WorldWideScience

Sample records for buildup

  1. Plastics control paraffin buildup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-06-01

    Paraffin buildup in producing oil wells has been virtually eliminated by the use of plastic-coated sucker rods. The payout of the plasticing process is generally reached in less than a year, and the paraffin buildup may be inhibited for 10 yr or longer. Most of the plants applying plastic coatings to sucker rods are now fully automated, though a few still offer the hand-sprayed coating that some operators prefer. The several steps involved are described. The ideal plastic for the job is resistant to chemicals at high and low temperatures, flexible, has good adhesion, abrasion resistance, impact resistance, and a smooth glossy finish. The phenol aldehyde and epoxy resins presently offered by the industry fulfill these specifications very well; the multicoating and multibaking techniques improve their performance. Due to wide variations in the severity of the paraffin problem from one oil field to another, there is no general rule to estimate the possible savings from using plastic-coated sucker rods. The process, however, does appear to do a remarkable job in controlling paraffin buildup wherever it is a problem in producing oil by pump.

  2. Mars base buildup scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station

  3. From detached to attached buildup complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, B.; Elvebakk, G.; Andreassen, K.

    2008-01-01

    -like ridges and possibly areas with restricted circulation. Warm-water carbonate buildups, forming ridges and isolated mounds, occur in the Gipsdalen Group (latest Serpukhovian-mid-Sakmarian), where they initially grew in a detached platform setting. The carbonate buildups are several tens of kilometres long...... deposition and buildup growth bridged the detached platform with the attached platform. In the Bjarmeland Group (Lower Permian) 0.35-4.8 km wide, 1.5-27 km long and 60-420 m thick cool-water bryozoan-dominated straight, sinuous and continuous carbonate ridges or atoll-like ridges are located on top...

  4. Momentum management strategy during Space Station buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lynda; Malchow, Harvey; Hattis, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The use of momentum storage devices to control effectors for Space Station attitude control throughout the buildup sequence is discussed. Particular attention is given to the problem of providing satisfactory management of momentum storage effectors throughout buildup while experiencing variable torque loading. Continuous and discrete control strategies are compared and the effects of alternative control moment gyro strategies on peak momentum storage requirements and on commanded maneuver characteristics are described.

  5. Am-241 buildup in nematode organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyushov, V.Z.; Tarasov, O.V.

    1990-01-01

    The process of Am-241 intake into earthworm organisms from chernozem leached in their presence in soil contaminated with this radionuclide is studied. The data on Am-241 buildup values during long-time radionuclide intake into earthworm organisms from soil are given. It s shown that Am-241 buildup in earthworm organisms do not exceed its concentration in soil for the whole observation period (as Am-241 presents in soil in state unavailable for animals). Intensive extraction of the radionuclide from the organisms is observed when earthworm contacts with soil are stopped

  6. Dose determination on buildup region using photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.J.; Lopes, F.J.; Melo, F. de A.

    1989-01-01

    A clinical dosemeter using photodiode BPW-34 was developed, allowing the determination of dose on buildup region. The measures were made with X-rays beam of linear accelerator and with gamma radiation of cobalt 60. The results were compared with others made in a ionization chamber. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Photon buildup factors of some chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaz, Esra; Ahmadishadbad, Nader; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2015-02-01

    Everyday more and more people are diagnosed with some form of cancer. Some are treatable with chemotherapy alone, while others need radiotherapy and occasionally surgery. Recently, concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been increasingly used in cancer treatment, leading to improvements in survival as well as quality of life. Accordingly, interaction of chemotherapy drugs with radiation will be meaningful to examine. In the present study, gamma ray energy absorption and exposure of buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for some chemotherapy drugs in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path (mfp). The generated energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of chemotherapy drugs have been studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. The significant variations in EABF and EBF for chemotherapy drugs have been observed at the moderate energy region. It has been concluded that the buildup of photons is less in azathioprine and is more in vinblastine compared with other drugs. Buildup factors investigated in the present work could be useful in radiation dosimetry and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  9. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    I present a summary of topics relevant to the electron-cloud build-up and dissipation that were presented at the International Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects 'ECLOUD 07' (Daegu, S. Korea, April 9-12, 2007). This summary is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the talks. Rather, I focus on those developments that I found, in my personal opinion, especially interesting. The contributions, all excellent, are posted in http://chep.knu.ac.kr/ecloud07/

  10. Build-up and management of transuranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Kunihiko

    1984-01-01

    About 17,000,000 kW is generated by nuclear power station at present and this figure correspond to 20 % of total power generation in Japan, and is expected to increase year after year. Following the increase of power generation, build-up of Transuraium from nuclear power station will increase as a matter of course. In 2,000 AD; the build-up of Pu and TPu is expected to reach up to 200 T(TPu = 24 T). Effective management of TPu build-up is now an urgent problem Recycling of Pu and TPu including LWR-Pu recycling, ATR-Pu recycling and FBR-Pu recycling were investigated. In LWR-Pu recycling, recycling quantities of Pu and TPu, and generation of power increase following the repetition of recycling. In ATR-Pu recycling, the increase of TPu following recycling is more remakable than that of LWR-Pu recycling. On the contrary, in FBR-Pu recycling, TPu decreases following the repetition of recycling. The decrease of TPu is thought to be caused by extinction effect in FBR. All of these recycling are suitable for the utilization of Pu, but FBR-Pu recycling is most effective for utilization of Pu and decrease of TPu. Accordingly, when LWR or ATR recycling is applied, Pu shall be transferred to FBR after 1 - 2 recycling. For long-term management of TPu, recycling is not sufficient and some positive method such as oxtinction by strong neutron source like proton linear accelerator is necessary. Fundamental researches on nuclear fuel cycle, nuclide separation method and extinction process of TPu must be carried out. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  11. CURRENT BUILDUP IN EMERGING SERPENTINE FLUX TUBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pariat, E.; Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.

    2009-01-01

    The increase of magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere during active-region formation involves the transport of the magnetic field from the solar convection zone through the lowest layers of the solar atmosphere, through which the plasma β changes from >1 to <1 with altitude. The crossing of this magnetic transition zone requires the magnetic field to adopt a serpentine shape also known as the sea-serpent topology. In the frame of the resistive flux-emergence model, the rising of the magnetic flux is believed to be dynamically driven by a succession of magnetic reconnections which are commonly observed in emerging flux regions as Ellerman bombs. Using a data-driven, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulation of flux emergence occurring in active region 10191 on 2002 November 16-17, we study the development of 3D electric current sheets. We show that these currents buildup along the 3D serpentine magnetic-field structure as a result of photospheric diverging horizontal line-tied motions that emulate the observed photospheric evolution. We observe that reconnection can not only develop following a pinching evolution of the serpentine field line, as usually assumed in two-dimensional geometry, but can also result from 3D shearing deformation of the magnetic structure. In addition, we report for the first time on the observation in the UV domain with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) of extremely transient loop-like features, appearing within the emerging flux domain, which link several Ellermam bombs with one another. We argue that these loop transients can be explained as a consequence of the currents that build up along the serpentine magnetic field.

  12. Metal transfer and build-up in friction and cutting

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, V D

    1956-01-01

    Metal Transfer and Build-up in Friction and Cutting aims to systematize our knowledge of the metal build-up, to describe some of the investigations past and present carried out in SFTI (Tomsk), and to make an effort to explain a number of the phenomena in cutting, scratching, and sliding from the point of view of metal transfer theory. The book opens with a chapter on the temperature of the rubbing interface of two solids. This temperature is needed in order to elucidate the nature of the formation of a build-up in scratching, cutting, and sliding. Separate chapters follow on the seizure phen

  13. Radiography simulation based on exposure buildup factors for multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, Predrag; Pesic, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques were usually used to study the effect of scattered photons on a radiographic X-ray image. Such approach is accurate, but computer time consuming. On the other hand, the exposure buildup factors can be used as approximate and efficient assessment to account for the scattering of X-rays. This method uses the known radiography parameters to find the resulting detector exposure due to both scattered and un-collided photons. A model for radiography simulation, based on X-ray dose buildup factor, is proposed. This model includes non-uniform attenuation in voxelized object of imaging (patient body tissue). Composition of patient body is considered as a multi-layer structure. Various empirical formulas exist for multi-layer structure calculations and they all calculate multi-layer buildup factors by combining single-layer buildup factors. The proposed model is convenient in cases when more exact techniques (like Monte Carlo) are not economical. (author)

  14. Chemical composition dependence of exposure buildup factors for some polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Tejbir [Department of Physics, S.D.D.I.E.T., Barwala, District Panchkula, Haryana 134 118 (India)], E-mail: tejbir.s@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Naresh [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 402 (India)], E-mail: naresh20dhiman@yahoo.com; Singh, Parjit S. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)], E-mail: dr_parjit@hotmail.com

    2009-01-15

    Exposure buildup factors for some polymers such as poly-acrylo-nitrile (PAN), poly-methyl-acrylate (PMA), poly-vinyl-chloride (PVC), synthetic rubber (SR), tetra-fluro-ethylene (Teflon) have been computed using the G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015-15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free paths (mfp). The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected polymers with incident photon energy at the fixed penetration depths has been studied, mainly emphasizing on chemical composition (equivalent atomic number) of the selected polymers. It has been observed that for the lower penetration depths (below 10 mfp), the exposure buildup factor decreases with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers at all the incident photon energies. However, at the penetration depth of 10 mfp and incident photon energy above 3 MeV, the exposure buildup factor becomes almost independent of the equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers. Further, above the fixed penetration depth of 15 mfp of the selected polymers and above the incident photon energy of 3 MeV, reversal in the trend has been observed, i.e., the exposure buildup factor increases with the increase in equivalent atomic number.

  15. Chemical composition dependence of exposure buildup factors for some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Parjit S.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure buildup factors for some polymers such as poly-acrylo-nitrile (PAN), poly-methyl-acrylate (PMA), poly-vinyl-chloride (PVC), synthetic rubber (SR), tetra-fluro-ethylene (Teflon) have been computed using the G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015-15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free paths (mfp). The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected polymers with incident photon energy at the fixed penetration depths has been studied, mainly emphasizing on chemical composition (equivalent atomic number) of the selected polymers. It has been observed that for the lower penetration depths (below 10 mfp), the exposure buildup factor decreases with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers at all the incident photon energies. However, at the penetration depth of 10 mfp and incident photon energy above 3 MeV, the exposure buildup factor becomes almost independent of the equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers. Further, above the fixed penetration depth of 15 mfp of the selected polymers and above the incident photon energy of 3 MeV, reversal in the trend has been observed, i.e., the exposure buildup factor increases with the increase in equivalent atomic number

  16. Energy absorption build-up factors in teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.; Rudraswamy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Geometric progression fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption build-up factor of teeth [enamel outer surface, enamel middle, enamel dentin junction towards enamel, enamel dentin junction towards dentin, dentin middle and dentin inner surface] for wide energy range (0.015-15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free path. The dependence of energy absorption build-up factor on incident photon energy, penetration depth, electron density and effective atomic number has also been studied. The energy absorption build-up factors increases with the penetration depth and electron density of teeth. So that the degree of violation of Lambert-Beer (I = I 0 e -μt ) law is less for least penetration depth and electron density. The energy absorption build-up factors for different regions of teeth are not same hence the energy absorbed by the different regions of teeth is not uniform which depends on the composition of the medium. The relative dose of gamma in different regions of teeth is also estimated. Dosimetric implication of energy absorption build-up factor in teeth has also been discussed. The estimated absorption build up factors in different regions of teeth may be useful in the electron spin resonance dosimetry. (author)

  17. Buildup of gamma ray photons in flyash concretes: A study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sukhpal; Ghumman, S.S.; Singh, Charanjeet; Thind, Kulwant Singh; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    2010-01-01

    The gamma ray buildup factors of flyash concretes have been calculated by using Geometrical Progression formula in the energy region of 0.015-15 MeV as well as up to a penetration depth of 40 mean free paths, and have been studied as a function of incident photon energy. From the obtained results it is seen that for a fixed penetration depth the values of buildup factor are very large in the medium energy region and are small in the low and high energy regions. The results have been shown graphically.

  18. Damage buildup and edge dislocation mobility in equiatomic multicomponent alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granberg, F., E-mail: fredric.granberg@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Djurabekova, F. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Levo, E.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We studied the damage buildup in equiatomic multicomponent alloys by MD simulations. • Edge dislocation mobility was lower in the studied alloys compared to elemental Ni. • Damage buildup in alloys saturated at lower levels than in elemental Ni. • Initial damage buildup is faster in alloys compared to elemental Ni. - Abstract: A new class of single phase metal alloys of equal atomic concentrations has shown very promising mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance. Moreover, a significant reduction in damage accumulation during prolonged irradiation has also been observed in these equiatomic multicomponent alloys. A comparison of elemental Ni with the two component NiFe- and the three component NiCoCr-alloy showed a substantial reduction in damage in both alloys, and an even larger difference was seen if only larger clusters were considered. One of the factors limiting the damage build-up in the alloys compared to the elemental material was seen to be dislocation mobility (Granberg et al., 2016). In this Article, we focus on a more thorough investigation of the mobility of edge dislocations in different cases of the Ni-, NiFe- and NiCoCr-samples. We find that even though the saturated amount of defects in the alloys is lower than in elemental Ni, the defect buildup in the early stages is faster in the alloys. We also find that the dislocation mobility in NiFe is lower than in Ni, at low stresses, and that the onset stress in NiFe is higher than in Ni. The same phenomenon was seen in comparison between NiFe and NiCoCr, since the three component alloy had lower dislocation mobility and higher onset stress. The dislocation velocity in elemental Ni plateaued out just under the forbidden velocity, whereas the alloys showed a more complex behaviour.

  19. Improved SVR Model for Multi-Layer Buildup Factor Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of point kernel method applied in gamma ray dose rate calculations in shielding design and radiation safety analysis is limited by the accuracy of buildup factors used in calculations. Although buildup factors for single-layer shields are well defined and understood, buildup factors for stratified shields represent a complex physical problem that is hard to express in mathematical terms. The traditional approach for expressing buildup factors of multi-layer shields is through semi-empirical formulas obtained by fitting the results of transport theory or Monte Carlo calculations. Such an approach requires an ad-hoc definition of the fitting function and often results with numerous and usually inadequately explained and defined correction factors added to the final empirical formula. Even more, finally obtained formulas are generally limited to a small number of predefined combinations of materials within relatively small range of gamma ray energies and shield thicknesses. Recently, a new approach has been suggested by the authors involving one of machine learning techniques called Support Vector Machines, i.e., Support Vector Regression (SVR). Preliminary investigations performed for double-layer shields revealed great potential of the method, but also pointed out some drawbacks of the developed model, mostly related to the selection of one of the parameters describing the problem (material atomic number), and the method in which the model was designed to evolve during the learning process. It is the aim of this paper to introduce a new parameter (single material buildup factor) that is to replace the existing material atomic number as an input parameter. The comparison of two models generated by different input parameters has been performed. The second goal is to improve the evolution process of learning, i.e., the experimental computational procedure that provides a framework for automated construction of complex regression models of predefined

  20. Hot ion buildup and lifetime in LITE. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    An experimental investigation of hot ion buildup and lifetime in a small scale mirror device (LITE) is described. Hot ions were produced by 27 kV neutral beam injection into laser produced LiH plasmas and H plasmas produced by a washer gun. Hot H ion (12 kV) densities of approx. = 10 12 cm -3 were produced with the LiH target plasmas and densities an order of magnitude lower were produced with the washer gun target plasmas. Hot ion dominant plasmas were not achieved in LITE. The experimental measurements and subsequent analysis using numerical models of the plasma buildup indicate that in small, unshielded mirror plasmas, careful control must be maintained over the transient background gas density in the vicinity of the plasma surface. The hot ion lifetime in LITE was set by the transient cold neutral background resulting from the washer gun of reflux from the target plasma striking the adjacent surfaces

  1. Quality of USMC Officers: Buildup Vs. Reduction in Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    the system and difficult to remove. Bacolod (2007), analyzes the decline in teacher quality due to expanded access to professional jobs for women ...display diminishing returns or contributions to an officer’s quality , productivity, job performance, or output. The FITREP is designed for the RS to take...minus FY Average of RS Highs between the Buildup and Drawdown An alternative measure of officer quality based on their job performance is the difference

  2. Humidity Buildup in Electronic Enclosures Exposed to Constant Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Electronic components and devices are exposed to a wide variety of climatic conditions, therefore the protection of electronic devices from humidity is becoming a critical factor in the system design. The ingress of moisture into typical electronic enclosures has been studied with defined paramet....... The moisture buildup inside the enclosure has been simulated using an equivalent RC circuit consisting of variables like controlled resistors and capacitors to describe the diffusivity, permeability, and storage in polymers....

  3. BUILDUP OF PROACTIVE INTERFERENCE IN JAPANESE KANJI LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    FUJITA, Tadashi

    1995-01-01

    The discriminative assumption on buildup of proactive interference in short-term memory predicts that when intertrial similarity of items is high, the proactive interference is built up while interlist similarity of items is low, the proactive interference is not built up. To test the discriminative assumption in Japanese Kanji learning, intertrial similarity was changed by the acoustic, the radical (as one of the figurative properties), and the radical plus semantic properties in Kanji. For ...

  4. Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, R.H.; Pick, M.E.; van Melsen, C.

    1991-11-01

    Test coupons of typical PWR materials of construction were prepared using a number of pretreatments to minimize radiation buildup. The coupons were then exposed to primary coolant at the Doel-2 PWR in Belgium. The exposure periods for the coupons ranged from one to three fuel cycles. After removal from the primary system, doserate and gamma spectroscopy measurements were made to determine the radioactivity levels on the coupons. Varying levels of success were achieved for the preconditioning techniques tested. Electropolishing alone provided some degree of resistance to radiation buildup on the treated surface and electropolishing plus passivation was shown to be even better. Radiation buildup resistance of the palladium-coated coupons was poor; radiation levels on these coupons were even higher than on the untreated reference coupons. The poor performance of the palladium-coated coupons was possibly due to the method used to apply the coating. In contrast to palladium coating, very encouraging results were achieved with chromium plating plus passivation. Preliminary results show that this technique can inhibit activity deposition by as much as a factor of ten. 4 refs., 64 figs., 26 tabs

  5. Energy absorption and exposure build-up factors in teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.; Rudraswamy, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Gamma and X-radiation are widely used in medical imaging and radiation therapy. The user of radioisotopes must have knowledge about how radiation interacts with matter, especially with the human body, because when photons enter the medium/body, they degrade their energy and build up in the medium, giving rise to secondary radiation which can be estimated by a factor which is called the 'build-up factor'. It is essential to study the exposure build up factor in radiation dosimetry. G.P. fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption and exposure build-up factor of teeth (enamel outer surface (EOS), enamel middle (EM), enamel dentin junction towards enamel (EDJE), enamel dentin junction towards dentin (EDJD), dentin middle (DM) and dentin inner surface (DIS)) for wide energy range (0.015 MeV-15 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 40 mean free path. The dependence of energy absorption and exposure build up factor on incident photon energy, Penetration depth and effective atomic number has also been assessed. The relative dose distribution at a distance r from the point source is also estimated. The computed exposure and absorption build-up factors are useful to estimate the gamma and Bremsstrahlung radiation dose distribution teeth which is useful in clinical dosimetry

  6. Activities concerning a re-evaluation of gamma-ray buildup factors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    2000-01-01

    Research related to gamma-ray buildup factors in Japan are continuing to improve in accuracy and usefulness after the publication of new standard buildup factors as NUREG/CR-5740. Buildup factors for homogeneous materials were studied by three different calculation methods. Several improvements were made to calculate buildup factors up to 40 mfp for various materials for a wide energy range at each code. Systematic data production of buildup factors for multilayer materials were performed by using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code, and were used to improve the fitting formula. These research activities related to gamma-ray buildup factors performed in Japan are presented together with discussions concerning re-evaluation of buildup factors. (author)

  7. Efforts to control radiation build-up in Ringhals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egner, K.; Aronsson, P.O.; Erixon, O. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    It is well known that good control of the primary chemistry in a PWR is essential in order to minimize material problems and fuel damages. It has also been well established that the water chemistry has a great influence on accumulation of corrosion products on the fuel and the radiation build-up on primary system surfaces. Ringhals was one of the pioneers to increase operating pH in order to reduce radiation build-up and has now been operating for ten years with pH at 7.4 or (in later years) 7.2. Our experience is favourable and includes low radiation levels in the new (1989) steam generators of Ringhals 2. Ringhals 4 has operated almost its whole life at pH 7.2 or higher and it remains one of the cleanest PWRs of its vintage. In addition to strict adherence to a stable operating chemistry, Ringhals is now working on a program with the aim to find optimum shut-down and start-up chemistry to reduce activity levels in the primary systems. A particular goal is to use the shut-down and start-up chemistry at the 1994 outage in Ringhals 3 in order to reduce doserates in preparation for the planned steam generator replacement in 1995. The paper summarizes the experience to date of the established operating chemistry, on-going tests with modified shut-down and start-up chemistry and other measures to limit or reduce the activity build-up.

  8. Efforts to control radiation build-up in Ringhals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egner, K.; Aronsson, P.O.; Erixon, O.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that good control of the primary chemistry in a PWR is essential in order to minimize material problems and fuel damages. It has also been well established that the water chemistry has a great influence on accumulation of corrosion products on the fuel and the radiation build-up on primary system surfaces. Ringhals was one of the pioneers to increase operating pH in order to reduce radiation build-up and has now been operating for ten years with pH at 7.4 or (in later years) 7.2. Our experience is favourable and includes low radiation levels in the new (1989) steam generators of Ringhals 2. Ringhals 4 has operated almost its whole life at pH 7.2 or higher and it remains one of the cleanest PWRs of its vintage. In addition to strict adherence to a stable operating chemistry, Ringhals is now working on a program with the aim to find optimum shut-down and start-up chemistry to reduce activity levels in the primary systems. A particular goal is to use the shut-down and start-up chemistry at the 1994 outage in Ringhals 3 in order to reduce doserates in preparation for the planned steam generator replacement in 1995. The paper summarizes the experience to date of the established operating chemistry, on-going tests with modified shut-down and start-up chemistry and other measures to limit or reduce the activity build-up

  9. PyECLOUD and build-up simulations at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadarola, G; Rumolo, G

    2013-01-01

    PyECLOUD is a newly developed code for the simulation of the electron cloud (EC) build-up in particle accelerators. Almost entirely written in Python, it is mostly based on the physical models already used in the ECLOUD code but, thanks to the implementation of new optimized algorithms, it exhibits a significantly improved performance in accuracy, speed, reliability and flexibility. Such new features of PyECLOUD have been already broadly exploited to study EC observations in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its injector chain as well as for the extrapolation to high luminosity upgrade scenarios. (author)

  10. Buildup of 236U in the gaseous diffusion plant product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized projection of the average annual 236 U concentration that can be expected in future enriched uranium product from the US-ERDA gaseous diffusion plants when reprocessed fuels become available for cascade feeding is given. It is concluded that the buildup of 236 U is not an ever-increasing function, but approaches a limiting value. Projected concentrations result in only slight separative work losses and present no operational problem to ERDA in supplying light water reactor requirements. The use of recycle uranium from power reactor spent fuels will result in significant savings in natural uranium feed

  11. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  12. New buildup factor data for point kernel calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubey, D.K.; Harima, Y.

    1986-01-01

    An American Nuclear Society Standards Committee Working Group, identified as ANS-6.4.3, is developing a set of evaluated gamma-ray isotropic point-source buildup factors and attenuation coefficients for a standard reference data base. As a first step, a largely unpublished set of buildup factors calculated with the moments method has been evaluated by recalculating key values with Monte Carlo, integral transport, and discrete ordinates methods. Attention is being given to frequently-neglected processes such as bremsstrahlung and the effect of introducing a tissue phantom behind the shield. The proposed standard contains data for a source energy range from 15 keV to 15 MeV and for approximately 19 elements and 3 mixtures (water, air, and concrete). The data will also be represented as coefficients for the G-P fitting function. The 1985 data base was released as part of the CCC-493B/QAD-CGGP code package available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC)

  13. Scintiscanning of arthritis and analysis of build-up curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Tsuneo; Omori, Shigeo; Miyawaki, Haruo; Maniwa, Masato; Yoshizaki, Kenichi

    1975-01-01

    In the present study 40 knee joints with rheumatoid arthritis, 23 knee joints with osteoarthrosis deformans, 3 knee joints with non-synovitis, one knee joint with pyogenic arthritis and 4 normal knee joints were scanned. By analysis of build-up curves obtained immediately after the intravenous injection of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, the rate of accumulation of radioactivity (t 1/2) in the affected joints was simultaneously estimated in order to compare them with clinical findings. 1. Scintiscanning of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis deformans of the knee joint, non-specific synovitis, and pyogenic arthritis of the knee joint, yielded a positive scan for all of the joint diseases. 2. In the scintigram of healthy knee joints, there are no areas of RI accumulation or right to left difference. 3. In some instances abnormal uptake of RI was seen on scintigrams of arthritis even after normal clinical and laboratory findings had been achieved with therapy. 4. sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, a radionuclide with a short half-life, allows repeated scans and provides a useful radiologic means of evaluating therapeutic course and effectiveness. 5. Analysis of build-up curves revealed that the rate of accumulation of RI was faster in rheumatoid arthritis than in osteoarthrosis deformans. (auth.)

  14. Zinc injection helps reduce radiation field buildup in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.

    1991-01-01

    The injection of zinc into the reactor water of BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors) was a technique developed by General Electric (GE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to control the buildup of radiation fields from cobalt-60 on out-of-core piping. The presence of 5-10ppb zinc in the reactor water reduces the growth of oxide films on stainless steel surfaces, thereby reducing the number of sites available for the incorporation of cobalt; zinc also competes with cobalt for the sites. In September 1990, EPRI organized a workshop at the request of several US utilities to provide a forum to discuss experiences with zinc injection. The meeting focused on six main issues: the effect of zinc on radiation fields in normal water chemistry; the radiation buildup in hydrogen water chemistry, with and without zinc; the effects of zinc-65; the corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials; the performance of zinc injection and monitoring equipment; and planning for zinc injection. (author)

  15. Characterizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon build-up processes on urban road surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Liang; Liu, An; Li, Dunzhu; Zhang, Lixun; Guan, Yuntao

    2016-01-01

    Reliable prediction models are essential for modeling pollutant build-up processes on urban road surfaces. Based on successive samplings of road deposited sediments (RDS), this study presents empirical models for mathematical replication of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) build-up processes on urban road surfaces. The contaminant build-up behavior was modeled using saturation functions, which are commonly applied in US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM). Accurate fitting results were achieved in three typical urban land use types, and the applicability of the models was confirmed based on their acceptable relative prediction errors. The fitting results showed high variability in PAH saturation value and build-up rate among different land use types. Results of multivariate data and temporal-based analyses suggested that the quantity and property of RDS significantly influenced PAH build-up. Furthermore, pollution sources, traffic parameters, road surface conditions, and sweeping frequency could synthetically impact the RDS build-up and RDS property change processes. Thus, changes in these parameters could be the main reason for variations in PAH build-up in different urban land use types. - Highlights: • Sufficient robust prediction models were established for analysis of PAH build-up on urban road surfaces. • PAH build-up processes showed high variability among different land use types. • Pollution sources as well as the quantity and property of RDS mainly influenced PAH build-up. - Sufficient robust prediction models were established for analysis of PAH build-up on urban road surfaces. Pollution sources as well as the quantity and property of RDS mainly influenced PAH build-up.

  16. Buildup factor studies of HCO-materials as a function of weight fraction of constituent elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, G.S.; Sidhu, G.S.; Singh, Parjit S.; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of fractional abundance of constituent elements have been investigated on the energy absorption buildup factors of HCO-materials for some incident photon energies at a fixed penetration depth of 20 mfp. At low incident photon energies, a change in buildup factor is seen whereas buildup factor values of HCO-materials are independent of fractional abundances of H, C and O for high energies

  17. New concept of the buildup factor in bent ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faik Ouahab, Z.; Jehouani, A.; Groetz, J.-E.

    2011-01-01

    A major problem confronting the radiation shielding designer is the accurate determination of neutron streaming through various penetrations in walls, ducts and mazes. The previous studies on neutron transmission were performed through empty ducts. The aim of this work is to evaluate the neutron transmission probability through a filled bent duct and the proposition of a new concept of the buildup factor for neutrons in multilegged ducts. An angular biaising technique is used in the Monte Carlo simulations to accelerate the calculation convergence. Results are first compared with those obtained by the MCNPX code. For an empty bent duct, the neutron transmission is only due to the neutron reflection on the duct wall. For a filled duct, the major contribution is due to the scattering on the atoms filling the duct.

  18. Detection of hydrogen buildup in initially pure nonhydrogenous liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeany, S.R.; Jenkins, J.D.

    1978-12-01

    A technique for monitoring hydrogen buildup in initially pure nonhydrogenous liquids is described in this report. The detection method is based upon the neutron-moderating properties of hydrogen. The analysis leading to the selection and design of a hydrogen-monitoring device is described. An experimental mockup of the device was then constructed and tested for hydrogen sensitivity. A hot cell was used for these tests. A device proved capable of measuring hydrogen concentrations in the range of 0 to 13.0 x 10 27 atoms/m 3 , with an accuracy of about 1.0 x 10 27 atoms/m 3 . A typical measurement can be made in 3 to 5 min. The experimental results confirmed the sensitivities predicted by the analysis and demonstrated that such a device would be practical for hydrogen concentration measurements for criticality control in an HTGR fuel refabrication plant

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Theory and Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a broad-brush survey of the phenomenology, history and importance of the electron-cloud effect (ECE). We briefly discuss the simulation techniques used to quantify the electron-cloud (EC) dynamics. Finally, we present in more detail an effective theory to describe the EC density build-up in terms of a few effective parameters. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC.

  20. Buildup of radioxenon isotopes in MOX-assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gniffke, Thomas; Kirchner, Gerald [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker-Centre for Science and Peace Research, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radioxenon is the main tracer for detection of nuclear tests conducted underground under the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Since radioxenon is emitted by civilian sources too, like commercial nuclear reactors, source discrimination is still an important issue. Inventory calculations are necessary to predict which xenon isotopic ratios are built up in a reactor and how they differ from those generated by a nuclear explosion. The screening line actually used by the CTBT Organization for source discrimination is based on calculations for uranium fuel of various enrichments used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The usage of different fuel, especially mixed U/Pu oxide (MOX) assemblies with reprocessed plutonium, may alter the radioxenon signature of civilian reactors. In this talk, calculations of the radioxenon buildup in a MOX-assembly used in a commercial PWR are presented. Implications for the CTBT verification regimes are discussed and open questions are addressed.

  1. Investigating the build-up of precedence effect using reflection masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Buchholz, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    signal processing, such an approach represents a bottom-up approach to the buildup of precedence. Three conditioner configurations measuring a possible buildup of reflection suppression were compared to the baseline RMT for four reflection delays ranging from 2.5–15 ms. No buildup of reflection...... suppression was observed for any of the conditioner configurations. Buildup of template (decrease in RMT for two of the conditioners), on the other hand, was found to be delay dependent. For five of six listeners, with reflection delay=2.5 and 15 ms, RMT decreased relative to the baseline. For 5- and 10-ms...

  2. Damage buildup and edge dislocation mobility in equiatomic multicomponent alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F.; Djurabekova, F.; Levo, E.; Nordlund, K.

    2017-02-01

    A new class of single phase metal alloys of equal atomic concentrations has shown very promising mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance. Moreover, a significant reduction in damage accumulation during prolonged irradiation has also been observed in these equiatomic multicomponent alloys. A comparison of elemental Ni with the two component NiFe- and the three component NiCoCr-alloy showed a substantial reduction in damage in both alloys, and an even larger difference was seen if only larger clusters were considered. One of the factors limiting the damage build-up in the alloys compared to the elemental material was seen to be dislocation mobility (Granberg et al., 2016). In this Article, we focus on a more thorough investigation of the mobility of edge dislocations in different cases of the Ni-, NiFe- and NiCoCr-samples. We find that even though the saturated amount of defects in the alloys is lower than in elemental Ni, the defect buildup in the early stages is faster in the alloys. We also find that the dislocation mobility in NiFe is lower than in Ni, at low stresses, and that the onset stress in NiFe is higher than in Ni. The same phenomenon was seen in comparison between NiFe and NiCoCr, since the three component alloy had lower dislocation mobility and higher onset stress. The dislocation velocity in elemental Ni plateaued out just under the forbidden velocity, whereas the alloys showed a more complex behaviour.

  3. SU-E-T-184: Feasibility of Superabsorbent Polymers as a Buildup Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, T; Sheu, R; Lo, Y [Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of superabsorbent polymers as a buildup material for radiation therapy Methods: A standard bolus, a layered damp towel, and a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) phantom were created and scanned to compare the Hounsfield units of each buildup material. A single field plan was developed on Eclipse TPS with AAA dose calculation algorithm to examine dose buildup. Relative film dosimetery (EBT3) was performed to evaluate the surface dose with each buildup material. Each buildup material had an approximate thickness of 0.5 cm and 100 monitor units with 6MV were delivered with solid water placed underneath film to simulate backscatter and more realistic surface dose. Results: The average HU units of the bolus, wet towel, and SAP phantom were 75 (SD=3), -378 (SD=113), -198 (SD=45) respectively. AAA dose calculation demonstrated sufficient dose buildup in all three materials. The relative surfaces doses to film were 23.7% without buildup, 87.5% with 0.5 cm bolus, 92.4% for the SAP phantom, and 87.1% for the damp towel. Conclusion: We demonstrate that superabsorbent polymers can provide sufficient dose buildup. Furthermore, due to the form in which SAPs are traditionally manufactured, this material is less expensive conforms more easily to irregular surfaces than standard sheets of bolus. Also, as a substance which is designed to absorb and retain water efficiently, SAPs are much more comfortable and more consistent than damp towels.

  4. SU-E-T-184: Feasibility of Superabsorbent Polymers as a Buildup Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, T; Sheu, R; Lo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of superabsorbent polymers as a buildup material for radiation therapy Methods: A standard bolus, a layered damp towel, and a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) phantom were created and scanned to compare the Hounsfield units of each buildup material. A single field plan was developed on Eclipse TPS with AAA dose calculation algorithm to examine dose buildup. Relative film dosimetery (EBT3) was performed to evaluate the surface dose with each buildup material. Each buildup material had an approximate thickness of 0.5 cm and 100 monitor units with 6MV were delivered with solid water placed underneath film to simulate backscatter and more realistic surface dose. Results: The average HU units of the bolus, wet towel, and SAP phantom were 75 (SD=3), -378 (SD=113), -198 (SD=45) respectively. AAA dose calculation demonstrated sufficient dose buildup in all three materials. The relative surfaces doses to film were 23.7% without buildup, 87.5% with 0.5 cm bolus, 92.4% for the SAP phantom, and 87.1% for the damp towel. Conclusion: We demonstrate that superabsorbent polymers can provide sufficient dose buildup. Furthermore, due to the form in which SAPs are traditionally manufactured, this material is less expensive conforms more easily to irregular surfaces than standard sheets of bolus. Also, as a substance which is designed to absorb and retain water efficiently, SAPs are much more comfortable and more consistent than damp towels

  5. Recommendations on dose buildup factors used in models for calculating gamma doses for a plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-09-01

    Calculations of external γ-doses from radioactivity released to the atmosphere have been made using different dose buildup factor formulas. Some of the dose buildup factor formulas are used by the Nordic countries in their respective γ-dose models. A comparison of calculated γ-doses using these dose buildup factors shows that the γ-doses can be significantly dependent on the buildup factor formula used in the calculation. Increasing differences occur for increasing plume height, crosswind distance, and atmospheric stability and also for decreasing downwind distance. It is concluded that the most accurate γ-dose can be calculated by use of Capo's polynomial buildup factor formula. Capo-coefficients have been calculated and shown in this report for γ-energies below the original lower limit given by Capo. (author)

  6. Radiation buildup and control in BWR recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Wood, R.M.; Rao, T.V.; Vook, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) employ stainless steel (Types 304 or 316 NG) pipes in which high-purity water at temperatures of ∼ 275 0 C are circulated. Various components of the system, such as valves and bearings, often contain hard facing metal alloys such as Stellite-6. These components, along with the stainless steel tubing and feedwater, serve as sources of 59 Co. This cobalt, along with other soluble and insoluble impurities, is carried along with the circulating water to the reactor core where it is converted to radioactive 60 Co. After reentering the circulating water, the 60 Co can be incorporated into a complex corrosion layer in the form of CoCr 2 O 4 and/or CoFe 2 O 4 . The presence of even small amounts of 60 Co on the walls of BWR cooling systems is the dominant contributor to inplant radiation levels. Thus BWR owners and their agents are expending significant time and resources in efforts to reduce both the rate and amount of 60 Co buildup. The object of this research is twofold: (a) to form a thin diffusion barrier against the outward migration of cobalt from a cobalt-containing surface and (b) to prevent the growth of a 60 Co-containing corrosion film. The latter goal was the more important since most of the radioactive cobalt will originate from sources other than the stainless steel piping itself

  7. The Mechanism for Energy Buildup in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro; Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection and helicity conservation are two of the most important basic processes determining the structure and dynamics of laboratory and space plasmas. The most energetic dynamics in the solar system are the giant CMEs/flares that produce the most dangerous space weather at Earth, yet may also have been essential for the origin of life. The origin of these explosions is that the lowest-lying magnetic flux in the Sun's corona undergoes the continual buildup of stress and free energy that can be released only through explosive ejection. We perform MHD simulations of a coronal volume driven by quasi-random boundary flows designed to model the processes by which the solar interior drives the corona. Our simulations are uniquely accurate in preserving magnetic helicity. We show that even though small-scale stress is injected randomly throughout the corona, the net result of magnetic reconnection is a coherent stressing of the lowest-lying field lines. This highly counter-intuitive result - magnetic stress builds up locally rather than spreading out to a minimum energy state - is the fundamental mechanism responsible for the Sun's magnetic explosions. It is likely to be a mechanism that is ubiquitous throughout laboratory and space plasmas. This work was supported by the NASA LWS and SR Programs.

  8. Optimum Water Chemistry in radiation field buildup control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien, C. [Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Nuclear utilities continue to face the challenGE of reducing exposure of plant maintenance personnel. GE Nuclear Energy has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC) to reduce the radiation field buildup and minimize the radioactive waste production. It is believed that reduction of radioactive sources and improvement of the water chemistry quality should significantly reduce both the radiation exposure and radwaste production. The most important source of radioactivity is cobalt and replacement of cobalt containing alloy in the core region as well as in the entire primary system is considered the first priority to achieve the goal of low exposure and minimized waste production. A plant specific computerized cobalt transport model has been developed to evaluate various options in a BWR system under specific conditions. Reduction of iron input and maintaining low ionic impurities in the coolant have been identified as two major tasks for operators. Addition of depleted zinc is a proven technique to reduce Co-60 in reactor water and on out-of-core piping surfaces. The effect of HWC on Co-60 transport in the primary system will also be discussed.

  9. Total Ambient Dose Equivalent Buildup Factor Determination for Nbs04 Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckic, Paulina; Hayes, Robert B

    2018-06-01

    Buildup factors are dimensionless multiplicative factors required by the point kernel method to account for scattered radiation through a shielding material. The accuracy of the point kernel method is strongly affected by the correspondence of analyzed parameters to experimental configurations, which is attempted to be simplified here. The point kernel method has not been found to have widespread practical use for neutron shielding calculations due to the complex neutron transport behavior through shielding materials (i.e. the variety of interaction mechanisms that neutrons may undergo while traversing the shield) as well as non-linear neutron total cross section energy dependence. In this work, total ambient dose buildup factors for NBS04 concrete are calculated in terms of neutron and secondary gamma ray transmission factors. The neutron and secondary gamma ray transmission factors are calculated using MCNP6™ code with updated cross sections. Both transmission factors and buildup factors are given in a tabulated form. Practical use of neutron transmission and buildup factors warrants rigorously calculated results with all associated uncertainties. In this work, sensitivity analysis of neutron transmission factors and total buildup factors with varying water content has been conducted. The analysis showed significant impact of varying water content in concrete on both neutron transmission factors and total buildup factors. Finally, support vector regression, a machine learning technique, has been engaged to make a model based on the calculated data for calculation of the buildup factors. The developed model can predict most of the data with 20% relative error.

  10. A new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, A.; Chiron, M.; Nimal, J.C.; Diop, C.M.; Ridoux, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study proposes a new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields. The formula combines the buildup factors of single-layer shields with products and quotients. The feasibility of the formula for reproducing the buildup factors was tested by using point isotropic buildup factors calculated with the SN1D discrete ordinates code as reference data. The dose buildup factors of single-, double-, and multilayer shields composed of water, aluminum, iron, and lead were calculated for a spherical geometry in the energy range between 10 MeV and 40 keV and for total thicknesses of up to 30 mean free paths. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the bound electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent scattering), the coherent scattering, the pair production, and the secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. The tests have shown that the approximating formula reproduces the reference data of double-layer shields very well for most cases. With the same parameters and with a new physical consideration that takes into account in a global way the degradation of the gamma-ray energy spectrum, the buildup factors of three- and five-layer shields were also very well reproduced

  11. MAGNETIC ENERGY BUILDUP FOR RELATIVISTIC MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Cong

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by coronal mass ejection studies, we construct general relativistic models of a magnetar magnetosphere endowed with strong magnetic fields. The equilibrium states of the stationary, axisymmetric magnetic fields in the magnetar magnetosphere are obtained as solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation in a Schwarzschild spacetime. To understand the magnetic energy buildup in the magnetar magnetosphere, a generalized magnetic virial theorem in the Schwarzschild metric is newly derived. We carefully address the question whether the magnetar magnetospheric magnetic field can build up sufficient magnetic energy to account for the work required to open up the magnetic field during magnetar giant flares. We point out the importance of the Aly-Sturrock constraint, which has been widely studied in solar corona mass ejections, as a reference state in understanding magnetar energy storage processes. We examine how the magnetic field can possess enough energy to overcome the Aly-Sturrock energy constraint and open up. In particular, general relativistic (GR) effects on the Aly-Sturrock energy constraint in the Schwarzschild spacetime are carefully investigated. It is found that, for magnetar outbursts, the Aly-Sturrock constraint is more stringent, i.e., the Aly-Sturrock energy threshold is enhanced due to the GR effects. In addition, neutron stars with greater mass have a higher Aly-Sturrock energy threshold and are more difficult to erupt. This indicates that magnetars are probably not neutron stars with extreme mass. For a typical neutron star with mass of 1-2 M sun , we further explore the cross-field current effects, caused by the mass loading, on the possibility of stored magnetic field energy exceeding the Aly-Sturrock threshold.

  12. Electron-cloud build-up in hadron machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    ,17]. In this article we focus on the mechanisms of electron-cloud buildup and dissipation for hadronic beams, particularly those with very long, intense, bunches

  13. Opacity Build-up in Impulsive Relativistic Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granot, Jonathan; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Silva, Eduardo do Couto e

    2007-01-01

    Opacity effects in relativistic sources of high-energy gamma-rays, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or Blazars, can probe the Lorentz factor of the outflow as well as the distance of the emission site from the source, and thus help constrain the composition of the outflow (protons, pairs, magnetic field) and the emission mechanism. Most previous works consider the opacity in steady state. Here we study the effects of the time dependence of the opacity to pair production (γγ → e + e - ) in an impulsive relativistic source, which may be relevant for the prompt gamma-ray emission in GRBs or flares in Blazars. We present a simple, yet rich, semi-analytic model for the time and energy dependence of the optical depth, τγγ, in which a thin spherical shell expands ultra-relativistically and emits isotropically in its own rest frame over a finite range of radii, R 0 (le) R (le) R 0 +ΔR. This is particularly relevant for GRB internal shocks. We find that in an impulsive source (ΔR ∼ 0 ), while the instantaneous spectrum (which is typically hard to measure due to poor photon statistics) has an exponential cutoff above the photon energy (var e psilon)1(T) where tγγ((var e psilon)1) = 1, the time integrated spectrum (which is easier to measure) has a power-law high-energy tail above the photon energy (var e psilon)1* ∼ (var e psilon)1(ΔT) where ΔT is the duration of the emission episode. Furthermore, photons with energies (var e psilon) > (var e psilon)1* are expected to arrive mainly near the onset of the spike in the light curve or flare, which corresponds to the short emission episode. This arises since in such impulsive sources it takes time to build-up the (target) photon field, and thus the optical depth τγγ((var e psilon)) initially increases with time and (var e psilon)1(T) correspondingly decreases with time, so that photons of energy (var e psilon) > (var e psilon)1* are able to escape the source mainly very early on while (var e psilon)1(T) > (var

  14. History matching of transient pressure build-up in a simulation model using adjoint method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajala, I.; Haekal, Rachmat; Ganzer, L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Almuallim, H. [Firmsoft Technologies, Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Schulze-Riegert, R. [SPT Group GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work is the efficient and computer-assisted history-matching of pressure build-up and pressure derivatives by small modification to reservoir rock properties on a grid by grid level. (orig.)

  15. The build-up and characterization of nuclear burn-up wave in a fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Anoop

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... evaluating the quality of the wave by the researchers working in the field of nuclear burn-up wave build-up and propagation. Keywords. ... However, there are concerns relating to the nuclear safety, ... Simulation studies have.

  16. Development and buildup of a biomass by various yeasts on whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalashka, L S; Samtsevich, S A; Bakunowicz, L

    1967-01-01

    Of the 113 strains of yeast grown on whey, 29 assimilated lactose by fermentation and 23 by direct souring. The most productive were Candida humicola and C. curvata. The buildup of biomass averaged 18 to 30 g./1. medium.

  17. Analysis of the build-up of semi and non volatile organic compounds on urban roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna

    2011-04-01

    Vehicular traffic in urban areas may adversely affect urban water quality through the build-up of traffic generated semi and non volatile organic compounds (SVOCs and NVOCs) on road surfaces. The characterisation of the build-up processes is the key to developing mitigation measures for the removal of such pollutants from urban stormwater. An in-depth analysis of the build-up of SVOCs and NVOCs was undertaken in the Gold Coast region in Australia. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multicriteria Decision tools such as PROMETHEE and GAIA were employed to understand the SVOC and NVOC build-up under combined traffic scenarios of low, moderate, and high traffic in different land uses. It was found that congestion in the commercial areas and use of lubricants and motor oils in the industrial areas were the main sources of SVOCs and NVOCs on urban roads, respectively. The contribution from residential areas to the build-up of such pollutants was hardly noticeable. It was also revealed through this investigation that the target SVOCs and NVOCs were mainly attached to particulate fractions of 75-300 μm whilst the redistribution of coarse fractions due to vehicle activity mainly occurred in the >300 μm size range. Lastly, under combined traffic scenario, moderate traffic with average daily traffic ranging from 2300 to 5900 and average congestion of 0.47 were found to dominate SVOC and NVOC build-up on roads. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of contamination-free build-up for 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, CH.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental verification of the difference between absorbed dose in tissue and the collision fraction of kerma requires precise knowledge of the absorbed dose curve, particularly in the build-up and build-down regions. A simple method from direct measurement of contamination-free build-up for 60 Co, which should also be applicable for most of the photon energies commonly employed for treatment, is presented. It is shown that the contribution from air-scattered electrons to the surface dose may be removed by extrapolating measurements of build-up to zero field size. The remaining contribution to contamination from the collimators and other source-related hardware may be minimised by measuring these build-up curves sufficiently far from the source. These results were tested by measuring the build-up using a magnet to sweep scattered electrons from the primary photon beam and by measuring the surface dose in the limit of an evacuated beam path. The relative dose at zero depth in polystyrene was found to be approximately 8.9+-0.3% of the dose at the depth of maximum build-up. (author)

  19. Understanding the build-up of SMBH and Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Francisco; Georgakakis, Antonis; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akylas, Thanassis; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Castello, N.

    2015-09-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  20. An Inverse Function Least Square Fitting Approach of the Buildup Factor for Radiation Shielding Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Alkhatee, Sari; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Dose absorption and energy absorption buildup factors are widely used in the shielding analysis. The dose rate of the medium is main concern in the dose buildup factor, however energy absorption is an important parameter in the energy buildup factors. ANSI/ANS-6.4.3-1991 standard data is widely used based on interpolation and extrapolation by means of an approximation method. Recently, Yoshida's geometric progression (GP) formulae are also popular and it is already implemented in QAD code. In the QAD code, two buildup factors are notated as DOSE for standard air exposure response and ENG for the response of the energy absorbed in the material itself. In this paper, a new least square fitting method is suggested to obtain a reliable buildup factors proposed since 1991. Total 4 datasets of air exposure buildup factors are used for evaluation including ANSI/ANS-6.4.3-1991, Taylor, Berger, and GP data. The standard deviation of the fitted data are analyzed based on the results. A new reverse least square fitting method is proposed in this study in order to reduce the fitting uncertainties. It adapts an inverse function rather than the original function by the distribution slope of dataset. Some quantitative comparisons are provided for concrete and lead in this paper, too. This study is focused on the least square fitting of existing buildup factors to be utilized in the point-kernel code for radiation shielding analysis. The inverse least square fitting method is suggested to obtain more reliable results of concave shaped dataset such as concrete. In the concrete case, the variance and residue are decreased significantly, too. However, the convex shaped case of lead can be applied to the usual least square fitting method. In the future, more datasets will be tested by using the least square fitting. And the fitted data could be implemented to the existing point-kernel codes.

  1. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  2. A model for the build-up of disordered material in ion bombarded Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    A new model based on experimental observation is developed for the build-up of disordered material in ion bombarded silicon. The model assumes that disordered zones are created in a background of migrating point defects, these zones then act as neutral sinks for such defects which interact with the zones and cause recrystallization. A simple steady state rate theory is developed to describe the build-up of disordered material with ion dose as a function of temperature. In general the theory predicts two distinct behaviour patterns depending on the temperature and the ion mass, namely a linear build-up with dose to complete disorder for heavy bombarding ions and a build-up to saturation at a relatively low level for light ions such as protons. However, in some special circumstances a transition region is predicted where the build-up of disorder approximately follows a (dose)sup(1/2) relationship before reverting to a linear behaviour at high dose. (author)

  3. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse

  4. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, An [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Cooperative Research and Education Centre for Environmental Technology, Kyoto University–Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Guan, Yuntao, E-mail: guanyt@tsinghua.edu.cn [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse.

  5. Exposure Buildup Factors for Heavy Metal Oxide Glass: A Radiation Shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manonara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray exposure buildup factors for three Heavy Metal Oxide (HMO) glass systems, viz. PbO-Bi2O3-B2O3, PbO-B2O3, and Bi2O3-B2O3 glasses are presented. The computations were done by interpolation method using the Geometric Progression fitting formula and ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 library for the energy ran...... of graphs. Buildup factors of these HMO glasses cannot be found in any standard database, but they are useful for practical calculations in gamma ray shield designs, and they also, help to determine and control the thickness of the shielding material used.......Gamma ray exposure buildup factors for three Heavy Metal Oxide (HMO) glass systems, viz. PbO-Bi2O3-B2O3, PbO-B2O3, and Bi2O3-B2O3 glasses are presented. The computations were done by interpolation method using the Geometric Progression fitting formula and ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 library for the energy range...... from 0.015 to 15 MeV, up to penetration depths of 40 mfp (mean free path). The buildup factors have been studied as functions of incident photon energy and penetration depth. The variations in the buildup factor, for all the glass systems, in different energy regions; have been presented in the form...

  6. Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, B.; Carlson, A.; Leach N.; Thangavelu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Economically viable and reliable building systems and tool sets are being sought, examined and tested for extraterrestrial infrastructure buildup. This project focused on a unique architecture weaving the robotic building construction technology with designs for assisting rapid buildup of initial operational capability Lunar and Martian bases. The project aimed to study new methodologies to construct certain crucial infrastructure elements in order to evaluate the merits, limitations and feasibility of adapting and using such technologies for extraterrestrial application. Current extraterrestrial settlement buildup philosophy holds that in order to minimize the materials needed to be flown in, at great transportation costs, strategies that maximize the use of locally available resources must be adopted. Tools and equipment flown as cargo from Earth are proposed to build required infrastructure to support future missions and settlements on the Moon and Mars.

  7. Build-up of actinides in irradiated fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N

    2001-09-01

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% {sup 235}U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% {sup 235}U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated.

  8. Paleochannel and beach-bar palimpsest topography as initial substrate for coralligenous buildups offshore Venice, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Luigi; Zecchin, Massimo; Franchi, Fulvio; Bergamasco, Andrea; Da Lio, Cristina; Baradello, Luca; Mazzoli, Claudio; Montagna, Paolo; Taviani, Marco; Tagliapietra, Davide; Carol, Eleonora; Franceschini, Gianluca; Giovanardi, Otello; Donnici, Sandra

    2017-05-02

    We provide a model for the genesis of Holocene coralligenous buildups occurring in the northwestern Adriatic Sea offshore Venice at 17-24 m depth. High-resolution geophysical surveys and underwater SCUBA diving reconnaissance revealed meandering shaped morphologies underneath bio-concretionned rocky buildups. These morphologies are inferred to have been inherited from Pleistocene fluvial systems reactivated as tidal channels during the post- Last Glacial Maximum transgression, when the study area was a lagoon protected by a sandy barrier. The lithification of the sandy fossil channel-levee systems is estimated to have occurred at ca. 7 cal. ka BP, likely due to the interaction between marine and less saline fluids related to onshore freshwater discharge at sea through a sealed water-table. The carbonate-cemented sandy layers served as nucleus for subsequent coralligenous buildups growth.

  9. Change in surface SP caused by pressure buildup observed at the Nigorikawa geothermal area; Nigorikawa chiiki ni okeru atsuryoku buildup ji no shizen den`i henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasukawa, K; Yano, Y; Matsushima, N; Ishido, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Takahashi, M; Suzuki, I; Aoyama, K; Kuwano, T

    1996-10-01

    To examine the effect of change of subsurface flow system on the surface SP (self potential), SP measurements were carried out before and after the pressure buildup and drawdown during the periodic inspection at Nigorikawa area. Relation between the SP distribution and the observed data was also examined by 2-D numerical simulation. Tendency was found that the SP increased gradually with the production near the production well, decreased during the pressure buildup, and increased again during the drawdown. There were some points having the reverse tendency in the surrounding area. Behavior during the pressure buildup and drawdown was not clear. The resistivity near the ground surface was low ranging between 2 and 5 ohm/m within the Nigorikawa basin. The variation of SP was not so large when compared with the measuring error. The SP profiles on the secondary section passing in the center of caldera at the production stop and at one week after the production start were well corresponded with the profiles under natural conditions which were reproduces using the 2-D model. It was considered that the SP profile before the production stop was affected by the production. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Modelling heavy metals build-up on urban road surfaces for effective stormwater reuse strategy implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Nian; Zhu, Panfeng; Liu, An

    2017-01-01

    Urban road stormwater is an alternative water resource to mitigate water shortage issues in the worldwide. Heavy metals deposited (build-up) on urban road surface can enter road stormwater runoff, undermining stormwater reuse safety. As heavy metal build-up loads perform high variabilities in terms of spatial distribution and is strongly influenced by surrounding land uses, it is essential to develop an approach to identify hot-spots where stormwater runoff could include high heavy metal concentrations and hence cannot be reused if it is not properly treated. This study developed a robust modelling approach to estimating heavy metal build-up loads on urban roads using land use fractions (representing percentages of land uses within a given area) by an artificial neural network (ANN) model technique. Based on the modelling results, a series of heavy metal load spatial distribution maps and a comprehensive ecological risk map were generated. These maps provided a visualization platform to identify priority areas where the stormwater can be safely reused. Additionally, these maps can be utilized as an urban land use planning tool in the context of effective stormwater reuse strategy implementation. - Highlights: • A model was developed to simulate heavy metal build-up loads on urban roads. • This model is based on artificial neural networks. • Land use fractions was used to model build-up loads on different particle sizes. • The maps of heavy metal spatial distribution and ecological risk were generated. • This model can be used for effective stormwater reuse strategy implementation. - Development of a robust modelling approach to mapping heavy metals build-up and their ecological risks for stormwater reuse safety.

  11. The Effect of Sloshing on a Tank Pressure Build-up Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Banne, Håvard Bolstad

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work has aimed to identify how sloshing will affect a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel tank. The physical nature of LNG means it needs to be kept cooled and pressurized in order to remain in a liquid state. By implementing a pressure build-up unit (PBU) it is possible to pressurize the tank vaporizing the tank’s contents, for the vapour then to return to tank in a loop, building pressure in the process. A tank pressure build-up unit has been built in the laboratory ...

  12. A method of the sensitivity analysis of build-up and decay of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Hiroshi; Koyama, Kinji; Kuroi, Hideo

    1977-07-01

    To make sensitivity analysis of build-up and decay of actinides, mathematical methods related to this problem have been investigated in detail. Application of time-dependent perturbation technique and Bateman method to sensitivity analysis is mainly studied. For the purpose, a basic equation and its adjoint equation for build-up and decay of actinides are systematically solved by introducing Laplace and modified Laplace transforms and their convolution theorems. Then, the mathematical method of sensitivity analyses is formulated by the above technique; its physical significance is also discussed. Finally, application of eigenvalue-method is investigated. Sensitivity coefficients can be directly calculated by this method. (auth.)

  13. Basic principle of constant q/sub a/ current build-up in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, M.

    1985-05-01

    An analytic expression is derived such that the current profile shape is kept constant during the current build-up phase in tokamaks. The required conductivity profile is parametrized by two externally controllable parameters, I/sub p/ and a/sub p/ in the case of the Gaussian current profile. It is shown that a Gaussian current profile can be maintained for a realistically broad conductivity profile by using the constant q/sub a/ current build-up method even under the condition of a high I/sub p/

  14. Pennsylvanian carbonate buildups, Paradox basin: Increasing reserves in heterogeneous, shallow-shelf reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Chidsey, T.C.; Eby, D.E.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer precipitous declines. An important new study focused on the detailed characterization of five separate reservoirs has resulted in significant information relevant to their future redevelopment. Completed assessment of Anasazi field suggests that phylloid algal mounds, the major productive buildup type in this area, consist of ten separate lithotypes and can be described in terms of a two-level reservoir system with an underlying high-permeability mound-core interval overlain by a lower permeability but volumetrically larger supramound (mound capping) interval. Reservoir simulations and related performance predictions indicate that CO2 flooding of these reservoirs should have considerable success in recovering remaining oil reserves.Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer

  15. Effect of heat build-up on carbon emissions in chimato compost piles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine impacts of heat build-up of chimato compost piles TD0, TD20, TD40, TD50, TD60, TD80 and TD100, made by blending maize stalks with 0, 20, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100% Tithonia diversifolia, respectively, on carbon losses and emissions during composting. Compost piles temperatures ...

  16. "Testing during Study Insulates against the Buildup of Proactive Interference": Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, Karl K.; McDermott, Kathleen B.; Roedigger, Henry L., III

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Testing during study insulates against the buildup of proactive interference" by Karl K. Szpunar, Kathleen B. McDermott and Henry L. Roediger III ("Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 2008[Nov], Vol 34[6], 1392-1399). Incorrect figures were printed due to an error in the…

  17. Energy absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials and their tissue equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The generated energy-absorption...

  18. Effect of finite sample dimensions and total scatter acceptance angle on the gamma ray buildup factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sukhpal; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Charanjeet; Thind, Kulwant Singh; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    2008-01-01

    The simultaneous variation of gamma ray buildup factors with absorber thickness (up to 6.5 mfp) and total scatter acceptance angle (which is the sum of incidence and exit beam divergence) in the media of high volume flyash concrete and water was studied experimentally using a point isotropic 137 Cs source

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. Results: An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. Conclusions: The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  20. Effects of Fallow Genealogical Cycles on the Build-up of Nutrients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effect of fallow generational cycles on the buildup of nutrients in the soil. Fallow sequence of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th generations were studied. The quadrat approach of sampling was employed to collect soil samples (surface and subsurface) from five plots of 10m x 10m across the five fallow ...

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-10-01

    A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  2. A study of the energy absorption and exposure buildup factors of some anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekinci, Neslihan; Kavaz, Esra; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    Human radiation exposure is increasing due to radiation development in science and technology. The development of radioprotective agents is important for protecting patients from the side effects of radiotherapy and for protecting the public from unwanted irradiation. Radioprotective agents are used to reduce the damage caused by radiation in healthy tissues. There are several classes of radioprotective compounds that are under investigation. Analgesics and anti-inflammatory compounds are being considered for treating or preventing the effects of damage due to radiation exposure, or for increasing the chance of survival after exposure to a high dose of radiation. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of some analgesic and anti-inflammatory compounds by evaluating buildup factors. The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) were calculated to select compounds in a 0.015–15 MeV energy region up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth elements were also investigated. Significant variations in both EABF and EBF values were observed for several compounds at the moderate energy region. At energies below 0.15 MeV, EABF and EBF values increased with decreasing equivalent atomic number (Z eq ) of the samples. In addition, EABF and EBF were the largest for ibuprofen, aspirin, paracetamol, naproxen and ketoprofen at 0.05 and 0.06 MeV, respectively, and the EABF value was 0.1 MeV for aceclofenac. From these results, we concluded that the buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac compared to other materials. - Highlights: • Buildup factors of anti-inflammatory drugs have been calculated by a G-P fitting method. • Z eff of diclofenac was observed higher than other compounds. • It was found that buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac and diclofenac. • It would be appealing to use aceclofenac and diclofenac as radioprotective

  3. Dose discrepancies in the buildup region and their impact on dose calculations for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Moran, Jean M.; Chen Yu; Kulasekere, Ravi; Roberson, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dose accuracy in the buildup region for radiotherapy treatment planning suffers from challenges in both measurement and calculation. This study investigates the dosimetry in the buildup region at normal and oblique incidences for open and IMRT fields and assesses the quality of the treatment planning calculations. Methods: This study was divided into three parts. First, percent depth doses and profiles (for 5x5, 10x10, 20x20, and 30x30 cm 2 field sizes at 0 deg., 45 deg., and 70 deg. incidences) were measured in the buildup region in Solid Water using an Attix parallel plate chamber and Kodak XV film, respectively. Second, the parameters in the empirical contamination (EC) term of the convolution/superposition (CVSP) calculation algorithm were fitted based on open field measurements. Finally, seven segmental head-and-neck IMRT fields were measured on a flat phantom geometry and compared to calculations using γ and dose-gradient compensation (C) indices to evaluate the impact of residual discrepancies and to assess the adequacy of the contamination term for IMRT fields. Results: Local deviations between measurements and calculations for open fields were within 1% and 4% in the buildup region for normal and oblique incidences, respectively. The C index with 5%/1 mm criteria for IMRT fields ranged from 89% to 99% and from 96% to 98% at 2 mm and 10 cm depths, respectively. The quality of agreement in the buildup region for open and IMRT fields is comparable to that in nonbuildup regions. Conclusions: The added EC term in CVSP was determined to be adequate for both open and IMRT fields. Due to the dependence of calculation accuracy on (1) EC modeling, (2) internal convolution and density grid sizes, (3) implementation details in the algorithm, and (4) the accuracy of measurements used for treatment planning system commissioning, the authors recommend an evaluation of the accuracy of near-surface dose calculations as a part of treatment planning commissioning.

  4. Correlation between Co-60 and X-ray exposures on radiation-induced charge buildup in silicon-on-insulator buried oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Loemker, Rhonda Ann; Draper, Bruce L.; Dodd, Paul E.; Witczak, StevenN C.; Riewe, Leonard Charles; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.-L.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Large differences in charge buildup in SOI buried oxides can result between x-ray and Co-60 irradiations. The effects of bias configuration and substrate type on charge buildup and hardness assurance issues are explored

  5. Exposure buildup factors for a cobalt-60 point isotropic source for single and two layer slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, R.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure buildup factors for point isotropic cobalt-60 sources are calculated by the Monte Carlo method with statistical errors ranging from 1.5 to 7% for 1-5 mean free paths (mfp) thick water and iron single slabs and for 1 and 2 mfp iron layers followed by water layers 1-5 mfp thick. The computations take into account Compton scattering. The Monte Carlo data for single slab geometries are approximated by Geometric Progression formula. Kalos's formula using the calculated single slab buildup factors may be applied to reproduce the data for two-layered slabs. The presented results and discussion may help when choosing the manner in which the radiation field gamma irradiation units will be described. (author)

  6. Calculation of point isotropic buildup factors of gamma rays for water and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. H.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available   Exposure buildup factors for water and lead have been calculated by the Monte-Carlo method for an isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium, using the latest cross secions available on the Internet. The types of interactions considered are ,photoelectric effect, incoherent (or bound-electron Compton. Scattering, coherent (or Rayleigh scattering and pair production. Fluorescence radiations have also been taken into acount for lead. For each material, calculations were made at 10 gamma ray energies in the 40 keV to 10 MeV range and up to penetration depths of 10 mean free paths at each energy point. The results presented in this paper can be considered as modified gamma ray exposure buildup factors and be used in radiation shielding designs.

  7. Energy buildup factor for ICRU 33 sphere surrounded by an air layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiana, G.; Oncescu, M.

    1994-01-01

    The buildup factor due to the air surrounding an ICRU 33 sphere is a desirable quantity in the assessment of the air kerma rate for external exposure to gamma emitters distributed on the ground. A Monte Carlo algorithm has been developed to perform the photon transport calculation within the air layer around the sphere. The energy buildup factor due to the air layer has been calculated for an extended radioactive source - the contaminated ground. The transport of photons within the air layer surrounding a sphere -ICRU 33 phantom - is done by calculating separately the energies deposited by photons into the sphere when this one is in vacuum and when it is surrounded by the air, respectively. The results are given for an air layer of 100 m thickness and photon energy between 0.01 and 3.0 MeV. (Author) 1 Fig., 1 Tab., 9 Refs

  8. Gamma-ray energy absorption and exposure buildup factor studies in some human tissues with endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Dogan, Bekir [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ingec, Metin [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ekinci, Neslihan; Ozdemir, Yueksel [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Human tissues with endometriosis have been analyzed in terms of energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Chemical compositions of the tissue samples were determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Possible conclusions were drawn due to significant variations in EABF and EBF for the selected tissues when photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition changed. Buildup factors so obtained may be of use when the method of choice for treatment of endometriosis is radiotherapy.

  9. Secondary side TSP deposit buildup: lab test investigation focused on electrokinetic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barale, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M., E-mail: Morgan.Barale@areva.com [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre, Le Creusot (France); Ryckelynck, N.; Clinard, M-H.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group, Paris (France); Corredera, G. [Electricite de France, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation, Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-07-01

    Deposit buildup which caused the clogging of the 'foils' of the upper tube-support-plates (TSP) inside a PWR steam generator of French NPPs in 2006 presents certain similarities with deposits observed in lab tests performed in secondary coolant chemistry at the Technical Centre of AREVA NP in 2002. The mechanism of TSP clogging seems not to present obvious phenomenological links with the fouling of the free span of SG since deposits buildup is quite uniform and is currently related to a surface boiling effect due to the surface heat flux. A specific mechanism could account for TSP clogging. In particular, electrokinetic effects were investigated by EDF-CEIDRE and AREVA NP SAS in the framework of a lab test program started in 2007. The electrokinetic approach is to consider that the coupling of local hydrodynamic and surface electrochemistry could lead to the formation of a very localized and heterogeneous deposit at the leading edge between both TSP and SG tubing material. Electrokinetic effects can lead to the oxidation and/or the precipitation of ferrous ions and to a variation of the electrokinetic potential which can produce strong attraction of iron oxide colloids. These electrokinetic effects are dependent of the T/H and local hydrodynamic conditions and surface electrochemistry explaining. The objective of this EDF-AREVA lab test program is to investigate the role of secondary chemistry coolant (pH, DH, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}, amine, redox) and of the nature of materials (SS, Ni base alloy) on deposit buildup. Properties of oxide surface and zeta potential of oxidized metallic materials have been also determined at temperature to understand their potential contribution on mechanism of TSP clogging in secondary side chemistry coolant. In this paper, a set of specific experiments carried out in this frame have been presented and discussed, paying particular attention to the effects of electrokinetic considerations and surface charges at oxide

  10. Effect of tungsten-187 in primary coolant on dose rate build-up in Vandellos 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Lillo, E.; Llovet, R.; Boronat, M.

    1994-01-01

    The present work proposes a relationship between the Cobalt-60 piping deposited activity and the relatively high levels of Tungsten-187 in the coolant of Vandellos 2. The conclusions of this work can be applicable to other plants, since it proposes a tool to estimate and quantify the contribution of stellite to the generation of Cobalt-60 and the radiation dose build-up. (authors). 7 figs., 6 refs

  11. Secondary side TSP deposit buildup: lab test investigation focused on electrokinetic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M.; Ryckelynck, N.; Clinard, M-H.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C.; Corredera, G.

    2010-01-01

    Deposit buildup which caused the clogging of the 'foils' of the upper tube-support-plates (TSP) inside a PWR steam generator of French NPPs in 2006 presents certain similarities with deposits observed in lab tests performed in secondary coolant chemistry at the Technical Centre of AREVA NP in 2002. The mechanism of TSP clogging seems not to present obvious phenomenological links with the fouling of the free span of SG since deposits buildup is quite uniform and is currently related to a surface boiling effect due to the surface heat flux. A specific mechanism could account for TSP clogging. In particular, electrokinetic effects were investigated by EDF-CEIDRE and AREVA NP SAS in the framework of a lab test program started in 2007. The electrokinetic approach is to consider that the coupling of local hydrodynamic and surface electrochemistry could lead to the formation of a very localized and heterogeneous deposit at the leading edge between both TSP and SG tubing material. Electrokinetic effects can lead to the oxidation and/or the precipitation of ferrous ions and to a variation of the electrokinetic potential which can produce strong attraction of iron oxide colloids. These electrokinetic effects are dependent of the T/H and local hydrodynamic conditions and surface electrochemistry explaining. The objective of this EDF-AREVA lab test program is to investigate the role of secondary chemistry coolant (pH, DH, N 2 H 4 , amine, redox) and of the nature of materials (SS, Ni base alloy) on deposit buildup. Properties of oxide surface and zeta potential of oxidized metallic materials have been also determined at temperature to understand their potential contribution on mechanism of TSP clogging in secondary side chemistry coolant. In this paper, a set of specific experiments carried out in this frame have been presented and discussed, paying particular attention to the effects of electrokinetic considerations and surface charges at oxide-solution interfaces

  12. Build-up dynamics of heavy metals deposited on impermeable urban surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A; O'Sullivan, A

    2012-12-30

    A method using thin boards (3 cm thick, 0.56 m(2)) comprising different paving materials typically used in urban environments (2 asphalt types and concrete) was employed to specifically investigate air-borne deposition dynamics of TSS, zinc, copper and lead. Boards were exposed at an urban car park near vehicular traffic to determine the rate of contaminant build-up over a 13-day dry period. Concentration profiles from simulated rainfall wash-off were used to determine contaminant yields at different antecedent dry days. Maximum contaminant yields after 13 days of exposure were 2.7 kg ha(-1) for TSS, 35 g ha(-1) zinc, 2.3 g ha(-1) copper and 0.4 g ha(-1) lead. Accumulation of all contaminants increased over the first week and levelled off thereafter, supporting theoretical assumptions that contaminant accumulation on impervious surfaces asymptotically approaches a maximum. Comparison of different surface types showed approximately four times higher zinc concentrations in runoff from asphalt surfaces and two times higher TSS concentrations in runoff from concrete, which is attributed to different physical and chemical compositions of the pavement types. Contaminant build-up and wash-off behaviours were modelled using exponential and saturation functions commonly applied in the US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM) showing good correlation between measured and modelled concentrations. Maximum build-up, half-saturation time, build-up rate constants and wash-off coefficients, necessary for stormwater contaminant modelling, were determined for the four contaminants studied. These parameters are required to model contaminant concentrations in urban runoff assisting in stormwater management decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutron Buildup Factors Calculation for Support Vector Regression Application in Shielding Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckic, P.; Matijevic, M.; Grgic, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper initial set of data for neutron buildup factors determination using Support Vector Regression (SVR) method is prepared. The performance of SVR technique strongly depends on the quality of information used for model training. Thus it is very important to provide representable data to the SVR. SVR is a supervised type of learning so it demands data in the input/output form. In the case of neutron buildup factors estimation, the input parameters are the incident neutron energy, shielding thickness and shielding material and the output parameter is the neutron buildup factor value. So far the initial sets of data for different shielding configurations have been obtained using SCALE4.4 sequence SAS3. However, this results were obtained using group constants, thus the incident neutron energy was determined as the average value for each energy group. Obtained this way, the data provided to the SVR are fewer and therefore insufficient. More valuable information is obtained using SCALE6.2beta5 sequence MAVRIC which can perform calculations for the explicit incident neutron energy, which leads to greater maneuvering possibilities when active learning measures are employed, and consequently improves the quality of the developed SVR model.(author).

  14. Planar imaging quantification using 3D attenuation correction data and Monte Carlo simulated buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.; Filipow, L.; Jackson, S.; Riauka, T.

    1996-01-01

    A new method to correct for attenuation and the buildup of scatter in planar imaging quantification is presented. The method is based on the combined use of 3D density information provided by computed tomography to correct for attenuation and the application of Monte Carlo simulated buildup factors to correct for buildup in the projection pixels. CT and nuclear medicine images were obtained for a purpose-built nonhomogeneous phantom that models the human anatomy in the thoracic and abdominal regions. The CT transverse slices of the phantom were converted to a set of consecutive density maps. An algorithm was developed that projects the 3D information contained in the set of density maps to create opposing pairs of accurate 2D correction maps that were subsequently applied to planar images acquired from a dual-head gamma camera. A comparison of results obtained by the new method and the geometric mean approach based on published techniques is presented for some of the source arrangements used. Excellent results were obtained for various source - phantom configurations used to evaluate the method. Activity quantification of a line source at most locations in the nonhomogeneous phantom produced errors of less than 2%. Additionally, knowledge of the actual source depth is not required for accurate activity quantification. Quantification of volume sources placed in foam, Perspex and aluminium produced errors of less than 7% for the abdominal and thoracic configurations of the phantom. (author)

  15. Modelling heavy metals build-up on urban road surfaces for effective stormwater reuse strategy implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nian; Zhu, Panfeng; Liu, An

    2017-12-01

    Urban road stormwater is an alternative water resource to mitigate water shortage issues in the worldwide. Heavy metals deposited (build-up) on urban road surface can enter road stormwater runoff, undermining stormwater reuse safety. As heavy metal build-up loads perform high variabilities in terms of spatial distribution and is strongly influenced by surrounding land uses, it is essential to develop an approach to identify hot-spots where stormwater runoff could include high heavy metal concentrations and hence cannot be reused if it is not properly treated. This study developed a robust modelling approach to estimating heavy metal build-up loads on urban roads using land use fractions (representing percentages of land uses within a given area) by an artificial neural network (ANN) model technique. Based on the modelling results, a series of heavy metal load spatial distribution maps and a comprehensive ecological risk map were generated. These maps provided a visualization platform to identify priority areas where the stormwater can be safely reused. Additionally, these maps can be utilized as an urban land use planning tool in the context of effective stormwater reuse strategy implementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Processing ultrasonic inspection data from multiple scan patterns for turbine rotor weld build-up evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuefei; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub; Abbasi, Waheed; Zhou, S. Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The study presents a data processing methodology for weld build-up using multiple scan patterns. To achieve an overall high probability of detection for flaws with different orientations, an inspection procedure with three different scan patterns is proposed. The three scan patterns are radial-tangential longitude wave pattern, axial-radial longitude wave pattern, and tangential shear wave pattern. Scientific fusion of the inspection data is implemented using volume reconstruction techniques. The idea is to perform spatial domain forward data mapping for all sampling points. A conservative scheme is employed to handle the case that multiple sampling points are mapped to one grid location. The scheme assigns the maximum value for the grid location to retain the largest equivalent reflector size for the location. The methodology is demonstrated and validated using a realistic ring of weld build-up. Tungsten balls and bars are embedded to the weld build-up during manufacturing process to represent natural flaws. Flat bottomed holes and side drilled holes are installed as artificial flaws. Automatic flaw identification and extraction are demonstrated. Results indicate the inspection procedure with multiple scan patterns can identify all the artificial and natural flaws.

  17. Prediction of moisture migration and pore pressure build-up in concrete at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; England, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of moisture migration and pore pressure build-up in non-uniformly heated concrete is important for safe operation of concrete containment vessels in nuclear power reactors and for assessing the behaviour of fire-exposed concrete structures. (1) Changes in moisture content distribution in a concrete containment vessel during long-term operation should be investigated, since the durability and radiation shielding ability of concrete are strongly influenced by its moisture content. (2) The pressure build-up in a concrete containment vessel in a postulated accident should be evaluated in order to determine whether a venting system is necessary between liner and concrete to relieve the pore pressure. (3) When concrete is subjected to rapid heating during a fire, the concrete can suffer from spalling due to pressure build-up in the concrete pores. This paper presents a mathematical and computational model for predicting changes in temperature, moisture content and pore pressure in concrete at elevated temperatures. A pair of differential equations for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in concrete are derived from the conservation of energy and mass, and take into account the temperature-dependent release of gel water and chemically bound water due to dehydration. These equations are numerically solved by the finite difference method. In the numerical analysis, the pressure, density and dynamic viscosity of water in the concrete pores are calculated explicitly from a set of formulated equations. The numerical analysis results are compared with two different sets of experimental data: (a) long-term (531 days) moisture migration test under a steady-state temperature of 200 deg. C, and (b) short-term (114 min) pressure build-up test under transient heating. These experiments were performed to investigate the moisture migration and pressure build-up in the concrete wall of a reactor containment vessel at high temperatures. The former experiment simulated

  18. Layer-splitting technique for testing the recursive scheme for multilayer shields gamma ray buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhatib, Sari F.; Park, Chang Je; Jeong, Hae Yong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple formalism is suggested for the recursive approach and then it is used to produce buildup factors for certain multilayer shields. • The newly layer-splitting technique is implemented on the studied cases for testing the suggested formalism performance. • The buildup factors are generated using cubic polynomial fitting functions that are produced based on previous well-acknowledge data. - Abstract: This study illustrates the implementation of the newly suggested layer-splitting testing technique. This technique is introduced in order to be implemented in examining suggested formalisms for the recursive scheme (or iterative scheme). The recursive scheme is a concept used in treating and producing the gamma ray buildup factors in the case of multilayer shields. The layer-splitting technique simply enforces the scheme to treat a single layer of one material as two separated layers with similar characteristics. Thus it subjects the scheme to an abnormal definition of the multilayer shield that will test its performance in treating the successive layers. Thus, it will act as a method of verification for the approximations and assumptions taken in consideration. A simple formalism was suggested for the recursive scheme then the splitting technique was implemented on it. The results of implementing both the suggested formalism and the splitting technique are then illustrated and discussed. Throughout this study, cubic polynomial fitting functions were used to generate the data of buildup factors for the basic single-media that constitute the multilayer shields understudy. This study is limited to the cases of multiple shields consisting of repeated consecutive thin layers of lead–water and iron–water shields for 1 MeV gamma rays. The produced results of the buildup factor values through the implementation of the suggested formalism showed good consistency with the Monte Carlo simulation results of Lin and Jiang work. In the implementation of

  19. Variation of energy absorption buildup factors with incident photon energy and penetration depth for some commonly used solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Parjit S.; Singh, Tejbir; Kaur, Paramjeet

    2008-01-01

    G.P. fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption buildup factor of some commonly used solvents such as acetonitrile (C 4 H 3 N), butanol (C 4 H 9 OH), chlorobenzene (C 6 H 5 Cl), diethyl ether (C 4 H 10 O), ethanol (C 2 H 5 OH), methanol (CH 3 OH), propanol (C 3 H 7 OH) and water (H 2 O) for the wide energy range (0.015-15.0 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 10 mean free path. The variation of energy absorption buildup factor with chemical composition as well as incident photon energy for the selected solvents has been studied. It has been observed that the maximum value of energy absorption buildup factors shifts to the slightly higher incident photon energy with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the solvent and the solvent with least equivalent atomic number possesses the maximum value of energy absorption buildup factor

  20. Document turn-over analysis to determine need of NPP construction in build-up structures of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojpe, D.K.; Lyubavin, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Document turn-over to determine used of NPP construction in build-up structures of reinforced concrete is carried out. Ways of improving determination of needs of NPP construction board in the mentioned structures are pointed out

  1. Uncertainty analysis of pollutant build-up modelling based on a Bayesian weighted least squares approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Khaled; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Rahman, Ataur; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-01-01

    Reliable pollutant build-up prediction plays a critical role in the accuracy of urban stormwater quality modelling outcomes. However, water quality data collection is resource demanding compared to streamflow data monitoring, where a greater quantity of data is generally available. Consequently, available water quality datasets span only relatively short time scales unlike water quantity data. Therefore, the ability to take due consideration of the variability associated with pollutant processes and natural phenomena is constrained. This in turn gives rise to uncertainty in the modelling outcomes as research has shown that pollutant loadings on catchment surfaces and rainfall within an area can vary considerably over space and time scales. Therefore, the assessment of model uncertainty is an essential element of informed decision making in urban stormwater management. This paper presents the application of a range of regression approaches such as ordinary least squares regression, weighted least squares regression and Bayesian weighted least squares regression for the estimation of uncertainty associated with pollutant build-up prediction using limited datasets. The study outcomes confirmed that the use of ordinary least squares regression with fixed model inputs and limited observational data may not provide realistic estimates. The stochastic nature of the dependent and independent variables need to be taken into consideration in pollutant build-up prediction. It was found that the use of the Bayesian approach along with the Monte Carlo simulation technique provides a powerful tool, which attempts to make the best use of the available knowledge in prediction and thereby presents a practical solution to counteract the limitations which are otherwise imposed on water quality modelling. - Highlights: ► Water quality data spans short time scales leading to significant model uncertainty. ► Assessment of uncertainty essential for informed decision making in water

  2. Fusion-product ash buildup in tokamak with radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The buildup of thermalized fusion products (ash) in a tokamak can seriously limit burn times. Prior studies have concentrated on deposition profile effects on alpha particle transport in tokamaks but have not considered the effect on ash of radial electric fields (either created internally, e.g. due to high-energy alpha leakage, or generated externally). The present study focuses on this issue since it appears that electric fields might offer one approach to control of the ash. Approximate field and source profiles are used, based on prior calculations

  3. Optimal Pile Arrangement for Minimizing Excess Pore Water Pressure Build-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Saadati, Meysam; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical analysis of pile group in a liquefiable soil was considered to investigate the influence of pile spacing on excess pore pressure distribution and liquefaction potential. The analysis is conducted using a two-dimensional plain strain finite difference program considering a nonlinear...... constitutive model for sandy soil, strength and stiffness reduction, and pile-soil interaction. The Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model coupled with Byrne pore pressure build-up model have been employed in the analysis. Numerical analysis results show that pile groups have significant influence on the dynamic...... response of sandy soil as they reduce the amount of excess pore pressure development during seismic shaking and may even prevent liquefaction....

  4. The application of the LTSN method in the evaluation of the buildup factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Barbara A.; Borges, Volnei; Zabadal, Jorge R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the LTS N method is used to solve the transport equation for photons in a heterogeneous medium, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel as the scattering differential cross section as well the multigroup model in the wavelength variable. The flux density of photons and the parameters of the medium are used for the calculation of the exposure buildup factor. We present numerical simulations and comparisons with available results in the literature for different compositions containing water, iron and lead. (author)

  5. Radiation Build-Up Of High Energy Gamma In Shielding Of High Atomic Number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuliati, Helfi; Akhadi, Mukhlis

    2000-01-01

    Research to observe effect of radiation build-up factor (b) in iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for high energy gamma shielding from exp.137 Cs (E gamma : 662 keV) and exp.60 Co (E gamma : 1332 keV) sources has been carried out. Research was conducted bt counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI (TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are near to 1 (b∼1) both for Fe and Pb. Without inserting b in calculation, from the experiment it was obtained HVT value of Fe for high gamma radiation of 662 and 1332 keV were : (12,94 n 0,03) mm and (17,33 n 0,01) mm with their deviation standards were 0,2% and 0,06% respectively. Value of HVT for Pb with the same energy were : (6,31 n 0,03) mm and (11,86 n 0,03) mm with their deviation standars were : 0,48% and 0,25% respectively. HVL concept could be applied directly to estimate shielding thickness of high atomic number of high energy gamma radiation, without inserting correction of radiation build-up factor

  6. Radiation Build-Up In Shielding Of Low Activity High Energia Gamma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfi-Yuliati; Mukhlis-Akhadi

    2003-01-01

    Research to observe radiation build-up factor (b) in aluminium (Al), iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for shielding of gamma radiation of high energy from 137 cs (E γ : 662 keV) source and 60 Co (E γ : 1332 keV) of low activity sources has been carried out. Al with Z =13 represent metal of low atomic number, Fe with Z =26 represent metal of medium atomic number, and Pb with Z = 82 represent metal of high atomic number. Low activity source in this research is source which if its dose rate decrease to 3 % of its initial dose rate became safe for the workers. Research was conducted by counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI(TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are close to 1 (b ∼ 1) for all kinds of metals. No radiation build-up factor is required in estimating the shielding thickness from several kinds of metals for low activity of high energy gamma source. (author)

  7. Buildup factors for multilayer shieldings in deterministic methods and their comparison with Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listjak, M.; Slavik, O.; Kubovcova, D.; Vermeersch, F.

    2008-01-01

    In general there are two ways how to calculate effective doses. The first way is by use of deterministic methods like point kernel method which is implemented in Visiplan or Microshield. These kind of calculations are very fast, but they are not very convenient for a complex geometry with shielding composed of more then one material in meaning of result precision. In spite of this that programs are sufficient for ALARA optimisation calculations. On other side there are Monte Carlo methods which can be used for calculations. This way of calculation is quite precise in comparison with reality but calculation time is usually very large. Deterministic method like programs have one disadvantage -usually there is option to choose buildup factor (BUF) only for one material in multilayer stratified slabs shielding calculation problems even if shielding is composed from different materials. In literature there are proposed different formulas for multilayer BUF approximation. Aim of this paper was to examine these different formulas and their comparison with MCNP calculations. At first ware compared results of Visiplan and Microshield. Simple geometry was modelled - point source behind single and double slab shielding. For Build-up calculations was chosen Geometric Progression method (feature of the newest version of Visiplan) because there are lower deviations in comparison with Taylor fitting. (authors)

  8. The future role of reforestation in reducing buildup of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marland, G.

    1993-01-01

    Among the options posed for mitigating the buildup of atmospheric CO 2 is planting new forest areas to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. Among the questions of interest in modeling the global carbon cycle is the extent to which reforestation is likely to succeed in providing physical removal of CO 2 from the atmosphere. There are many strategies for using forest land to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of CO 2 : decreasing the rate at which forests are cleared for other land uses, increasing the density of carbon storage in existing forests, improving the rate and efficiency at which forest products are used in the place of other energy intensive products, substitution of renewable wood fuels for fossil fuels, improved management of forests and agroforestry, and increasing the amount of land in standing forest. Because increasing the area of forests has social, political, and economic limitations; in addition to physical limitations; it is hard to envision a large increase in forest area except where there are associated economic benefits. The authors speculation is that, over the next several decades, the forest strategies most likely to be pursued for the express purpose of CO 2 mitigation are those which provide more or more-efficient substitution of forest products for energy or energy-intensive resources and that the physical accumulation of additional carbon in forests will be of lesser importance

  9. French experience to reduce radiation field build-up and improve nuclear fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazet, J.; Beslu, P.; Noe, M.; Stora, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Over these last years, considerable information has been obtained on primary coolant chemistry, activity build-up and nuclear fuel behavior. As of December 1982, twenty three 900 MWe type reactors were in operation in France and about 1.3 millions of rods had been loaded in power reactors among which six regions of 17x17 fuel assemblies had completed successfully their third cycle of irradiation with a lead assembly burn-up of 37,000 MWd/MtU. Visual examination shows that crud deposited on fuel clads is mostly thin or inexistent. This result is due to the appropriate B/Li coolant concentration control which is currently applied in French reactors since several years. Correlatively, radiation field build-up is minimized and excessive external corrosion has never been observed. Nevertheless for higher coolant temperature plants, where occurrence of nucleate boiling could increase crud deposition, and for load follow and high burn-up operation, an extensive programme is performed jointly by Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Electricite de France, FRAMATOME and FRAGEMA to reduce even more the radiation field. This programme, described in the paper, includes: loop tests; on site chemical and radiochemical surveys; radiation field measurements; on site fuel examination crud-scrapping, crud analysis and oxide thickness measurements; hot cells examination. Some key results are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Quantitative assessment of the effect of corrosion product buildup on occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    The program was developed to provide a method for predicting occupational exposures caused by the deposition of radioactive corrosion products outside the core of the primary system of an operating power reactor. This predictive capability will be useful in forecasting total occupational doses during maintenance, inspection, decontamination, waste treatment, and disposal. In developing a reliable predictive model, a better understanding of the parameters important to corrosion product film formation, corrosion product transport, and corrosion product film removal will be developed. This understanding can lead to new concepts in reactor design to minimize the buildup and transport of radioactive corrosion products or to improve methods of operation. To achieve this goal, three objectives were established to provide: (1) criteria for acceptable coolant sampling procedures and sampling equipment that will provide data which will be used in the model development; (2) a quantitative assessment of the effect of corrosion product deposits on occupational exposure; and (3) a model which describes the influence of flow, temperature, coolant chemistry, construction materials, radiation, and other operating parameters on the transport and buildup of corrosion products

  11. Electron Cloud Buildup Characterization Using Shielded Pickup Measurements and Custom Modeling Code at CESRTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, James A

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experimental program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup, applying various mitigation techniques in custom vacuum chambers. Among these are two 1.1-m-long sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions. These chambers are equipped with pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of small holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. Carbon-coated, TiN-coated and uncoated aluminum chambers have been tested. Electron and positron beams of 2.1, 4.0 and 5.3 GeV with a variety of bunch populations and spacings in steps of 4 and 14 ns have been used. Here we report on results from the ECLOUD modeling code which highlight the sensitivity of these measurements to the physical phenomena determining cloud buildup such as the photoelectron produ...

  12. The evaluation of nylon and polyethylene as build-up material in a neutron therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, J.H.; Binns, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    In high-energy neutron beams a substantial amount of build-up material is required to irradiate biological samples under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. Ideally A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic is used for this purpose. This material is however not always readily available and hence the need for a substitute compound. The selected hydrocarbon should satisfy two requirements: the quality of the radiation on the distal side needs to be the same as that measured for A-150 plastic and the absorbed dose should remain consistent. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter operating at reduced pressure not only measures the absorbed dose accurately but provides a means for assessing the nature of a radiation field in terms of a secondary charged particle spectrum. Using build-up caps manufactured from nylon (type 6) and polyethylene, it is shown that the former is an acceptable substitute for A-150 plastic. The data further demonstrate that both the absorbed dose and the spectral character of the measured single-event distribution are altered when polyethylene is used and that these discrepancies are attributable to the higher hydrogen content of polyethylene. (Author)

  13. Buildup factors for multilayer shieldings in deterministic methods and their comparison with Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listjak, M.; Slavik, O.; Kubovcova, D.; Vermeersch, F.

    2009-01-01

    In general there are two ways how to calculate effective doses. The first way is by use of deterministic methods like point kernel method which is implemented in Visiplan or Microshield. These kind of calculations are very fast, but they are not very convenient for a complex geometry with shielding composed of more then one material in meaning of result precision. In spite of this that programs are sufficient for ALARA optimisation calculations. On other side there are Monte Carlo methods which can be used for calculations. This way of calculation is quite precise in comparison with reality but calculation time is usually very large. Deterministic method like programs have one disadvantage -usually there is option to choose buildup factor (BUF) only for one material in multilayer stratified slabs shielding calculation problems even if shielding is composed from different materials. In literature there are proposed different formulas for multilayer BUF approximation. Aim of this paper was to examine these different formulas and their comparison with MCNP calculations. At first ware compared results of Visiplan and Microshield. Simple geometry was modelled - point source behind single and double slab shielding. For Build-up calculations was chosen Geometric Progression method (feature of the newest version of Visiplan) because there are lower deviations in comparison with Taylor fitting. (authors)

  14. Impact of eccentricity build-up and graveyard disposal Strategies on MEO navigation constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jonas; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Flegel, Sven K.; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Merz, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo, and Chinese BeiDou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For this, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semimajor axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are determining values. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. However, for the MEO region, no internationally agreed mitigation guidelines exist. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvres leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvres are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options exist: disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. In the study performed, the key criterion for the graveyard strategy is that the disposed spacecraft must keep a safe minimum distance to the altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites and disposed GEO payloads. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon. Depending on the initial conditions, these can cause a large eccentricity build-up, which finally can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or

  15. An Empirical Model for Build-Up of Sodium and Calcium Ions in Small Scale Reverse Osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subriyer Nasir

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple models for predicting build-up of solute on membrane surface were formulated in this paper. The experiments were conducted with secondary effluent, groundwater and simulated feed water in small-scale of RO with capacity of 2000 L/d. Feed water used in the experiments contained varying concentrations of sodium, calcium, combined sodium and calcium. In order to study the effect of sodium and calcium ions on membrane performance, experiments with ground water and secondary effluent wastewater were also performed. Build-up of salts on the membrane surface was calculated by measuring concentrations of sodium and calcium ions in feed water permeate and reject streams using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS. Multiple linear regression of natural logarithmic transformation was used to develop the model based on four main parameters that affect the build-up of solute in a small scale of RO namely applied pressure, permeate flux, membrane resistance, and feed concentration. Experimental data obtained in a small scale RO unit were used to develop the empirical model. The predicted values of theoretical build-up of sodium and calcium on membrane surface were found in agreement with experimental data. The deviation in the prediction of build-up of sodium and calcium were found to be 1.4 to 10.47 % and 1.12 to 4.46%, respectively.

  16. Support vector regression model for the estimation of γ-ray buildup factors for multi-layer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, Kresimir; Smuc, Tomislav; Pevec, Dubravko

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy of the point-kernel method, which is a widely used practical tool for γ-ray shielding calculations, strongly depends on the quality and accuracy of buildup factors used in the calculations. Although, buildup factors for single-layer shields comprised of a single material are well known, calculation of buildup factors for stratified shields, each layer comprised of different material or a combination of materials, represent a complex physical problem. Recently, a new compact mathematical model for multi-layer shield buildup factor representation has been suggested for embedding into point-kernel codes thus replacing traditionally generated complex mathematical expressions. The new regression model is based on support vector machines learning technique, which is an extension of Statistical Learning Theory. The paper gives complete description of the novel methodology with results pertaining to realistic engineering multi-layer shielding geometries. The results based on support vector regression machine learning confirm that this approach provides a framework for general, accurate and computationally acceptable multi-layer buildup factor model

  17. Calculation of gamma ray dose buildup factors in water for isotropic point, plane mono directional and line sources using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atak, H.; Celikten, O. S.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma ray dose buildup factors in water for isotropic point, plane mono directional and infinite/finite line sources were calculated using the MCNP code. The buildup factors are determined for gamma ray energies of 1, 2, 3 and 4 Mev and for shield thicknesses of 1, 2, 4 and 7 mean free paths. The calculated buildup factors were then fitted in the Taylor and Berger forms. For the line sources a buildup factor table was also constructed using the Sievert function and the constants in Taylor form derived in this study to compare with the Monte Carlo results. All buildup factors were compared with the tabulated data given in literature. In order to reduce the statistical errors on buildup factors, 'forced collision' option was used in the MCNP calculations.

  18. The Build-Up to Eruptive Solar Events Viewed as the Development of Chiral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. F.; Panasenco, O.; Berger, M. A.; Engvold, O.; Lin, Y.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Srivastava, N.

    2012-12-01

    When we examine the chirality or observed handedness of the chromospheric and coronal structures involved in the long-term build-up to eruptive events, we find that they evolve in very specific ways to form two and only two sets of large-scale chiral systems. Each system contains spatially separated components with both signs of chirality, the upper portion having negative (positive) chirality and the lower part possessing positive (negative) chirality. The components within a system are a filament channel (represented partially by sets of chromospheric fibrils), a filament (if present), a filament cavity, sometimes a sigmoid, and always an overlying arcade of coronal loops. When we view these components as parts of large-scale chiral systems, we more clearly see that it is not the individual components of chiral systems that erupt but rather it is the approximate upper parts of an entire evolving chiral system that erupts. We illustrate the typical pattern of build-up to eruptive solar events first without and then including the chirality in each stage of the build-up. We argue that a complete chiral system has one sign of handedness above the filament spine and the opposite handedness in the barbs and filament channel below the filament spine. If the spine has handedness, the observations favor its having the handedness of the filament cavity and coronal loops above. As the separate components of a chiral system form, we show that the system appears to maintain a balance of right-handed and left-handed features, thus preserving an initial near-zero net helicity. We further argue that the chiral systems allow us to identify key sites of energy transformation and stored energy later dissipated in the form of concurrent CMEs, erupting filaments and solar flares. Each individual chiral system may produce many successive eruptive events above a single filament channel. Because major eruptive events apparently do not occur independent of, or outside of, these unique

  19. Build-up Factor Calculation for Ordinary Concrete, Baryte Concrete and Blast-furnace Slugges Concrete as γ Radiation Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isman MT; Elisabeth Supriatni; Tochrul Binowo

    2002-01-01

    Calculation of build up factor ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast-furnace sludge concrete have been carried out. The calculations have been carried out by dose rate measurement of Cs 137 source before and after passing through shielding. The investigated variables were concrete type, thickness of concrete and relative possession of concrete. Concrete type variables are ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast sludge furnace concrete. The thickness variables were 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 cm. The relative position variables were dose to the source and close to detector. The result showed that concrete type and position did not have significant effect to build-up factor value, while the concrete thickness (r) and the attenuation coefficient (μ) were influenced to the build-up factor. The higher μr value the higher build-up factor value. (author)

  20. Urban nonpoint source pollution buildup and washoff models for simulating storm runoff quality in the Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Wei, Jiahua; Huang, Yuefei; Wang, Guangqian; Maqsood, Imran

    2011-07-01

    Many urban nonpoint source pollution models utilize pollutant buildup and washoff functions to simulate storm runoff quality of urban catchments. In this paper, two urban pollutant washoff load models are derived using pollutant buildup and washoff functions. The first model assumes that there is no residual pollutant after a storm event while the second one assumes that there is always residual pollutant after each storm event. The developed models are calibrated and verified with observed data from an urban catchment in the Los Angeles County. The application results show that the developed model with consideration of residual pollutant is more capable of simulating nonpoint source pollution from urban storm runoff than that without consideration of residual pollutant. For the study area, residual pollutant should be considered in pollutant buildup and washoff functions for simulating urban nonpoint source pollution when the total runoff volume is less than 30 mm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Buildup factor and mechanical properties of high-density cement mixed with crumb rubber and prompt gamma ray study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim-O, P.; Wongsawaeng, D.; Tancharakorn, S.; Sophon, M.

    2017-09-01

    High-density cement mixed with crumb rubber has been studied to be a gamma ray and neutron shielding material, especially for photonuclear reactions that may occur from accelerators where both types of radiation exist. The Buildup factors from gamma ray scattering, prompt and secondary gamma ray emissions from neutron capture and mechanical properties were evaluated. For buildup factor studies, two different geometries were used: narrow beam and broad beam. Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) was carried out to determine the prompt and secondary gamma ray emissions. The compressive strength of samples was evaluated by using compression testing machine which was central point loading crushing test. The results revealed that addition of crumb rubber increased the buildup factor. Gamma ray spectra following PGNAA revealed no prompt or secondary gamma ray emission. Mechanical testing indicated that the compressive strength of the shielding material decreased with increasing volume percentage of crumb rubber.

  2. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary......, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor...... of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Zeff. These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues...

  3. Aesthetic Closure of Maxillary and Mandibular Anterior Spaces Using Direct Composite Resin Build-Ups: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schick Simona-Georgiana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of multiple spaces in the anterior aesthetic zone can produce discomfort for patients and its treatment can be difficult for dental professionals. A variety of treatment options are available and these include orthodontic movement, prosthetic indirect restorations or direct composite resin build-ups. Among these, the closure of interdental spaces using composite build-ups combined with orthodontic treatment is considered to be most conservative. This type of treatment has several advantages like the maximum preservation of tooth substance (no tooth preparation, no need for anesthesia, no multiple time-consuming visits, no provisional restorations and also comparably low costs. Clinical Consideration: This case report describes the clinical restorative procedure of direct composite resin build-ups for the closure of multiple anterior spaces.

  4. The effect of plasma minor-radius expansion in the current build-up phase of a large tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tomofumi; Tazima, Teruhiko; Tani, Keiji; Tamura, Sanae

    1977-03-01

    A plasma simulation code has been developed to study the plasma current build-up process in JT-60. Plasma simulation is made with a model which represents well overall plasma behavior of the present-day tokamaks. The external electric circuit is taken into consideration in simulation calculation. An emphasis is placed on the simulation of minor-radius expansion of the plasma and behavior of neutral particles in the plasma during current build-up. A calculation with typical parameters of JT-60 shows a week skin distribution in the current density and the electron temperature, if the minor radius of the plasma expands with build-up of the plasma current. (auth.)

  5. Interpolation of Gamma-ray buildup Factors for Arbitrary Source Energies in the Vicinity of the K-edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michieli, I.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new buildup factors approximation formula based on the expanded polynomial set (E-P function) was successfully introduced (Michieli 1994.) with the maximum approximation error below 4% throughout the standard data domain. Buildup factors interpolation in E-P function parameters for arbitrary source energies, near the K-edge in lead, was satisfactory. Maximum interpolation error, for lead, lays within 12% what appears to be acceptable for most Point Kernel application. 1991. Harima at. al., showed that, near the K-edge, fluctuation in energy of exposure rate attenuation factors i.e.: D(E)B(E, μ E r)exp(-μ E r), given as a function of penetration depth (r) in ordinary length units (not mfps.), is not nearly as great as that of buildup factors. That phenomenon leads to the recommendation (ANSI/ANS-6.4.3) that interpolations in that energy range should be made in the attenuation factors B(E, μ E r)exp(-μ E r) rather than in the buildup factors alone. In present article, such interpolation approach is investigated by applying it to the attenuation factors in lead, with E-P function representation of exposure buildup factors. Simple form of the E-P function leads to strait calculation of new function parameters for arbitrary source energy near the K-edge and thus allowing the same representation form of buildup factors as in the standard interpolation procedure. results of the interpolation are discussed and compared with those from standard approach. (author)

  6. A modified method of calculating the lateral build-up ratio for small electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyner, E; McCavana, P; McClean, B

    2006-01-01

    This note outlines an improved method of calculating dose per monitor unit values for small electron fields using Khan's lateral build-up ratio (LBR). This modified method obtains the LBR directly from the ratio of measured, surface normalized, electron beam percentage depth dose curves. The LBR calculated using this modified method more accurately accounts for the change in lateral scatter with decreasing field size. The LBR is used along with Khan's dose per monitor unit formula to calculate dose per monitor unit values for a set of small fields. These calculated dose per monitor unit values are compared to measured values to within 3.5% for all circular fields and electron energies examined. The modified method was further tested using a small triangular field. A maximum difference of 4.8% was found. (note)

  7. Internal background build-up measurements in CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasybrahmanyam, V.; Measures, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems associated with the internal background build-up (IBB) of CaF 2 :Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters are reported. As a result of an investigation of batches of the EG and G model 15 dosimeter it is considered that measurements using this type of dosimeter are accurate and reproducible once the IBB has been determined. However, the use of the Manufacturer's claimed average of 0.064 mR/day can lead to erroneous results when determining environmental background dose rates. The authors therefore urge a rigid quality control program by the manufacturer and suggest that purchasers should be supplied with IBB information of each batch of dosimeters. Meanwhile each user should be aware of the IBB problem and be extremely cautious when using these dosimeters for environmental monitoring purposes. (U.K.)

  8. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Frede, Maik

    2009-05-01

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  9. Early-Time Solution of the Horizontal Unconfined Aquifer in the Buildup Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravanis, Elias; Akylas, Evangelos

    2017-10-01

    We derive the early-time solution of the Boussinesq equation for the horizontal unconfined aquifer in the buildup phase under constant recharge and zero inflow. The solution is expressed as a power series of a suitable similarity variable, which is constructed so that to satisfy the boundary conditions at both ends of the aquifer, that is, it is a polynomial approximation of the exact solution. The series turns out to be asymptotic and it is regularized by resummation techniques that are used to define divergent series. The outflow rate in this regime is linear in time, and the (dimensionless) coefficient is calculated to eight significant figures. The local error of the series is quantified by its deviation from satisfying the self-similar Boussinesq equation at every point. The local error turns out to be everywhere positive, hence, so is the integrated error, which in turn quantifies the degree of convergence of the series to the exact solution.

  10. Electron-Cloud Build-up in the FNAL Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade [1] in a fieldfree region at the location of the RFA electron detector [2]. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding measurements obtained with the RFA we infer that the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta) max is ∼> 1.4, and the average electron density is n e ∼> 10 10 m -3 at transition energy for the specific fill pattern and beam intensities defined below. The sensitivity of our results to several variables remains to be explored in order to reach more definitive results. Effects from the electron cloud on the beam are being investigated separately [3

  11. Particle simulation of pedestal buildup and study of pedestal scaling law in a quiescent plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Ku, S.; Weitzner, H.; Groebner, R.; Osborne, T.

    2005-01-01

    A discrete guiding-center particle code XGC (X-point included Guiding Center code) is used to study pedestal buildup and sheared E r formation in a quiescent plasma edge of a diverted tokamak. A neoclassical pedestal scaling law has been deduced, which shows that the density pedestal width is proportional to T i 1/2 M 1/2 /B t where T i is the ion temperature, M is ion mass and B t is the toroidal magnetic field. Dependence on the pedestal density or the poloidal magnetic field is found to be much weaker. Ion temperature pedestal is not as well defined as the density pedestal. Neoclassical electron transport rate, including the collisional heat exchange rate with ions, is too slow to be considered in the time scale of simulation (∼ 10 ms). (author)

  12. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS-A 'light shining through a wall' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehret, Klaus; Frede, Maik; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Hildebrandt, Matthias; Knabbe, Ernst-Axel; Kracht, Dietmar; Lindner, Axel; List, Jenny; Meier, Tobias; Meyer, Niels; Notz, Dieter; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas; Wiedemann, Guenter; Willke, Benno

    2009-01-01

    The ALPS Collaboration runs a 'light shining through a wall' (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into 'weakly interacting sub-eV particles' (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical resonant cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run.

  13. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  14. Variation of energy absorption buildup factors with incident photon energy and penetration depth for some commonly used solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Parjit S. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)], E-mail: dr_parjit@hotmail.com; Singh, Tejbir [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 402 (India); Kaur, Paramjeet [IAS and Allied Services Training Centre, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)

    2008-06-15

    G.P. fitting method has been used to compute energy absorption buildup factor of some commonly used solvents such as acetonitrile (C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N), butanol (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), chlorobenzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Cl), diethyl ether (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O), ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH), methanol (CH{sub 3}OH), propanol (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH) and water (H{sub 2}O) for the wide energy range (0.015-15.0 MeV) up to the penetration depth of 10 mean free path. The variation of energy absorption buildup factor with chemical composition as well as incident photon energy for the selected solvents has been studied. It has been observed that the maximum value of energy absorption buildup factors shifts to the slightly higher incident photon energy with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the solvent and the solvent with least equivalent atomic number possesses the maximum value of energy absorption buildup factor.

  15. Insect Venom Immunotherapy: Analysis of the Safety and Tolerance of 3 Buildup Protocols Frequently Used in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Fernández, D; Moreno-Ancillo, A; Fernández Meléndez, S; Domínguez-Noche, C; Gálvez Ruiz, P; Alfaya Arias, T; Carballada González, F; Alonso Llamazares, A; Marques Amat, L; Vega Castro, A; Antolín Amérigo, D; Cruz Granados, S; Ruiz León, B; Sánchez Morillas, L; Fernández Sánchez, J; Soriano Gomis, V; Borja Segade, J; Dalmau Duch, G; Guspi Bori, R; Miranda Páez, A

    2016-01-01

    Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an effective treatment but not one devoid of risk, as both local and systemic adverse reactions may occur, especially in the initial phases. We compared the tolerance to 3 VIT buildup protocols and analyzed risk factors associated with adverse reactions during this phase. We enrolled 165 patients divided into 3 groups based on the buildup protocol used (3, 4, and 9 weeks). The severity of systemic reactions was evaluated according to the World Allergy Organization model. Results were analyzed using exploratory descriptive statistics, and variables were compared using analysis of variance. Adverse reactions were recorded in 53 patients (32%) (43 local and 10 systemic). Local reactions were immediate in 27 patients (63%) and delayed in 16 (37%). The severity of the local reaction was slight/moderate in 15 patients and severe in 13. Systemic reactions were grade 1-2. No significant association was found between the treatment modality and the onset of local or systemic adverse reactions or the type of local reaction. We only found a statistically significant association between severity of the local reaction and female gender. As for the risk factors associated with systemic reactions during the buildup phase, we found no significant differences in values depending on the protocol used or the insect responsible. The buildup protocols compared proved to be safe and did not differ significantly from one another. In the population studied, patients undergoing the 9-week schedule presented no systemic reactions. Therefore, this protocol can be considered the safest approach.

  16. Extremely rare collapse and build-up of turbulence in stochastic models of transitional wall flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical and theoretical study of multistability in two stochastic models of transitional wall flows. An algorithm dedicated to the computation of rare events is adapted on these two stochastic models. The main focus is placed on a stochastic partial differential equation model proposed by Barkley. Three types of events are computed in a systematic and reproducible manner: (i) the collapse of isolated puffs and domains initially containing their steady turbulent fraction; (ii) the puff splitting; (iii) the build-up of turbulence from the laminar base flow under a noise perturbation of vanishing variance. For build-up events, an extreme realization of the vanishing variance noise pushes the state from the laminar base flow to the most probable germ of turbulence which in turn develops into a full blown puff. For collapse events, the Reynolds number and length ranges of the two regimes of collapse of laminar-turbulent pipes, independent collapse or global collapse of puffs, is determined. The mean first passage time before each event is then systematically computed as a function of the Reynolds number r and pipe length L in the laminar-turbulent coexistence range of Reynolds number. In the case of isolated puffs, the faster-than-linear growth with Reynolds number of the logarithm of mean first passage time T before collapse is separated in two. One finds that ln(T)=A_{p}r-B_{p}, with A_{p} and B_{p} positive. Moreover, A_{p} and B_{p} are affine in the spatial integral of turbulence intensity of the puff, with the same slope. In the case of pipes initially containing the steady turbulent fraction, the length L and Reynolds number r dependence of the mean first passage time T before collapse is also separated. The author finds that T≍exp[L(Ar-B)] with A and B positive. The length and Reynolds number dependence of T are then discussed in view of the large deviations theoretical approaches of the study of mean first passage times and

  17. Extremely rare collapse and build-up of turbulence in stochastic models of transitional wall flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical and theoretical study of multistability in two stochastic models of transitional wall flows. An algorithm dedicated to the computation of rare events is adapted on these two stochastic models. The main focus is placed on a stochastic partial differential equation model proposed by Barkley. Three types of events are computed in a systematic and reproducible manner: (i) the collapse of isolated puffs and domains initially containing their steady turbulent fraction; (ii) the puff splitting; (iii) the build-up of turbulence from the laminar base flow under a noise perturbation of vanishing variance. For build-up events, an extreme realization of the vanishing variance noise pushes the state from the laminar base flow to the most probable germ of turbulence which in turn develops into a full blown puff. For collapse events, the Reynolds number and length ranges of the two regimes of collapse of laminar-turbulent pipes, independent collapse or global collapse of puffs, is determined. The mean first passage time before each event is then systematically computed as a function of the Reynolds number r and pipe length L in the laminar-turbulent coexistence range of Reynolds number. In the case of isolated puffs, the faster-than-linear growth with Reynolds number of the logarithm of mean first passage time T before collapse is separated in two. One finds that ln(T ) =Apr -Bp , with Ap and Bp positive. Moreover, Ap and Bp are affine in the spatial integral of turbulence intensity of the puff, with the same slope. In the case of pipes initially containing the steady turbulent fraction, the length L and Reynolds number r dependence of the mean first passage time T before collapse is also separated. The author finds that T ≍exp[L (A r -B )] with A and B positive. The length and Reynolds number dependence of T are then discussed in view of the large deviations theoretical approaches of the study of mean first passage times and multistability

  18. Impacts of traffic and rainfall characteristics on heavy metals build-up and wash-off from urban roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Kokot, Serge

    2010-12-01

    An investigation into the effects of changes in urban traffic characteristics due to rapid urbanisation and the predicted changes in rainfall characteristics due to climate change on the build-up and wash-off of heavy metals was carried out in Gold Coast, Australia. The study sites encompassed three different urban land uses. Nine heavy metals commonly associated with traffic emissions were selected. The results were interpreted using multivariate data analysis and decision making tools, such as principal component analysis (PCA), fuzzy clustering (FC), PROMETHEE, and GAIA. Initial analyses established high, low, and moderate traffic scenarios as well as low, low to moderate, moderate, high, and extreme rainfall scenarios for build-up and wash-off investigations. GAIA analyses established that moderate to high traffic scenarios could affect the build-up, while moderate to high rainfall scenarios could affect the wash-off of heavy metals under changed conditions. However, in wash-off, metal concentrations in 1-75 μm fraction were found to be independent of the changes to rainfall characteristics. In build-up, high traffic activities in commercial and industrial areas influenced the accumulation of heavy metal concentrations in particulate size range from 75 - >300 μm, whereas metal concentrations in finer size range of 300 μm can be targeted for removal of Ni, Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Zn from build-up, while organic matter from 300 μm can be targeted for removal of Cd, Cr, Pb, and Ni from wash-off. Cu and Zn need to be removed as free ions from most fractions in wash-off.

  19. Uji ketahanan galur padi terhadap wereng coklat biotipe 3 melalui population build-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baehaki Suherlan Effendi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Screening of rice lines resistance to brown planthopper (BPH through mass screening, filtering line resistance and the population build-up are essential for the release of resistant rice varieties. In addition, the stages of the endurance are important in determining the stability of resistance, as well as the type of resistant. The research was carried out in the screen house at Indonesian Center for Rice Research in 2007. The BPH used in the research was the off spring of BPH biotype 3 that had been rearing on IR42 (bph2 variety since 1994. The result of this research showed that 22.2% of 18 lines/varieties were moderately resistant to BPH biotype 3ft namely BP4130-1f-13-3-2*B, BP4188-7f-1-2-2*B, BP2870-4e- Kn-22-2-1-5*B, and Pulut Lewok. On the population build-up test, the above lines/varieties were moderately resistant to BPH biotype 3pb. The low FPLI values were found in BP4130-1f-13-3-2*B and Pulut Lewok. The highest tolerance index was found on BP4130-1f- 13-3-2*B and Pulut Lewok followed by BP2870-4e-Kn-22-2-1-5*B and BP4188-7f-1-2-2*B. Pulut Lewok has the highest antibiosis index and is not significantly different to BP4130-1f-13-3-2*B, while BP4188-7f-1-2-2*B was lowest. Although Pulut Lewok has antibiosis defense mechanism, it is not tolerant to BPH biotype 3. The BP4130-1f-13-3-2*B line have both antibiosis and tolerant to BPH biotype 3. BP4188-7f-1-2-2*B line has tolerance character, but does not have character of antibiosis to BPH biotype 3.

  20. Prediction of wax buildup in 24 inch cold, deep sea oil loading line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.; Sattler, R.E.; Tolonen, W.J.; Pitchford, A.C.

    1981-10-01

    When designing pipelines for cold environments, it is important to know how to predict potential problems due to wax deposition on the pipeline's inner surface. The goal of this work was to determine the rate of wax buildup and the maximum, equlibrium wax thickness for a North Sea field loading line. The experimental techniques and results used to evaluate the waxing potential of the crude oil (B) are described. Also, the theoretic model which was used for predicting the maximum wax deposit thickness in the crude oil (B) loading pipeline at controlled temperatures of 40 F (4.4 C) and 100 F (38 C), is illustrated. Included is a recommendation of a procedure for using hot oil at the end of a tanker loading period in order to dewax the crude oil (B) line. This technique would give maximum heating of the pipeline and should be followed by shutting the hot oil into the pipeline at the end of the loading cycle which will provide a hot oil soaking to help soften existing wax. 14 references.

  1. Shielded button electrodes for time-resolved measurements of electron cloud buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Billing, M.G.; Li, Y.; Palmer, M.A.; Sikora, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded button electrodes sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors, derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design, have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and the lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time steps of 100 ps or more. The fine time steps provide a detailed characterization of the cloud, allowing the independent estimation of processes contributing on differing time scales and providing sensitivity to the characteristic kinetic energies of the electrons making up the cloud. By varying the spacing and population of electron and positron beam bunches, we map the time development of the various cloud production and re-absorption processes. The excellent reproducibility of the measurements also permits the measurement of long-term conditioning of vacuum chamber surfaces

  2. Process and equipment for pressure build-up in nuclear reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, W.F.; Carli, E.V. de.

    1976-01-01

    The equipment makes possible the build-up of inert gas pressure in a filled and closed fuel can, i.e. in a complete fuel rod. Handling is simple, it is suitable for mass production and only causes low processing costs. The quality, e.g. the degree of purity of the contents of the rod, remains unchangedin processing. The equipment consists of a vacuum-tight space, into which the equally vacuum tight fuel rod is introduced, and can be fixed so that its position can be reproduced unmistakeably. The vacuum space contains a connection for the inert gases and a laser arrangement. After inserting a fuel rod into the facility, this is evacuated and the fuel can has a hole bored in it by a laser beam. After fast equalisation of pressure, an inert gas at the required pressure is introduced into the chamber and the fuel rod. After the filling process is completed, the fuel can is closed again with the same laser beam. The quality of the seal obtained, i.e the leak-tightness of the fuel can, can be checked after reduction of the inert gas pressure and before taking out the fuel rod, by repeated evacuation of the chamber. Laser light energies between 13,000 and 110,000 Joule/sq cm are sufficient. Optimum results were obtained for a Zircaloy fuel can with about 52,000 Joule/sq cm. (TK) [de

  3. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer′s recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success.

  4. The Build-Up Course of Visuo-Motor and Audio-Motor Temporal Recalibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimori Sugano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The sensorimotor timing is recalibrated after a brief exposure to a delayed feedback of voluntary actions (temporal recalibration effect: TRE (Heron et al., 2009; Stetson et al., 2006; Sugano et al., 2010. We introduce a new paradigm, namely ‘synchronous tapping’ (ST which allows us to investigate how the TRE builds up during adaptation. In each experimental trial, participants were repeatedly exposed to a constant lag (∼150 ms between their voluntary action (pressing a mouse and a feedback stimulus (a visual flash / an auditory click 10 times. Immediately after that, they performed a ST task with the same stimulus as a pace signal (7 flashes / clicks. A subjective ‘no-delay condition’ (∼50 ms served as control. The TRE manifested itself as a change in the tap-stimulus asynchrony that compensated the exposed lag (eg, after lag adaptation, the tap preceded the stimulus more than in control and built up quickly (∼3–6 trials, ∼23–45 sec in both the visuo- and audio-motor domain. The audio-motor TRE was bigger and built-up faster than the visuo-motor one. To conclude, the TRE is comparable between visuo- and audio-motor domain, though they are slightly different in size and build-up rate.

  5. Kick-Off Point (KOP and End of Buildup (EOB Data Analysis in Trajectory Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novrianti Novrianti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Well X is a development well which is directionally drilled. Directional drilling is choosen because the coordinate target of Well X is above the buffer zone. The directional track plan needs accurate survey calculation in order to make the righ track for directional drilling. There are many survey calculation in directional drilling such as tangential, underbalance, average angle, radius of curvature, and mercury method. Minimum curvature method is used in this directional track plan calculation. This method is used because it gives less error than other method.  Kick-Off Point (KOP and End of Buildup (EOB analysis is done at 200 ft, 400 ft, and 600 ft depth to determine the trajectory design and optimal inclination. The hole problem is also determined in this trajectory track design. Optimal trajectory design determined at 200 ft depth because the inclination below 35º and also already reach the target quite well at 1632.28 ft TVD and 408.16 AHD. The optimal inclination at 200 ft KOP depth because the maximum inclination is 18.87º which is below 35º. Hole problem will occur if the trajectory designed at 600 ft. The problems are stuck pipe and the casing or tubing will not able to bend.

  6. Correction of build-up factor one x-ray hvl measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuliati, Helfi; Akhadi, Mukhlis

    2000-01-01

    Research to obtain the value build-up factor (b) on half value layers (HVL) measurement of diagnostic X-Rays using pocket dosimeter behind aluminium (AI) filter with its thickness vary from 1 to 4 mm. From the measurement it was obtained HVL value of 1.997, 2.596 and 2.718 mmAI for X-Rays of kVp : 80 Kv with 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm filter thickness respectively. HVL value significantly increase with increasing AI filter thickness. Increasing of HVL means increasing filter thickness. From the calculation it was obtained increasing b value relative to 1 mm AI filter of 18.26 and 46% for filter thickness of 2, 3 and 4 mm respectively. Experiment result shows the need of involving b value in HVL calculation of X-Rays if the filter is relatively thick. Calculation of HVL of X-Rays can be carried out with thin layers filter. Key words : x-rays, half value layer, build up factor

  7. Development of fitting methods using geometric progression formulae of gamma-ray buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    The gamma ray buildup factors are represented by an approximation method to speed up calculation using the point attenuation kernel method. The fitting parameters obtained by the GP formula and Taylor's formula are compiled in ANSI/ANS 6.4.3, available without any limitation. The GP formula featured high accuracy but required a high-level fitting technique. Thus the GP formula was divided into a curved line and a part representing the base values and used to develop the a fitting method and X k fitting method. As a result, this methodology showed that (1) when the fitting ranges were identical, there was no change in standard deviation when the unit penetration depth was varied; (2) even with fitting up to 300 mfp, the average standard deviation of 26 materials was 2.9% and acceptable GP parameters were extracted; (3) when the same end points of the fitting were selected and the starting points of fitting were identical with the unit penetration depth, the deviation became smaller with increasing unit penetration depth; and (4) even with the deviation adjusted to the positive side from 0.5 mfp to 300 mfp, the average standard deviation of 26 materials was 5.6%, which was an acceptable value. However, the GP parameters obtained by this methodology cannot be used for direct interpolation using gamma ray energy or materials. (author)

  8. VVER operational experience - effect of preconditioning and primary water chemistry on radioactivity build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.; Kysela, J.; Dudjakova, K.; Martykan, M.; Janesik, J.; Hanus, V.; Marcinsky, P.

    2004-01-01

    The primary coolant technology approaches currently used in VVER units are reviewed and compared with those used in PWR units. Standard and modified water chemistries differing in boron-potassium control are discussed. Preparation of the VVER Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines in the Czech Republic is noted. Operational experience of some VVER units, operated in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, in the field of the primary water chemistry, and radioactivity transport and build-up are presented. In Mochovce and Temelin units, a surface preconditioning (passivation) procedure has been applied during hot functional tests. The main principles of the controlled primary water chemistry applied during the hot functional tests are reviewed and importance of the water chemistry, technological and other relevant parameters is stressed regarding to the quality of the passive layer formed on the primary system surfaces. The first operational experience obtained in the course of beginning of these units operation is presented mainly with respect to the corrosion products coolant and surface activities. Effect of the initial passivation performed during hot functional tests and the primary water chemistry on corrosion products radioactivity level and radiation situation is discussed. (author)

  9. SU-E-T-59: Calculations of Collimator Scatter Factors (Sc) with and Without Custom-Made Build-Up Caps for CyberKnife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokoma, S; Yoon, J; Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, S [Rhode Island Hospital / Warren Alpert Medical, Providence, RI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settings ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps.

  10. Humidity Build-Up in a Typical Electronic Enclosure Exposed to Cycling Conditions and Effect on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    The design of electronic device enclosures plays a major role in determining the humidity build-up inside the device as a response to the varying external humidity. Therefore, the corrosion reliability of electronic devices has direct connection to the enclosure design. This paper describes......, thermal mass, and port/opening size. The effect of the internal humidity build-up on corrosion reliability has been evaluated by measuring the leakage current (LC) on interdigitated test comb patterns, which are precontaminated with sodium chloride and placed inside the enclosure. The results showed...... that the exposure to cycling temperature causes significant change of internal water vapor concentration. The maximum value of humidity reached was a function of the opening size and the presence of thermal mass inside the enclosure. A pumping effect was observed due to cycling temperature, and the increase...

  11. A study of energy and effective atomic number dependence of the exposure build-up factors in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, G.S.; Singh, P.S.; Mudahar, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented to determine the gamma-radiation build-up factors in various biological materials. The gamma energy range is 0.015-15.0 MeV, with penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths considered. The dependence of the exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy and the effective atomic number (Z eff ) has also been assessed. In a practical analysis of dose burden to gamma-irradiated biological materials, the sophistication of Monte Carlo computer techniques would be applied, with associated detailed modelling. However, a feature of the theoretical method presented is its ability to make the consequences of the physics of the scattering process in biological materials more transparent. In addition, it can be quickly employed to give a first-pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed computer study. (author)

  12. Measurement of exposure buildup factors: The influence of scattered photons on gamma-ray attenuation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2018-01-01

    Scattered photon's influence on measured values of attenuation coefficients (μm, cm2g-1) for six low-Z (effective atomic number) building materials, at three photon energies has been estimated. Narrow-beam transmission geometry has been used for the measurements. Samples of commonly used engineering materials (Cements, Clay, Lime-Stone, Plaster of Paris) have been selected for the present study. Standard radioactive sources Cs137 and Co60 have been used for obtaining γ-ray energies 661.66, 1173.24 and 1332.50 keV. The optical thickness (OT) of 0.5 mfp (mean free path) has been found the optimum optical thickness (OOT) for μm-measurement in the selected energy range (661.66-1332.50 keV). The aim of this investigation is to provide neglected information regarding subsistence of scattered photons in narrow beam geometry measurements for low-Z materials. The measurements have been performed for a wide range of sample-thickness (2-26 cm) such that their OT varies between 0.2-3.5 mfp in selected energy range. A computer program (GRIC2-toolkit) has been used for various theoretical computations required in this investigation. It has been concluded that in selected energy-range, good accuracy in μm-measurement of low-Z materials can be achieved by keeping their sample's OT below 0.5 mfp. The exposure buildup factors have been measured with the help of mathematical-model developed in this investigation.

  13. Hydropower build-up and the timber floating in Northern Finland after the Second World War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, N. (Univ. of Oulu, Thule Inst. (Finland)). email: niko.hanninen@oulu.fi

    2009-07-01

    During the Second World War, Finland lost a substantial amount of built and yet un-built hydropower capacity to Soviet Union due to loss of Karelia. The most significant energy user at the time was the forest industry, especially paper and pulp mills, which had to replace this loss and to secure uninterrupted supply of energy in the future; otherwise the industry could not realise their expansion plans. One solution was to harness the still untouched northern waters for the service of the industry and society in large. However, these rivers served already the forest industry in another way, as transport routes in floating of timber. Vast waterways had made the emergence of forest industry in Finland possible. Transportation of timber from distant forests, located more than hundreds of kilometres away from the mills, was possible using rivers and lakes. Especially in Northern Finland the industry had to rely on floating as the railway network was less extensive than in some other parts of the country. The objective of this paper is to study closer, how the emergence of vast hydropower dams in these northern rivers from late 1940's to 1970's changed the transportation of timber. Road transportation in particular could not compete with floating because of their higher costs and the lack of suitable trucks and roads, but this changed after the war. Despite the fact that expanding industries consumed more and more timber, the role of floating decreased. But how did these ratios change during this period? Did the build-up of hydropower plants contribute to this shift of timber transportations from waterways to the land? Salmon and logs did not fit on the same river, the fishermen had to yield in the end. Did the hydropower plants do the same to the floaters

  14. Reducing the rate of carbon dioxide buildup with biomass fuel under climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peart, R.; Curry, R.; Jones, J.; Boote, K.; Allen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have been working for several years on estimating, through crop simulation and crop growth chamber experiments, the changes in yield and in irrigation demand which would be brought about by a doubling of atmospheric greenhouse gases, given the results of three General Circulation Models (GCM) that simulate the climate change that would be expected. They are now beginning to study the impact this might have in relation to biomass fuels. An important question is the effect of the changed climate on crop production, would the increased carbon dioxide concentration outweigh the negative climate change effects on crop yields? Results are quite variable due to different climate change effects at different locations and the differences in historical weather and in soils in different locations. However, on balance, climate change would result in reduced yields of the crops we studied, soybean, maize and peanut. However, US production of these crops could be maintained or increased by the use of irrigation on more acres. Irrigated crops, in general, would have increased yields under climate change because of the increased photosynthetic efficiency with higher carbon dioxide levels. Results on net remediation of carbon dioxide buildup by the use of biomass fuel rather than fossil fuel are not completed, but previous work has shown that Midwest non-irrigated maize production provides much more equivalent biomass energy than is required for its production. The studies with soybean show a ratio of equivalent energy output in the seed to energy used in producing the crop ranging from 4 to almost 9 under climate change

  15. Venom Immunotherapy in High-Risk Patients: The Advantage of the Rush Build-Up Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Yossi; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Goldberg, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is considered to be the gold standard treatment for patients with hymenoptera venom allergy. This treatment induces systemic reactions (SR) in a significant number of patients. To evaluate the outcome of VIT in patients with known risk factors for VIT-induced SR and to compare rush VIT (RVIT) and conventional VIT (CVIT). All of the patients who received VIT and had at least one of the following risk factors were included: current cardiovascular disease, uncontrolled asthma, high basal serum tryptase, current treatment with β-blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and age >70 or bee venom. Thirty-five (54.7%) patients underwent RVIT and 29 CVIT. The incidence of patients who developed SR during the build-up phase was similar for RVIT and CVIT (25.7 and 27.5%, respectively; p = 1). However, the incidence of SR per injection was significantly higher in CVIT than in RVIT (5.6 and 2.75%, respectively; p = 0.01). Most reactions (79.1%) were mild, limited to the skin. Most of the patients (92.1%) reached the full maintenance dose of 100 μg. This dose was reached by a significantly larger number of patients receiving RVIT compared to CVIT (100 and 82.7%, respectively; p = 0.01). None of the patients experienced exacerbation of their concurrent chronic disease during VIT. VIT can be performed safely and efficiently in patients with risk factors for immunotherapy. In these patients RVIT appears to be safer and more efficient than CVIT. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Clinical comparison of various esthetic restorative options for coronal build-up of primary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Duhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare the clinical performance of composite, strip crowns, biological restoration, and composite with stainless steel band when used for the coronal build-up of anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients aged 3-6 years presenting with mutilated primary anterior teeth due to caries or trauma were selected for the study using randomized simple sampling. A total of 52 primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups having 13 teeth in each group. Teeth in Group I were restored with composite, in Group II with strip crowns, in Group III with biologic restoration and with stainless steel band reinforced composite in group IV. The restorations were evaluated for color match, retention, surface texture, and anatomic form according to Ryge′s Direct (US Public Health Service evaluation criteria at baseline (immediate postoperative, after 48 h, 3, 6, and 9 months. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, and level of significance, that is, P value was determined. Results: At baseline, none of the groups showed any color changes. Other than Group III all other groups showed highly significant changes (P 0.05. Deterioration in surface texture was exhibited maximum by restorations in Group IV followed by Group I at 3 months. Whereas, no surface changes were seen in Group II and III. Only Group I and IV showed discontinuity in anatomic form after 3 months. After 6 months, except in Group II, discontinuity in anatomic form was observed in all the groups. Discontinuity in anatomic form was seen in all the 4 groups after 9 months although the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Biological restoration was found to be most satisfying esthetically owing to color compatibility with the patient′s tooth. Thus, it has a great potential to be used as esthetic restorative option in primary anteriors.

  17. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian, E-mail: o.haas@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Petrov, Fedor [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. -- Author-Highlights: •Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. •These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. •Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. •This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  18. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Galvão Arrais

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore®-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore®2, Dentsply Caulk, and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter, and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5. All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37°C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001, regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001. LuxaCore®-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore®2 (p = 0.00001 when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available.

  19. Source term evaluation model for high-level radioactive waste repository with decay chain build-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Manish; Sunny, Faby; Oza, R B

    2016-09-18

    A source term model based on two-component leach flux concept is developed for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The long-lived radionuclides associated with high-level waste may give rise to the build-up of activity because of radioactive decay chains. The ingrowths of progeny are incorporated in the model using Bateman decay chain build-up equations. The model is applied to different radionuclides present in the high-level radioactive waste, which form a part of decay chains (4n to 4n + 3 series), and the activity of the parent and daughter radionuclides leaching out of the waste matrix is estimated. Two cases are considered: one when only parent is present initially in the waste and another where daughters are also initially present in the waste matrix. The incorporation of in situ production of daughter radionuclides in the source is important to carry out realistic estimates. It is shown that the inclusion of decay chain build-up is essential to avoid underestimation of the radiological impact assessment of the repository. The model can be a useful tool for evaluating the source term of the radionuclide transport models used for the radiological impact assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories.

  20. Urban nonpoint source pollution buildup and washoff models for simulating storm runoff quality in the Los Angeles County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Long; Wei Jiahua; Huang Yuefei; Wang Guangqian; Maqsood, Imran

    2011-01-01

    Many urban nonpoint source pollution models utilize pollutant buildup and washoff functions to simulate storm runoff quality of urban catchments. In this paper, two urban pollutant washoff load models are derived using pollutant buildup and washoff functions. The first model assumes that there is no residual pollutant after a storm event while the second one assumes that there is always residual pollutant after each storm event. The developed models are calibrated and verified with observed data from an urban catchment in the Los Angeles County. The application results show that the developed model with consideration of residual pollutant is more capable of simulating nonpoint source pollution from urban storm runoff than that without consideration of residual pollutant. For the study area, residual pollutant should be considered in pollutant buildup and washoff functions for simulating urban nonpoint source pollution when the total runoff volume is less than 30 mm. - Highlights: → An improved urban NPS model was developed. → It performs well in areas where storm events have great temporal variation. → Threshold of total runoff volume for ignoring residual pollutant was determined. - An improved urban NPS model was developed. Threshold of total runoff volume for ignoring residual pollutant was determined.

  1. The effect of different initial densities of nematode (Meloidogyne javanica) on the build-up of Pasteuria penetrans population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darban, Daim Ali; Pathan, Mumtaz Ali; Bhatti, Abdul Ghaffar; Maitelo, Sultan Ahmed

    2005-02-01

    Pasteuria penetrans will build-up faster where there is a high initial nematode density and can suppress root-knot nematode populations in the roots of tomato plants. The effect of different initial densities of nematode (Meloidogyne javanica) (150, 750, 1500, 3000) and P. penetrans infected females (F1, F3) densities (F0=control and AC=absolute control without nematode or P. penetrans inoculum) on the build-up of Pasteuria population was investigated over four crop cycles. Two major points of interest were highlighted. First, that within a confined soil volume, densities of P. penetrans can increase >100 times within 2 or 3 crop cycles. Second, from a relatively small amount of spore inoculum, infection of the host is very high. There were more infected females in the higher P. penetrans doses. The root growth data confirms the greater number of females in the controls particularly at the higher inoculum densities in the third and fourth crops. P. penetrans generally caused the fresh root weights to be higher than those in the control. P. penetrans has shown greater reduction of egg masses per plant at most densities. The effects of different initial densities of M. javanica and P. penetrans on the development of the pest and parasite populations were monitored. And no attempt was made to return the P. penetrans spores to the pots after each crop so the build-up in actual numbers of infected females and spores under natural conditions may be underestimated.

  2. The Influence of Seal Properties on Pressure Buildup and Leakage of Carbon Dioxide from Sequestration Reservoirs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, S. M.; Chabora, E.

    2009-12-01

    The transport properties of seals, namely permeability, relative permeability, and capillary pressure control both migration of carbon dioxide and brine through the seal. Only recently has the the importance of brine migration emerged as key issue in the environmental performance of carbon dioxide sequestration projects. In this study we use numerical simulation to show that brine migration through the seal can be either advantageous or deleterious to the environmental performance of a carbon dioxide sequestration project. Brine migration through the seal can lower the pressure buildup in the storage reservoir, thereby reducing the risk of leakage or geomechanical stresses on the seal. On the other hand, if the seal is penetrated by a permeable fault it can lead to focused flow up a fault, which could lead to brine migration into drinking water aquifers. We also show that as the carbon dioxide plume grows, brine flow undergoes a complex evolution from upward flow to downward flows driven by countercurrent migration of carbon dioxide and brine in the seal and capillary pressure gradients at the base of the seal. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes seals, taking into account both carbon dioxide and brine migration through the seal. In particular, identifying seals that provide an effective capillary barrier to block the flow of carbon dioxide while allowing some brine migration through the seal can help to control pressure buildup and allow more efficient utilization of a sequestration reservoir. This could be particularly important in those settings that may be limited by the maximum allowable pressure buildup.

  3. Forced-air warming design: evaluation of intake filtration, internal microbial buildup, and airborne-contamination emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mike; Kimberger, Oliver; McGovern, Paul D; Albrecht, Mark C

    2013-08-01

    Forced-air warming devices are effective for the prevention of surgical hypothermia. However, these devices intake nonsterile floor-level air, and it is unknown whether they have adequate filtration measures to prevent the internal buildup or emission of microbial contaminants. We rated the intake filtration efficiency of a popular current-generation forced-air warming device (Bair Hugger model 750, Arizant Healthcare) using a monodisperse sodium chloride aerosol in the laboratory. We further sampled 23 forced-air warming devices (same model) in daily hospital use for internal microbial buildup and airborne-contamination emissions via swabbing and particle counting. Laboratory testing found the intake filter to be 63.8% efficient. Swabbing detected microorganisms within 100% of the forced-air warming blowers sampled, with isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci, mold, and micrococci identified. Particle counting showed 96% of forced-air warming blowers to be emitting significant levels of internally generated airborne contaminants out of the hose end. These findings highlight the need for upgraded intake filtration, preferably high-efficiency particulate air filtration (99.97% efficient), on current-generation forced-air warming devices to reduce contamination buildup and emission risks.

  4. The effect of build-up cap materials on the response of an ionization chamber to 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, M.P.O.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the effect of wall and build-up cap materials on ionization chamber response is necessary to determine absorbed dose in a medium using a calibration factor based on exposure or kerma in air. Attenuation and scattering effects of 60 Co gamma rays in the ionization chamber wall and build-up cap, as well as their non-equivalence to air, were studied with an OFS ionization chamber (Delrin wall) and a set of build-up caps specially built for this purpose. Results for a specific material were plotted as functions of wall and cap total thickness, extrapolated to zero wall thickness, then corrected for mean centre of electron production in the wall (= 0.136 g cm -2 ). Correction factors for a specific thickness were analysed in relation to cap material, and to relative responses compared with values calculated by using AAPM, SEFM and IAEA formalisms for cap effects. A Monte Carlo calculation was performed to compare the experimental and theoretical values. Calculations showed an agreement within 0.1% with experimental values and a wall effect of approximately 1.6%. (Author)

  5. A comprehensive study of the energy absorption and exposure buildup factors of different bricks for gamma-rays shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Sayyed

    Full Text Available The present investigation has been performed on different bricks for the purpose of gamma-ray shielding. The values of the mass attenuation coefficient (µ/ρ, energy absorption buildup factor (EABF and exposure buildup factor (EBF were determined and utilized to assess the shielding effectiveness of the bricks under investigation. The mass attenuation coefficients of the selected bricks were calculated theoretically using WinXcom program and compared with MCNPX code. Good agreement between WinXcom and MCNPX results was observed. Furthermore, the EABF and EBF have been discussed as functions of the incident photon energy and penetration depth. It has been found that the EABF and EBF values are very large in the intermediate energy region. The steel slag showed good shielding properties, consequently, this brick is eco-friendly and feasible compared with other types of bricks used for construction. The results in this work should be useful in the construction of effectual shielding against hazardous gamma-rays. Keywords: Brick, Mass attenuation coefficient, Buildup factor, G-P fitting, Radiation shielding

  6. Evaluation of Geometric Progression (GP Buildup Factors using MCNP Codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNP5-1.60

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-O

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gamma-ray buildup factors of three-dimensional point kernel code (QAD-CGGP are re-evaluated by using MCNP codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNPX5-1.60 and ENDF/B-VI.8 photoatomic data, which cover an energy range of 0.015–15 MeV and an iron thickness of 0.5–40 Mean Free Path (MFP. These new data are fitted to the Geometric Progression (GP fitting function and are then compared with ANS standard data equipped with QAD-CGGP. In addition, a simple benchmark calculation was performed to compare the QAD-CGGP results applied with new and existing buildup factors based on the MCNP codes. In the case of the buildup factors of low-energy gamma-rays, new data are evaluated to be about 5% higher than the existing data. In other cases, these new data present a similar trend based on the specific penetration depth, while existing data continuously increase beyond that depth. In a simple benchmark, the calculations using the existing data were slightly underestimated compared to the reference data at a deep penetration depth. On the other hand, the calculations with new data were stabilized with an increasing penetration depth, despite a slight overestimation at a shallow penetration depth.

  7. A One-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Model of Plasma Build-Up in Vacuum Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Timko, H; Kovermann, J; Taborelli, M; Nordlund, K; Descoeudres, A; Schneider, R; Calatroni, S; Matyash, K; Wuensch, W; Hansen, A; Grudiev, A

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of plasma build-up in vacuum arcs is essential in many fields of physics. A one-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulation model is presented, which models the plasma developing from a field emitter tip under electrical breakdown conditions, taking into account the relevant physical phenomena. As a starting point, only an external electric field and an initial enhancement factor of the tip are assumed. General requirements for plasma formation have been identified and formulated in terms of the initial local field and a critical neutral density. The dependence of plasma build-up on tip melting current, the evaporation rate of neutrals and external circuit time constant has been investigated for copper and simulations imply that arcing involves melting currents around 0.5-1 A/mu m(2),evaporation of neutrals to electron field emission ratios in the regime 0.01 - 0.05, plasma build-up timescales in the order of similar to 1 - 10 ns and two different regimes depending on initial ...

  8. Calculation of Buildup Factor for Gamma-ray Exposure in Two Layered Shields Made of Water and Lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saadi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The buildup factor for gamma ray exposure is most useful in calculations for biological protective shields.The buildup factors for gamma ray exposure were calculated in tow layered shields consist of water-lead and lead-water up to optical Thickness 20 mean free path (mfp) at gamma ray energies 1, 2 and 6MeV by using kalos's formula.The program has been designed to work at any atomic number of the attenuating medium, photon energy, slab thickness and and the arrangement of materials.The results obtained in this search leading to the buildup factor for gamma ray exposure at energies (1and2MeV) in lead-water were higher than the reverse case,while at energy 6 MeV the effect was opposite.The calculated data were parameterized by an empirical formula as a function of optical thickness of tow materials.The results obtained were in reasonable agreement with a previous work

  9. Holocene beach buildup and coastal aeolian sand incursions off the Nile littoral cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Shtienberg, Gilad; Porat, Naomi; Bookman, Revital

    2017-04-01

    Israel's coastal plain is abundant with sand originating from the Nile littoral cell. The inland windblown loose sand has formed 3-6 km wide lobe-like sand and dune fields currently comprised of foredunes, linear and northeasterly facing transverse and parabolic dunes that are currently stabilized by vegetation. This study reviews the architecture and history of the these dune fields aiming to: (a) Date the timings of beach accretion, and sand and dune incursions. (b) Discriminate between natural and human-induced forcing factors of sand mobilization and stabilization in time and space. (c) Present a model of the dunescape development. (d) Assess scenarios of sand transport in the future charcaterized by intense human impact and climate change. Luminescence ages, radiocarbon dates and relative ages from previously published geological and archaeological reports, historical texts, together with new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages and stratigraphic and sedimentological data are analyzed. The deposition, mobilizations and preservation of the sand bodies, initially induced by the decline in sea level rise at 6-4 ka, were later controlled by historic land-use intensity and modern land-use/negligence practices. At 6 ka, beach sand buildup rapidly started. Where aeolianite ridges bordered the coast, pulses of sand with biogenic carbonate grains unconformably draped the ridges and rapidly consolidated into a distinct sandy calcarenite unit. Further east, sand sheets and low dunes partly pedogenized following their incursion, but did not cement. The water retention capacities of the sand sheets enabled the establishment of a sand-stabilizing vegetation cover that probably became an attractive environment for fuel and grazing. The growing Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine ( 2.4-1.3 ka) populations probably led to increased consumption and massive destruction of sand stabilizing vegetation, enabling sand erodibility and mobilization during winter storms. The sand

  10. Investigation of human teeth with respect to the photon interaction, energy absorption and buildup factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Sinan [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Endodontic, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of human teeth have been calculated for total photon interaction (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Ne{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) and photon energy absorption (Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Z{sub RW{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}Ne{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) in the energy region 1 keV-20 MeV. Besides, the energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors have been calculated for these samples by using the geometric progression fitting approximation in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path). Wherever possible the results were compared with experiment. Effective atomic numbers (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) of human teeth were calculated using different methods. Discrepancies were noted in Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} between the direct and interpolation methods in the low and high energy regions where absorption processes dominate while good agreement was observed in intermediate energy region where Compton scattering dominates. Significant variations up to 22% were observed between Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} and Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} in the energy region 30-150 keV which is the used energy range in dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) X-ray machines. The Z{sub eff} values of human teeth were found to relatively vary within 1% if different laser treatments are applied. In this variation, the Er:YAG laser treated samples were found to be less effected than Nd:YAG laser treated ones when compared with control group. Relative differences between EABF and EBF were found to be significantly high in the energy region 60 keV-1 MeV even though they have similar variations with respect to the different parameters viz. photon energy, penetration depth.

  11. Influence of Pressure Build-Up Time of Compression Chamber on Improving the Operation Frequency of a Single-Piston Hydraulic Free-Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-bo Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-piston hydraulic free-piston engine with a two-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine as its driver is introduced. It takes the free-piston assembly a certain time to move after the pressure in the compression chamber starts to increase. The time difference between the pressure increasing and the piston starting to move is defined as the pressure build-up time. The characteristics of the pressure build-up time and its influence on the performance of the free-piston engine are introduced and analyzed. Based on the basic law of dynamics of the free-piston assembly, the parameters which influence the pressure build-up time are analyzed. And then improvement and optimization are proposed to shorten the pressure build-up time.

  12. Aphanitic buildup from the onset of the Mulde Event (Homerian, middle Silurian at Whitman's Hill, Herefordshire, UK: ultrastructural insights into proposed microbial fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Filip Päßler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A microbial origin has been proposed for matrix-supported, low-diversity buildups reported from different palaeocontinents during the onset of the Mulde positive carbon isotope excursion. We have investigated a small aphanitic buildup from the Lower Quarried Limestone Member of the Much Wenlock Limestone Formation, exposed at Whitman's Hill (Herefordshire, corresponding to the central part of the Midland Platform (UK. Up to 50% of the rock volume in this buildup consists of mottled micrite. The SEM studies revealed that the micrite is largely detrital and does not show features characteristic of calcareous cyanobacteria or leiolites. The aphanitic character of the buildup is suggested to be controlled by the depositional rate, and the widespread occurrence of matrix-supported reefs in this interval to be driven by a mid-Homerian rapid eustatic transgression.

  13. The effect of electron collimator leaf shape on the build-up dose in narrow electron MLC fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatanen, T; Vaeaenaenen, A; Lahtinen, T; Traneus, E

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have found that the build-up dose from abutting narrow electron beams formed with unfocussed electron multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) steal leaves was higher than with the respective open field. To investigate more closely the effect of leaf material and shape on dose in the build-up region, straight, round (radius 1.5 cm) and leaf ends with a different front face angle of α (leaf front face pointing towards the beam axis at an angle of 90 - α) made of steel, brass and tungsten were modelled using the BEAMnrc code. Based on a treatment head simulation of a Varian 2100 C/D linac, depth-dose curves and profiles in water were calculated for narrow 6, 12 and 20 MeV eMLC beams (width 1.0 cm, length 10 cm) at source-to-surface distances (SSD) of 102 and 105 cm. The effects of leaf material and front face angle were evaluated based on electron fluence, angle and energy spectra. With a leaf front face angle of 15 deg., the dose in the build-up region of the 6 MeV field varied between 91 and 100%, while for straight and round leaf shapes the dose varied between 89 and 100%. The variation was between 94 and 100% for 12 and 20 MeV. For abutting narrow 6 MeV fields with total field size 5 x 10 cm 2 , the build-up doses at 5 mm depth for the face angle 15 deg. and straight and round leaf shapes were 96% and 86% (SSD 102 cm) and 89% and 85% (SSD 105 cm). With higher energies, the effect of eMLC leaf shape on dose at 5 mm was slight (3-4% units with 12 MeV) and marginal with 20 MeV. The fluence, energy and angle spectra for total and leaf scattered electrons were practically the same for different leaf materials with 6 MeV. With high energies, the spectra for tungsten were more peaked due to lower leaf transmission. Compared with straight leaf ends, the face angle of 15 deg. and round leaf ends led to a 1 mm (for 6 MeV) and between 1 and 5 mm (12 and 20 MeV at a SSD of 105 cm) decrease of therapeutic range and increase of the field size, respectively. However

  14. Activity build-up on the circulation loops of boiling water reactors: Basics for modelling of transport and deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covelli, B.; Alder, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    In the past 20 years the radiation field of nuclear power plant loops outside the core zone was the object of investigations in many countries. In this context test loops were built and basic research done. At our Institute PSI the installation of a LWR-contamination loop is planned for this year. This experimental loop has the purpose to investigate the complex phenomena of activity deposition from the primary fluid of reactor plants and to formulate analytical models. From the literature the following conclusions can be drawn: The principal correlations of the activity build-up outside the core are known. The plant specific single phenomena as corrosion, crud-transport, activation and deposit of cobalt in the oxide layer are complex and only partially understood. The operational experience of particular plants with low contaminated loops (BWR-recirculation loops) show that in principle the problem is manageable. The reduction of the activity build-up in older plants necessitates a combination of measures to modify the crud balance in the primary circuit. In parallel to the experimental work several simulation models in the form of computer programs were developed. These models have the common feature that they are based on mass balances, in which the exchange of materials and the sedimentation processes are described by global empirical transport coefficients. These models yield satisfactory results and allow parameter studies; the application however is restricted to the particular installation. All programs lack models that describe the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic mechanisms on the surface of deposition layers. Analytical investigations on fouling of process equipment led to models that are also applicable to the activity build-up in reactor loops. Therefore it seems appropriate to combine the nuclear simulation models with the fundamental equations for deposition. 10 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Understanding the build-up of supermassive black holes and galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Francisco; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Georgakakis, Antonis

    2016-07-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  16. Probing the Build-Up of Quiescent Galaxies at z>3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven

    We propose to perform the most robust investigation to date into the evolution of massive quiescent and star-forming galaxies at z > 3, at a time when the universe was less than two billion years old. The build-up of quiescent galaxies in particular is poorly understood, primarily due to large Poisson and cosmic variance issues that have plagued previous studies that probed small volumes, leading to a disagreement on the quiescent fraction by a factor of >3 in the literature. Our proposed work is only now possible due to a new legacy survey led by our team: the Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large Area Survey (SHELA), which is imaging a 23 deg^2 area of the sky at optical, and near, mid and far-infrared, and X-ray wavelengths. In particular, the wide area coverage of the Spitzer/IRAC data allows us to be sensitive to massive galaxies at very high redshifts, the Herschel data allows us to rule out lower-redshift counterparts, and the XMM-Newton data allows us to remove quasar contaminants from our sample. This survey covers a volume >14X that of the largest previous survey for quiescent galaxies at z=3.5, and ~6X larger than that of the largest previous survey for star-forming galaxies at z=4. All of these data exist in the region soon to be observed by the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), which will provide high-precision measures of halo masses and local density at z~3. Using this exquisite multi-wavelength dataset, we will measure the abundance of massive quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3-5, and, combining with measures of the halo masses and environment, compare properties of quiescent galaxies to star-forming galaxies to investigate the physical cause behind the quenching. We will also investigate the onset of quenching in star-forming galaxies in two ways, first by studying the relation between star formation rate and stellar mass, to search for a break in the typically-linear relation at high masses, and second by constraining the feedback

  17. SU-E-T-104: An Examination of Dose in the Buildup and Build-Down Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, W; Kuo, H; Phillips, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine dose in the buildup and build-down regions and compare measurements made with various models and dosimeters Methods: Dose was examined in a 30×30cm 2 phantom of water-equivalent plastic with 10cm of backscatter for various field sizes. Examination was performed with radiochromic film and optically-stimulated-luminescent-dosimeter (OSLD) chips, and compared against a plane-parallel chamber with a correction factor applied to approximate the response of an extrapolation chamber. For the build-down region, a correction factor to account for table absorption and chamber orientation in the posterior-anterior direction was applied. The measurement depths used for the film were halfway through their sensitive volumes, and a polynomial best fit curve was used to determine the dose to their surfaces. This chamber was also compared with the dose expected in a clinical kernel-based computer model, and a clinical Boltzmann-transport-equation-based (BTE) computer model. The two models were also compared against each other for cases with air gaps in the buildup region. Results: Within 3mm, all dosimeters and models agreed with the chamber within 10% for all field sizes. At the entrance surface, film differed in comparison with the chamber from +90% to +15%, the BTE-model by +140 to +3%, and the kernel-based model by +20% to −25%, decreasing with increasing field size. At the exit surface, film differed in comparison with the chamber from −10% to −15%, the BTE-model by −53% to −50%, the kernel-based model by −55% to −57%, mostly independent of field size. Conclusion: The largest differences compared with the chamber were found at the surface for all field sizes. Differences decreased with increasing field size and increasing depth in phantom. Air gaps in the buildup region cause dose buildup to occur again post-gap, but the effect decreases with increasing phantom thickness prior to the gap

  18. Simulation of Electron-Cloud Build-Up for the Cold Arcs of the LHC and Comparison with Measured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H; Rumolo, G; Tavian, L; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    The electron cloud generated by synchrotron radiation or residual gas ionization is a concern for LHC operation and performance. We report the results of simulations studies which examine the electron cloud build-up, at injection energy, 3.5 TeV for various operation parameters. In particular, we determine the value of the secondary emission yield corresponding to the multipacting threshold, and investigate the electron density, and heat as a function of bunch intensity for dipoles and field-free regions. We also include a comparison between simulations results and measured heat-load data from the LHC scrubbing runs in 2011.

  19. Component build-up method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating the component build-up terms, with the exception of zero-lift drag, for missile airframes in steady flow and at arbitrary angles of attack and bank. The underlying and unifying bases of all these efforts are slender-body theory and its nonlinear extensions through the equivalent angle-of-attack concept. Emphasis is placed on the forces and moments which act on each of the fins, so that control cross-coupling effects as well as longitudinal and lateral-directional effects can be determined.

  20. Role of urban surface roughness in road-deposited sediment build-up and wash-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Jiang, Qian; Xie, Wenxia; Li, Xuyong; Yin, Chengqing

    2018-05-01

    Urban road surface roughness is one of the most important factors in estimation of surface runoff loads caused by road-deposited sediment (RDS) wash-off and design of its control measures. However, because of a lack of experimental data to distinguish the role of surface roughness, the effects of surface roughness on RDS accumulation and release are not clear. In this study, paired asphalt and concrete road surfaces and rainfall simulation designs were used to distinguish the role of surface roughness in RDS build-up and wash-off. Our results showed that typical asphalt surfaces often have higher depression depths than typical concrete surfaces, indicating that asphalt surfaces are relatively rougher than concrete surface. Asphalt surfaces can retain a larger RDS amount, relative higher percentage of coarser particles, larger RDS wash-off loads, and lower wash-off percentage, than concrete surfaces. Surface roughness has different effects in RDS motilities with different particle sizes during rainfall runoff, and the settleable particles (44-149 μm) were notably influenced by it. Furthermore, the first flush phenomenon tended to be greater on relatively smooth surfaces than relatively rough surfaces. Overall, surface roughness plays an important role in influencing the complete process of RDS build-up and wash-off on different road characteristics.

  1. Water chemistry and radiation buildup at the Commonwealth Edison Company LaSalle-1 BWR. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earls, C.E.; Blok, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive study of the water quality and radiation buildup at the LaSalle County Unit 2 boiling warer reactor (BWR). The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of corrosion product inputs from the forward pumped heater drains on overall water quality. Since the drains are pumped into the feedwater line without filtration or demineralization, corrosion products in these streams will directly add to the impurity levels of the final feedwater. At LaSalle, the forward pumped heater drains contributed less to the feedwater impurities, on average, than the effluent of the condensate demineralizer. The feedwater quality at LaSalle was generally in the ''acceptable'' range. Nevertheless, significant water chemistry improvements, especially in reducing the corrosion product spikes associated with power or flow transients, is highly desirable for this plant. Such improvements should begin with a more consistent quality of demineralizer operation. Quantitative gamma scans of the primary system piping at LaSalle 2 were carried out in the course of the water chemistry study. Although the cumulative operational exposure of the plant was relatively limited at the time this study was carried out, the radiation buildup rate did appear to be rapid (in fact, among the most rapid) compared to other similar BWRs

  2. Determination of point isotropic buildup factors of gamma rays including incoherent and coherent scattering for aluminum, iron, lead, and water by discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, S.; Assad, A.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure and energy absorption buildup factors for aluminum, iron, lead, and water are calculated by the SNID discrete ordinates code for an isotropic point source in a homogeneous medium. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the effects of both bound-electron Compton (incoherent) and coherent (Rayleigh) scattering. A comparison with buildup factors from the literature shows that these two effects greatly increase the buildup factors for energies below a few hundred kilo-electron-volts, and thus the new results are improved relative to the experiment. This greater accuracy is due to the increase in the linear attenuation coefficient, which leads to the calculation of the buildup factors for a mean free path with a smaller shield thickness. On the other hand, for the same shield thickness, exposure increases when only incoherent scattering is included and decreases when only coherent scattering is included, so that the exposure finally decreases when both effects are included. Great care must also be taken when checking the approximations for gamma-ray deep-penetration transport calculations, as well as for the cross-section treatment and origin

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karaoui, Mohamed-Karim

    2007-01-01

    X-ray buildup factors of lead in broad beam geometry for energies from 15 to 150 keV are determined using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C). The obtained buildup factors data are fitted to a modified three parameter Archer et al. model for ease in calculating the broad beam transmission with computer at any tube potentials/filters combinations in diagnostic energies range. An example for their use to compute the broad beam transmission at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The calculated broad beam transmission is compared to data derived from literature, presenting good agreement. Therefore, the combination of the buildup factors data as determined and a mathematical model to generate x-ray spectra provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for lead barriers in shielding x-ray facilities

  4. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  5. Modeling of gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials using multilayer perceptron neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Nil; Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, multilayered perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) were presented for the computation of the gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors (BA) of seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials [LiF, BeO, Na2B4O7, CaSO4, Li2B4O7, KMgF3, Ca3(PO4)2] in the energy region 0.015–15Me......V, and for penetration depths up to 10 mfp (mean-free-path). The MLPNNs have been trained by a Levenberg–Marquardt learning algorithm. The developed model is in 99% agreement with the ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 standard data set. Furthermore, the model is fast and does not require tremendous computational efforts. The estimated BA...

  6. Applications of Monte Carlo codes to a study of gamma-ray buildup factors, skyshine and duct streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Many shielding calculations for gamma-rays have continued to rely on point-kernel methods incorporating buildup factor data. Line beam or conical beam response functions, which are calculated using a Monte Carlo code, for skyshine problems are useful to estimate the skyshine dose from various facilities. A simple calculation method for duct streaming was proposed using the parameters calculated by the Monte Carlo code. It is therefore important to study, improve and produce basic parameters related to old, but still important, problems in the fields of radiation shielding using the Monte Carlo code. In this paper, these studies performed by several groups in Japan as applications of the Monte Carlo method are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS-A 'light shining through a wall' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, Klaus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Frede, Maik [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Ghazaryan, Samvel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hildebrandt, Matthias [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Knabbe, Ernst-Axel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kracht, Dietmar [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Lindner, Axel, E-mail: axel.lindner@desy.d [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Meier, Tobias [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert-Einstein-Institute, and Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet, Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Niels; Notz, Dieter; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Wiedemann, Guenter [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Willke, Benno [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert-Einstein-Institute, and Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet, Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-12-21

    The ALPS Collaboration runs a 'light shining through a wall' (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into 'weakly interacting sub-eV particles' (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical resonant cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run.

  8. Evaluation of pollutant build-up and wash-off from selected land uses at the Port of Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Kitchen, Brad

    2009-02-01

    The quality of stormwater runoff from seaports can be an important source of pollution to the marine environment. Currently, little knowledge exists with regards to the pollutant generation capacity specific to seaports as they do not necessarily compare well with conventional urban land use. The research project focussed on the assessment of pollutant build-up and wash-off. The study was undertaken using rainfall simulation and small impervious plots for different port land uses with the results obtained compared to typical urban land uses. The study outcomes confirmed that the Port land uses exhibit comparatively lower pollutant concentrations. However, the pollutant characteristics varied across different land uses. Hence, the provision of stereotypical water quality improvement measures could be of limited value. Particle size < 150microm was predominant in suspended solids. Therefore, if suspended solids are targeted as the surrogate parameter for water quality improvement, this particle size range needs to be removed.

  9. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Frede, Maik [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (DE)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic model for tritium build-up at NPP with RBMK type reactors and its enviromental beraviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyaev, V.V.; Egorov, Yu.A.; Ivanov, E.A.; Stegachev, G.F.; Tolstykh, V.D.

    1982-01-01

    A model of tritium production dynamics for a high power NPP with RBMK type reactors is proposed and investigated. The main ''skeleton'' model structure for forecasting tritium buildup at a NPP and its exchange with the environment has been singled out at a heuristic level. Decomposition and layout of the units have been performed by global functional relations of the investigated objects (NPP and environment). the model accounts for only oxidized tritium forms. Water exchange between the NPP subsystems and environment is the main mechanism for tritium migration. The model does not account for scheduled periodic maintenance work effects, presence of stagnant zones in the station circuits, fuel burn-up, etc. The parametric identification method applied in the model makes the model adaptable to particular situations and considered systems of the NPP and environment. Completing the model with necessary and sufficient experimental data one can pass to certain forecasting problems and to NPP control as a tritium source in the environment

  11. The computation of the build-up of long-lived radioisotopes on the surface of primary circuits and the ion exchange material of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.

    1980-06-01

    The buildup of radionuclides on the surface of the primary circuits and in the ion exchange material is calculated. The computation is made by the computer code 'CRUD'. The buildup is interesting from the viewpoint of nuclear waste. Oskarshamn 2 is chosen as the reference plant. An extrapolation is made for 20 years of operation. Calculation are givin for Mn54, Fe55, Co60, Ni59, Ni63 and Zn65. The constants of deposition and disharge are determined by fitting the values. (G.B.)

  12. Evaluation of surface and build-up region dose for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Heeteak; Jin, Hosang; Dempsey, James F.; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2005-01-01

    Despite much development, there remains dosimetric uncertainty in the surface and build-up regions in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans for head and neck cancers. Experiments were performed to determine the dosimetric discrepancies in the surface and build-up region between the treatment planning system (TPS) prediction and experimental measurement using radiochromic film. A head and neck compression film phantom was constructed from two semicylindrical solid water slabs. Treatment plans were generated using two commercial TPSs (PINNACLE3 and CORVUS) for two cases, one with a shallow (∼0.5 cm depth) target and another with a deep (∼6 cm depth) target. The plans were evaluated for a 54 Gy prescribed dose. For each case, two pieces of radiochromic film were used for dose measurement. A small piece of film strip was placed on the surface and another was inserted within the phantom. Overall, both TPSs showed good agreement with the measurement. For the shallow target case, the dose differences were within ±300 cGy (5.6% with respect to the prescribed dose) for PINNACLE3 and ±240 cGy (4.4%) for CORVUS in 90% of the region of interest. For the deep target case, the dose differences were ±350 (6.5%) for PINNACLE3 and ±260 cGy (4.8%) for CORVUS in 90% of the region of interest. However, it was found that there were significant discrepancies from the surface to about 0.2 cm in depth for both the shallow and deep target cases. It was concluded that both TPSs overestimated the surface dose for both shallow and deep target cases. The amount of overestimation ranges from 400 to 1000 cGy (∼7.4% to 18.5% with respect to the prescribed dose, 5400 cGy)

  13. The rudist buildup depositional model, reservoir architecture and development strategy of the cretaceous Sarvak formation of Southwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the lithofacies, sedimentary facies, depositional models and reservoir architecture of the rudist-bearing Sar-3 zone of Cretaceous Sarvak in the Southwest of Iran by utilizing coring, thin section, XRD data of five coring wells and 3D seismic data. Research results include the following: According to lithofacies features and their association, the rudist-mound and tidal flat are the main microfacies in the Sar-3 depositional time. By investigating the regional tectonic setting and seismic interpretation, a depositional model was built for the Sar-3 zone, which highlights four key points: 1 The distribution of the rudist-buildup is controlled by the paleo-high. 2 The build-up outside of the wide colonize stage but reached the wave-base level in a short time by regression and formation uplift, and was destroyed by the high energy current, then forming the moundy allochthonous deposition after being dispersed and redeposited. 3 The tidal flat develops widely in the upper Sar-3, and the deposition thickness depends on the paleo-structure. The tidal channel develops in the valley and fringe of the Paleo-structure. 4 The exposure within the leaching effect by the meteoric water of the top of Sar-3 is the main controlling factor of the reservoir vertical architecture. The Sar-3 zone featured as the dualistic architecture consists of two regions: the lower is the rudist reef limestone reservoir and the upper is the tidal condense limestone interlayer. The thickness of each is controlled by the paleo-structure. The Paleo-high zone is the preferential development zone. Based on reservoir characteristics of the different zones, a targeted development strategy has been proposed. Keeping the trajectory in the middle of the oil-layer in the paleo-high, and in the paleo-low, make the trajectory crossing the oil-zone and then keep it in the lower.

  14. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A 4-year clinical evaluation of direct composite build-ups for space closure after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Mustafa; Tuncer, Safa; Öztaş, Evren; Tekçe, Neslihan; Uysal, Ömer

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the medium-term clinical performance of direct composite build-ups for diastema closures and teeth recontouring using a nano and a nanohybrid composite in combination with three- or two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives following treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. A total of 30 patients (mean age, 19.5 years) received 147 direct composite additions for teeth recontouring and diastema closures. A nano and a nanohybrid composite (Filtek Supreme XT and CeramX Duo) were bonded to tooth structure by using a three-step (Scotchbond Multipurpose) or a two-step (XP Bond) etch and rinse adhesive. Ten out of 147 composite build-ups (composite addition) constituted tooth recontouring cases, and the remaining 137 constituted diastema closure cases. The restorations were evaluated by two experienced, calibrated examiners according to modified Ryge criteria at the following time intervals: baseline, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years. The 4-year survival rates were 92.8 % for Filtek Supreme XT/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 93 % for CeramX Duo/XP Bond. Only ten restorations failed (5 Filtek Supreme XT and 5 CeramX Duo). Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the two composite-adhesive combinations with respect to color match, marginal discoloration, wear/loss of anatomical form, caries formation, marginal adaptation, and surface texture on comparing the five time periods (baseline, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years) The 4-year survival rates in the present study were favorable. The restorations exhibited excellent scores with regard to color match, marginal adaptation, surface texture, marginal discoloration, wear/loss of anatomical form, and caries formation, after 4 years of clinical evaluation. Clinical relevance An alternative clinical approach for correcting discrepancies in tooth size and form, such as performing direct composite restorations following fixed orthodontic treatment, may be an excellent and minimally invasive treatment.

  16. Measurements of dose on build-up region, surface dose and outlet dose by a 10 MeV Linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C.N. de; Khoury, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The dose on buildup region and the surface dose for a 10 MeV photon beam from a linear acelerator (Mevatrom-74, Siemens) is studied. The influence of the tray of polycarbonate on the surface dose is determined. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Generation of point isotropic source dose buildup factor data for the PFBR special concretes in a form compatible for usage in point kernel computer code QAD-CGGP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Around the PFBR (Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor) reactor assembly, in the peripheral shields special concretes of density 2.4 g/cm 3 and 3.6 g/cm 3 are to be used in complex geometrical shapes. Point-kernel computer code like QAD-CGGP, written for complex shield geometry comes in handy for the shield design optimization of peripheral shields. QAD-CGGP requires data base for the buildup factor data and it contains only ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm 3 . In order to extend the data base for the PFBR special concretes, point isotropic source dose buildup factors have been generated by Monte Carlo method using the computer code MCNP-4A. For the above mentioned special concretes, buildup factor data have been generated in the energy range 0.5 MeV to 10.0 MeV with the thickness ranging from 1 mean free paths (mfp) to 40 mfp. Capo's formula fit of the buildup factor data compatible with QAD-CGGP has been attempted

  18. The effect of zinc injection into PWR primary coolant on the reduction of radiation buildup and corrosion control. The solubilities of zinc, nickel and cobalt spinel oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Kaori; Hirano, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    The use of zinc injection into PWR primary coolant to reduce radiation buildup has been widely studied, and te reduction effect has been experimentally confirmed. However, some items, such as the optimal concentration of zinc required to reduce radiation buildup, the corrosion control effect of zinc injection, and the influence of zinc injection on the integrity of fuel cladding, have not been clarified yet. In particular, the corrosion suppression effect of zinc remains unconfirmed. Therefore, it is necessary to measure and calculate the solubilities of zinc and nickel spinel oxides, which are formed on the surface of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary systems. In this study, in order to assess the effectiveness of zinc injection in the reduction of radiation buildup and the corrosion control of Ni-based alloy, the potential-pH diagrams for Zn-Cr-H 2 O, Ni-Cr-H 2 O, and Co-Cr-H 2 O systems at 300degC were constructed and the solubilities of Zn-Cr, Ni-Cr, and Co-Cr spinel oxides were calculated. It is concluded that under pH conditions for which NiCr 2 O 4 is stable, zinc injection is effective in corrosion control as well as in reducing radiation buildup. (author)

  19. A Measurement and Analysis of Buildup Region Dose for Open Field Photon Beams (Cobalt-60 through 24 MV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, Edwin C.

    2015-01-01

    The central axis depth dose in the build-up region (surface to d_m_a_x) of single open field photon beams (cobalt-60 through 24 MV) has been measured utilizing parallel plate and extrapolation chamber methodology. These data were used to derive, for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, values of surface dose, the maximum value of dose along the central axis (D_m_a_x) and the depth (nearest the surface) at which 90% of the prescription dose occurs (d_9_0). For both single and parallel opposed pair (POP) open field configurations, data are presented at field sizes of 5 × 5, 15 × 15 and 25 × 25 cm"2 for prescription depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm (midplane for POP). For the treatment machines, field sizes, and prescription depths studied, it is possible to conclude that: for single open field irradiation, surface dose values (as a percentage of the prescription dose) can be either low (<10%) or comparable to the prescription dose itself; for POP open fields, surface dose values are relatively independent of photon energy and midplane depth, and range between 30% and 70% of prescription dose, being principally dependent on field size; the depth of the initial 90 cGy point for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, d_9_0, was larger for POP fields. For either single or POP open field treatments, d_9_0 was always less than 22 mm, while for 6 MV or less, values of d_9_0 were less than 4 mm; D_m_a_x values can be very large (e.g., above 300 cGy) for certain treatment situations and are reduced significantly for POP treatments; for open field POP treatments, the percent reduction in D_m_a_x with each increment in beam energy above 10 MV is reduced over that seen at 10 MV or less and, possibly, this further reduction may be clinically insignificant; for open field POP treatments, changes in surface dose, d_9_0 and D_m_a_x with beam energy above 10 MV do not suggest, with regard to these specific build-up curve parameters, any obvious advantage for treatment with beam energies greater

  20. Acetone as biomarker for ketosis buildup capability--a study in healthy individuals under combined high fat and starvation diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Amlendu; Quach, Ashley; Zhang, Haojiong; Terrera, Mirna; Jackemeyer, David; Xian, Xiaojun; Tsow, Francis; Tao, Nongjian; Forzani, Erica S

    2015-04-22

    Ketogenic diets are high fat and low carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diets, which render high production of ketones upon consumption known as nutritional ketosis (NK). Ketosis is also produced during fasting periods, which is known as fasting ketosis (FK). Recently, the combinations of NK and FK, as well as NK alone, have been used as resources for weight loss management and treatment of epilepsy. A crossover study design was applied to 11 healthy individuals, who maintained moderately sedentary lifestyle, and consumed three types of diet randomly assigned over a three-week period. All participants completed the diets in a randomized and counterbalanced fashion. Each weekly diet protocol included three phases: Phase 1 - A mixed diet with ratio of fat: (carbohydrate + protein) by mass of 0.18 or the equivalence of 29% energy from fat from Day 1 to Day 5. Phase 2- A mixed or a high-fat diet with ratio of fat: (carbohydrate + protein) by mass of approximately 0.18, 1.63, or 3.80 on Day 6 or the equivalence of 29%, 79%, or 90% energy from fat, respectively. Phase 3 - A fasting diet with no calorie intake on Day 7. Caloric intake from diets on Day 1 to Day 6 was equal to each individual's energy expenditure. On Day 7, ketone buildup from FK was measured. A statistically significant effect of Phase 2 (Day 6) diet was found on FK of Day 7, as indicated by repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), F(2,20) = 6.73, p fat content and 90% fat content vs. 29% fat content (with p = 0.00159**, and 0.04435**, respectively), with no significant difference between diets with 79% fat content and 90% fat content. In addition, independent of the diet, a significantly higher ketone buildup capability of subjects with higher resting energy expenditure (R(2) = 0.92), and lower body mass index (R(2) = 0.71) was observed during FK.

  1. Effect of various physical parameters on surface and build-up dose for 15-MV X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Girigesh; Yadav, R.S.; Kumar, Alok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of various physical parameters on the skin and build-up doses of 15-MV photon beams. The effects of field dimensions, acrylic shadow tray, focus to-skin distance (FSD) on surface and buildup dose were determined for open, motorized 60 deg wedge (MW) and blocked fields. A 'Markus' plane parallel plate chamber was used for these measurements in an Elekta (6-15MV) linear accelerator. The surface dose for MW fields was lower than the dose for an open field, but the trend reversed for large fields and higher degree wedges. With the use of an acrylic shadow tray, the surface dose increased for all field sizes, but the increase was dominant for large fields. The surface dose for blocked fields was lower than the dose for open fields. The percentage depth dose of 10 x 10 cm 2 field at surface (PDD 0 ) for open beam were 13.89%, 11.71%, and 10.74% at 80 cm, 100 cm, and 120 cm FSD, respectively. The blocking tray increased PDD 0 of 10 x 10 cm 2 field to 26.29%, 14.01%, and 11.53%, while the motorized 60 deg wedge decreased PDD 0 to 11.32%, 9.7%, and 8.9 % at these FSDs. The maximum PDD difference seen at surface (i.e. skin) for 5x5 cm 2 , 15x15 cm 2 , and 30x30 cm 2 are 0.5%, 4.6%, and 5.6% for open field and 0.9%, 4.7%, and 7.2% for motorized 60 deg wedge field, when FSDs varied from 80 cm to 120 cm. The maximum PDD difference seen at surface for 5x5 cm 2 , 15x15 cm 2 , and 30x30 cm 2 fields are 5.6%, 22.8%, and 29.6%, respectively, for a 1.0-cm perspex-blocking tray as the FSD is changed. The maximum PDD difference was seen at the surface (i.e. skin) and this decreased with increasing depth. (author)

  2. Build-up of the silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengfei; Li Zhankui; Li Haixia

    2014-01-01

    Silicon micro-strip detectors have been widely used in the world-famous nuclear physics laboratories due to their better position resolution and energy resolution. Double-sided silicon micro-strip detectors with a position resolution of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm, have been fabricated in the IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, CAS) by using microelectronics technology. These detectors have been used in the ETF (External Target Facility) of HIRFL-CSR, as ΔE detectors of the ΔE-E telescope system and the track detectors. With the help of flexibility printed circuit board (FPCB) and the integrated ASIC chips, a compact multi-channel front-end electronic board has been designed to fulfill the acquisition of the energy and position information of the Silicon micro-strip detectors. It is described in this paper that the build-up of the Silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR, the determination of the energy resolution of the detector units, and the energy resolution of approximately 1% obtained for 5∼9 MeV α particles in vacuum. (authors)

  3. Determination of neutron buildup factor using analytical solution of one-dimensional neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Julio Cesar L.; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada; Borges, Volnei; Bodmann, Bardo Ernest, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.b, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2011-07-01

    The principal idea of this work, consist on formulate an analytical method to solved problems for diffusion of neutrons with isotropic scattering in one-dimensional cylindrical geometry. In this area were develop many works that study the same problem in different system of coordinates as well as cartesian system, nevertheless using numerical methods to solve the shielding problem. In view of good results in this works, we starting with the idea that we can represent a source in the origin of the cylindrical system by a Delta Dirac distribution, we describe the physical modeling and solved the neutron diffusion equation inside of cylinder of radius R. For the case of transport equation, the formulation of discrete ordinates S{sub N} consists in discretize the angular variables in N directions and in using a quadrature angular set for approximate the sources of scattering, where the Diffusion equation consist on S{sub 2} approximated transport equation in discrete ordinates. We solved the neutron diffusion equation with an analytical form by the finite Hankel transform. Was presented also the build-up factor for the case that we have neutron flux inside the cylinder. (author)

  4. Post and core build-ups in crown and bridge abutments: Bio-mechanical advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John

    2017-06-01

    Dentists often place post and core buildups on endodontically treated abutments for crown and bridge restorations. This article analyzes the bio-mechanical purposes, advantages and disadvantages of placing a core or a post and core in an endodontically treated tooth and reviews literature on post and core biomechanics. The author assesses the scientific rationale of the claim that the main purpose of a post is to retain a core, or the claim that posts weaken teeth. More likely, the main function of a post is to help prevent the abutment, on which a crown is cemented, from fracturing such that the abutment separates from the tooth root, at a fracture plane that is located approximately and theoretically at the level of the crown (or ferrule) margin. A post essentially improves the ferrule effect that is provided by the partial fixed denture prosthesis. This paper also explores the difference between bio-mechanical failures of crowns caused by lack of retention or excess taper, versus failures due to a sub-optimal ferrule effect in crown and bridge prostheses.

  5. DC Model Cable under Polarity Inversion and Thermal Gradient: Build-Up of Design-Related Space Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Adi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of energy transport, High-Voltage DC (HVDC technologies are booming at present due to the more flexible power converter solutions along with needs to bring electrical energy from distributed production areas to consumption sites and to strengthen large-scale energy networks. These developments go with challenges in qualifying insulating materials embedded in those systems and in the design of insulations relying on stress distribution. Our purpose in this communication is to illustrate how far the field distribution in DC insulation systems can be anticipated based on conductivity data gathered as a function of temperature and electric field. Transient currents and conductivity estimates as a function of temperature and field were recorded on miniaturized HVDC power cables with construction of 1.5 mm thick crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE insulation. Outputs of the conductivity model are compared to measured field distributions using space charge measurements techniques. It is shown that some features of the field distribution on model cables put under thermal gradient can be anticipated based on conductivity data. However, space charge build-up can induce substantial electric field strengthening when materials are not well controlled.

  6. Determination of neutron buildup factor using analytical solution of one-dimensional neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Julio Cesar L.; Vilhena, Marco Tullio; Borges, Volnei; Bodmann, Bardo Ernest

    2011-01-01

    The principal idea of this work, consist on formulate an analytical method to solved problems for diffusion of neutrons with isotropic scattering in one-dimensional cylindrical geometry. In this area were develop many works that study the same problem in different system of coordinates as well as cartesian system, nevertheless using numerical methods to solve the shielding problem. In view of good results in this works, we starting with the idea that we can represent a source in the origin of the cylindrical system by a Delta Dirac distribution, we describe the physical modeling and solved the neutron diffusion equation inside of cylinder of radius R. For the case of transport equation, the formulation of discrete ordinates S N consists in discretize the angular variables in N directions and in using a quadrature angular set for approximate the sources of scattering, where the Diffusion equation consist on S 2 approximated transport equation in discrete ordinates. We solved the neutron diffusion equation with an analytical form by the finite Hankel transform. Was presented also the build-up factor for the case that we have neutron flux inside the cylinder. (author)

  7. Decomposition of litter and soil organic matter - Can we distinguish a mechanism for soil organic matter buildup ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.; Johansson, M.B.; McClaugherty, C.; Virzo de Santo, A.; Ekbohm, G.

    1995-01-01

    This synthesis paper presents a model for estimating the buildup of soil organic matter in various types of coniferous forests. The knowledge used was obtained from a well-studied forest with good litterfall data, decomposition information and validation measurements of the soil organic matter layer. By constructing a simple model for litterfall, and the information on maximum decomposition levels for litter, we could estimate the annual increase in soil organic matter and extend this to encompass stand age. The validation measurement and the estimated amount of soil organic matter differed by about 8 or 26% over a 120-yr period, depending on the litterfall model. The estimated increased storage of soil organic matter as a consequence of climate change was found to be drastic. We thus found that the soil organic matter layer would grow about four times as fast as a result of the needle component only. This estimate was based on a comparison between latitudes with a difference of 17 degrees. 35 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  8. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS{sub N} method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS{sub N} nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  9. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS N method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS N nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  10. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation period on bond strengths between fiber-reinforced composite post and core build-up composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation period on the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts to core build-up resin. Three types of FRC posts were prepared using polymethyl methacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and epoxy resin. The surfaces of these posts were treated using UV irradiation at a distance of 15 mm for 0 to 600 s. The pull-out bond strength was measured and analyzed with the Dunnett's comparison test (α=0.05). The bond strengths of the post surfaces without irradiation were 6.9 to 7.4 MPa; those after irradiation were 4.2 to 26.1 MPa. The bond strengths significantly increased after 15 to 120-s irradiation. UV irradiation on the FRC posts improved the bond strengths between the FRC posts and core build-up resin regardless of the type of matrix resin.

  11. Catheter for Cleaning Surgical Optics During Surgical Procedures: A Possible Solution for Residue Buildup and Fogging in Video Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Abrão, Fernando Conrado; Silva, Alessandra Rodrigues; Corrêa, Larissa Teresa Cirera; Younes, Riad Nain

    2015-05-01

    Currently, there is a tendency to perform surgical procedures via laparoscopic or thoracoscopic access. However, even with the impressive technological advancement in surgical materials, such as improvement in quality of monitors, light sources, and optical fibers, surgeons have to face simple problems that can greatly hinder surgery by video. One is the formation of "fog" or residue buildup on the lens, causing decreased visibility. Intracavitary techniques for cleaning surgical optics and preventing fog formation have been described; however, some of these techniques employ the use of expensive and complex devices designed solely for this purpose. Moreover, these techniques allow the cleaning of surgical optics when they becomes dirty, which does not prevent the accumulation of residue in the optics. To solve this problem we have designed a device that allows cleaning the optics with no surgical stops and prevents the fogging and residue accumulation. The objective of this study is to evaluate through experimental testing the effectiveness of a simple device that prevents the accumulation of residue and fogging of optics used in surgical procedures performed through thoracoscopic or laparoscopic access. Ex-vivo experiments were performed simulating the conditions of residue presence in surgical optics during a video surgery. The experiment consists in immersing the optics and catheter set connected to the IV line with crystalloid solution in three types of materials: blood, blood plus fat solution, and 200 mL of distilled water and 1 vial of methylene blue. The optics coupled to the device were immersed in 200 mL of each type of residue, repeating each immersion 10 times for each distinct residue for both thirty and zero degrees optics, totaling 420 experiments. A success rate of 98.1% was observed after the experiments, in these cases the device was able to clean and prevent the residue accumulation in the optics.

  12. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE BUILD-UP OF STELLAR MASS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, J. P.; Collins, C. A.; Hilton, M.; Capozzi, D.; Sahlen, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Hosmer, M.; Liddle, A. R.; Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T. P.; Davidson, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S. T.; Nichol, R. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present deep J- and K s -band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z = 0.8 and1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at ∼9 x 10 11 M sun since z ∼ 1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well-known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, which predict a more protracted mass build-up over a Hubble time. However, we discuss that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.

  13. On the relative role of meridional convergence and downwelling motion during the heat buildup leading to El Niño events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Joan; Bordoni, Simona; Petrova, Desislava; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Despite steady progress in the understanding of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the past decades, questions remain on the exact mechanisms leading to the onset of El Niño (EN) events. Several authors have highlighted how the subsurface heat buildup in the western tropical Pacific and the recharged phase in equatorial heat content are intrinsic elements of ENSO variability, leading to those changes in zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and thermocline tilt that characterize the growing and mature phases of EN. Here we use an ensemble of ocean and atmosphere assimilation products to identify the mechanisms contributing to the heat buildup that precedes EN events by about 18-24 months on average. Anomalous equatorward subsurface mass convergence due to meridional Sverdrup transport is found to be an important mechanism of thermocline deepening near and to the east of the dateline. In the warm pool, instead, surface horizontal convergence and downwelling motion have a leading role in subsurface warming, since equatorward mass convergence is weaker and counterbalanced by subsurface zonal divergence. The picture emerging from our results highlights the complexity of the three dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the tropical Pacific during the heat buildup leading to EN events.

  14. A polynomial–based function approach to point isotropic gamma-ray buildup factor data in double layered spherical shield of water and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Alamatsaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the input of MCNP code (Monte Carlo N - Particle code system, a monoenergetic and isotropic point source with the energy rangeg from 0.3 to 10 MeV was placed at the center of a spherical material surrounded by another one. The first shielding material was water and the second one was lead. The total thickness of the shield varied between 2 to 10 mfp. Then, using the output of MCNCP, exposure build up factor was calculated. The MCNP computed data were analyzed by plotting the buildup factor as a function of each independent variable (energy, first material thickness and second material thickness and observing the trends. Based on the trends, we examined many different expressions with different number of constants. By MINUIT the FORTRAN program, the constants were calculated, which gave the best agreement between the MCNP-computed exposure buildup factors and those obtained by the formula. At last, we developed a polynomial formula with 11 constants that reproduced exposure buildup factor with a relative error below 2% (in comparison with the MCNP result.

  15. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J; Sanchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terron, J A; Gomez, F

    2006-01-01

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm 3 ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface

  16. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  18. Mississippian carbonate buildups and development of cool-waterlike carbonate platforms in the Illinois Basin, Midcontinent U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasemi, Z.; Norby, R.D.; Utgaard, J.E.; Ferry, W.R.; Cuffey, R.J.; Dever, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous biohermal buildups occur in Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) strata in the Illinois Basin and adjacent regions. They developed as mud mounds, biodetrital calcisiltite mounds, and bryozoan frame thickets (fenestrate-frame coquina or rudstone) during the Kinderhookian and early Meramecian (Tournaisian and early Visean), and as microbial mud mounds, microbial- serpulidbryozoanboundstones, and solenoporoid (red algal) boundstones during the Chesterian (late Visean and Serpukhovian). True Waulsortian mounds did not develop in the Illinois Basin, but echinoderm (primarily crinoids)-bryozoan carbonate banks and bryozoan frame thickets generally occupied the same niche during the Kinderhookian-early Meramecian. Nutrient availability and the resulting increase in the productivity of echinoderms and bryozoans were apparently detrimental to Waulsortian mound development. Deposition of crinoidal-bryozoan carbonates during the Kinderhookian-Osagean initially occurred on a ramp setting that later evolved into a platform with a relatively steep margin through sediment aggradation and progradation. By mid-Osagean-early Meramecian, two such platforms, namely the Burlington Shelf and the Ullin Platform, developed adjacent to a deep, initially starved basin. Sedimentologic and petrographic characteristics of the Kinderhookian-earliest Meramecian carbonates resemble the modern cool-water Heterozoan Association. This is in contrast with post-earliest Meramecian carbonates, which are typically oolitic and peloidal with common peri tidal facies. The post-earliest Meramecian carbonates, therefore, resemble those of the warm-water Photozoan Association. The prevalence of Heterozoan carbonates in the Illinois Basin correlates with a rapid increase in the rate of subsidence and a major second-order eustatic sea-level rise that resulted in deep-water starved basins at this time. In the starved Illinois Basin, deposition was initially limited to a thin phosphatic shale that was

  19. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Build-up and wash-off dynamics of atmospherically derived Cu, Pb, Zn and TSS in stormwater runoff as a function of meteorological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Louise U; Cochrane, Thomas A; O'Sullivan, Aisling

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric pollutants deposited on impermeable surfaces can be an important source of pollutants to stormwater runoff; however, modelling atmospheric pollutant loads in runoff has rarely been done, because of the challenges and uncertainties in monitoring their contribution. To overcome this, impermeable concrete boards (≈ 1m(2)) were deployed for 11 months in different locations within an urban area (industrial, residential and airside) throughout Christchurch, New Zealand, to capture spatially distributed atmospheric deposition loads in runoff over varying meteorological conditions. Runoff was analysed for total and dissolved Cu, Zn, Pb, and total suspended solids (TSS). Mixed-effect regression models were developed to simulate atmospheric pollutant loads in stormwater runoff. In addition, the models were used to explain the influence of different meteorological characteristics (e.g. antecedent dry days and rain depth) on pollutant build-up and wash-off dynamics. The models predicted approximately 53% to 69% of the variation in pollutant loads and were successful in predicting pollutant-load trends over time which can be useful for general stormwater planning processes. Results from the models illustrated the importance of antecedent dry days on pollutant build-up. Furthermore, results indicated that peak rainfall intensity and rain duration had a significant relationship with TSS and total Pb, whereas, rain depth had a significant relationship with total Cu and total Zn. This suggested that the pollutant speciation phase plays an important role in surface wash-off. Rain intensity and duration had a greater influence when the pollutants were predominantly in their particulate phase. Conversely, rain depth exerted a greater influence when a high fraction of the pollutants were predominantly in their dissolved phase. For all pollutants, the models were represented by a log-arctan relationship for pollutant build-up and a log-log relationship for pollutant wash

  1. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm 2 and 40 cmx40 cm 2 fields, respectively

  2. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm{sup 2} and 40 cmx40 cm{sup 2} fields, respectively.

  3. Effects of internal and external scatter on the build-up characteristics of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose for electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.; Wu, DS.; Wu, AD.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of internal and external scatter on surface, build-up and depth dose characteristics simulated by Monte Carlo code EGSnrc for varying field size and SSD for a 10 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with and without an accelerator model are extensively studied in this paper. In particular, sub-millimetre surface PDD was investigated. The percentage depth doses affected significantly by the external scatter show a larger build-up dose. A forward shifted Dmax depth and a sharper fall-off region compared to PDDs with only internal scatter considered. The surface dose with both internal and external scatter shows a marked decrease at 110 cm SSD, and then slight further changes with the increasing SSD since few external scattered particles from accelerator model can reach the phantom for large SSDs. The sharp PDD increase for the 5 cm x 5 cm field compared to other fields seen when only internal scatter is considered is significantly less when external scatter is also present. The effect of external scatter on surface PDD is more pronounced for large fields than small fields (5 cm x 5 cm field)

  4. Accumulation and dissipation of positive charges induced on a PMMA build-up cap of an ionisation chamber by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Takata, N.

    2013-01-01

    The signal current from an ionisation chamber with a PMMA build-up cap decreases with irradiation time due to electric fields produced by positive charges induced on the cap. In the present study, it was confirmed that the signal current decreases faster for irradiation using narrower 60 Co gamma-ray beams. This is because the number of secondary electrons that are emitted from surrounding materials and penetrate the build-up cap is smaller in a narrower gamma-ray beam, so that fewer positive charges are neutralised. The ionisation chamber was first subjected to continuous gamma-ray irradiation for 24 h, following which it was irradiated with shorter periodic gamma-ray bursts while measuring the current signal. This allowed the coefficients of positive charge accumulation and dissipation to be determined. It was found that the dissipation coefficient has a large constant value during gamma-ray irradiation and decreases asymptotically to a small value after irradiation is stopped. From the coefficients, the minimum signal current was calculated, which is the value when accumulation and dissipation balance each other under continuous irradiation. The time required for the signal current to recover following irradiation was also calculated. (authors)

  5. Mechanism of the re-buildup phenomenon in moyamoya disease; Analysis of local cerebral hemodynamics with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Morisako, Toshitaka; Yamada, Keisuke; Nagai, Shigeki; Shibamoto, Kenji [Osaka Neurological Institute, Osaka (Japan)

    1990-10-01

    The authors investigated the mechanism of the re-buildup phenomenon on electroencephalogram in 14 patients of moyamoya disease with superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis. Visualization of the lateral view of the common carotid angiography was performed with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA), using a 4/sec x 3 sec + 2/sec x 5 sec + 1/sec x 5 sec film sequence. The catheter tip was inserted into C5/6 level and 250 mgl/ml of iopamidol was used as the contrast agent; 6 ml in total was injected over 1.5 seconds. Circulation times of the common carotid artery (C{sub 3} portion)-ascending parietal vein ({delta}TTP{sub s}) and common carotid artery-internal cerebral vein ({delta}TTP{sub D}) were measured before hyperventilation (HV), immediately after HV, and 3 minutes after HV during pre- and postoperative periods. {delta}TTP{sub D} in the preoperative period was prolonged by HV and was normalized at 3 minutes after HV but {delta}TTP{sub S} were prolonged immediately after and 3 minutes after HV. In the postoperative period, however, these values did not change significantly immediately after and 3 minutes after HV. These findings indicate that delayed cerebral blood flow response to HV is a pathogenetic factor of the re-buildup phenomenon in moyamoya disease. (author).

  6. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. A.; Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Jeon, D.; Park, J. Y.; Cha, E. J.; Lee, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10310 and 20320 cm 2 , respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. (authors)

  7. Suspension-firing of wood with coal ash addition: Probe measurements of ash deposit build-up at Avedøre Power Plant (AVV2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood-firing. Investigat...... to the gas phase as HCl(g). Effect of boiler operational parameters on gas emissions has also been investigated.......This report is about full-scale probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal conducted at the Avedøreværket Unit 2, a 800 MWth suspension boiler, firing wood and natural gas with the addition of coal ash. Coal ash was used as an additive to capture potassium (K) from wood...... and boiler load on ash deposition propensity was investigated. Results of ash deposition propensity showed increasing trend with increasing flue gas temperature. Video monitoring revealed that the deposits formed were not sticky and could be easily removed, and even at very high flue gas temperatures (> 1350...

  8. Improvement of gamma-ray Sn transport calculations including coherent and incoherent scatterings and secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence: Determination of gamma-ray buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, S.; Diop, C.M.; Assad, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Ridoux, P.

    1996-01-01

    Improvements of gamma-ray transport calculations in S n codes aim at taking into account the bound-electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent), coherent scattering (Rayleigh), and secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. A computation scheme was developed to take into account these phenomena by modifying the angular and energy transfer matrices, and no modification in the transport code has been made. The incoherent and coherent scatterings as well as the fluorescence sources can be strictly treated by the transfer matrix change. For bremsstrahlung sources, this is possible if one can neglect the charged particles path as they pass through the matter (electrons and positrons) and is applicable for the energy range of interest for us (below 10 MeV). These improvements have been reported on the kernel attenuation codes by the calculation of new buildup factors. The gamma-ray buildup factors have been carried out for 25 natural elements up to 30 mean free paths in the energy range between 15 keV and 10 MeV

  9. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R.; Hong-Nian Jow

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm 3 thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm 3 active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response

  10. Build-up and surface dose measurements on phantoms using micro-MOSFET in 6 and 10 MV x-ray beams and comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Hong F.; Song, Jun S.; Chin, David W. H.; Cormack, Robert A.; Tishler, Roy B.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Court, Laurence E.; Chin, Lee M.

    2007-01-01

    This work is intended to investigate the application and accuracy of micro-MOSFET for superficial dose measurement under clinically used MV x-ray beams. Dose response of micro-MOSFET in the build-up region and on surface under MV x-ray beams were measured and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. First, percentage-depth-doses were measured with micro-MOSFET under 6 and 10 MV beams of normal incidence onto a flat solid water phantom. Micro-MOSFET data were compared with the measurements from a parallel plate ionization chamber and Monte Carlo dose calculation in the build-up region. Then, percentage-depth-doses were measured for oblique beams at 0 deg. - 80 deg. onto the flat solid water phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm below the surface. Measurements were compared to Monte Carlo calculations under these settings. Finally, measurements were performed with micro-MOSFET embedded in the first 1 mm layer of bolus placed on a flat phantom and a curved phantom of semi-cylindrical shape. Results were compared to superficial dose calculated from Monte Carlo for a 2 mm thin layer that extends from the surface to a depth of 2 mm. Results were (1) Comparison of measurements with MC calculation in the build-up region showed that micro-MOSFET has a water-equivalence thickness (WET) of 0.87 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.99 mm for 10 MV beam from the flat side, and a WET of 0.72 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.76 mm for 10 MV beam from the epoxy side. (2) For normal beam incidences, percentage depth dose agree within 3%-5% among micro-MOSFET measurements, parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements, and MC calculations. (3) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm, measurements were consistent with MC calculations within a typical uncertainty of 3%-5%. (4) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom and a curved-surface phantom, measurements with micro-MOSFET placed at 1.0 mm agrees with the MC

  11. AAA and PBC calculation accuracy in the surface build-up region in tangential beam treatments. Phantom and breast case study with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Barsoum, Pierre; Westermark, Mathias; Brualla, Lorenzo; Lax, Ingmar

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In tangential beam treatments accurate dose calculation of the absorbed dose in the build-up region is of major importance, in particular when the target has superficial extension close to the skin. In most analytical treatment planning systems (TPSs) calculations depend on the experimental measurements introduced by the user in which accuracy might be limited by the type of detector employed to perform them. To quantify the discrepancy between analytically calculated and delivered dose in the build-up region, near the skin of a patient, independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the PENELOPE code were performed. Dose distributions obtained with MC simulations were compared with those given by the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm and the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) implemented in the commercial TPS Eclipse. Material and methods: A cylindrical phantom was used to approximate the breast contour of a patient for MC simulations and the TPS. Calculations of the absorbed doses were performed for 6 and 18 MV beams for four different angles of incidence: 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg. and 75 deg. and different field sizes: 3 x 3 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 and 40 x 40 cm 2 . Absorbed doses along the phantom central axis were obtained with both the PBC algorithm and the AAA and compared to those estimated by the MC simulations. Additionally, a breast patient case was calculated with two opposed 6 MV photon beams using all the aforementioned analytical and stochastic algorithms. Results: For the 6 MV photon beam in the phantom case, both the PBC algorithm and the AAA tend to underestimate the absorbed dose in the build-up region in comparison to MC results. These differences are clinically irrelevant and are included in a 1 mm range. This tendency is also confirmed in the breast patient case. For the 18 MV beam the PBC algorithm underestimates the absorbed dose with respect to the AAA. In comparison to MC simulations the PBC algorithm tends

  12. Time-resolved Shielded-Pickup Measurements and Modeling of Beam Conditioning Effects on Electron Cloud Buildup at CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, J A; Liu, X; Palmer, M A; Santos, S; Sikora, J P; Kato, S; Calatroni, S; Rumolo, G

    2012-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup in vacuum chambers with various coatings. Two 1.1-mlong sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions are equipped with BPM-like pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of 0.76 mm-diameter holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. We present new measurements of the effect of beam conditioning on a newly-installed amorphous carbon coated chamber, as well as on an extensively conditioned chamber with a diamond-like carbon coating. The ECLOUD modeling code is used to quantify the sensitivity of these measurements to model parameters, differentiating between photoelectron and secondary-electron production processes.

  13. GRAB - WRS system module number 60221 for calculating gamma-ray penetration in slab shields by the method of kernel integration with build-up factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1978-06-01

    The WRS Modular Programming System has been developed as a means by which programmes may be more efficiently constructed, maintained and modified. In this system a module is a self-contained unit typically composed of one or more Fortran routines, and a programme is constructed from a number of such modules. This report describes one WRS module, the function of which is to calculate the gamma-ray flux, dose, or heating rate in a slab shield using the build-up factor method. The information given in this manual is of use both to the programmer wishing to incorporate the module in a programme, and to the user of such a programme. (author)

  14. Study of the effect of external heating and internal temperature build-up during polymerization on the morphology of porous polymethacrylate adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Chan Yi, E-mail: vicchanyiwei@hotmail.com; Ongkudon, Clarence M., E-mail: clarence@ums.edu.my; Kansil, Tamar, E-mail: tamarkansil87@gmail.com [Biotechnology Research Institute, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Modern day synthesis protocols of methacrylate monolithic polymer adsorbent are based on existing polymerization blueprint without a thorough understanding of the dynamics of pore structure and formation. This has resulted in unproductiveness of polymer adsorbent consequently affecting purity and recovery of final product, productivity, retention time and cost effectiveness of the whole process. The problems magnified in monolith scaling-up where internal heat buildup resulting from external heating and high exothermic polymerization reaction was reflected in cracking of the adsorbent. We believe that through careful and precise control of the polymerization kinetics and parameters, it is possible to prepare macroporous methacrylate monolithic adsorbents with controlled pore structures despite being carried out in an unstirred mould. This research involved the study of the effect of scaling-up on pore morphology of monolith, in other words, porous polymethacrylate adsorbents that were prepared via bulk free radical polymerization process by imaging the porous morphology of polymethacrylate with scanning electron microscope.

  15. Together, slowly but surely: the role of social interaction and feedback in the build-up of benefit in collective decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Olsen, Karsten; Bang, Dan

    2011-01-01

    That objective reference is necessary for formation of reliable beliefs about the external world is almost axiomatic. However, Condorcet (1785) suggested that purely subjective information-if shared and combined via social interaction-is enough for accurate understanding of the external world. We...... asked if social interaction and objective reference contribute differently to the formation and build-up of collective perceptual beliefs. In three experiments, dyads made individual and collective perceptual decisions in a two-interval, forced-choice, visual search task. In Experiment 1, participants...... negotiated their collective decisions with each other verbally and received feedback about accuracy at the end of each trial. In Experiment 2, feedback was not given. In Experiment 3, communication was not allowed but feedback was provided. Social interaction (Experiments 1 and 2 vs. 3) resulted...

  16. A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon with calculation of their recharges at defect clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgolenko, A.P.; Fishchuk, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Pulled n-Si samples with rho approximately 40 Ωcm are investigated after irradiation with different doses of fast-pile neutrons. It is known that the simple defects are created not only in the conductive matrix but also in the region of the space charge of defect clusters. Then the charge state, for example, of A-centres in the region of the space charge is defined by both, the temperature and the value of the electrostatical potential. If this circumstance is not taken into account the calculation of the conductive volume is not precise enough. In the present paper the temperature dependence of the volume fraction is calculated, in which the space charge of defect clusters occurs, taking into account the recharges of A-centres in the region of the space charge. Using the expression obtained the A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon is calculated. (author)

  17. Comprehensive study on estimation of gamma-ray exposure buildup factors for smart polymers as a potent application in nuclear industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, M. I.; AlZaatreh, M. Y.; Matori, K. A.; Sidek, H. A. A.; Zaid, M. H. M.

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, the exposure buildup factors (EBF) have been investigated using geometric progression (G-P) fitting method for different types of smart polymers (DMSO, PDMS, PES, PMA, PVDC, and PVDF) in the energy range of 0.015-15 MeV. From the calculations, the values of the EBF were depended on the incident photon energy, penetration depth as well as chemical composition of the polymers. In the intermediate energy region, the EBF values were reached at maximum point while in low and high energy regions, the EBF values were decreased at minimum point. The obtained results of the selected polymers have been compared in terms of EBF with Al2O3 and other common polymers such as PAN, Teflon and SR. The shielding effectiveness of the selected polymers is found to be comparable to the common polymers. The results of this work should be useful in radiation shielding applications such as in industry, medical and nuclear engineering.

  18. Variation of energy absorption and exposure buildup factors with incident photon energy and penetration depth for boro-tellurite (B2O3-TeO2) glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, M. I.; Elhouichet, H.

    2017-01-01

    The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of (100-x)TeO2-xB2O3 glass systems (where x=5, 10, 15, 20, 22.5 and 25 mol%) have been calculated in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). The five parameters (G-P) fitting method has been used to estimate both EABF and EBF values. Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth have been studied. It was found that EABF and EBF values were higher in the intermediate energy region, for all the glass systems. Furthermore, boro-tellurite glass with 5 mol% B2O3, was found to present the lowest EABF and EBF values, hence it is superior gamma-ray shielding material. The results indicate that the boro-tellurite glasses can be used as radiation shielding materials.

  19. Regional cerebral perfusion measurements: a comparative study of xenon-enhanced CT and C15O2 build-up using dynamic PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Lawrence, K.S.; Bews, J.; Dunscombe, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion can be determined by monitoring the uptake of a diffusable tracer concurrently in cerebral tissue and arterial blood. Two techniques based on this methodology are xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe CT) and C 15 O 2 build-up using dynamic positron emission tomography (C 15 O 2 PET). Serial images are used by both Xe CT and C 15 O 2 PET to characterize the uptake of the tracer in cerebral tissue. The noise present in these images will reduce the precision of the perfusion measurements obtained by either technique. Using Monte Carlo type computer simulations, the precision of the two techniques as a function of image noise has been examined. On the basis of their results, they conclude that the precision of the Xe CT technique is comparable to the precision of C 15 O 2 PET when realistic clinical protocols are employed for both. (author)

  20. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  1. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  2. The Influence Of Modified Water Chemistries On Metal Oxide Films, Activity Build-Up And Stress Corrosion Cracking Of Structural Materials In Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of activated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  3. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  4. Study of Diagenetic Features in Rudist Buildups of Cretaceous Edwards Formation Using Ground Based Hyperspectral Scanning and Terrestrial LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnik, D.; Khan, S.; Okyay, U.; Hartzell, P. J.; Biber, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ground based remote sensing is a novel technique for development of digital outcrop models which can be instrumental in performing detailed qualitative and quantitative sedimentological analysis for the study of depositional environment, diagenetic processes, and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. For this investigation, ground-based hyperspectral data collection is combined with terrestrial LiDAR to study outcrops of Late Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards formation in the Lake Georgetown Spillway in Williamson County, Texas. The Edwards formation consists of shallow water deposits of reef and associated inter-reef facies, including rudist bioherms and biostromes. It is a significant aquifer and was investigated as a hydrocarbon play in south central Texas. Hyperspectral data were used to map compositional variation in the outcrop by distinguishing spectral properties unique to each material. Lithological variation was mapped in detail to investigate the structure and composition of rudist buildups. Hyperspectral imagery was registered to a 3D model produced from the LiDAR point cloud with an accuracy of up to one pixel. Flat-topped toucasid-rich bioherm facies were distinguished from overlying toucasid-rich biostrome facies containing chert nodules, overlying sucrosic dolostones, and uppermost peloid wackestones and packstones of back-reef facies. Ground truth was established by petrographic study of samples from this area and has validated classification products of remote sensing data. Several types of porosity were observed and have been associated with increased dolomitization. This ongoing research involves integration of remotely sensed datasets to analyze geometrical and compositional properties of this carbonate formation at a finer scale than traditional methods have achieved and seeks to develop a workflow for quick and efficient ground based remote sensing-assisted outcrop studies.

  5. Analysis of the summertime buildup of tropospheric ozone abundances over the Middle East and North Africa as observed by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jane J.; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Worden, John R.; Noone, David; Parrington, Mark; Kar, Jay

    2009-03-01

    We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to interpret observations of tropospheric ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite instrument in summer 2005. Observations from TES reveal elevated ozone in the middle troposphere (500-400 hPa) across North Africa and the Middle East. Observed ozone abundances in the middle troposphere are at a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter, consistent with the previously predicted summertime "Middle East ozone maximum." This summertime enhancement in ozone is associated with the Arabian and Sahara anticyclones, centered over the Zagros and Atlas Mountains, respectively. These anticyclones isolate the middle troposphere over northeast Africa and the Middle East, with westerlies to the north and easterlies to the south, facilitating the buildup of ozone. Over the Middle East, we find that in situ production and transport from Asia provides comparable contributions of 30-35% to the ozone buildup. Over North Africa, in situ production is dominant (at about 20%), with transport from Asia, North America, and equatorial Africa each contributing about 10-15% to the total ozone. We find that although the eastern Mediterranean is characterized by strong descent in the middle and upper troposphere in summer, transport from the boundary layer accounts for about 25% of the local Middle Eastern contribution to the ozone enhancement in the middle troposphere. This upward transport of boundary layer air is associated with orographic lifting along the Zagros Mountains in Iran and the Asir and Hijaz Mountain ranges in Saudi Arabia, and is consistent with TES observations of deuterated water.

  6. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n e in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N t = (2-5) x 10 13 , and the beam kinetic energy in the range E k = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta) max vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N t there is a clear threshold behavior of n e as a function of (delta) max in the range ∼ 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed (delta) max , there is a threshold behavior of n e as a function of N t provided (delta) max is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N t is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E k is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  7. A THEORETICAL STUDY OF THE BUILD-UP OF THE SUN’S POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD BY USING A 3D KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Miesch, Mark S., E-mail: ghazra@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: arnab@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: miesch@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We develop a three-dimensional kinematic self-sustaining model of the solar dynamo in which the poloidal field generation is from tilted bipolar sunspot pairs placed on the solar surface above regions of strong toroidal field by using the SpotMaker algorithm, and then the transport of this poloidal field to the tachocline is primarily caused by turbulent diffusion. We obtain a dipolar solution within a certain range of parameters. We use this model to study the build-up of the polar magnetic field and show that some insights obtained from surface flux transport models have to be revised. We present results obtained by putting a single bipolar sunspot pair in a hemisphere and two symmetrical sunspot pairs in two hemispheres. We find that the polar fields produced by them disappear due to the upward advection of poloidal flux at low latitudes, which emerges as oppositely signed radial flux and which is then advected poleward by the meridional flow. We also study the effect that a large sunspot pair, violating Hale’s polarity law, would have on the polar field. We find that there would be some effect—especially if the anti-Hale pair appears at high latitudes in the mid-phase of the cycle—though the effect is not very dramatic.

  8. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  9. Electrophoretic build-up of alternately multilayered films and micropatterns based on graphene sheets and nanoparticles and their applications in flexible supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhiqiang; Du, Jianjun; Cao, Xuebo; Sun, Yinghui; Zhou, Weiya; Hng, Huey Hoon; Ma, Jan; Chen, Xiaodong; Xie, Sishen

    2012-10-22

    Graphene nanosheets and metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been used as nano-building-blocks for assembly into macroscale hybrid structures with promising performance in electrical devices. However, in most graphene and metal NP hybrid structures, the graphene sheets and metal NPs (e.g., AuNPs) do not enable control of the reaction process, orientation of building blocks, and organization at the nanoscale. Here, an electrophoretic layer-by-layer assembly for constructing multilayered reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/AuNP films and lateral micropatterns is presented. This assembly method allows easy control of the nano-architecture of building blocks along the normal direction of the film, including the number and thickness of RGO and AuNP layers, in addition to control of the lateral orientation of the resultant multilayered structures. Conductivity of multilayered RGO/AuNP hybrid nano-architecture shows great improvement caused by a bridging effect of the AuNPs along the out-of-plane direction between the upper and lower RGO layers. The results clearly show the potential of electrophoretic build-up in the fabrication of graphene-based alternately multilayered films and patterns. Finally, flexible supercapacitors based on multilayered RGO/AuNP hybrid films are fabricated, and excellent performance, such as high energy and power densities, are achieved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Three-Step Buildup of the 17 March 2015 Storm Ring Current: Implication for the Cause of the Unexpected Storm Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Seki, Kanako; Nosé, Masahito; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Gkioulidou, Matina; Manweiler, Jerry W.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the spatiotemporal variations of the energy density and the energy spectral evolution of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere during the main phase of the 17 March 2015 storm, using data from the RBSPICE and EMFISIS instruments onboard Van Allen Probes. The storm developed in response to two southward IMF intervals separated by about 3 h. In contrast to two steps seen in the Dst/SYM-H index, the ring current ion population evolved in three steps: the first subphase was apparently caused by the earlier southward IMF, and the subsequent subphases occurred during the later southward IMF period. Ion energy ranges that contribute to the ring current differed between the three subphases. We suggest that the spectral evolution resulted from the penetration of different plasma sheet populations. The ring current buildup during the first subphase was caused by the penetration of a relatively low-energy population that had existed in the plasma sheet during a prolonged prestorm northward IMF interval. The deeper penetration of the lower-energy population was responsible for the second subphase. The third subphase, where the storm was unexpectedly intensified to a Dst/SYM-H level of population. We attribute the hot, dense population to the entry of hot, dense solar wind into the plasma sheet and/or ion heating/acceleration in the near-Earth plasma sheet associated with magnetotail activity such as reconnection and dipolarization.

  11. Applying Petroleum the Pressure Buildup Well Test Procedure on Thermal Response Test—A Novel Method for Analyzing Temperature Recovery Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kurevija

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Thermal Response Testing (TRT is a well-known part of the sizing process of the geothermal exchange system. Multiple parameters influence the accuracy of effective ground thermal conductivity measurement; like testing time, variable power, climate interferences, groundwater effect, etc. To improve the accuracy of the TRT, we introduced a procedure to additionally analyze falloff temperature decline after the power test. The method is based on a premise of analogy between TRT and petroleum well testing, since the origin of both procedures lies in the diffusivity equation with solutions for heat conduction or pressure analysis during radial flow. Applying pressure build-up test interpretation techniques to borehole heat exchanger testing, greater accuracy could be achieved since ground conductivity could be obtained from this period. Analysis was conducted on a coaxial exchanger with five different power steps, and with both direct and reverse flow regimes. Each test was set with 96 h of classical TRT, followed by 96 h of temperature decline, making for almost 2000 h of cumulative borehole testing. Results showed that the ground conductivity value could vary by as much as 25%, depending on test time, seasonal period and power fluctuations, while the thermal conductivity obtained from the falloff period provided more stable values, with only a 10% value variation.

  12. Interpretation of changes in diffusive and non-diffusive transport in the edge plasma during pedestal buildup following a low-high transition in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M.; Sayer, M.-H.; Floyd, J.-P. [Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The evolution of diffusive and non-diffusive transport during pedestal buildup following a low-high (L-H) transition has been interpreted from a particle-momentum-energy balance analysis of the measured density, temperature, and rotation velocity profiles in the plasma edge (0.82<{rho}<1.0) of a DIII-D [Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] discharge. In the discharge examined, there was an edge-localized-mode-free period of more than 600 ms following the L-H transition, and the majority of edge pedestal development occurred within the first 100 ms following the L-H transition. There appears to be a spatio-temporal correlation among the measured toroidal and poloidal rotation, the formation of a negative well in the measured radial electric field, the creation of a large inward particle pinch, the calculated intrinsic rotation due to ion orbit loss, and the measured formation of steep gradients in density and temperature in the outer region ({rho}>0.95) of the edge pedestal.

  13. Trace organic solutes in closed-loop forward osmosis applications: influence of membrane fouling and modeling of solute build-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Haese, Arnout; Le-Clech, Pierre; Van Nevel, Sam; Verbeken, Kim; Cornelissen, Emile R; Khan, Stuart J; Verliefde, Arne R D

    2013-09-15

    In this study, trace organics transport in closed-loop forward osmosis (FO) systems was assessed. The FO systems considered, consisted of an FO unit and a nanofiltration (NF) or reverse osmosis (RO) unit, with the draw solution circulating between both units. The rejection of trace organics by FO, NF and RO was tested. It was found that the rejection rates of FO were generally comparable with NF and lower than RO rejection rates. To assess the influence of fouling in FO on trace organics rejection, FO membranes were fouled with sodium alginate, bovine serum albumin or by biofilm growth, after which trace organics rejection was tested. A negative influence of fouling on FO rejection was found which was limited in most cases, while it was significant for some compounds such as paracetamol and naproxen, indicating specific compound-foulant interactions. The transport mechanism of trace organics in FO was tested, in order to differentiate between diffusive and convective transport. The concentration of trace organics in the final product water and the build-up of trace organics in the draw solution were modeled assuming the draw solution was reconcentrated by NF/RO and taking into account different transport mechanisms for the FO membrane and different rejection rates by NF/RO. Modeling results showed that if the FO rejection rate is lower than the RO rejection rate (as is the case for most compounds tested), the added value of the FO-RO cycle compared to RO only at steady-state was small for diffusively and negative for convectively transported trace organics. Modeling also showed that trace organics accumulate in the draw solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Essential role of the electroneutral Na+-HCO3- cotransporter NBCn1 in murine duodenal acid-base balance and colonic mucus layer build-up in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anurag Kumar; Xia, Weiliang; Riederer, Brigitte; Juric, Marina; Li, Junhua; Zheng, Wen; Cinar, Ayhan; Xiao, Fang; Bachmann, Oliver; Song, Penghong; Praetorius, Jeppe; Aalkjaer, Christian; Seidler, Ursula

    2013-04-15

    Duodenal epithelial cells need efficient defence strategies during gastric acidification of the lumen, while colonic mucosa counteracts damage by pathogens by building up a bacteria-free adherent mucus layer. Transport of HCO3(-) is considered crucial for duodenal defence against acid as well as for mucus release and expansion, but the transport pathways involved are incompletely understood. This study investigated the significance of the electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 for duodenal defence against acid and colonic mucus release. NBCn1 was localized to the basolateral membrane of duodenal villous enterocytes and of colonic crypt cells, with predominant expression in goblet cells. Duodenal villous enterocyte intracellular pH was studied before and during a luminal acid load by two-photon microscopy in exteriorized, vascularly perfused, indicator (SNARF-1 AM)-loaded duodenum of isoflurane-anaesthetized, systemic acid-base-controlled mice. Acid-induced HCO3(-) secretion was measured in vivo by single-pass perfusion and pH-stat titration. After a luminal acid load, NBCn1-deficient duodenocytes were unable to recover rapidly from intracellular acidification and could not respond adequately with protective HCO3(-) secretion. In the colon, build-up of the mucus layer was delayed, and a decreased thickness of the adherent mucus layer was observed, suggesting that basolateral HCO3(-) uptake is essential for optimal release of mucus. The electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 displays a differential cellular distribution in the murine intestine and is essential for HCO3(-)-dependent mucosal protective functions, such as recovery of intracellular pH and HCO3(-) secretion in the duodenum and secretion of mucus in the colon.

  15. Influence of light-exposure methods and depths of cavity on the microhardness of dual-cured core build-up resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi YOSHIDA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN of dual-cured core build-up resin composites (DCBRCs at 6 depths of cavity after 3 post-irradiation times by 4 light-exposure methods. Material and Methods: Five specimens each of DCBRCs (Clearfil DC Core Plus [DCP] and Unifil Core EM [UCE] were filled in acrylic resin blocks with a semi-cylindrical cavity and light-cured using an LED light unit (power density: 1,000 mW/cm2at the top surface by irradiation for 20 seconds (20 s, 40 seconds (40 s, bonding agent plus 20 seconds (B+20 s, or 40 seconds plus light irradiation of both sides of each acrylic resin block for 40 seconds each (120 s. KHN was measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days post-irradiation. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's compromise post-hoc test with a significance level of p0.05. In DCP, and not UCE, at 24 hours and 7 days post-irradiation, the B+20 s method showed significantly higher KHN at all depths of cavity, except the depth of 0.5 mm (p<0.05. Conclusion: KHN depends on the light-exposure method, use of bonding agent, depth of cavity, post-irradiation time, and material brand. Based on the microhardness behavior, DCBRCs are preferably prepared by the effective exposure method, when used for a greater depth of cavity.

  16. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Le Roux

    Full Text Available Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively, the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number, and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species, though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification

  17. Ionization chamber with build-up cup spectral sensitivity to megavoltage (0.5-20 MeV) photon fluences in free air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlachev, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    In-air measurements of photon beam properties, used in radiation therapy, is common practice for determining radiation output dependence from the field size, known as head scatter factors (HSF). PMMA and brass build-up caps are most popular miniphantoms for providing electron equilibrium. Discrepancies up to 2% in HSF measurements by different combinations of detectors and equilibrium caps have been published. One of the main reasons of those discrepancies is the detector system spectral sensitivity and differences in primary and scatter radiation spectra. In the light of new model based dose calculation methods direct radiation fluence measurement is of great interest. So, understanding of detector spectral sensitivity is important task for modern dosimetry of radiation therapy. In the present study Monte Carlo (MC) method was employed to calculate ionization chamber response to monoenergetic photon fluences, normalized to water kerma units. Simulation was done using EGS4 package. Electron transport was performed with ESTEPE equal to 4%. PEGS cross sections were generated for maximal energy 20 MeV with cutoff kinetic energy 10 KeV both for photons and electrons. Scanditronix RK-05 ionization chamber was chosen as a prototype. Eight cylindrical miniphantoms, representing four materials (PMMA, Al, Cu, Pb) and two front wall thickness, were simulated. Results are presented. Miniphantom front wall thicknesses in each case are shown in the figure. Diameter depends on the material and equal respectively: PMMA - 4, Al - 2.5, Cu - 1.5, and PB - 1.5 cm. Ionization chamber outer diameter is equal to 0.7 cm. Detector sensitivity has considerable energy dependence. Two effects explain it. First is the radiation attenuation in the miniphantom. Second is pair production, which dominates in high atomic number miniphantoms for energies above 5 MeV. Depending on the miniphantom material detector response changes from 1.5 to 5 times in the energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. Correct

  18. HIMMELI v1.0: HelsinkI Model of MEthane buiLd-up and emIssion for peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivonen, Maarit; Smolander, Sampo; Backman, Leif; Susiluoto, Jouni; Aalto, Tuula; Markkanen, Tiina; Mäkelä, Jarmo; Rinne, Janne; Peltola, Olli; Aurela, Mika; Lohila, Annalea; Tomasic, Marin; Li, Xuefei; Larmola, Tuula; Juutinen, Sari; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Heimann, Martin; Sevanto, Sanna; Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; Vesala, Timo

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands are one of the most significant natural sources of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. They emit CH4 because decomposition of soil organic matter in waterlogged anoxic conditions produces CH4, in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2). Production of CH4 and how much of it escapes to the atmosphere depend on a multitude of environmental drivers. Models simulating the processes leading to CH4 emissions are thus needed for upscaling observations to estimate present CH4 emissions and for producing scenarios of future atmospheric CH4 concentrations. Aiming at a CH4 model that can be added to models describing peatland carbon cycling, we composed a model called HIMMELI that describes CH4 build-up in and emissions from peatland soils. It is not a full peatland carbon cycle model but it requires the rate of anoxic soil respiration as input. Driven by soil temperature, leaf area index (LAI) of aerenchymatous peatland vegetation, and water table depth (WTD), it simulates the concentrations and transport of CH4, CO2, and oxygen (O2) in a layered one-dimensional peat column. Here, we present the HIMMELI model structure and results of tests on the model sensitivity to the input data and to the description of the peat column (peat depth and layer thickness), and demonstrate that HIMMELI outputs realistic fluxes by comparing modeled and measured fluxes at two peatland sites. As HIMMELI describes only the CH4-related processes, not the full carbon cycle, our analysis revealed mechanisms and dependencies that may remain hidden when testing CH4 models connected to complete peatland carbon models, which is usually the case. Our results indicated that (1) the model is flexible and robust and thus suitable for different environments; (2) the simulated CH4 emissions largely depend on the prescribed rate of anoxic respiration; (3) the sensitivity of the total CH4 emission to other input variables is mainly mediated via the concentrations of dissolved gases, in particular, the O2

  19. HIMMELI v1.0: HelsinkI Model of MEthane buiLd-up and emIssion for peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raivonen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are one of the most significant natural sources of methane (CH4 to the atmosphere. They emit CH4 because decomposition of soil organic matter in waterlogged anoxic conditions produces CH4, in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2. Production of CH4 and how much of it escapes to the atmosphere depend on a multitude of environmental drivers. Models simulating the processes leading to CH4 emissions are thus needed for upscaling observations to estimate present CH4 emissions and for producing scenarios of future atmospheric CH4 concentrations. Aiming at a CH4 model that can be added to models describing peatland carbon cycling, we composed a model called HIMMELI that describes CH4 build-up in and emissions from peatland soils. It is not a full peatland carbon cycle model but it requires the rate of anoxic soil respiration as input. Driven by soil temperature, leaf area index (LAI of aerenchymatous peatland vegetation, and water table depth (WTD, it simulates the concentrations and transport of CH4, CO2, and oxygen (O2 in a layered one-dimensional peat column. Here, we present the HIMMELI model structure and results of tests on the model sensitivity to the input data and to the description of the peat column (peat depth and layer thickness, and demonstrate that HIMMELI outputs realistic fluxes by comparing modeled and measured fluxes at two peatland sites. As HIMMELI describes only the CH4-related processes, not the full carbon cycle, our analysis revealed mechanisms and dependencies that may remain hidden when testing CH4 models connected to complete peatland carbon models, which is usually the case. Our results indicated that (1 the model is flexible and robust and thus suitable for different environments; (2 the simulated CH4 emissions largely depend on the prescribed rate of anoxic respiration; (3 the sensitivity of the total CH4 emission to other input variables is mainly mediated via the concentrations of dissolved gases, in particular

  20. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-10-05

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the

  1. Review on transactinium isotope build-up and decay in reactor fuel and related sensitivities to cross section changes and results and main conclusions of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data, held at Karlsruhe, November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Lalovic, M.

    1976-04-01

    In this report a review is given on the actinium isotope build-up and decay in LWRs, LMFBRs and HTRs. The dependence of the corresponding physical aspects on reactor type, fuel cycle strategy, calculational methods and cross section uncertainties is discussed. Results from postirradiation analyses and from integral experiments in fast zero power assemblies are compared with theoretical predictions. Some sensitivity studies about the influence of actinium nuclear data uncertainties on the isotopic concentration, decay heat, and the radiation out-put in fuel and waste are presented. In a second part, the main results of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data are summarized and discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. The Young-Feynman two-slits experiment with single electrons: Build-up of the interference pattern and arrival-time distribution using a fast-readout pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frabboni, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gabrielli, Alessandro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Carlo Gazzadi, Gian [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Giorgi, Filippo [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Matteucci, Giorgio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Pozzi, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.pozzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Cesari, Nicola Semprini; Villa, Mauro; Zoccoli, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    The two-slits experiment for single electrons has been carried out by inserting in a conventional transmission electron microscope a thick sample with two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique and a fast recording system able to measure the electron arrival-time. The detector, designed for experiments in future colliders, is based on a custom CMOS chip equipped with a fast readout chain able to manage up to 10{sup 6} frames per second. In this way, high statistic samples of single electron events can be collected within a time interval short enough to measure the distribution of the electron arrival-times and to observe the build-up of the interference pattern. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the first results obtained regarding the two-slits Young-Feynman experiment with single electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use two nano-slits fabricated by Focused Ion Beam technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We insert in the transmission electron microscope a detector, designed for experiments in future colliders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We record the build-up of high statistic single electron interference patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measure the time distribution of electron arrivals.

  3. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES. Semi-annual Technical Report October 6, 2002 - April 5, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; McClure, Kevin; Morgan, Craig D.

    2003-01-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m 3 ) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores

  4. Morphology, structure, composition and build-up processes of the active channel-mouth lobe complex of the Congo deep-sea fan with inputs from remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) multibeam and video surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennielou, Bernard; Droz, Laurence; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jacq, Céline; Bonnel, Cédric; Picot, Marie; Le Saout, Morgane; Saout, Yohan; Bez, Martine; Savoye, Bruno; Olu, Karine; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The detailed structure and composition of turbiditic channel-mouth lobes is still largely unknown because they commonly lie at abyssal water depths, are very thin and are therefore beyond the resolution of hull-mound acoustic tools. The morphology, structure and composition of the Congo turbiditic channel-mouth lobe complex (90×40 km; 2525 km2) were investigated with hull-mounted swath bathymetry, air gun seismics, 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler, sediment piston cores and also with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and video acquired with a Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV). The lobe complex lies 760 km off the Congo River mouth in the Angola abyssal plain between 4740 and 5030 m deep. It is active and is fed by turbidity currents that deposit several centimetres of sediment per century. The lobe complex is subdivided into five lobes that have prograded. The lobes are dominantly muddy. Sand represents ca. 13% of the deposits and is restricted to the feeding channel and distributaries. The overall lobe body is composed of thin muddy to silty turbidites. The whole lobe complex is characterized by in situ mass wasting (slumps, debrites). The 1-m-resolution bathymetry shows pervasive slidings and block avalanches on the edges of the feeding channel and the channel mouth indicating that sliding occurs early and continuously in the lobe build-up. Mass wasting is interpreted as a consequence of very-high accumulation rates, over-steepening and erosion along the channels and is therefore an intrinsic process of lobe building. The bifurcation of feeding channels is probably triggered when the gradient in the distributaries at the top of a lobe becomes flat and when turbidity currents find their way on the higher gradient on the lobe side. It may also be triggered by mass wasting on the lobe side. When a new lobe develops, the abandoned lobes continue to collect significant turbiditic deposits from the feeding channel spillover, so that the whole lobe complex remains active. A

  5. A comprehensive study on energy absorption and exposure buildup factors for some essential amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrates in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mean free path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Ozdemir, Yueksel

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) have been calculated for some essential amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrates in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). The five parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting approximation has been used to calculate both EABF and EBF. Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy, penetration depth and weight fraction of elements have been studied. While the significant variations in EABF and EBF for amino acids and fatty acids have been observed at the intermediate energy region where Compton scattering is the main photon interaction process, the values of EABF and EBF appear to be almost the same for all carbohydrates in the continuous energy region. It has been observed that the fatty acids have the largest EABF and EBF at 0.08 and 0.1 MeV, respectively, whereas the maximum values of EABF and EBF have been observed for aminoacids and carbohydrates at 0.1 MeV. At the fixed energy of 1.5 MeV, the variation of EABF with penetration depth appears to be independent of the variations in chemical composition of the amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrates. Significant variations were also observed between EABF and EBF which may be due to the variations in chemical composition of the given materials.

  6. Barriers to repeated assessment of verbal learning and memory: a comparison of international shopping list task and rey auditory verbal learning test on build-up of proactive interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Golkhandan, S; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Wilson, P

    2012-11-01

    Proactive interference (PI) that remains unidentified can confound the assessment of verbal learning, particularly when its effects vary from one population to another. The International Shopping List Task (ISLT) is a new measure that provides multiple forms that can be equated for linguistic factors across cultural groups. The aim of this study was to examine the build-up of PI on two measures of verbal learning-a traditional test of list learning (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, RAVLT) and the ISLT. The sample consisted of 61 healthy adults aged 18-40. Each test had three parallel forms, each recalled three times. Results showed that repeated administration of the ISLT did not result in significant PI effects, unlike the RAVLT. Although these PI effects, observed during short retest intervals, may not be as robust under normal clinical administrations of the tests, the results suggest that the choice of the verbal learning test should be guided by the knowledge of PI effects and the susceptibility of particular patient groups to this effect.

  7. Defense.gov - Special Report: Afghanistan Buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    explosive devices in Afghanistan and rendering them harmless. Story Commanders Look to Boost Security Force mind of an Afghan elder, the hope of an Afghan mother, the aspirations of an Afghan child, this can be , Mullen Says NATO Leader Expects Partners to Boost Contributions Petraeus: Afghan 'Surge' to Target

  8. Electron cloud buildup studies for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160803; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    Electron clouds can develop in accelerators operating with positively charged particles. The con- sequences of e-cloud related effects are very important for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and for the design of future accelerators including the LHC luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). High electron densities are generated by an interaction between the beam and the confining chamber. Primary electrons, that can be generated through various mecha- nisms, are accelerated by the beam and impinge on the chamber walls, thereby extracting more electrons from the material. Furthermore they also deposit their kinetic energy in the process, which has to be compensated by the cooling system. Especially in cryogenic environments, as it is the case for a large part of the LHC, high heat loads can pose a serious problem. In order to improve the understanding of the electron cloud, simulation studies are performed with the code PyECLOUD, developed at CERN. The work of the first half of the project is desc...

  9. Build-up and impact of volatile fatty acids on E. coli and A. lumbricoides during co-digestion of urine diverting dehydrating toilet (UDDT-F) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riungu, Joy; Ronteltap, Mariska; van Lier, Jules B

    2018-06-01

    This study examined the potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Ascaris lumbricoides (A. lumbricoides) eggs inactivation in faecal matter coming from urine diverting dehydrating toilets (UDDT-F) by applying high concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during anaerobic stabilization. The impact of individual VFAs on E. coli and A. lumbricoides eggs inactivation in UDDT-F was assessed by applying various concentrations of store-bought acetate, propionate and butyrate. High VFA concentrations were also obtained by performing co-digestion of UDDT-F with organic market waste (OMW) using various mixing ratios. All experiments were performed under anaerobic conditions in laboratory scale batch assays at 35±1 °C. A correlation was observed between E. coli log inactivation and VFA concentration. Store bought VFA spiked UDDT-F substrates achieved E. coli inactivation up to 4.7 log units/day compared to UDDT-F control sample that achieved 0.6 log units/day. In co-digesting UDDT-F and organic market waste (OMW), a ND-VFA concentration of 4800-6000 mg/L was needed to achieve E. coli log inactivation to below detectable levels and complete A. lumbricoides egg inactivation in less than four days. E. coli and A. lumbricoides egg inactivation was found to be related to the concentration of non-dissociated VFA (ND-VFA), increasing with an increase in the OMW fraction in the feed substrate. Highest ND-VFA concentration of 6500 mg/L was obtained at a UDDT-F:OMW ratio 1:1, below which there was a decline, attributed to product inhibition of acidogenic bacteria. Results of our present research showed the potential for E. coli and A. lumbricoides inactivation from UDDT-F up to WHO standards by allowing VFA build-up during anaerobic stabilization of faecal matter. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report April 6, 2000 - October 5, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m 3 ) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging

  11. Methods of Increasing the Performance of Radionuclide Generators Used in Nuclear Medicine: Daughter Nuclide Build-Up Optimisation, Elution-Purification-Concentration Integration, and Effective Control of Radionuclidic Purity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van So Le

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods of increasing the performance of radionuclide generators used in nuclear medicine radiotherapy and SPECT/PET imaging were developed and detailed for 99Mo/99mTc and 68Ge/68Ga radionuclide generators as the cases. Optimisation methods of the daughter nuclide build-up versus stand-by time and/or specific activity using mean progress functions were developed for increasing the performance of radionuclide generators. As a result of this optimisation, the separation of the daughter nuclide from its parent one should be performed at a defined optimal time to avoid the deterioration in specific activity of the daughter nuclide and wasting stand-by time of the generator, while the daughter nuclide yield is maintained to a reasonably high extent. A new characteristic parameter of the formation-decay kinetics of parent/daughter nuclide system was found and effectively used in the practice of the generator production and utilisation. A method of “early elution schedule” was also developed for increasing the daughter nuclide production yield and specific radioactivity, thus saving the cost of the generator and improving the quality of the daughter radionuclide solution. These newly developed optimisation methods in combination with an integrated elution-purification-concentration system of radionuclide generators recently developed is the most suitable way to operate the generator effectively on the basis of economic use and improvement of purposely suitable quality and specific activity of the produced daughter radionuclides. All these features benefit the economic use of the generator, the improved quality of labelling/scan, and the lowered cost of nuclear medicine procedure. Besides, a new method of quality control protocol set-up for post-delivery test of radionuclidic purity has been developed based on the relationship between gamma ray spectrometric detection limit, required limit of impure radionuclide activity and its measurement

  12. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report April 6, 2003 - October 5, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-01-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m 3 ) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m 3 ) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of

  13. Activity buildup in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1987-05-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel irradiation dose rates during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to Co-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, the author has attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of Co-59 in the reactor feedwater; - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel element crud deposits (activation); - the release and transport of the Co-60; - the build up of Co-60 in the corrosion products of the primary circuit. Existing models for the build up of cirquit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experience from selected reactors are summarized. Finally the state of the art of knowledge concerning the individual stages in the development of the activation build up is depicted. This highlights the existing gaps and thus identifies areas for possible R+D activities. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobald build up in the primary cirquit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of austenitic steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with an understanding of the activation processes of the cobalt deposited on the fuel elements and in the mass transfer of Co-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. In this respect there is ample room for new and original research contributions. It is recommended that sections 8 and 9 of this report should be read as an 'Executive Summary'. (author)

  14. Test for bacterial resistance build-up against plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J L; Shimizu, T; Li, Y-F; Morfill, G E; Schmidt, H-U; Isbary, G

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal ‘agents’ are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms. (paper)

  15. THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, 2900 Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Crouch, A. D., E-mail: kim@astro.umontreal.ca-a, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca-b, E-mail: ash@cora.nwra.com-c [CORA/NWRA, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  16. THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P.; Crouch, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  17. The Buildup of a Scale-free Photospheric Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P.; Crouch, A. D.

    2012-10-01

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  18. Testing during Study Insulates against the Buildup of Proactive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, Karl K.; McDermott, Kathleen B.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2008-01-01

    Recent interest in the benefits of retrieval practice on long-term retention--the testing effect--has spawned a considerable amount of research toward understanding the underlying nature of this ubiquitous memory phenomenon. Taking a test may benefit retention through both direct means (engaging appropriate retrieval processes) and indirect means…

  19. Spheromak Buildup in SSPX using a Modular Capacitor Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R D; McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Hooper, E B; Romero-Talamas, C A

    2006-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [1] was designed to address both magnetic field generation and confinement. The SSPX produces 1.5-3.5msec, spheromak plasmas with a 0.33m major radius and a minor radius of ∼0.23m. DC coaxial helicity injection is used to build and sustain the spheromak plasma within the flux conserver. Optimal operation is obtained by flattening the profile of λ = μ 0 j/B, consistent with reducing the drive for tearing and other MHD modes, and matching of edge current and bias flux to minimize |(delta)B/B| rms . With these optimizations, spheromak plasmas with central T e >350eV and β e ∼ 5% with toroidal fields of 0.6T [3] have been obtained. If a favorable balance between current drive efficiency and energy confinement can be shown, the spheromak has the potential to yield an attractive magnetic fusion concept [4]. The original SSPX power system consists of two lumped-circuit capacitor banks with fixed circuit parameters. This power system is used to produce an initial fast formation current pulse (10kV, 0.5MJ formation bank), followed by a lower current, 3.5ms flattop sustainment pulse (5kV, 1.5MJ sustainment bank). Experimental results indicate that a variety of injected current pulses, such as a longer sustainment flattop [5], higher and longer fast formation [6], and multiple current pulses [7], might further our understanding of magnetic field generation. Although the formation bank can be split into two independent banks capable of producing other injected current waveforms, the variety of current waveforms produced by this power system is limited. Thus, to extend the operating range of the SSPX, a new pulsed-power system has been designed and partially constructed. In this paper, we discuss the design of the programmable bank and present first results from using the bank to increase the magnetic field in SSPX

  20. Carbon buildup monitoring using RBS: Correlation with secondary electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, E.F.; Rosales, P.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Murillo, G.; Fernandez, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The RBS technique is applied to solve the problem of on-line monitoring of the carbon deposited on a thin backed foil under ion bombardment. An iterative method is used to reliably extract quantities such as number of projectiles and target thickness in spite of beam energy changes and detector unstabilities. Experimental values for secondary electron yields are also deduced. Results are reported for the thickness variation of thin carbon foils bombarded with carbon ions of energies between 8.95 and 13 MeV. A linear correlation of this variation is found with both, the ion fluence at target and the number of secondary electrons emitted. The correlation exists even though a wide range of beam currents, beam energies and bombarding times was used during the experiment. The measured electron yields show evidence for a change in the emission process between the original foils and the deposited layer, possibly due to a texture change

  1. Alternatives for contaminant control during MFTF plasma buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, J.M.; Valby, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    The MFTF mirror device considers all low-energy species to be contaminants, since their primary effect is to erode the plasma boundary by charge-exchange reactions. Confinement for other than hydrogen isotypes is far from complete and confinement time is hardly more than transit time from the source to the end wall. The brevity of the confinement time makes it all the more necessary to prevent any contamination which might further reduce it. At Livermore, the historical solution to contaminant control has been to evaporate titanium onto cold surfaces. An alternative to this approach and its implications are considered

  2. Survey report for fiscal 1999 on foundation of strategy formation for industrial technologies. Strategy of foundation and environment buildup (Further into support for technological innovation); 1999 nendo sangyo gijutsu senryaku sakutei kiban chosa hokokusho. Kiban kankyo senryaku gijutsu kakushin shien shisaku shinkutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Surveyed are the roles of the government, important for environmental buildup for technological innovation. The U.S. research and development support programs are classed into contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, and CRADAs (Cooperative Research and Development Agreements). The government financially supports the first three, but not CRADA. It provides CRADA with manpower, facilities, and resources. The research and development (R-and-D) appropriation not for national defense in the U.S. fiscal 2000 budget is up 36% to $39.4 billion occupying 50.6% of the total R-and-D expense. The basic research appropriation is given the highest priority, enjoying an increase of 4.7% to $18.1 billion. In the U.S., taxation for R-and-D expenses is done in two ways. One is a research expense tax deduction system under which R-and-D expense is handled as a cost, a subject of deduction. The other is a research and experiment tax deduction system under which a certain percentage of R-and-D increment is free of taxation. NEDO's (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) system for national R-and-D projects is scheduled to change extensively upon reorganization of the government ministries and agencies in January, 2001. Under the circumstances, the current and future systems of the state supports for R-and-D are outlined, and the position of NEDO in them is clarified. The R-and-D systems of the entrusted businesses and the problems they contain are also described. (NEDO)

  3. Fission gas pressure build-up and fast-breeder economy; Accumulation de la pression des gaz de fission et economie des reacteurs surgenerateurs a neutrons rapides; Nakoplenie davleniya gazov produktov deleniya i ehkonomika reaktorov-razmnozhitelej na bystrykh nejtronakh; Aumento de la presion de los gases de fision y economia de los reactores reproductores rapidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, P [Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1962-03-15

    Fuel-cycle costs and doubling time of fast-breeder reactors are strongly affected by the fuel-burn-up obtainable. Use of oxide or carbide fuel offers the possibility of reaching a burn-up of 100 000 MWd/t. In fuel-clad elements, a limiting factor is the fission-gas-pressure build-up. At the high burn-up considered, an appreciable fraction of the fission gases gets into the pores and thus contributes to the pressure on the can. Starting from the known fission-product yields and decay chains, gas production and pressure build-up have been calculated. Three physical models have been employed in calculating the pressure acting upon the can : the gas is contained either in interconnected pores, in separate pores, or in a central hole. The pressure-dependence upon free volume (fuel density) and temperature will be discussed. Cans made of high-strength materials as Ineonel-X and molybdenum could stand the fission-gas pressure at operating temperatures. Unfortunately, these materials have higher absorption cross-sections than stainless steel. Results of a multi-group calculation are given, showing the effect of using these can materials and of decreasing the fuel density on critical mass and breeding ratio in small and medium-size breeders. (author) [French] Le cout du cycle de combustible et la periode de doublement des reacteurs surgenerateurs a neutrons rapides dependent etroitement du taux de combustion. En utilisant pour combustible un oxyde ou un carbure, on peut atteindre un taux de combustion de 100 000 MW j/t. Avec des combustibles gaines, l'accumulation de la pression des gaz de fission est un facteur limitatif. Pour le fort taux de combustion envisage, une fraction non negligeable des gaz de fission penetre dans les interstices et contribue ainsi a la pression sur la gaine. A partir des rendements en produits de fission et des chaines de desintegration connus, l'auteur a calcule la production de gaz et l'accumulation de pression. Pour calculer la pression

  4. Resistência à remoção por tração de coroas totais metálicas cimentadas em dentes com e sem reconstrução coronária Tensile strength of metal crowns cemented on dental and buildup surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista FRANCO

    1999-12-01

    C, 37°C and 55°C, and later subjected to tensile tests in a Universal Kratos testing machine. The results obtained were submitted to ANOVA, showing statistically significant differences (5% between the distinct conditions studied. Regarding the teeth without reconstruction, we verified improved results of Ketac-Cem when using polyacrylic acid. The teeth reconstructed with Vitremer did not show significant statistical difference between the two cementing agents. The reconstruction of teeth buildup surfaces did not hinder the retentiveness of the metal crowns.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Electron Injection and E-Layer Build-Up in Astron; Etudes Theoriques sur l'Injection d'Electrons et la Formation de la Couche E dans l'Astron; Teoreticheskie izucheniya ehlektronnoj inzhektsii i narashchivaniya sloya-E v ustanovke ''Astron''; Estudios Teoricos de Electrones y Formacion de la Capa E en la Instalacion Astron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J.; Neil, V. K.; Heckrotte, W. [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1966-04-15

    High intensity beams of relativistic electrons injected into the Astron device can be trapped in part by the action of coherent electromagnetic self-forces. Through the appropriate design of external passive circuitry, axial electrostatic blow-up of the azimuthally injected beam can be prevented or inhibited. The self-forces result in a spread of particles in z-P{sub z} phase space, and part of the beam is trapped at the expense of the loss of the rest. In addition to this effect, for sufficiently high beam currents, the coupling of the relativistic beam to the passive circuitry can lead to significant loss of axial momentum through energy dissipation. A one-dimensional model of the actual Astron geometry has been investigated theoretically. Green's functions for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields have been calculated analytically and incorporated into the Vlasov equation governing the axial motion of the electrons. Results of the calculation allow some qualitative comparison with experimental results from the Astron experiment. As envisioned, the trapped electrons will form a cylindrical layer of sufficient intensity so that the self-magnetic field is comparable to the applied field. The mathematical model for the build-up of the electron layer and the self-field is the time-dependent Vlasov equation coupled with Maxwell's equations. The system is axially symmetric and complete neutralization is assumed. The field components Br and B{sub z} can be derived from a stream function {psi}( r, z, t). The canonical angular momentum is a constant of the motion, hence we can consider an electron distribution function f{sub e}( r, z, P{sub r}, P{sub z}). The partial differential equations for f{sub e} and {psi} are solved numerically by using finite difference methods. The phase space consists of over 160 000 points, that is 81 in z, 12 in r, 19 in P{sub z} and 9 in P{sub r}. At each step an integration of f{sub e} over momentum space yields the current density j

  6. Variations in 6MV x-ray radiotherapy build-up dose with treatment distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW; Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Dose in the build up region for high energy x-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator is affected by the x-ray source to patient surface distance (SSD). The use of isocentric treatments whereby the tumour is positions 100cm from the source means that depending of the depth of the tumour and the size of the patient, the SSD can vary from distances of 80cm to 100cm. To achieve larger field sizes, the SSD can also be extended out to 120cm at times. Results have shown that open fields are not significantly affected by SSD changes with deviations in percentage dose being less than 4% of maximum dose for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm SSD. With the introduction of beam modifying devices such as Perspex blocking trays, the effects are significant with a deviation of up to 22% measured at 6MV energy with a 6mm Perspex tray for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm. These variations are largest at the skin surface and reduce with depth. The use of a multi leaf collimator for blocking removes extra skin dose caused by the Perspex block trays with decreasing SSD. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  7. Picosecond buildup and relaxation of intense stimulated emission in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L.; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    In support of the idea developed previously based on circumstantial evidence, we have found that stimulated emission emerges in GaAs and its intensity increases with a picosecond delay relative to the front of powerful picosecond optical pumping that produced a dense electron-hole plasma. The emission intensity relaxes with decreasing pumping with a characteristic time of ∼10 ps. We have derived the dependences of the delay time, the relaxation time, and the duration of the picosecond emission pulse on its photon energy. The estimates based on the fact that the relaxation of emission is determined by electron-hole plasma cooling correspond to the measured relaxation time.

  8. Effects of Fallow Genealogical Cycles on the Build-up of Nutrients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2012-01-04

    Jan 4, 2012 ... soil nutrients was attributed to the increased in tree size, vegetation cover and adequate ground cover ... regeneration of fallow vegetation with diverse tree ...... Semi-Deciduous Forest following Anthropogenic ... Dynamics under Shifting Cultivation in Eastern ... World Bank, Washington, DC, 226–230.

  9. Build-up of a liquid hydrogen target with extremely thin windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckle, V.G.

    1992-06-01

    Small hydrogen targets with only a few cubic millimeters of liquid have many advantages in experiments on accelerators with phase-space cooled particle beams. In order to achieve good suppression of systematic errors by secondary reactions in the target and in the target windows, the thickness of the foil window for a 1 mm target may only be 0.3 μm. A pressure difference of 200 mbar permits the use of such thin foils (with a diameter of 6 mm). A purely mechanical pressure control unit was built, which consists of soft bellows and a loading weight. The pressure difference from a vacuum, which is in the bellows, is set by the weight on the bellows. The working parameters were chosen so that deuterium, nitrogen and oxygen can be used. The pressure variations in the cell are only ± 2.5 mbar. A mixing of gaseous and liquid hydrogen in the target cell and the formation of bubbles due to free convection can be prevented. A quiet volume of liquid hydrogen free of bubbles was obtained. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Effect of the LHC Beam Screen Baffle on the Electron Cloud Buildup

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Annalisa; Li, Kevin; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Electron Cloud (EC) has been identified as one of the major intensity-limiting factors in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the EC, an additional heat load is deposited on the perforated LHC beam screen, for which only a small cooling capacity is available. In order to preserve the superconducting state of the magnets, pumping slots shields were added on the outer side of the beam screens. In the framework of the design of the beam screens of the new HL-LHC triplets, the impact of these shields on the multipacting process was studied with macroparticle simulations. For this purpose multiple new features had to be introduced in the PyECLOUD code. This contribution will describe the implemented simulation model and summarize the outcome of this study.

  11. Internal filtration and external filter cake build-up in sandstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Abduwani, F.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Water injection is an integral constituent of most field development scenarios. This injection may take place for secondary recovery and pressure maintenance such as sea water injection. Alternatively, it may take place as a waste water disposal method as in the case of produced water re-injection.

  12. Considerations on pressure build-up in deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, Hans-Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Gas formation caused by corrosion of metals is a pivotal point with respect to the safety analysis of deep geological repositories. Solid corrosion products are formed unavoidably during the gas formation. The volumes of these solid corrosion products are multiples of the original waste volume. These solid corrosion products are chemically extremely stable and result in a pressure increase inside the repository. This pressure is considerably higher than that of the overlaying rock. The question that arises is, why this aspect is not considered in the consulted documents.

  13. Implications of Galaxy Buildup for Putative IMF Variations in Massive Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancato, Kirsten; Genel, Shy; Bryan, Greg

    2017-08-01

    Recent observational evidence for initial mass function (IMF) variations in massive quiescent galaxies at z = 0 challenges the long-established paradigm of a universal IMF. While a few theoretical models relate the IMF to birth cloud conditions, the physical driver underlying these putative IMF variations is still largely unclear. Here we use post-processing analysis of the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamical simulation to investigate possible physical origins of IMF variability with galactic properties. We do so by tagging stellar particles in the simulation (each representing a stellar population of ≈ {10}6 {M}⊙ ) with individual IMFs that depend on various physical conditions, such as velocity dispersion, metallicity, or star formation rate, at the time and place in which the stars are formed. We then follow the assembly of these populations throughout cosmic time and reconstruct the overall IMF of each z = 0 galaxy from the many distinct IMFs it is composed of. Our main result is that applying the observed relations between IMF and galactic properties to the conditions at the star formation sites does not result in strong enough IMF variations between z = 0 galaxies. Steeper physical IMF relations are required for reproducing the observed IMF trends, and some stellar populations must form with more extreme IMFs than those observed. The origin of this result is the hierarchical nature of massive galaxy assembly, and it has implications for the reliability of the strong observed trends, for the ability of cosmological simulations to capture certain physical conditions in galaxies, and for theories of star formation aiming to explain the physical origin of a variable IMF.

  14. Electron cloud buildup driving spontaneous vertical instabilities of stored beams in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Romano

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the 2016 run, an anomalous beam instability was systematically observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC. Its main characteristic was that it spontaneously appeared after beams had been stored for several hours in collision at 6.5 TeV to provide data for the experiments, despite large chromaticity values and high strength of the Landau-damping octupole magnet. The instability exhibited several features characteristic of those induced by the electron cloud (EC. Indeed, when LHC operates with 25 ns bunch spacing, an EC builds up in a large fraction of the beam chambers, as revealed by several independent indicators. Numerical simulations have been carried out in order to investigate the role of the EC in the observed instabilities. It has been found that the beam intensity decay is unfavorable for the beam stability when LHC operates in a strong EC regime.

  15. NARMER-1: a photon point-kernel code with build-up factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visonneau, Thierry; Pangault, Laurence; Malouch, Fadhel; Malvagi, Fausto; Dolci, Florence

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of NARMER-1, the new generation of photon point-kernel code developed by the Reactor Studies and Applied Mathematics Unit (SERMA) at CEA Saclay Center. After a short introduction giving some history points and the current context of development of the code, the paper exposes the principles implemented in the calculation, the physical quantities computed and surveys the generic features: programming language, computer platforms, geometry package, sources description, etc. Moreover, specific and recent features are also detailed: exclusion sphere, tetrahedral meshes, parallel operations. Then some points about verification and validation are presented. Finally we present some tools that can help the user for operations like visualization and pre-treatment.

  16. Space charge build-up in XLPE-cable with temperature gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens; Hjerrild, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    and temperatures were applied in the 20 - 80°C range with gradients across the insulation of up to 15°C. In this paper, the observed charge phenomena in the bulk and at the interfaces are related to the external conditions, in particular to the temperature gradient. The measured space charge distributions...

  17. Inflationary buildup of a vector field condensate and its cosmological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Juan C. Bueno; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Light vector fields during inflation obtain a superhorizon perturbation spectrum when their conformal invariance is appropriately broken. Such perturbations, by means of some suitable mechanism (e.g. the vector curvaton mechanism), can contribute to the curvatue perturbation in the Universe and produce characteristic signals, such as statistical anisotropy, on the microwave sky, most recently surveyed by the Planck satellite mission. The magnitude of such characteristic features crucially depends on the magnitude of the vector condensate generated during inflation. However, in the vast majority of the literature the expectation value of this condensate has so-far been taken as a free parameter, lacking a definite prediction or a physically motivated estimate. In this paper, we study the stochastic evolution of the vector condensate and obtain an estimate for its magnitude. Our study is mainly focused in the supergravity inspired case when the kinetic function and mass of the vector boson is time-varying during inflation, but other cases are also explored such as a parity violating axial theory or a non-minimal coupling between the vector field and gravity. As an example, we apply our findings in the context of the vector curvaton mechanism and contrast our results with current observations

  18. Evaluation of microshield build-up factors and their limits of applicability / Lucky Mkhonza

    OpenAIRE

    Mkhonza, Lucky

    2007-01-01

    MicroShield is a point-kernel computer code used for gamma-ray shielding and dose rate assessment. It allows the modeling of simple source geometries and simple shielding layouts which lead to very accurate results with low computer time consumption, compared with more advanced methods such as Monte Carlo transport code (e.g., MCNP), among others. The short computer time in finding solutions is due to a deterministic transport using analytic solutions for the direct source contribution (unsca...

  19. Build-up and decay of fuel actinides in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Shindo, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Yasukawa, Shigeru

    1976-05-01

    For boiling water reactors, pressurized light-water reactors, pressure-tube-type heavy water reactors, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors, uranium fueled and mixed-oxide fueled, each of 1000 MWe, the following have been studied: (1) quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides built up in the reactor, (2) cooling behaviors of activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the spent fuels, and (3) activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the high-level reprocessing wastes as a function of storage time. The neutron cross section and decay data of respective actinide nuclides are presented, with their evaluations. For effective utilization of the uranium resources and easy reprocessing and high-level waste management, a thermal reactor must be fueled with uranium; the plutonium produced in a thermal reactor should be used in a fast reactor; and the plutonium produced in the blanket of a fast reactor is more appropriate for a fast reactor than that from a thermal reactor. (auth.)

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal processes in solar flare energy build-up and release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tend, W. van.

    1979-01-01

    A solar flare can be described as an instability in the upper solar atmosphere that converts 10 28 ergs to 10 32 ergs of magnetic energy into other forms of energy, mainly kinetic energy. The solar flare gives rise to a wealth of observable phenomena. The author develops a fairly simple model to explain many of these apparently very diverse features of solar flares. (Auth.)

  1. PAD WELDING EFFECT ON CRANKSHAFT LENGTH WHILE MAKING BUILD-UP PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Vigerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals a pad welding effect on axial sizes of a crankshaft to be built-up and a dependence of axial deformation of built-up element on an elasticity modulus, a heating temperature and thermal coefficient of linear expansion of an element and a plating, weave bead sizes. This dependence enables to forecast tensile stresses in the plating. The paper contains justification on limitation of axial deformation of the built crank due to decrease of pad welding numbers up to only one during the whole period of its lifetime and carrying out  resource-saving measures.

  2. RIBD-IRT, Isotope Buildup and Isotope Decay from Fission Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: RIBD-IRT calculates isotopic concentrations resulting from two fission sources with normal down- chain decay by beta emission and isomeric transfers and inter-chain coupling resulting from (n,gamma) reactions. Calculations can be made to follow an irradiation history through an unlimited number of step changes of unrestricted duration and variability including shutdown periods, restarts at different power levels and/or any other level changes. In addition, the program permits to track and modify the concentration of individual elements as they decay with time following reactor shutdown. Tracking individual elements enables one to estimate time-dependent source terms for a hypothetical LOCA based on known or postulated fission product release mechanisms. 2 - Method of solution: RIBD-IRT is a grid processor. It organizes the various members described by the fission product library data into a grid with the various linkages established from chain branching data, yield data, and neutron capture cross sections with their branching ratios. Radioactive decay includes not only the simple member-to-member cascade but also the more complex forms where branching may be partially or completely skip one or two intervening members

  3. Build-up of macroscopic eigenstates in a memory-based constrained system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labousse, M; Perrard, S; Couder, Y; Fort, E

    2014-01-01

    A bouncing drop and its associated accompanying wave forms a walker. Based on previous works, we show in this article that it is possible to formulate a simple theoretical framework for the walker dynamics. It relies on a time scale decomposition corresponding to the effects successively generated when the memory effects increase. While the short time scale effect is simply responsible for the walker's propulsion, the intermediate scale generates spontaneously pivotal structures endowed with angular momentum. At an even larger memory scale, if the walker is spatially confined, the pivots become the building blocks of a self-organization into a global structure. This new theoretical framework is applied in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and reveals the underlying mechanisms leading to the emergence of the macroscopic spatial organization reported by Perrard et al (2014 Nature Commun. 5 3219). (paper)

  4. Ion Composition and Energization in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere and the Effects on Ring Current Buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Brandt, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ observations and modeling work have confirmed that singly-charged oxygen ions, O+, which are of Earth's ionospheric origin, are heated/accelerated up to >100 keV in the magnetosphere. The energetic O+ population makes a significant contribution to the plasma pressure in the Earth's inner magnetosphere during magnetic storms, although under quiet conditions H+ dominates the plasma pressure. The pressure enhancements, which we term energization, are caused by adiabatic heating through earthward transport of source population in the plasma sheet, local acceleration in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet, and enhanced ion supply from the topside ionosphere. The key issues regarding stronger O+ energization than H+ are non-adiabatic local acceleration, responsible for increase in O+ temperature, and more significant O+ supply than H+, responsible for increase in O+ density. Although several acceleration mechanisms and O+ supply processes have been proposed, it remains an open question what mechanism(s)/process(es) play the dominant role in stronger O+ energization. In this paper we summarize important spacecraft observations including those from Van Allen Probes, introduces the proposed mechanisms/processes that generate O+-rich energetic plasma population, and outlines possible scenarios of O+ pressure abundance in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  5. Machined part sales price build-up based on the contribution margin concept

    OpenAIRE

    Lucato, Wagner Cesar; Baptista, Elesandro Antonio; Coppini, Nivaldo Lemos

    2009-01-01

    One of the main competitive moves observed in the last two decades was the change in product pricing, evolving from a cost plus margin paradigm to a market-driven one. In the present days, the customer defines how much he or she is willing to pay for a given product or service. As a result, traditional cost accounting procedures and their related pricing formulas cannot accommodate that kind of change without significant turnaround in practices and concepts. Taking that into consideration, th...

  6. Buildup of electrons with hot electron beam injection into a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashko, V.A.; Krivoruchko, A.M.; Tarasov, I.K.

    1989-01-01

    The injection of the monoenergetic beam of electrons into the vacuum drift channel under the conditions when the beam current exceeds a certain threshold value involves a virtual cathode creation. The process of virtual cathode creation leads to an exchange of one-fluid movement of beam particles to three-fluid one corresponding to incident, reflected and passed through anticathode beam particles. For the monoenergetic beam case when the velocity spread Δv dr (v dr is the beam drift velocity), the beam instability was predicted in theory and was observed in experiment. Meanwhile, the injection in the drift space of the 'hot' beam having finite spread in velocities may be accompanied not only by the reflection of particles if their velocity v 1/2 (where φ is the electrostatic potential dip value, e and m are the electron charge and mass, respectively), but also the mutual Coulomb scattering of incident and reflected electrons. The scattering process leads in its turn to appearance of viscosity forces and to trapping of a part of beam electrons into the effective potential well formed by electrostatic potential dip and the viscous force potential. The interaction of travelling and trapped particles may occur even at the stage preceding the virtual electrode formation and it may influence the process of its appearance and also the current flow through the drift space. In this report there are described the experimental results on accumulation of electrons when electron beam propagates in vacuum and has a large spread in particle velocities Δv dr in the homogeneous longitudinal magnetic field when ω pe He where ω pe is the electron Langmuir frequency of beam electrons, ω He is the electron cyclotron frequency. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  7. Inversion Build-Up and Cold-Air Outflow in a Small Alpine Sinkhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Manuela; Whiteman, C. David; Dorninger, Manfred

    2017-06-01

    Semi-idealized model simulations are made of the nocturnal cold-air pool development in the approximately 1-km wide and 100-200-m deep Grünloch basin, Austria. The simulations show qualitatively good agreement with vertical temperature and wind profiles and surface measurements collected during a meteorological field expedition. A two-layer stable atmosphere forms in the basin, with a very strong inversion in the lowest part, below the approximate height of the lowest gap in the surrounding orography. The upper part of the stable layer is less strongly stratified and extends to the approximate height of the second-lowest gap. The basin atmosphere cools most strongly during the first few hours of the night, after which temperatures decrease only slowly. An outflow of air forms through the lowest gap in the surrounding orography. The outflow connects with a weak inflow of air through a gap on the opposite sidewall, forming a vertically and horizontally confined jet over the basin. Basin cooling shows strong sensitivity to surface-layer characteristics, highlighting the large impact of variations in vegetation and soil cover on cold-air pool development, as well as the importance of surface-layer parametrization in numerical simulations of cold-air-pool development.

  8. Process for prevention of water build-up in cryogenic distillation column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopewell, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    In a process for the separation of a hydrocarbon and acid gas containing feed stream in a cryogenic distillation column, a zone of the column which is operated at a temperature of 60 0 F or less, wherein free water accumulates or forms hydrates in the column from water vapor in the feed stream during the cryogenic process, and which process comprises separating the feed stream in the column into an overhead stream and a bottom stream, this patent describes the improvement which comprises: withdrawing a hydrocarbon and acid gas vapor stream which stream is enriched in water vapor with respect to the feed stream, thereby preventing the excess accumulation of free water or the formation of hydrates in the cryogenic column

  9. The effect of the build-up wall at the TLD calibration using Co-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose in thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material at the calibration using Co-60 gamma rays depends on the TLD thickness and the wall material used for electric equilibrium condition. The relation was examined for LiF, BeO and CaF 2 TLDs sandwiched with PMMA, Teflon and Pyrex glass walls using a Monte Carlo transport code and compared with cavity ionization theory calculations. For the mismatched combination of LiF, BeO/Pyrex glass and CaF 2 /PMMA, it was found that the energy deposition did not change monotonously with TLD thickness from small cavity to large cavity value: a depression observed around 1-mm thickness for LiF/Pyrex glass and a peak around 0.6-mm thickness for CaF 2 /PMMA. The phenomena were explained by using different exponential attenuation coefficients β and β' for the weighting functions of cavity theory. Moreover, use of large cavity values was found to lead possibly to 3-5% errors in the calibration of thin TLDs. (author)

  10. Model of the buildup effect on the photon flux over a cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the photon flux over a cylinder surrounded by an homogeneous and isotropic medium is studied; the gamma field is produced by a radioactive point source. A model for the photon flux that reach the cylinder calculation is developed. The model is applied when the medium is vacuum and when the medium is water. The model includes the secondary photons generated by Compton scattering in the water. The model reliable and it is verified by experimental data. The high dependence on the geometry conditions of the build up flux is corroborated. (author) [es

  11. Understanding the build-up of a technological innovation system around hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurs, R.A.A.; Hekkert, M.P.; Smits, R.E.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides insight into the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the Netherlands (1980-2007). This is done by applying a Technological Innovation System (TIS) approach. This approach takes the perspective that a technology is shaped by a surrounding network of actors,

  12. Effect of feeding rate and ammonia build-up on growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -up on growth performance of Clarias gariepinus juveniles in the Wet Laboratory, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State. Completely Randomized Design was used; each treatment was ...

  13. Modelling Venting and Pressure Build-up in a 18650 LCO Cell during Thermal Runaway (ABSTRACT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian; White, Ralph

    Li-ion batteries are a very popular type of electric storage devices that possess high energy density when compared to the other battery chemistries. Due to this property, when operating under abusive conditions such as high ambient temperature, the batteries can experience thermal runaway, which...... may lead to fires and explosions. To prevent this, it is therefore important to model thermal runaway considering different events such as venting and the pressure development inside the battery cell, which makes the main purpose of this paper. A model consisting of the different decomposition....... By fitting the activation energies, and measuring experimentally the mass of the ejecta during thermal runaway, the model is compared and validated against an extensive experiment performed by Golukbov et al. [1] during oven heating. When analysing the results, it is found that by including the venting...

  14. QELBY®-Induced Enhancement of Exclusion Zone Buildup and Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hydrophilic powder, QELBY, from the feldspar family of clay minerals was investigated for its ability to form structured or exclusion-zone (EZ water. We demonstrated microsphere-free zones around different fractions of the QELBY powder or its hydrated pellet. Averaging approximately 100 μm, these zones grew to a size similar to that formed in the vicinity of the Nafion standard. In the case of silica (control, only occasional microsphere-free zones of about 70 μm were found. Further, studies to investigate QELBY’s energizing effect on germination and early sapling growth in brown chickpea seeds showed at least a 2-3-fold increase in root length and/or formation of shoots. This was seen in seeds bathed in QELBY supernatants or surrounded by QELBY powder outside the vials containing the seeds. This indirect effect was observed whether the QELBY was dry or hydrated.

  15. Radiation damage buildup and dislocation evolution in Ni and equiatomic multicomponent Ni-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levo, E. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Granberg, F., E-mail: fredric.granberg@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Fridlund, C.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Djurabekova, F. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-07-15

    Single-phase multicomponent alloys of equal atomic concentrations (“equiatomic”) have proven to exhibit promising mechanical and corrosion resistance properties, that are sought after in materials intended for use in hazardous environments like next-generation nuclear reactors. In this article, we investigate the damage production and dislocation mobility by simulating irradiation of elemental Ni and the alloys NiCo, NiCoCr, NiCoFe and NiFe, to assess the effect of elemental composition. We compare the defect production and the evolution of dislocation networks in the simulation cells of two different sizes, for all five studied materials. We find that the trends in defect evolution are in good agreement between the different cell sizes. The damage is generally reduced with increased alloy complexity, and the dislocation evolution is specific to each material, depending on its complexity. We show that increasing complexity of the alloys does not always lead to decreased susceptibility to damage accumulation under irradiation. We show that, for instance, the NiCo alloy behaves very similarly to Ni, while presence of Fe or Cr in the alloy even as a third component reduces the saturated level of damage substantially. Moreover, we linked the defect evolution with the dislocation transformations in the alloys. Sudden drops in defect number and large defect fluctuations from the continuous irradiation can be explained from the dislocation activity.

  16. Radioactive well logging system with shale (boron) compensation by gamma ray build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelman, H.E.; Arnold, D.M.; Pitts, R.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole are repetitively bombarded with bursts of high energy neutrons. A radiation detector in a sonde in the borehole senses the gamma rays induced by the capture of thermal neutrons and sends signals representative thereof to the surface. At the surface, two single channel energy analyzers, such as from 1.30 to 2.92 MeV and from 3.43 to 10.0 MeV, sense the formation thermal neutron capture gamma ray response after each neutron burst. The counts of thermal neutron capture gamma rays in these analyzers are used to distinguish between the presence of salt water and hydrocarbons, which is logged. By controlling the repetition rate of the neutron source, measured counting rates in formations with relatively large thermal neutron lifetimes are emphasized, compensating for borehole effects which could otherwise give rise to erroneous results in shale formations, which have a high boron content. 11 claims, 5 figures

  17. Transmission fidelity is the key to the build-up of cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hannah M; Laland, Kevin N

    2012-08-05

    Many animals have socially transmitted behavioural traditions, but human culture appears unique in that it is cumulative, i.e. human cultural traits increase in diversity and complexity over time. It is often suggested that high-fidelity cultural transmission is necessary for cumulative culture to occur through refinement, a process known as 'ratcheting', but this hypothesis has never been formally evaluated. We discuss processes of information transmission and loss of traits from a cognitive viewpoint alongside other cultural processes of novel invention (generation of entirely new traits), modification (refinement of existing traits) and combination (bringing together two established traits to generate a new trait). We develop a simple cultural transmission model that does not assume major evolutionary changes (e.g. in brain architecture) and show that small changes in the fidelity with which information is passed between individuals can lead to cumulative culture. In comparison, modification and combination have a lesser influence on, and novel invention appears unimportant to, the ratcheting process. Our findings support the idea that high-fidelity transmission is the key driver of human cumulative culture, and that progress in cumulative culture depends more on trait combination than novel invention or trait modification.

  18. Characterization and Quantification of Deposits Buildup and Removal in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of biomass as wood or straw in large suspension­fired boilers is an efficient method to reduce the use of fossil fuels consumption and to reduce the net CO2 formation. However, the presence of chlorine and alkali metals in biomass (straw) generate ash with a low melting point and induce...... large problems of ash deposit formation on the superheater tubes. Full scale studies on biomass ash deposition and removal had been done on biomass grate boilers, while only limited data is available from biomass suspension­firing. The aim of this study was to investigate deposit mass uptake, heat...... uptake reduction, fly ash and deposit characteristics, and deposit removal by using an advanced online deposit probe in a suspension­fired boiler using wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type and probe exposure time on the ash deposition rate, the heat uptake, the fly ash and deposit...

  19. The Distinct Build-Up Of Dense And Normal Massive Passive Galaxies In Vipers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Adriana; Vipers Team

    2017-06-01

    At fixed stellar mass, the population of passive galaxies has increased its mean effective radius by a factor 5 in the last 10 Gyr, decreasing its mean stellar mass density (S = Mstar/(2πRe 2 ) by a factor >> 10. Whether this increase in is mainly due to the size-growth of individual galaxies through dry mergers, or to the fact that newly quenched galaxies have a larger size, is still matter of debate. A promising approach to shed light on this issue is to investigate the evolution of the number density of passive galaxies as a function of their mass density. In this context, massive (Mstar >10^11 Msun) passive galaxies are the most intriguing systems to study, since, in a hierarchical scenario, they are expected to accrete their stellar mass mainly by mergers. The wide area (˜ 16 sq. deg) and high sampling rate (˜ 40%) of the spectroscopic survey VIPERS allowed us to collect a sample of ˜ 2000 passive massive galaxies over the redshift range 0.5 passive galaxies as function both of redshift and mass density. This information, combined with the evolution of the number density allowed us to put constraints on the mass accretion scenarios of passive galaxies. In this talk I will present our results and conclusions and how they depend on the environment in which the galaxies reside.

  20. SOIL-AIR PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENT WITH A TRANSIENT PRESSURE BUILDUP METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical solution for transient pressure change in a single venting well was derived from mass conservation of air, Darcy's law of flow in porous media, and the ideal gas law equation of state. Slopes of plots of Pw2 against ln (t+Δt)/Δt similar to Homer's plot were used to ...

  1. Build-up enhancement of photoluminescence from phenylazomethine bismuth dendrimer using Bi(OTf)3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Tetsuya; Imaoka, Shotaro; Imaoka, Takane; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2018-05-01

    Metal assembly to a dendrimer can provide various functionalities based on the branched structure. Here, we researched assembly phenomena of bismuth salts in the phenylazomethine dendrimer and achieved enhancement of emission intensity per metal unit by using Bi(OTf)3. This enhancement suggested increasing of Bi-N coordination bonds derived from the bismuth units in the dendrimer.

  2. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Primary water chemistry monitoring from the point of view of radiation build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.L.; Civin, V.; Pinter, T.

    1997-01-01

    Basic operational principles of a computer code system calculating the primary circuit corrosion product activities based on actual measured plant chemistry data are presented. The code system consists of two parts: FeSolub.prg: calculates the characteristic iron solubilities based on actual primary water chemistry (H 3 BO 3 KOH, ... etc.) and plant load (MW) data. A developed solubility calculation method has been applied fitted to magnetite solubility data of several authors; RADTRAN.exe: calculates primary circuit water and surface corrosion product activities based on results of FeSolub.prg or planned water chemistry data up to the next shutdown. The computer code system is going to be integrated into a general primary water chemistry monitoring and surveillance system. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Model Study of the Pressure Build-Up during Subcutaneous Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Hernandez Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In this study we estimate the subcutaneous tissue counter pressure during drug infusion from a series of injections of insulin in type 2 diabetic patients using a non-invasive method. We construct a model for the pressure evolution in subcutaneous tissue based on mass continuity and the flow laws...

  5. Operation New Arrivals. Phase I - The Buildup, 27 April 1975 - 23 May 1975. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    la nbvbg nba Ian bao chuyen-nghlep, na ohi la nhSng ngvicfl oo thlen« eh£, ohUng ehung tol üde-aong Dear Conpatrlote i Away fron our natlTe land...field, places for badmitten, basketball , and volleyball playing. (4) A newspaper in Vietnamese for the center is in production. Contributions of

  6. Unexpected 226Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K.; Berg, W.B. van de

    1982-01-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filters. This higher radiation level is caused by radium which is present in very low concentrations in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works have since been determined. In all factories the filter part and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of barium sulphate and calcium sulphate with a higher radium concentration is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the barium sulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal contamination in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed. (author)

  7. Unexpected /sup 226/Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K. (Stamicarbon B.V., Geleen (Netherlands)); van de Berg, W.B. (Unie van Kunstmestfabrieken, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filters. This higher radiation level is caused by radium which is present in very low concentrations in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works have since been determined. In all factories the filter part and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of barium sulphate and calcium sulphate with a higher radium concentration is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the barium sulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal contamination in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed.

  8. Unexpected 226Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardinoye, M H; Weterings, K; van de Berg, W B

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filtres. This higher radiation level is caused by radium, which, as a decay product in the 238U series, is present in very low concentrations (1-50 pCi 226R/g) in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Specific research later on established that there were detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works as well. It turned out that in all factories the filter part, and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation-level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of bariumsulphate and calciumsulphate with a higher radiumconcentration (+/- 0.1 Ci/g) is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the bariumsulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal pollution, for example in cleaning operations by radio-active intake or inhallation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning (every 1-3 yr) the equipment in which the radio-active scaling is formed.

  9. Unexpected /sup 226/Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K.; van de Berg, W.B.

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filtres. This higher radiation level is caused by radium, which, as a decay product in the /sup 238/U series, is present in very low concentrations (1-50 pCi 226R/g) in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Specific research later on established that there were detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works as well. It turned out that in all factories the filter part, and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation-level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of bariumsulfate and calciumsulfate with a higher radium concentration (+/- 0.1 Ci/g) is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the bariumsulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal pollution, for example in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning (every 1-3 yr) the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed.

  10. Strain buildup in GaAs due to 100 MeV Ag ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Shramana; Bhaumik, Sudipta; Panda, Jaya Kumar [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Ojha, Sunil [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Dhar, Achintya [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Roy, Anushree, E-mail: anushree@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The formation of strained layers and a non-monotonic evolution of strain in high energy (100 MeV) silver ion (Ag{sup 7+}) irradiated undoped semi-insulating GaAs are observed and analyzed using Raman scattering and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. At low fluence, compressively strained layers are formed, whereas, with increase in fluence both compressive and tensile strains appear as observed from HRXRD measurements. Further, at low fluence, the change in compressive strain with increase in fluence is found to be sharper than what is observed at higher fluence, thereby suggesting a critical fluence value, beyond which there is a simultaneous generation and annihilation of vacancy type defects. The initial blue shift and subsequent relative red shift beyond above critical fluence in the Raman peak also qualitatively reveal non-monotonic evolution of strain in this case. Finally, we demonstrate the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting the decrease in lattice ordering in the crystal in the low fluence regime, below the detection limit of Rutherford back-scattering channeling (c-RBS) measurements.

  11. Effect of heat build-up on carbon emissions in chimato compost piles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Mlangeni

    atmospheric carbon compounds such as dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) into soil organic carbon compounds. (Biala, 2011; Gill et al., 2012; Biddlestone and Gray,. 1987). Maturity and stability of compost is partly dependent on type of feedstock that influence compost pile moisture content, aeration and heat build up. Well.

  12. POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN BUILDUP IN HANFORD SEALED AIR FILLED NUCLEAR STORAGE VESSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY BE

    2008-01-01

    This calculation is performed in accordance with HNF-PRO-8259, PHMC Calculation Preparation and Issue and addresses the question as to whether a flammable mixture of hydrogen gas can accumulate in a Hanford sealed nuclear storage vessel where the only source of hydrogen is the moisture in the air that initially filled the vessel Of specific concern is nuclear fuel inside IDENT 69-Gs, placed in Core Component Containers (CCCs) located inside Interim Storage Vaults (ISVs) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) The CCCs are to be removed from the ISVs and placed inside a Hanford Unirradiated Fuel Package (HUFP) for transport and interim storage. The repackaging procedures mandated that no plastics were permitted, all labels and tape were to be removed and the pins to be clean and inspected Loading of the fuel into the CCC/ISV package was permitted only if it was not raining or snowing. This was to preclude the introduction of any water The purpose was to minimize the presence of any hydrogenous material inside the storage vessels. The scope of NFPA 69, 'Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems', precludes its applicability for this case. The reactor fuel pins are helium bonded. The non-fuel pins, such as the pellet stacks, are also helium bonded. The fuel pellets were sintered at temperatures that preclude any residual hydrogenous material. Hydrogen gas can be formed from neutron and gamma radiolysis of water vapor. The radiolysis reaction is quite complex involving several intermediate radicals, and competing recombination reactions. Hydrogen gas can also be formed through corrosion. This analysis takes a simplistic approach and assumes that all water vapor present in the storage vessel is decomposed into hydrogen gas. Although the analysis is needed to specifically address HUFP storage of nuclear fuel, it is equally applicable to any sealed fuel storage vessel under the assumptions listed

  13. International Monitoring system (IMS) build-up in Africa: Current status and the way forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, P.

    2002-01-01

    The complete IMS verification system for primary and auxiliary seismic together with that of radionuclide, hydroacoustic and infrasound is plotted on a global map and Africa in particular showing its status. IMS situation in East and Southern Africa is included

  14. Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandstroem, Kjell; Mueller, Christian; Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Aabo (Finland)

    2007-12-15

    Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling is since long considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. (author)

  15. Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa [Abo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Abo (Finland)

    2007-12-15

    Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Primary water chemistry monitoring from the point of view of radiation build-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, G L [Institute for Electrical Power Research, Budapest (Hungary); Civin, V [Hungarian Electricity Generating Board, Budapest (Hungary); Pinter, T [Nuclear Power Plant PAKS, Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-02-01

    Basic operational principles of a computer code system calculating the primary circuit corrosion product activities based on actual measured plant chemistry data are presented. The code system consists of two parts: FeSolub.prg: calculates the characteristic iron solubilities based on actual primary water chemistry (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}KOH, ... etc.) and plant load (MW) data. A developed solubility calculation method has been applied fitted to magnetite solubility data of several authors; RADTRAN.exe: calculates primary circuit water and surface corrosion product activities based on results of FeSolub.prg or planned water chemistry data up to the next shutdown. The computer code system is going to be integrated into a general primary water chemistry monitoring and surveillance system. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  17. Activity build-up in the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachse, G.; Mittag, I.

    1986-01-01

    Based upon international literature, the following topics are reviewed: research and development efforts; release, transport, and deposition of radioactive corrosion products under primary circuit conditions; experimental results in test and technical systems; possibilities of controlling radiation fields in nuclear power plants by water-chemical measures, decontamination, and high-temperature filtration. (author)

  18. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  19. On the reversibility of cake buildup and compression in a membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-01-01

    fouling depends on the relaxation time relative to the filtration time and pressure. Therefore, to observe a critical flux for irreversible fouling, the relaxation times applied in the stepping approach should be customized to be sufficient to remove all removable fouling. The model suggests...

  20. Problems of Gas Pressure Build-up in Casing String of UGS and Gas Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sovius

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of three basic parts. The opening part is a brief description of problems associated with the secondary untightness of UGS wells (Underground Gas Storages and gas wells generally.The main part of the paper is composed of some cases that we have met in our company. Solution proposals of various cases are also supplied in this part. Separate problem situations are described in terms of finding out an untight point and also a testing result and consequential removing of untightness.The conclusion includes knowledge summary that were taken by solution of complicatedsituations connected with well non-hermeticity.

  1. BUILD-UP OF UNDERSTANDING OF TECHNOLOGICAL CONVERGENCE: EVIDENCE FROM PRINTED INTELLIGENCE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    MATTI KARVONEN; MATTI LEHTOVAARA; TUOMO KÄSSI

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze the dynamics between traditional and emerging new industries in converging industry environments. The paper identifies different convergence types and utilizes the framework to analyze the evolution of printed intelligence and RFID markets. The primary source of information is based on the main RFID industry players, patents, and 12 semistructured interviews conducted by the research group. The results reveal that the emerging industry is in the early st...

  2. A study of build-up effects in high-energy radiation fields using a TEPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M; Stevenson, G R [CERN, European Laboratory for Particle Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Aroua, A [IAR, Institute for Applied Radiophysics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sannikov, A V [IHEP, Institute for High-Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-04

    A dose of 2 mSv close to the body surface of a pregnant woman is considered by ICRP to assure a dose limit of 1 mSv to the foetus. Such an assumption depends on the energy spectrum and composition of the external radiation field and it was tested in radiation fields containing high-energy particles similar to those found around high-energy particle accelerators and in air-craft. Measurements of dose and dose equivalent were performed as a function of wall thickness using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in radiation fields at the CERN-EU Reference Radiation Facility. Results are presented both with respect to integral quantities and event size spectra. The decrease in dose and dose equivalent at a depth equivalent to that of the foetus was typically 10% in a high-energy stray radiation field and in the case of PuBe source neutrons amounted to only 30%. It is concluded that it would be prudent under such exposure conditions to limit the dose of a pregnant woman to 1 mSv in order to assure that the dose to the foetus remains below the same limit. (author)

  3. A study of build-up effects in high-energy radiation fields using a TEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.; Aroua, A.; Sannikov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    A dose of 2 mSv close to the body surface of a pregnant woman is considered by ICRP to assure a dose limit of 1 mSv to the foetus. Such an assumption depends on the energy spectrum and composition of the external radiation field and it was tested in radiation fields containing high-energy particles similar to those found around high-energy particle accelerators and in air-craft. Measurements of dose and dose equivalent were performed as a function of wall thickness using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in radiation fields at the CERN-EU Reference Radiation Facility. Results are presented both with respect to integral quantities and event size spectra. The decrease in dose and dose equivalent at a depth equivalent to that of the foetus was typically 10% in a high-energy stray radiation field and in the case of PuBe source neutrons amounted to only 30%. It is concluded that it would be prudent under such exposure conditions to limit the dose of a pregnant woman to 1 mSv in order to assure that the dose to the foetus remains below the same limit. (author)

  4. An investigation of build-up effects in high energy radiation fields using a Handi TEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroua, A.; Sannikov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    ICRP considers that a dose limit of 2 mSv close to the body surface of a pregnant woman will ensure a dose limit of 1 mSv to the foetus. This assumption depends on the energy spectrum and composition of the radiation fields, especially those containing high energy particles such as are found around particle accelerators or in aircraft. In this work the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter in radiation fields of different composition and energy was measured as a function of depth in cylindrical phantoms. The decrease in dose and dose equivalent at a phantom depth equivalent to that of a foetus was 10% in a typical high energy stray radiation field and 30% for neutrons from a Pu-Be source. It is concluded that it would be prudent in these cases to limit the exposure of a pregnant woman to 1 mSv in order to ensure that the dose to the foetus stays below the same limit. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of build-up dose from 6 MV X-rays under pelvic and abdominal patient immobilisation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, M.J.Martin J. E-mail: mbutson@usa.netmbutson@guessmail.com; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-06-01

    The use of pelvic and abdominal immobilisation devices in radiotherapy is required for accurate positioning and repositioning of patients during their fractionated treatment delivered normally over a period of 5-6 weeks. 6 MV X-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator have a skin sparing effect whereby the skin dose delivered is considerably less than that received by the tumour. The treatment through a vacuum compressed immobilisation device (Vacbag) however increases the dose delivered to the skin by interactions of the X-rays within the Vacbag material. For example, the basal layer doses increased from 16% for an open field to 52% of maximum with a bag thickness of 2.5 cm for a 10 cmx10 cm field at 6 MV X-ray energy. At the same field size the dermal skin layer (1 mm depth) doses increased from 44% (no bag) to 60% for a bag thickness of 2.5 cm at 6 MV X-rays. The Vacbag should be placed outside the treatment field whenever possible to keep skin dose to a minimum level.

  6. Evaluation of build-up dose from 6 MV X-rays under pelvic and abdominal patient immobilisation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, M.J.Martin J.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    The use of pelvic and abdominal immobilisation devices in radiotherapy is required for accurate positioning and repositioning of patients during their fractionated treatment delivered normally over a period of 5-6 weeks. 6 MV X-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator have a skin sparing effect whereby the skin dose delivered is considerably less than that received by the tumour. The treatment through a vacuum compressed immobilisation device (Vacbag) however increases the dose delivered to the skin by interactions of the X-rays within the Vacbag material. For example, the basal layer doses increased from 16% for an open field to 52% of maximum with a bag thickness of 2.5 cm for a 10 cmx10 cm field at 6 MV X-ray energy. At the same field size the dermal skin layer (1 mm depth) doses increased from 44% (no bag) to 60% for a bag thickness of 2.5 cm at 6 MV X-rays. The Vacbag should be placed outside the treatment field whenever possible to keep skin dose to a minimum level

  7. Buildup of aerosol precursor gases and sulfur-induced activation of soot in nascent jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Hirschberg, M.M.; Fabian, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Gerz, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Research issues concerning the chemical transformation of exhaust trace gases are summarized. The photochemical evolution of NO{sub x} early in the plume is strongly coupled to plume mixing. Substantial amounts of HNO{sub 3} are generated in nascent plumes even if no NO{sub 2} is emitted. The production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes very efficient if part of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. Each emitted soot particle can acquire 1-10% by mass fully oxidized sulfur molecules prior to binary homogeneous nucleation, if a few percent of the exhaust SO{sub x} are emitted as SO{sub 3}, indicating an important activation pathway for soot, and leading to a marked enhancement of new aerosol formation and growth rates. (author) 11 refs.

  8. Extreme Water Loss and Abiotic O2 Buildup on Planets Throughout the Habitable Zones of M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We show that terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of M dwarfs older than ∼1 Gyr could have been in runaway greenhouses for several hundred million years following their formation due to the star's extended pre-main sequence phase, provided they form with abundant surface water. Such prolonged runaway greenhouses can lead to planetary evolution divergent from that of Earth. During this early runaway phase, photolysis of water vapor and hydrogen/oxygen escape to space can lead to the loss of several Earth oceans of water from planets throughout the habitable zone, regardless of whether the escape is energy-limited or diffusion-limited. We find that the amount of water lost scales with the planet mass, since the diffusion-limited hydrogen escape flux is proportional to the planet surface gravity. In addition to undergoing potential desiccation, planets with inefficient oxygen sinks at the surface may build up hundreds to thousands of bar of abiotically produced O2, resulting in potential false positives for life. The amount of O2 that builds up also scales with the planet mass; we find that O2 builds up at a constant rate that is controlled by diffusion: ∼5 bar/Myr on Earth-mass planets and up to ∼25 bar/Myr on super-Earths. As a result, some recently discovered super-Earths in the habitable zone such as GJ 667Cc could have built up as many as 2000 bar of O2 due to the loss of up to 10 Earth oceans of water. The fate of a given planet strongly depends on the extreme ultraviolet flux, the duration of the runaway regime, the initial water content, and the rate at which oxygen is absorbed by the surface. In general, we find that the initial phase of high luminosity may compromise the habitability of many terrestrial planets orbiting low-mass stars. Key Words: Astrobiology—Biosignatures—Extrasolar terrestrial planets—Habitability—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 15, 119–143. PMID:25629240

  9. Quantification of Ash Deposit Build-up and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension­fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...

  10. Possibilities for the reduction of the activity build-up in the primary circuit of water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachse, G.; Mittag, I.

    1985-01-01

    Basing upon the international literature in a review are refered: research and development efforts; release, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products under primary circuit conditions; experimental results in test and technical systems; and possibilities to control radiation fields in nuclear power plants by waterchemical measures, decontamination, and high temperature filtration. Relevant patents are summarized. (author)

  11. Investigations with respect to pressure build-up in 200 l drums with supercompacted low level waste (LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroth, K.; Lammertz, H.

    1988-04-01

    In the drum storage facilities of various nuclear power stations, ballooning effects have recently been observed on a limited number of 200 l drums filled with hypercompacted mixed LLW. The ballooning of the drums lid and bottom is due to internal overpressure caused by gas formation in the waste. The internal drum pressures and the composition of the drum gases were measured on a considerable number of 200 l drums. Hydrogen, formed by chemical reactions between the waste components, was identified as the pressure generating gas. The reasons for the hydrogen formation were investigated on both real and simulated wastes. (orig.) [de

  12. The Liquid Sustainer Build-up Time Impact on the Emptying Spacecraft Fuel Tank in Free Orbiting Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sapozhnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trouble-free operation of liquid rocket engines (LRE depends, among other factors, on the nonstop supply of liquid rocket fuel components in the fuel tank feed line with continuous flow.This condition becomes especially relevant for the aerial vehicles (AV in orbital (suborbital environment. With a little filled fuel tanks discontinuity of flow may occur because of pressurizing gas blow-by in the feed line as a result of the funnel generation (with or without vortex formation and so-called phenomenon of dynamic failure of the interface "liquid-gas”.The paper presents a mathematical model of the process of emptying tank initially a little filled and having a reduced level of the gravity acceleration. Using the developed mathematical model a parametric study has been conducted to find how stabilization rate of liquid flow effects on the volume of drained liquid. The computational experiment defines gas blow-by points in the feed line and propellant residuals, depending on the flow rate, physical properties of the fuel components, residual value of the acceleration, and diameter of the feed line.As a result, an effect is discovered that previously has been never mentioned in publications on research of the emptying processes of the aircraft fuel tanks, namely: with abrupt bootstrap of the flow rate a blow-by of gas occurs at the initial stage of emptying tank. In this case, to ensure LRE trouble-free operation there is a need in a special inner-tank device to prevent premature blow-by of pressurizing gas in the tank feed line.

  13. Air Force Basing Strategies in the Western Pacific in Response to Chinese Military Buildup during Fiscal Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Table of Contents Disclaimer...of time. The USAF and U.S. government would have to be content with a lighter force of fighters in the region and a delay in response to the theater...Sea.” Audiovisual Library of International Law, United Nations. January 2016. http://legal.un.org/avl/intro/introduction.html?tab=2 14 Zheng, Bijian

  14. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Stone, J O.H.; Evans, J M; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  15. Buildup of aerosol precursor gases and sulfur-induced activation of soot in nascent jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B; Hirschberg, M M; Fabian, P [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Gerz, T [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    Research issues concerning the chemical transformation of exhaust trace gases are summarized. The photochemical evolution of NO{sub x} early in the plume is strongly coupled to plume mixing. Substantial amounts of HNO{sub 3} are generated in nascent plumes even if no NO{sub 2} is emitted. The production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes very efficient if part of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. Each emitted soot particle can acquire 1-10% by mass fully oxidized sulfur molecules prior to binary homogeneous nucleation, if a few percent of the exhaust SO{sub x} are emitted as SO{sub 3}, indicating an important activation pathway for soot, and leading to a marked enhancement of new aerosol formation and growth rates. (author) 11 refs.

  16. Linkages between orogenic plateau build-up, fold-thrust shortening, and foreland basin evolution in the Zagros (NW Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Iranian Plateau (IP) is a thickened, low-relief morphotectonic province of diffuse deformation that formed due to Arabia-Eurasia collision and may serve as a younger analogue for the Tibetan Plateau. Despite detailed geophysical characterization of the IP, its deformation history and relationship to the Zagros fold-thrust belt and its foreland basin evolution remains unresolved. Low-temperature thermochronometry and provenance data from a transect across the internal and external Zagros track growth of the IP and delineate multiphase interaction between upper- and lower-plate processes during closure of the Neotethys and Arabia-Eurasia suturing. Inversion of zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track data from plutonic and metamorphic basement rocks in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) of the IP reveals an initial stage of low-rate exhumation from 36-25 Ma, simultaneous with the onset of tectonic subsidence and marine incursion in the Zagros foreland basin. Overlapping apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He ages indicate sharp acceleration in SSZ exhumation rates between 20-15 Ma, coincident with rejuvenation of foreland basin subsidence and an influx of Eurasian-derived sediments into the Zagros foreland deposited above an Oligocene unconformity. The mid-Miocene marks a transition in focused exhumation from the SSZ to Arabian lower-plate. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages suggest in-sequence fold-thrust propagation from the High Zagros to simply folded belt from 10 Ma to recent, which is reflected in the foreland by a shift in provenance to dominantly recycled Arabian-derived detritus and clastic facies progradation. Integrated thermochronometric and provenance data document a two-phase outward expansion of the Iranian Plateau and Zagros fold-thrust belt, tightly coupled to distinct phases of basin evolution and provenance shifts in the Zagros foreland. We associate multiple deformation and basin episodes with protracted collisional processes, from subduction of attenuated Arabian transitional crust beneath Eurasia causing low-rate upper-plate exhumation in the late Eocene, to accelerated Miocene unroofing and basin flexure linked to increased plate coupling and eventual to suturing as buoyant Arabian continental lithosphere entered the subduction interface.

  17. Semi-empirical prediction of moisture build-up in an electronic enclosure using analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Conseil, Helene; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2016-01-01

    Electronic systems are exposed to harsh environmental conditions such as high humidity in many applications. Moisture transfer into electronic enclosures and condensation can cause several problems as material degradation and corrosion. Therefore, it is important to control the moisture content...... and the relative humidity inside electronic enclosures. In this work, moisture transfer into a typical polycarbonate electronic enclosure with a cylindrical shape opening is studied. The effects of four influential parameters namely, initial relative humidity inside the enclosure, radius and length of the opening...... and temperature are studied. A set of experiments are done based on a fractional factorial design in order to estimate the time constant for moisture transfer into the enclosure by fitting the experimental data to an analytical quasi-steady-state model. According to the statistical analysis, temperature...

  18. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth's surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes 10 Be (t 1/2 = 1.5Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on 36 Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic 36 Cl in calcite (CaCO 3 ) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of 36 Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of 36 Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of 36 Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs

  19. Modification of SRIM-calculated dose and injected ion profiles due to sputtering, injected ion buildup and void swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Toloczko, Mychailo B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Bailey, Nathan [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garner, Frank A.; Gigax, Jonathan; Shao, Lin [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In radiation effects on materials utilizing self-ion irradiations, it is necessary to calculate the local displacement damage level and ion injection profile because of the short distance that self-ions travel in a material and because of the strong variation of displacement rate with depth in a specimen. The most frequently used tool for this is the software package called Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). A SRIM-calculated depth-dependent dose level is usually determined under the implicit assumption that the target does not undergo any significant changes in volume during the process, in particular SRIM ignores the effect of sputtering, injected ions, and void swelling on the redistribution of the dose and injected ion profiles. This approach become increasingly invalid as the ion fluence reaches ever higher levels, especially for low energy ion irradiations. The original surface is not maintained due to sputter-induced erosion, while within the irradiated region of the specimen, injected ions are adding material, and if void swelling is occurring, it is creating empty space. An iterative mathematical treatment of SRIM outputs to produce corrected dose and injected ion profiles based on these phenomenon and without regard to diffusion is presented along with examples of differences between SRIM-calculated values and corrected values over a range of typical ion energies. The intent is to provide the reader with a convenient tool for more accurately calculating dose and injected ion profiles for heavy-ion irradiations.

  20. Rigging dark haloes: why is hierarchical galaxy formation consistent with the inside-out build-up of thin discs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, C.; Pogosyan, D.; Kimm, T.; Slyz, A.; Devriendt, J.; Dubois, Y.

    2011-12-01

    State-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations show that gas inflow through the virial sphere of dark matter haloes is focused (i.e. has a preferred inflow direction), consistent (i.e. its orientation is steady in time) and amplified (i.e. the amplitude of its advected specific angular momentum increases with time). We explain this to be a consequence of the dynamics of the cosmic web within the neighbourhood of the halo, which produces steady, angular momentum rich, filamentary inflow of cold gas. On large scales, the dynamics within neighbouring patches drives matter out of the surrounding voids, into walls and filaments before it finally gets accreted on to virialized dark matter haloes. As these walls/filaments constitute the boundaries of asymmetric voids, they acquire a net transverse motion, which explains the angular momentum rich nature of the later infall which comes from further away. We conjecture that this large-scale driven consistency explains why cold flows are so efficient at building up high-redshift thin discs inside out.

  1. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  2. Resonant light power buildup in ALPS, a ''light shining through a wall''-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Tobias; Danzmann, Karsten; Willke, Benno [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut (Germany); Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Knabbe, Axel; Lindner, Axel; List, Jenny; Meyer, Niels; Notz, Dieter; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Frede, Maik; Hildebrandt, Matthias [Laserzentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Wiedemann, Guenter [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We report on the first successfull application of a new experimental technique to search for weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) coupling to photons. As part of the ALPS experiment located at DESY in Hamburg, this technique uses an optical resonator to enhance the power inside a HERA dipole magnet on the production side of a typical ''light shining through a wall''-experiment. We use a frequency doubled continuous-wave laser emitting 0.6 W of power at 532 nm that is stabilized to a linear optical resonator with 8 m length. On resonance we achieve a circulating power of 34 W within the magnet. With this we obtained sensitivities corresponding to a coupling strength of g{approx}5.10{sup -7} GeV{sup -1} for interactions of axion-like particles and photons. The experimental setup and possible improvements are described and compared with common experimental designs with pulsed lasers.

  3. Plio-Quaternary Sandy Deposits and Microbial Buildups at the Southern Marmara Shelf Near Shoreface Area, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizhan Vardar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the formation and evolution mechanism of the sandy deposits plays key role to define the hydrodynamics of the shelves and coasts. The barrier islands determined from high resolution chirp seismic reflection profiles, were started to deposit on the boundary (SB that characterized by the lowstand stages of global sea level in the southern Marmara shelf near shoreface area. The unit haslost its activity at 55 ms, 60 ms depth in Erdek Bay, at 55 ms in Bandırma Bay, at 61 ms front of the Kocasu River. According to global sea level curves, this unit was evolved between 11000-11500 BP and10450-10150 BP. The geometrical situation and internal reflection character of these units indicate the balance between fluvial sediment transportation, marine intrusion and current systems in the study area. Belkis Isthmus that connects the Kapıdağ Peninsula to the mainland occurred synchronously with same process that formed the barrier islands. Bioherm structures were formed on the barrier islands and some of the bioherm’s uppermost surface is reached to 1 m below the sea floor. Bioherm structures are composing from organisms; formation and evolution depend on various stress factors. Barrier islands provide nutritional source to bioherms. Since these structures occur in a limited area, the development should be controlled by secondary factors. Biogenic gas determined from seismic sections closed to bioherm structures, probably plays the secondary role. Addition to this, during the forming and the growing of bioherms, Marmara Islands (Pasalimanı, Avşa, Marmara Islands and Imralı Island were possibly control the currents and the flooding in the study area and provided convenient environment to these structures evolution.

  4. Simulation of the build-up phase of a high voltage low pressure gas discharge using Monte-Carlo-methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, W.

    1990-02-01

    In this report the simulation of a Pseudospark predischarge between anode and cathode using Monte-Carlo-Methods is described. In the early phase of the discharge electric and magnetic self-fields can be neglected. The model is based on a discharge between two infinitely extended capacitor plates. Eleven different collision reactions and two electrode surface effects are taken into account. A Fortran program was developed that computes the built-up of the discharge in time and space. A specially of the code is, that not only electrons and ions are taken into account, but also fast neutral atoms and molecules. Three pairs of diode-length and voltage were investigated at different pressures: 350 kV/5.0 cm, 30 kV/10.0 cm and 6.9 kV/0.7 cm. The working gas was hydrogen. The computations included: The Paschen-curve, the time evolution of the current densities of the electrons at the anode and the ions at the cathode, the space- and time-dependent particle densities, the time-dependent energy distributions of the different particle species, the relative number of the different collision reactions. (orig./HSI) [de

  5. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    An attractive option for reducing the net CO2 emissions is to substitute coal with biomass in large power plant boilers. However, the presence of chlorine (Cl) and alkali metals (K, Na) in biomassmay induce large operational problems due to ash deposit formation on the superheater tubes. The aim...... of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... elemental analysis of fly ashes revealed that fly ash from suspension firing of straw has high contents of Si, K and Ca, while fly ash from straw firing on grate was rich in the volatile elements K, Cl and S. Investigations of deposit formation ratesweremade in the superheater and convective pass regions...

  6. Humidity build-up in electronic enclosures exposed to different geographical locations by RC modelling and reliability prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil-Gudla, H.; Staliulionis, Z.; Mohanty, S.

    2018-01-01

    according to this steady state (25 °C and 60% RH) have been calculated for the different climates, and the protection offered by the enclosures has been estimated under different casing materials and resistor-capacitor (RC) simulation. This method offers a way to predict the average value of failure rate...

  7. The Role of Test Expectancy in the Build-Up of Proactive Interference in Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Yana; Gilmore, Adrian W.; Szpunar, Karl K.; McDermott, Kathleen B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that interpolated testing in a multiple list paradigm protects against proactive interference by sustaining test expectancy during encoding. In both experiments, recall on the last of 5 word lists was compared between 4 conditions: a tested group who had taken tests on all previous lists, an untested group who had not…

  8. Assessment the accuracy of dose calculation in build-up region for two radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Farhood

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: It is concluded that for open field sizes without gantry angulation, dose calculation accuracy in Prowess TPS with CCCS algorithm is better than TiGRT and Prowess TPSs with FPE algorithm. Furthermore, it is concluded that for wedged field with large gantry angle, dose calculation accuracy of Prowess TPS with FPE algorithm is better than TiGRT TPS while, for medium and small gantry angles, dose calculation accuracy of TiGRT TPS is better than Prowess TPS with FPE algorithm.

  9. An Objective Measurement of the Build-Up of Auditory Streaming and of Its Modulation by Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah K.; Carlyon, Robert P.; Cusack, Rhodri

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments studied auditory streaming using sequences of alternating "ABA" triplets, where "A" and "B" were 50-ms tones differing in frequency by [delta]f semitones and separated by 75-ms gaps. Experiment 1 showed that detection of a short increase in the gap between a B tone and the preceding A tone, imposed on one ABA triplet, was better…

  10. Report on the Second KIMS-CNA Conference: The PLA Navys Build-Up and ROK-USN Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Modernization (London and Washington, DC: Kegan Paul International and The AEI Press, 1996), p. 274. See also his “China’s Push Through the South China Sea...to change its nature of the PLA Navy naval strategy from “brown water” force to “ green /blue water” navy enable to secure its vast maritime...and “full ocean-going green water fleet.” It is conceivable that the Chinese navy’s goal of its operational capability is not “blue water navy,” but

  11. Russian Build-Up on the Black Sea and Recommendations for U.S.-NATO Counter-Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    the Mediterranean and the greater world by Russia. In 1841 in London the great powers of Europe—Russia, United Kingdom, France , Austria and Prussia—as...next decade, becoming one of the causes of the Crimean War (1853–1856).4 In 1850 some disputes arose between the Orthodox and the Roman Catholic ...the Turkish fleet near Sinop, in the Black Sea. France , the British Empire, and Sardinia sided with the Ottomans. War was fought on the Black Sea as

  12. Extreme water loss and abiotic O2 buildup on planets throughout the habitable zones of M dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, R; Barnes, R

    2015-02-01

    We show that terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of M dwarfs older than ∼1 Gyr could have been in runaway greenhouses for several hundred million years following their formation due to the star's extended pre-main sequence phase, provided they form with abundant surface water. Such prolonged runaway greenhouses can lead to planetary evolution divergent from that of Earth. During this early runaway phase, photolysis of water vapor and hydrogen/oxygen escape to space can lead to the loss of several Earth oceans of water from planets throughout the habitable zone, regardless of whether the escape is energy-limited or diffusion-limited. We find that the amount of water lost scales with the planet mass, since the diffusion-limited hydrogen escape flux is proportional to the planet surface gravity. In addition to undergoing potential desiccation, planets with inefficient oxygen sinks at the surface may build up hundreds to thousands of bar of abiotically produced O2, resulting in potential false positives for life. The amount of O2 that builds up also scales with the planet mass; we find that O2 builds up at a constant rate that is controlled by diffusion: ∼5 bar/Myr on Earth-mass planets and up to ∼25 bar/Myr on super-Earths. As a result, some recently discovered super-Earths in the habitable zone such as GJ 667Cc could have built up as many as 2000 bar of O2 due to the loss of up to 10 Earth oceans of water. The fate of a given planet strongly depends on the extreme ultraviolet flux, the duration of the runaway regime, the initial water content, and the rate at which oxygen is absorbed by the surface. In general, we find that the initial phase of high luminosity may compromise the habitability of many terrestrial planets orbiting low-mass stars.

  13. Lowering Temperature is the Trigger for Glycogen Build-Up and Winter Fasting in Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Joonas; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal changes in physiology of vertebrate animals are triggered by environmental cues including temperature, day-length and oxygen availability. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) tolerate prolonged anoxia in winter by using several physiological adaptations that are seasonally activated. This study examines which environmental cues are required to trigger physiological adjustments for winter dormancy in crucian carp. To this end, crucian carp were exposed to changing environmental factors under laboratory conditions: effects of declining water temperature, shortening day-length and reduced oxygen availability, separately and in different combinations, were examined on glycogen content and enzyme activities involved in feeding (alkaline phosphatase, AP) and glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase, GyS; glycogen phosphorylase, GP). Lowering temperature induced a fall in activity of AP and a rise in glycogen content and rate of glycogen synthesis. Relative mass of the liver, and glycogen concentration of liver, muscle and brain increased with lowering temperature. Similarly activity of GyS in muscle and expression of GyS transcripts in brain were up-regulated by lowering temperature. Shortened day-length and oxygen availability had practically no effects on measured variables. We conclude that lowering temperature is the main trigger in preparation for winter anoxia in crucian carp.

  14. Layer-by-layer buildup of polysaccharide-containing films: Physico-chemical properties and mesenchymal stem cells adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikouskaya, Viktoryia I; Pinchuk, Sergei V; Hileuskaya, Kseniya S; Kraskouski, Aliaksandr N; Vasilevich, Irina B; Matievski, Kirill A; Agabekov, Vladimir E; Volotovski, Igor D

    2018-03-22

    Layer-by-Layer assembled polyelectrolyte films offer the opportunity to control cell attachment and behavior on solid surfaces. In the present study, multilayer films based on negatively charged biopolymers (pectin, dextran sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose) and positively charged polysaccharide chitosan or synthetic polyelectrolyte polyethyleneimine has been prepared and evaluated. Physico-chemical properties of the formed multilayer films, including their growth, morphology, wettability, stability, and mechanical properties, have been studied. We demonstrated that chitosan-containing films are characterized by the linear growth, the defect-free surface, and predominantly viscoelastic properties. When chitosan is substituted for the polyethyleneimine in the multilayer system, the properties of the formed films are significantly altered: the rigidity and surface roughness increases, the film growth acquires the exponential character. The multilayer films were subsequently used for culturing mesenchymal stem cells. It has been determined that stem cells effectively adhered to chitosan-containing films and formed on them the monolayer culture of fibroblast-like cells with high viability. Our results show that cell attachment is a complex process which is not only governed by the surface functionality because one of the key parameter effects on cell adhesion is the stiffness of polyelectrolyte multilayer films. We therefore propose our Layer-by-Layer films for applications in tissue engineering. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The 'Build-Up' Approach to Academic Writing Skills Development: The Case for a Discipline-Driven Collaborative Design

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Orna; Dowling-Hetherington, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and delivery of support for academic writing skills development. The paper also presents a case study of such support on an undergraduate, part-time degree programme at University College Dublin (UCD). Elton (2010) suggests that the approach to academic writing is discipline dependent and that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can separately provide students with the necessary support to develop the ability to writ...

  16. First evaluation of experimental results describing pressure buildup and hydrogen distribution, obtained by experimental series E11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzbauer, H.; Wolf, L.; Valencia, L.

    1990-01-01

    The beginning of the core meltdown process in the reactor pressure vessel, with a supposed release position for hydrogen in the upper part of the containment, is simulated, and the influence of the plant geometry on the distribution process is studied. In addition, the release point is shifted to the lower containment area, additional hydrogen production owing to the interaction between concrete and melt is taken into account, and sump boiling is simulated. The experimental program covers analytical investigations in the form of blind post-calculations. (DG) [de

  17. Build-up of Red Blood Cells in Refuelling Bar-Tailed Godwits in Relation to Individual Migratory Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; Everaarts, Jan M.; Jukema, Joop

    1996-01-01

    We examined hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHbC) in Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica during the latter half of their staging period in May in the Wadden Sea of The Netherlands. Here they recover from a 4,000-5,000 km long flight from West African

  18. An advanced analytical solution for pressure build-up during CO2 injection into infinite saline aquifers: The role of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiqing; Bai, Bing; Li, Xiaochun

    2018-02-01

    Existing analytical or approximate solutions that are appropriate for describing the migration mechanics of CO2 and the evolution of fluid pressure in reservoirs do not consider the high compressibility of CO2, which reduces their calculation accuracy and application value. Therefore, this work first derives a new governing equation that represents the movement of complex fluids in reservoirs, based on the equation of continuity and the generalized Darcy's law. A more rigorous definition of the coefficient of compressibility of fluid is then presented, and a power function model (PFM) that characterizes the relationship between the physical properties of CO2 and the pressure is derived. Meanwhile, to avoid the difficulty of determining the saturation of fluids, a method that directly assumes the average relative permeability of each fluid phase in different fluid domains is proposed, based on the theory of gradual change. An advanced analytical solution is obtained that includes both the partial miscibility and the compressibility of CO2 and brine in evaluating the evolution of fluid pressure by integrating within different regions. Finally, two typical sample analyses are used to verify the reliability, improved nature and universality of this new analytical solution. Based on the physical characteristics and the results calculated for the examples, this work elaborates the concept and basis of partitioning for use in further work.

  19. Development of the morphology during functional stack build-up of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells with inverted geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijia; Pröller, Stephan; Niedermeier, Martin A; Körstgens, Volker; Philipp, Martine; Su, Bo; Moseguí González, Daniel; Yu, Shun; Roth, Stephan V; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-14

    Highly efficient poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bulk heterojunction solar cells are achieved by using an inverted geometry. The development of the morphology is investigated as a function of the multilayer stack assembling during the inverted solar cell preparation. Atomic force microscopy is used to reveal the surface morphology of each stack, and the inner structure is probed with grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. It is found that the smallest domain size of P3HT is introduced by replicating the fluorine-doped tin oxide structure underneath. The structure sizes of the P3HT:PCBM active layer are further optimized after thermal annealing. Compared to devices with standard geometry, the P3HT:PCBM layer in the inverted solar cells shows smaller domain sizes, which are much closer to the exciton diffusion length in the polymer. The decrease in domain sizes is identified as the main reason for the improvement of the device performance.

  20. Influence of process parameters on layer build-up and microstructure of Ti6Al4V (ELI) alloy on the optomec LENS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arthur, N

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Optomec Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS®) system is a laser-based platform that relies on computer-aided design (CAD) files to design and produce 3 D printed components. This system is comprised of a 1 kW laser used to melt metal powders...

  1. Pore pressure buildup and soil stress relaxation in monopile foundations of offshore wind converters; Porenwasserdruckaufbau und Bodenentfestigung um Pfahlgruendungen von Offshore-Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuellar, Pablo; Baessler, Matthias; Georgi, Steven; Ruecker, Werner [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich 7.2 Ingenieurbau

    2012-09-15

    For the installation of wind turbines in the offshore environment and their foundation in the seabed it is customary to employ large-diameter steel piles, either in monopile or multi-pile configurations (jacket, tripod, etc..). The effects of cyclic lateral loading on the offshore piles and particularly the possibility of a progressive accumulation of residual pore water pressure within the saturated embedding soil are discussed in this article. Here it is shown that this can lead to significant changes of their behaviour under external loading, which can potentially compromise the foundation's stability or serviceability. Furthermore, some of the singular effects arising during a realistic storm of moderate magnitude as well as their potential for transient damages to the foundation's stiffness are addressed in the paper. For the investigation of these phenomena the authors have employed a coupled bi-phasic analytical model of the offshore foundation. The constitutive model employed for the seabed, in the frame of the theory of Generalized Plasticity, can reproduce some complex features of cyclic soil behaviour such as the tendency for a progressive densification under cyclic loading, which is responsible for the soil liquefaction phenomena in undrained conditions. Finally, some implications and specific recommendations for the design of offshore monopiles in the frame of the limit states are provided. (orig.)

  2. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wray, Laura L.; Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Jr. Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells

  3. Simulation studies on the electron cloud build-up in the elements of the LHC Arcs at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The formation of electron clouds in the arcs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been identified as one of the main limitations for the performance of the machine. In particular, the impacting electrons can deposit a significant power on the cold beam screens of the LHC superconducting magnets, which translates into a significant heat load for the cryogenic system. A detailed model of the e-cloud formation in the different elements of the LHC arc half-cell has been developed using the PyECLOUD simulation code. The model includes the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, shorter corrector magnets and drift spaces. Particular care was taken to correctly model the impact of the hotoelectrons produced by the beam synchrotron radiation. For this purpose, we reviewed the available literature on the characterization of the LHC beam screen surface in terms of reflectivity and photoelectron yield and we defined the necessary steps to obtain the photoemission model in the format required in input by t...

  4. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

    2001-01-01

    The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities

  5. Together, Slowly but Surely: The Role of Social Interaction and Feedback on the Build-Up of Benefit in Collective Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Olsen, Karsten; Bang, Dan; Roepstorff, Andreas; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    That objective reference is necessary for formation of reliable beliefs about the external world is almost axiomatic. However, Condorcet (1785) suggested that purely subjective information--if shared and combined via social interaction--is enough for accurate understanding of the external world. We asked if social interaction and objective…

  6. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Van Cu; Nguyen Huu Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  7. Short-Term Effects of Mixed Species Fallows on Soil Organic Matter Build-Up in the Soil of Western Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndufa, J.K; Candish, D.

    2007-01-01

    The rotations of crops with Nitrogen fixing legumes in improved fallows have become central agroforestry technology for soil fertility replenishments in smallholder farms because of high cost of inorganic fertilizers. The choice of the fallow species is important because the quality of residue incorporated into the soil determines it's distribution to soil organic matter (SOM) and nitrogen (N) release. High quality residues (high N content, low lignin and polyphenols) may decompose rapidly and it's unlikely to release N in synchrony with crop demand. In contrast, residues with wide C- to- N ratio, high lignin and high polyphenols may lead to long period of N immobilization and long term build up of SOM. Field experiments were conducted on farmers' fields on a Kandiudalfic eutrudox soil in Western Kenya to determine the fate of 1 5 N labelled residues in soil. Maize recovered significantly less N from single calliandra residue treatment (3 to 6%). About 70% of the residue N recovered in a mize was contained in the maize grain yield. In long rains 2000, there were no significant differences in residue-N recovery among the different single mixed residue treatment. The percentage 1 5N recovery of residues N by maize was significantly correlated with maize grain yield. At the end of short rains 1999, legume-15N recovery from 0 to 15 cm depth ranged from 30 to 80 % and was significantly higher for calliandra both in single and mixed treatment. 15N distribution in particle size fraction showed that most calliandra N was found in >20 um fraction but N from sesbania and macroptilium was mostly in the 20 um fraction. The high recovery of N of calliandra in the soil confirms the high contribution of polyphenol rich residues to soil organic matter build up

  8. ORIGEN-S: scale system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    ORIGEN-S computes time-dependent concentrations and source terms of a large number of isotopes, which are simultaneously generated or depleted through neutronic transmutation, fission, radioactive decay, input feet rates and physical or chemical removal rates. The calculations may pertain to fuel irradiation within nuclear reactors, or the storage, management, transportation or subsequent chemical processing of removed fuel elements. The matrix exponential expansion model of the ORIGIN code is unaltered in ORIGEN-S. Essentially all features of ORIGEN were retained, expanded or supplemented within new computations. The primary objective of ORIGEN-S, as requested by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is that the calculations may utilize the multi-energy group cross sections from any currently processed standardized ENDF/B data base. This purpose has been implemented through the prior execution of codes within either the SCALE System or the AMPX System, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These codes compute flux-weighted cross sections, simulating conditions within any given reactor fuel assembly, and convert the data into a library that can be input to ORIGEN-S. Time-dependent libraries may be produced, reflecting fuel composition variations during irradiation. Presented in the document are: detailed and condensed input instructions, model theory, features available, range of applicability, brief subroutine descriptions, sample input, and I/O requirements. Presently the code is operable on IBM 360/370 computers and may be converted for CDC computers. ORIGEN-S is a functional module in the SCALE System and will be one of the modules invoked in the SAS2 Control Module, presently being developed, or may be applied as a stand alone program. It can be used in nuclear reactor and processing plant design studies, radiation safety analyses, and environmental assessments

  9. Transport and build-up of tropospheric trace gases during the MINOS campaign: comparision of GOME, in situ aircraft measurements and MATCH-MPIC-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ladstätter-Weißenmayer

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The MINOS (Mediterranean INtensive Oxidant Study campaign was an international, multi-platform field campaign to measure long-range transport of air-pollution and aerosols from South East Asia and Europe towards the Mediterranean basin during August 2001. High pollution events were observed during this campaign. For the Mediterranean region enhanced tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and formaldehyde (HCHO, which are precursors of tropospheric ozone (O3, were detected by the satellite based GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument and compared with airborne in situ measurements as well as with the output from the global 3D photochemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC (Model of Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry - Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. The increase of pollution in that region leads to severe air quality degradation with regional and global implications.

  10. [Significance of hypo-osmolar diets for oral nutrition build-up in very severe malabsorption--clinical observations exemplified by infants with subtotal small intestine resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, K H; Teufel, M

    1984-01-01

    Regenerative and adaptive processes of the gut are apparently analogous to the absorption rate in small bowel diseases. These processes can be enhanced by the prolongation of passage time which, in turn, is influenced by the osmolality of the formula diet. Since infants who have undergone a subtotal bowel resection, like other children with serious diseases of the small bowel, are extraordinarily sensitive to hyperosmolar food, any preparation with special indications should be balanced and rendered hypoosmolar in full caloric concentration. Such formulas may well facilitate food supply to infants and, in case of short bowel syndrome, encourage more pronounced morphologic adaptation.

  11. Pressure Build-up and Decay in Acid Gas Injection Operations in Reefs in the Zama Field, Canada, and Implications for CO2 Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hong, H.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Bachu, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine reasons for pressure rise in the Zama X2X pool in northwestern Alberta, Canada, that was used for acid gas disposal, and whether subsequent pressure decay was a result of pressure dissipation into a larger aquifer. The Zama X2X pool, approximately 1 km 2 in size, is connected to four other nearby pools through a common underlying aquifer. Pressure analysis for all the pools indicates that they are in good hydraulic communication. Initial pressure in the Zama X2X pool was approximately 15 MPa. Pressure declined first during oil production, stabilizing at around 10 MPa in the early 1970's, after which started to increase such that it reached 26 MPa in 1986. Subsequently, pressure declined reaching 22 MPa by 1995 just prior to starting injection of acid gas (80% CO 2 and 20% H 2 S). The operator injected acid gas at lower rates and wellhead pressures than those licensed by the regulatory agency. Despite significant production of water and hydrocarbons, the pressure in the Zama X2X pool continued to be higher than the initial reservoir pressure by more than 5 MPa, such that disposal operations were suspended in late 1998. Oil production continued all this time until 2002. Numerical simulations using CMG-IMEM and corresponding sensitivity studies reported in this paper show that disposal of more than 1 million m 3 of water between 1970 and 1988 and again in 1992-1993 in the adjacent Zama YY pool, which is in good hydrodynamic communication with the Zama X2X pool through the aquifer below the oil column, is the main reason for the high pressures observed in the Zama X2X pool. Sensitivity studies indicate that pressure decay in the X2X pool was due to fluid production. The study indicates that while pressure rise has been caused by hydraulic communication between the X2X and YY pools through the common aquifer, the aquifer was not of large volume to allow dissipation of the pressure. In addition to the case study, the implications of pressure communication to geological storage of CO 2 in aquifers are briefly discussed. (authors)

  12. Considerations on pressure build-up in deep geological repositories for radioactive waste; Betrachtungen zum Druckaufbau in einem geologischen Tiefenlager fuer radioaktive Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Hans-Frieder [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Gas formation caused by corrosion of metals is a pivotal point with respect to the safety analysis of deep geological repositories. Solid corrosion products are formed unavoidably during the gas formation. The volumes of these solid corrosion products are multiples of the original waste volume. These solid corrosion products are chemically extremely stable and result in a pressure increase inside the repository. This pressure is considerably higher than that of the overlaying rock. The question that arises is, why this aspect is not considered in the consulted documents.

  13. Software concepts for the build-up of complex systems - selection and realization taking as example a program system for calculation of hypothetical core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuermann, W.

    1994-10-01

    Development and application of simulation systems for the analysis of complex processes require on the one hand and detailed engineering knowledge of the plant and the processes to be simulated and on the other hand a detailled knowledge about software engineering, numerics and data structures. The cooperation of specialists of both areas will become easier if it is possible to reduce the complexicity of the problems to be solved in a way that the analyses will not be disturbed and the communication between different disciplines will not become unnecessarily complicated. One solution to reduce the complexity is to consider computer science as an engineering discipline which provides mainly abstract elements and to allow engineers to build application systems based on these abstract elements. The principle of abstraction leads through the processes of modularisation and the solution of the interface problem to an almost problem independent system architecture where the elements of the system (modules, model components and models) operate only on those data assigned to them. In addition the development of abstract data types allows the formal description of the relations and interactions between system elements. This work describes how these ideas can be concretized to build complex systems which allow reliable and effective problem solutions. These ideas were applied successfully during the design, realization and application of the code system KESS, which allows the analysis of core melt down accidents in pressurized water reactors. (orig.) [de

  14. The 3 vs 1 game build-up effectiveness examination in physical and technical tests of 11-year-old football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth jr. Janos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study is to prove that young players who have been coached with the main focus on technical ability and player interaction, perform better when tested on physical and technical attributes.

  15. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Laura L.; Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.

    2002-07-24

    This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells.

  16. Fast prediction of the fatigue behavior of short-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics based on heat build-up measurements: application to heterogeneous cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Leonell; Marco, Yann; Le Saux, Vincent; Robert, Gilles; Charrier, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Short-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics components for structural applications are usually very complex parts as stiffeners, ribs and thickness variations are used to compensate the quite low material intrinsic stiffness. These complex geometries induce complex local mechanical fields but also complex microstructures due to the injection process. Accounting for these two aspects is crucial for the design in regard to fatigue of these parts, especially for automotive industry. The aim of this paper is to challenge an energetic approach, defined to evaluate quickly the fatigue lifetime, on three different heterogeneous cases: a classic dog-bone sample with a skin-core microstructure and two structural samples representative of the thickness variations observed for industrial components. First, a method to evaluate dissipated energy fields from thermal measurements is described and is applied to the three samples in order to relate the cyclic loading amplitude to the fields of cyclic dissipated energy. Then, a local analysis is detailed in order to link the energy dissipated at the failure location to the fatigue lifetime and to predict the fatigue curve from the thermomechanical response of one single sample. The predictions obtained for the three cases are compared successfully to the Wöhler curves obtained with classic fatigue tests. Finally, a discussion is proposed to compare results for the three samples in terms of dissipation fields and fatigue lifetime. This comparison illustrates that, if the approach is leading to a very relevant diagnosis on each case, the dissipated energy field is not giving a straightforward access to the lifetime cartography as the relation between fatigue failure and dissipated energy seems to be dependent on the local mechanical and microstructural state.

  17. EXTENDCHAIN: a package of computer programs for calculating the buildup of heavy metals, fission products, and activation products in reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    Design of HTGR recycle and refabrication facilities requires a detailed knowledge of the concentrations of around 400 nuclides which are segregated into four different fuel particle types. The EXTENDCHAIN package of computer programs and the supporting input data files were created to provide an efficient method for calculating the 1600 different concentrations required. The EXTENDCHAIN code performs zero-dimensional nuclide burnup, decay, and activation calculations in nine energy groups for up to 108 nuclides per run. Preparation and handling of the input and output for the sixteen EXTENDCHAIN runs required to produce the desired data are the most time consuming tasks in the computation of the spent fuel element composition. The EXTENDCHAIN package of computer programs contains four codes to aid in the preparation and handling of these data. Most of the input data such as cross sections, decay constants, and the nuclide interconnection scheme will not change when calculating new cases. These data were developed for the life cycle of a typical HTGR and stored on archive tapes for future use. The fuel element composition for this typical HTGR life has been calculated and the results for an equilibrium recycle reload are presented. 12 figures, 7 tables

  18. Growth stress buildup in ion beam sputtered Mo thin films and comparative study of stress relaxation upon thermal annealing or ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debelle, A.; Abadias, G.; Michel, A.; Jaouen, C.; Pelosin, V.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to address the understanding of the origin of growth stress in thin films deposited under very energetic conditions, the authors investigated the stress state and microstructure of Mo thin films grown by ion beam sputtering (IBS) as well as the stress relaxation processes taking place during subsequent thermal annealing or ion irradiation. Different sets of samples were grown by varying the IBS deposition parameters, namely, the energy E 0 and the flux j of the primary ion beam, the target-to-sputtering gas mass ratio M 1 /M 2 as well as film thickness. The strain-stress state was determined by x-ray diffraction using the sin 2 ψ method and data analyzed using an original stress model which enabled them to correlate information at macroscopic (in terms of stress) and microscopic (in terms of defect concentration) levels. Results indicate that these refractory metallic thin films are characterized by a high compressive growth stress (-2.6 to -3.8 GPa), resulting from the creation of a large concentration (up to ∼1.4%) of point or cluster defects, due to the atomic peening mechanism. The M 1 /M 2 mass ratio enables tuning efficiently the mean deposited energy of the condensing atoms; thus, it appears to be the more relevant deposition parameter that allows modifying both the microstructure and the stress level in a significant way. The growth stress comes out to be highly unstable. It can be easily relaxed either by postgrowth thermal annealing or ion irradiation in the hundred keV range at very low dose [<0.1 dpa (displacement per atom)]. It is shown that thermal annealing induces deleterious effects such as oxidation of the film surface, decrease of the film density, and in some cases adhesion loss at the film/substrate interface, while ion irradiation allows controlling the stress level without generating any macroscopic damage

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial to Explore the Effect of Experimental Low Abrasivity Dentifrices on Enamel Gloss and Smoothness, and the Build-up of Extrinsic Tooth Stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleman, Kimberly R; Milleman, Jeffery L; Young, Sarah; Parkinson, Charles

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate and compare examiner-assessed changes in enamel gloss, extrinsic dental stain, and surface smoothness following one, two, four, and eight weeks of twice-daily use of an experimental low abrasivity desensitizing dentifrice (relative dentin abrasivity [RDA] ~40) containing 5% sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) chemical cleaning agent and 1% aluminum trioxide abrasive. This was compared with an ultra-low abrasivity dentifrice (5% STP only; RDA ~13), a moderate abrasivity fluoride dentifrice (RDA ~80), and a higher abrasivity marketed whitening dentifrice (RDA ~142). This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, controlled, parallel group study in healthy adults stratified by gloss score and age. Following a washout period with a conventional silica abrasive dentifrice, subjects received a dental scale and polish and were randomized to treatment. Subjects brushed their teeth for two minutes, twice daily, with their assigned dentifrice. Enamel gloss was assessed visually by comparing the facial surfaces of the maxillary incisors to the Sturzenberger gloss standards. Extrinsic dental stain was measured on the 12 anterior teeth (facial and lingual) using the Macpherson modification of the Lobene Stain Index (MLSI). Tooth smoothness was assessed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of a silicone impression of the central incisors. Of 120 screened subjects, 95 were randomized to the study. Subjects using the low abrasivity aluminum trioxide/STP dentifrice demonstrated statistically significant (p tooth smoothness, at Week 8, statistically significant increases in surface smoothness were observed for most treatment groups compared to baseline (p tooth gloss compared to a non-alumina ultra-low abrasivity STP-containing dentifrice, and moderate and high abrasivity dentifrices, over an eight-week period.

  20. Defense Infrastructure: Opportunity to Improve the Timeliness of Future Overseas Planning Reports and Factors Affecting the Master Planning Effort for the Military Buildup on Guam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lepore, Brian J; Little, Mark; Alcoser, Nelsie; Jones, Mae; Lenane, Kate; Matta, Julia; Moon, Jamilah

    2008-01-01

    ... after the February 2008 budget submission, even though both the Senate and conference reports accompanying the fiscal year 2004 military construction bill require DOD to issue the plans with the military construction budget submission...

  1. A Study of Venezuela’s Internal and External Threat and the United States Security Assistance Program in the Build-Up and Modernization of Her Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    percent of the popula- tion, leaving six percent of the population to other denominations; and (3) a literacy rate of 77 percent. The national language is...has focused on the improve- ment of Venezuela’s educational system. In 1958, the adult literarcy rate was 63 percent (20:320). Today the adult literacy ...hasta Marzo 1969. Oficina Central de Informacion . Caracas, Venezuela, 1969. 28. Penniman, Howard R. Venezuela at the Polls: The National Elections of

  2. Characterization and Quantification of Deposit Build-up and Removal in Straw Suspension-Fired Boilers - Ph.d. thesis Muhammad Shafique Bashir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad

    An increased use of biomass in large suspension-red power plants can be a relatively economic and potentially also efficient way to utilize biomass for heat and power production. However, large deposit formation problems limit the electrical efficiency by limiting the maximum applicable superheat...

  3. Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Albert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly proteins (MRJPs of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands (HGs, the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (BtRJPL, represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin (F-actin rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function.

  4. Possibilities of utilizing solar systems for heating the hot service water in Košice build-up areas KVP and Ťahanovce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Horbaj

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A production of „HSW“ in block of flats areas by solar collectors means a real alternative to the traditional way of heating by fossil fuels (coal, gas. With this method, it’s possible to save ca. 50 % of energy from the net of the central service of the heat, what can reduce the production of pollutants in the locality, or it can enable to increase the quantity of customers without claims for the restructuralization of the central source. Because Slovakia is the producer of quality solar collectors it’s suitable to use them just for this reason, which could be projected into the price reduction of relatively expensive present systems. On the other side, when using the flat roofs on the block of flats, other useful places are hot occupied and the heating source is nearby the place of it sconsumption. In this case, a collaboration of the solar system and the Central Service of Heat is especially suitable in time with a shortage of the solar radiation.

  5. On the transient pressure build-up in the full pressure safety shell of watercooled nuclear reactors after a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1979-08-01

    The thermo-and fluid-dynamic processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment during a loss of coolant accident have been investigated. Comparison of the calculations carried out with the computer programs, in which ZOCO VI was used as being representative of similar programs, with the experimental results pointed out discrepancies in the determination of time dependent pressure, pressure difference and temperature curves. This led to the development of a new theoretical model and a program COFLOW which pays particular attention to the fluid dynamic processes in the initial phase of a loss of coolant accident. It can also be used to determine the maximum containment pressure towards the end of a loss of coolant accident. Comparison of the COFLOW results with experiments has shown that COFLOW provides a model and a procedure by which the physical processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment can be simulated satisfactorily

  6. Contribution to the build-up of a core calculation frame: comparison between ''diffusion'' and ''SPn'' operators on various configurations of the first N4 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magat, Ph.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two calculation methods implemented in the neutronic code CRONOS 2: the diffusion approximation and the SP n method. The APOLLO 2 code is used to build the multiparameter cross section libraries.The comparison is based on the first core of N4 type Chooz reactor. The rod worth and the power map have been calculated. Some recommendations about the SP n development order of flux are made and the results show that the diffusion calculations over-estimate the black rod efficiency up to 10%. (A.C.)

  7. Study of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants as the source of radiation fields build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabant, R. van; Regge, P. de.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part the behaviour of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants is depicted on the basis of a literature review of the field. Water chemistry, corrosion processes and activation of corrosion products are the main topics. In the second part the results of the characterization of corrosion particles in the primary coolant circuit of the Doel 1 and 2 reactors are described, during steady state operation and transient phases. In the third part the possibilities for radiation control at nuclear power plants are outlined. The filtration possibilities for the reactor coolant are explored in detail. (author)

  8. Fuel buildup and potential fire behavior after stand-replacing fires, logging fire-killed trees and herbicide shrub removal in Sierra Nevada forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Thomas W.; Keeley, Jon E.; Stephens, Scott L.; Roller, Gary B.

    2010-01-01

    Typically, after large stand-replacing fires in mid-elevation Sierra Nevada forests, dense shrub fields occupy sites formerly occupied by mature conifers, until eventually conifers overtop and shade out shrubs. Attempting to reduce fuel loads and expedite forest regeneration in these areas, the USDA Forest Service often disrupts this cycle by the logging of fire-killed trees, replanting of conifers and killing of shrubs. We measured the effects of these treatments on live and dead fuel loads and alien species and modeled potential fire behavior and fire effects on regenerating forests. Sampling occurred in untreated, logged and herbicide-treated stands throughout the Sierra Nevada in four large fire areas 4–21 years after stand-replacing fires. Logging fire-killed trees significantly increased total available dead fuel loads in the short term but did not affect shrub cover, grass and forb cover, alien species cover or alien species richness. Despite the greater available dead fuel loads, fire behavior was not modeled to be different between logged and untreated stands, due to abundant shrub fuels in both logged and untreated stands. In contrast, the herbicide treatment directed at shrubs resulted in extremely low shrub cover, significantly greater alien species richness and significantly greater alien grass and forb cover. Grass and forb cover was strongly correlated with solar radiation on the ground, which may be the primary reason that grass and forb cover was higher in herbicide treated stands with low shrub and tree cover. Repeat burning exacerbated the alien grass problem in some stands. Although modeled surface fire flame lengths and rates of spread were found to be greater in stands dominated by shrubs, compared to low shrub cover conifer plantations, surface fire would still be intense enough to kill most trees, given their small size and low crown heights in the first two decades after planting.

  9. Fiscal 1992 survey report. Promotion of coal importing base buildup (How ocean freight system should be in the future); 1992 nendo kaigaitan yunyu kiban seibi sokushin chosa. Kongo no gaiko yuso taisei no arikata ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    When a general view is taken of coal chains that connect overseas coal suppliers to Japan's end users, it is found that no survey has ever been made to sufficiently explain marine transportation of coal. It is now expected that the gap between supply of and demand for shipping tonnage will widen thanks to a sharp increase supposed to emerge in the demand for overseas coal in the future and that a scarcity of tonnage will impede stable space securing for coal and economically viable coal transportation. Such being the case, this project aims to investigate the ocean freight systems to serve between overseas coal shipping ports and Japan's coal receiving bases and the current states and problems of cargo facilities in Japan, to study how to build up a shipping space securing system which will properly deal with an increase in the import of steam coal from abroad, and to contribute to the formation of measures for enabling smooth transportation of coal from overseas. The survey conducted for this purpose covers the present conditions of Japan's ocean freight systems and of its coal receiving bases, present conditions of transportation by oceangoing ships in the Pacific basin, compilation of a list of oceangoing ships, prediction of ocean freight transportation and supply of transportation service, prediction of ocean freight cost in the future, and putting in an easy-to-review order the tasks to be accomplished for the enhancement of coal transportation by oceangoing ships. (NEDO)

  10. Nitrate dosage system in a reclaimed wastewater pipeline for the inhibition of sulfide build-up; Sistema de dosificacion de nitrato en una conduccion de transporte de agua depurada para evitar la generacion de sulfuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteagudo Perez-Machado, T.; Rodriguez Gomez, L. E.; Alvarez Diaz, M.

    2007-07-01

    During reclaimed wastewater transportation under anaerobic conditions sulfide generation may take place, which should be avoided due to the numerous problems related to it. This is the case of the reclaimed wastewater reuse scheme of Tenerife, one of whose elements is a completely filled 61 km long gravity pipeline, 0,60 m in diameter. In order to avoid the appearance of anaerobic conditions a controlled nitrate dosage system has been designed to be installed at the pipeline inlet, with nitrate dosage to be controlled by the organic matter content of the reclaimed wastewater, using turbidity as an indicator of it. (Author) 26 refs.

  11. Design and development of LH2 cooled rolling element radial bearings for the NERVA engine turbopump. Volume 3: Phase 2: Tests on build-ups 16, 17, and 18 at NRDS, Jackass Flats, Nevada, December 1971 - March 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.; Koch, D. A.; Reuter, F.

    1972-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen to cool the rolling element radial bearings in the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles is discussed. The fifteen hour service life goal was obtained during the tests. The increase in bearing life was also considered to be produced by: (1) improvements in bearing material, (2) bearing retainer configuration and manufacturing changes, and (3) better control of operating parameters.

  12. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model is an engineering wake model designed to physically model the wake deficit evolution and the unsteady meandering that occurs in wind turbine wakes. The present study aims at improving two features of the model: The effect of the atmospheric boundary layer s...

  13. An indoor air quality-pharmacokinetic simulation of passive inhalation of marijuana smoke and the resultant buildup of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, N J

    1997-03-01

    In military courts of law, the good soldier defense is often used by the defendant to explain the presence of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine (hereafter referred to as THCA) above the Department of Defense (DOD) established limit of 15 ng/mL. The defense will contend the defendant unwittingly breathed side-stream marijuana smoke, thus resulting in the presence of THCA in the defendant's urine. The purpose of this work was to link an indoor air quality model (IAQ) with a pharmacokinetic (PK) model to predict a passive marijuana smoker's resultant concentration of the major urinary metabolite THCA.

  14. The role of the memory inherited by the system from the Cretaceous-Tertiary evolution of convergent margins into the build-up of the Source area (Apuseni Mountains, Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Martin; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Schuster, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    The Apuseni mountains in Romania take a central position in the Alpine Carpathian Dinaride system and separate the Pannonian basin in the west from the Transsylvanian basin in the east. The Cretaceous age nappe stack involves from bottom to top Tisza- (Bihor and Codru) and Dacia-derived units (Biharia, according to Schmid et al., 2008) overlain by the South Apuseni and Transylvanian ophiolite belt. This study tries to provide new and additional information on the structural and metamorphic evolution of these units from the Jurassic obduction to neotectonic activity. This also comprises information on their interaction with the neighbouring basins. The objective is to show the impact of large scale (plate) tectonics (f.i. in terms of its thermal configuration and strengths profile) and the impact of early-formed tectonic features for the further evolution, specifically the formation of the surrounding basins together with its feedback with topography. This approach includes investigation of kinematics along first order contacts during distinct events together with the thermotectonic characterization of the involved units. While the early "high-grade" evolution will be geochronologically addressed by Sm/Nd, Rb/Sr and Ar/Ar dating, fission track analysis on zircon and apatite will be used to constrain the low-temperature part of the story. Already available data by Sanders (1998), Schuller (2004), Merten (in preparation) and Kounov (in preparation) together with new own data will be used to provide a 4D model for the late-stage thermal evolution of the Apuseni mountains. Thermal modelling will be compared and integrated with numerical modelling of the landscape evolution. The hereby generated data and information on erosion and exhumation will be further used in associated partner projects of the Source to Sink research network which addresses the evolution of the Danube system from the hinterland to the Black Sea. References: Sanders, C. A. E. (1998), Tectonics and erosion - Competitive forces in a compressive orogen: A fission track study of the Romanian Carpathians, PhD-thesis, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, pp. 204. Schuller, V. (2004), Evolution and geodynamic significance of the Upper Cretaceous Gosau basin in the Apuseni Mountains (Romania), PhD Thesis, Tubinger Geowiss. Arb. Reihe A70, 112 pp. Schmid, S. M., D. Bernoulli, B. Fügenschuh, L. Matenco, S. Schaefer, R. Schuster, M. Tischler and K. Ustaszewski (2008), The Alps-Carpathians-Dinaridic orogenic system: correlation and evolution of tectonic units, Swiss Journal of Geosciences, 2008.

  15. Changing the paradigm for marine data production, dissemination and validation with Collaborative Platforms. The GlobColour webservice, a prime example which leads to the integration of CWE technologies to build-up virtual research centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton d'Andon, Odile; Martin-Lauzer, François-Regis; Mangin, Antoine; Barrot, Gilbert; Clouaire, Stephane; Sardou, Olivier; Demaria, Julien; Serra, Romain

    2015-04-01

    The GlobColour webservice provides a rich dataset of marine bio-geochemical information for research and education purposes. We report on recent evolutions to improve the functionalities of the service to access EO and in-situ data and check information quality. In addition, a new concept, the Collaborative Platform, support the processing of bespoke information for remote users. At the root of the service is an integrated and automated production chain, processing not only EO satellite data but also in-situ measurements from bio-Argo floats. This production chain provides daily updated bio-geochemical data and performs automated data analysis (merging of sensors, temporal and spatial binning). The GlobColour webservice has been recently upgraded to provide improved navigation and selection capabilities. These evolutions were necessary as the catalogue of EO products has been significantly increased, with many new parameters, new spatial resolution (1 km over Europe in addition to 4 km global products) and projections (rectangular grid in addition to sinus grid). The validation and quality control of the information is essential to demonstrate the fitness-for-purpose of the service. Match-ups between in-situ measurements and EO data are a key element to establish the validity of the information. The standard approach is to perform these match-ups off-line using a database of in-situ measurements, and report the results in a validation document. Two innovations are introduced which greatly increase the value for the user: • An interactive navigation tool allows a detailed analysis the results of the match-ups, with temporal and geographical selection capabilities. Background information for each match-up can be easily retrieved, both for in-situ (measurement identification) and for satellite data (context retrieval, providing information such as cloud coverage and spatial variability). This allows users to get a better insight into the validity of the retrieved data for their particular applications. • Match-ups using real-time EO data and data collected from bio-Argo floats are processed automatically on-the-fly. • This is possible because quality control of the bio-Argo float data is also automated. A dedicated interface has been set-up to monitor the whole fleet of Bio-Argo floats, and access detailed information from each acquired profile. Finally, a Collaborative Platform has been developed to support R&D activities in parallel to the standard production chain, enabling users to work remotely within a dedicated production environment in order to develop new algorithms and methods. The Collaborative Platform is based on a Collaborative Working Environment, a secured IT environment mixing hardware and software elements. It provides access to raw data, to processing and storage facilities, to specific applicative software (e.g. visualisation and post-processing tools). In addition, collaborative tools to exchange data, information and ideas between participants (through forums, web-conferencing…) contribute to create a "Virtual Research Centre" preparing future evolutions of the service. Acknowledgements: This research received funding from the following projects: • MCGS project funded by the Fonds Unique Interministériel, French regional funds PACA and Bretagne, the Fonds Européen de Développement Régional • FP7 Copernicus projects OSS2015 (grant n° 282723) and E-AIMS (grant n° 312642). • The French EQUIPEX project NAOS

  16. Report on the KIMS-CNA Conference (2nd): The PLA Navy’s Build-Up and ROK-USN Cooperation, Held in Seoul, Korea on 20 November 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Kegan Paul International and The AEI Press, 1996), p. 274. See also his "China’s Push Through the South China Sea: The Interaction of Bureaucratic and...to " green /blue water" navy enable to secure its vast maritime territorial claims with modern combat capability. For long time, the Chinese navy...operational capability placed somewhat between "coastal defense" and "full ocean-going green water fleet." It is conceivable that the Chinese navy’s

  17. Fiscal 1992 survey report. Promotion of coal importing base buildup (How ocean freight system should be in the future); 1992 nendo kaigaitan yunyu kiban seibi sokushin chosa. Kongo no gaiko yuso taisei no arikata ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    When a general view is taken of coal chains that connect overseas coal suppliers to Japan's end users, it is found that no survey has ever been made to sufficiently explain marine transportation of coal. It is now expected that the gap between supply of and demand for shipping tonnage will widen thanks to a sharp increase supposed to emerge in the demand for overseas coal in the future and that a scarcity of tonnage will impede stable space securing for coal and economically viable coal transportation. Such being the case, this project aims to investigate the ocean freight systems to serve between overseas coal shipping ports and Japan's coal receiving bases and the current states and problems of cargo facilities in Japan, to study how to build up a shipping space securing system which will properly deal with an increase in the import of steam coal from abroad, and to contribute to the formation of measures for enabling smooth transportation of coal from overseas. The survey conducted for this purpose covers the present conditions of Japan's ocean freight systems and of its coal receiving bases, present conditions of transportation by oceangoing ships in the Pacific basin, compilation of a list of oceangoing ships, prediction of ocean freight transportation and supply of transportation service, prediction of ocean freight cost in the future, and putting in an easy-to-review order the tasks to be accomplished for the enhancement of coal transportation by oceangoing ships. (NEDO)

  18. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lipodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more likely to have buildup of breast and abdominal fat. Length and severity of HIV infection : The risk ... a medicine used to reduce the buildup of abdominal fat due to lipodystrophy. A healthy diet and daily ...

  19. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  20. Fiscal 1999 survey report. Survey of long-term strategy for energy technology: Volume 1 (Survey of foundation for strategy formulation for industrial technologies - strategy for environmental foundation buildup); 1999 nendo choki energy gijutsu senryaku nado ni kansuru chosa hokokusho. 1. Sangyo gijutsu senryaku sakutei kiban chosa (kankyo kiban seibi senryaku)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Japan has to prepare itself to behave accurately, and to stay technologically competitive, in the severe competition age to come in which it will fail to find leaders to follow. To fulfill this goal, Japan has to collect sufficient information and analyze it relative to the current state and future prospect of industrial technologies in Japan and overseas and various factors that will influence them, and to develop industrial technology related policies based firmly on scientific and theoretical foundations to be established using the thus-acquired knowledge. Under the circumstances, a survey is conducted of innovative, technological foundations, such as industrial technology related efforts in and out of Japan. The report consists of two volumes that cover what are described below. For the survey of technology related policies pursued in various countries abroad, literature and the like are investigated concerning technology related measures, budgets, and decision making processes in America, Britain, Germany, France, and the European Union, and the results are compiled so that their systems may be compared with each other. In the survey of Japan's technology related innovative systems, case studies are made about commodities over which Japan is relatively high in competitive power. Specifically, commodities manufactured by Japan's businesses and occupying 75% or more of the global share are investigated. (NEDO)

  1. Fiscal 1998 intellectual infrastructure project utilizing civil sector functions. Research and development project on prompt-effect type intellectual infrastructure creation (Buildup of base for thermophysical property data for new industry creation); 1998 nendo minkan no kino wo katsuyoshita chiteki kiban jigyo seika hokokusho. Sokkogata chiteki kiban sosei kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo (shinki sangyo sosei no tame no netsubussei data ni kansuru kiban seibi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For promoting the creation of new industries, thermophysical data on high-temperature molten bodies, liquid substances, solid materials, and the like were collected, and further measurements were performed; the data were stored in distributed databases; and databases were also developed about access to the Internet. In the study of the thermal properties of high-temperature molten bodies, data were collected from technical literature concerning molten silicon for semiconductor production, that is, 2 about thermal diffusivity, 4 about viscosity index, 30 about surface tension, 8 about density, and 6 about emissivity; and, concerning potassium niobate, 6 about density, 4 about surface tension, and 5 about viscosity index were collected. Thermal properties were measured for molten silicon and molten carbonates. In the study of thermal properties of fluids, data such as PVT (pressure, volume, temperature) values, boiling point pressure, saturated liquid density, isothermal compressibility, cubical expansion coefficient, surplus mol volume, and the like were collected again from technical literature concerning trifluoroethanol and its water solution. Thermodynamic properties of the aqueous ammonia solution comprised of equimolecules were measured. (NEDO)

  2. Fiscal 1998 intellectual infrastructure project utilizing civil sector functions. Research and development project on prompt-effect type intellectual infrastructure creation (Data buildup for assurance of safety of non-ferrous metals); 1998 nendo minkan no kino wo katsuyoshita chiteki kiban jigyo seika hokokusho. Sokkogata chiteki kiban sosei kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo (hitetsu kinzoku no anzensei kakuho ni shisuru data seibi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Data were collected, put in an easy-to-use order, and developed into a database for safety assurance for automobiles and transportation equipment built of light metals as represented by aluminum. In the collection and arrangement of existing dynamics data, a database having 52 data relating to dynamic properties was prepared after retrieving data from academic essays previously published in Japan and abroad. In the testing of new materials, a Hopkinson high-speed rod-type impact/tensile tester was used to perform tensile tests at eight load application speeds between 0.5mm/min and 50m/sec for practical aluminum alloys 2024, 2091, 5052, 5083, 5254, 6061, 6063, 6NO1, 7075, and AC4CH. As the results, data on the 5000 and 6000 series alloys which had been insufficient were complemented. Data from a newly introduced multi-functional instrumentation Charpy impact tester were compared for study, correlations between property values obtained from bend test specimens and those obtained from tensile test specimens were evaluated, and then a simplified test evaluation method was proposed. (NEDO)

  3. 4-[18F]Fluorophenylpiperazines by Improved Hartwig-Buchwald N-Arylation of 4-[18F]fluoroiodobenzene, Formed via Hypervalent λ3-Iodane Precursors: Application to Build-Up of the Dopamine D4 Ligand [18F]FAUC 316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Kügler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Substituted phenylpiperazines are often neuropharmacologically active compounds and in many cases are essential pharmacophores of neuroligands for different receptors such as D2-like dopaminergic, serotoninergic and other receptors. Nucleophilic, no-carrier-added (n.c.a. 18F-labelling of these ligands in an aromatic position is desirable for studying receptors with in vivo molecular imaging. 1-(4-[18F]Fluorophenylpiperazine was synthesized in two reaction steps starting by 18F-labelling of a iodobenzene-iodonium precursor, followed by Pd-catalyzed N-arylation of the intermediate 4-[18F]fluoro-iodobenzene. Different palladium catalysts and solvents were tested with particular attention to the polar solvents dimethylformamide (DMF and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. Weak inorganic bases like potassium phosphate or cesium carbonate seem to be essential for the arylation step and lead to conversation rates above 70% in DMF which is comparable to those in typically used toluene. In DMSO even quantitative conversation was observed. Overall radiochemical yields of up to 40% and 60% in DMF and DMSO, respectively, were reached depending on the labelling yield of the first step. The fluorophenylpiperazine obtained was coupled in a third reaction step with 2-formyl-1H-indole-5-carbonitrile to yield the highly selective dopamine D4 ligand [18F]FAUC 316.

  4. Fiscal 1999 survey report. Survey of long-term strategy for energy technology: Volume 1 (Survey of foundation for strategy formulation for industrial technologies - strategy for environmental foundation buildup); 1999 nendo choki energy gijutsu senryaku nado ni kansuru chosa hokokusho. 1. Sangyo gijutsu senryaku sakutei kiban chosa (kankyo kiban seibi senryaku)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Japan has to prepare itself to behave accurately, and to stay technologically competitive, in the severe competition age to come in which it will fail to find leaders to follow. To fulfill this goal, Japan has to collect sufficient information and analyze it relative to the current state and future prospect of industrial technologies in Japan and overseas and various factors that will influence them, and to develop industrial technology related policies based firmly on scientific and theoretical foundations to be established using the thus-acquired knowledge. Under the circumstances, a survey is conducted of innovative, technological foundations, such as industrial technology related efforts in and out of Japan. The report consists of two volumes that cover what are described below. For the survey of technology related policies pursued in various countries abroad, literature and the like are investigated concerning technology related measures, budgets, and decision making processes in America, Britain, Germany, France, and the European Union, and the results are compiled so that their systems may be compared with each other. In the survey of Japan's technology related innovative systems, case studies are made about commodities over which Japan is relatively high in competitive power. Specifically, commodities manufactured by Japan's businesses and occupying 75% or more of the global share are investigated. (NEDO)

  5. Contribution to the build-up of a core calculation frame: comparison between ``diffusion`` and ``SP{sub n}`` operators on various configurations of the first N4 core; Contribution a l`elaboration d`un schema de coeur en transport: comparaison des operateurs ``diffusion`` et ``SP{sub n}`` sur differentes configurations du premier coeur N4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magat, Ph

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two calculation methods implemented in the neutronic code CRONOS 2: the diffusion approximation and the SP{sub n} method. The APOLLO 2 code is used to build the multiparameter cross section libraries.The comparison is based on the first core of N4 type Chooz reactor. The rod worth and the power map have been calculated. Some recommendations about the SP{sub n} development order of flux are made and the results show that the diffusion calculations over-estimate the black rod efficiency up to 10%. (A.C.) 12 refs.

  6. Naval trends in ASEAN: is there a new arms race?

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Frank Curtis

    1995-01-01

    Global military spending is decreasing. However this trend does not apply to some regions of the world, specifically Southeast Asia. This thesis describes the ongoing naval arms buildup in this region and examines why it is occurring when the rest of the world is decreasing military spending. Next, this thesis asks if this arms build-up is dangerous. Unlike many other arms races around the world, the Southeast Asian build-up is not particularly dangerous because of the parallel development of...

  7. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - bacterial; Meningitis - viral; Meningitis - fungal; Meningitis - vaccine ... treatment, meningitis may result in the following: Brain damage Buildup ... that leads to brain swelling ( hydrocephalus ) Seizures Death

  8. Optimization for getting stable plasma initiation in JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Ryuji; Neyatani, Yuzuru; Abe, T.

    1988-06-01

    This paper analyses the plasma current build-up just after the breakdown, and investigates the method for obtaining more stable plasma initiation with reduced Volt-second consumption. Control of the amount of particles contained in the wall is necessary for getting the optimum plasma density just after the breakdown, and is essential for obtaining the stable current build-up. (author)

  9. Calculation of Dose Gamma Ray Build up Factor in Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gamma ray buildup factor was calculated by analyzing the narrow- beam and broad-beam geometry equations using Taylor's formula for isotropic sources and homogeneous materials. The buildup factor was programmed using MATLAB software to operate with any radiation energy (E), atomic number (Z) and the ...

  10. Take-Off. De opbouw van de Nederlandse luchtstrijdkrachten 1945-1973

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Q.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/327931558

    2013-01-01

    There has been little academic focus on the build-up of the Dutch Air Force after the Second World War. The aim of this study is to identify the key developments in the build-up and sustainment of the Dutch air force between 1945 and 1973 and to answer the question as to which factors and actors

  11. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  12. Organic Matter Dynamics in Soils Regenerating from Degraded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The area of secondary forest (SF) regenerating from degraded abandoned rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantation is increasing in the rainforest zone of south southern Nigeria; however, the build-up of soil organic matter following abandonment is not well understood. This study examined the build-up of soil organic matter in ...

  13. Gas generation by self-radiolysis of tritiated waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadlock, W.E.; Abell, G.C.; Steinmeyer, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Studies simulating the effect of self-radiolysis in disposal packages containing tritiated waste materials show hydrogen to be the dominant gas-phase product. Pressure buildup and gas composition over various tritiated octane and tritiated water samples are designed to give worst case results. One effect of tritium fixation agents is to reduce pressure buildup. The results show that development of explosive gas mixtures is unlikely and that maximum pressure buildup in typical Mound Facility waste packages can be expected to be <0.25 MPa

  14. Set of programs for determining exposure and dose rates from selected sources of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hep, J.; Kralovcova, E.; Smutny, V.; Valenta, V.

    1982-01-01

    The programs are described for the determination of exposure and dose rate of gamma radiation from point, surface, linear and volume sources with and without shielding. The computation is conducted using the classical method taking into consideration the buildup factor. For the computation of the buildup factor in heterogeneous shielding the Broder and Kitazuma formulas are used. Kitazuma's alpha coefficients were calculated recurrently using a new semi-empirical method. Taylor's approximation was used for the calculation of the buildup factor in a single layer

  15. Operational experience in chemical control of scale in boilers at the Ostrava-Karvina power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, E; Srovnal, O

    1988-03-01

    Discusses methods for buildup removal from coal-fired boilers in power plants. Buildup types are analyzed. Standardized methods for buildup removal tested on a commercial scale in the power plants are comparatively evaluated. Scaling in the boiler heat exchange system is investigated. Using hydrofluoric acid for scale removal is discussed. Concentration of hydrofluoric acid ranges from 1.5% to 2.0%. Ryphalgan and Kaptax are used as corrosion inhibitors. Syntron B is also used for scale removal during boiler operation (at a pressure to 6.4% and temperature below 270 C). Efficiency of scale removal using various reagents is discussed. 4 refs.

  16. 24 CFR 3285.203 - Site Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... per foot away from the foundation for the first ten feet. Where property lines, walls, slopes, or... of foundation supports and to prevent water build-up under the home, as shown in Figure to § 3285.203...

  17. Diet - liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins normally help the body repair tissue. They also prevent fatty buildup and damage to the liver cells. In people with badly damaged livers, proteins are not properly processed. Waste products may build up and affect the brain. Dietary ...

  18. Monitoring Linear Accelerator Output Constancy Using the PTW Linacheck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Garry M.; Buckle, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    The PTW-Linacheck was assessed for its ability to monitor linear accelerator radiation output constancy. The key issues that were considered were the setup for daily output measurements, e.g., requirements for build-up and backscatter material, and the reproducibility and linearity of the device with linear accelerator output. An appropriate measurement setup includes a 10 x 10 cm field at 100 cm FSD, 5 cm backscatter, and no added build-up for 4 MeV electron beams, 1 cm added build-up for 6-16 MeV electron beams and 5 cm added build-up for 6-15 MV photon beams. Using this measurement setup, the dose linearity and short-term reproducibility were acceptable; however, the Linacheck should be recalibrated on a monthly basis to ensure acceptable long-term reproducibility.

  19. An Analysis of Weight Change in Filters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reilly, Matthew; Fultz, George; Gschwender, Lois

    2006-01-01

    ... to evaluate possible sources of error. Many sources of weight change exist, including particulate and water accumulation from air, buildup of static electricity causing interference with the metal microbalance pan, and removal...

  20. Can North Korean Airborne Special Purpose Forces Successfully Conduct Military Operations Against the United States and South Korea?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allmond, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    ...; and secondly by producing the world's largest SPF. North Korea (NK) has built the world's largest SPF in the world with more than 100,000 men to support surprise attacks to disrupt CFC combat buildup and operations...

  1. Сomplex and protection vibrokontrolyu gas compressor units "visa-pc"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.П. Ясиніцький

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available  Writers wanted to introduce and develop complex “Viza-PC” which meant for dimensioning and reflecting operation vibrofactors, forming the signal for tolerance buildup in system automatic control gascompressor unit.

  2. The Failure of German Logistics During the Ardennes Offensive of 1944

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kennedy, James

    2000-01-01

    .... The thesis explains that despite the incredible buildup of forces and supplies, the inability of the German strategic and operational logistics systems to properly equip, fuel, arm, and move forces...

  3. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis can cause a buildup of cholesterol ... of the artery forming a plaque. If this process restricts blood flow enough it may result in ...

  4. drawing as an instrument of professional excellence in visual arts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    ... GPA build-up. Several rounds of conversational engagements with some students leave a palpable evidence ... The overall parental attitude to art in Nigeria raises a barrier ..... or indirectly are subjectively assessed to pay them 'in their own ...

  5. Development of arctic wind technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M.; Antikainen, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The climatic conditions of Lapland set special technical requirements for wind power production. The most difficult problem regarding wind power production in arctic regions is the build-up of hard and rime ice on structures of the machine

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... build-up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more ... build up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) Bruising and bleeding easily Enlarged ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide energy for cells. This amino acid is broken down in cell structures called mitochondria , which convert ... 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase, leucine is not properly broken down, which leads to a buildup of related ...

  8. Advanced Material Studies for Additive Manufacturing in terms of Future Gear Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bräunig

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing by laser beam melting is predestined for complex component geometry like integrated cooling channels without enormous posttreatment processing. To investigate the influence of build-up direction in terms of later tooth excitation of gear-wheels, first fundamental material analyses were accomplished in this publication. Therefore, additively produced specimens were used to determine the build-up direction dependent elastic properties of the material in all three spatial directions based on tensile and torsion tests. The anisotropies of elastic limits and breaking points of previous studies were confirmed in this paper. Furthermore, torsion values were also determined depending on build-up direction. Laser beam melted X3NiCoMoTi18-9-5 (hot-work tool steel was shown to exhibit extremely high performance under shear loading in comparison to conventionally processed steel. The influence of build-up direction on torsional strength was also shown.

  9. Study of gamma radiation shielding properties of ZnO−TeO2 glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... as industry, agriculture and medicine. It is very important ...... prominent reaction between the studied glass samples barriers and gamma rays is the ..... buildup factors for engineering materials. [20] Singh V P, Badiger N M ...

  10. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AMONG YOUTHS IN KASHERE TOWN: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DGS-FUTO

    2018-06-01

    Jun 1, 2018 ... so on to feel high and enhance social performance to their own ... Nigerian society, and that drug abuse could lead to reduction in academic achievement or ..... depression, frustration and sometimes to build-up self-esteem.

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they have increased pressure in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow ... the hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein ...

  12. Atelectasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tight body cast, a bone deformity, or pleural effusion (fluid buildup between the ribs and the ... able to make enough surfactant. Surfactant is a liquid that coats the inside of the lungs and ...

  13. Trace Contaminant Monitor for Air in Spacecraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A need exists for analyzers that can measure trace contaminants in air on board spacecraft. Toxic gas buildup can endanger the crew particularly during long...

  14. Control of external radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Control of external radiation exposure: working time, working distance, shielding: Total Linear Attenuation Coefficient, Half-Value Layer (HVL), Tenth-Value Layer (TVL); Build-up Factor

  15. European Union's Arms Embargo on China: Implications and Options for U.S. Policy. CRS Report to Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archick, Kristin; Grimmett, Richard F; Kan, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    .... The United States contends that engagement with China need not send the wrong signals on China's human rights record and military buildup that threaten a peaceful resolution of Taiwan and other issues...

  16. Definition of satellite servicing technology development missions for early space stations. Volume 2: Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Early space station accommodation, build-up of space station manipulator capability, on-orbit spacecraft assembly test and launch, large antenna structure deployment, service/refurbish satellite, and servicing of free-flying materials processing platform are discussed.

  17. Tezacaftor and Ivacaftor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body to decrease the build-up of thick mucus in the lungs and improve other cystic fibrosis ... butter, nuts, peanut butter, cheese pizza, and whole-milk dairy products (such as whole milk, cheese, and ...

  18. Lumacaftor and Ivacaftor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body to decrease the build-up of thick mucus in the lungs and improving other symptoms of ... avocados, nuts, butter, peanut butter, cheese pizza, whole milk and other whole milk products such as cheese ...

  19. The impact of antioxidant supplementation on clinical outcomes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cells from the damaging effects of excess free radical build-up. The ... supplementation of vitamins and trace elements, particularly vitamin A, C, E, ... articles were found using manual searching, such as reviewing the reference lists of other ...

  20. Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lipoprotein ( LDL ) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein ( HDL ) cholesterol. LDL (bad) cholesterol - the main source of cholesterol buildup ... Teens How to Lower Cholesterol How to Lower Cholesterol with Diet LDL: The "Bad" Cholesterol Nutrition Statins Triglycerides VLDL Cholesterol ...

  1. Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocephalus is the buildup of too much cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Normally, this fluid cushions your ... though, it puts harmful pressure on your brain. Hydrocephalus can be congenital, or present at birth. Causes ...

  2. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  3. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  4. Composition of microfouling on aluminium and fibre glass panels exposed in Agatti waters (Lakshadweep Island)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raveendran, T.V.; Sankaran, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    Rate of microfouling build-up was high during the initial periods of exposure of test surfaces but decreased with the increasing duration. Fibre glass surfaces showed higher deposition than those of aluminium. Carbohydrates and lipids were the major...

  5. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood ... coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis can cause a buildup of cholesterol and cells and ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver ... to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the buildup of this waste product can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis resulting from ... MCKD1 is caused by mutations in the MUC1 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein ...

  8. Pellet injection requirements for TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafferranderie, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main parameters of TORE SUPRA are outlined and pellet injection requirements to meet plasma density goals are discussed. Topics considered include plasma buildup, plasma refueling and penetration depth

  9. Genetics Home Reference: congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an abnormal buildup of fats in the liver (hepatic steatosis), which can result in an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly) ... links) Encyclopedia: Acanthosis Nigricans Encyclopedia: Chronic ... Hypertrophic Cardiomypathy Encyclopedia: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial partial lipodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an abnormal buildup of fats in the liver (hepatic steatosis), which can result in an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly) ... Encyclopedia: Chronic Pancreatitis Encyclopedia: Coronary Heart Disease Encyclopedia: Fatty Liver - Nonalcoholic Encyclopedia: Polycystic Ovary Disease Health Topic: Coronary ...

  11. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  13. ELECTRON CLOUD AT COLLIMATOR AND INJECTION REGION OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WANG, L.; HSEUH, H.-C.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; WEI, J.; COUSINEAU, S.

    2005-01-01

    The beam loss along the Spallation Neutron Source's accumulator ring is mainly located at the collimator region and injection region. This paper studied the electron cloud build-up at these two regions with the three-dimension program CLOUDLAND

  14. Some estimates of mirror plasma startup by neutral beam heating of pellet and gas cloud targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Hot plasma buildup by neutral beam injection into an initially cold solid or gaseous target is found to be conceivable in large mirror machine experiments such as 2XIIB or MFTF. A simple analysis shows that existing neutral beam intensities are sufficient to ablate suitable targets to form a gas or vapor cloud. An approximate rate equation model is used to follow the subsequent processes of ionization, heating, and hot plasma formation. Solutions of these rate equations are obtained by means of the ''GEAR'' techniques for solving ''stiff'' systems of differential equations. These solutions are in rough agreement with the 2XIIB stream plasma buildup experiment. They also predict that buildup on a suitable nitrogen-like target will occur in the MFTF geometry. In 2XIIB the solutions are marginal; buildup may be possible, but is not certain

  15. Extending U.S. Theater Missile Defense to Northeast Asia: Ramifications for Regional Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Attenweiler, Steven

    2001-01-01

    The absence of a formidable U.S. and allied Theater Missile Defense (TMD) capability in the East Asian region has encouraged a build-up in offensive missile capability on the part of the People's Republic of China (PRC...

  16. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  17. Antibacterials in Household Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and residue build-up has resulted in detectable contamination of the environment—the consequences of which are not yet fully understood. It has been recovered from lake sediment, rivers, streams, wastewater, seawater, and has been found in ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: CLN6 disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the accumulation of proteins and other substances in lysosomes , which are cell structures that digest and recycle ... are involved in the buildup of substances in lysosomes in CLN6 disease . These accumulations occur in more ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Pompe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as acid maltase). This enzyme is active in lysosomes , which are structures that serve as recycling centers ... sugar to build up to toxic levels in lysosomes. This buildup damages organs and tissues throughout the ...

  20. The amorphous phase transition in irradiated NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Kissinger, H.E.; Pelton, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Observed supralinear dose dependence for the amorphous transformation during irradiation of NiTi is compatible with a cascade overlap model for heavy ion (2.5 MeV Ni + , 6 MeV Ta +++ ) irradiations. A model based on total defect build-up, however, is necessary to explain the amorphous transition induced by electron irradiation and can also be applied to heavy ion irradiation. The cascade effects in this latter model are manifested by non-uniform defect distribution in the lattice. The defect build-up model requires a high activation energy for interstitial migration which is not incompatible with recent findings. The form of the temperature dependence can also be rationalized using a defect build-up model (amorphous phase transition, heavy-ion irradiation, electron irradiation, NiTi, defect build-up, cascade overlap). (author)

  1. Linking Air Pollution and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Matters article about a study finding that exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen oxides can prematurely age blood vessels and contribute to a more rapid buildup of calcium in the coronary artery.

  2. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  3. Start-up of belt conveyors used for haulage of large lumps under difficult climatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobny, J

    1979-01-01

    Investigations are discussed carried out by the Research and Development Center for Brown Coal in Most, Czechoslovakia into effects of climate, weather and mass of coal lumps on reliability of belt conveyors in surface mines. Dirt buildup on the driving drums reduces friction and increases belt sliding hazards. Belt wear increases. Driving drum diameter, increased by the buildup, negatively influences load distribution among the electric motors of the drive system. In extreme cases belt wear and irregular load distribution cause belt failures. Methods for buildup removal used in Czechoslovakia and methods for protection of the return side of a conveyor are described. Effects of large mass of coal lumps and ice buildup on large lumps on the risk of belt damage (cuts, punctures etc,) are discussed. Recommendations for design of coal transfer points are made. 2 refs.

  4. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  5. Malignant hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked with the disease Muscle biopsy Urine myoglobin (muscle protein) Treatment During an episode of MH, a medicine called ... Fluid buildup in the lungs Weak or deformed muscles (myopathy or muscular dystrophy ) When to Contact a Medical Professional If you ...

  6. Assessing Discount Rate for a Project Financed Entirely with Equity Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Vintila

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimating discount rate for an investment project is one of the most challenging tasks incapital budgeting. In this paper we discuss different kind of models for cost of equity capital proposed infinance literature (static CAPM, conditional CAPM, APT, build-up model, focusing especially on advantagesand disadvantages of using each of them. In the final section, we estimate the discount rate fora certain project financed entirely with equity capital, using a version of build-up model.

  7. Atolls et récifs du Frasnien du Synclinorium de Dinant (Belgique, France): sédimentologie et implications paléocéanographiques

    OpenAIRE

    Boulvain, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    The facies architecture, sedimentary dynamics and palaeogeographical evolution were reconstructed for a number of Middle to Late Frasnian buildups developed on a carbonate platform on the south side of the Dinant Synclinorium (Belgium, France). Nine facies were documented in the buildups, each characterized by a specific range of textures and assemblage of organisms. Sedimentological evidence suggests that facies (1) and (2) correspond to iron bacteria-sponge-dominated communities, developing...

  8. The problem of helium in structural materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.S.; Zakharov, A.P.; Chuev, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The processes of helium buildup in some metals and alloys at different energy neutron flux irradiation under thermonuclear reactor conditions are considered. The data on high temperature helium embrittlement of a number of stainless steels, titanium and aluminium alloys etc. are given A review of experiments concerning the implanted helium behaviour is presented. Possible reactions between helium atoms and point defects or their clusters are discussed. Analysed are material structure variations upon buildup in them up to 1 at % of helium

  9. Application of automation and robotics to lunar surface human exploration operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.; Sherwood, Brent; Buddington, Patricia A.; Bares, Leona C.; Folsom, Rolfe; Mah, Robert; Lousma, Jack

    1990-01-01

    Major results of a study applying automation and robotics to lunar surface base buildup and operations concepts are reported. The study developed a reference base scenario with specific goals, equipment concepts, robot concepts, activity schedules and buildup manifests. It examined crew roles, contingency cases and system reliability, and proposed a set of technologies appropriate and necessary for effective lunar operations. This paper refers readers to four companion papers for quantitative details where appropriate.

  10. Discontinuity effects in dynamically loaded tilting pad journal bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two discontinuity effects that can occur when modelling radial tilting pad bearings subjected to high dynamic loads. The first effect to be treated is a pressure build-up discontinuity effect. The second effect is a contact-related discontinuity that disappears when a contact...... force is included in the theoretical model. Methods for avoiding the pressure build-up discontinuity effect are proposed....

  11. Safe venting of ''red oil'' runaway reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paddleford, D.F.; Fauske, H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetry testing of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) saturated with strong nitric acid was performed to determine the relationship between vent size and pressure buildup in the event of a runaway reaction. These experiments show that runaway can occur in an open system, but that even when runaway is induced in the TBP/HN0 3 system, dangerous pressure buildup will be prevented with practical vent size

  12. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, it has been attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build-up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: The origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters; the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pins deposits (activation); the release and transport of cobalt-60; the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarized. 90 refs, figs and tabs

  13. EXPLORATION WELL TEST CASE HISTORY CONFIRMS IMPORTANCE OF DST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Damjanić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drill stem testing of the exploration well consisted of two flow and two pressure build-up periods. Gas was obtained. Modified isochronal test was used during testing the well after completion. Except gas, small quantity of condensate and traces of oil and water were obtained. Both pressure build-up analyses showed that formation permeability is low. DST pressure build-up analysis showed that wellbore damage is present. This was proved later, when acid treatment was performed, by which skin was removed and production increased significantly. Data obtained by well testing are very important for future productivity prediction and determination of optimal well completion and surface facility construction (the paper is published in Croatian.

  14. Measurement of cosmogenic 36Cl/Cl in young volcanic rocks: An application of accelerator mass spectrometry in geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavy, B.D.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in a number of young volcanic rocks in order to test the feasibility of using 36 Cl buildup as a geochronometer for materials less than about 700,000 years old. All of the analyzed rocks have been dated independently using K-Ar or other radiometric dating methods and have exposure histories that are known or can be reasonably assumed. Measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in these rocks are in good agreement with the calculated in-situ 36 Cl buildup curve. These analyses indicate that AMS measurement of 36 Cl buildup in young rocks is a potentially powerful new method for dating materials that had previously been undatable, and as such will have broad applications in volcanology, tectonics, geophysics, and Quaternary research

  15. The Military Dimension of American Hegemony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONELA BĂLŢĂTESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A Political Economy of American Hegemony - Buildups, Booms and Busts by Thomas Oatley offers relevant historical and statistical evidence regarding military buildups in postwar America, assessing the economic and political impact of deficit financed military spending. From this point of view the book proves to be a very instructive and challenging reading. Thomas Oatley is professor of political science at North Carolina University, teaching courses on international politics and political economy. He is also the author of a series of papers and books on international political economy. His main theme of research is the interaction between economic interests and political institutions and how it shaped governments’ foreign economic policies. A Political Economy of American Hegemony Buildups, Booms and Busts is the most recent and also the most challenging of his books, in terms of inquired questions and defended theses.

  16. Subsurface example of a dolomitized middle Guadalupian (Permian) reef from west Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    A middle Guadalupian organic buildup was cored in the North McElroy Unit (NMU No. 3713 well) in Upton County, W. Texas. Fusulinid control indicates the buildup is equivalent to the Goat Seep reef that crops out in the Guadalupe Mt. The organic buildup at North McElroy consists of boundstones and associated flank grainstones. The reef biota is dominated by ramose and encrusting bryozoans, numerous types of calcareous sponges, the problematic encrusting organism Tubiphytes, encrusting algae, crinoids, brachiopods, and trilobites. Among the more significant aspects of diagenesis are mechanical degradation and biologic degradation, leaching, gypsum-anhydrite transformations, cementation, replacement of all calcite by dolomite, cementation and replacement by baroque dolomite, fracturing, and replacement of carbonate by anhydrite. 17 references.

  17. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  18. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  19. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  20. Auditory stream segregation using amplitude modulated bandpass noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjiu eNie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of spectral overlap and amplitude modulation (AM rate for stream segregation for noise signals, as well as to test the build-up effect based on these two cues. Segregation ability was evaluated using an objective paradigm with listeners’ attention focused on stream segregation. Stimulus sequences consisted of two interleaved sets of bandpass noise bursts (A and B bursts. The A and B bursts differed in spectrum, AM-rate, or both. The amount of the difference between the two sets of noise bursts was varied. Long and short sequences were studied to investigate the build-up effect for segregation based on spectral and AM-rate differences. Results showed the following: 1. Stream segregation ability increased with greater spectral separation. 2. Larger AM-rate separations were associated with stronger segregation abilities. 3. Spectral separation was found to elicit the build-up effect for the range of spectral differences assessed in the current study. 4. AM-rate separation interacted with spectral separation suggesting an additive effect of spectral separation and AM-rate separation on segregation build-up. The findings suggest that, when normal-hearing listeners direct their attention toward segregation, they are able to segregate auditory streams based on reduced spectral contrast cues that vary by the amount of spectral overlap. Further, regardless of the spectral separation they were able to use AM-rate difference as a secondary/weaker cue. Based on the spectral differences, listeners can segregate auditory streams better as the listening duration is prolonged—i.e. sparse spectral cues elicit build-up segregation; however, AM-rate differences only appear to elicit build-up when in combination with spectral difference cues.