDF-CEIDRE and AREVA NP SAS in the framework of a lab test program started in 2007. The electrokinetic approach is to consider that the coupling of local hydrodynamic and surface electrochemistry could lead to the formation of a very localized and heterogeneous deposit at the leading edge between both TSP and SG tubing material. Electrokinetic effects can lead to the oxidation and/or the precipitation of ferrous ions and to a variation of the electrokinetic potential which can produce strong attraction of iron oxide colloids. These electrokinetic effects are dependent of the T/H and local hydrodynamic conditions and surface electrochemistry explaining. The objective of this EDF-AREVA lab test program is to investigate the role of secondary chemistry coolant (pH, DH, N2H4, amine, redox) and of the nature of materials (SS, Ni base alloy) on deposit buildup. Properties of oxide surface and zeta potential of oxidized metallic materials have been also determined at temperature to understand their potential contribution on mechanism of TSP clogging in secondary side chemistry coolant. In this paper, a set of specific experiments carried out in this frame have been presented and discussed, paying particular attention to the effects of electrokinetic considerations and surface charges at oxide-solution interfaces in

  14. Deposit buildup on prosthetic eyes and implications for conjunctival inflammation and mucoid discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Pine KR; Sloan B; Jacobs RJ

    2012-01-01

    Keith Raymond Pine,1 Brian Sloan,2 Robert John Jacobs11Department of Optometry and Vision Science, 2New Zealand National Eye Centre, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandBackground: The aim of this study was to investigate deposit buildup on prosthetic eyes and the implications for conjunctival inflammation and discharge.Methods: Forty-three prosthetic eye wearers participated in the study. Twenty-three had their prostheses polished normally before being worn continuously for 2 we...

  15. Exposure Buildup Factors for Heavy Metal Oxide Glass: A Radiation Shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manonara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif;

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray exposure buildup factors for three Heavy Metal Oxide (HMO) glass systems, viz. PbO-Bi2O3-B2O3, PbO-B2O3, and Bi2O3-B2O3 glasses are presented. The computations were done by interpolation method using the Geometric Progression fitting formula and ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 library for the energy range...

  16. Gamma-ray dose at shield-tissue interfaces and buildup factor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buildup factors continue to be widely used for gamma-ray shield design, but there are several problems in application. Shure has pointed out the need for buildup factors to be consistent with the ANSI standard flux-to-dose factors. However, consistent buildup factor data cannot be obtained by simply integrating the ANSI response function over infinite-medium spectra, because this function gives the response at various depths in a tissue phantom for a gamma ray of a certain energy entering the phantom. The ANSI response function can only be applied to a spectrum emerging from a shield as determined from a transport calculation. In order to evaluate the dose in tissue from gamma rays which have penetrated a shield, a detailed transport study was undertaken at the Safety Research Laboratory at Kalpakkam in collaboration with the Radiation shielding Information Center. Computations were made using the one-dimensional transport code ASFIT which has recently been extended to treat the secondary sources of fluorescence and bremsstrahlung. Results are reported

  17. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: implication for stormwater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a "fit-for-purpose" road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. PMID:25687783

  18. Optimal Thermo-Structural Analysis for High Density Package Mounting on Build-up Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tohru; Hase, Tomohiro

    The importance of the high density packaging technology and mounting technology on the printed wiring build-up board has been increased for the consumer electric products. On the other hand, the chance to use the build-up boards for mounting the high density packages has been increased. However, the understanding that the reliability of the solder connection depends on the structure of the package, the motherboard, and the material properties, is not very high. In this paper, the reliability for high density packaging, mounted on the build-up board, is assessed. The compact numerical analysis model for the reliability assessment is suggested and the most reliable packaging design with optimizing each of the parameters is reported. For introduction to the reliability assessment of the FCA attachment, ceramic and silicon are compared as the inter-poser with the parameter of the solder height. The verification of the numerical analysis results using tests on the actual hardware is also shown. And the established numerical analysis model is applied to the study of influence of the copper balance between the front side and the back side copper layers.

  19. γ-ray attenuation coefficient and dose buildup factor of various building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the γ-ray attenuation coefficient and the dose buildup factor of various building materials, which are of great importance for estimation of the shielding effect of residential houses against γ-rays. The linear attenuation coefficients were measured for 19 building materials with γ-rays and filtered X-rays at energies ranging 44 - 1,250 keV. A corresponding atomic number, Zcor, was defined as an atomic number of the element having the mass attenuation coefficients akin to those of the material. According to Zcor, materials were classified into two groups: one is Zcor = 7 - 9 and the other is Zcor = 13 - 16. The dose buildup factors were measured for 4 materials selected from each material group with γ-rays and filtered X-rays at energies ranging 68 - 1,250 keV. It was found for the thin materials such as ordinary building materials, that the dose buildup factor could be represented approximately by the linear formula, BD = 1 + αμt, and α was characterized by both γ-ray energy and material group. (author)

  20. Flare build-up study; Proceedings of the Workshop, Falmouth, Mass., September 8-11, 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svestka, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with problems which might be common to solar flares and earth's magnetosphere, problems associated with the initial phases of the flare phenomenon, the acceleration processes that seem to occur in flares and the magnetosphere, as well as the buildup and storage of flare energy in magnetic-field structures. Topics include the active role of magnetic fields in providing flare energy, current-sheet models of solar flares, the role of plasma turbulence in flare development, similarities and differences between magnetospheric substorms and solar flares, observations of magnetic merging in earth's magnetotail during magnetospheric substorms, evidence for magnetic-energy storage in coronal active regions, the possible role of transition-zone instabilities in preflare energy buildup, and flare energy storage and deposition. Other papers discuss energy release through the interaction of coronal magnetic fields, photospheric electric currents as a source of flare energy, magnetic-energy buildup in the solar atmosphere, magnetic and velocity fields in an active region, flare onset at meter wavelengths, laboratory experiments on field-line reconnection, key problems in auroral flare processes, and the solar-physics Shuttle/Spacelab program. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    . With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials......Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary......, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor...

  2. Gamma Ray Buildup Factor for Finite Media in Energy Range (4-10) MeV for Al and Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program based on Monte Carlo method had been designed and written in visual basic computer language and utilized for simulating the classic problem of gamma ray beam incident on finite plane slabs of absorbing materials.The source geometry adopted in this program is plane normal source. Dose buildup factor of gamma photons in the absence and presence pair production effect have been calculated in the energy range (4-10) MeV for Aluminum and Lead up to 5 mean free path thickness.Dose buildup factor in the presence of pair production is higher than dose buildup factor in the absence of pair production effect.The deviation between the values of dose buildup factor in the presence and absence pair production is increased when the energy is increased within the studied energy range because the cross section for pair production is increased within the studied energy range

  3. Monitoring the progress of build-up formation in fatty alcohol plant pipelines using gamma-ray scanning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to monitor the progress of material build-up formation in fatty acid alcohol pipelines using gamma ray absorption techniques. The investigation was periodically performed at few selected location which has been defined as critical area. Before performing a scan, the intensity of the gamma ray as a reference at the clean pipe should be determined. From the gamma ray absorption principle, the intensity of the radiation initial and the radiation after it pass through a material should be different, so the thickness of the build-up in the pipeline can be determined. As a result, base on this early information of the actual condition of the build-up formation, the more effective maintenance schedule can be planned. From that, the maintenance cost which is due to the build-up formation could be minimise as low as possible. (Author)

  4. Assessment of exposure buildup factors of some oxide dispersion strengthened steels applied in modern nuclear engineering and designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Vishwanath P., E-mail: kudphyvps@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580003 (India); Health Physics Section, Kaiga Atomic Power Station-3 and 4, NPCIL, Karwar 581400 (India); Medhat, M.E., E-mail: medhatme@ymail.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Centre, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Badiger, N.M. [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580003 (India)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We report new data on energy absorption and exposure buildup factor for some oxide dispersion strengthened steels. • The GP fitting method can be used to calculate buildup factors up to 40 mfp. • These parameters are useful in reactor and to its structural shielding materials. - Abstract: The gamma-ray exposure buildup factors of oxide dispersive-strengthen (ODS) steel alloys have been computed for photon energy 0.015–15 MeV up to 40 mean free path (mfp) penetration depth by geometrical progression (GP) method. An appreciable variation in exposure buildup factors for the investigated ODS steel alloys was observed. The exposure buildup factors of ODS alloys were observed strongly depending upon the photon energy, penetration depths and the chemical compositions. The exposure buildup factors were found to be small in low- and high-photon energy whereas these were very large in intermediate-energy region. Our investigation signifies that the Eurofer 97 ODS steel alloy is the superior gamma-ray and neutron shielding materials. This study should be useful for shielding design and application in future reactor technologies and fusion reactor blankets.

  5. Approximating model for multilayer gamma-ray buildup factors by transmission matrix method: Application to point isotropic source geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximating formula recently proposed by the authors for gamma-ray buildup factors of multilayered shields is applied to point isotropic source problems. The formula, which is formulated in vector form with a four-group approximation, handles the gamma-ray energy spectrum directly and uses the transmission and albedo matrices to take gamma-ray transmission and backscattering effects into consideration. The gamma-ray transmission and back-scattering probabilities through a 1-mean-free-path- (mfp-) thick shell depend on the shell curvature. This phenomenon plays an important role in simulating the gamma-ray buildup factor in point isotropic source geometry. In this model, the dependence is described by simplified expressions. The feasibility of the formula for systematically describing the point isotropic buildup factors was tested by using buildup factors calculated by the Monte Carlo method as reference data. The materials used in the tests were water, iron, and lead, and the source energies assumed were 0.5, 1, and 10 MeV. Through the tests, the method was found to reproduce the reference data of double-layered shields of these materials very well. With the same parameters, the buildup factors of three-layered shields are also reproducible. Buildup factors computed with two different group structures were examined to test the adequacy of the energy group structure adopted. The group structure previously adopted was found to be adequate in the energy range of 0.5 to 10 MeV

  6. Interpolation of gamma-ray buildup factors in atomic number, using the geometrical progression (G-P) parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The values of buildup factors for specified energy above K-edges and penetration distance vary smoothly with respect to atomic number, and the geometrical progression (G-P) parameters behave also similarly. An interpolation of buildup factors for an arbitrary elemental material was examined using the G-P parameters for an equivalent atomic number, where the G-P parameters are data fitted to the proposed American National Standard buildup factor data compilation of 17 elements from Be to Mo calculated by the moments method and those for 8 elements of Fe, Mo, Sn, La, Gd, W, Pb and U, including bremsstrahlung and fluorescence, calculated by the PALLAS code. It has been confirmed through various tests over a wide range of atomic number that the values of the buildup factors generated by interpolated G-P parameters can accurately reproduce the basic data calculated directly over the full range of energy within a few percent. The values of equivalent atomic number for mixture materials, such as water, air, concrete and lead glass of the density 4.36, are determined from a ratio of scattering cross section to the total attenuation coefficient. The buildup factors for these materials calculated using the G-P parameters, interpolated by the equivalent atomic number, are in good agreement with the basic data, except the buildup factors for lead glass to γ-ray energy above 3 MeV. (author)

  7. Assessment of exposure buildup factors of some oxide dispersion strengthened steels applied in modern nuclear engineering and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report new data on energy absorption and exposure buildup factor for some oxide dispersion strengthened steels. • The GP fitting method can be used to calculate buildup factors up to 40 mfp. • These parameters are useful in reactor and to its structural shielding materials. - Abstract: The gamma-ray exposure buildup factors of oxide dispersive-strengthen (ODS) steel alloys have been computed for photon energy 0.015–15 MeV up to 40 mean free path (mfp) penetration depth by geometrical progression (GP) method. An appreciable variation in exposure buildup factors for the investigated ODS steel alloys was observed. The exposure buildup factors of ODS alloys were observed strongly depending upon the photon energy, penetration depths and the chemical compositions. The exposure buildup factors were found to be small in low- and high-photon energy whereas these were very large in intermediate-energy region. Our investigation signifies that the Eurofer 97 ODS steel alloy is the superior gamma-ray and neutron shielding materials. This study should be useful for shielding design and application in future reactor technologies and fusion reactor blankets

  8. Uncertainty analysis of pollutant build-up modelling based on a Bayesian weighted least squares approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Khaled [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Building XB, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Egodawatta, Prasanna [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4001 (Australia); Rahman, Ataur [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Building XB, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Goonetilleke, Ashantha, E-mail: a.goonetilleke@qut.edu.au [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4001 (Australia)

    2013-04-01

    Reliable pollutant build-up prediction plays a critical role in the accuracy of urban stormwater quality modelling outcomes. However, water quality data collection is resource demanding compared to streamflow data monitoring, where a greater quantity of data is generally available. Consequently, available water quality datasets span only relatively short time scales unlike water quantity data. Therefore, the ability to take due consideration of the variability associated with pollutant processes and natural phenomena is constrained. This in turn gives rise to uncertainty in the modelling outcomes as research has shown that pollutant loadings on catchment surfaces and rainfall within an area can vary considerably over space and time scales. Therefore, the assessment of model uncertainty is an essential element of informed decision making in urban stormwater management. This paper presents the application of a range of regression approaches such as ordinary least squares regression, weighted least squares regression and Bayesian weighted least squares regression for the estimation of uncertainty associated with pollutant build-up prediction using limited datasets. The study outcomes confirmed that the use of ordinary least squares regression with fixed model inputs and limited observational data may not provide realistic estimates. The stochastic nature of the dependent and independent variables need to be taken into consideration in pollutant build-up prediction. It was found that the use of the Bayesian approach along with the Monte Carlo simulation technique provides a powerful tool, which attempts to make the best use of the available knowledge in prediction and thereby presents a practical solution to counteract the limitations which are otherwise imposed on water quality modelling. - Highlights: ► Water quality data spans short time scales leading to significant model uncertainty. ► Assessment of uncertainty essential for informed decision making in water

  9. Uncertainty analysis of pollutant build-up modelling based on a Bayesian weighted least squares approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Khaled; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Rahman, Ataur; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-04-01

    Reliable pollutant build-up prediction plays a critical role in the accuracy of urban stormwater quality modelling outcomes. However, water quality data collection is resource demanding compared to streamflow data monitoring, where a greater quantity of data is generally available. Consequently, available water quality datasets span only relatively short time scales unlike water quantity data. Therefore, the ability to take due consideration of the variability associated with pollutant processes and natural phenomena is constrained. This in turn gives rise to uncertainty in the modelling outcomes as research has shown that pollutant loadings on catchment surfaces and rainfall within an area can vary considerably over space and time scales. Therefore, the assessment of model uncertainty is an essential element of informed decision making in urban stormwater management. This paper presents the application of a range of regression approaches such as ordinary least squares regression, weighted least squares regression and Bayesian weighted least squares regression for the estimation of uncertainty associated with pollutant build-up prediction using limited datasets. The study outcomes confirmed that the use of ordinary least squares regression with fixed model inputs and limited observational data may not provide realistic estimates. The stochastic nature of the dependent and independent variables need to be taken into consideration in pollutant build-up prediction. It was found that the use of the Bayesian approach along with the Monte Carlo simulation technique provides a powerful tool, which attempts to make the best use of the available knowledge in prediction and thereby presents a practical solution to counteract the limitations which are otherwise imposed on water quality modelling. PMID:23454702

  10. Photon buildup factors in some dosimetric materials for heterogeneous radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-03-01

    Effective photon energy absorption (EABF(eff)) and exposure buildup factors (EBF(eff)) have been calculated based on the effective energy concept, for some dosimetric materials such as water, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene, solid water (WT1), RW3 (Goettingen Water 3), and ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), for MV X-rays and (60)Co gamma rays. Firstly, the equivalent atomic numbers (Z(eq)) of the given materials have been determined using the effective photon energies (E eff). Then, the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting approximation has been used to calculate both EABF(eff) and EBF(eff) values. Since the G-P fitting parameters are not available for the E eff values of the given materials, a linear interpolation in which a function of the logarithm of the variable is used has been performed, in order to calculate the parameters in each E eff, which will be further used for the determination of EABF(eff) and EBF(eff). In the present paper, water equivalence properties of the given materials are also discussed based on the effective buildup factors. In this study, special emphasis is placed on the calculation of EABF(eff) and EBF(eff) values of different materials for photons that are not monoenergetic but heterogeneous in energy, to obtain an initial and prior knowledge of the probable energy and buildup of photons at locations of interest, i.e., to understand whether the real absorbed dose occurs at the surface or somewhere inside the medium of interest. PMID:24287785

  11. Correlation buildup during recrystallization in three-dimensional dusty plasma clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schella, André; Mulsow, Matthias; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The recrystallization process of finite three-dimensional dust clouds after laser heating is studied experimentally. The time-dependent Coulomb coupling parameter is presented, showing that the recrystallization starts with an exponential cooling phase where cooling is slower than damping by the neutral gas friction. At later times, the coupling parameter oscillates into equilibrium. It is found that a large fraction of cluster states after recrystallization experiments is in metastable states. The temporal evolution of the correlation buildup shows that correlation occurs on even slower time scale than cooling.

  12. Simulations of electron cloud build-up and saturation in the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studies with positron beams in the Advanced Photon Source, a dramatic amplification was observed in the electron cloud for certain bunch current and bunch spacings. In modeling presented previously, we found qualitative agreement with the observed beam-induced multipacting condition, provided reasonable values were chosen for the secondary electron yield parameters, including the energy distribution. In this paper, we model and discuss the build-up and saturation process observed over long bunch trains at the resonance condition. Understanding this saturation mechanism in more detail may have implications for predicting electron cloud amplification, multipacting, and instabilities in future rings

  13. Time-Scales for Non-Inductive Current Buildup in Low-Aspect-Ratio Toroidal Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental differences between inductive and non-inductive current buildup are clarified and the associated time-scales and other implications are discussed. A simulation is presented whereby the plasma current in a low-aspect-ratio torus is increased primarily by the self-generated bootstrap current with only 10% coming from external current drive. The maximum obtainable plasma current by this process is shown to scale with the toroidal field strength. The basic physics setting the time-scales can be obtained from a 1D analysis. Comparisons are made between the timescales found here and those reported in the experimental literature

  14. Rime Mushrooms - Extreme Rime Ice Buildup on Mountain Summits of Southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes are known among mountain climbers for a meteorological phenomenon that occurs there but is unknown in many other mountain areas. The phenomenon is the buildup of rime ice in large bulbous or mushroom-shaped accretions on the windward side of projecting mountain summits, ridges and exposed near-vertical rock faces. These "ice mushrooms" have never been investigated scientifically. This talk will introduce the audience to ice mushrooms, describe where they are found, consider the meteorological factors leading to their formation, and illustrate how they are negotiated by mountain climbers using photographs and descriptions from Southern Patagonia.

  15. The role of the buildup oscillations on the speed of resonant tunneling diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Romo, R; Romo, Roberto; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    The fastest tunneling response in double barrier resonant structures is investigated by considering explicit analytic solutions of the time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. For cutoff initial plane waves, we find that the earliest tunneling events consist on the emission of a series of propagating pulses of the probability density governed by the buildup oscillations in the quantum well. We show that the fastest tunneling response comes from the contribution of incident carriers at energies different from resonance, and that its relevant time scale is given by $\\tau_r=\\pi \\hbar /| E-\\epsilon | $, where $\\epsilon $ is the resonance energy and $E$ is the incidence energy.

  16. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on radiation field buildup in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) use high purity water as the neutron moderator and primary coolant in the production of steam. As a result of water radiolysis the coolant in the BWR under normal water chemistry (NWC) operation conditions contains approximately 200 ppb of oxidant (O2 + H2O2) in the recirculation line and several hundred ppb of oxidant in the core region. This range of the oxidant concentration increases the potential susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel and certain nickel base alloys to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when other requisite factors such as stress and sensitization are present. Modification of coolant chemistry by feedwater hydrogen addition is a viable option to mitigate SCC in operating plants. Currently, there are more than 20 BWRs worldwide operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions. In some reactors after switching from NWC to HWC, an increase in recirculation piping dose rates has been observed, but other plants have shown very minimal or no effect. Earlier laboratory test results have shown that Co-60 deposition on stainless steel is slightly enhanced by switching from NWC to HWC, and more recent experiments have shown that the activity buildup rate is more profound under cyclic HWC/NWC conditions. Both the reactor and laboratory data will be evaluated with the aid of oxide film characterization, and a plausible mechanism of enhanced activity buildup under HWC conditions will be hypothesized. (authors). 4 figs., 4 refs

  17. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point

  18. Investigation of Pectin/Chitosan Multilayers Build-up on Corona Charged Polylactide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovcheva, T. A.; Marudova, M. G.; Viraneva, A. P.; Gencheva, E. A.; Mekishev, G. A.; Sainov, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate the formation and stability of pectin/chitosan multilayer films on preliminary corona charged polylactide substrate with different polarity. For this purpose two different multilayer structures with alternative ordering of polycation and polyanion layers were prepared. Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique was used for multilayer build-up. The FT-IR transmittance spectra of the substrates with multilayers indicated of the presence of pectin and chitosan. The intensity of the typical bands was found to increase with increasing of the number of the deposited layers. The stability and physico-chemical properties of the multilayer structures were investigated by determination of surface refractive index and swelling behaviour. Multilayers are stable enough in distilled water and their equilibrium degree of swelling increases with the increase of build-up layers. This relation is correlated with the increased amount of hydrophilic biopolymers. It was found out that chitosan/pectin multilayers buil-up on negatively charged substrate consist of higher amount of polyelectrolytes and are more stable in distilled water.

  19. Prediction model of the buildup of volatile organic compounds on urban roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2011-05-15

    A model to predict the buildup of mainly traffic-generated volatile organic compounds or VOCs (toluene, ethylbenzene, ortho-xylene, meta-xylene, and para-xylene) on urban road surfaces is presented. The model required three traffic parameters, namely average daily traffic (ADT), volume to capacity ratio (V/C), and surface texture depth (STD), and two chemical parameters, namely total suspended solid (TSS) and total organic carbon (TOC), as predictor variables. Principal component analysis and two phase factor analysis were performed to characterize the model calibration parameters. Traffic congestion was found to be the underlying cause of traffic-related VOC buildup on urban roads. The model calibration was optimized using orthogonal experimental design. Partial least squares regression was used for model prediction. It was found that a better optimized orthogonal design could be achieved by including the latent factors of the data matrix into the design. The model performed fairly accurately for three different land uses as well as five different particle size fractions. The relative prediction errors were 10-40% for the different size fractions and 28-40% for the different land uses while the coefficients of variation of the predicted intersite VOC concentrations were in the range of 25-45% for the different size fractions. Considering the sizes of the data matrices, these coefficients of variation were within the acceptable interlaboratory range for analytes at ppb concentration levels. PMID:21513297

  20. Measurements of spheromak formation and field buildup at SSPX using a double magnetic probe array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ohia, O. O.; Jayakumar, R.

    2007-11-01

    A specially designed magnetic probe consisting of two linear arrays that measure Bx, By, and Bz, is being used to investigate magnetic evolution during spheromak formation, and during multiple gun current pulses on top of a baseline current at SSPX. The measurements reveal that at the start of each pulse there is a time lag in the magnetic response of the closed flux region, while the open flux (intercepting the gun electrodes) responds immediately. This is interpreted as the time to build enough helicity on the open flux, before reconnecting and adding flux to the closed surfaces. Magnetic reconstructions after pulsed buildup using CORSICA show good agreement with the data. A code that simulates the magnetic field from current-carrying flux ropes is used to reproduce the field measured during flux buildup. The code includes an optimization routine that finds the rope shape that best fits the data in order to estimate helicity in the open flux. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  1. Influence of Experimental Parameters on Fatigue Crack Growth and Heat Build-Up in Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Stadlbauer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Loading parameters (frequency, amplitude ratio and waveform are varied to determine their influence on fatigue crack growth in rubber. Up to three different rubber blends are investigated: one actual engineering material and two model materials. Fatigue crack growth curves and strain distributions of pure shear and faint waist pure shear samples are compared for a model material. Fatigue behavior is studied for three different frequencies (1 Hz, 3 Hz and 5 Hz. Amplitude ratio appears to be another important influence factor concerning fatigue crack growth in rubber. The beneficial effect of positive amplitude ratios (tensional loading conditions is shown for different materials. However, fatigue crack growth is considerably increased for negative amplitude ratios (tensional-compressional loading conditions. Furthermore, the influence of the waveform is determined for three different waveform shapes. One is sinusoidal, and two have a square shape, including dwell periods and sinusoidal slopes. Special focus lies on heat build-up, which is substantial, especially for large loads, high frequencies and/or highly filled rubber blends. Plateau temperatures are determined for various loading conditions and rubber blends. A very simple linear relationship with dissipated energy per time and unit area is obtained. Results gathered with dynamic mechanical analyses show, likewise, a linear trend, but the heat build-up is very small, due to different sample geometries.

  2. Buildup factors for multilayer shieldings in deterministic methods and their comparison with Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general there are two ways how to calculate effective doses. The first way is by use of deterministic methods like point kernel method which is implemented in Visiplan or Microshield. These kind of calculations are very fast, but they are not very convenient for a complex geometry with shielding composed of more then one material in meaning of result precision. In spite of this that programs are sufficient for ALARA optimisation calculations. On other side there are Monte Carlo methods which can be used for calculations. This way of calculation is quite precise in comparison with reality but calculation time is usually very large. Deterministic method like programs have one disadvantage -usually there is option to choose buildup factor (BUF) only for one material in multilayer stratified slabs shielding calculation problems even if shielding is composed from different materials. In literature there are proposed different formulas for multilayer BUF approximation. Aim of this paper was to examine these different formulas and their comparison with MCNP calculations. At first ware compared results of Visiplan and Microshield. Simple geometry was modelled - point source behind single and double slab shielding. For Build-up calculations was chosen Geometric Progression method (feature of the newest version of Visiplan) because there are lower deviations in comparison with Taylor fitting. (authors)

  3. MODEL TESTS OF HYDRAULIC FLOW CONDITIONS IN THE VEGETATION BUILD-UP FISHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tymiński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our engineering activity aiming at keeping ecological corridors in rivers are a difficult and complex issue that requires specialist knowledge in many disciplines. One of the installations for ensuring ecological continuum river are fishways, particularly their “near-natural” designs. They resemble mountain streams and creeks. Natural materials, such as wood, vegetation, gravel, stones and rocks are used for their construction. Design of hydraulic fishways based solely on the criteria of maximum speed vmax and parameter of unitary energy of water E, it does not give complete information about the effectiveness of these devices. In order to produce the optimal flow conditions for ichthyofauna, very useful are spatial structure research of hydraulic parameters, such as disorders of flow velocity field or distributions of the turbulence number Tu. The article presents an example of such a study, which the authors carried out on the model seminatural fishway in the water laboratory in Institute of Environmental Engineering in Wrocław. The results were used to assess the accuracy of the functioning of the fishway. The tested combination of “vegetated baffles” and “pools” in the fishway model was found to be optimal for the ichthyofauna. Vegetation build-up in fishways is an interesting and proecological alternative for “heavy” technical build-up.

  4. Electron Cloud Buildup Characterization Using Shielded Pickup Measurements and Custom Modeling Code at CESRTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, James A

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experimental program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup, applying various mitigation techniques in custom vacuum chambers. Among these are two 1.1-m-long sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions. These chambers are equipped with pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of small holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. Carbon-coated, TiN-coated and uncoated aluminum chambers have been tested. Electron and positron beams of 2.1, 4.0 and 5.3 GeV with a variety of bunch populations and spacings in steps of 4 and 14 ns have been used. Here we report on results from the ECLOUD modeling code which highlight the sensitivity of these measurements to the physical phenomena determining cloud buildup such as the photoelectron produ...

  5. The future role of reforestation in reducing buildup of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the options posed for mitigating the buildup of atmospheric CO2 is planting new forest areas to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. Among the questions of interest in modeling the global carbon cycle is the extent to which reforestation is likely to succeed in providing physical removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. There are many strategies for using forest land to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of CO2: decreasing the rate at which forests are cleared for other land uses, increasing the density of carbon storage in existing forests, improving the rate and efficiency at which forest products are used in the place of other energy intensive products, substitution of renewable wood fuels for fossil fuels, improved management of forests and agroforestry, and increasing the amount of land in standing forest. Because increasing the area of forests has social, political, and economic limitations; in addition to physical limitations; it is hard to envision a large increase in forest area except where there are associated economic benefits. The authors speculation is that, over the next several decades, the forest strategies most likely to be pursued for the express purpose of CO2 mitigation are those which provide more or more-efficient substitution of forest products for energy or energy-intensive resources and that the physical accumulation of additional carbon in forests will be of lesser importance

  6. Radiation Build-Up In Shielding Of Low Activity High Energia Gamma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research to observe radiation build-up factor (b) in aluminium (Al), iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for shielding of gamma radiation of high energy from 137cs (Eγ : 662 keV) source and 60Co (Eγ : 1332 keV) of low activity sources has been carried out. Al with Z =13 represent metal of low atomic number, Fe with Z =26 represent metal of medium atomic number, and Pb with Z = 82 represent metal of high atomic number. Low activity source in this research is source which if its dose rate decrease to 3 % of its initial dose rate became safe for the workers. Research was conducted by counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI(TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are close to 1 (b ∼ 1) for all kinds of metals. No radiation build-up factor is required in estimating the shielding thickness from several kinds of metals for low activity of high energy gamma source. (author)

  7. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point.

  8. Radiation-field buildup at Monticello BWR with hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary recirculation piping at Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant was replaced in 1984. In November 1988, approximately midway through the third fuel cycle after pipe replacement, Monticello initiated hydrogen addition to mitigate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking. Due to expectedly high activity levels of Cobalt-60 observed in April of 1989, Northern States Power elected to decontaminate the entire primary system during the August 1989 refueling outage at the end of the third fuel cycle after pipe replacement. At the beginning of the fourth fuel cycle after pipe replacement, Monticello also initiated GEZIP in an effort to reduce future radiation level build-up. Four isotopic measurement campaigns of the Monticello recirculation system were performed since the system was decontaminated in 1989. These measurement campaigns and the radiation build-up at MNGP during fuel cycle 14 are the subject of this report. Northern States Power Company also performed a primary system decontamination at the end of cycle 14. the decontamination process was also monitored and the final report documenting these measurements, RCT-9107-2403, is appended to this report. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Impact of eccentricity build-up and graveyard disposal Strategies on MEO navigation constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jonas; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Flegel, Sven K.; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Merz, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo, and Chinese BeiDou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For this, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semimajor axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are determining values. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. However, for the MEO region, no internationally agreed mitigation guidelines exist. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvres leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvres are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options exist: disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. In the study performed, the key criterion for the graveyard strategy is that the disposed spacecraft must keep a safe minimum distance to the altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites and disposed GEO payloads. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon. Depending on the initial conditions, these can cause a large eccentricity build-up, which finally can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or

  10. Evaluation of simplified analytical models for CO2 plume movement and pressure buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, Y.; Mishra, S.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 injection into the sub-surface is emerging as a viable technology for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. When large amounts of CO2 are sequestered, pressure buildup is an associated risk, along with plume movement beyond the injected domain. In this context, simple modeling tools become valuable assets in preliminary CO2 injection project screening and implementation phases. This study presents an evaluation of two commonly used simplified analytical models for plume movement and pressure buildup, (1) the sharp interface model of Nordbotten et al. (2005), and the corresponding pressure distribution solution of Mathias et al. (2008), and (2) the 3-region model of Burton et al. (2008) based on fractional flow and steady-state pressure gradient considerations. The three-region model of Burton et al. assumes a constant pressure outer boundary. In this study, we incorporate the radius of investigation of the pressure front as the transient pressure boundary, in order to represent an infinite-acting system. The sharp-interface model also assumes the system to be infinite-acting. Temperature and pressure conditions used in these models correspond to the "warm, shallow" and "cold, deep" aquifer conditions as defined by Nordbotten et al. The saturation and pressure profiles as well as injection-well pressure buildup predicted by the analytical models are compared with those from the numerical simulator STOMP in order to provide a verification of the simplified modeling assumptions. Both the STOMP results and the three-region model show two sharp fronts (the drying and two-phase fronts), and a good match is obtained between the front positions at any time. For the sharp interface model, the vertically averaged gas saturation does not exhibit two sharp fronts as seen in the STOMP simulations, but shows a gradual change in saturation with radial distance over the two-phase region. The pressure profiles from STOMP and the analytical model are

  11. Analytical expressions for the gate utilization factors of passive multiplicity counters including signal build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the realm of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting using shift register pulse train analysis to nondestructively quantify Pu in product materials is a familiar and widely applied technique. The approach most commonly taken is to construct a neutron detector consisting of 3He filled cylindrical proportional counters embedded in a high density polyethylene moderator. Fast neutrons from the item enter the moderator and are quickly slowed down, on timescales of the order of 1-2 (micro)s, creating a thermal population which then persists typically for several 10's (micro)s and is sampled by the 3He detectors. Because the initial transient is of comparatively short duration it has been traditional to treat it as instantaneous and furthermore to approximate the subsequent capture time distribution as exponential in shape. With these approximations simple expressions for the various Gate Utilization Factors (GUFs) can be obtained. These factors represent the proportion of time correlated events i.e. Doubles and Triples signal present in the pulse train that is detected by the coincidence gate structure chosen (predelay and gate width settings of the multiplicity shift register). More complicated expressions can be derived by generalizing the capture time distribution to multiple time components or harmonics typically present in real systems. When it comes to applying passive neutron multiplicity methods to extremely intense (i.e. high emission rate and highly multiplying) neutron sources there is a drive to use detector types with very fast response characteristics in order to cope with the high rates. In addition to short pulse width, detectors with a short capture time profile are also desirable so that a short coincidence gate width can be set in order to reduce the chance or Accidental coincidence signal. In extreme cases, such as might be realized using boron loaded scintillators, the dieaway time may be so short that the build-up

  12. The effect of plasma minor-radius expansion in the current build-up phase of a large tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plasma simulation code has been developed to study the plasma current build-up process in JT-60. Plasma simulation is made with a model which represents well overall plasma behavior of the present-day tokamaks. The external electric circuit is taken into consideration in simulation calculation. An emphasis is placed on the simulation of minor-radius expansion of the plasma and behavior of neutral particles in the plasma during current build-up. A calculation with typical parameters of JT-60 shows a week skin distribution in the current density and the electron temperature, if the minor radius of the plasma expands with build-up of the plasma current. (auth.)

  13. Log jams and flood sediment buildup caused channel avulsion in the Pennsylvanian of Atlantic Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibling, Martin R; Bashforth, Arden Roy; Falcon-Lang, Howard J;

    2010-01-01

    interpreted as stable ‘‘transport log jams’’ formed during floods, although some may have been ‘‘unstable jams’’ stranded on bars during peak-flow recession. Associated with the logs are extrabasinal gravel and intraclasts of mudstone and coal, which suggest that floods in sediment-choked channels undercut...... banks of gravelly sand capped by mud and forested peat, widened the channels, and toppled riparian vegetation. An estimated blockage ratio of 8% for one accumulation (ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the log jam and host channel) is close to the 10% value considered to cause substantial blockage in...... some modern rivers. In two instances, a radical change in paleoflow between pre- and post-abandonment channels is consistent with an interpretation that log jams and flood sediment buildup promoted channel-belt avulsion. Although large trees had evolved by Middle to Late Devonian times, it is unlikely...

  14. Particle simulation of pedestal buildup and study of pedestal scaling law in a quiescent plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discrete guiding-center particle code XGC (X-point included Guiding Center code) is used to study pedestal buildup and sheared Er formation in a quiescent plasma edge of a diverted tokamak. A neoclassical pedestal scaling law has been deduced, which shows that the density pedestal width is proportional to Ti1/2M1/2/Bt where Ti is the ion temperature, M is ion mass and Bt is the toroidal magnetic field. Dependence on the pedestal density or the poloidal magnetic field is found to be much weaker. Ion temperature pedestal is not as well defined as the density pedestal. Neoclassical electron transport rate, including the collisional heat exchange rate with ions, is too slow to be considered in the time scale of simulation (∼ 10 ms). (author)

  15. Shielded-Pickups for Time-Resolved Measurements of Electron Cloud Buildup

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, James A; Li, Yulin; Palmer, Mark A; Sikora, John P

    2013-01-01

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded-pickups sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time steps of 100 ps or more. The fine time steps provide highly differential characterization of the cloud, allowing the independent estimation of processes contributing on differing time scales and providing sensitivity to the characteristic kinetic energies of the electrons making up the cloud. By varying the spacing and population of electron and positron beam bunches, we map the time development of competing cloud production and re-absorption processes. The excellent reproducibility of the measurements also permits the measurement o...

  16. Comparison between the radial density buildup in the TARA plugs using hydrogen versus deuterium neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WOLF code is used to compare the beam divergences from a TARA source using hydrogen and deuterium. Factors which influence the divergence which are investigated are the electron temperature, initial ion energy, electrode positions and ion beam current density. The beam divergence for 20 keV hydrogen is found to be only 20% smaller than for 25 keV deuterium for the same electrode positions. Since the optimal positioning of the electrodes is found to be independent of mesh spacing, a large parameter study is undertaken using little computer time. A time-dependent radial Fokker-Planck code is next used to examine the radial density buildup in a plug of the TARA tandem mirror. For both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beams, the influences of beam positioning, current and energy, edge neutral pressure and assumed electron temperature are studied

  17. Monitoring the stress build-up in dental cements: a novel optical characterization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Tabak, M.; Bartholomees, F.; de Wilde, Willy P.; Veretennicoff, Irina P.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that during the curing of dental cements, polymerization shrinkage induces unacceptable stresses, which can result into cracks and an over-sensitivity of the teeth. We demonstrate that polarimetric optical fiber sensors can be used to characterize this shrinkage quantitatively. To determine the time evolution and the amount of shrinkage we embed a highly birefringent optical fiber in the dental cement and analyze the change in optical polarization at its output. This change is a measure for the dynamic stress-build up. We also demonstrate the repeatability of our characterization method for these cements. Moreover we given indications that this technique allows for in- vivo monitoring of the stress build-up dynamics between dentine and porcelain facings. This may bring durable all-ceramic restorations closer to reality. In this paper we present the principle of this original optical fiber sensor, its practical implementation and the experimental results we obtained for this application.

  18. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  19. The Accelerated Build-up of the Red Sequence in High Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cerulo, P; Lidman, C; Demarco, R; Huertas-Company, M; Mei, S; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Barrientos, L F; Muñoz, R P

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts $0.8 11.5$) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than $z=0.8$. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range $0.8build-up of the red sequence.

  20. Natural refuge crops, buildup of resistance, and zero-refuge strategy for Bt cotton in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROZELLE; Scott; WILEN; James

    2010-01-01

    In the context of genetically modified crops expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin, a ‘refuge’ refers to a crop of the same or a related species that is planted nearby to enable growth and reproduction of the target pest without the selection pres- sure imposed by the Bt toxin. The goal of this study is to discuss the role of natural refuge crops in slowing down the buildup of resistance of cotton bollworm (CBW), and to evaluate China’s no-refuge policy for Bt cotton. We describe in detail the dif- ferent factors that China should consider in relation to the refuge policy. Drawing on a review of scientific data, economic analyses of other cases, and a simulation exercise using a bio-economic model, we show that in the case of Bt cotton in China, the no-refuge policy is defensible.

  1. Electron-Cloud Build-up in the FNAL Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade [1] in a fieldfree region at the location of the RFA electron detector [2]. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding measurements obtained with the RFA we infer that the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta)max is ∼> 1.4, and the average electron density is ne ∼> 1010 m-3 at transition energy for the specific fill pattern and beam intensities defined below. The sensitivity of our results to several variables remains to be explored in order to reach more definitive results. Effects from the electron cloud on the beam are being investigated separately [3

  2. Numerical simulation of flare energy build-up and release via Joule dissipation. [solar MHD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; Wang, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    A new numerical MHD model is developed to study the evolution of an active region due to photospheric converging motion, which leads to magnetic-energy buildup in the form of electric current. Because this new MHD model has incorporated finite conductivity, the energy conversion occurs from magnetic mode to thermal mode through Joule dissipation. In order to test the causality relationship between the occurrence of flare and photospheric motion, a multiple-pole configuration with neutral point is used. Using these results it is found that in addition to the converging motion, the initial magnetic-field configuration and the redistribution of the magnetic flux at photospheric level enhance the possibility for the development of a flare.

  3. Buildup of the Kondo effect from real-time effective action for the Anderson impurity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Sebastian; Liluashvili, Alexander; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The nonequilibrium time evolution of a quantum dot is studied by means of dynamic equations for time-dependent Green's functions derived from a two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action for the Anderson impurity model. Coupling the dot between two leads at different voltages, the dynamics of the current through the dot is investigated. We show that the 2PI approach is capable of describing the dynamical buildup of the Kondo effect, which shows up as a sharp resonance in the spectral function, with a width exponentially suppressed in the electron self-coupling on the dot. An external voltage applied to the dot is found to deteriorate the Kondo effect at the hybridization scale. The dynamic equations are evaluated within different nonperturbative resummation schemes, within the direct, particle-particle, and particle-hole channels, as well as their combination, and the results compared with those from other methods.

  4. The build-up of polyelectrolyte multilayers of microfibrillated cellulose and cationic polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wågberg, Lars; Decher, Gero; Norgren, Magnus; Lindström, Tom; Ankerfors, Mikael; Axnäs, Karl

    2008-02-01

    A new type of nanocellulosic material has been prepared by high-pressure homogenization of carboxymethylated cellulose fibers followed by ultrasonication and centrifugation. This material had a cylindrical cross-section as shown by transmission electron microscopy with a diameter of 5-15 nm and a length of up to 1 microm. Calculations, using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, showed that the surface potential was between 200 and 250 mV, depending on the pH, the salt concentration, and the size of the fibrils. They also showed that the carboxyl groups on the surface of the nanofibrils are not fully dissociated until the pH has reached pH = approximately 10 in deionized water. Calculations of the interaction between the fibrils using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory and assuming a cylindrical geometry indicated that there is a large electrostatic repulsion between these fibrils, provided the carboxyl groups are dissociated. If the pH is too low and/or the salt concentration is too high, there will be a large attraction between the fibrils, leading to a rapid aggregation of the fibrils. It is also possible to form polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) by combining different types of polyelectrolytes and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). In this study, silicon oxide surfaces were first treated with cationic polyelectrolytes before the surfaces were exposed to MFC. The build-up of the layers was monitored with ellipsometry, and they show that it is possible to form very well-defined layers by combinations of MFC and different types of polyelectrolytes and different ionic strengths of the solutions during the adsorption of the polyelectrolyte. A polyelectrolyte with a three-dimensional structure leads to the build-up of thick layers of MFC, whereas the use of a highly charged linear polyelectrolyte leads to the formation of thinner layers of MFC. An increase in the salt concentration during the adsorption of the polyelectrolyte results in the formation of thicker

  5. The use of the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of build-up factors in wide conical gamma-radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The values of the build-up factors for the number of photons are presented in this paper. The results were obtained for the number of photons in wide conical gamma-ray beams penetrating through various material slabs. The dependence of the build-up factor on the thicknesses of the material slabs were computed by the Monte Carlo method. (orig.)

  6. Correction of build-up factor one x-ray hvl measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research to obtain the value build-up factor (b) on half value layers (HVL) measurement of diagnostic X-Rays using pocket dosimeter behind aluminium (AI) filter with its thickness vary from 1 to 4 mm. From the measurement it was obtained HVL value of 1.997, 2.596 and 2.718 mmAI for X-Rays of kVp : 80 Kv with 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm filter thickness respectively. HVL value significantly increase with increasing AI filter thickness. Increasing of HVL means increasing filter thickness. From the calculation it was obtained increasing b value relative to 1 mm AI filter of 18.26 and 46% for filter thickness of 2, 3 and 4 mm respectively. Experiment result shows the need of involving b value in HVL calculation of X-Rays if the filter is relatively thick. Calculation of HVL of X-Rays can be carried out with thin layers filter. Key words : x-rays, half value layer, build up factor

  7. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort (1). Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector (2-4). The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta)max, which we let vary in the range 1.2 (le) (delta)max (le) 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 ∼max ∼e. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency fRF = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population Ntot. The density ne goes through a clear threshold as a function of Ntot in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in Ntot is a factor ∼ 2 higher for fRF = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor ∼ 2 when Ntot is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed

  8. Renewable build-up pathways for the US: Generation costs are not system costs

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Jacobson, Mark Z; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The transition to a future electricity system based primarily on wind and solar PV is examined for all regions in the contiguous US. We present optimized pathways for the build-up of wind and solar power for least backup energy needs as well as for least cost obtained with a simplified, lightweight model based on long-term high resolution weather-determined generation data. In the absence of storage, the pathway which achieves the best match of generation and load, thus resulting in the least backup energy requirements, generally favors a combination of both technologies, with a wind/solar PV energy mix of about 80/20 in a fully renewable scenario. The least cost development is seen to start with 100% of the technology with the lowest average generation costs first, but with increasing renewable installations, economically unfavorable excess generation pushes it toward the minimal backup pathway. Surplus generation and the entailed costs can be reduced significantly by combining wind and solar power, and/or a...

  9. Metal-air cells comprising collapsible foam members and means for minimizing internal pressure buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Glenn (Inventor); Putt, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides a prismatic zinc-air cell including, in general, a prismatic container having therein an air cathode, a separator and a zinc anode. The container has one or more oxygen access openings, and the air cathode is disposed in the container in gaseous communication with the oxygen access openings so as to allow access of oxygen to the cathode. The separator has a first side in electrolytic communication with the air cathode and a second side in electrolytic communication with the zinc anode. The separator isolates the cathode and the zinc anode from direct electrical contact and allows passage of electrolyte therebetween. An expansion chamber adjacent to the zinc anode is provided which accommodates expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. A suitable collapsible foam member generally occupies the expansion space, providing sufficient resistance tending to oppose movement of the zinc anode away from the separator while collapsing upon expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. One or more vent openings disposed in the container are in gaseous communication with the expansion space, functioning to satisfactorily minimize the pressure buildup within the container by venting gasses expelled as the foam collapses during cell discharge.

  10. Shielded button electrodes for time-resolved measurements of electron cloud buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded button electrodes sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors, derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design, have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and the lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time steps of 100 ps or more. The fine time steps provide a detailed characterization of the cloud, allowing the independent estimation of processes contributing on differing time scales and providing sensitivity to the characteristic kinetic energies of the electrons making up the cloud. By varying the spacing and population of electron and positron beam bunches, we map the time development of the various cloud production and re-absorption processes. The excellent reproducibility of the measurements also permits the measurement of long-term conditioning of vacuum chamber surfaces

  11. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer′s recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success.

  12. Prediction of wax buildup in 24 inch cold, deep sea oil loading line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.; Sattler, R.E.; Tolonen, W.J.; Pitchford, A.C.

    1981-10-01

    When designing pipelines for cold environments, it is important to know how to predict potential problems due to wax deposition on the pipeline's inner surface. The goal of this work was to determine the rate of wax buildup and the maximum, equlibrium wax thickness for a North Sea field loading line. The experimental techniques and results used to evaluate the waxing potential of the crude oil (B) are described. Also, the theoretic model which was used for predicting the maximum wax deposit thickness in the crude oil (B) loading pipeline at controlled temperatures of 40 F (4.4 C) and 100 F (38 C), is illustrated. Included is a recommendation of a procedure for using hot oil at the end of a tanker loading period in order to dewax the crude oil (B) line. This technique would give maximum heating of the pipeline and should be followed by shutting the hot oil into the pipeline at the end of the loading cycle which will provide a hot oil soaking to help soften existing wax. 14 references.

  13. VVER operational experience - effect of preconditioning and primary water chemistry on radioactivity build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary coolant technology approaches currently used in VVER units are reviewed and compared with those used in PWR units. Standard and modified water chemistries differing in boron-potassium control are discussed. Preparation of the VVER Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines in the Czech Republic is noted. Operational experience of some VVER units, operated in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, in the field of the primary water chemistry, and radioactivity transport and build-up are presented. In Mochovce and Temelin units, a surface preconditioning (passivation) procedure has been applied during hot functional tests. The main principles of the controlled primary water chemistry applied during the hot functional tests are reviewed and importance of the water chemistry, technological and other relevant parameters is stressed regarding to the quality of the passive layer formed on the primary system surfaces. The first operational experience obtained in the course of beginning of these units operation is presented mainly with respect to the corrosion products coolant and surface activities. Effect of the initial passivation performed during hot functional tests and the primary water chemistry on corrosion products radioactivity level and radiation situation is discussed. (author)

  14. An automated classification approach to ranking photospheric proxies of magnetic energy build-up

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the photospheric magnetic field of ~2000 active regions in solar cycle 23 to search for parameters indicative of energy build-up and subsequent release as a solar flare. We extract three sets of parameters: snapshots in space and time- total flux, magnetic gradients, and neutral lines; evolution in time- flux evolution; structures at multiple size scales- wavelet analysis. This combines pattern recognition and classification techniques via a relevance vector machine to determine whether a region will flare. We consider classification performance using all 38 extracted features and several feature subsets. Classification performance is quantified using both the true positive rate and the true negative rate. Additionally, we compute the true skill score which provides an equal weighting to true positive rate and true negative rate and the Heidke skill score to allow comparison to other flare forecasting work. We obtain a true skill score of ~0.5 for any predictive time window in the range 2-24hr, with ...

  15. Shielded button electrodes for time-resolved measurements of electron cloud buildup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J.A., E-mail: crittenden@cornell.edu; Billing, M.G.; Li, Y.; Palmer, M.A.; Sikora, J.P.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded button electrodes sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors, derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design, have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and the lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time steps of 100 ps or more. The fine time steps provide a detailed characterization of the cloud, allowing the independent estimation of processes contributing on differing time scales and providing sensitivity to the characteristic kinetic energies of the electrons making up the cloud. By varying the spacing and population of electron and positron beam bunches, we map the time development of the various cloud production and re-absorption processes. The excellent reproducibility of the measurements also permits the measurement of long-term conditioning of vacuum chamber surfaces.

  16. Discrete element simulations and validation tests investigating solids-conveying processes with pressure buildup in single screw extruders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Johann-Sebastian; Schoeppner, Volker

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this contribution is to describe a method of simulating solids-conveying processes in single screw extruders which include a defined back pressure leading to a resulting pressure buildup in the screw channel. To do so, use is made of the Discrete Element Method. Material parameters are presented, as well as details concerning the contact model used and the simulation tool EDEM. Additionally, a test setup is presented which has been used to validate the solids-conveying simulations. Results are shown for both simulations and experimental tests. Comparing the results from simulations and measurements shows acceptable conformity. Such simulations and experimental tests are crucial in order to better understand the buildup of pressure in high-speed single-screw extruders.

  17. Clinical comparison of various esthetic restorative options for coronal build-up of primary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Duhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare the clinical performance of composite, strip crowns, biological restoration, and composite with stainless steel band when used for the coronal build-up of anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients aged 3-6 years presenting with mutilated primary anterior teeth due to caries or trauma were selected for the study using randomized simple sampling. A total of 52 primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups having 13 teeth in each group. Teeth in Group I were restored with composite, in Group II with strip crowns, in Group III with biologic restoration and with stainless steel band reinforced composite in group IV. The restorations were evaluated for color match, retention, surface texture, and anatomic form according to Ryge′s Direct (US Public Health Service evaluation criteria at baseline (immediate postoperative, after 48 h, 3, 6, and 9 months. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, and level of significance, that is, P value was determined. Results: At baseline, none of the groups showed any color changes. Other than Group III all other groups showed highly significant changes (P 0.05. Deterioration in surface texture was exhibited maximum by restorations in Group IV followed by Group I at 3 months. Whereas, no surface changes were seen in Group II and III. Only Group I and IV showed discontinuity in anatomic form after 3 months. After 6 months, except in Group II, discontinuity in anatomic form was observed in all the groups. Discontinuity in anatomic form was seen in all the 4 groups after 9 months although the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Biological restoration was found to be most satisfying esthetically owing to color compatibility with the patient′s tooth. Thus, it has a great potential to be used as esthetic restorative option in primary anteriors.

  18. A new wafer level TSV build-up stacking using oxide bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new through-silicon via (TSV) build-up stacking method using oxide bonding is proposed and implemented in this work. The proposed method can be applied to the fabrication of a TSV stack chip. Thermal stress analysis was carried out to compare the structural reliability between conventional TSV and the proposed TSV model. The simulation results indicate that the proposed TSV model is more reliable than the conventional model with respect to stress in the stack chip. Experiments were conducted by oxide bonding of chips and the oxide bonding energy was acquired by a four point bending test. The obtained bonding energy sufficiently exceeds the energy criteria of 3D stacking. Thus, two oxide wafers with an 8 inch diameter were bonded by oxide bonding at the wafer level. The 0.6 µm thick oxide layers were located between bonded wafers and the top wafer was thinned down to fabricate blind via at the top of bonded wafer. The thickness of the top and bottom wafer is to 70 and 725 µm, respectively, after the top chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. Then blind vias were fabricated by deep reactive ion etching; the diameter and depth of the via is 20 µm and 150 µm, respectively. A through hole was formed by bottom CMP; total thickness of the oxide bonded wafer is 140 µm. The dielectric layer (SiO2), adhesion and diffusion barrier (TiN, Ti) and wetting layer (Cu) were deposited sequentially to improve the wettability of the via wall. Since the molten solder cannot be filled in the via if there is no wetting layer at the via wall. Finally, the vias were successfully filled with molten solder within 10 s. (paper)

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, Miguel .A.

    2008-08-25

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort [1]. Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector [2-4]. The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, which we let vary in the range 1.2 {le} {delta}{sub max} {le} 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 {approx}< {delta}{sub max} {approx}< 1.35 at this location. From this piece of information we estimate features of the EC distribution for various fill patterns, including the average electron number density n{sub e}. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency f{sub RF} = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population N{sub tot}. The density n{sub e} goes through a clear threshold as a function of N{sub tot} in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in N{sub tot} is a factor {approx} 2 higher for f{sub RF} = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor {approx} 2 when N{sub tot} is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed.

  20. Population analysis of the genera buildup on some commercially important vegetable crops grown in Kashmir Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Javaid Hassan; Chishti, M Z; Rasheed, Majidah; Tak, Irfan-Ur-Rauf; Dar, Shoaib Ali; Lal, Eugenia P; Mohiuddin, Dawood

    2016-09-01

    In order to list the genera buildup on Brassica oleracea (Cauliflower), Capsicum frustscens (Chillies), Spinacia oleracea (Spinach) and Phaseolus vulgaris (Farash bean) a general survey was carried in the summer season of 2013. On examining the soil samples as well as root samples of Cauliflower Boleodorus, Psilenchus, Helicotylenchus, Merlinius, Aglenchus and Filenchus were encountered with their absolute density of 18, 31, 34.5, 35, 35 and 31.5 %. On Chillies, Tylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Psilenchus, Pratylenchus and Hirschmaniella with their absolute frequency of 86, 96.6, 100, 100 and 96.6 % respectively were collected. Among these five genera recorded on Chillies the Relative prominence value of 16 % is lowest for Psilenchus and 26.7 % for Helicotylenchus. Merlinius, Psilenchus, Aglenchus, and Boleodorus were encountered on examining the soil and root samples of Spinach during the period of study. Boleodorus was met with the highest percentage of frequency of 90 % as well as highest proportion of absolute density of 37 % and lowest value of 24 % in case of Merlinius and Psilenchus. Soil samples as well as root samples of Farash bean, Aglenchus, Tylenchus, Hirschmaniella, Helicotylenchus and Psilenchus were encountered with their absolute density of 27, 19.5, 33, 33 and 35.4 %. The absolute frequency of 100 % was found in Tylenchus with the lowest frequency of 70 % in Helicotylenchus. Among the genera recorded on Farash bean relative prominence value happened to be highest in Hirschmaniella with the value as 23.6 % and lowest on Tylenchus with the value of 14.2 %. PMID:27605801

  1. Study of activity build-up in primary coolant pump casing vent lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiga Generating Station (KGS) Unit-II is a Standardized Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor with 220 MWe capacity and is located at Kaiga in Karnataka. Radioactive sources produced in nuclear reactor include fission products and activation products. Fission products are produced in the nuclear fuel UO2 during fission and confined to the fuel during normal operation of the plant. These products are likely to come out of the fuel to the primary coolant during the system depressurization due to presence of micro fissures in fuel cladding. Activation products are produced in the reactor core due to activation of impurities by neutrons, present in the primary coolant and in the reactor core components. The fission products and activation products circulate in the primary Heat Transport system and settles in specific out of core locations of the system equipment or components. The deposited radionuclides in system components become a source of radiation exposures in accessible areas. Radiological surveillance of reactor building areas is carried out at regular intervals to identify the hot spots on PHT system equipment to keep personnel exposures ALARA during maintenance activities. Radiological survey of reactor building areas 48 hours after shutdown showed the presence of significant hot spots on primary circulating pump (PCP) casing Vent lines in pump room. The radiation levels on PCP casing vent lines showed increasing trend over the past four months. Maximum radiation field on PCP-2 Casing Vent line was observed to be 770 mSv/h 3 hours after shutdown of the reactor. Major sources for build-up of activity on PCP casing Vent lines were Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Antimony-122 and 124. (author)

  2. Can captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) be coaxed into cumulative build-up of techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Stephan R; Burkart, Judith M; Schaik, Carel P van

    2011-11-01

    While striking cultural variation in behavior from one site to another has been described in chimpanzees and orangutans, cumulative culture might be unique to humans. Captive chimpanzees were recently found to be rather conservative, sticking to the technique they had mastered, even after more effective alternatives were demonstrated. Behavioral flexibility in problem solving, in the sense of acquiring new solutions after having learned another one earlier, is a vital prerequisite for cumulative build-up of techniques. Here, we experimentally investigate whether captive orangutans show such flexibility, and if so, whether they show techniques that cumulatively build up (ratchet) on previous ones after conditions of the task are changed. We provided nine Sumatran orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) with two types of transparent tubes partly filled with syrup, along with potential tools such as sticks, twigs, wood wool and paper. In the first phase, the orangutans could reach inside the tubes with their hands (Regular Condition), but in the following phase, tubes had been made too narrow for their hands to fit in (Restricted Condition 1), or in addition the setup lacked their favorite materials (Restricted Condition 2). The orangutans showed high behavioral flexibility, applying nine different techniques under the regular condition in total. Individuals abandoned preferred techniques and switched to different techniques under restricted conditions when this was advantageous. We show for two of these techniques how they cumulatively built up on earlier ones. This suggests that the near-absence of cumulative culture in wild orangutans is not due to a lack of flexibility when existing solutions to tasks are made impossible. PMID:21767010

  3. SU-E-T-59: Calculations of Collimator Scatter Factors (Sc) with and Without Custom-Made Build-Up Caps for CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settings ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps

  4. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues...

  5. Growth and diagenesis of cryptalgal-bryozoan buildups within a Mid-Visean (Dinantian) cyclic sequence, Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Lauwers, S.

    1992-01-01

    Cryptalgal-bryozoan carbonate buildups are reported from the Middle Visean (Upper Dinantian) near Namur, Belgium. They occur in a 20 m-thick, upward-shallowing, carbonate rhythm - the thickest in a succession of such rhythms.The rhythm comprises three phases; from bottom to top: (1) packstones-grainstones with rich and diverse biota, indicating open, shallow marine conditions; grading to (2) wackestones, with a poorer and more restricted biota, passing upwards to cryptalgal boundstones; and(3...

  6. Benchmarking Electron-Cloud Build-Up and Heat-Load Simulations against Large-Hadron-Collider Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez, O; Iriso, U; Maury, H.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    After reviewing the basic features of electron clouds in particle accelerators, the pertinent vacuum-chamber surface properties, and the electron-cloud simulation tools in use at CERN, we report recent observations of electron-cloud phenomena at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and ongoing attempts to benchmark the measured LHC vacuum pressure increases and heat loads against electron-cloud build-up simulations aimed at determining the actual surface parameters and at monitoring the so-called ...

  7. Modeling of gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials using multilayer perceptron neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Nil; Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, L.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, multilayered perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) were presented for the computation of the gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors (BA) of seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials [LiF, BeO, Na2B4O7, CaSO4, Li2B4O7, KMgF3, Ca3(PO4)2] in the energy region 0.015–15MeV, and...

  8. Experimental method of in-vivo dosimetry without build-up device on the skin for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dahl, E-mail: dpark411@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Cheol-Ha [Department of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of modern radiotherapy. To evaluate the dose actually delivered to patients, in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) is generally performed during radiotherapy to measure the entrance doses. In IVD, a build-up device should be placed on top of an in-vivo dosimeter to satisfy the electron equilibrium condition. However, a build-up device made of tissue-equivalent material or metal may perturb dose delivery to a patient, and requires an additional laborious and time-consuming process. We developed a novel IVD method using a look-up table of conversion ratios instead of a build-up device. We validated this method through a monte-carlo simulation and 31 clinical trials. The mean error of clinical IVD is 3.17% (standard deviation: 2.58%), which is comparable to that of conventional IVD methods. Moreover, the required time was greatly reduced so that the efficiency of IVD could be improved for both patients and therapists.

  9. Evaluation of Geometric Progression (GP Buildup Factors using MCNP Codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNP5-1.60

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-O

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gamma-ray buildup factors of three-dimensional point kernel code (QAD-CGGP are re-evaluated by using MCNP codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNPX5-1.60 and ENDF/B-VI.8 photoatomic data, which cover an energy range of 0.015–15 MeV and an iron thickness of 0.5–40 Mean Free Path (MFP. These new data are fitted to the Geometric Progression (GP fitting function and are then compared with ANS standard data equipped with QAD-CGGP. In addition, a simple benchmark calculation was performed to compare the QAD-CGGP results applied with new and existing buildup factors based on the MCNP codes. In the case of the buildup factors of low-energy gamma-rays, new data are evaluated to be about 5% higher than the existing data. In other cases, these new data present a similar trend based on the specific penetration depth, while existing data continuously increase beyond that depth. In a simple benchmark, the calculations using the existing data were slightly underestimated compared to the reference data at a deep penetration depth. On the other hand, the calculations with new data were stabilized with an increasing penetration depth, despite a slight overestimation at a shallow penetration depth.

  10. Gamma-ray exposure build-up factors of some brick materials in the state of Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray exposure build-up factors of raw materials of bricks (soils and fly- ashes) in the state of Punjab were investigated for the photon energy range 0.015 to 15 MeV up to 40 mfp penetration depth by the geometrical progression (GP) method. Appreciable variations in the exposure build-up factor (EBF) are noted for the raw materials. The EBFs of the raw materials of bricks change depending on the photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition. The build-up factors are low at low and high photon energies, whereas they are very high in the medium-energy region. The peak energy of the EBF for soils is 0.3 MeV and 0.2 MeV for fly ashes. The EBFs of the raw materials of bricks are also compared with those of bricks of red mud and common brick materials. Common bricks were found to have the lowest gamma-ray EBF. This study should be useful for emergency preparedness planning and emergency dose estimation for future planned nuclear power plants in the state of Punjab. (authors)

  11. Experimental method of in-vivo dosimetry without build-up device on the skin for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of modern radiotherapy. To evaluate the dose actually delivered to patients, in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) is generally performed during radiotherapy to measure the entrance doses. In IVD, a build-up device should be placed on top of an in-vivo dosimeter to satisfy the electron equilibrium condition. However, a build-up device made of tissue-equivalent material or metal may perturb dose delivery to a patient, and requires an additional laborious and time-consuming process. We developed a novel IVD method using a look-up table of conversion ratios instead of a build-up device. We validated this method through a monte-carlo simulation and 31 clinical trials. The mean error of clinical IVD is 3.17% (standard deviation: 2.58%), which is comparable to that of conventional IVD methods. Moreover, the required time was greatly reduced so that the efficiency of IVD could be improved for both patients and therapists

  12. Description of multilayered gamma-ray exposure buildup factors up to 40 mfp by the approximating model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximating formula recently proposed by the authors for γ-ray buildup factors of multilayered shields was applied for very thick shields up to 40 mfp. For this purpose, modifications were made to the model and the fitting method to improve the data reproducibility. The previous model was expanded so that it included both the plane-normal and point isotropic geometries. The verification test of the modified model was made for three materials; water, iron and lead. The separately published data of double-layered shields for point isotropic buildup factors calculated by EGS4 from 0.1 MeV to 10 MeV were used as well as newly calculated data at 1 MeV for the plane-normal geometry, and data for the point isotropic geometry of triple-layered shields at 1 and 10 MeV. The present formula generally shows a very good reproducibility of the multilayer buildup factors, even in case of very thick shielding problems. The observed error between the approximating description and the EGS4 data is 15% in the intermediate energy range, about 30% in the higher energy range, and 35% at 0.3 MeV. However, the error in the approximation reaches a factor of 4 in the worst case at 0.1 MeV. (author)

  13. The possible influences of fuel crud build-up and water chemistry on waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of fuel crud build-up and water chemistry on waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys have drawn a certain attention in fuel integrity evaluation programs. This article is an attempt to explore the possible causes for such effects, based on the presumption that diffusion of oxygen vacancies in the oxide barrier layer is the rate limiting process for corrosion in reactor water environments. It is shown that fuel crud build-up and water chemistry may influence corrosion through changing the chemical reactivity at the metal/oxide and oxide/water interfaces, the oxygen vacancy concentration and the diffusivity through the oxide layer. In particular, crud build-up may increase corrosion by enhancing, for example, the oxygen content of reactor water by radiolysis at the crud/water interface and the cladding surface temperature. The presence of fuel crud may also affect ZrO2 grain growth and its phase transformation, which are also closely related to the corrosion kinetics. (author)

  14. Urban nonpoint source pollution buildup and washoff models for simulating storm runoff quality in the Los Angeles County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many urban nonpoint source pollution models utilize pollutant buildup and washoff functions to simulate storm runoff quality of urban catchments. In this paper, two urban pollutant washoff load models are derived using pollutant buildup and washoff functions. The first model assumes that there is no residual pollutant after a storm event while the second one assumes that there is always residual pollutant after each storm event. The developed models are calibrated and verified with observed data from an urban catchment in the Los Angeles County. The application results show that the developed model with consideration of residual pollutant is more capable of simulating nonpoint source pollution from urban storm runoff than that without consideration of residual pollutant. For the study area, residual pollutant should be considered in pollutant buildup and washoff functions for simulating urban nonpoint source pollution when the total runoff volume is less than 30 mm. - Highlights: → An improved urban NPS model was developed. → It performs well in areas where storm events have great temporal variation. → Threshold of total runoff volume for ignoring residual pollutant was determined. - An improved urban NPS model was developed. Threshold of total runoff volume for ignoring residual pollutant was determined.

  15. Calculation of Buildup Factor for Gamma-ray Exposure in Two Layered Shields Made of Water and Lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The buildup factor for gamma ray exposure is most useful in calculations for biological protective shields.The buildup factors for gamma ray exposure were calculated in tow layered shields consist of water-lead and lead-water up to optical Thickness 20 mean free path (mfp) at gamma ray energies 1, 2 and 6MeV by using kalos's formula.The program has been designed to work at any atomic number of the attenuating medium, photon energy, slab thickness and and the arrangement of materials.The results obtained in this search leading to the buildup factor for gamma ray exposure at energies (1and2MeV) in lead-water were higher than the reverse case,while at energy 6 MeV the effect was opposite.The calculated data were parameterized by an empirical formula as a function of optical thickness of tow materials.The results obtained were in reasonable agreement with a previous work

  16. An iterative method for calculating gamma-ray build-up factors in multi-layer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point kernel codes that simulate gamma-ray transport often use build-up factors to take scattered photons into account. This study introduces a new method, for computing multi-layer shield build-up factors. This method, based on an empirical formula for calculating double-layer shield build-up factors, is iterative. For an N-layer shield, each iteration of the method treats the first and the second layer of the shield. It replaces these layers by a single equivalent layer composed of an appropriate material and, hence, it turns the N-layer shield into an (N - 1)-layer shield. In order to determine the equivalent layer of an appropriate material, a neural network approach is developed: some neural networks trained on a large set of various configurations provide the equivalent material for any double-layer configuration. The method is implemented into MERCURE-6.3 straight-line attenuation code and is validated by comparison between MERCURE-6.3 results and reference data for one-dimensional geometries. Reference data obtained from transport calculations performed using the Sn transport code TWODANT. The comparisons prove the accuracy and sturdiness of the method. (authors)

  17. Understanding the uncertainty associated with particle-bound pollutant build-up and wash-off: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-09-15

    Accurate prediction of stormwater quality is essential for developing effective pollution mitigation strategies. The use of models incorporating simplified mathematical replications of pollutant processes is the common practice for determining stormwater quality. However, an inherent process uncertainty arises due to the intrinsic variability associated with pollutant processes, which has neither been comprehensively understood, nor well accounted for in uncertainty assessment of stormwater quality modelling. This review provides the context for defining and quantifying the uncertainty associated with pollutant build-up and wash-off on urban impervious surfaces based on the hypothesis that particle size is predominant in influencing process variability. Critical analysis of published research literature brings scientific evidence together in order to establish the fact that particle size changes with time, and different sized particles exhibit distinct behaviour during build-up and wash-off, resulting in process variability. Analysis of the different adsorption behaviour of particles confirmed that the variations in pollutant load and composition are influenced by particle size. Particle behaviour and variations in pollutant load and composition are related due to the strong affinity of pollutants such as heavy metals and hydrocarbons for specific particle size ranges. As such, the temporal variation in particle size is identified as the key to establishing a basis for assessing build-up and wash-off process uncertainty. Therefore, accounting for pollutant build-up and wash-off process variability, which is influenced by particle size, would facilitate the assessment of the uncertainty associated with modelling outcomes. Furthermore, the review identified fundamental knowledge gaps where further research is needed in relation to: (1) the aggregation of particles suspended in the atmosphere during build-up; (2) particle re-suspension during wash-off; (3) pollutant

  18. A comprehensive interpretation of the NEEM basal ice build-up using a multi parametric approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Goossens

    2015-10-01

    propose a first interpretative framework for the build-up of the NEEM basal ice sequence, based on the origin of the various ice types.

  19. An automated classification approach to ranking photospheric proxies of magnetic energy build-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghraibah, A.; Boucheron, L. E.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We study the photospheric magnetic field of ~2000 active regions over solar cycle 23 to search for parameters that may be indicative of energy build-up and its subsequent release as a solar flare in the corona. Methods: We extract three sets of parameters: (1) snapshots in space and time: total flux, magnetic gradients, and neutral lines; (2) evolution in time: flux evolution; and (3) structures at multiple size scales: wavelet analysis. This work combines standard pattern recognition and classification techniques via a relevance vector machine to determine (i.e., classify) whether a region is expected to flare (≥C1.0 according to GOES). We consider classification performance using all 38 extracted features and several feature subsets. Classification performance is quantified using both the true positive rate (the proportion of flares correctly predicted) and the true negative rate (the proportion of non-flares correctly classified). Additionally, we compute the true skill score which provides an equal weighting to true positive rate and true negative rate and the Heidke skill score to allow comparison to other flare forecasting work. Results: We obtain a true skill score of ~0.5 for any predictive time window in the range 2 to 24 h, with a true positive rate of ~0.8 and a true negative rate of ~0.7. These values do not appear to depend on the predictive time window, although the Heidke skill score (<0.5) does. Features relating to snapshots of the distribution of magnetic gradients show the best predictive ability over all predictive time windows. Other gradient-related features and the instantaneous power at various wavelet scales also feature in the top five (of 38) ranked features in predictive power. It has always been clear that while the photospheric magnetic field governs the coronal non-potentiality (and hence likelihood of producing a solar flare), photospheric magnetic field information alone is not sufficient to determine this in a unique manner

  20. Buildup of Abiotic Oxygen and Ozone in Atmospheres of Temperate Terrestrial Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinboehl, Armin; Willacy, Karen; Friedson, Andrew James; Swain, Mark R.

    2015-12-01

    The last two decades have seen a rapid increase in the detection and characterization of exoplanets. A focus of future missions will be on the subset of transiting, terrestrial, temperate exoplanets as they are the strongest candidates to harbor life as we know it.An important bioindicator for life as we know it is the existence of significant amounts of oxygen, and its photochemical byproduct ozone, in the exoplanet’s atmosphere. However, abiotic processes also produce oxygen and ozone, and the amount of oxygen abiotically produced in an atmosphere will largely depend on other atmospheric parameters. Constraining this parameter space will be essential to avoid ‘false positive’ detections of life, that is the interpretation of oxygen or ozone as a bioindicator despite being produced abiotically.Based on 1D radiative-convective model calculations, Wordsworth and Pierrehumbert (ApJL, 2014) recently pointed out that the formation and buildup of abiotic oxygen on water-rich planets largely depends on the amount of non-condensable gases in the atmosphere. The amount of non-condensable gases determines whether an atmosphere will develop a 'cold-trap' (similar to the tropopause on Earth) that contains most of the water in the lower atmosphere and dries out the upper atmosphere. If water vapor is a major constituent of the atmosphere, this cold-trapping is inhibited, leading to a much moister upper atmosphere. Water vapor in the upper atmosphere is photolyzed due to the availability of hard UV radiation, yielding oxygen.We use a photochemical model coupled to a 1D radiative-convective climate model to self-consistently study this effect in atmospheres with N2, CO2 and H2O as the main constituents. These are typical constituents for secondary, oxidized atmospheres, and they can exist in a wide range of ratios. We calculate the amounts of abiotically produced oxygen and ozone and determine the vertical structure of temperature and constituent mixing ratios for various

  1. Investigation of human teeth with respect to the photon interaction, energy absorption and buildup factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Sinan [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Endodontic, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of human teeth have been calculated for total photon interaction (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Ne{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) and photon energy absorption (Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Z{sub RW{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}Ne{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) in the energy region 1 keV-20 MeV. Besides, the energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors have been calculated for these samples by using the geometric progression fitting approximation in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path). Wherever possible the results were compared with experiment. Effective atomic numbers (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) of human teeth were calculated using different methods. Discrepancies were noted in Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} between the direct and interpolation methods in the low and high energy regions where absorption processes dominate while good agreement was observed in intermediate energy region where Compton scattering dominates. Significant variations up to 22% were observed between Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} and Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} in the energy region 30-150 keV which is the used energy range in dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) X-ray machines. The Z{sub eff} values of human teeth were found to relatively vary within 1% if different laser treatments are applied. In this variation, the Er:YAG laser treated samples were found to be less effected than Nd:YAG laser treated ones when compared with control group. Relative differences between EABF and EBF were found to be significantly high in the energy region 60 keV-1 MeV even though they have similar variations with respect to the different parameters viz. photon energy, penetration depth.

  2. Activity build-up on the circulation loops of boiling water reactors: Basics for modelling of transport and deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 20 years the radiation field of nuclear power plant loops outside the core zone was the object of investigations in many countries. In this context test loops were built and basic research done. At our Institute PSI the installation of a LWR-contamination loop is planned for this year. This experimental loop has the purpose to investigate the complex phenomena of activity deposition from the primary fluid of reactor plants and to formulate analytical models. From the literature the following conclusions can be drawn: The principal correlations of the activity build-up outside the core are known. The plant specific single phenomena as corrosion, crud-transport, activation and deposit of cobalt in the oxide layer are complex and only partially understood. The operational experience of particular plants with low contaminated loops (BWR-recirculation loops) show that in principle the problem is manageable. The reduction of the activity build-up in older plants necessitates a combination of measures to modify the crud balance in the primary circuit. In parallel to the experimental work several simulation models in the form of computer programs were developed. These models have the common feature that they are based on mass balances, in which the exchange of materials and the sedimentation processes are described by global empirical transport coefficients. These models yield satisfactory results and allow parameter studies; the application however is restricted to the particular installation. All programs lack models that describe the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic mechanisms on the surface of deposition layers. Analytical investigations on fouling of process equipment led to models that are also applicable to the activity build-up in reactor loops. Therefore it seems appropriate to combine the nuclear simulation models with the fundamental equations for deposition. 10 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  3. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  4. Understanding the build-up of supermassive black holes and galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Francisco; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Georgakakis, Antonis

    2016-07-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  5. Simulation of Electron-Cloud Build-Up for the Cold Arcs of the LHC and Comparison with Measured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H; Rumolo, G; Tavian, L; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    The electron cloud generated by synchrotron radiation or residual gas ionization is a concern for LHC operation and performance. We report the results of simulations studies which examine the electron cloud build-up, at injection energy, 3.5 TeV for various operation parameters. In particular, we determine the value of the secondary emission yield corresponding to the multipacting threshold, and investigate the electron density, and heat as a function of bunch intensity for dipoles and field-free regions. We also include a comparison between simulations results and measured heat-load data from the LHC scrubbing runs in 2011.

  6. Surface analytical characterization of chromium-stabilized protecting oxide layers on stainless steel referring to activity buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Scharnweber, D.; Drechsler, L.; Heiser, C.; Adolphi, B.; Weiss, A.

    1992-08-01

    Surface analytical methods were used to characterize both protecting oxide layers formed by hydrothermal chromate treatment (HTCT) on stabilized austenitic stainless steel and hydrothermally grown corrosion product layers (CPL) within the scope of lowering the activity buildup in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants. Morphology, thickness and chromium depth distribution of the layers proved to be considerably different from each other. According to Raman microspectrometry, there were also alterations in the chemical nature of the oxide species. Preceding electropolishing gave rise to particular properties of the respective layers. Prerequisites for an optimal corrosion behaviour of the protecting layers are discussed. Titanium-containing precipitations were oxidatively transformed by HTCT.

  7. Humidity Build-Up in a Typical Electronic Enclosure Exposed to Cycling Conditions and Effect on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    , thermal mass, and port/opening size. The effect of the internal humidity build-up on corrosion reliability has been evaluated by measuring the leakage current (LC) on interdigitated test comb patterns, which are precontaminated with sodium chloride and placed inside the enclosure. The results showed...... that the exposure to cycling temperature causes significant change of internal water vapor concentration. The maximum value of humidity reached was a function of the opening size and the presence of thermal mass inside the enclosure. A pumping effect was observed due to cycling temperature, and the increase...

  8. Comprehensive study on energy absorption buildup factors and exposure buildup factors for photon energy 0.015 to 15 MeV up to 40 mfp penetration depth for gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gel dosimeter comprises of phantom, dosimetric material and three-D spatial dose distribution has advantages over one- and two-D dosimeters. Energy absorption buildup factor (EABF) and exposure buildup factor (EBF) values of sixteen gel dosimeters have been computed for photon energy 0.015 to 15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path) penetration depths. Kerma of the gel dosimeters were computed for photon energy 1 keV to 20 MeV. The water and PMMA phantom equivalence of the gel dosimeters was evaluated using EABF, and large difference was noted below 1 MeV photon energy. This study should be useful for estimation of effective dose to the human organs and simulation of the dose for radiation therapy and various medical applications. - Highlights: • EABF and EBF values of 16 gel dosimeters were computed using GP fitting method. • Water and PMMA equivalence was investigated using EABF. • Ratio of EABF of BANG1 to water and PMMA is close to unity above 1 MeV. • Photon kerma relative to air of PRESAGE shows a peak at 40 keV

  9. Gamma-ray double-layered transmission exposure buildup factors of some engineering materials, a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Heer, Manmohan Singh; Rani, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Comparative study on various deterministic methods and formulae of double layered transmission exposure buildup factors (DLEBF) for point isotropic gamma-ray sources has been performed and the results are provided here. This investigation has been performed on some commonly available engineering materials for the purpose of gamma-ray shielding. In reality, the presence of air around the gamma-ray shield motivated to focus this study on exposure buildup factor (EBF). DLEBF have been computed at four energies viz. 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 MeV for various combinations of the chosen five samples taken two at a time with combined optical thickness up to 8 mean free path (mfp). For the necessary computations for DLEBF, a computer program (BUF-toolkit) has been designed. Comparison of Monte Carlo (EGS4-code) and Geometric Progression (G.P.) fitting point kernel methods were done for DLEBF computation. It is concluded that empirical formula given by Lin and Jiang using EBF computed by G.P. fitting formula is the most accurate and easiest method for DLEBF computations. It was observed that DLEBF values at selected energies for two layered slabs with an orientation (low-Z material followed by high-Z material) were lower than the opposite orientation. For optical thickness up to 8 mfp and chosen energy range (0.5-3.0 MeV), Aluminum-Lime Stone shield, appears to provide the best protection against the gamma-rays.

  10. The global build-up to intrinsic ELM bursts seen in divertor full flux loops in Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, S C; Todd, T N; Watkins, N W; Calderon, F A; Morris, J; Contributors, JET

    2015-01-01

    A global signature of the build-up to an intrinsic ELM is found in the phase of signals measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region of JET. Full flux loop signals provide a global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux; they are electromagnetically induced by the dynamics of spatially integrated current density. We perform direct time-domain analysis of the high time-resolution full flux loop signals VLD2 and VLD3. We analyze plasmas where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which all the observed ELMs are intrinsic; there is no deliberate intent to pace the ELMing process by external means. ELM occurrence times are determined from the Be II emission at the divertor. We previously found that the occurrence times of intrinsic ELMs correlate with specific phases of the VLD2 and VLD3 signals. Here, we investigate how the VLD2 and VLD3 phases vary with time in advance of the ELM occurrence time. We identify a build-up to the ELM ...

  11. Development of the DCHAIN-SP code for analyzing decay and build-up characteristics of spallation products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kosako, Kazuaki

    1999-03-01

    For analyzing the decay and build-up characteristics of spallation products, the DCHAIN-SP code has been developed on the basis of the DCHAIN-2 code by revising the decay data and implementing the neutron cross section data. The decay data are newly processed from the data libraries of EAF 3.1, FENDL/D-1 and ENSDF. The neutron cross section data taken from FENDL/A-2 data library are also prepared to take account of the transmutation of nuclides by the neutron field at the produced position. The DCHAIN-SP code solves the time evolution of decay and build-up of nuclides in every decay chain by the Beteman method. The code can estimate the following physical quantities of produced nuclides: inventory, activity, decay heat by the emission of {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}-rays, and {gamma}-ray energy spectrum, where the nuclide production rate estimated by the nucleon-meson transport code such as NMTC/JAERI97 is used as an input data. This paper describes about the function, the solution model and the database adopted in the code and explains how to use the code. (author)

  12. Design and metrological evaluation of the new 5 MN hexapod-shaped multicomponent build-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Stefano; Germak, Alessandro; Mazzoleni, Fabrizio; Desogus, Sergio; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    The new 5 MN hexapod-shaped multicomponent build-up system (HSM-BUS) represents significant progress in the field of reference transducers in the high force range. As with any build-up system, the presented hexapod-shaped multicomponent force transducer can lead, not only to measure forces 5 times higher than the capacity of a each single uniaxial force transducer (UFT), but gives also information about the other components of the force vector and of the moment vector. Furthermore, the calibration of such types of multicomponent force transducer regards only the calibration of the signal outputs coming from each UFT and the calibration of the geometry of the system. In this work, an a priori evaluation of the expected uncertainty is performed. As a first approximation, the effects of the calibration uncertainties of UFTs and of the geometrical tolerances given on the construction drawing were considered. Subsequently, with a finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of the 5 MN HSM-BUS under load, a mathematical model of elastic deformations has been evaluated and applied for evaluating and correcting the systematic errors due to the deformation of the geometry under load.

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of the processes in a boiling water reactor to buildup the magnetic corrosion product deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. ► Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe2O4]. ► GEM calculations applied to the boiling zone match with the EPMA and EXAFS findings. ► Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations. - Abstract: The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by using Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM-Selector code) calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium at in situ temperatures and pressures. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe2O4] spinel solid solutions. GEM calculations applied to the boiling zone match with the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) findings, indicating that zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations under Zn water chemistry conditions. GEM results have helped to explain the existence of magnetic product deposits on the surface of the fuel element and the processes that take place in the reactor.

  14. Ways of reducing the build-up of Sr-90 in crops in the Kyshtym accident zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the zone of the Kyshtym radiation accident, with its leached clayey loam chernozem soil, the lowest 90Sr concentration - expressed in terms of contamination level (in units of Bq/kg per Bq/m2) - was observed in the grain of millet, maize and wheat and in potato tubers, varying for this group of crops from 0.051 to 0.234 x 10-3 m2/kg. The largest build-up was found in oil-bearing crops (flax, mustard) and root crops (carrots, beet, swede, turnip) - (0.73-1.37) x 10-3 m2/kg and (1.23-4.15) x 10-3 m2/kg respectively. Leguminous crops (peas, beans, French beans) occupied the middle section of this scale. Values for individual crops varied by a factor of 2-4 in different years in line with seasonal agro-meteorological conditions. A 37-40% reduction in 90Sr build-up in the grain and stalks of vetch and oats was observed after deep ploughing to a depth of 50 cm. Transfer to the grain and vegetative organs fell by a factor of 2-4 in comparison with the control when mineral fertilizers (NPK) were added - in doses of 9 g/m2 of each element - to the upper soil layer after deep ploughing. The addition of Na3PO4 to the surface of soil containing 90Sr in quantities equivalent to 100, 200 and 300% of exchangeable Ca++ content, and then ploughing this layer under to a depth of 50 cm, reduced transfer to wheat grain by a factor of 2.5-12. The addition of Na2SiO3 in corresponding quantities proved less effective. Adding colophony or furfural-analine to this soil layer at the rate of 2% of layer mass, followed by ploughing to a depth of 50 cm, reduced the transfer to wheat grain and peas by a factor of 2-5, and by a factor of 4-8 when higher doses of colophony were applied. Adding colophony to the soil led to a decrease in 90Sr build-up in the following year's crops as well. (author)

  15. The global build-up to intrinsic edge localized mode bursts seen in divertor full flux loops in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.; Morris, J.

    2015-07-01

    A global signature of the build-up to an intrinsic edge localized mode (ELM) is found in the temporal analytic phase of signals measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region of JET. Toroidally integrating, full flux loop signals provide a global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux; they are electromagnetically induced by the dynamics of spatially integrated current density. We perform direct time-domain analysis of the high time-resolution full flux loop signals VLD2 and VLD3. We analyze plasmas where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds during which all the observed ELMs are intrinsic; there is no deliberate intent to pace the ELMing process by external means. ELM occurrence times are determined from the Be II emission at the divertor. We previously [Chapman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 062302 (2014); Chapman et al., in 41st EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Europhysics Conference Abstracts (European Physical Society, 2014), Vol. 38F, ISBN 2-914771-90-8] found that the occurrence times of intrinsic ELMs correlate with specific temporal analytic phases of the VLD2 and VLD3 signals. Here, we investigate how the VLD2 and VLD3 temporal analytic phases vary with time in advance of the ELM occurrence time. We identify a build-up to the ELM in which the VLD2 and VLD3 signals progressively align to the temporal analytic phase at which ELMs preferentially occur, on a ˜ 2 - 5 ms timescale. At the same time, the VLD2 and VLD3 signals become temporally phase synchronized with each other, consistent with the emergence of coherent global dynamics in the integrated current density. In a plasma that remains close to a global magnetic equilibrium, this can reflect bulk displacement or motion of the plasma. This build-up signature to an intrinsic ELM can be extracted from a time interval of data that does not extend beyond the ELM occurrence time, so that these full flux loop signals could assist in ELM

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray buildup factors of lead in broad beam geometry for energies from 15 to 150 keV are determined using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C). The obtained buildup factors data are fitted to a modified three parameter Archer et al. model for ease in calculating the broad beam transmission with computer at any tube potentials/filters combinations in diagnostic energies range. An example for their use to compute the broad beam transmission at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The calculated broad beam transmission is compared to data derived from literature, presenting good agreement. Therefore, the combination of the buildup factors data as determined and a mathematical model to generate x-ray spectra provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for lead barriers in shielding x-ray facilities

  17. Ball phantom for dosimetry of surface and build-up region in megavoltage photon beam of oblique incidence through the couch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Chuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tainan Sin-Lau Hospital, The Presbyterian Church in, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hsin-Hsiung [Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tainan Sin-Lau Hospital, The Presbyterian Church in, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Chung-Ming [Department of Information Engineering, I-Shou University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ching-Jiang [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Min Chao, Max [Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Niu, H.; Chao, J.H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jia-Ming, E-mail: rtojmwu@gmail.com [Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tzong-Jer [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Shu-Zen College of Medicine and Management, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jin-Tze [Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates surface dose and build-up region dosimetry as well as beam attenuation by ball phantom for coplanar and non-coplanar oblique photon beam incidence through a treatment couch in radiation therapy. The dosimetry of the surface and build-up region and attenuating incidence of true posterior and maximum oblique incidence (15{sup 0} below surface) beams on the treatment couch are measured and compared with an open field. Photon calculation kernels of the computerized treatment planning system do not include the factor of scatter doses induced by the couch in the build-up region. These scatter doses can have some implications for skin reactions. Therefore, monitor unit calculation is necessary in posterior oblique angles or non-coplanar incidence of the treatment couch.

  18. Benchmarking Electron-Cloud Build-Up and Heat-Load Simulations against Large-Hadron-Collider Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Maury, H; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    After reviewing the basic features of electron clouds in particle accelerators, the pertinent vacuum-chamber surface properties, and the electron-cloud simulation tools in use at CERN, we report recent observations of electron-cloud phenomena at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and ongoing attempts to benchmark the measured LHC vacuum pressure increases and heat loads against electron-cloud build-up simulations aimed at determining the actual surface parameters and at monitoring the so-called scrubbing process. Finally, some other electron-cloud studies related to the LHC are mentioned, and future study plans are described. Presented at MulCoPim2011, Valencia, Spain, 21-23 September 2011.

  19. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Frede, Maik [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (DE)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of deposits build-up on austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L exposed in high purity water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the characterization of deposit layers on AISI 316L surfaces in high purity water systems, operating up to 80 deg C Moessbauer spectroscopy (ME), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used. Austenitic steel particles were identified on the surfaces of systems not properly cleaned before start-up. Long exposition of austenitic surfaces to high purity water promotes the build-up, composed by trivalent iron and chromium oxidehydroxides and oxide. The oxidehydroxide phase is located mainly at the solid-water interface, whereas oxide phase is in direct contact with metal. Spheroid-like morphology of particles in these layers and the lack of metal attack suggest that coagulation and crystallization processes are the way for oxide production from existing dissolved species. (author)

  1. The solar physics Shuttle/Spacelab program and its relationship to studies of the flare build-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    The main phase of solar physics (including flare-buildup) research on Shuttle/Spacelab during the 1980s centers around the use of facility instruments for multiple-user, multiple flight operations. Three main facilities are being considered: a meter-class optical telescope for visible and near-UV wavelengths, an EUV/XUV/soft X-ray facility, and a hard X-ray imaging facility (including a full-sun 5-600 keV spectrometer, a nuclear gamma ray spectrometer, and an X-ray polarimeter for the 5-100 keV range). Smaller instruments designed for specific observations and other classes of instruments such as solar monitors that are not on the facility level are also being considered.

  2. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  3. Temperature effect on the build-up of exponentially growing polyelectrolyte multilayers. An exponential-to-linear transition point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikulina, Anna S; Anissimov, Yuri G; Singh, Prateek; Prokopović, Vladimir Z; Uhlig, Katja; Jaeger, Magnus S; von Klitzing, Regine; Duschl, Claus; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-21

    In this study, the effect of temperature on the build-up of exponentially growing polyelectrolyte multilayer films was investigated. It aims at understanding the multilayer growth mechanism as crucially important for the fabrication of tailor-made multilayer films. Model poly(L-lysine)/hyaluronic acid (PLL/HA) multilayers were assembled in the temperature range of 25-85 °C by layer-by-layer deposition using a dipping method. The film growth switches from the exponential to the linear regime at the transition point as a result of limited polymer diffusion into the film. With the increase of the build-up temperature the film growth rate is enhanced in both regimes; the position of the transition point shifts to a higher number of deposition steps confirming the diffusion-mediated growth mechanism. Not only the faster polymer diffusion into the film but also more porous/permeable film structure are responsible for faster film growth at higher preparation temperature. The latter mechanism is assumed from analysis of the film growth rate upon switching of the preparation temperature during the film growth. Interestingly, the as-prepared films are equilibrated and remain intact (no swelling or shrinking) during temperature variation in the range of 25-45 °C. The average activation energy for complexation between PLL and HA in the multilayers calculated from the Arrhenius plot has been found to be about 0.3 kJ mol(-1) for monomers of PLL. Finally, the following processes known to be dependent on temperature are discussed with respect to the multilayer growth: (i) polymer diffusion, (ii) polymer conformational changes, and (iii) inter-polymer interactions. PMID:26911320

  4. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro® polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region

  5. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuse, Hiraku, E-mail: fuseh@ipu.ac.jp; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0331 (Japan); Shinoda, Kazuya [Graduate School of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Miyamoto, Katsumi [Department of Radiological Technology, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Sakae, Takeji [Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  6. Interpretation of changes in diffusive and non-diffusive transport in the edge plasma during pedestal buildup following a low-high transition in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of diffusive and non-diffusive transport during pedestal buildup following a low-high (L-H) transition has been interpreted from a particle-momentum-energy balance analysis of the measured density, temperature, and rotation velocity profiles in the plasma edge (0.820.95) of the edge pedestal.

  7. Application of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code to a study of multilayer gamma-ray exposure buildup factors of up to 40 mfp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayer γ-ray exposure buildup factors of up to 40 mfp were calculated using an electron-photon cascade Monte Carlo code, EGS4, as a point isotropic source. A kind of splitting technique was used in the EGS4 calculations in order to obtain reasonable results at very deep penetration problems, such as 40 mfp. The double-layer γ-ray exposure buildup factors were calculated for combinations of water, iron and lead for 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 10 MeV γ-rays. The thickness of the first medium was set to 1, 5, 10 or 20 mfp. As typical triple-layered shields, the calculations were performed for 4 different configurations of water, iron and lead. The behavior of multilayer buildup factors for deep penetration problems was studied using the obtained results. Buildup factors after the boundary show the tendency to vary largely depending on the material combination and the source energy of γ-rays. (author)

  8. The importance of satellite quenching for the build-up of the red sequence of present-day galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Aquino, Daniel; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Pasquali, Anna; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Weinmann, Simone M.; Kang, Xi

    2008-06-01

    According to the current paradigm, galaxies initially form as disc galaxies at the centres of their own dark matter haloes. During their subsequent evolution, they may undergo a transformation to a red, early-type galaxy, thus giving rise to the build-up of the red sequence. Two important, outstanding questions are (i) which transformation mechanisms are most important and (ii) in what environment do they occur. In this paper, we study the impact of transformation mechanisms that operate only on satellite galaxies, such as strangulation, ram-pressure stripping and galaxy harassment. Using a large galaxy group catalogue constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we compare the colours and concentrations of satellites galaxies to those of central galaxies of the same stellar mass, adopting the hypothesis that the latter are the progenitors of the former. On average, satellite galaxies are redder and more concentrated than central galaxies of the same stellar mass, indicating that satellite-specific transformation processes do indeed operate. Central-satellite pairs that are matched in both stellar mass and colour, however, show no average concentration difference, indicating that the transformation mechanisms operating on satellites affect colour more than morphology. We also find that the colour and concentration differences of matched central-satellite pairs are completely independent of the mass of the host halo (not to be confused with the subhalo) of the satellite galaxy, indicating that satellite-specific transformation mechanisms are equally efficient in host haloes of all masses. This strongly rules against mechanisms that are thought to operate only in very massive haloes, such as ram-pressure stripping or harassment. Instead, we argue that strangulation is the main transformation mechanism for satellite galaxies. Finally, we determine the relative importance of satellite quenching for the build-up of the red sequence. We find that roughly 70 per cent of

  9. Evaluation of buildup of activated corrosion products for highly compact marine reactor DRX without primary coolant water purification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, Naoteru; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has studied a highly compact reactor DRX for deep-sea research. The DRX has no purification system to achieve compact and light weight design by simplification of the system. The DRX is designed to operate for one month without purification of the primary coolant water. To quantitatively evaluate the validity of reactor operation without a purification system, a computer code CTAM-II has been developed to calculate accumulation of the activated corrosion products during and after reactor operation. The code is an improved and modified version of CTAM, which was developed for the shield modification project of the nuclear ship Mutsu. Validity of CTAM-II and parameters used in the code has been confirmed by comparison of the calculated data and experimental ones for measurement of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the primary coolant water. Estimation of buildup of the corrosion products for DRX using CTAM-II has been carried out and shielding calculations using source terms calculated from CTAM-II have been performed. A radiation safety assessment of the DRX without the purification system has been carried out by these shielding calculations. (author)

  10. Decomposition of litter and soil organic matter - Can we distinguish a mechanism for soil organic matter buildup ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This synthesis paper presents a model for estimating the buildup of soil organic matter in various types of coniferous forests. The knowledge used was obtained from a well-studied forest with good litterfall data, decomposition information and validation measurements of the soil organic matter layer. By constructing a simple model for litterfall, and the information on maximum decomposition levels for litter, we could estimate the annual increase in soil organic matter and extend this to encompass stand age. The validation measurement and the estimated amount of soil organic matter differed by about 8 or 26% over a 120-yr period, depending on the litterfall model. The estimated increased storage of soil organic matter as a consequence of climate change was found to be drastic. We thus found that the soil organic matter layer would grow about four times as fast as a result of the needle component only. This estimate was based on a comparison between latitudes with a difference of 17 degrees. 35 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  11. On stress-forecasting strategy of earthquakes from stress buildup, stress shadow and stress transfer (SSS) based on numerical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunan Tang; Tianhui Ma; Xiaoli Ding

    2009-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), used for monitoring crust deformation, are found to be very promising in earthquake prediction subject to stress-forecasting. However, it is rec-ognized that unless we can give reasonable explanations of these curious precursory phenomena that continue to be seren-dipitously observed fi'om time to time, such high technology of GPS or InSAR is difficult to be efficiently used. Therefore, a proper model revealing the relation between earthquake evolution and stress variation, such as the phenomena of stress buildup, stress shadow and stress transfer (SSS), is crucial to the GPS or lnSAR based earthquake prediction. Here we ad-dress this question through a numerical approach of earthquake development using an intuitive physical model with a map-like configuration of discontinuous fault system. The simulation provides a physical basis for the principle of stress-forecasting of earthquakes based on SSS and for the application of GPS or InSAR in earthquake prediction. The ob-served SSS associated phenomena with images of stress distribution during the failure process can be continuously simulated. It is shown that the SSS are better indicators of earthquake precursors than that of seismic foreshocks, suggesting a predict-ability of earthquakes based on stress-forecasting strategy.

  12. Effect of the thermoplastic masks on dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Półtorak, Michał; Fujak, Edyta; Kukołowicz, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of thermoplastic masks material (Klarity Medical&Equipment Co., Guangzhou, China) with different diameters of holes (ϕ 0.25 cm and ϕ 0.40 cm) on the dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams. Measurements were made for external radiation beams produced by the linear accelerator (TrueBeam, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA) using the Markus parallel plane ionization chamber and the Unidos electrometer (both from PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Measurements were made in a solid water phantom for two photon energies 6 MV and 15 MV, at 90 cm source to skin distance, for four fields of 5 cm × 5 cm, 10 cm × 10 cm, 15 cm × 15 cm and 20 cm × 20 cm. Compared to the open field, the maximum dose with mask was closer to the surface of the phantom by about 1.4 mm and 1.2 mm for 6 MV and 15 MV X-Rays, respectively. The surface dose increase from 10% to 42% for 6 MV and from 5% to 28% for 15 MV X-Rays.

  13. Determination of neutron buildup factor using analytical solution of one-dimensional neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Julio Cesar L.; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada; Borges, Volnei; Bodmann, Bardo Ernest, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.b, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2011-07-01

    The principal idea of this work, consist on formulate an analytical method to solved problems for diffusion of neutrons with isotropic scattering in one-dimensional cylindrical geometry. In this area were develop many works that study the same problem in different system of coordinates as well as cartesian system, nevertheless using numerical methods to solve the shielding problem. In view of good results in this works, we starting with the idea that we can represent a source in the origin of the cylindrical system by a Delta Dirac distribution, we describe the physical modeling and solved the neutron diffusion equation inside of cylinder of radius R. For the case of transport equation, the formulation of discrete ordinates S{sub N} consists in discretize the angular variables in N directions and in using a quadrature angular set for approximate the sources of scattering, where the Diffusion equation consist on S{sub 2} approximated transport equation in discrete ordinates. We solved the neutron diffusion equation with an analytical form by the finite Hankel transform. Was presented also the build-up factor for the case that we have neutron flux inside the cylinder. (author)

  14. Evaluation of buildup of activated corrosion products for highly compact marine reactor DRX without primary coolant water purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has studied a highly compact reactor DRX for deep-sea research. The DRX has no purification system to achieve compact and light weight design by simplification of the system. The DRX is designed to operate for one month without purification of the primary coolant water. To quantitatively evaluate the validity of reactor operation without a purification system, a computer code CTAM-II has been developed to calculate accumulation of the activated corrosion products during and after reactor operation. The code is an improved and modified version of CTAM, which was developed for the shield modification project of the nuclear ship Mutsu. Validity of CTAM-II and parameters used in the code has been confirmed by comparison of the calculated data and experimental ones for measurement of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the primary coolant water. Estimation of buildup of the corrosion products for DRX using CTAM-II has been carried out and shielding calculations using source terms calculated from CTAM-II have been performed. A radiation safety assessment of the DRX without the purification system has been carried out by these shielding calculations. (author)

  15. Improvement of MERCURE-6's General Formalism for Calculating Gamma-Ray Buildup Factors in Multilayer Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes an improvement of the general formalism for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields developed by Assad et al. The main modification concerns the treatment of the double-layer shield formed by the two first layers of a multilayer shield. Instead of replacing the double-layer shield with an equivalent thickness of the layer of the second material, the improved general formalism replaces it with a single-layer shield made of an appropriate material. The determination of the appropriate material is implemented into MERCURE-6.1 thanks to neural networks trained on a large set of various configurations.One-dimensional comparisons with the TWODANT transport Sn code shows the accuracy of the new formalism for shields composed of three and five layers. Indeed, for three-layer shields with an infinitesimal second layer and for multilayer shields composed of numerous thin layers (more than 15), MERCURE-6.1 matches the reference data quite well. The MERCURE-6.1 ability to solve three-dimensional realistic cases is highlighted by comparisons to the TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP-4C Monte Carlo codes

  16. Enhanced damage buildup in C{sup +}-implanted GaN film studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. F.; Chen, Z. Q., E-mail: chenzq@whu.edu.cn; Liu, C. [Department of Physics, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang, H. J.; Kawasuso, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2015-02-28

    Wurtzite GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy were implanted with 280 keV C{sup +} ions to a dose of 6 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. Vacancy-type defects in C{sup +}-implanted GaN were probed using a slow positron beam. The increase of Doppler broadening S parameter to a high value of 1.08–1.09 after implantation indicates introduction of very large vacancy clusters. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures up to 800 °C makes these vacancy clusters to agglomerate into microvoids. The vacancy clusters or microvoids show high thermal stability, and they are only partially removed after annealing up to 1000 °C. The other measurements such as X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and Photoluminescence all indicate severe damage and even disordered structure induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered lattice shows a partial recovery after annealing above 800 °C. Amorphous regions are observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurement, which directly confirms that amorphization is induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered GaN lattice is possibly due to special feature of carbon impurities, which enhance the damage buildup during implantation.

  17. Hydrothermal formation of Co complex oxide and 58Co radioactivity build-up on zircaloy in simulated BWR primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explicate deposition and release of Co on fuel cladding in BWR, the hydrothermal formation of spinel type oxide from hydroxide and oxide and Co-58 radioactivity build-up on zircaly has been investigated experimentary in a simulated BWR primary coolant system. (1) The order of reactivity in formation of Co complex oxide from Co(OH)2 was CrO3 > Fe(OH)2 ≥ Cr(OH)3. (2) Compared with Co complex oxide, Ni complex oxide was hard to form. (3) Co-58 radioactivity build-up was practically unaffected by zircaloys with the prior treatment condition. (4) Cr ion was selectively deposited among Fe, Cr, Ni and Co ion on zircaloy test pieces. (author)

  18. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS{sub N} method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS{sub N} nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  19. Together, slowly but surely: the role of social interaction and feedback in the build-up of benefit in collective decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Olsen, Karsten; Bang, Dan;

    2011-01-01

    That objective reference is necessary for formation of reliable beliefs about the external world is almost axiomatic. However, Condorcet (1785) suggested that purely subjective information-if shared and combined via social interaction-is enough for accurate understanding of the external world. We...... asked if social interaction and objective reference contribute differently to the formation and build-up of collective perceptual beliefs. In three experiments, dyads made individual and collective perceptual decisions in a two-interval, forced-choice, visual search task. In Experiment 1, participants...... were robust and statistically indistinguishable. Taken together, this work demonstrates that social interaction was necessary for build-up of reliable collaborative benefit, whereas objective reference only accelerated the process but-given enough opportunity for practice-was not necessary for building...

  20. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE BUILD-UP OF STELLAR MASS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present deep J- and Ks -band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z = 0.8 and1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at ∼9 x 1011 M sun since z ∼ 1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well-known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, which predict a more protracted mass build-up over a Hubble time. However, we discuss that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.

  1. Artifacts in time-resolved NUS: A case study of NOE build-up curves from 2D NOESY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Rupashree; Kasprzak, Paweł; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy requires time-consuming sampling of indirect dimensions and so is usually used to study stable samples. However, dynamically changing compounds or their mixtures commonly occur in problems of natural science. Monitoring them requires the use multidimensional NMR in a time-resolved manner - in other words, a series of quick spectra must be acquired at different points in time. Among the many solutions that have been proposed to achieve this goal, time-resolved non-uniform sampling (TR-NUS) is one of the simplest. In a TR-NUS experiment, the signal is sampled using a shuffled random schedule and then divided into overlapping subsets. These subsets are then processed using one of the NUS reconstruction methods, for example compressed sensing (CS). The resulting stack of spectra forms a temporal "pseudo-dimension" that shows the changes caused by the process occurring in the sample. CS enables the use of small subsets of data, which minimizes the averaging of the effects studied. Yet, even within these limited timeframes, the sample undergoes certain changes. In this paper we discuss the effect of varying signal amplitude in a TR-NUS experiment. Our theoretical calculations show that the variations within the subsets lead to t1 -noise, which is dependent on the rate of change of the signal amplitude. We verify these predictions experimentally. As a model case we choose a novel 2D TR-NOESY experiment in which mixing time is varied in parallel with shuffled NUS in the indirect dimension. The experiment, performed on a sample of strychnine, provides a near-continuous NOE build-up curve, whose shape closely reflects the t1 -noise level. 2D TR-NOESY reduces the measurement time compared to the conventional approach and makes it possible to verify the theoretical predictions about signal variations during TR-NUS.

  2. Kerogen to oil conversion in source rocks. Pore-pressure build-up and effects on seismic velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Giorgia; Carcione, José M.; Poletto, Flavio

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain a model for source rocks relating to kerogen-oil conversion and pore pressure to seismic velocity and anisotropy. The source rock is described by a porous transversely isotropic medium composed of illite/smectite and organic matter. The rock has a very low permeability and pore-pressure build-up occurs. We consider a basin-evolution model with constant sedimentation rate and geothermal gradient. Kerogen-oil conversion starts at a given depth in a volume whose permeability is sufficiently low so that the increase in pressure due to oil generation greatly exceeds the dissipation of pressure by flow. Assuming a first-order kinetic reaction, with a reaction rate satisfying the Arrhenius equation, the kerogen-oil conversion fraction is calculated. Pore-pressure changes affect the dry-rock stiffnesses, which have an influence on seismic velocities. The properties of the kerogen-oil mixture are obtained with the Kuster and Toksöz model, assuming that oil is the inclusion in a kerogen matrix. We use Gassmann's equations generalized to the anisotropic case to obtain the seismic velocities of the source rock as a function of depth, pressure and oil saturation. The procedure is to obtain the dry-rock stiffnesses by assuming a Poisson medium for the mineral material constrained by the physical stability conditions at the calibration confining pressures. The example considers a sample of the North-Sea Kimmeridge shale. At a given depth, the conversion increases with increasing geothermal gradient and decreasing sedimentation rate, and the porosity increases with depth due to the conversion. As expected, the horizontal velocities are greater than the vertical velocities and the degree of anisotropy increases with depth. The analysis reveals that the vertical P-wave velocity is the main indicator of overpressure.

  3. Diagenesis and Geochemistry of Upper Muschelkalk (Triassic) Buildups and Associated Facies in Catalonia (NE Spain): a paper dedicated to Francesc Calvet

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, M.; Marshall, J

    2004-01-01

    Carbonate buildups are well developed in the Triassic Upper Muschelkalk of eastern Spain in the La Riba Unit, but they are completely dolomitised. These mud-mounds with reefal caps have well-developed fibrous and botryoidal marine cements which were probably high-Mg calcite and aragonite originally. The dolomite is fabric retentive indicating an early origin, but the d18O values are quite negative (average -3.‰), interpreted as indicating recrystallisation during shallow burial, but without f...

  4. Upper Paleozoic Carbonate Buildups of the Timan-Pechora Basin, the Sverdrup Basin and the Barents Sea as Potential Reservoirs of the Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Svyatkovskiy, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the three Arctic Provinces: the Timan-Pechora Basin, the Sverdrup Basin and the Barents Sea, and make a comparison between them with a focus on the Paleozoic sediments and their potential as reservoirs based on published literature. The Upper Paleozoic carbonate reefal structures of the Timan-Pechora Basin have been proven as good reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation, while similar carbonate buildups of the Sverdrup Basin and the Barents Sea ar...

  5. Paleoecological Characteristics of the Carboniferous Phylloid Algal Buildups in Southern Guizhou%贵州南部石炭纪叶状藻礁古生态学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巩恩普; 董旭明; 张永利; 关长庆; 孙宝亮

    2009-01-01

    The Carboniferous phylloid algal buildups are widespread and well exposed in southern Guizhou. A unique depositional sequence consists of phylloid algal buildups, bioclastic banks and mud facies affected by frequent changes of depositional environments. The phylloid algae that grow on the margin of carbonate platform prefer to live in clean water with medium turbulence. Therefore the phylloid algae must be a narrow spectrum of ecological environment. Adjacent two leaves of phylloid algae rarely are tightly together in the growth-form and the spaces between two leaves are often filled with sparry calcite. It indicates that phylloid algae thallus should be a certain tenacity and intensity. The worm may be taked part in the construction of buildup substrate, and they are the pioneer of phylloid algal buildup.%贵州紫云石炭纪叶状藻礁极为发育.叶状藻礁在沉积环境频繁变化作用下,与碎屑滩相、灰泥相共同形成独特的沉积序列.产于碳酸盐岩台地边缘的叶状藻生态适应范围较窄,不能忍受混浊的海水,喜欢清洁动荡中等水动力条件.野外很少见到相邻叶状藻片紧密生长在一起,其间空隙常充填亮晶方解石,表明叶状藻片具有一定的强度和韧性.蠕虫很可能参与了基底的建造,并成为叶状藻礁的先驱.

  6. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the 19F(p, αγ)16O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials. (authors)

  7. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terrón, J A; Gómez, F

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm(3) ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface. PMID:16510960

  8. A polynomial–based function approach to point isotropic gamma-ray buildup factor data in double layered spherical shield of water and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Alamatsaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the input of MCNP code (Monte Carlo N - Particle code system, a monoenergetic and isotropic point source with the energy rangeg from 0.3 to 10 MeV was placed at the center of a spherical material surrounded by another one. The first shielding material was water and the second one was lead. The total thickness of the shield varied between 2 to 10 mfp. Then, using the output of MCNCP, exposure build up factor was calculated. The MCNP computed data were analyzed by plotting the buildup factor as a function of each independent variable (energy, first material thickness and second material thickness and observing the trends. Based on the trends, we examined many different expressions with different number of constants. By MINUIT the FORTRAN program, the constants were calculated, which gave the best agreement between the MCNP-computed exposure buildup factors and those obtained by the formula. At last, we developed a polynomial formula with 11 constants that reproduced exposure buildup factor with a relative error below 2% (in comparison with the MCNP result.

  9. Surface and buildup region dose measurements with Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, Gafchromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for high energy photon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Akbas, Ugur; Koksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance (SDD) for 5x5, 10x10 and 20x20 cm2 field sizes and 0, 30, 60, 80 and 90 beam angles. The surface doses for 10x10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.33%, 18.80% and 25.48% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary, thus the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry, and must be taken into account.

  10. Eumelanin buildup on the nanoscale: aggregate growth/assembly and visible absorption development in biomimetic 5,6-dihydroxyindole polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzillo, Marianna; Mangiapia, Gaetano; Pezzella, Alessandro; Heenan, Richard K; Radulescu, Aurel; Paduano, Luigi; d'Ischia, Marco

    2012-08-13

    Establishing structure-property relationships in the black insoluble eumelanins, the key determinants of human pigmentation and skin photoprotective system, is a considerable conceptual and experimental challenge in the current drive for elucidation of the biological roles of these biopolymers and their application as advanced materials for organoelectronics. Herein, we report a new breakthrough toward this goal by the first detailed investigation on the nanoscale level of the oxidative polymerization of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), a model process of eumelanin synthesis. On the basis of a combined use of spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigations, it was possible to unveil the dynamics of the aggregation process before precipitation, the key relationships with visible light absorption and the shape of fundamental aggregates. The results indicated a polymerization mechanism of the type: Polymer(n) + DHI(x) = Polymer(n+x), where DHI(x) indicates monomer, dimer, or low oligomers (x ≤ 5). During polymerization, visible absorption increases rapidly, reaching a plateau. Particle growth proceeds slowly, with formation of 2-D structures ~55 nm thick, until precipitation occurs, that is, when large aggregates with a maximum hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) of ~1200 nm are formed. Notably, markedly smaller R(h) values, up to ~110 nm, were determined in the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) that was shown to be an efficient aggregation-preventing agent for polymerizing DHI ensuring water solubilization. Finally, it is shown that DHI monomer can be efficiently and partially irreversibly depleted from aqueous solutions by the addition of eumelanin suspensions. This behavior is suggested to reflect oxidant-independent competing pathways of polymer synthesis and buildup via monomer conversion on the active aggregate surface contributing to particle growth. Besides filling crucial gaps in DHI polymerization, these

  11. Precipitation dominates fire occurrence in Greece (1900-2010): its dual role in fuel build-up and dryness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xystrakis, F.; Kallimanis, A. S.; Dimopoulos, P.; Halley, J. M.; Koutsias, N.

    2014-01-01

    Historical fire records and meteorological observations spanning over one century (1894-2010) were assembled in a database to collect long-term fire and weather data in Greece. Positive/negative events of fire occurrence on an annual basis were considered as the years where the annual values of the examined parameters were above (positive values) or below (negative values) the 95% confidence limits around the trend line of the corresponding parameter. To analyse the association of positive/negative events of fire occurrence with meteorological extremes, we proceeded with a cross-tabulation analysis based on a Monte Carlo randomization. Positive/negative values of total annual precipitation were randomly associated with the corresponding values of burned areas, and significant associations were observed for seasonal precipitation totals (spring and fire season). Fire season precipitation is the dominant factor coinciding with negative values of area burned, while years with high spring precipitation coincide with years with large areas burned. These results demonstrate the dual role of precipitation in controlling a fire's extent through fuel build-up and dryness. Additionally, there is a clear outperformance of precipitation-related variables compared with temperature-related weather revealing that, at least in Greece, total area burned at the national scale is controlled by precipitation totals rather than air temperature. This analysis improves our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of fire regimes and provides valuable information concerning the development of models relating fire activity to weather parameters, which are essential when facing a changing climate that may be associated with shifts in various aspects of the typical fire regimes of ecosystems. Our results may allow fire managers to more easily incorporate the effect of extreme weather conditions into long-term planning strategies. They contribute to the exploration of fire

  12. Buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers of polyethyleneimine and microfibrillated cellulose studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulin, Christian; Varga, Imre; Claesson, Per M; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2008-03-18

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) and Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have been used to buildup polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) on silicone oxide and silicone oxynitride surfaces at different pH values and with different electrolyte and polyelectrolyte/colloid concentrations of the components. Consecutive adsorption on these surfaces was studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry (DPI) and quartz crystal microbalance measurements. The adsorption data obtained from both the techniques showed a steady buildup of multilayers. High pH and electrolyte concentration of the PEI solution was found to be beneficial for achieving a high adsorbed amount of PEI, and hence of MFC, during the buildup of the multilayer. On the other hand, an increase in the electrolyte concentration of the MFC dispersion was found to inhibit the adsorption of MFC onto PEI. The adsorbed amount of MFC was independent of the bulk MFC concentration in the investigated concentration range (15-250 mg/L). Atomic force microscopy measurements were used to image a MFC-treated silicone oxynitride chip from DPI measurements. The surface was found to be almost fully covered by randomly oriented microfibrils after the adsorption of only one bilayer of PEI/MFC. The surface roughness expressed as the rms-roughness over 1 microm2 was calculated to be 4.6 nm (1 bilayer). The adsorbed amount of PEI and MFC and the amount of water entrapped by the individual layers in the multilayer structures were estimated by combining results from the two analytical techniques using the de Feijter formula. These results indicate a total water content of ca. 41% in the PEM. PMID:18278961

  13. Surface and Buildup Region Dose Measurements with Markus Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber, GafChromic EBT3 Film, and MOSFET Detector for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Akbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance for 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm2 field sizes and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 80° beam angles. The surface doses using 6 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.3%, 18.8%, and 25.5% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface doses using 15 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 14.9%, 13.4%, and 16.4% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary; thus, the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry and must be taken into account.

  14. 关于政务公开理念建构的思考%Considerations on Buildup the Concept of Open Government

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王运萍

    2012-01-01

    The concept is of extraordinary power.Open government is the behavior of the governments' administration,which needs not only to build the dams of the system,but also to build moral embankment.The significance of buildup the concepts is well highlighted in the dialectical relationship between the concept and the operations and systems(the rule by law).To achieve effective results in the open government the buildup of the concept of the right to know,of mutually beneficial win-win,of good governance of society,and of flexible treatment is critical.%理念的力量意义非凡,政务公开是政府的治理行为,不但要修筑制度的大坝,更要建构道德的堤岸,理念建构的意义在它与行动和制度(法治)之间的辩证关系中得到了很好的凸显。政务公开要取得实效,知情权理念、双赢互利理念、社会善治理念、柔性处理理念的建构至为关键。

  15. General Physical Problems Related to MHD. Auxiliary Ionization and Relaxation. Introduction to Papers In Section 1-D(ii). Relaxation and Build-Up of Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the build-up and the relaxation of ionization phenomena is of interest in connection with closed-cycle MHD generators in which thermal equilibrium among the different species of the plasma is not present. From the study of the ionization build-up, we can deduce the length of the generator necessary for the electron density to reach its asymptotic (quasi-steady-state) value; this information is essential to determine the minimum dimensions of an MHD experiment whose aim is to observe magnetically induced ionization. From the study of the ionization relaxation we can deduce the maximum length which a non-equilibrium plasma must travel so that its electron density changes by a given amount before approaching its equilibrium value. The information that must be assessed is: the applicability of a pre-ionization system before the inlet of an MHD duct; the presence of frozen electrons at the outlet of a nozzle; the persistence of non-equilibrium ionization in actual MHD generators of great length, etc. To describe a plasma during a transient one should write the rate equations for the population and depopulation of each state due to collisional and radiative processes, and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation for the free electron distribution function including elastic and inelastic collisions. These equations are all linked together and the solutions of this system would be very complex, if not completely impossible, because of the scarcity and uncertainties of the available data. Two main assumptions are often introduced.

  16. A 3D point-kernel multiple scatter model for parallel-beam SPECT based on a gamma-ray buildup factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional (3D) point-kernel multiple scatter model for point spread function (PSF) determination in parallel-beam single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), based on a dose gamma-ray buildup factor, is proposed. This model embraces nonuniform attenuation in a voxelized object of imaging (patient body) and multiple scattering that is treated as in the point-kernel integration gamma-ray shielding problems. First-order Compton scattering is done by means of the Klein-Nishina formula, but the multiple scattering is accounted for by making use of a dose buildup factor. An asset of the present model is the possibility of generating a complete two-dimensional (2D) PSF that can be used for 3D SPECT reconstruction by means of iterative algorithms. The proposed model is convenient in those situations where more exact techniques are not economical. For the proposed model's testing purpose calculations (for the point source in a nonuniform scattering object for parallel beam collimator geometry), the multiple-order scatter PSF generated by means of the proposed model matched well with those using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Discrepancies are observed only at the exponential tails mostly due to the high statistic uncertainty of MC simulations in this area, but not because of the inappropriateness of the model

  17. A 3D point-kernel multiple scatter model for parallel-beam SPECT based on a gamma-ray buildup factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, Predrag; Ilic, Radovan; Spaic, Rajko

    2007-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) point-kernel multiple scatter model for point spread function (PSF) determination in parallel-beam single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), based on a dose gamma-ray buildup factor, is proposed. This model embraces nonuniform attenuation in a voxelized object of imaging (patient body) and multiple scattering that is treated as in the point-kernel integration gamma-ray shielding problems. First-order Compton scattering is done by means of the Klein-Nishina formula, but the multiple scattering is accounted for by making use of a dose buildup factor. An asset of the present model is the possibility of generating a complete two-dimensional (2D) PSF that can be used for 3D SPECT reconstruction by means of iterative algorithms. The proposed model is convenient in those situations where more exact techniques are not economical. For the proposed model's testing purpose calculations (for the point source in a nonuniform scattering object for parallel beam collimator geometry), the multiple-order scatter PSF generated by means of the proposed model matched well with those using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Discrepancies are observed only at the exponential tails mostly due to the high statistic uncertainty of MC simulations in this area, but not because of the inappropriateness of the model.

  18. Plutonium build-up credits for a material test research reactor and influence of cross-section differences on actinide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup calculations with SARC system were carried out to analyse the effects of plutonium build-up on criticality of MTR type research reactor PARR-1 using several WIMSD libraries based on evaluated nuclear data files ENDFB-VI.8, JEF-2.2, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.2. For equilibrium core of the reactor, it was found that a net reactivity of more than 3.5 mk is induced due to build-up of plutonium isotopes during depletion. The plutonium credit amounts to 3% of the length of equilibrium cycle. From the analysis of actinide production in the core during burnup, it was observed that in most of the cases, the amounts of actinides obtained using various cross section libraries agree fairly with each other, however, significant differences were observed for 238Pu, 241Pu, 242mAm, 243Am, 242Cm and 244Cm for some libraries. The actinide chain analysis was conducted to investigate the reasons for the observed differences

  19. Plutonium build-up credits for a material test research reactor and influence of cross-section differences on actinide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Siraj Islam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad-45650 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: sirajisl@yahoo.co.uk; Ahmad, Nasir [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad-45650 (Pakistan)

    2006-12-15

    Burnup calculations with SARC system were carried out to analyse the effects of plutonium build-up on criticality of MTR type research reactor PARR-1 using several WIMSD libraries based on evaluated nuclear data files ENDFB-VI.8, JEF-2.2, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.2. For equilibrium core of the reactor, it was found that a net reactivity of more than 3.5 mk is induced due to build-up of plutonium isotopes during depletion. The plutonium credit amounts to 3% of the length of equilibrium cycle. From the analysis of actinide production in the core during burnup, it was observed that in most of the cases, the amounts of actinides obtained using various cross section libraries agree fairly with each other, however, significant differences were observed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm for some libraries. The actinide chain analysis was conducted to investigate the reasons for the observed differences.

  20. Modeling of gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials using multilayer perceptron neural network: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, multilayered perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) were presented for the computation of the gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors (BA) of seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials [LiF, BeO, Na2B4O7, CaSO4, Li2B4O7, KMgF3, Ca3(PO4)2] in the energy region 0.015–15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 10 mfp (mean-free-path). The MLPNNs have been trained by a Levenberg–Marquardt learning algorithm. The developed model is in 99% agreement with the ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 standard data set. Furthermore, the model is fast and does not require tremendous computational efforts. The estimated BA data for TLD materials have been given with penetration depth and incident photon energy as comparative to the results of the interpolation method using the Geometrical Progression (G-P) fitting formula. - Highlights: ► Gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors estimation in TLD materials. ► The ANN approach can be alternative to G-P fitting method for BA calculations. ► The applied model is not time-consuming and easily predicted

  1. Evolutionary paths among different red galaxy types at 0.3 < z < 1.5 and the build-up of massive E-S0's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Jesús; Prieto, Mercedes; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Balcells, Marc; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Erwin, Peter; Abreu, David; Domínguez-Palmero, Lilian; Hempel, Angela; López-Sanjuan, Carlos; Guzmán, Rafael; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Barro, Guillermo; Zamorano, Jaime

    2013-07-01

    Some recent observations seem to disagree with hierarchical theories of galaxy formation on the role of major mergers in a late build-up of massive early-type galaxies. We re-address this question by analysing the morphology, structural distortion level, and star formation enhancement of a sample of massive galaxies (M* > 5 × 1010M⊙) lying on the Red Sequence and its surroundings at 0.3 1011M⊙ at z = 0 through gas-rich major mergers has frozen since z ~ 0.6. Our results support that major mergers have played the dominant role in the definitive build-up of present-day E-S0's with M* > 1011M⊙ at 0.6 Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) under projects AYA2009-10368, AYA2006-12955, AYA2010-21887-C04-04, and AYA2009-11137, by the Madrid Regional Government through the AstroMadrid Project (CAM S2009/ESP-1496), and by the Spanish MICINN under the Consolider-Ingenio 2010 Program grant CSD2006-00070: ``First Science with the GTC'' (http://www.iac.es/consolider-ingenio-gtc/). S. D. H. & G.

  2. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm3 thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm3 active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response

  3. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hong-Nian Jow [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm{sup 3} active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response.

  4. Study of the effect of external heating and internal temperature build-up during polymerization on the morphology of porous polymethacrylate adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern day synthesis protocols of methacrylate monolithic polymer adsorbent are based on existing polymerization blueprint without a thorough understanding of the dynamics of pore structure and formation. This has resulted in unproductiveness of polymer adsorbent consequently affecting purity and recovery of final product, productivity, retention time and cost effectiveness of the whole process. The problems magnified in monolith scaling-up where internal heat buildup resulting from external heating and high exothermic polymerization reaction was reflected in cracking of the adsorbent. We believe that through careful and precise control of the polymerization kinetics and parameters, it is possible to prepare macroporous methacrylate monolithic adsorbents with controlled pore structures despite being carried out in an unstirred mould. This research involved the study of the effect of scaling-up on pore morphology of monolith, in other words, porous polymethacrylate adsorbents that were prepared via bulk free radical polymerization process by imaging the porous morphology of polymethacrylate with scanning electron microscope

  5. Time-resolved Shielded-Pickup Measurements and Modeling of Beam Conditioning Effects on Electron Cloud Buildup at CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, J A; Liu, X; Palmer, M A; Santos, S; Sikora, J P; Kato, S; Calatroni, S; Rumolo, G

    2012-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup in vacuum chambers with various coatings. Two 1.1-mlong sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions are equipped with BPM-like pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of 0.76 mm-diameter holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. We present new measurements of the effect of beam conditioning on a newly-installed amorphous carbon coated chamber, as well as on an extensively conditioned chamber with a diamond-like carbon coating. The ECLOUD modeling code is used to quantify the sensitivity of these measurements to model parameters, differentiating between photoelectron and secondary-electron production processes.

  6. Study of the effect of external heating and internal temperature build-up during polymerization on the morphology of porous polymethacrylate adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chan Yi; Ongkudon, Clarence M.; Kansil, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Modern day synthesis protocols of methacrylate monolithic polymer adsorbent are based on existing polymerization blueprint without a thorough understanding of the dynamics of pore structure and formation. This has resulted in unproductiveness of polymer adsorbent consequently affecting purity and recovery of final product, productivity, retention time and cost effectiveness of the whole process. The problems magnified in monolith scaling-up where internal heat buildup resulting from external heating and high exothermic polymerization reaction was reflected in cracking of the adsorbent. We believe that through careful and precise control of the polymerization kinetics and parameters, it is possible to prepare macroporous methacrylate monolithic adsorbents with controlled pore structures despite being carried out in an unstirred mould. This research involved the study of the effect of scaling-up on pore morphology of monolith, in other words, porous polymethacrylate adsorbents that were prepared via bulk free radical polymerization process by imaging the porous morphology of polymethacrylate with scanning electron microscope.

  7. Study of the effect of external heating and internal temperature build-up during polymerization on the morphology of porous polymethacrylate adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Chan Yi, E-mail: vicchanyiwei@hotmail.com; Ongkudon, Clarence M., E-mail: clarence@ums.edu.my; Kansil, Tamar, E-mail: tamarkansil87@gmail.com [Biotechnology Research Institute, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Modern day synthesis protocols of methacrylate monolithic polymer adsorbent are based on existing polymerization blueprint without a thorough understanding of the dynamics of pore structure and formation. This has resulted in unproductiveness of polymer adsorbent consequently affecting purity and recovery of final product, productivity, retention time and cost effectiveness of the whole process. The problems magnified in monolith scaling-up where internal heat buildup resulting from external heating and high exothermic polymerization reaction was reflected in cracking of the adsorbent. We believe that through careful and precise control of the polymerization kinetics and parameters, it is possible to prepare macroporous methacrylate monolithic adsorbents with controlled pore structures despite being carried out in an unstirred mould. This research involved the study of the effect of scaling-up on pore morphology of monolith, in other words, porous polymethacrylate adsorbents that were prepared via bulk free radical polymerization process by imaging the porous morphology of polymethacrylate with scanning electron microscope.

  8. Effects of salinity build-up on the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor regarding basic water quality parameters and removal of trace organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoye; McDonald, James; Price, William E; Khan, Stuart J; Hai, Faisal I; Ngo, Hao H; Guo, Wenshan; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-09-01

    The effects of elevated inorganic salt concentration on anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment regarding basic biological performance and trace organic contaminant (TrOC) removal were investigated. A set of 33 TrOCs were selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroids, and pesticides in municipal wastewater. Results show potential adverse effects of increase in the bioreactor salinity to 15g/L (as NaCl) on the performance of AnMBR with respect to chemical oxygen demand removal, biogas production, and the removal of most hydrophilic TrOCs. Furthermore, a decrease in biomass production was observed as salinity in the bioreactor increased. The removal of most hydrophobic TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by salinity build-up in the bioreactor. The accumulation of a few persistent TrOCs in the sludge phase was observed, but such accumulation did not vary significantly as salinity in the bioreactor increased. PMID:27262094

  9. Suspension-firing of wood with coal ash addition: Probe measurements of ash deposit build-up at Avedøre Power Plant (AVV2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood-firing....... Investigations of deposit formation rate were made by use of an advanced online ash deposition/shedding probe. Quantification of ash deposition and shedding was made via deposit mass uptake signals obtained from the deposit probe. The influence of coal ash, flue gas temperature, probe surface temperature...... oC), deposit removal through surface melting was not identified. SEM-EDS analysis of the deposits showed significant presence of Ca, Al and Si, indicating that a significant amount of K has been captured by coal ash to form deposits rich in calcium-aluminum-silicates, and possible release of Cl...

  10. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  11. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  12. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  13. Study of Diagenetic Features in Rudist Buildups of Cretaceous Edwards Formation Using Ground Based Hyperspectral Scanning and Terrestrial LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnik, D.; Khan, S.; Okyay, U.; Hartzell, P. J.; Biber, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ground based remote sensing is a novel technique for development of digital outcrop models which can be instrumental in performing detailed qualitative and quantitative sedimentological analysis for the study of depositional environment, diagenetic processes, and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. For this investigation, ground-based hyperspectral data collection is combined with terrestrial LiDAR to study outcrops of Late Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards formation in the Lake Georgetown Spillway in Williamson County, Texas. The Edwards formation consists of shallow water deposits of reef and associated inter-reef facies, including rudist bioherms and biostromes. It is a significant aquifer and was investigated as a hydrocarbon play in south central Texas. Hyperspectral data were used to map compositional variation in the outcrop by distinguishing spectral properties unique to each material. Lithological variation was mapped in detail to investigate the structure and composition of rudist buildups. Hyperspectral imagery was registered to a 3D model produced from the LiDAR point cloud with an accuracy of up to one pixel. Flat-topped toucasid-rich bioherm facies were distinguished from overlying toucasid-rich biostrome facies containing chert nodules, overlying sucrosic dolostones, and uppermost peloid wackestones and packstones of back-reef facies. Ground truth was established by petrographic study of samples from this area and has validated classification products of remote sensing data. Several types of porosity were observed and have been associated with increased dolomitization. This ongoing research involves integration of remotely sensed datasets to analyze geometrical and compositional properties of this carbonate formation at a finer scale than traditional methods have achieved and seeks to develop a workflow for quick and efficient ground based remote sensing-assisted outcrop studies.

  14. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone

  15. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating the impacts of fracture zone on pressure build-up and ground surface uplift during geological CO₂ sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2015-06-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation and preexisting fault properties was developed to systematically evaluate the impacts of preexisting faults on pressure buildup and ground surface uplift during CO₂ injection. Numerical test cases were conducted using a coupled hydro-geomechanical simulator, eSTOMP (extreme-scale Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases). For efficient sensitivity analysis and reliable construction of a reduced-order model, a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to effectively sample a high-dimensional input parameter space to explore uncertainties associated with hydrologic, geologic, and geomechanical properties. The uncertainty quantification results show that the impacts on geomechanical response from the pre-existing faults mainly depend on reservoir and fault permeability. When the fault permeability is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the reservoir permeability, the fault can be considered as an impermeable block that resists fluid transport in the reservoir, which causes pressure increase near the fault. When the fault permeability is close to the reservoir permeability, or higher than 10⁻¹⁵ m² in this study, the fault can be considered as a conduit that penetrates the caprock, connecting the fluid flow between the reservoir and the upper rock.

  16. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density ne in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range Nt = (2-5) x 1013, and the beam kinetic energy in the range Ek = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta)max vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed Nt there is a clear threshold behavior of ne as a function of (delta)max in the range ∼ 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed (delta)max, there is a threshold behavior of ne as a function of Nt provided (delta)max is sufficiently high; the threshold value of Nt is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on Ek is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  17. Build-up of an antimicrobial multilayer coating on a textile support based on a methylene blue–poly(cyclodextrin) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to develop an antibacterial multilayer coating activated with methylene blue (MB) and based on chitosan (CHT) and cyclodextrin polyelectrolyte (polyCD) onto a non-woven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile support. The MB-free and MB-loaded systems were built-up by applying the dip-coating technique, alternating soak cycles of the PET textile preliminarily modified with carboxylate groups in CHT and in polyCD or polyCD/MB complex solutions. The layer-by-layer assembly build-up was followed by optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy on the one hand and by gravimetry once it was applied on the textile substrate on the other hand. Two chitosan grades were used, low molecular weight (CHT-L) and medium molecular weight (CHT-M). The influence of the molar ratio CD/MB in the polyCD solutions was varied and finally the system underwent a post reticulation with genipin. Such parameters influences were investigated with regard to the loading capacity in MB of the systems, the release kinetics profiles of MB in pure water, phosphate buffer and MEM media, and the degradation of the self-assembled coating in the same media. Finally, biological and microbiological tests were performed to demonstrate the cytocompatibility of the systems and their ability to display a sustained antibacterial effect of the device through the MB prolonged release. (paper)

  18. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G.; Bao, J.; Hou, Z.; Fang, Y.; Ren, H.

    2013-12-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on pressure build-up and ground surface displacement and therefore risks of induced seismicity during CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the migration of injected CO2 and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 12 other parameters describing hydrogeological properties of subsurface formations, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, pore-size index, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 13 input parameters. For the investigated two-dimensional cases, reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most signifi cant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection, such as injection pressure and ground surface uplift. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations.

  19. The coordinated key role of wet, mixed, and dry major mergers in the buildup of massive early-type galaxies at z<~1

    CERN Document Server

    Eliche-Moral, M Carmen; Gallego, Jesus; Zamorano, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Hierarchical models predict that massive early-type galaxies (mETGs) derive from the most massive and violent merging sequences occurred in the Universe. However, the role of wet, mixed, and dry major mergers in the assembly of mETGs is questioned by some recent observations. We have developed a semi-analytical model to test the feasibility of the major-merger origin hypothesis for mETGs, just accounting for the effects on galaxy evolution of the major mergers strictly reported by observations. The model proves that it is feasible to reproduce the observed number density evolution of mETGs since z~1, just accounting for the coordinated effects of wet/mixed/dry major mergers. It can also reconcile the different assembly redshifts derived by hierarchical models and by mass downsizing data for mETGs, just considering that a mETG observed at a certain redshift is not necessarily in place since then. The model predicts that wet major mergers have controlled the mETGs buildup since z~1, although dry and mixed merge...

  20. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  1. The Hot and Energetic Universe: Understanding the build-up of supermassive black holes and galaxies at the heyday of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Lanzuisi, G; Brightman, M; Buchner, J; Aird, J; Page, M; Cappi, M; Afonso, J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Ballo, L; Barcons, X; Ceballos, M T; Comastri, A; Georgantopoulos, I; Mateos, S; Nandra, K; Rosario, D; Salvato, M; Schawinski, K; Severgnini, P; Vignali, C

    2013-01-01

    Observations in the last decade have provided strong evidence that the growth of supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies is among the most influential processes in galaxy evolution. Open questions that relate to our current understanding of black hole growth and its relation to the build-up of galaxies at redshifts z=1-4, when most black holes and stars we see in present-day galaxies were put in place, include: what is the nature of AGN feedback and whether it plays a significant role in the evolution of galaxies? what is the dominant population of accreting AGN at that critical epoch? is it dominated by obscured objects as required by many current observations and models? The Athena+ mission concept will provide the technological leap required for a breakthrough in our understanding of AGN and galaxy evolution at the heyday of the Universe. The high throughput of Athena+ will allow the systematic study of the incidence, nature and energetics of AGN feedback processes to z~4 via the identification...

  2. Four phases of angular-momentum buildup in high-z galaxies:from cosmic-web streams to an extended tilted ring, disc and bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Danovich, Mark; Hahn, Oliver; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel

    2014-01-01

    We study the buildup of angular momentum (AM) in high-z galaxies using zoom-in hydro-cosmological simulations. The disc AM originates in a few co-planar streams of cold gas and merging galaxies tracing filaments of the cosmic web and undergo 4 phases of evolution. In phase I, outside the halo virial radius (Rv), the elongated streams gain AM by tidal torques with a specific AM (sAM) ~1.7 times that of the dark matter (DM) due to the gas' higher quadrupole moment. This AM is expressed as stream impact parameters, from ~0.3Rv to occasional counter rotation. In phase II, in the outer halo, while the incoming DM mixes with the existing halo of lower sAM to a spin $\\lambda_{\\rm dm}\\sim0.04$, the cold streams transport the AM to the inner halo such that their spin in the halo is $\\sim3\\lambda_{\\rm dm}$. In phase III, near pericenter, the streams dissipate and form a non-uniform, rotating ring extending to ~0.3Rv and tilted relative to the inner disc. Torques exerted partly by the disc make the gas ring lose AM, spi...

  3. On the buildup of massive early-type galaxies at z<~1. II- The coordinated key role of wet, mixed, and dry major mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Eliche-Moral, M C; Gallego, J; Zamorano, J

    2010-01-01

    Hierarchical models predict that present-day massive early-type galaxies (mETGs) have finished their assembly at a quite late cosmic epoch (z~0.5), conflicting directly with galaxy mass-downsizing. In Eliche-Moral et al. (2010), we presented a semi-analytical model that predicts the increase by a factor of ~2.5 observed in the number density of mETGs since z~1 to the present, just accounting for the effects of the major mergers strictly-reported by observations. Here, we describe the relative, coordinated role of wet, mixed, and dry major mergers in driving this assembly. Accordingly to observations, the model predicts that: 1) wet major mergers have controlled the mETGs buildup since z~1, although dry and mixed mergers have also contributed significantly to it; 2) the bulk of this assembly takes place during the ~1.4 Gyr time-period elapsed at 0.7

  4. Evolutionary paths among different red galaxy types at 0.3 < z < 1.5 and the late buildup of massive E-S0's through major mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Mercedes; Balcells, Marc; Cristobal-Hornillos, David; Erwin, Peter; Abreu, David; Dominguez-Palmero, Lilian; Hempel, Angela; Lopez-Sanjuan, Carlos; Guzman, Rafael; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Barro, Guillermo; Gallego, Jesus; Zamorano, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Some recent observations seem to disagree with hierarchical theories of galaxy formation about the role played by major mergers in the late buildup of massive E-S0's. We re-address this question by analysing the morphology, structural distortion level, and star formation enhancement of a sample of massive galaxies (M_* > 5 * 10^10 Msun) lying on the Red Sequence and its surroundings at 0.3 10^11 Msun at z=0 through gas-rich major mergers has frozen since z~0.6. All these facts support that major mergers have played the dominant role in the definitive buildup of present-day E-S0's with M_*> 10^11 Msun at 0.6

  5. Characteristics of pressure buildup from local fuel-coolant interactions in a simulated molten fuel pool. 2. Numerical analyses using SIMMER-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of severe accidents for sodium-cooled fast reactors have shown that by assuming pessimistic conditions the accident might proceed into a transition phase where a whole-core-scale pool containing sufficient fuel to exceed prompt criticality by fuel compaction might be formed. Local fuel-coolant interaction in the pool is regarded as one of the probable initiators that could lead to such compactive fluid motions. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this interaction, in the past years a series of simulated experiments, which covers a variety of conditions including much difference in water volume, melt temperature and water subcooling, was conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency by delivering a given quantity of water into a molten pool formed with a low-melting-point alloy. In this study, motivated by acquiring further evidence for understanding its mechanism, SIMMER-III, an advanced fast reactor safety analysis code, is utilized for analyses. It is found that, similar to experiments, the water volume and melt temperature are observable to have remarkable impact on the pressure buildup during local FCIs, while the role of water subcooling seems to be less prominent. In addition, from the numerical runs performed it is also inferable that the most probable reason leading to the limited pressurization for a given melt and water temperature within the non-film boiling range, even under a condition of much larger volume of water delivered into the pool, should be due to an isolation effect of vapor bubbles generated at the water-melt interface. Knowledge and data from this study might be utilized for potential empirical-model development as well as further investigations using reactor material in the future. (author)

  6. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Le Roux

    Full Text Available Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively, the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number, and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species, though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification

  7. Build-ups in the supply chain of the brain: on the neuroenergetic cause of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Peters

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes have become the major health problems in many industrialized countries. A few theoretical frameworks have been set up to derive the possible determinative cause of obesity. One concept views that food availability determines food intake, i.e. that obesity is the result of an external energy “push” into the body. Another one views that the energy milieu within the human organism determines food intake, i.e. that obesity is due to an excessive “pull” from inside the organism. Here we present the unconventional concept that a healthy organism is maintained by a „competent brain-pull“ which serves systemic homeostasis, and that the underlying cause of obesity is “incompetent brain-pull”, i.e. that the brain is unable to properly demand glucose from the body. We describe the energy fluxes from the environment, through the body, towards the brain with a mathematical “supply chain” model and test whether its predictions fit medical and experimental data sets from our and other research groups. In this way, we show data-based support of our hypothesis, which states that under conditions of food abundance incompetent brain-pull will lead to build-ups in the supply chain culminating in obesity and type 2 diabetes. In the same way, we demonstrate support of the related hypothesis, which states that under conditions of food deprivation a competent brain-pull mechanism is indispensable for the continuance of the brain´s high energy level. In conclusion, we took the viewpoint of integrative physiology and provided evidence for the necessity of brain-pull mechanisms for the benefit of health. Along these lines, our work supports recent molecular findings from the field of neuroenergetics and continues the work on the “Selfish Brain” theory dealing with the maintenance of the cerebral and peripheral energy homeostasis.

  8. Influence of light-exposure methods and depths of cavity on the microhardness of dual-cured core build-up resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi YOSHIDA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN of dual-cured core build-up resin composites (DCBRCs at 6 depths of cavity after 3 post-irradiation times by 4 light-exposure methods. Material and Methods: Five specimens each of DCBRCs (Clearfil DC Core Plus [DCP] and Unifil Core EM [UCE] were filled in acrylic resin blocks with a semi-cylindrical cavity and light-cured using an LED light unit (power density: 1,000 mW/cm2at the top surface by irradiation for 20 seconds (20 s, 40 seconds (40 s, bonding agent plus 20 seconds (B+20 s, or 40 seconds plus light irradiation of both sides of each acrylic resin block for 40 seconds each (120 s. KHN was measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days post-irradiation. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's compromise post-hoc test with a significance level of p0.05. In DCP, and not UCE, at 24 hours and 7 days post-irradiation, the B+20 s method showed significantly higher KHN at all depths of cavity, except the depth of 0.5 mm (p<0.05. Conclusion: KHN depends on the light-exposure method, use of bonding agent, depth of cavity, post-irradiation time, and material brand. Based on the microhardness behavior, DCBRCs are preferably prepared by the effective exposure method, when used for a greater depth of cavity.

  9. Galaxy stellar mass functions from ZFOURGE/CANDELS: An excess of low-mass galaxies since z = 2 and the rapid buildup of quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Mehrtens, Nicola; Spitler, Lee R.; Tilvi, Vithal [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Quadri, Ryan F.; Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Labbé, Ivo; Straatman, Caroline M. S. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Glazebrook, Karl; Allen, Rebecca; Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Brammer, Gabriel B. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Van Dokkum, Pieter, E-mail: tomczak@physics.tamu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) at 0.2 < z < 3. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2 μm. We combine this with Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses of ∼10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin{sup 2} distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z ≤ 1.5 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the SMF, leading to an upturn at masses <10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} that is not well described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ∼ 2 and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (α) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 10.65 and ∼ – 1.5, respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. Our data allow us, for the first time, to observe a rapid buildup at the low-mass end of the quiescent SMF. Since z = 2.5, the total stellar mass density of quiescent galaxies (down to 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) has increased by a factor of ∼12, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies only increases by a factor of ∼2.2.

  10. Ionization chamber with build-up cup spectral sensitivity to megavoltage (0.5-20 MeV) photon fluences in free air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-air measurements of photon beam properties, used in radiation therapy, is common practice for determining radiation output dependence from the field size, known as head scatter factors (HSF). PMMA and brass build-up caps are most popular miniphantoms for providing electron equilibrium. Discrepancies up to 2% in HSF measurements by different combinations of detectors and equilibrium caps have been published. One of the main reasons of those discrepancies is the detector system spectral sensitivity and differences in primary and scatter radiation spectra. In the light of new model based dose calculation methods direct radiation fluence measurement is of great interest. So, understanding of detector spectral sensitivity is important task for modern dosimetry of radiation therapy. In the present study Monte Carlo (MC) method was employed to calculate ionization chamber response to monoenergetic photon fluences, normalized to water kerma units. Simulation was done using EGS4 package. Electron transport was performed with ESTEPE equal to 4%. PEGS cross sections were generated for maximal energy 20 MeV with cutoff kinetic energy 10 KeV both for photons and electrons. Scanditronix RK-05 ionization chamber was chosen as a prototype. Eight cylindrical miniphantoms, representing four materials (PMMA, Al, Cu, Pb) and two front wall thickness, were simulated. Results are presented. Miniphantom front wall thicknesses in each case are shown in the figure. Diameter depends on the material and equal respectively: PMMA - 4, Al - 2.5, Cu - 1.5, and PB - 1.5 cm. Ionization chamber outer diameter is equal to 0.7 cm. Detector sensitivity has considerable energy dependence. Two effects explain it. First is the radiation attenuation in the miniphantom. Second is pair production, which dominates in high atomic number miniphantoms for energies above 5 MeV. Depending on the miniphantom material detector response changes from 1.5 to 5 times in the energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. Correct

  11. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline COTES

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Material and Methods Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath. A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT No treatment (control; (SP Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8 and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS, while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05. Results The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007 and thermocycling (p=0.000. Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Conclusion Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  12. A study of buildup factors, angular and energy distributions at small distances from three source geometries - plane isotropic, point isotropic, and plane normal - for low-energy gamma-ray incidence on water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure buildup factors for plane isotropic, point isotropic, and plane normal sources have been calculated using a discrete ordinates, direct integration code, PALLAS-PL,SP-Br, in infinite and finite water shields in the 0.06- to 0.1-MeV range. The values of the attenuation kernel, Be- /sup mur/, are greater than unity at distances up to a fe mean-free-paths in an infinite medium. The maximum value of Be- /sup mur/ depends on the incident energy, and this effect reaches a maximum for a 0.08-MeV source. The implication that the dose rate with a shield is greater than without a shield should be noticed. Results of this study show, however, that the large degree of scattering in a low-z material, such as water, produces this effect. Buildup factors, energy spectra, and angular distributions were analyzed for three source geometries in the comparisons of scattered gamma-ray transport in infinite and finite water shields

  13. Model assumptions for computation of the energy build-up prior to a rock burst on the basis of extension measurements in the coal face. Modellvorstellungen zur Berechnung des Energiestaus vor einem Gebirgsschlag auf der Grundlage von Dehnungsmessungen im Kohlenstoss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotitschke, G.; Reisner, M. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Lehre und Bildung mbH, Essen (Germany))

    1991-08-01

    Place and time of a rock burst can be computed by means of extension measurements at the coal faces of a mined rock where a rock burst occurred upon approach of a coal face. The extension values measured from nine measuring points at the face side were evaluated. A mathematical model was developed; the model which computes the building-up energy potential which causes the rock burst. The results show that the latent energy potential increases continuously in the range of the rock burst. It increases exponentially in the last days, until a maximum is reached soon before the event. The process is different in the other areas, where the energy provided by the approaching is consumed in a more or less pronounced widening of the coal face. The energy build-up is low. Consequently, the danger potential can be calculated with the aid of a time and location-dependent 'sum extension function' from the extension behavior of the coal face. In this way, the hazard of a rock burst can be predicted. (orig./HS).

  14. User's manual for SIN: a one-dimensional hydrodynamic code for problems that include chemical reactions, elastic--plastic flow, spalling, phase transitions, melting, Forest Fire, detonation build-up, and Sesame tabular equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CDC 7600 or CRAY computer FORTRAN code for computing one-dimensional hydrodynamic problems in slab, cylindrical, or spherical geometry with realistic equations of state is described. Features available in the code include chemical reactions using an Arrhenius rate law, the C-J volume burn, or, for slabs, a gamma-law Taylor wave; sharp-shock burn, Forest Fire; elastic--plastic flow using the Hooke's law--Von Mises yield model and Kennedy melt law; and spalling using the Whiteman and Skidmore model of the tensile stress at spalling as a linear function of the square root of the stress rate. The HOM equation of state is used to compute the equation of state for detonation products, undecomposed explosives, mixtures of the two, and condensed components which may have an instantaneous phase change. The Sesame tabular equation of state, Barnes equation of state, explosive build-up equation of state, and a solid-foam equation of state are included. Sample input and output are given for several typical types of problems. 2 tables

  15. The Star Formation Rate Function for Redshift z~4-7 Galaxies: Evidence for a Uniform Build-Up of Star-Forming Galaxies During the First 3 Gyr of Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, R; Franx, M; Illingworth, G D; Labbé, I; Oesch, P A; van Dokkum, P G

    2012-01-01

    We combine recent estimates of dust extinction at z~4-7 with UV luminosity function (LF) determinations to derive star formation rate (SFR) functions at z~4, 5, 6 and 7. SFR functions provide a more physical description of galaxy build-up at high redshift and allow for direct comparisons to other techniques for determining the SFRs at lower redshifts. The present SFR functions are based on well-established z~4-7 UV LFs, UV-continuum slope trends with redshift and luminosity, and IRX-beta relations, and are well-described by Schechter relations. We extend the comparison baseline to z~2 by considering recent determinations of the H{\\alpha} and mid-IR luminosity functions. We find that the high-end turnover of the SFR function, log SFR*, increases linearly with cosmic time from ~5 M_sun/yr at z~8, 650 Myr after the Big Bang, to ~100 M_sun/yr at z~2, ~2.5 Gyr later. Recent results at z~10, close to the onset of galaxy formation, are consistent with this trend. These results provide strong evidence that galaxies b...

  16. Polysaccharide Thin Films – Buildup and Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plating, painting and the application of enamel are common anti-corrosion treatments by providing a barrier of resistant material between the damaging environment and the structural material. Coatings start failing rapidly if scratched or damaged because “pitting” occurs at high rates in cracks or p...

  17. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report April 6, 2000 - October 5, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m3) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m3) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and

  18. 基于均力结构60 MN叠加式力值传递系统%The 60 MN Build-uP Force Delivery System Based on ComPensating Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池辉

    2015-01-01

    针对60 MN力标准机开展国际力值比对的需求,提出了一种带均力结构的叠加式力值传递系统。采用理论和数值模拟的方法分析了力值传递系统中的侧向力分布及均力结构对侧向力的影响,并通过实验进行了验证。结果表明,均力结构不但能减小传递到每个子传感器上的侧向力,而且能将侧向力较均匀地分配到各子传感器上,减小旋转效应对系统的影响。采用均力结构的力值传递系统能满足国际大力值比对与量值溯源的计量性能要求。%For needs of the force value comparison of 60 MN force standard machine,the 60 MN build-up system is studied. Through theoretical and numerical simulation,analysis on the lateral force distribution and the effect on the compensating structure to the lateral force is analysed,and the validation through the experiment and the international force value comparison is carried out. The results show that using compensating structure can not only reducing the lateral force which is passed on to each load sensor,but also can evenly distribute the lateral force to each load sensor,thus reducing the rotating effect. Reasonable compensating structure design can make the build—up system to have a stable mechanical properties,meet the requirements of both international great force value comparison and the domestic quantity traceability of measuring performance.

  19. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report April 6, 2003 - October 5, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m3) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m3) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the

  20. Pilot studies on discolouration loose deposits' build-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poças, Ana; Rebola, Nazaré; Rodrigues, Sérgio; Benoliel, Maria João; Rietveld, Luuk; Vreeburg, Jan; Menaia, José

    2015-01-01

    Tap water discolouration occurs due to resuspension of loose deposits (LD) that accumulate in drinking water distribution systems. Strategies for discolouration control involve network pipe cleaning and replacement of cast-iron pipes. However, the sole application of such measures is not generall

  1. The Build-Up of Diversity in Complex Ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Tacchella, Andrea; Gabrielli, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Diversity is a fundamental feature of ecosystems, even when the concept of ecosystem is extended to sociology or economics. Diversity can be intended as the count of different items, animals, or, more generally, interactions. There are two classes of stylized facts that emerge when diversity is taken into account. The first are Diversity explosions: evolutionary radiations in biology, or the process of escaping 'Poverty Traps' in economics are two well known examples. The second is nestedness: entities with a very diverse set of interactions are the only ones that interact with more specialized ones. In a single sentence: specialists interact with generalists. Nestedness is observed in a variety of bipartite networks of interactions: Biogeographic, macroeconomic and mutualistic to name a few. This indicates that entities diversify following a pattern. Since they appear in such very different systems, these two stylized facts point out that the build up of diversity is driven by a fundamental probabilistic mec...

  2. Activity build-up in pressure vessel type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model is presented which permits the calculation of the average activity on the fuel elements of a reactor which operates under continuous refuelling, based on the assumption of crud interchange between fuel element surface and coolant in the form of particulate material only and using the crud specific activity as an empirical parameter determined experimentally. The net activity flux from core to out-of-core components is then calculated in the form of parametric curves depending upon crud specific activity and rate particulate release from fuel surface. The contribution to out-of-core radionuclide inventory arising in the release of activated material from core components is then assessed, and a way to estimate it numerically is presented. This method is based on experimentally determined cobalt-contents of structural materials and crud, and is specially suitable when high-cobalt alloys are present in-core. Activation of crud and release of activated materials are compared and it is shown that it is very likely that the latter may represent a sizable (and even the largest) fraction of the total cobalt activity. The use of the ratio of activities of 59 Fe to 54 Mn as a diagnostic tool for in-situ activation of structural materials is discussed. (author)

  3. Build-up the new essential service water system (TVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    n this paper there is description of the service water system reconstruction goals, description of the service water system before reconstruction, and description of the essential service water system in NPP V-1 Jaslovske Bohunice after reconstruction. (author)

  4. THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  5. Exceptional crud build-up in Loviisa-2 fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous primary coolant outlet temperatures at Loviisa 2 unit were first discovered in October, 1994, one month after the start of the 15. cycle. The reason for increased outlet temperatures was soon found out to be decreased coolant flow through part of the fuel assemblies. This phenomenon was most pronounced in six first cycle fuel assemblies with spacer grids made of Zr1%Nb (ZR assemblies). Due to continuously increasing outlet temperature the reactor was shut down at the end of January, 1995. The six ZR assemblies were discharged from the reactor. Towards the end of cycle no. 15 the rate of outlet temperature increase slowed down and essentially stopped in the remaining assemblies, which had spacer grids made of stainless steel (SS assemblies). One of the ZR assemblies was visually inspected using the pool-side inspection equipment at Loviisa 2 unit. This inspection showed that the reason for the decreased coolant flow was deposition of crud in the spacer grids, especially in the lower parts of the assembly. Based on data of coolant outlet temperatures, flow resistance measurements were carried out for eighty SS assemblies during the refuelling outage between cycles no. 15 and no. 16. As a result thirty assemblies, which had the most clogged spacer grids, were discharged from the reactor before their planned end of life. The cycle no. 16 started with an indication of a small leakage in September, 1995. Primary coolant activity kept increasing steadily, indicating more fuel failures, up to values never reached before at Loviisa NPP. The estimated number of leaking rods varied from approximately 10 rods up to ca. 70 rods. Finally, Loviisa 2 unit was decided to be shut down in late October, 1995. Sipping of the core indicated that there were seven leaking fuel assemblies in the reactor. All leaking assemblies had earlier been identified as being slightly clogged due to the deposition of crud in the spacer grids. Altogether thirty-two slightly clogged assemblies, including the seven leakers, were discharged from the reactor. The rest of cycle no. 16 was operated without further indications of fuel leakage or any indications of further clogging of the assemblies. Up to now, pool side inspections of two leaking assemblies have been carried out. It has been concluded that the fuel failures were caused by mechanical wear of the cladding in contact with the spacer grid. It is assumed that the increased flow resistance of the lowest spacer grids has caused turbulence in the coolant flow and thereby vibrations which have led to wear of the cladding tube

  6. Alternatives for contaminant control during MFTF plasma buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MFTF mirror device considers all low-energy species to be contaminants, since their primary effect is to erode the plasma boundary by charge-exchange reactions. Confinement for other than hydrogen isotypes is far from complete and confinement time is hardly more than transit time from the source to the end wall. The brevity of the confinement time makes it all the more necessary to prevent any contamination which might further reduce it. At Livermore, the historical solution to contaminant control has been to evaporate titanium onto cold surfaces. An alternative to this approach and its implications are considered

  7. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  8. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  9. Model for radiation damage buildup in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a model that explains both saturation and a shift of the maximum of bulk disorder profiles in ion-implanted GaN. Our model is based on two main assumptions that (i) the advancing amorphous/crystalline interface acts as a perfect sink for mobile point defects generated in the crystal bulk and (ii) the diffusion length of mobile defects increases with increasing ion fluence due to saturation of defect sinks in the bulk.

  10. Test for bacterial resistance build-up against plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal ‘agents’ are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms. (paper)

  11. DROWNING OF ATOLL-LIKE CARBONATE BUILDUPS ON THE NW PACIFIC GUYOTS LINKED TO CRETACEOUS EQUATORIAL CURRENTS%太平洋西北平顶海山上环礁型碳酸盐建造与白垩纪赤道洋流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luba JANSA

    2005-01-01

    Cretaceous-Paleogene atolls. These formed through an accumulation of biogenic and inorganic carbonate sediments in mid-oceanic regions. Deep-sea drilling has documented that shallow-water carbonate buildups resembling atolls are capping many of the northwest Pacific guyots. In contrast to the coral-algal bulwarks of modern atolls, the perimeter ridges of these isolated Cretaceous and Paleogene atolls have negligible biohermal content and thus lower up-building capacity. These atolls drowned during the earliest Albian, latest Albian, late Maastrichtian and middle Eocene. The carbonate systems recovered from earlier brief episodes of subaerial exposure and subsequent transgressive flooding. However, when the northward drift of the Pacific plate carried piggy-back these guyots to within ~7° S paleolatitude, the atolls drowned. Several different hypotheses such as atolls emergence, karsting and subaerial erosion, enhanced equatorial upwelling, anoxia and/or presence of nutrient-rich, turbid waters were suggested as the causes of atoll drowning. Study of sedimentary sequences capping the guyots, comprised of a shallow water carbonate buildup, Fe-Mn crusts coating the top of the carbonate buildups and or volcanic pedestal surfaces, and of the overlying pelagic carbonate cap, provide evidence of an overwhelming effect of an equatorial current system on sediment deposition. These late Cretaceous-Paleogene in age atolls drowned when they came into the influence of the proto-South Equatorial Current (pSEC), which created an inhospitable environment for carbonate secreting organisms. A combination of continuing guyot subsidence and northwestward drift of the Pacific plate brought submerging surfaces of guyots into the influence of strong proto-Equatorial Undercurrent (50~400 m bsl), indicated by nondeposition and erosion on guyot surfaces. Precipitation of ferromanganese crusts was initiated between paleolatitude of ~5°S and the equator, when the tops of the guyots subsided

  12. Resistência à remoção por tração de coroas totais metálicas cimentadas em dentes com e sem reconstrução coronária Tensile strength of metal crowns cemented on dental and buildup surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista FRANCO

    1999-12-01

    C, 37°C and 55°C, and later subjected to tensile tests in a Universal Kratos testing machine. The results obtained were submitted to ANOVA, showing statistically significant differences (5% between the distinct conditions studied. Regarding the teeth without reconstruction, we verified improved results of Ketac-Cem when using polyacrylic acid. The teeth reconstructed with Vitremer did not show significant statistical difference between the two cementing agents. The reconstruction of teeth buildup surfaces did not hinder the retentiveness of the metal crowns.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal processes in solar flare energy build-up and release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solar flare can be described as an instability in the upper solar atmosphere that converts 1028 ergs to 1032 ergs of magnetic energy into other forms of energy, mainly kinetic energy. The solar flare gives rise to a wealth of observable phenomena. The author develops a fairly simple model to explain many of these apparently very diverse features of solar flares. (Auth.)

  14. Energy Buildup, Flux Confinement and Helicity Accumulation in the Solar Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Qiu Hu; Wen Li

    2006-01-01

    Starting from a dipole field and a given distribution of footpoint displacement of field lines on the photosphere, we find axisymmetric, force-free field solutions in spherical coordinates that have the same distribution of normal field on the photosphere and magnetic topology as the dipole field. A photospheric shear is introduced in the azimuthal direction in a region that strides across the equator and ends at latitude λs. The footpoint displacement has a sine distribution in latitude and a peak amplitude of ψm. The magnetic energy E, azimuthal flux Fψ, and magnetic helicity HT in the solar corona are then calculated for each force-free field solution. It is found that for a given shear region range λs, all of the three quantities increase monotonically with increasing ψm. In particular, both Fψ and HT have a linear dependence on ψm. When ψm reaches a certain critical value ψmc, the force-free field loses equilibrium, leading to a partial opening of the field and the appearance of a current sheet in the equatorial plane. At this point, E, Fψ and HT reach their maximum values,Ec, Fψc and HTc. Ec increases, and Fψc and HTc decrease with decreasing λs. It is found that Ec is always smaller than the open field energy, in agreement with the Aly conjecture. Of the three critical parameters, Ec has the weakest dependence on λs. Therefore, if one is interested in the transition of a magnetic configuration from a stable state to a dynamic one, the magnetic energy is probably the most appropriate marker of the transition.

  15. In Vessel Fuel Inventory Build-up in Tokamaks: Lessons Learnt from Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For next step fusion devices, fuel retention by the vessel walls is a crucial issue, as the tritium inventory will be limited for safety reasons. The rate at which the in vessel fuel inventory builds up will have a strong impact on the device operation, as it determines the number of discharges allowed before reaching the tritium safety limit and the frequency of shutdowns eventually needed for plasma facing components (PFC) detritiation processes. Extensive studies performed on Tore Supra have allowed to gain a global view on these issues, taking advantage of the long pulse capability of the device to cumulate ITER relevant particle fluence on PFC within a reasonable operation time. This paper presents an overview of the results obtained in terms of fuel retention under long pulse operation in Tore Supra, showing a consolidated carbon and deuterium balance. In particular, the critical importance of taking into account long term outgassing between discharges when assessing fuel inventory build up over long periods is outlined. This result is based on the recent extension of the analysis carried out in terms of fuel retention and carbon balance for a dedicated wall inventory campaign in 2007 to the full period preceding the extraction of in vessel samples for post mortem analysis (2001-2007). Special care was taken to assess the amount of deuterium outgassed during the nights and weekends of the experimental campaigns and during vents. In particular, dedicated experiments have been performed during the last Tore Supra vent to estimate the deuterium recovered during the process. While the impact of vents is rather moderate, it is shown that the outgassing during nights and weekends is the main process that reconciles both the post mortem and gas balance estimates of fuel retention as well as the coupled carbon-deuterium balance. Results from Tore Supra and present day devices are extrapolated to derive estimates of the fuel inventory build up in ITER over an experimental campaign, for different wall materials options and taking into account different operational scenario. In particular, the potential impact of long term outgassing on the fuel inventory build up is assessed, showing that it remains modest for high fuel uptake during plasma/high repetition rate of discharges, while it can play a significant role for lower fuel uptake/lower repetition rate. (author)

  16. Status of Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide a brief status report on measurements and simulations of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). Areas of agreement and disagreement are spelled out, along with their possible significance. An upgrade to the MI is being considered that would increase the bunch intensity Nb, from the present ∼ 1 x 1011 to 3 x 1011, corresponding to a total pulse intensity Ntot = 16.4 x 1013, in order to generate intense beams for the neutrino program. Such an increase in beam intensity would place the MI in a parameter regime where other storage rings have seen a significant EC effect. Motivated by this concern, efforts have been undertaken over the recent past to measure and simulate the magnitude of the effect and to assess its operational implications on the proposed upgrade. We report here a summary of simulation results obtained with the code POSINST, and certain benchmarks against measurements. Unless stated otherwise, the simulation parameters used are shown in Tab. 1. Some of these represent a slightly simplified version of the MI operation.

  17. Modelling of e-cloud build-up in grooved vacuum chambers using POSINST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a way to limit electron cloud accumulation in the ILC-DR. We report on simulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accounting for e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact with previous estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for grooved surfaces

  18. Buildup of electron cloud with different bunch pattern in the presence of solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have augmented the code POSINST to include solenoid fields, and used it to simulate the build up of electron cloud due to electron multipacting in the PEP-II positron ring. We find that the distribution of electrons is strongly affected by the resonances associated with the cyclotron period and bunch spacing. In addition, we discover a threshold beyond which the electron density grows exponentially until it reaches the space charge limit. The threshold does not depend on the bunch spacing but does depend on the positron bunch population

  19. Problems of Gas Pressure Build-up in Casing String of UGS and Gas Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sovius

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of three basic parts. The opening part is a brief description of problems associated with the secondary untightness of UGS wells (Underground Gas Storages and gas wells generally.The main part of the paper is composed of some cases that we have met in our company. Solution proposals of various cases are also supplied in this part. Separate problem situations are described in terms of finding out an untight point and also a testing result and consequential removing of untightness.The conclusion includes knowledge summary that were taken by solution of complicatedsituations connected with well non-hermeticity.

  20. Adsorption and mobility of metals in build-up on road surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the adsorption and bioavailability characteristics of traffic generated metals common to urban land uses, in road deposited solids particles. To validate the outcomes derived from the analysis of field samples, adsorption and desorption experiments were undertaken. The analysis of field samples revealed that metals are selectively adsorbed to different charge sites on solids. Zinc, copper, lead and nickel are adsorbed preferentially to oxides of manganese, iron and aluminium. Lead is adsorbed to organic matter through chemisorption. Cadmium and chromium form weak bonding through cation exchange with most of the particle sizes. Adsorption and desorption experiments revealed that at high metal concentrations, chromium, copper and lead form relatively strong bonds with solids particles while zinc is adsorbed through cation exchange with high likelihood of being released back into solution. Outcomes from this study provide specific guidance for the removal of metals from stormwater based on solids removal. PMID:24630452

  1. The reactivity effects of nuclide buildup and decay during long-term fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of spent fuel reactivity over a 100,000-year cooling time. The goal of this work was to study the changes in reactivity and to recognize which nuclides contribute to such changes. The analysis employs the use of the effective one-group cross-section data of each nuclide studied. The primary contributors to K∞ changes during long-term spent fuel storage were identified as 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, and 235U. The approach presented here can be processed simply by spreadsheet-type calculations on a personal computer after performing only one SAS2H calculation to obtain one-group cross-section data and nuclide densities

  2. DCHAIN: code for analysis of build-up and decay of nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DCHAIN is a one-point depletion code which solves the coupled equations of radioactive growth and decay for a large number of nuclides by the Bateman method. The present code has the following characteristics: (1) The code can treat any type of transmutation through decays or neutron induced reactions. (2) The code constructs the decay scheme of each nuclide in the code and breaks it up into linear chains. Nuclide names, decay types and branching ratios of mother nuclides are necessary as the input data for each nuclide. Order of nuclides in the library is arbitrary because each nuclide is distinguished by its nuclide name. (3) The code can treat cyclic chains by an approximation. (4) The code performs calculation even if two nuclides with equal decay constants exist in a chain. (5) Cumulative fission yield is used for the top nuclide in each linear chain so that the abundance of each nuclide can be calculated accurately even if the chain length is limited. (6) Power, neutron flux, neutron spectrum, and fission ratio and fission energy of each fissile nuclide can be varied for each time step. (7) Abundances can be calculated for the selected nuclides in the nuclear data library. (8) The code uses variable dimension arrays and there is little limitation in number of nuclides or length of a chain. A library of the nuclear data has been prepared for 1170 fission products, including the data for half-lives and decay schemes, neutron absorption cross sections, fission yields, and disintegration energies. While DCHAIN is used to compute the compositions, radioactivity and decay heat of fission products, the gamma-ray spectrum of fission products can be computed also by a separate code FPGAM using the compositions obtained from DCHAIN. (J.P.N.)

  3. Studies of organic matter turnover and nutrient buildup in a Bangladesh soil for sustainable agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted with a wheat-rice cropping system over four consecutive years, 1996 to 2000. The objective was to assess whether an adapted residue-management system would enhance the potential to retain added nutrients within the crop-soil system with concomitant increases in yields. To synchronize nutrient release from organic amendments with nutrient uptake by the crop, another experiment was conducted in 1997/98. The rate of decomposition and the release of N from crop residues were determined in an incubation study conducted under field conditions in small 15N microplots contained within cylinders. Results indicated that wheat residue was enriched in 15N at 4.3 to 5.5% a.e., where 10.5% 15N a.e. labelled ammonium sulphate had been applied. Total yields of rice (grain + straw) increased significantly in treatment T2 where 15N-labelled crop residue was applied at 5 Mg ha-1, i.e. 14.0, 11.6, 12.6 and 12.6 Mg ha-1 in the first, second, third and fours years, respectively. The 15N-labelled wheat residue contributed about 3 kg N ha-1 to the total N pool of the first crop of rice in treatment T2 and 0.99, 0.39 and 0.15 N kg ha-1 in the second, third, and fourth years respectively. The 15N fertilizer, which was applied to the first crop (wheat), was gradually recovered in the subsequent crops in plots where 15 N-labelled crop residues were incorporated, and more 15N was retained in the soil than was taken up by plants. In the incubation study, N release from crop residues showed an irregular relationship with crop-N uptake. Changes were observed in soil mineral N following addition of crop residues. The greatest release of 15N from residues was recorded with the longest incubation period. (author)

  4. [Structure and ecological benefits of urban forest in Shenyang build-up area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhibin; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei; Li, Yuehui; Li, Haimei

    2003-12-01

    Investigations were made in the sampling plots covering 243 km2 of the Shenyang urban area, and the results were used as the input for the Urban Forest Management Information System (UFMIS), which was developed based on the model of CITY green. With this system, and using tree species, tree density, tree height grade distribution, tree DBH (diameter at beast height) grade distribution, and tree health condition as parameters, the land use and forest structure in Shenyang City were analyzed. It was found that there were 1,914,500 trees in Shenyang, belonging to 136 species. The 25 dominant species accounted for 84.78% of the total number of trees, and the forest coverage was 9.765%. Trees with DBH 0.5 m accounted for 82.8% of the total, and the young, middle-aged and old trees occupied 27%, 58% and 15% of the total, respectively. The healthy status of 84% of the trees was above middle level. Therefore, the forest in Shenyang urban is at a stable stage. According to the statistical results from UFMIS, the ecological value of forest in Shenyang urban is as high as 26,526,955. 1 USD in terms of economy. PMID:15031897

  5. Build-up and decay of fuel actinides in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For boiling water reactors, pressurized light-water reactors, pressure-tube-type heavy water reactors, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors, uranium fueled and mixed-oxide fueled, each of 1000 MWe, the following have been studied: (1) quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides built up in the reactor, (2) cooling behaviors of activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the spent fuels, and (3) activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the high-level reprocessing wastes as a function of storage time. The neutron cross section and decay data of respective actinide nuclides are presented, with their evaluations. For effective utilization of the uranium resources and easy reprocessing and high-level waste management, a thermal reactor must be fueled with uranium; the plutonium produced in a thermal reactor should be used in a fast reactor; and the plutonium produced in the blanket of a fast reactor is more appropriate for a fast reactor than that from a thermal reactor. (auth.)

  6. International Space Station Internal Thermal Control System Lab Module Simulator Build-Up and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Paul; Miller, Lee; Ibarra, Tom

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Sustaining Engineering program for the International Space Station (ISS), a ground simulator of the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) in the Lab Module was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). To support prediction and troubleshooting, this facility is operationally and functionally similar to the flight system and flight-like components were used when available. Flight software algorithms, implemented using the LabVIEW(Registered Trademark) programming language, were used for monitoring performance and controlling operation. Validation testing of the low temperature loop was completed prior to activation of the Lab module in 2001. Assembly of the moderate temperature loop was completed in 2002 and validated in 2003. The facility has been used to address flight issues with the ITCS, successfully demonstrating the ability to add silver biocide and to adjust the pH of the coolant. Upon validation of the entire facility, it will be capable not only of checking procedures, but also of evaluating payload timelining, operational modifications, physical modifications, and other aspects affecting the thermal control system.

  7. On-site evaluation of crud build-up and clad oxidation level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general trend in the late 1980's is to move toward longer operating cycles and extended burn-up. Among the questions raised by this increased performance PWR's waterside corrosion could be a potentially life-limiting problem. Therefore a large on site surveillance programme has been set up to collect data in various conditions: different plants and cycles, local burn-up up to 60 GWd/MTU, load follow operation, nucleate boiling... For that purpose FRAGEMA has developed a simple device, which can be easily installed in the spent fuel pit, featuring jointly a crud scrapping system and an Eddy-current probe for oxide thickness measurements: this makes possible correlation between clad corrosion and crud thickness. A telescopic pole is hanged along the wall of the pit, an X-Y carriage allows its movement in two perpendicular directions. At the bottom part either a scrapping head or an Eddy-current probe can be mounted. Both selection of the areas to be examined and monitoring during scrapping and measurements are made with the help of a T.V. camera. Design of the tool has been focused on safety aspect to avoid any deterioration of the fuel assembly and to minimize radiation exposure during crud collection and filtration. The positioning and the touching of the eddy-current probe on the rod have been carefully studied to ensure reliable data collection. For calibration, oxidized zircaloy tubes with well known oxide thickness, are used. Detailed description of the complete device and experience obtained through several campaigns are presented in this paper. (author)

  8. Primary water chemistry monitoring from the point of view of radiation build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic operational principles of a computer code system calculating the primary circuit corrosion product activities based on actual measured plant chemistry data are presented. The code system consists of two parts: FeSolub.prg: calculates the characteristic iron solubilities based on actual primary water chemistry (H3BO3KOH, ... etc.) and plant load (MW) data. A developed solubility calculation method has been applied fitted to magnetite solubility data of several authors; RADTRAN.exe: calculates primary circuit water and surface corrosion product activities based on results of FeSolub.prg or planned water chemistry data up to the next shutdown. The computer code system is going to be integrated into a general primary water chemistry monitoring and surveillance system. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Interface slip and the buildup of hydrodynamic pressure in nanoscale bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of hydrodynamic bearing is presented. Instead of physically forming a wedged space by two plates, the bearing consists of two parallel plates, with regions of different wettability on one of the surfaces. With the introduction of such a wettability-patterned surface, the hydrodynamic pressure can be built up because the local slip length over different regions in the bearing is different and results in similar velocity profiles to that in a traditional wedged bearing. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicate that the hydrodynamic pressure is proportional to the shear velocity. However, as the shear velocity exceeds a critical value, the slip length becomes infinite and the hydrodynamic bearing loses its function

  10. Status of Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M. A.; Kourbanis, I.; Zwaska, R. M.

    2009-05-04

    We provide a brief status report on measurements and simulations of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Areas of agreement and disagreement are spelled out, along with their possible significance.

  11. Characterization and Quantification of Deposits Buildup and Removal in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of biomass as wood or straw in large suspension­fired boilers is an efficient method to reduce the use of fossil fuels consumption and to reduce the net CO2 formation. However, the presence of chlorine and alkali metals in biomass (straw) generate ash with a low melting point and induce...... uptake reduction, fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal by using an advanced online deposit probe in a suspension­fired boiler using wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type and probe exposure time on the ash deposition rate, the heat uptake, the fly ash and deposit...... small in the tube bank region (flue gas temperature, 550­605 oC) during pure wood­firing. It was found that during suspension­firing of pure straw at low boiler load, the overall weight uptake is comparable with grate­firing, even though the amount of fly ash generated was significantly higher during...

  12. The Argo Simulation: II. The Early Build-up of the Hubble Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Hubble sequence is a common classification scheme for the structure of galaxies. Despite the tremendous usefulness of this diagnostic, we still do not fully understand when, where, and how this morphological ordering was put in place. Here, we investigate the morphological evolution of a sample of 22 high redshift ($z\\geq3$) galaxies extracted from the Argo simulation. Argo is a cosmological zoom-in simulation of a group-sized halo and its environment. It adopts the same high resolution ($\\sim10^4$ M$_\\odot$, $\\sim100$ pc) and sub-grid physical model that was used in the Eris simulation but probes a sub-volume almost ten times bigger with as many as 45 million gas and star particles in the zoom-in region. Argo follows the early assembly of galaxies with a broad range of stellar masses ($\\log M_{\\star}/{\\rm M}_{\\odot}\\sim8-11$ at $z\\simeq3$), while resolving properly their structural properties. We recover a diversity of morphologies, including late-type/irregular disc galaxies with flat rotation curves, s...

  13. 3-D seismic facies analysis of a reefal buildup, offshore North Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.L.; Nellia, M.R. (Mobil Oil Indonesia, Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1994-07-01

    The [open quotes]A[close quotes] field is located on the Sunda shelf, offshore north Sumatra. The A-1 discovery well, drilled in 1972, found hydrocarbon gas in middle Miocene carbonate rocks of reefal origin. Six appraisal wells were subsequently drilled, the most recent in late 1990. Because of drilling problems, mainly lost circulation in the carbonate reservoir, the well data obtained from the appraisal program was generally disappointing. Prior to development of the offshore area, an extensive 3-D seismic survey was shot, a portion of which covered the [open quotes]A[close quotes] field. Interpretation of the 3-D data over the [open quotes]A[close quotes] field identified different seismic facies within the carbonate reservoir. These seismic facies have been integrated with the geological data in order to construct a depositional model for the field. The seismic facies analysis was critical for developing the model because of the inadequate geological data obtained from the wells. Three distinct facies could be identified on the 3-D seismic data and correlated with the well data: reef, near-reef and inter-reef. The main concerns this facies mapping addressed were reserve determination, areas of severe lost circulation, and the distribution of dolomite. The near-reef and inter-reef areas were found to have better reservoir properties than the reef core, thereby impacting reserve calculations. In addition, the reef facies, with zones of vuggy to near cavernous type porosity, was correlatable to wells that had experienced severe lost circulation. Finally, dolomite was found to occur only within the reef facies, enabling its distribution to be predicted.

  14. MODEL TESTS OF HYDRAULIC FLOW CONDITIONS IN THE VEGETATION BUILD-UP FISHWAY

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Tymiński; Justyna Mumot

    2015-01-01

    Our engineering activity aiming at keeping ecological corridors in rivers are a difficult and complex issue that requires specialist knowledge in many disciplines. One of the installations for ensuring ecological continuum river are fishways, particularly their “near-natural” designs. They resemble mountain streams and creeks. Natural materials, such as wood, vegetation, gravel, stones and rocks are used for their construction. Design of hydraulic fishways based solely on the criteria of maxi...

  15. Model Study of the Pressure Build-Up during Subcutaneous Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Maria; Hernandez Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim; Poulsen, Mette Homann; Sørensen, Dan,; Tarnow, Lise; Feidenhans'l, Robert Krarup

    2014-01-01

    In this study we estimate the subcutaneous tissue counter pressure during drug infusion from a series of injections of insulin in type 2 diabetic patients using a non-invasive method. We construct a model for the pressure evolution in subcutaneous tissue based on mass continuity and the flow laws of a porous medium. For equivalent injection forces we measure the change in the infusion rate between injections in air at atmospheric pressure and in tissue. From a best fit with our model, we then...

  16. Testing Cold Dark Matter with the hierarchical buildup of stellar light

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L; Bower, Richard G; Eke, Vincent R

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We demonstrate that the tenet of hierarchical structure growth leads directly to a robust, falsifiable prediction for the correlation between stellar fraction (fstar) and total system mass (M500) of galaxy groups and clusters. This prediction is relatively insensitive to the details of baryonic physics or cosmological parameters. In particular, if the fstar-M500 relation is fixed and does not evolve with redshift, CDM models predict the logarithmic slope of this relation to be b>-0.3. This constraint can be weakened if the fstar-M500 relation evolves strongly, but this implies more stars must be formed in situ in groups at low redshift. Conservatively requiring that at least half the stars in groups were formed by z=1, the constraint from evolution models is b>-0.35. Since the most massive clusters (M500=1E15 Msun) are observed to have fstar=0.01, this means that groups with M500=5E13 Msun must have fstar0.04 in groups, leading to b=-0.64. If confirmed, this would rule out hierarchical structure fo...

  17. Buildup of multilayer structures of organic-inorganic hybrid ultra thin films by wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayer structures of alternate organic and inorganic semiconductors were fabricated by the wet processes that control thickness of each layer with nanometre level. Organic layers were deposited as electron-donor including poly(p-phenylene vinylene) by the layer-by-layer adsorption method. Inorganic layers composed of titanium oxide were fabricated as electron-acceptor by the surface sol-gel process. Clearly, periodic and uniform nanostructures were confirmed by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses. The multilayer exhibited a photovoltaic effect under illumination. The fabrication of those structures by wet process under room temperature and normal pressure will be one of the important methods in energy-saving nano-technology

  18. Effect of density of hydrogen-bonding donor on hydrogen-bonded multilayer buildup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongyu; MA Ning; WANG Zhiqiang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of density of hydrogen-bonding donor (HBD) on the formation of layer-by-layer assemblies of poly(4-vinylpyridine) and poly(4-vinylphenol) was investigated. For this purpose, a series of ethyl-substituted poly(4-vinylphenol) (EsPVPhf) with variable ethyl substitute percentage was synthesized by grafting the phenol moiety along the poly(4-vinylphenol) backbone with 1-bromoethane. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed a uniform deposition process of the hydrogen-bonded multilayer consisting of poly(4- vinylpyridine) (PVPy) and EsPVPhf with variable density of HBD. Notably, it was found that increasing the HBD density of EsPVPhf resulted in a marked decrease of both amount of polymers adsorbed and film thickness, which should be related to the EsPVPhf conformation change from coiled state to extended conformation in ethanol solution. Compared with the effect of charge density in polyelectrolyte multilayer, however, there does not exist a critical density of HBD in our case of hydrogen-bonded multilayer assembly. In addition, surface structures of PVPy/EsPVPhf multilayer films also can be tailored controllably by adjusting HBD density of EsPVPhf. As a result, a new method for tuning the structure of hydrogen-bonding-directed multilayer films was developed.

  19. Polymerization in non-uniform reaction fields : Monte Carlo description of structure buildup during photopolymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Anshu

    1993-01-01

    A Monte Carlo 3D off lattice percolation in a non-uniform reaction field is reported. Monomers are simulated as point particles of functionality (coordination number), f=3. The non-uniform field is expressed as an exponentially decaying reaction probability in one dimension tailored to simulate the photopolymerization process. It is argued that tubular reactors and other polymerizations in non-uniform fields will show similar qualitative features. Two cases of molecular mobility are studied. ...

  20. Quantifying the buildup in extent and complexity of free exploration in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamini, Yoav; Fonio, Ehud; Galili, Tal; Havkin, Gregor Z.; Golani, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    To obtain a perspective on an animal's own functional world, we study its behavior in situations that allow the animal to regulate the growth rate of its behavior and provide us with the opportunity to quantify its moment-by-moment developmental dynamics. Thus, we are able to show that mouse exploratory behavior consists of sequences of repeated motion: iterative processes that increase in extent and complexity, whose presumed function is a systematic active management of input acquired durin...

  1. Buildup of CO2 in Lake Nyos and evaluation of recurrence of future gas outbursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 21 August 1986 an outburst of lethal gas came from Lake Nyos, Cameroon, killed about 1700 people. The gas was found to be CO2 dissolved in the lake; it was suddenly released from the lake to the atmosphere and flowed rapidly down valleys asphyxiating people and animals in its path. Isotopic analyses of carbon (δ13C = -3/4 per mille) and helium (3He/4He 5.7 Ratm) of the dissolved gases indicate that CO2 and He are of mantle origin. The conductivity-temperature-depth profile measurements and chemical analyses of the lake water done during November 1986 and December 1988 revealed that the temperature, total dissolved solid and CO2 content of the water increased markedly from 160 m to the bottom. This result supports the view that CO2 is being supplied to the lake bottom in the form of warm, CO2-charged, mineralized water favoring the ''limnological'' hypothesis rather than the ''volcanic'' one for the cause of the gas bursts in 1986. The heat and CO2 fluxes at the bottom were estimated to be 0.43 MW and 1.0 Gmol/y, respectively. The CO2 flux is large enough to saturate the lake's hypolimnion within about 30 years. Considering that the gas release may not require full saturation of the lake, another gas outburst could occur at any time. Regular geochemical and limnological monitoring of the lake is highly desirable in order to prevent future disasters. Remedial measures to remove CO2 from the bottom water should also be taken. (author). 25 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  2. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  3. Modelling Venting and Pressure Build-up in a 18650 LCO Cell during Thermal Runaway (ABSTRACT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian; White, Ralph;

    Li-ion batteries are a very popular type of electric storage devices that possess high energy density when compared to the other battery chemistries. Due to this property, when operating under abusive conditions such as high ambient temperature, the batteries can experience thermal runaway, which...

  4. A new buildup biofilm model that mimics accumulation of material in flexible endoscope channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Luciano, Cristiana; Olson, Nancy; DeGagne, Patricia; Franca, Rodrigo; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Alfa, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new build up biofilm (BBF) model that was based on repeated exposure to test soil containing Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and repeated rounds of fixation to mimic the accumulation of patient material in endoscope channels during reprocessing. The new BBF model is a novel adaptation of the minimum biofilm effective concentration (MBEC) 96-well model where biofilm is formed on plastic pegs. The new MBEC-BBF model was developed over eight days and included four rounds of partial fixation using glutaraldehyde. There was 6.14Log10cfu/cm(2) of E. faecalis and 7.71Log10cfu/cm(2) of P. aeruginosa in the final BBF. Four detergents (two enzymatic and two non-enzymatic) were tested alone or in combination with orthophthalaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or accelerated hydrogen peroxide to determine if BBF could be either removed or the bacteria within the BBF killed. None of the detergents alone could remove the biofilm or reduce the bacterial level in the BBF as determined by viable count and scanning electron microscopy. The combination of detergents and disinfectants tested provided a 3 to 5Log10 reduction in viable bacteria but no combination could provide the expected 6Log10 reduction. Our data indicated that once formed BBF was extremely difficult to eliminate. Future research using the BBF model may help develop new cleaning and disinfection methods that can prevent or eliminate BBF within endoscope channels. PMID:27345713

  5. Detailed Design Data Package item 3.9a: Cadmium buildup in off-gas lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste currently stored at the Hanford Reservation in underground double-shell and single-shell tanks is being considered for vitrification and disposal. To achieve this, Hanford is conducting a Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Technology Development Project melter campaign. In this campaign, a requirement was identified to quantify the amount of cadmium depositing in the off-gas line between the liquid-fed ceramic melter and the submerged bed scrubber. This issue of cadmium volatility was raised due to the limited data on cadmium volatility in HLW vitrification. Prior to the start of slurry processing, the off-gas line sections were removed and inspects. Any pre-existing deposits were removed. Following the melter campaign, the lines were again removed and solids deposits were sampled and the quantity of deposits were estimated. The data presented in this package include chemical analysis of feed, glass, line deposits, in-ling off-gas stream, and SBS condensate samples. Process data includes melter feeding and glass production rates, off- gas flow rate, and plenum and off-gas stream temperatures

  6. PAD WELDING EFFECT ON CRANKSHAFT LENGTH WHILE MAKING BUILD-UP PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Vigerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals a pad welding effect on axial sizes of a crankshaft to be built-up and a dependence of axial deformation of built-up element on an elasticity modulus, a heating temperature and thermal coefficient of linear expansion of an element and a plating, weave bead sizes. This dependence enables to forecast tensile stresses in the plating. The paper contains justification on limitation of axial deformation of the built crank due to decrease of pad welding numbers up to only one during the whole period of its lifetime and carrying out  resource-saving measures.

  7. Competition between damage buildup and dynamic annealing in ion implantation into Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channeling implantation of Ga into Ge is performed at two very different ion fluxes (1012 and 1019 cm-2 s-1), at two temperatures (room temperature and 250 deg. C), and at five different fluences. The fluence dependence of the range profiles and of the implantation damage is strongly influenced by defect accumulation and dynamic annealing. At 250 deg. C, the maximum lifetime of the defects is less than 10 s. On the other hand, at room temperature no significant annealing is found within the first 10 s after ion impact. The measured Ga depth profiles are reproduced very well by atomistic computer simulations

  8. Model Study of the Pressure Build-Up during Subcutaneous Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Hernandez Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim;

    2014-01-01

    In this study we estimate the subcutaneous tissue counter pressure during drug infusion from a series of injections of insulin in type 2 diabetic patients using a non-invasive method. We construct a model for the pressure evolution in subcutaneous tissue based on mass continuity and the flow laws...... of a porous medium. For equivalent injection forces we measure the change in the infusion rate between injections in air at atmospheric pressure and in tissue. From a best fit with our model, we then determine the flow permeability as well as the bulk modulus of the tissue, estimated to be of the...

  9. The Effect of Cyberwar Technologies on Force Buildup: The Israeli Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Baram

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Israel's national interest focuses on maintaining its security against those seeking to harm it and undermine its very existence. This interest, along with Israel's geopolitical location, necessitates superiority in cyberspace as an integral part of its ability to defend itself against conventional and cyber attacks, and an integral part of its deterrent attack capability in the Middle East theater and beyond. The aim of this article is to present the role of cyber warfare technology in Israel’s security doctrine and to examine Israel’s preparations for dealing with the cyber threat by evaluating three necessary levels: (1 formulating a regular strategy for handling the threat posed by the development of cyber warfare technology; (2 allocating resources and budgets; and (3 effecting changes in the manner in which Israel builds its forces. An assessment of government publications will presumably demonstrate the importance of this topic for decision makers and the resources they allocate for dealing with it. The aim here is to portray the situation in Israel and attempt to point out the existing gaps in this field.

  10. Buildup of electrons with hot electron beam injection into a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection of the monoenergetic beam of electrons into the vacuum drift channel under the conditions when the beam current exceeds a certain threshold value involves a virtual cathode creation. The process of virtual cathode creation leads to an exchange of one-fluid movement of beam particles to three-fluid one corresponding to incident, reflected and passed through anticathode beam particles. For the monoenergetic beam case when the velocity spread Δvdr (vdr is the beam drift velocity), the beam instability was predicted in theory and was observed in experiment. Meanwhile, the injection in the drift space of the 'hot' beam having finite spread in velocities may be accompanied not only by the reflection of particles if their velocity v1/2 (where φ is the electrostatic potential dip value, e and m are the electron charge and mass, respectively), but also the mutual Coulomb scattering of incident and reflected electrons. The scattering process leads in its turn to appearance of viscosity forces and to trapping of a part of beam electrons into the effective potential well formed by electrostatic potential dip and the viscous force potential. The interaction of travelling and trapped particles may occur even at the stage preceding the virtual electrode formation and it may influence the process of its appearance and also the current flow through the drift space. In this report there are described the experimental results on accumulation of electrons when electron beam propagates in vacuum and has a large spread in particle velocities Δvdr in the homogeneous longitudinal magnetic field when ωpeHe where ωpe is the electron Langmuir frequency of beam electrons, ωHe is the electron cyclotron frequency. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  11. Construction of an ionization chamber for buildup measurements in megavoltage X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of a simple homemade ion chamber for brildup measurements in megavoltage beams is described. Tests indicate that the performance of the chamber is superior in some respects to a commercially available chamber. Results obtained using the chamber in a 6 MV beam are presented. (Author)

  12. Status of Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the Main Injector

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a brief status report on measurements and simulations of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Areas of agreement and disagreement are spelled out, along with their possible significance.

  13. Modelling of e-cloud build-up in grooved vacuum chambers using POSINST

    OpenAIRE

    Venturini, Marco; Celata, C.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a way to limit electron cloud accumulation in the ILC-DR. We report on simulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accounting for e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact with previous estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for grooved surfaces.

  14. One-pot build-up procedure for the synthesis of variously substituted purine derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejmek, Milan; Kovačková, Soňa; Zborníková, Eva; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Šála, Michal; Dračínský, Martin; Nencka, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 17 (2012), s. 6970-6980. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : purines * heterocycles * adenine * guanine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2012

  15. Build-up of macroscopic eigenstates in a memory-based constrained system

    CERN Document Server

    Labousse, Matthieu; Couder, Yves; Fort, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    A bouncing drop and its associated accompanying wave forms a walker. Based on previous works, we show in this article that it is possible to formulate a simple theoretical framework for the walker dynamics. It relies on a time scale decomposition corresponding to the effects successively generated when the memory effects increase. While the short time scale effect is simply responsible for the walker's propulsion, the intermediate scale generates spontaneously pivotal structures endowed with angular momentum. At an even larger memory scale, if the walker is spatially confined, the pivots become the building blocks of a self-organization into a global structure. This new theoretical framework is applied in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and reveals the underlying mechanisms leading to the emergence of the macroscopic spatial organization reported by Perrard et al. (2014, Nature Commun. 5, 3219)

  16. Quasi-static electric field build-up between two spherical conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that the exposure of dielectrics to electron beams can produce electric fields of sufficient magnitude to cause dielectric break-down. It is the purpose of this investigation to calculate the electric fields for two of the geometric shapes of common interest: spherical shells and cylinders. This report summarizes the work done to date on spherical dielectric shells with an inner and outer conducting surface which are traversed by an electron beam through the sphere's center. Future work will deal with a spherical shell when the beam is displaced from the sphere's center and with cylinders

  17. Internal filtration and external filter cake build-up in sandstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Abduwani, F.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Water injection is an integral constituent of most field development scenarios. This injection may take place for secondary recovery and pressure maintenance such as sea water injection. Alternatively, it may take place as a waste water disposal method as in the case of produced water re-injection.

  18. In field N transfer, build-up, and leaching in ryegrass-clover mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, J.; Eriksen, J.; Jensen, E.S.; Høgh-Jensen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Two field experiments investigating dynamics in grass-clover mixtures were conducted, using 15N- and 14C-labelling to trace carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) from grass (Lolium perenne L.) and clover (Trifolium repens L. and Trifolium pratense L.). The leaching of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), as measured in pore water sampled by suction cups, increased during the autumn and winter, whereas the leaching of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was fairly constant during this period. Leaching of 15...

  19. Effect of the LHC Beam Screen Baffle on the Electron Cloud Buildup

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Annalisa; Li, Kevin; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Electron Cloud (EC) has been identified as one of the major intensity-limiting factors in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the EC, an additional heat load is deposited on the perforated LHC beam screen, for which only a small cooling capacity is available. In order to preserve the superconducting state of the magnets, pumping slots shields were added on the outer side of the beam screens. In the framework of the design of the beam screens of the new HL-LHC triplets, the impact of these shields on the multipacting process was studied with macroparticle simulations. For this purpose multiple new features had to be introduced in the PyECLOUD code. This contribution will describe the implemented simulation model and summarize the outcome of this study.

  20. On the reversibility of cake buildup and compression in a membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-01-01

    increased shear rates at removing cake layers indicated that cake layer removal follows the same kinetics as does cake layer development, so the fouling layers can be characterized as removable fouling. Furthermore, transmembrane pressure stepping indicates compression reversibility, so when the pressure on...... compressed cake layers is released, the cake swells back to a looser structure. Based on these observations, we discuss the validity of using the critical flux concept to study fouling irreversibility. Modeling data of short-term filtration tests shows that the presence of a critical flux for irreversible...... critical flux occurs when the critical amount of deposit forming a stagnant cake on the membrane has been reached....

  1. International Monitoring system (IMS) build-up in Africa: Current status and the way forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete IMS verification system for primary and auxiliary seismic together with that of radionuclide, hydroacoustic and infrasound is plotted on a global map and Africa in particular showing its status. IMS situation in East and Southern Africa is included

  2. Extreme Water Loss and Abiotic O$_2$ Buildup On Planets Throughout the Habitable Zones of M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Luger, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    We show that terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of M dwarfs older than $\\sim$ 1 Gyr could have been in runaway greenhouses for several hundred Myr following their formation due to the star's extended pre-main sequence phase, provided they form with abundant surface water. Such prolonged runaway greenhouses can lead to planetary evolution divergent from that of Earth. During this early runaway phase, photolysis of water vapor and hydrogen/oxygen escape to space can lead to the loss of several Earth oceans of water from planets throughout the habitable zone, regardless of whether the escape is energy-limited or diffusion-limited. We find that the amount of water lost scales with the planet mass, since the diffusion-limited hydrogen escape flux is proportional to the planet surface gravity. In addition to undergoing potential desiccation, planets with inefficient oxygen sinks at the surface may build up hundreds to thousands of bars of abiotically produced O$_2$, resulting in potential false positives fo...

  3. Canal projection using gutta-percha points: A novel technique for pre-endodontic buildup of grossly destructed tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2016-01-01

    The use of Projector Endodontic Instrument Guidance System (PEIGS) during endodontic treatment of grossly mutilated tooth facilitates projection of canal orifices from the floor of the pulp chamber to the cavosurface, providing direct visualization and access to the projected canals. Alternatives, such as hypodermic needles as sleeves, were tried successfully with similar outcome. The aim of this case report is to describe a simpler, easily available, economical, yet an effective alternative technique to conventional PEIGS during the pre-endodontic management of grossly destructed tooth. These case reports demonstrate the use of greater tapered gutta-percha points that are easily available and more economical than PEIGS for the successful management of a badly destructed tooth. PMID:27099431

  4. Rigging dark halos: why is hierarchical galaxy formation consistent with the inside-out build-up of thin discs?

    OpenAIRE

    Pichon, C.; Pogosyan, D.; Kimm, T.; Slyz, A.; Devriendt, J; Dubois, Y.

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations show that gas inflow through the virial sphere of dark matter halos is focused (i.e. has a preferred inflow direction), consistent (i.e. its orientation is steady in time) and amplified (i.e. the amplitude of its advected specific angular momentum increases with time). We explain this to be a consequence of the dynamics of the cosmic web within the neighbourhood of the halo, which produces steady, angular momentum rich, filamentary inflow of cold ga...

  5. Effect of Carbon Sources on the Biomass Build-Up and Degradation of Rubber Processing Industry Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    K. Girish

    2014-01-01

    Rubber processing industry effluent represents a serious environmental pollution problem especially for underground and surface water. Wastewater collected from rubber processing industry was characterized for their pollution characteristics. Analysis showed that the biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), total solids (TS), ammonia and phosphate were high when compared to effluent discharge standard for industr...

  6. Lack of social capital of the Russian business community as a build-up factors of a political risk

    OpenAIRE

    Sukiasyan Arthur Khachaturovich

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the characteristics of the social capital of the business community in modern Russia. Special attention is paid to the conditions of formation of the Russian business social responsibility as a key factor of accumulation of social capital. Particular attention is paid to the proper use of a business institution of social responsibility.

  7. Monolayer Phases of a Dipolar Perylene Derivative on Au(111) and Surface Potential Build-Up in Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhausen, Jens; Kersell, Heath R; Christodoulou, Christos; Heimel, Georg; Wonneberger, Henrike; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P; Hla, Saw-Wai; Koch, Norbert

    2016-04-19

    9-(Bis-p-tert-octylphenyl)-amino-perylene-3,4-dicarboxy anhydride (BOPA-PDCA) is a strongly dipolar molecule representing a group of asymmetrically substituted perylenes that are employed in dye-sensitized solar cells and hold great promise for discotic liquid crystal applications. Thin BOPA-PDCA films with orientated dipole moments can potentially be used to tune the energy-level alignment in electronic devices and store information. To help assessing these prospects, we here elucidate the molecular self-assembly and electronic structure of BOPA-PCDA employing room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combination with ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. BOPA-PCDA monolayers on Au(111) exclusively form in-plane antiferroelectric phases. The molecular arrangements, the increase of the average number of molecules per unit cell via ripening, and the rearrangement upon manipulation with the STM tip indicate an influence of the dipole moment on the molecular assembly and the rearrangement. A slightly preferred out-of-plane orientation of the molecules in the multilayer induces a surface potential of 1.2 eV. This resembles the giant surface potential effect that was reported for vacuum-deposited tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and deemed applicable for data storage. Notably, the surface potential in the case of BOPA-PDCA can in part be reversibly removed by visible light irradiation. PMID:26991048

  8. Opting different land use for carbon buildup in soils and their bioeconomics in humid subtropics of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divy Ninad Koul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Long term carbon sequestration in soil had been advocated in almost all the international forum to minimize the global warming. However, the extent of carbon storage in soil will depend on the type of vegetation it supports. The study examined different land use potentiality in sequestering carbon in soil on the basis of extent of tree component. In addition it was also investigated that how soil carbon is related with other physical and chemical parameters of the soil in different land uses. Farmers will adopt a particular land use system only if it fits in his socio-economic frame work. Hence, bioeconomics of different land uses were also calculated and compared. Extent of tree in the land use affected the physical and chemical properties of soil. The pH of the soil decreased from 6.09 to 5.09 and bulk density from 1.55 to 1.21 g/cm3 as the tree component increased. Available soil nitrogen increased from 97 to 143 kg/ha and organic carbon from 0.39 to 1.77 per cent. Out of the four soil depths surface soil had less pH, bulk density and moisture, however soil nitrogen and organic carbon was higher. Physical characters of the soil were found to be more related with organic carbon in land uses which are devoid of trees or when their number was less. However, as the tree component increases both physical and chemical component needs to be taken simultaneously to get better estimate of carbon. Agroforestry systems (agrihorticulture seems to be better land use practices as they fulfill the needs of the farmers and can also earn carbon-credits thus increasing their income by 21 per cent. 

  9. Quantification of Ash Deposit Build-up and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension­fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share in...... wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550 and 600 oC) and flue gas temperature (600 ­1050 oC) on ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake by the probe, the fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal have been investigated. A systematic mathematical procedure was used...... recordings of all deposit probe experiments revealed that deposit shedding was primarily through debonding from the surface of the tubes in the superheater region. Chemical analysis of fly ashes indicated that during suspension­firing of straw and wood, the fly ashes were rich in Si, K, Ca and Cl, but the...

  10. Rigging dark halos: why is hierarchical galaxy formation consistent with the inside-out build-up of thin discs?

    CERN Document Server

    Pichon, C; Kimm, T; Slyz, A; Devriendt, J; Dubois, Y

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations show that gas inflow through the virial sphere of dark matter halos is focused (i.e. has a preferred inflow direction), consistent (i.e. its orientation is steady in time) and amplified (i.e. the amplitude of advected specific angular momentum increases with time). This is a consequence of the dynamics of the cosmic web within the neighbourhood of the halo, which produces steady, angular momentum rich, filamentary inflow of cold gas. On large scales, the dynamics within neighbouring patches drives matter out of the surrounding voids, into walls and filaments before it finally gets accreted onto virialised dark matter halos. As these walls/filaments constitute the boundaries of asymmetric voids, they naturally acquire a net transverse motion, which explains the angular momentum rich nature of the later infall which comes from further away (lever effect). We argue that this large-scale driven consistency explains why cold flows are so efficient at building up thin dis...

  11. Homologous Solar Events on 2011 January 27: Build-up and Propagation in a Complex Coronal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, M.; Stenborg, G.; Démoulin, P.; Zucca, P.; Lecacheux, A.

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the wealth of imaging observations at the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), X-ray, and radio wavelengths, there are still relatively few cases where all of the imagery is available to study the full development of a coronal mass ejection (CME) event and its associated shock. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the role of the coronal environment in the development of CMEs and the formation of shocks, and their propagation. We have analyzed the interactions of a couple of homologous CME events with ambient coronal structures. Both events were launched in a direction far from the local vertical, and exhibited a radical change in their direction of propagation during their progression from the low corona into higher altitudes. Observations at EUV wavelengths from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory were used to track the events in the low corona. The development of the events at higher altitudes was followed by the white-light coronagraphs on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Radio emissions produced during the development of the events were well recorded by the Nançay solar instruments. Thanks to their detection of accelerated electrons, the radio observations are an important complement to the EUV imaging. They allowed us to characterize the development of the associated shocks, and helped to unveil the physical processes behind the complex interactions between the CMEs and ambient medium (e.g., compression, reconnection).

  12. Lowering Temperature is the Trigger for Glycogen Build-Up and Winter Fasting in Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Joonas; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal changes in physiology of vertebrate animals are triggered by environmental cues including temperature, day-length and oxygen availability. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) tolerate prolonged anoxia in winter by using several physiological adaptations that are seasonally activated. This study examines which environmental cues are required to trigger physiological adjustments for winter dormancy in crucian carp. To this end, crucian carp were exposed to changing environmental factors under laboratory conditions: effects of declining water temperature, shortening day-length and reduced oxygen availability, separately and in different combinations, were examined on glycogen content and enzyme activities involved in feeding (alkaline phosphatase, AP) and glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase, GyS; glycogen phosphorylase, GP). Lowering temperature induced a fall in activity of AP and a rise in glycogen content and rate of glycogen synthesis. Relative mass of the liver, and glycogen concentration of liver, muscle and brain increased with lowering temperature. Similarly activity of GyS in muscle and expression of GyS transcripts in brain were up-regulated by lowering temperature. Shortened day-length and oxygen availability had practically no effects on measured variables. We conclude that lowering temperature is the main trigger in preparation for winter anoxia in crucian carp. PMID:26853873

  13. Buildup of aerosol precursor gases and sulfur-induced activation of soot in nascent jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Hirschberg, M.M.; Fabian, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Gerz, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Research issues concerning the chemical transformation of exhaust trace gases are summarized. The photochemical evolution of NO{sub x} early in the plume is strongly coupled to plume mixing. Substantial amounts of HNO{sub 3} are generated in nascent plumes even if no NO{sub 2} is emitted. The production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes very efficient if part of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. Each emitted soot particle can acquire 1-10% by mass fully oxidized sulfur molecules prior to binary homogeneous nucleation, if a few percent of the exhaust SO{sub x} are emitted as SO{sub 3}, indicating an important activation pathway for soot, and leading to a marked enhancement of new aerosol formation and growth rates. (author) 11 refs.

  14. Heavy coolant fast neutron reactor BRUS-150 for minor actinides burning and U-233 build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the calculational research into the performance of fast reactor BRUS-150 cooled with liquid metal coolant eutectic lead-bismuth alloy with reference to minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) transmutation and isotopic pure U 233 build up. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs

  15. Activity build-up and properties of oxide films on stainless steel samples at Loviisa unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent of activity incorporation on primary circuit surfaces in a VVER plant is connected to the chemical composition of the coolant water and to the structure and properties of oxide films formed on material surfaces. Changes in operational conditions may induce changes in the structure of the oxide films and in the rate of activity incorporation. To predict these changes, experimental correlations between water chemistry, oxide films and activity incorporation, as well as mechanistic understanding of the related phenomena have been established. (R.P.)

  16. Effect of Carbon Sources on the Biomass Build-Up and Degradation of Rubber Processing Industry Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Girish

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubber processing industry effluent represents a serious environmental pollution problem especially for underground and surface water. Wastewater collected from rubber processing industry was characterized for their pollution characteristics. Analysis showed that the biological oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total dissolved solids (TDS, total suspended solids (TSS, total solids (TS, ammonia and phosphate were high when compared to effluent discharge standard for industrial wastewater. Four bacterial species were isolated from the wastes and were identified as Arthrobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Pseudomonas sp. A bacterial consortium was constituted by mixing proportionately these four bacteria and used in effluent aerobic biotreatment. Complex carbon sources such as bagasse, corn-cob, rice straw, wheat bran, molasses, corn steep liquor, were screened for their effect on growth of the consortium constituted. Highest biomass production was in molasses followed by rice straw hydrolysate, wheat bran hydrolysate and bagasse hydrolysate. However, the inoculum grown on rice straw and wheat bran hydrolysate caused maximum degradation in terms of reduction in various parameters such as BOD, COD, TDS, TSS, NH4+ and PO43, about 70 to 80% reduction was observed. From the results of the present study it could be inferred that the constituted consortium could effectively be used for the treatment of effluents from rubber processing industry and rice straw and wheat bran hydrolysate could be used for mass production of effective consortium.

  17. Effects of super-powdered activated carbon pretreatment on coagulation and trans-membrane pressure buildup during microfiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Ohno, Koich; Matsushita, Taku; Mima, Satoru; Kawase, Yuji; Aizawa, Takako

    2009-01-01

    As a pretreatment for membrane microfiltration (MF), the use of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with a particle size much smaller than that of conventional PAC (super-powdered PAC, or S-PAC) has been proposed to enhance the removal of dissolved substances. In this paper, another advantage of S-PAC as a pretreatment for MF is described: the use of S-PAC attenuates transmembrane pressure increases during the filtration operation. The floc particles that formed during coagulation preceded by S-P...

  18. Integration of Mature Adipocytes to Build-Up a Functional Three-Layered Full-Skin Equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Link, Antonia; Linke, Kirstin; Gehrke, Sandra A.; Winnefeld, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, deep full-thickness skin wounds from high-graded burns or trauma are not able to reepithelialize sufficiently, resulting in scar formation, mobility limitations, and cosmetic deformities. In this study, in vitro-constructed tissue replacements are needed. Furthermore, such full-skin equivalents would be helpful as in vivo-like test systems for toxicity, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical testing. Up to date, no skin equivalent is available containing the underlying subcutaneous fatty tissue. In this study, we composed a full-skin equivalent and evaluated three different media for the coculture of mature adipocytes, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes. Therefore, adipocyte medium was supplemented with ascorbyl-2-phosphate and calcium chloride, which are important for successful epidermal stratification (Air medium). This medium was further supplemented with two commercially available factor combinations often used for the in vitro culture of keratinocytes (Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium). We showed that in all media, keratinocytes differentiated successfully to build a stratified epidermal layer and expressed cytokeratin 10 and 14. Perilipin A-positive adipocytes could be found in all tissue models for up to 14 days, whereas adipocytes in the Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium seemed to be smaller. Adipocytes in all tissue models were able to release adipocyte-specific factors, whereas the supplementation of keratinocyte-specific factors had a slightly negative effect on adipocyte functionality. The permeability of the epidermis of all models was comparable since they were able to withstand a deep penetration of cytotoxic Triton X in the same manner. Taken together, we were able to compose functional three-layered full-skin equivalents by using the Air medium. PMID:27334067

  19. Minijet plasma sources for the build-up of an array of plasma generators for surface processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An array of miniature size plasma jet generators might become an important tool for surface processing especially if the minijet plasma generator can operate at atmospheric pressures. Our efforts started with the design and construction of a d.c. miniature plasma jet generator but components' heating and unstable operation excluded this solution and imposed its change. In the present paper we report a successful development of an a.c. operated miniature type plasma jet generator. The frequency of the applied a.c. voltage was around 10 kHz, the value of the peak to peak voltages being up to 700 V for nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure. The obtained time dependence of the discharge current and voltage drop over the discharge space, prove that the discharge was not of barrier type but an alternating d.c. type discharge with the mentioned frequency. The measured discharge current was of 55 mA, the measured power value being of the order of a few watts. It is important to mention that the gas flux is passing through a central hole of 0.5 mm diameter of the minijet generator, the obtained jet being very stable and operating hours without failure. In the case of an array of such minijets, due to radial expansion of plasma minijets after going out of hole, at a few millimeter distance, the jets will unite, building up a large area of uniform plasma, ideal for surface treatment at low plasma temperature. (authors)

  20. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  1. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    An attractive option for reducing the net CO2 emissions is to substitute coal with biomass in large power plant boilers. However, the presence of chlorine (Cl) and alkali metals (K, Na) in biomassmay induce large operational problems due to ash deposit formation on the superheater tubes. The aim...... of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... elemental analysis of fly ashes revealed that fly ash from suspension firing of straw has high contents of Si, K and Ca, while fly ash from straw firing on grate was rich in the volatile elements K, Cl and S. Investigations of deposit formation ratesweremade in the superheater and convective pass regions...

  2. Non-thermal processes during the 'build-up' phase of solar flares and in absence of flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Hard X-ray and radio observations indicate production of non-thermal electrons as a common phenomenon of the active sun. A preliminary analysis of three hard X-ray bursts observed with the OGO-5 satellite and radio observations indicate that non-thermal particles are present in the flare region prior to the impulsive (flash) phase and also during the gradual rise and fall (GRF) bursts which are usually explained in terms of purely 'thermal' radiation. The principal difference between the non-thermal electrons observed before the flash phase and during the flash phase appears to be in their total number rather than in the hardness of their energy spectrum. Basic characteristics of the two acceleration processes are probably similar although the total energy converted into non-thermal electrons is considerably larger in the flash phase. Transient absorbing H-alpha features and filament activations are discussed in terms of their ability to produce energetic particle events and magnetic energy release.

  3. Buildup of a dynamically supported orogenic plateau: Numerical modeling of the Zagros/Central Iran case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, T.; Burov, E.; Agard, P.; Meyer, B.

    2014-06-01

    Iranian plateau is a vast inland region with a smooth average elevation of c. 1.5 km formed at the rear of the Zagros orogen as a result of the Arabia-Eurasia collision (i.e., over the last 30-35 Myr). This collision zone is of particular interest due to its disputed resemblance to the faster Himalayan collision, which gave birth to the Tibetan plateau around 50 Myr ago. Recent studies have suggested that a recent (10-5 Ma) slab break-off event below Central Iran caused the formation of the Iranian plateau. Here, we test several hypotheses through large-scale (3082 × 590 km) numerical models of continental subduction models that incorporate a free upper surface erosion, rheological stratification, brittle-elastic-ductile rheologies, and metamorphic phase changes (density and physical properties) and account for the specific crustal and thermal structure of the Arabian and Iranian continental lithospheres. We test the impact of the transition from oceanic to continental subduction and the topographic consequences of the progressive slowdown of the convergence rate during continental subduction. Our results demonstrate the role of mantle flow beneath the overriding plate, initiated as an indirect consequence of slab break-off. This flow creates a dynamic topography support during continental subduction and results in delamination of the overriding plate lithospheric mantle followed by isostatic readjustment, hence of further uplift and maintenance of a plateau-like topography without significant crustal thickening. The slowdown of the convergence rate during the development of the continental subduction/collision phase largely contributes to this process by controlling the timing and depth of slab break-off.

  4. Observing large-scale solar surface flows with GONG: Investigation of a key element in solar activity buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John G.; Simon, George W.; Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) solar telescope network has begun regular operations, and will provide continuous Doppler images of large-scale nearly-steady motions at the solar surface, primarily those due to supergranulation. Not only the Sun's well-known magnetic network, but also flux diffusion, dispersal, and concentration at the surface appear to be controlled by supergranulation. Through such magnetoconvective interactions, magnetic stresses develop, leading to solar activity. We show a Doppler movie made from a 45.5 hr time series obtained 1995 May 9-10 using data from three of the six GONG sites (Learmonth, Tenerife, Tucson), to demonstrate the capability of this system.

  5. Providing of environmental safety at construction of residential buildings in compact build-up area / Обеспечение экологической безопасности при строительстве жилых зданий в районах с плотной застройкой

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seleznev M.G. / Селезнев Михаил Георгиевич

    Full Text Available Manufacture of civil work in areas with dense building is defined by some major factors of ecological safety of inhabitants. To these factors carry also essential increase in levels of the power impurity including effect of vibration on objects and people in a wide range of frequencies (I include infraыonic and ultrasonic. In article the problem of influence of the raised level of sound pressure on on people and objects is described. The issue of influence of the increased level of sound pressure on people and objects in the areas of compact build-up area was considered. Suitability of assessment of levels of vibration influence on nearby buildings and structures at the stage of design by means of calculation way with the next changing of technological process during the implementation of construction operations was argued. / Освещена проблема влияния повышенного уровня звукового давления на людей и объекты в районах с плотной застройкой. Обоснована целесообразность оценки уровней вибровоз-действия на близлежащие здания и сооружения на стадии проектирования расчетным способом с последующим внесением изменений в технологический процесс при производстве строительных работ.

  6. Considerations on pressure build-up in deep geological repositories for radioactive waste; Betrachtungen zum Druckaufbau in einem geologischen Tiefenlager fuer radioaktive Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Hans-Frieder [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Gas formation caused by corrosion of metals is a pivotal point with respect to the safety analysis of deep geological repositories. Solid corrosion products are formed unavoidably during the gas formation. The volumes of these solid corrosion products are multiples of the original waste volume. These solid corrosion products are chemically extremely stable and result in a pressure increase inside the repository. This pressure is considerably higher than that of the overlaying rock. The question that arises is, why this aspect is not considered in the consulted documents.

  7. Resolving the build-up of femtosecond mode-locking with single-shot spectroscopy at 90 MHz frame rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herink, G.; Jalali, B.; Ropers, C.; Solli, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    Mode-locked lasers have enabled some of the most precise measurements ever performed, from attosecond time-domain spectroscopy to metrology with frequency combs. However, such extreme precision belies the complexity of the underlying mode-locking dynamics. This complexity is particularly evident in the emergence of the mode-locked state, an intrinsically singular, non-repetitive transition. Many details of mode-locking are well understood, yet conventional spectroscopy cannot resolve the nascent dynamics in passive mode-locking on their natural nanosecond timescale, the single pulse period. Here, we capture the pulse-resolved spectral evolution of a femtosecond pulse train from the initial fluctuations, recording ∼900,000 consecutive periods. We directly observe critical phenomena on timescales from tens to thousands of roundtrips, including the birth of the broadband spectrum, accompanying wavelength shifts and transient interference dynamics described as auxiliary-pulse mode-locking. Enabled by the time-stretch transform, the results may impact laser design, ultrafast diagnostics and nonlinear optics.

  8. 亚健康评价指标体系的研究与建立%Analysis and Build-up for Sub-Health Evaluating Indicator System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯丽仪; 许军; 罗仁; 丘金彩; 张金华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze and screen the items about sub - health evaluation system. so as to keep the more reliable, accurate and representative versions for development of sub - health rueasurement scale ( SHMS ) . Methods Totally 2 400 participants were surveyed by using the 64 - item questionnaire. Critical Ratio ( CR ) method was used for items analysis. The methods of coefficient of variation, coefficient of correlation, factor analysis, principal component analysis and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used to screen the 64 items. Results Score of each item in the questionnaire was statistically significantly different between the high - score - group and the low - score - group , except the overall evaluation indexes ( P < 0. 01 ). After screened by the 6 methods. 39 sub - health items were retained in the final version. Conclusion After screened by the 6 methods, the finally obtained indexes for sub - health assessment are more simple, reliable, accurate and representative, and thus the Suh - Health Measurement Scale Version 1. 0 ( SHMS V1. 0 ) is established and it is up to the request of the initial design. However, the reliability and validity of the scale still need to be tested in the future.%目的 为编制亚健康评定量表,对亚健康评价指标体系进行条目分析与筛选,保留更可靠、更准确、更有代表性的条目,最终形成亚健康评定量表.方法 应用由64个亚健康评价指标构成的自测问卷,选取2 400名研究对象进行测试.采用"临界比率"法对评价指标进行分析;采用离散趋势法、相关系数法、因子分析法、主成分分析法、Cronbach's Alpha系数法对指标进行筛选.结果 除4个总体评价指标不参与分析外,所有指标临界比率的高分组和低分组得分间均存在统计学差异(P<0.01).经6种方法筛选,最后保留39个亚健康评定指标.结论 经条目分析和筛选,最终得到更简化、可靠、准确、具有代表性的亚健康评价指标,达到最初的设计要求,形成亚健康评定量表(第1版),但未来仍需对该量表的信度、效度做进一步检验.

  9. High Back Pressure on Pressure Safety Valves (PSVs) in a Flare System. Developing the Simulation model, Identifying and analyzing the back-pressure build-up

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Muktikanta

    2013-01-01

    Process safety is a disciplined framework for managing the integrity of operating systems and processes handling hazardous substances. It is achieved by applying good design principles, engineering, and operating and maintenance practices. Flare systems play an important role in the safety of Oil and Gas installations by serving as outlets for emergency pressure relief in case of process upsets. Accurate and reliable estimation of system thermo-hydraulic parameters, especially system ...

  10. Contribution to the build-up of a core calculation frame: comparison between ''diffusion'' and ''SPn'' operators on various configurations of the first N4 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to compare two calculation methods implemented in the neutronic code CRONOS 2: the diffusion approximation and the SPn method. The APOLLO 2 code is used to build the multiparameter cross section libraries.The comparison is based on the first core of N4 type Chooz reactor. The rod worth and the power map have been calculated. Some recommendations about the SPn development order of flux are made and the results show that the diffusion calculations over-estimate the black rod efficiency up to 10%. (A.C.)

  11. The 3 vs 1 game build-up effectiveness examination in physical and technical tests of 11-year-old football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth jr. Janos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study is to prove that young players who have been coached with the main focus on technical ability and player interaction, perform better when tested on physical and technical attributes.

  12. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppala Jan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs, IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were decreased by decreasing the SWA. To achieve adequate surface dose coverage to small lung tumours with a difference less than 1 mm in the isodose line radius between the open and modulated field, a larger than 6 mm SWA should be used in the dose delivery of SLRT.

  13. Ozone Concentration Profiles in the Los Angeles Basin - A Possible Similarity in the Build-up Mechanism of Inland Surface Ozone in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Uri; Koch, Jean

    1996-07-01

    This paper analyzes some measurements of the Southern California Air Quality Study, which collected a comprehensive air quality, meteorological, and emissions database in the Los Angeles Basin. This analysis emphasizes the interaction of the enriched ozone layer existing aloft with the top of the convective boundary layer (CBL) in the early afternoon of warm summer days, leading to downward mixing (fumigation) of the ozone cloud toward the ground. This process was shown to contribute to the high ozone concentrations measured at inland elevated sites. It is suggested that this mechanism also exists in Israel and contributes to the elevated concentrations observed in the summer on the slopes of the Judean Hills. This analogy is based on the similarity between the Los Angeles Basin and central Israel regarding the climate, the local circulation (sea breeze), the orientation of the coast, and the upwind location of ozone precursor sources. The temporal fluctuations of the synoptic configuration persisting over Israel during the summer cause rapid variations in the depth of the CBL inland and its subsequent interaction with an ozone layer aloft.

  14. Analysis on Employment Opportunities for Medical Graduates and Their Overall Capability Buildup%医学生就业空间的多维建构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪晓畅; 叶建

    2011-01-01

    With the deepening of the reform in economic structure and educational system, the enrollment of medical students has been expanded. As a result, the employment of medical graduates has become a heated social issue. The thesis will look into the possible future employment opportunities for medical graduates. It also analyzes factors which affect the employment of medical students, including their individual capabilities, graduate schools,family background, enrollment entities, governmental policies, employment market and other affiliated factors. It explores ways to expand the employment opportunities for medical graduates and assist medical graduates to find themselves valuable and competitive in the job market.%对医学生就业空间现状进行研究,分析影响医学生就业的诸多因素如就业竞争力不强,空间维度不宽;择业取向趋同,空间重叠率高等.建构一个包含医学生自身、学校、学生家庭、用人单位、政府、就业市场的多维就业空间,并使各维度的宽度达到最大化,最终实现医学生在广阔的就业空间中找到属于自己的位置,有效促进医学生就业.

  15. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities

  16. On the transient pressure build-up in the full pressure safety shell of watercooled nuclear reactors after a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermo-and fluid-dynamic processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment during a loss of coolant accident have been investigated. Comparison of the calculations carried out with the computer programs, in which ZOCO VI was used as being representative of similar programs, with the experimental results pointed out discrepancies in the determination of time dependent pressure, pressure difference and temperature curves. This led to the development of a new theoretical model and a program COFLOW which pays particular attention to the fluid dynamic processes in the initial phase of a loss of coolant accident. It can also be used to determine the maximum containment pressure towards the end of a loss of coolant accident. Comparison of the COFLOW results with experiments has shown that COFLOW provides a model and a procedure by which the physical processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment can be simulated satisfactorily

  17. Tentative idea for build-up of Shanghai natural gas SCADA system%上海天然气SCADA系统组建设想

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄均义

    2000-01-01

    作者根据自己多年来从事计算机应用项目,尤其是SCADA系统项目的经验,针对"西气东输"后上海地区天然气发展的客观要求,讨论了天然气SCADA系统的有关技术问题,提出了组建天然气SCADA系统的设想.

  18. The influence of tritium build-up in Cernavoda NPP systems on gaseous and liquid emission after four years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium in a CANDU reactor is formed by thermal-neutron-capture reactions, 2H(n,γ)3H, which occurs both in the moderator and heat transport system. Very small amounts of tritiated heavy water may escape from moderator and heat-transport systems of CANDU reactors during maintenance and normal operation. Tritium emissions of Cernavoda NPP were continuously monitored since 1996, when the plant became operational. HTO is continuously sampled on molecular sieves and measured twice a week. Statistical methods were applied to find the emission trend and to develop criteria for identifying abnormal emissions, and to predict the further emissions. During routine operation of a CANDU reactor, various gaseous, liquid, and solid radioactive wastes are generated. The design of its systems ensures that these are minimized but small quantities of gaseous and liquid wastes are continuously discharged at very low concentrations. CANDU reactors are both moderated and cooled by heavy water (D2O). Tritium is produced in CANDU reactors by neutron reactions with deuterium boron and lithium and by ternary fission. Activation of deuterium is by far the most important mechanism which is responsible for the production of about 89 TBq of tritium per MW(e) per year compared to only 0.7 TBq of tritium per MW (e) per year produced by ternary fission. Most of the tritium present in CANDU reactors is in the form of tritiated heavy water - DTO. The sources of tritiated heavy water vapor in reactor building, air are the leaks from the main reactor systems or their auxiliaries. Special dryers were designed and are used to remove moisture from different ventilation systems of a CANDU reactor in order to maintain the gaseous tritium emissions below the limits established by the national authorities. Tritium emissions are monitored both at the stack and in liquid discharges to demonstrate the compliance with the approved Derived Emission Limits. A specialized laboratory using Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry methods currently determines tritium activities in effluent samples. All information about the radioactivity of liquid and gaseous effluent is stored into a dedicated data base and used to make periodical reports. Based on four years data the present paper made an analysis of tritium emissions in gaseous effluents in order to highlight the trends and to provide a method to identify abnormal tritium emission. (authors)

  19. Dependence of Yb-169 absorbed dose energy correction factors on self-attenuation in source material and photon buildup in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Absorbed dose energy correction factors, used to convert the absorbed dose deposited in a LiF thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) into the clinically relevant absorbed dose to water, were obtained for both spherical volumetric sources and for the model 4140 HDR Yb-169 source. These correction factors have a strong energy dependence below 200 keV; therefore, spectral changes were quantified as Yb-169 photons traveled through both source material (Yb2O3) and water with the corresponding absorbed dose energy correction factors, f(r,θ), calculated as a function of location in a phantom. Methods: Using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation program, the Yb-169 spectrum emerging from spherical Yb2O3 sources (density 6.9 g/cm3) with radii between 0.2 and 0.9 mm were analyzed and their behavior compared against those for a point-source. The absorbed dose deposited to both LiF and H2O materials was analyzed at phantom depths of 0.1-10 cm for each source radius and the absorbed dose energy correction factor calculated as the ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of LiF. Absorbed dose energy correction factors for the Model 4140 Yb-169 HDR brachytherapy source similarly were obtained and compared against those calculated for the Model M-19 Ir-192 HDR source. Results: The Yb-169 average spectral energy, emerging from Yb2O3 spherical sources 0.2-0.9 mm in radius, was observed to harden from 7% to 29%; as these photons traveled through the water phantom, the photon average energy softened by as much as 28% at a depth of 10 cm. Spectral softening was dependent on the measurement depth in the phantom. Energy correction factors were found to vary both as a function of source radius and phantom depth by as much as 10% for spherical Yb2O3 sources. The Model 4140 Yb-169 energy correction factors depended on both phantom depth and reference angle and were found to vary by more than 10% between depths of 1 and 10 cm and angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg. This was in contrast to that of the Model M-19 Ir-192 source which exhibited approximately 3.5%-4.4% variation in its energy correction factors from phantom depths of 0.5-10 cm. The absorbed dose energy correction factor for the Ir-192 source, on the other hand, was independent of angle to within 1%. Conclusions: The application of a single energy correction factor for Yb-169 TLD based dosimetry would introduce a high degree of measurement uncertainty that may not be reasonable for the clinical characterization of a brachytherapy source; rather, an absorbed dose energy correction function will need to be developed for these sources. This correction function should be specific to each source model, type of TLD used, and to the experimental setup to obtain accurate and precise dosimetric measurements.

  20. Diurnal variation of radon measured indoors and outdoors in Grand Junction, Colorado, and Teaneck, New Jersey, and the influence that ventilation has on the buildup of radon indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous measurements of 222Rn were performed indoors and outdoors in two localities that differ primarily in the amount of radon source material within, under, and around building foundations. Grand Junction, Colorado, represents an area where uranium mill tailings have been incorporated into several residential and commercial structures. The radon concentration measured in the basement of a residential structure in Grand Junction known to have no uranium mill tailings within or around the foundation was 0.9 +- 0.2 pCi/liter. The presence of uranium mill tailings increased the average indoor radon concentration by at least a factor of 10 compared to the structure without tailings. Continuous radon measurements were made in a residential structure in Teaneck, NJ, which represents a locality where the 226Ra content of soil and building materials is not artificially enhanced. The daily average radon content of the basement was 0.9 +- 0.2 pCi/liter. Diurnal-like fluctuations were observed in the radon concentration in Grand Junction and Teaneck. These fluctuations were primarily a result of ventilation changes made by the occupants of the home. An algebraic equation was developed relating the equilibrium indoor and outdoor radon concentrations, the ventilation rate, and the radon flux from the 226Ra in the soil beneath the structure and in the fabrication materials of the foundation floor and walls. This relationship was used to calculate the basement ventilation rate of the house in New Jersey

  1. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Seppala Jan; Suilamo Sami; Kulmala Jarmo; Mali Pekka; Minn Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the prob...

  2. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs), IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were decreased by decreasing the SWA. To achieve adequate surface dose coverage to small lung tumours with a difference less than 1 mm in the isodose line radius between the open and modulated field, a larger than 6 mm SWA should be used in the dose delivery of SLRT

  3. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2001-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

  4. Possibilities of utilizing solar systems for heating the hot service water in Košice build-up areas KVP and Ťahanovce

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Horbaj

    2005-01-01

    A production of „HSW“ in block of flats areas by solar collectors means a real alternative to the traditional way of heating by fossil fuels (coal, gas). With this method, it’s possible to save ca. 50 % of energy from the net of the central service of the heat, what can reduce the production of pollutants in the locality, or it can enable to increase the quantity of customers without claims for the restructuralization of the central source. Because Slovakia is the producer of quality solar co...

  5. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  6. Application Cases and Integration of Additive Manufacturing Processes into Conventional Process Chains by the Example of Tool Repair Using the Con-trolled Metal Build-Up Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wimmer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis an overview of the most common Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes and a valid classification scheme outside of the classification of conventional ma-chining processes is presented. Advantages and shortcomings of these processes are briefly explained and application cases from the industry are given. Transitioning from the shortcom-ings of current Additive Manufacturing processes the so called “hybrid additive subtractive” processes are introduced.The concep...

  7. The Build-Up of Ionization in a Nuclear Induced 3He Plasma, at High Pressure and Moderate Temperature, Seeded with Silver and Copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recombination in a steady state, high pressure plasma was investigated in two previous communications. The electron temperature was equal to the gas temperature and the plasma was generated by the nuclear reactions 3He(n, α)T. It was found that in a carefully purified gas the steady state level of the conductivity was very low compared to what is predicted by using recombination coefficients taken from the three-body recombination theory of hydrogenic ions. An addition of metal vapour (Cu, Ag, Pb) improved the conductivity considerably. However, when the vapour pressure of the seed metal was increased above a certain level the conductivity dropped again. This could be explained by assuming that electron - attachment was the dominating electron loss process and thus formation of negative metal ions was established. In the present work we have investigated a situation where the electron temperature has been elevated above the gas temperature by applying a pulsed electric field to the plasma and observing the associated change in conductivity during the pulse and in the afterglow. It was found that the time function of the electron density in the pulse (during which the electron temperature was held constant) consisted of two distinct regions. During the first millisecond the electron density rise was very rapid and could not be explained as due to dissociation of negative metal ions nor to the electron temperature (Te) dependence of some recombination coefficients. During the rest of the pulse, the electron density rose exponentially with time. The exponent is again an exponential function of 1/Te indicating an activation energy of roughly 0.4 eV for the ionization process in the later part of the pulse. The observations are discussed in some detail and it seems as if this increase is due to a Penning reaction associated with an activation energy of 0.4 eV. (author)

  8. Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Albert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly proteins (MRJPs of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands (HGs, the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (BtRJPL, represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin (F-actin rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function.

  9. Software concepts for the build-up of complex systems - selection and realization taking as example a program system for calculation of hypothetical core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and application of simulation systems for the analysis of complex processes require on the one hand and detailed engineering knowledge of the plant and the processes to be simulated and on the other hand a detailled knowledge about software engineering, numerics and data structures. The cooperation of specialists of both areas will become easier if it is possible to reduce the complexicity of the problems to be solved in a way that the analyses will not be disturbed and the communication between different disciplines will not become unnecessarily complicated. One solution to reduce the complexity is to consider computer science as an engineering discipline which provides mainly abstract elements and to allow engineers to build application systems based on these abstract elements. The principle of abstraction leads through the processes of modularisation and the solution of the interface problem to an almost problem independent system architecture where the elements of the system (modules, model components and models) operate only on those data assigned to them. In addition the development of abstract data types allows the formal description of the relations and interactions between system elements. This work describes how these ideas can be concretized to build complex systems which allow reliable and effective problem solutions. These ideas were applied successfully during the design, realization and application of the code system KESS, which allows the analysis of core melt down accidents in pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  10. Short-Term Effects of Mixed Species Fallows on Soil Organic Matter Build-Up in the Soil of Western Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotations of crops with Nitrogen fixing legumes in improved fallows have become central agroforestry technology for soil fertility replenishments in smallholder farms because of high cost of inorganic fertilizers. The choice of the fallow species is important because the quality of residue incorporated into the soil determines it's distribution to soil organic matter (SOM) and nitrogen (N) release. High quality residues (high N content, low lignin and polyphenols) may decompose rapidly and it's unlikely to release N in synchrony with crop demand. In contrast, residues with wide C- to- N ratio, high lignin and high polyphenols may lead to long period of N immobilization and long term build up of SOM. Field experiments were conducted on farmers' fields on a Kandiudalfic eutrudox soil in Western Kenya to determine the fate of 15 N labelled residues in soil. Maize recovered significantly less N from single calliandra residue treatment (3 to 6%). About 70% of the residue N recovered in a mize was contained in the maize grain yield. In long rains 2000, there were no significant differences in residue-N recovery among the different single mixed residue treatment. The percentage 15N recovery of residues N by maize was significantly correlated with maize grain yield. At the end of short rains 1999, legume-15N recovery from 0 to 15 cm depth ranged from 30 to 80 % and was significantly higher for calliandra both in single and mixed treatment. 15N distribution in particle size fraction showed that most calliandra N was found in >20 um fraction but N from sesbania and macroptilium was mostly in the 20 um fraction. The high recovery of N of calliandra in the soil confirms the high contribution of polyphenol rich residues to soil organic matter build up

  11. Employer Brand Buildup Based on Human Resources Management Procedure%基于人力资源管理流程的雇主品牌构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉宁

    2015-01-01

    雇主品牌能够帮助企业吸引和留住优秀的人才,在人力资源市场获得持久竞争优势。文章分析了人力资源管理与雇员聘用的状态关系,并以此为基础,从识人、选人、用人、育人、留人的人力资源管理流程方面阐述了如何构建雇主品牌。%Employer Brand can help enterprises attract and retain outstanding employees as well as enhancing lasting competitive advantages in the human resources market. This paper analyzes the relationship between human resource management and employment, and with the thus obtained results, expounds how to establish the Employer Brand from the procedure of human resource management including selecting, employing, training and retaining employees.

  12. “Waiting for the Bass to Drop”: Correlations between Intense Emotional Experiences and Production Techniques in Build-up and Drop Sections of Electronic Dance Music

    OpenAIRE

    Ragnhild Torvanger Solberg

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the correlations between theories of intense emotional experiences and production techniques used in the electronic dance music (EDM) sections “build-up” and “drop”, which are designed to build tension and create a heightened emotional intensity among clubbers. This is done by descriptive and interpretive music analysis, where spectrograms and a schematic model visually represent the dominant production techniques. Through a theoretical framework consisting of musical ...

  13. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM): Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George H; Bercik, David J; Kazachenko, Maria D; Lynch, Benjamin J; Welsch, Brian T; Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Norton, Aimee A; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Sun, Xudong; DeRosa, Marc L; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predi...

  14. Study of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants as the source of radiation fields build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part the behaviour of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants is depicted on the basis of a literature review of the field. Water chemistry, corrosion processes and activation of corrosion products are the main topics. In the second part the results of the characterization of corrosion particles in the primary coolant circuit of the Doel 1 and 2 reactors are described, during steady state operation and transient phases. In the third part the possibilities for radiation control at nuclear power plants are outlined. The filtration possibilities for the reactor coolant are explored in detail. (author)

  15. Together, Slowly but Surely: The Role of Social Interaction and Feedback on the Build-Up of Benefit in Collective Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Olsen, Karsten; Bang, Dan; Roepstorff, Andreas; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    That objective reference is necessary for formation of reliable beliefs about the external world is almost axiomatic. However, Condorcet (1785) suggested that purely subjective information--if shared and combined via social interaction--is enough for accurate understanding of the external world. We asked if social interaction and objective…

  16. Transport and build-up of tropospheric trace gases during the MINOS campaign: comparision of GOME, in situ aircraft measurements and MATCH-MPIC-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ladstätter-Weißenmayer

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The MINOS (Mediterranean INtensive Oxidant Study campaign was an international, multi-platform field campaign to measure long-range transport of air-pollution and aerosols from South East Asia and Europe towards the Mediterranean basin during August 2001. High pollution events were observed during this campaign. For the Mediterranean region enhanced tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and formaldehyde (HCHO, which are precursors of tropospheric ozone (O3, were detected by the satellite based GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument and compared with airborne in situ measurements as well as with the output from the global 3D photochemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC (Model of Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry - Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. The increase of pollution in that region leads to severe air quality degradation with regional and global implications.

  17. ORIGEN-S: SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ORIGEN-S computes time-dependent concentrations and source terms of a large number of isotopes, which are simultaneously generated or depleted through neutronic transmutation, fission, radioactive decay, input feed rates and physical or chemical removal rates. The calculations may pertain to fuel irradiation within nuclear reactors, or the storage, management, transportation or subsequent chemical processing of removed fuel elements. The matrix exponential expansion model of the ORIGEN code is unaltered in ORIGEN-S. Essentially all features of ORIGEN were retained, expanded or supplemented within new computations. The primary objective of ORIGEN-S, as requested by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is that the calculations may utilize the multi-energy-group cross sections from any currently processed standardized ENDF/B data base. This purpose has been implemented through the prior execution of codes within either the SCALE System or the AMPX System, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These codes compute flux-weighted cross sections, simulating conditions within any given reactor fuel assembly, and convert the data into a library that can be input to ORIGEN-S. Time-dependent libraries may be produced, reflecting fuel composition variations during irradiation. Presented in the document are: detailed and condensed input instructions, model theory, features available, range of applicability, brief subroutine descriptions, sample input, and I/O requirements

  18. Pressure Build-up and Decay in Acid Gas Injection Operations in Reefs in the Zama Field, Canada, and Implications for CO2 Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to examine reasons for pressure rise in the Zama X2X pool in northwestern Alberta, Canada, that was used for acid gas disposal, and whether subsequent pressure decay was a result of pressure dissipation into a larger aquifer. The Zama X2X pool, approximately 1 km2 in size, is connected to four other nearby pools through a common underlying aquifer. Pressure analysis for all the pools indicates that they are in good hydraulic communication. Initial pressure in the Zama X2X pool was approximately 15 MPa. Pressure declined first during oil production, stabilizing at around 10 MPa in the early 1970's, after which started to increase such that it reached 26 MPa in 1986. Subsequently, pressure declined reaching 22 MPa by 1995 just prior to starting injection of acid gas (80% CO2 and 20% H2S). The operator injected acid gas at lower rates and wellhead pressures than those licensed by the regulatory agency. Despite significant production of water and hydrocarbons, the pressure in the Zama X2X pool continued to be higher than the initial reservoir pressure by more than 5 MPa, such that disposal operations were suspended in late 1998. Oil production continued all this time until 2002. Numerical simulations using CMG-IMEM and corresponding sensitivity studies reported in this paper show that disposal of more than 1 million m3 of water between 1970 and 1988 and again in 1992-1993 in the adjacent Zama YY pool, which is in good hydrodynamic communication with the Zama X2X pool through the aquifer below the oil column, is the main reason for the high pressures observed in the Zama X2X pool. Sensitivity studies indicate that pressure decay in the X2X pool was due to fluid production. The study indicates that while pressure rise has been caused by hydraulic communication between the X2X and YY pools through the common aquifer, the aquifer was not of large volume to allow dissipation of the pressure. In addition to the case study, the implications of pressure communication to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers are briefly discussed. (authors)

  19. Characterization and Quantification of Deposit Build-up and Removal in Straw Suspension-Fired Boilers - Ph.d. thesis Muhammad Shafique Bashir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad

    An increased use of biomass in large suspension-red power plants can be a relatively economic and potentially also efficient way to utilize biomass for heat and power production. However, large deposit formation problems limit the electrical efficiency by limiting the maximum applicable superheater...... influence. The IDF-rate, qualitatively related to the ratio between the time-integrated DDF-rate and the integration time, followed the same trends. Quantication of naturally occurring deposit shedding and deposit shedding during plant sootblowing was made via deposit mass uptake signals obtained from...... and natural gas, with the addition of coal fly ash. The results showed that the addition of coal fly ash can significantly affect the ash deposition behaviors and the deposit properties. At the location of the probe measurements with fuel gas temperature of 1250-1300 °C, although the addition of coal fly ash...

  20. Spectroscopic far ultraviolet observations of transition zone instabilities and their possible role in a pre-flare energy build-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Patterson, N. P.; Scherrer, V. E.

    1976-01-01

    Highly flare-productive newly emerging active regions are characterized by numerous small low-lying loops which frequently show a chaotic pattern. Flare activity in such a region subsides as the chaotic loop structures relax and expand into a bipolar configuration. The transition zone in such an active region is highly unstable, as shown by broadened and shifted nonthermal line profiles of medium-ionized elements like Si III, Si IV, and C IV. These transition-zone instabilities, which occur as isolated events in active regions of low flare productivity, are often observed prior to flares. Transition-zone instabilities can be traced to the footpoints of active loops and seem to be accompanied by heating of the loop. The loops vary in size and show differing degrees of activity, with the brightest and most compact ones seemingly being in a pre-flare state which results in the catastrophic energy release along the loop during a flare.

  1. Diagenesis and application of LiDAR in reservoir analogue studies: karstification in the Cretaceous Apulia carbonate platform dolomitization in the Triassic Latemar carbonate buildup

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemyn, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for energy and hydrocarbons coincides with gradual depletion of currently producing conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Therefore new exploration plays are extended to more complex oil and gas plays, such as karstified limestones and hydrothermal dolomites. Furthermore production from currently producing reservoirs is optimized by revisiting or improving the geological knowledge of these reservoirs. These two perspectives are covered in this study on dolomitization...

  2. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells

  3. Cenozoic exhumation of the internal Zagros: first constraints from low-temperature thermochronology and implications for the build-up of the Iranian plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, T.; Agard, P.; Bernet, M.; Meyer, B.; Chung, S.-L.; Zarrinkoub, M. H.; Burov, E.; Monié, P.

    2014-10-01

    The Iranian plateau is a flat ~ 1.5-2 km high plateau thought to result from the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates since ~ 30 ± 5 Ma, and may represent a young analogue to the so far better studied Tibetan plateau. In order to constrain the exhumation history of the internal Zagros and of the Iranian plateau, we herein present apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and apatite (AFT) and zircon fission-track (ZFT) data on plutonic rocks from the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ), Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), Central Iran and Kopet Dagh. Thermochronologic data show that the SSZ was exhumed early in the collision process (essentially before 25-20 Ma), with a likely acceleration of cooling during the late Eocene, from 0.04 to 0.3 mm/year. Results suggest that cooling of the internal Zagros migrated from the SSZ to the UDMA during a more mature stage of the continental collision, after ~ 17 Ma (i.e., coeval with the outward propagation of deformation and topography fronts in the external Zagros). Constant exhumation rates in the UDMA (~ 0.3 mm/year) suggest that no significant variation of erosion rates occurred since the onset of continental collision. In Central Iran, the overlap of ZFT, AFT and AHe ages from gneissic samples points to rapid cooling during the late Eocene (~ 42 °C/Myr), which is consistent with previous reports on the formation of Eocene metamorphic core-complexes.

  4. Changing the paradigm for marine data production, dissemination and validation with Collaborative Platforms. The GlobColour webservice, a prime example which leads to the integration of CWE technologies to build-up virtual research centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton d'Andon, Odile; Martin-Lauzer, François-Regis; Mangin, Antoine; Barrot, Gilbert; Clouaire, Stephane; Sardou, Olivier; Demaria, Julien; Serra, Romain

    2015-04-01

    The GlobColour webservice provides a rich dataset of marine bio-geochemical information for research and education purposes. We report on recent evolutions to improve the functionalities of the service to access EO and in-situ data and check information quality. In addition, a new concept, the Collaborative Platform, support the processing of bespoke information for remote users. At the root of the service is an integrated and automated production chain, processing not only EO satellite data but also in-situ measurements from bio-Argo floats. This production chain provides daily updated bio-geochemical data and performs automated data analysis (merging of sensors, temporal and spatial binning). The GlobColour webservice has been recently upgraded to provide improved navigation and selection capabilities. These evolutions were necessary as the catalogue of EO products has been significantly increased, with many new parameters, new spatial resolution (1 km over Europe in addition to 4 km global products) and projections (rectangular grid in addition to sinus grid). The validation and quality control of the information is essential to demonstrate the fitness-for-purpose of the service. Match-ups between in-situ measurements and EO data are a key element to establish the validity of the information. The standard approach is to perform these match-ups off-line using a database of in-situ measurements, and report the results in a validation document. Two innovations are introduced which greatly increase the value for the user: • An interactive navigation tool allows a detailed analysis the results of the match-ups, with temporal and geographical selection capabilities. Background information for each match-up can be easily retrieved, both for in-situ (measurement identification) and for satellite data (context retrieval, providing information such as cloud coverage and spatial variability). This allows users to get a better insight into the validity of the retrieved data for their particular applications. • Match-ups using real-time EO data and data collected from bio-Argo floats are processed automatically on-the-fly. • This is possible because quality control of the bio-Argo float data is also automated. A dedicated interface has been set-up to monitor the whole fleet of Bio-Argo floats, and access detailed information from each acquired profile. Finally, a Collaborative Platform has been developed to support R&D activities in parallel to the standard production chain, enabling users to work remotely within a dedicated production environment in order to develop new algorithms and methods. The Collaborative Platform is based on a Collaborative Working Environment, a secured IT environment mixing hardware and software elements. It provides access to raw data, to processing and storage facilities, to specific applicative software (e.g. visualisation and post-processing tools). In addition, collaborative tools to exchange data, information and ideas between participants (through forums, web-conferencing…) contribute to create a "Virtual Research Centre" preparing future evolutions of the service. Acknowledgements: This research received funding from the following projects: • MCGS project funded by the Fonds Unique Interministériel, French regional funds PACA and Bretagne, the Fonds Européen de Développement Régional • FP7 Copernicus projects OSS2015 (grant n° 282723) and E-AIMS (grant n° 312642). • The French EQUIPEX project NAOS

  5. HerMES: deep number counts at 250, 350, and 500 microns in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields and the build-up of the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Béthermin, M; Ilbert, O; Conley, A; Lagache, G; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Berta, S; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Casey, C M; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Heinis, S; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Kartaltepe, J S; Levenson, L; Magdis, G; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Salvato, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Wang, L; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    ABRIGED Herschel/SPIRE has provided confusion limited maps of deep fields at 250, 350, and 500um, as part of the HerMES survey. Due to confusion, only a small fraction of the Cosmic Infrared Background can be resolved into individually-detected sources. Our goal is to produce deep galaxy number counts and redshift distributions below the confusion limit, which we then use to place strong constraints on the origins of the cosmic infrared background and on models of galaxy evolution. We individually extracted the bright SPIRE with a method using the positions, the flux densities, and the redshifts of the 24um sources as a prior, and derived the number counts and redshift distributions of the bright SPIRE sources. For fainter SPIRE sources, we reconstructed the number counts and the redshift distribution below the confusion limit using the deep 24um catalogs associated with photometric redshift and information provided by the stacking of these sources into the deep SPIRE maps. Finally, by integrating all these c...

  6. 加强军校技能教员队伍建设的思考%Strengthen the Buildup of Skill -teacher Contigent, Lay a Solid Foundation of Military Skill Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董洪强; 胡国新; 高博

    2012-01-01

    军事技能教员队伍建设是一项关系到军事人才培养和国防现代化进程的基础性工程.必须加强技能教员队伍建设,从思想上锤炼其爱岗敬业、甘于奉献的高尚品质,通过建立和完善各项制度,充分调动一线技能教员教学积极性,并通过“三支队伍”建设不断提高教员队伍素质,增强教员队伍活力和发展后劲,为培养高素质新型军事人才打牢军事技能教学基石.

  7. Design and development of LH2 cooled rolling element radial bearings for the NERVA engine turbopump. Volume 3: Phase 2: Tests on build-ups 16, 17, and 18 at NRDS, Jackass Flats, Nevada, December 1971 - March 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.; Koch, D. A.; Reuter, F.

    1972-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen to cool the rolling element radial bearings in the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles is discussed. The fifteen hour service life goal was obtained during the tests. The increase in bearing life was also considered to be produced by: (1) improvements in bearing material, (2) bearing retainer configuration and manufacturing changes, and (3) better control of operating parameters.

  8. A review on tectonic record of strain buildup and stress release across the Andean forearc along the Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes basin (GGTB) near Ecuador-Peru border

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gravimetric and geologic data show that the reactivation of the Neogene Interandean depression and/or the ~75 - 65 Ma ophiolite suture into the modern dynamic of the Andes controlled the Gulf of Guayaquil Tumbes basin (GGTB) location and evolution during the past 1.8 - 1.6 Myr at least. Depending on whether the remobilization occurred along the in- terandean depression or the ophiolite suture, the GGTB evolved trough pure or simple shear mechanisms, respectively. Because the GGTB exhibits an ...

  9. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Lee, Sang; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    shear on the wake deficit evolution by including a strain-rate contribution in the wake turbulence calculation. The method to account for the increased turbulence at a wake-affected turbine by basing the wake-added turbulence directly on the Reynolds stresses of the oncoming wake. This also allows the...

  10. 4-[18F]Fluorophenylpiperazines by Improved Hartwig-Buchwald N-Arylation of 4-[18F]fluoroiodobenzene, Formed via Hypervalent λ3-Iodane Precursors: Application to Build-Up of the Dopamine D4 Ligand [18F]FAUC 316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Kügler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Substituted phenylpiperazines are often neuropharmacologically active compounds and in many cases are essential pharmacophores of neuroligands for different receptors such as D2-like dopaminergic, serotoninergic and other receptors. Nucleophilic, no-carrier-added (n.c.a. 18F-labelling of these ligands in an aromatic position is desirable for studying receptors with in vivo molecular imaging. 1-(4-[18F]Fluorophenylpiperazine was synthesized in two reaction steps starting by 18F-labelling of a iodobenzene-iodonium precursor, followed by Pd-catalyzed N-arylation of the intermediate 4-[18F]fluoro-iodobenzene. Different palladium catalysts and solvents were tested with particular attention to the polar solvents dimethylformamide (DMF and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. Weak inorganic bases like potassium phosphate or cesium carbonate seem to be essential for the arylation step and lead to conversation rates above 70% in DMF which is comparable to those in typically used toluene. In DMSO even quantitative conversation was observed. Overall radiochemical yields of up to 40% and 60% in DMF and DMSO, respectively, were reached depending on the labelling yield of the first step. The fluorophenylpiperazine obtained was coupled in a third reaction step with 2-formyl-1H-indole-5-carbonitrile to yield the highly selective dopamine D4 ligand [18F]FAUC 316.

  11. Pressure Build-up and Decay in Acid Gas Injection Operations in Reefs in the Zama Field, Canada, and Implications for CO2 Storage Variations de pression au cours de l’injection de gaz acides dans le réservoir récifal duchamp de Zama, Canada. Implications pour le stockage géologique de CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooladi-Darvish M.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examinereasons for pressure rise in the Zama X2X pool in northwestern Alberta, Canada, that was used foracid gas disposal, and whether subsequent pressure decay was a result of pressure dissipation into a larger aquifer. The Zama X2X pool, approximately 1 km2 in size, is connected to four other nearby poolsthrough a common underlying aquifer. Pressure analysis for all the pools indicates that they are in goodhydraulic communication. Initial pressure in the Zama X2X pool was approximately 15 MPa. Pressuredeclined first during oil production, stabilizing at around 10 MPa in the early 1970s, after which started toincrease such that it reached 26 MPa in 1986. Subsequently, pressure declined reaching 22 MPa by 1995just prior to starting injection of acid gas (80% CO2 and 20% H2S. The operator injected acid gas at lowerrates and wellhead pressures than those licensed by the regulatory agency. Despite significant production ofwater and hydrocarbons, the pressure in the Zama X2X pool continued to be higher than the initial reservoirpressure by more than 5 MPa, such that disposal operations were suspended in late 1998. Oil productioncontinued all this time until 2002. Numerical simulations using CMG-IMEXTM and corresponding sensitivity studies reported in this papershow that disposal of more than 1 million m3 of water between 1970 and 1988 and again in 1992-1993 inthe adjacent Zama YY pool, which is in good hydrodynamic communication with the Zama X2X poolthrough the aquifer below the oil column, is the main reason for the high pressures observed in the ZamaX2X pool. Sensitivity studies indicate that pressure decay in the X2X pool was due to fluid production.The study indicates that while pressure rise has been caused by hydraulic communication between theX2X and YY pools through the common aquifer, the aquifer was not of large volume to allow dissipationof the pressure. In addition to the case study, the implications of pressure communication to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers are briefly discussed. Le but de l’article est de comprendre l’accroissement de pression dans le gisement de Zama X2X, utilisé pour le stockage degaz acide (NO de l’Alberta, Canada, et aussi d’examiner si la baisse de pression, observée ultérieurement,est la conséquence d’une dissipation par un aquifère de grande taille. Le gisement de Zama X2X, d’uneextension de 1 km2 environ, est connecté à quatre autres gisements voisins par l’intermédiaire d’un aquifère commun sous-jacent. L’analyse de la pression à travers tous ces gisements indique un bon niveau decommunication hydraulique. La pression initiale de l’accumulation de Zama X2X était d’environ 15 MPa.Pendant la production d’huile, la pression a commencé par décroître, pour se stabiliser vers 10 MPa audébut de la décennie 1970. Mais ensuite la pression a repris son ascension, jusqu’à atteindre 26 MPa en1986. Un nouvel épisode de baisse est alors intervenu et la pression s’est établie vers 22 MPa en 1995,au moment où l’on a commencé à injecter du gaz acide (80 % CO2 et 20 % H2S – l’opérateur, toutefois,injectait ce gaz à des débits et à des pressions en tête de puits qui se situaient en deçà des seuils autoriséspar l’Administration. En dépit d’une production significative d’eau et d’hydrocarbures, la pression à ZamaX2X est ensuite restée plus élevée que la pression vierge, d’au moins 5 MPa, au point qu’en 1998 les opérations d’injection de gaz furent suspendues. La production d’huile a cependant été maintenue jusqu’en 2002. Des simulations numériques effectuées avec CMG-IMEXTM, assorties d’une analyse de sensibilité,montrent ici que la ré-injection de plus de 1 million de m3 d’eau dans le gisement voisin de Zama YY,entre 1970 et 1988 puis en 1992-93, est la principale cause du comportement de la pression à Zama X2X.Les deux champs sont en effet connectés hydrauliquement via l’aquifère situé au-dessous de la colonned’huile. L’analyse de sensibilité indique que la baisse de pression un moment enregistrée à Zama X2Xétait due à la production de fluides, mais aussi que l’aquifère commun n’est pas d’une dimension suffisante pour permettre une dissipation rapide et complète des effets de pression. Ce cas d’étude illustretoute l’importance, pour la transmission des pressions lors du stockage géologique de CO2, de la connectivité entre les réservoirs concernés.

  12. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mediastinitis ) Abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) Buildup of fluid between the layers of tissue that line the lungs and chest cavity ( pleural effusion ) Many ... as bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and methotrexate Illegal drugs

  13. Pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary edema is an abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs. This buildup of fluid leads to shortness of ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  14. Naval trends in ASEAN: is there a new arms race?

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Frank Curtis

    1995-01-01

    Global military spending is decreasing. However this trend does not apply to some regions of the world, specifically Southeast Asia. This thesis describes the ongoing naval arms buildup in this region and examines why it is occurring when the rest of the world is decreasing military spending. Next, this thesis asks if this arms build-up is dangerous. Unlike many other arms races around the world, the Southeast Asian build-up is not particularly dangerous because of the parallel development of...

  15. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  16. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard provides rules for testing the following welding operations: welding of ferritic pearlitic steels, welding of corrosion resistant austenitic steels, welding of components made of corrosion resistant austenitic steels and ferritic pearlitic steels, build-up welding of groove faces, and build-up welding of corrosion protecting layers

  17. Optimization for getting stable plasma initiation in JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the plasma current build-up just after the breakdown, and investigates the method for obtaining more stable plasma initiation with reduced Volt-second consumption. Control of the amount of particles contained in the wall is necessary for getting the optimum plasma density just after the breakdown, and is essential for obtaining the stable current build-up. (author)

  18. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard applies to the following welding operations: welding of ferritic pearlitic steels, welding of corrosion resistant austenitic steels, welding of components made of corrosion resistant austenitic steels and ferritic pearlitic steels, build-up welding of groove faces, and build-up welding of corrosion protecting layers

  19. Take-Off. De opbouw van de Nederlandse luchtstrijdkrachten 1945-1973

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Q.J.

    2013-01-01

    There has been little academic focus on the build-up of the Dutch Air Force after the Second World War. The aim of this study is to identify the key developments in the build-up and sustainment of the Dutch air force between 1945 and 1973 and to answer the question as to which factors and actors sha

  20. Improvement of the gamma-ray transport model the point kernel attenuation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray buildup factor is a multiplicative factor which corrects the response of non-collided photons to include the contribution of the scattered photons. Buildup factors are very important data implemented in Point kernel codes for use in shield design. We propose in this study, a new evaluation of gamma-ray buildup factors which takes into account all the interaction modes of photons with matter, in the energy range of 15 KeV to 10 MeV, for materials of atomic number Z=1 to Z=92. The analytical representation, called Geometric Progression, has been applied to reproduce the buildup factors calculated within a few percent. This formula can be used to interpolate the buildup factors over the full range of distance, energy and atomic number. We tackle also the calculation of buildup factors in stratified shields and propose a new approximate formula to calculate the buildup factors in these complex configurations. (authors). 77 refs., 55 figs., 33 tabs

  1. Improvement of the gamma-ray transport model the point kernel attenuation method; Amelioration de la modelisation du transport des gamma suivant la methode de l`attenuation en ligne droite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assad, A.

    1995-12-01

    The gamma-ray buildup factor is a multiplicative factor which corrects the response of non-collided photons to include the contribution of the scattered photons. Buildup factors are very important data implemented in Point kernel codes for use in shield design. We propose in this study, a new evaluation of gamma-ray buildup factors which takes into account all the interaction modes of photons with matter, in the energy range of 15 KeV to 10 MeV, for materials of atomic number Z=1 to Z=92. The analytical representation, called Geometric Progression, has been applied to reproduce the buildup factors calculated within a few percent. This formula can be used to interpolate the buildup factors over the full range of distance, energy and atomic number. We tackle also the calculation of buildup factors in stratified shields and propose a new approximate formula to calculate the buildup factors in these complex configurations. (authors). 77 refs., 55 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Vay, J-L; Furman, M A

    2011-01-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density.

  3. Simple Signal Source based Micro Controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using micro controller, DAC and Multi-periods syn-thesis, we can buildup a very simple signal source with precisefrequency, amplitude and waveform. Wave parameters can beprogrammed in advance. The circuit can satisfy some special re-quirements.

  4. Radioactivity Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  5. Composition of microfouling on aluminium and fibre glass panels exposed in Agatti waters (Lakshadweep Island)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raveendran, T.V.; Sankaran, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    Rate of microfouling build-up was high during the initial periods of exposure of test surfaces but decreased with the increasing duration. Fibre glass surfaces showed higher deposition than those of aluminium. Carbohydrates and lipids were the major...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1160 - Compliance dates and maintenance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... eliminator elements as needed; (D) Repair or replacement of heat exchanger elements used to control the... mist eliminators at intervals sufficient to prevent buildup of solids or other fouling; (iv) Require...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cystic fibrosis cystic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterized by the buildup ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemical called lactic acid in the body (lactic acidosis). Some affected individuals also have buildup of molecules ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (4 links) Encyclopedia: Lactic Acidosis Encyclopedia: Metabolic Acidosis Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders ...

  9. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis can cause a buildup of cholesterol ... of the artery forming a plaque. If this process restricts blood flow enough it may result in ...

  10. Some estimates of mirror plasma startup by neutral beam heating of pellet and gas cloud targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot plasma buildup by neutral beam injection into an initially cold solid or gaseous target is found to be conceivable in large mirror machine experiments such as 2XIIB or MFTF. A simple analysis shows that existing neutral beam intensities are sufficient to ablate suitable targets to form a gas or vapor cloud. An approximate rate equation model is used to follow the subsequent processes of ionization, heating, and hot plasma formation. Solutions of these rate equations are obtained by means of the ''GEAR'' techniques for solving ''stiff'' systems of differential equations. These solutions are in rough agreement with the 2XIIB stream plasma buildup experiment. They also predict that buildup on a suitable nitrogen-like target will occur in the MFTF geometry. In 2XIIB the solutions are marginal; buildup may be possible, but is not certain

  11. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fat, cholesterol, and other substances. Eventually, the material builds up and a plaque is formed, narrowing the artery. When the build-up is severe, a clot could block the ...

  12. Pulse radiolysis of tetraalkylammonium hydroxides in alkaline solution containing oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the pulse radiolysis of aqueous oxygenated solutions of tetraalkylammonium hydroxides there is a build-up of ozonide ion lasting up to 100 μs after the pulse. The build-up does not occur in solutions containing a twenty fold (reactivity) excess of N2O to O2. The influence of various concentrations of tetraalkylammonium cations, oxygen and different reactivity ratios of N2O to O2 on the build-up of ozonide ion after the pulse was investigated. The reaction rates of O2-and O- with peroxy radicals and organic cations, respectively, control the nature of the observed build-up and decay of ozonide ion. (author)

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver into ... in the wall of the stomach, which can cause severe bleeding. severe ascites (the accumulation of fluid ...

  14. Numerical model of a stationary Alfven flow and magnetohydrodynamic flows close to it in coaxial canals in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary transonic super-Alfven, subsonic super-Alfven, supersonic sub-Alfven, and Alfven magnetohydrodynamic flows, obtained by numerical modeling of their build-up processes, in coaxial canals in the presence of longitudinal magnetic field have been considered

  15. Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for nearly 32,000 deaths each year. More ... stomach, or both an enlarged spleen, called splenomegaly mental confusion due to a buildup of toxins that ...

  16. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... centers in a large city and/or an academic center near you (for a listing of epilepsy ... onset seizures. Occasionally, the onset of seizures will result from a buildup of pressure in the brain ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver into the veins of ... does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood ...

  18. Trace Contaminant Monitor for Air in Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A need exists for analyzers that can measure trace contaminants in air on board spacecraft. Toxic gas buildup can endanger the crew particularly during long...

  19. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis can cause a buildup of cholesterol and cells and other ... lack of oxygen to the heart muscle and cause angina. If the inner wall of a coronary ...

  20. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cholesterol, and other substances. Eventually, the material builds up and a plaque is formed, narrowing the artery. When the build-up is severe, a clot could block the vessel ...

  1. Protecting Your Hearing

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will typically complain that their ear feels blocked up, they feel like they have cotton in their ... the cochlea. The cause may be earwax build-up, fluid, or a punctured eardrum. Medical or surgical ...

  2. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wall of an artery. This material includes fat, cholesterol, and other substances. Eventually, the material builds up and a plaque is formed, narrowing the artery. When the build-up is ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they have increased pressure in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow ... the hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein ...

  4. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  5. Bile duct obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the liver. It contains cholesterol, bile salts, and waste products such as bilirubin . Bile salts help your ... can lead to life-threatening infection and a dangerous buildup of bilirubin. If the blockage lasts a ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Batten disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... somehow disrupt the function of cellular structures called lysosomes . Lysosomes are compartments in the cell that normally digest and recycle different types of molecules. Lysosome malfunction leads to a buildup of fatty substances ...

  7. Paint-Bonding Improvement for 2219 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.; Cibula, Audrey Y.

    1987-01-01

    Bonding of adhesives and primers to 2219 aluminum alloy improved by delaying rinse step in surface-treatment process. Delaying rinse allows formation of rougher surface for stronger bonding and greater oxide buildup.

  8. Mounting technique for pressure transducers minimizes measurement interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, R. N.; Taylor, C. E.; Balmer, C. E.; Hwang, C.

    1975-01-01

    Miniaturized transducers are fabricated from commercially available four-arm semiconductor gages; transducers are connected as bridge circuit and mounted on internal face of small diaphragm. Jacket made of conductive plastic may be needed to avoid buildup or static charges.

  9. Improved Atomizer Resists Clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Improved constant-output atomizer has conical orifice that permits air to sweep out all liquid thoroughly and prevent any buildup of liquid or dissolved solids. Capillary groove guides liquid to gas jet. Simple new design eliminates clogging.

  10. Development of arctic wind technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M.; Antikainen, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The climatic conditions of Lapland set special technical requirements for wind power production. The most difficult problem regarding wind power production in arctic regions is the build-up of hard and rime ice on structures of the machine

  11. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti) protons by multiple passage through a polarized internal target (PIT). The implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR are discussed

  12. Spin Filtering of Stored (Anti)Protons: from FILTEX to COSY to AD to FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the theory of spin filtering of stored (anti)protons by multiple passage through the polarized internal target (PIT). Implications for the antiproton polarization buildup in the proposed PAX experiment at FAIR GSI are discussed

  13. Kidney Failure and Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... narrows due to plaque buildup (stenosis) and blood flow is restricted to even one kidney, high blood pressure (hypertension) ... can be detected by physical examination or special tests: A physician’s ... through narrowed renal arteries. An Abdominal Ultrasound examination ...

  14. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes; Modelisation de la generation de defauts crees par irradiation dans les oxydes de transistors bipolaires: caracterisation par la methode ''diodes controlees par grille''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Dept. of ECE (United States); Kosier, St. [VTC Inc. Bloomington, MN (United States); Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X. [Bordeaux Univ., Lab. IXL, CNRS UMR 5818, 33 (France)

    1999-07-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  15. Statistical patterns in the location of natural lightning

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Zoghzoghy, F.G; Cohen,M.B; Said, R.K

    2013-01-01

    Lightning discharges are nature’s way of neutralizing the electrical buildup in thunderclouds. Thus, if an individual discharge destroys a substantial fraction of the cloud charge, the probability of a subsequent ?ash is reduced until the cloud charge separation rebuilds. The temporal pattern of lightning activity in a localized region may thus inherently be a proxy measure of the corresponding timescales for charge separation and electric ?eld buildup processes. We present a s...

  16. Application of game theory to the interface between militarization and environmental stewardship in the Mariana Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Marler, Thomas E.; Wiecko, Greg; Moore, Aubrey

    2012-01-01

    We recently described threats to the terrestrial biological resources on the Mariana islands of Guam and Tinian resulting from the large-scale buildup of military operations. Attitudes that view these military buildup plans in a zero sum context whereby the positives of greater security and improved local economy can be attained only with corresponding negatives of environmental destruction are prevalent. We argue these attitudes oversimplify the complicated interactions between military oper...

  17. Partial Discharge Detection and Localization in High Voltage Transformers Using an Optical Acoustic Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarevich, Alison Kay

    2003-01-01

    A partial discharge (PD) is the dissipation of energy caused by the buildup of localized electric field intensity. In high voltage devices such as transformers, this buildup of charge and its release can be symptomatic of problems associated with aging, such as floating components and insulation breakdown. This is why PD detection is used in power systems to monitor the state of health of high voltage transformers. If such problems are not detected and repaired, the strength and frequency ...

  18. Safety and Behavior of Nuclear Reactors After Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the performance of the nuclear reactors after shutdown is studied. The decay power and xenon poisoning buildup are calculated using a developed mathematical models. Xenon buildup after reactor shutdown is evaluated and discussed from the safety point of view. The calculations are applied for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and for the Egyptian research reactor (ETRR-1). The calculated results for ETRR-1 are compared with the available experimental data

  19. Soil-borne pathogens in intensive legume cropping - Aphanomyces spp. and root rots

    OpenAIRE

    Levenfors, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Root diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens are often main constraints in legume crop production. Changes towards organic farming practices have recently contributed to an increase in legume cropping, mainly for nitrogen supply purposes, and these have raised concerns about unacceptable build-up of soil-borne pathogen inocula. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of frequent legume cropping on such inocula build-up, and had emphasis on Aphanomyces euteiches, an important pathogen causing ...

  20. The Flight from Maturity

    OpenAIRE

    Gary B. Gorton; Andrew Metrick; Lei Xie

    2014-01-01

    Why did the failure of Lehman Brothers make the financial crisis dramatically worse? The financial crisis was a process of a build-up of risk during the crisis prior to the Lehman failure. Market participants tried to preserve an option or exit by shortening maturities - the "flight from maturity". With increasingly short maturities, lenders created the possibility of fast exit. The failure of Lehman Brothers was the tipping point of this build-up of systemic fragility. We produce a chronolog...

  1. Studies of Beam Induced Electron Cloud Resonances in Dipole Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple...

  2. Safe venting of ''red oil'' runaway reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calorimetry testing of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) saturated with strong nitric acid was performed to determine the relationship between vent size and pressure buildup in the event of a runaway reaction. These experiments show that runaway can occur in an open system, but that even when runaway is induced in the TBP/HN03 system, dangerous pressure buildup will be prevented with practical vent size

  3. Assessing Discount Rate for a Project Financed Entirely with Equity Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Vintila

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimating discount rate for an investment project is one of the most challenging tasks incapital budgeting. In this paper we discuss different kind of models for cost of equity capital proposed infinance literature (static CAPM, conditional CAPM, APT, build-up model, focusing especially on advantagesand disadvantages of using each of them. In the final section, we estimate the discount rate fora certain project financed entirely with equity capital, using a version of build-up model.

  4. Oil-productive Miocene algal and sea grass carbonate mudbanks, south Sumatra, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longman, M.W.; Beddoes, L.R. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Ramba and Tanjung Laban oil fields, located about 70 km northwest of Palembang in southern Sumatra, produce from wackestones and packstones in the lower Miocene Batu Raja Formation. Reservoir rocks are part of relatively small, undolomitized, low-relief carbonate buildups that accumulated on a widespread platform facies. Rocks in the platform facies are dominantly shaly nodular wackestones, whereas rocks in the buildup are dominantly nonshaly wackestones and packstones. The regional setting, the abundance of micrite in the buildups, the absence of both coralline algae and marine cements, and the geometry of the buildups suggest that noncalcareous algae and/or sea grasses were the dominant organisms responsible for forming these mudbanks. The absence of shale in the mudbanks has been important in forming the secondary porosity that yields most of the oil. Vugs and molds form as much as 30% of the rock in the best reservoir zones. Fractures formed by dissolution and collapse greatly enhance reservoir zones quality in many places. Another type of porosity, microintercrystalline, occurs within chalky micrites scattered through the upper part of the buildups. Porosity in these micrites reaches 25%, but permeability is very low. The recent discovery of oil in these low-energy carbonate mudbanks of the Batu Raja Formation has opened a new exploration play in the South Sumatra basin. Many similar buildups will likely be found as exploration continues and the basin's paleogeography becomes better understood.

  5. Incorporating process variability into stormwater quality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-11-15

    Process variability in pollutant build-up and wash-off generates inherent uncertainty that affects the outcomes of stormwater quality models. Poor characterisation of process variability constrains the accurate accounting of the uncertainty associated with pollutant processes. This acts as a significant limitation to effective decision making in relation to stormwater pollution mitigation. The study undertaken developed three theoretical scenarios based on research findings that variations in particle size fractions 150 μm during pollutant build-up and wash-off primarily determine the variability associated with these processes. These scenarios, which combine pollutant build-up and wash-off processes that takes place on a continuous timeline, are able to explain process variability under different field conditions. Given the variability characteristics of a specific build-up or wash-off event, the theoretical scenarios help to infer the variability characteristics of the associated pollutant process that follows. Mathematical formulation of the theoretical scenarios enables the incorporation of variability characteristics of pollutant build-up and wash-off processes in stormwater quality models. The research study outcomes will contribute to the quantitative assessment of uncertainty as an integral part of the interpretation of stormwater quality modelling outcomes. PMID:26179783

  6. Electrohydrodynamic pumping in cable pipes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, J.M.; Chato, J.C.

    1983-02-01

    Many oil-insulated electric power cables are limited by heat buildup caused in part by the low thermal conductivity of the oil. Circulation of the oil is known to reduce the cable temperature, but can lead to excessive pressure buildup on long cables when using conventional pumping methods. An alternate pumping method using distributed electric fields to avoid this pressure buildup is described. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pumping was studied both theoretically and experimentally for possible application in underground cable cooling. Theoretical studies included both analytical and finite-element analysis of the flow patterns driven by travelling electric fields. Experimentally, flow rates in a cable-pipe model were measured under a wide variety of operating conditions. Theory and experiment are in agreement for velocities below 10 cm/s, but higher velocities could not be reached in the experiment, due to increased electroconvection and, possibly, turbulence.

  7. The Military Dimension of American Hegemony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONELA BĂLŢĂTESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A Political Economy of American Hegemony - Buildups, Booms and Busts by Thomas Oatley offers relevant historical and statistical evidence regarding military buildups in postwar America, assessing the economic and political impact of deficit financed military spending. From this point of view the book proves to be a very instructive and challenging reading. Thomas Oatley is professor of political science at North Carolina University, teaching courses on international politics and political economy. He is also the author of a series of papers and books on international political economy. His main theme of research is the interaction between economic interests and political institutions and how it shaped governments’ foreign economic policies. A Political Economy of American Hegemony Buildups, Booms and Busts is the most recent and also the most challenging of his books, in terms of inquired questions and defended theses.

  8. Build up of actinides in burnt fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% 235U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated. (author)

  9. Upflow bioreactor with septum and pressure release mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Conly L.; Hansen, Carl S.; Pack, Kevin; Milligan, John; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Tolman, C. Wayne; Tolman, Kenneth W.

    2010-04-20

    An upflow bioreactor includes a vessel having an inlet and an outlet configured for upflow operation. A septum is positioned within the vessel and defines a lower chamber and an upper chamber. The septum includes an aperture that provides fluid communication between the upper chamber and lower chamber. The bioreactor also includes means for releasing pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In one configuration, the septum includes a releasable portion having an open position and a closed position. The releasable portion is configured to move to the open position in response to pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In the open position fluid communication between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is increased. Alternatively the lower chamber can include a pressure release line that is selectively actuated by pressure buildup. The pressure release mechanism can prevent the bioreactor from plugging and/or prevent catastrophic damage to the bioreactor caused by high pressures.

  10. The Exploration Portable Electrostatic Detector (xPED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Telana L.; Farrell, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts and rovers, while exploring dynamic environments, can experience charge buildup through Tribo-charging (contact electrification). Charge levels can become substantially high. especially in areas where photoelectric and plasma currents are reduced (e.g. lunar polar crater). Tribo-charging in areas that have little to no charge dissipative path can be severe, leaving an astronaut or roving object to remain charged for extended periods of time. Charge buildup on space suits and/or rovers is expected to present significant hazards to missions, such as electrostatic discharge and arcing, dust adhesion to space suits/equipment, and destruction of equipment. The avoidance of hazards associated with charge buildup is critical for future NASA missions to near earth objects, the Moon and Mars. The Exploration Portable Electrostatic Device (xPED) will allow astronauts to determine their charge state, and also characterize the electrical environment from their excursions. xPED would benefit manned, as well as robotic missions.

  11. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  12. Microfractures due to overpressures caused by thermal cracking in well-sealed Devonian reservoirs, deep Alberta basin, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, X.M. [Dept. de Exploracion, Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela); Mountjoy, E.W. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    Microfractures (< 1 mm in width) filled with reservoir bitumen crosscut all diagenetic phases in the upper 200 m of the partially to completely dolomitized Upper Devonian (Leduc Formation) Strachan buildup and other buildups in the deep Alberta basin. They display three patterns: (1) subhorizontal, extending from intraskeletal pores and perpendicular to sub-vertical fractures, (2) random in the matrix, and (3) radial around vugs and fossil molds. Subhorizontal microfracturing is most common and radial is the least common. Overpressuring caused by thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial can produce most of the characteristics exhibited by these microfractures: their association with all pore types, bitumen fillings and relatively late diagenetic timing. Microfractures are restricted to isolated buildups below depths of about 3800 m in the Alberta Basin. Thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial is also indicated by finely and coarsely deformed lamellar textures of the reservoir bitumen that fill the microfractures in the Strachan buildup. Also, the stress field was modified by tectonic compression during the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary Laramide orogeny. Pressures generated during thermal cracking of oil together with tectonic compression probably created the microfractures in the isolated and effectively sealed reservoirs. The increased horizontal stresses resulted in subhorizontal microfractures, whereas rare radial and random microfractures formed under conditions of more uniform stress. The lack of microfractures in adjacent gas-bearing and updip buildups along the Rimbey-Meadowbrook reef trend is likely due to the connection of these buildups to a regional conduit system in the underlying Cooking Lake platform, preventing them from developing sufficient overpressures.

  13. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  14. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  15. How do clinicians and suicide attempters understand suicide attempt impulsivity? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimkeviciene, Jurgita; O'Gorman, John; De Leo, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Inconsistencies in the definition of impulsive suicide attempts hamper research integration. To expand the currently limited data on how this construct is used in clinical practice, researchers interviewed eight suicide attempters to create timelines of their suicide process, then had seven experienced clinicians review these timelines. Thematic analysis of the patient and clinician data revealed three themes: "thinking out," build-up, and unclear intentionality. The results imply that assessing build-up of agitation and exhaustion symptoms can contribute to understanding acuteness of suicide risk. In addition, uncertainty about one's intentions during the attempt should not be equated to low intent to die. PMID:26399157

  16. MIDLINE DIASTEMA: TREATMENT OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Maxillary midline diastema is a common esthetic problem in mixed and permanent dentition. The space can occur either as a transient malocclusion or created by developmental, pathological or iatrogenic factors. Many innovative therapies are available from restorative procedures such as composite build-up to surgery (fr enectomies and Orthodontics is available. Treatment depends upon the correct diagnosis of its etiology and early intervention relevant to the specific etiology. Presented herewith case report s which were treated by Orthodontic treatment and also composite build-up.

  17. Pebble Delivery for Inside-Out Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Xiao; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    Inside-Out Planet Formation (IOPF; Chatterjee & Tan 2014, hereafter CT14) is a scenario for sequential in situ planet formation at the pressure traps of retreating dead zone inner boundaries (DZIBs) motivated to explain the many systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs) discovered by Kepler. The scenario involves build-up of a pebble-dominated protoplanetary ring, supplied by radial drift of pebbles from the outer disk. It may also involve further build-up of planetary masses to gap-opening scales via continued pebble accretion. Here we study radial drift & growth of pebbles delivered to the DZIB in fiducial IOPF disk models.

  18. Take-Off. De opbouw van de Nederlandse luchtstrijdkrachten 1945-1973

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vegt, Q.J.

    2013-01-01

    There has been little academic focus on the build-up of the Dutch Air Force after the Second World War. The aim of this study is to identify the key developments in the build-up and sustainment of the Dutch air force between 1945 and 1973 and to answer the question as to which factors and actors shaped these developments. This study describes that process from the perspectives of foreign policy, domestic policy and the institutional perspective. At the level of multilateral dynamics, the Cold...

  19. γ-ray shielding effect of various building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to know the γ-ray attenuation coefficients and the dose buildup factors for various building materials in order to evaluate the γ-ray shielding factor of the residential houses in the reactor accident. As a matter of fact, however, there is few information about these values. This report describes measurements of the linear attenuation coefficients and dose buildup factors for the typical building materials used in Japan and estimation of the γ-ray shielding effects of these materials. (author)

  20. Effects of noncontact cleaners on transparent solar materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, H.L.; Lind, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    A brief study has been undertaken to evaluate the performance of noncontact cleaning agents for use on solar collectors. Several techniques are used to compare cleansing agents which have been recommended by their respective manufacturers for cleaning solar mirrors. Wetting and residue buildup properties are evaluated for over 50 of these commercially available cleaners. The wetting properties of each cleaner are evaluated by measuring the growth of the contact area of a constant volume drop as a function of time. Losses due to residue buildup are solar weighted and considered equally with the wetting parameters and cost figures to construct a figure of merit for cleaner comparison.

  1. Effective management of heat transfer fluid flash point temperatures using a light-ends removal kit (LERK)

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Ian Wright

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer fluids (HTF) need to be regularly sampled to assess the extent of thermal degradation, oxidative state, the accumulation of short-chained light-ends and contamination by intrinsic or extrinsic particles. The build-up of light-ends in a HTF system presents a potential fire hazard. A light-ends removal kit (LERK) enables light-ends to be removed continuously, helping to push-up flash point temperatures. In the current case, the concentration of light-ends started to build-up in th...

  2. Complexities of the analysis of surface shut-in DST in an offshore volatile oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, H.; Haws, G.W.; Kunzman, W.J.; Milton, H.W.; Halbert, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A surface shut-in drill-stem testing (DST) procedure was used on delineation wells in an offshore volatile oil reservoir. Bottom-hole pressures were recorded on all tested intervals, and surface pressures and temperatures were recorded on most of the tests. Subsequent type-curve plots and the Horner plots of the bottom hole pressure buildup data of several wells did not conform to classical theory. This report describes a new theory that explains the discrepancies, relating them to the combined effects of a set of wellbore phenomena during pressure buildup testing. 7 refs.

  3. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a...... sootblowing probe. The influences of feedstock (i.e., straw share in wood), flue gas temperature (600−1050 °C), probe surface temperature (500 and 600 °C), and probe exposure time on deposit shedding have been quantified. Quantification of naturally occurring deposit shedding and deposit shedding during plant...

  4. Community-level birth rate: a missing link between ecology, evolution and diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Bruun, Hans Henrik; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    We propose a conceptual model to explain the variation in species richness in local communities and in build-up of regional species pools over time. The idea is that the opportunity for new species to enter a community (its invasibility) determines the present richness of that community as well as the long-term build-up of a species pool by speciation and migration. We propose that a community's invasibility is determined by the turnover rate of reproductive genets in the community, which...

  5. Experimental Determination and Numerical Modelling of Process Induced Strains and Residual Stresses in Thick Glass/Epoxy Laminate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Wenani; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom;

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a cure hardening instantaneous linear elastic (CHILE) model and a path dependent (PD) constitutive approach are compared, for the case of modelling strain build-up during curing of a thick composite laminate part. The PD approach is a limiting case of viscoelasticity with path...... dependency on temperature and cure degree. Model predictions are compared to experimentally determined in-situ strains, determined using FBG sensors. It was found that both models offer good approximations of internal strain build-up. A general shortcoming is the lack of capturing rate-dependent effects such...

  6. Short-term test can cut cost of gas reserve determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that to determine original gas in place (OGIP), gas operators can reduce testing costs by replacing static pressures with short-term build-up pressures. These cost savings are the result of reduced well downtime and less lost production during testing. This new, isochronal, transient p/z (pressure divided by gas compressibility factor) method uses transient, or shut-in pressure build-up data measured with respect to shut-in time. The slope of these isochronal plots is the same as the standard, static pressure (bar p/z-vs. -Gp) plot

  7. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide buildup in sewer networks is associated with several problems, including health impacts, corrosion of sewer structures and odor nuisance. In recent years, significant advances in the knowledge of the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks have been made. This paper...... summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  8. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  9. Studies of Beam Induced Electron Cloud Resonances in Dipole Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Calvey, J R; Makita, J; Venturini, M

    2016-01-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  10. Effect of closed v. intermittent-flow respirometry on hypoxia tolerance in the shiner perch Cymatogaster aggregata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, S; Nadler, L E; Bayley, J S;

    2016-01-01

    hypoxia tolerance in closed respirometry is consistent with additional stress, caused by a build-up of ammonia and carbon dioxide and a faster rate in dissolved oxygen decline. The results indicate that these two methods of determining hypoxia tolerance in aquatic organisms are not comparable, and that...

  11. In-reactor simulation study of zinc injection to reduce radioactive corrosion product transport in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion products containing transition metal elements that deposit in core become radioactive and then are released and redeposited on components such as steam generators, pumps, and coolant piping are a significant source of radiation exposure to workers in commercial power reactors. A number of strategies have been developed to reduce the buildup of radiation fields, including careful control of primary coolant chemistry. In pressurized water reactors (PWRs) it has been found that controlling pH between 7.2 and 7.4 (at 300 degrees C) results in much slower field buildup than is experienced at lower pH. However, the lithium hydroxide levels required to maintain this pH at the beginning of cycle when high-boron content is required for reactivity control have been implicated in primary-side stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing. Based on experience in boiling water reactors and laboratory tests, zinc injection has been proposed in PWRs to both control radiation field buildup more effectively than pH control alone and to reduce the incidence of PWSCC. This paper describes an in-pile simulation experiment designed to investigate the efficacy of zinc injection in reducing radiation field buildup

  12. Optimisation potential of sucker rod deep drilling systems in petroleum production at Brown Fields; Optimierungspotential von Gestaengetiefpumpensystemen bei der Erdoelfoerderung von Brown Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, G.; Kass, M.; Rice, D. [Rohoel-Aufsuchungs AG (RAG), Gampern (Austria)

    2007-09-13

    Optimised operation of sucker rod deep drilling systems is a decisive criterion for economically efficient production from older wells with liquid build-up (Brown Fields). Possibilities for optimising the system as a whole are reviewed from different angles (software, hardware). Design software, design methods, material problems, and corrosion prevention are gone into. (orig.)

  13. Bacteriological Survey of AFD (Meat Packing Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Rawal

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the manufacturing process of freeze dried mutton from slaughtering to packing and makes an assessment of microbial build-up on equipment, hands of workers and environment in which the mutton comes in contact during processing.

  14. On the Design and Development of WEBSEE: A Web-Based Senior Exit Exam for Value-Added Assessment of a CIS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, Faouzi; Selim, Said

    2008-01-01

    Higher education institutions are becoming increasingly engaged in assessing their programs in order to enhance student learning outcomes. States, accreditation bodies and various organizations are calling upon institutions to buildup their accountability towards student learning. Accordingly, multiple assessment methods (both direct and indirect)…

  15. Adopt a Four-pronged Approach against Scientific Misconduct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Scientific misconduct has become a social issue that should not be overlooked,warns CAS President LU Yongxiang. To cope with the problem, he emphasizes that it is far from sufficient to simply call for scientists to exercise self-discipline.Stress must be also placed on the enhancement of ethics education,social supervision and institutional buildup in the S&T community.

  16. Diversity, virulence and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol sensitivity of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici isolates from Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens buildup in soils that have undergone continuous wheat or barley monoculture, resulting in take-all decline (TAD). We tested whether Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) isolates (causal agent of take-all) in mon...

  17. 30 CFR 56.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 56.13017 Section 56.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Boilers § 56.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon build-up may...

  18. Collapsible pistons for light-gas guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Moving and expandable parts of gun consist of pump-tube diaphragm, piston, launch-tube diaphragm, and saboted projectile. As a result of improved piston design, pressure cycle has been significantly improved by smoother buildup, increasing muzzle velocities up to 50%.

  19. Investigation of Operation of the Cryotronic Relaxation Oscillations Generator in the Supercooled Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation results of operation of the cryotronic relaxation oscillations generator (CROG) in the supercooled helium have been given. The processes that take place in helium during its warming up have been described and the CROG operation peculiarities have been shown. The helium temperature build-up time and CROG frequency under different values of helium supercooling have been measured

  20. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)