WorldWideScience

Sample records for building ventilation policy

  1. Mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Batzanas, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the mechanisms of natural ventilation in livestock buildings are reviewed and influences on discharge and pressure coefficients are discussed. Compared to studies conducted on buildings for human occupation and industrial buildings which focus on thermal comfort, ventilation systems...

  2. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  3. Hybrid ventilation systems and high performance buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utzinger, D.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). School of Architecture and Urban Planning

    2009-07-01

    This paper described hybrid ventilation design strategies and their impact on 3 high performance buildings located in southern Wisconsin. The Hybrid ventilation systems combined occupant controlled natural ventilation with mechanical ventilation systems. Natural ventilation was shown to provide adequate ventilation when appropriately designed. Proper control integration of natural ventilation into hybrid systems was shown to reduce energy consumption in high performance buildings. This paper also described the lessons learned from the 3 buildings. The author served as energy consultant on all three projects and had the responsibility of designing and integrating the natural ventilation systems into the HVAC control strategy. A post occupancy evaluation of building energy performance has provided learning material for architecture students. The 3 buildings included the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center completed in 2003; the Urban Ecology Center completed in 2004; and the Aldo Leopold Legacy Center completed in 2007. This paper included the size, measured energy utilization intensity and percentage of energy supplied by renewable solar power and bio-fuels on site for each building. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  4. Impact of Fire Ventilation on General Ventilation in the Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender-Świercz, Ewa; Telejko, Marek

    2017-10-01

    The fire of building is a threat to its users. The biggest threat is generation, during lifetime of fire, hot gases and smoke. The purpose of quick and efficient evacuation from the area covered by the fire, at first step the escape routes have to be secured from smokiness. The smoke ventilation systems are used for this purpose. The proper design and execution of smoke ventilation is important not only because of the safety, but also of the maintenance of comfort in the building at a time when there is no fire. The manuscript presents the effect of incorrectly realized smoke ventilation in the stairwell of the medium building. The analysis shows that the flaps of smoke ventilation located in the stairwell may have a significant impact on the proper functioning of mechanical ventilation in the period when there is no fire. The improperly installed or incorrect insulated components cause perturbation of air flow and they change pressure distribution in the building. The conclusion of the analysis is the need to include the entire technical equipment of the building during the design and realization of its individual elements. The impact of various installations at each other is very important, and the omission of any of them can cause disturbances in the proper work of another.

  5. A novel system solution for cooling and ventilation in office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Lei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    technologies and renewable energy sources have risen. Based on a literature review of natural ventilation, building thermal mass activation and diffuse ceiling ventilation, this paper proposes a new system solution combining these three technologies for cooling and ventilation in office buildings. This new......As a response to new energy policies in the building sector, office buildings have become well-insulated and highly-airtight, resulting in an increasing cooling need both in summer and in winter. In order to effectively save energy, new interests in cooling concepts using passive cooling...

  6. Hybrid Ventilation in New and Retrofitted Office Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The scope of this annex is to obtain better knowledge of the use of hybrid ventilation technologies. The annex will focus on development of control strategies for hybrid ventilation, on development of methods to predict hybrid ventilation performance in office buildings and on development...

  7. Saving energy for ventilation by careful selection of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of the research project described in this paper was to study the potential of reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials without compromising indoor air quality.......The main objective of the research project described in this paper was to study the potential of reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials without compromising indoor air quality....

  8. Economic, Environmental and Health Implications of Enhanced Ventilation in Office Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNaughton, Piers; Pegues, James; Satish, Usha; Santanam, Suresh; Spengler, John; Allen, Joseph

    2015-11-18

    %, equivalent to a $6500 increase in employee productivity each year. Reduced absenteeism and improved health are also seen with enhanced ventilation. The health benefits associated with enhanced ventilation rates far exceed the per-person energy costs relative to salary costs. Environmental impacts can be mitigated at regional, building, and individual-level scales through the transition to renewable energy sources, adoption of energy efficient systems and ventilation strategies, and promotion of other sustainable policies.

  9. Elective ventilation for organ donation: law, policy and public ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, John

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: 'basic elective ventilation'; 'epistemically complex elective ventilation'; 'practically complex elective ventilation'; and 'epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation'. I give a legal analysis of each. In concluding remarks on their potential practical viability, I emphasise the importance not just of ascertaining the legal and ethical acceptability of these and other forms of elective ventilation, but also of assessing their professional and political acceptability. This importance relates both to the successful implementation of the individual practices, and to guarding against possible harmful effects in the wider efforts to increase the rates of posthumous organ donation.

  10. Computer Simulation of Buildings Cooled by Natural Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    performance of a building, the influence of natural infiltration on mechanical ventilation systems, and the study of smoke in the event of a fire...natural infiltration on mechanical ventilation systems, and the study of smoke in the event of a fire. Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIrIcATION OF TIIS PAGE...whether open or closed). Other influences include the operation of mechanical ventilation systems and the transient effects caused by opening and

  11. Building Land Information Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a conceptual understanding in the areas of Cadastre, Land Administration, and Land Management as a basis for building adequate land information policies. To develop this understanding the paper looks at each area as a system or an infrastructure designed for handling specific...... and judicial setting of the individual country. However, in spite of the different origins, the systems seem to merge into a global model serving some basic societal needs. The paper presents an outline of this development towards a global model for sustainable land administration infrastructures...... of measurement science, spatial information, management, and land management. (2) To establish national professional associations which accommodate a modern interdisciplinary profile. (3) To assess the capacity needs in land administration and to develop the capacity needed at societal, institutional...

  12. Enhanced Single-Sided Ventilation with Overhang in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the ventilation performance of energy-efficient buildings with single-sided openings is important because their ventilation performance is poor and strongly depends on the wind conditions. We considered an overhang as a potential building façade for improving the single-sided ventilation performance. We performed numerical simulations of three-dimensional unsteady turbulent flows over an idealized building with an overhang in order to investigate the effect of the overhang on the ventilation performance. Parametric studies were systematically carried out where the overhang length, wind speed, and wind direction were varied. The numerical results showed that the overhang drastically enhanced the ventilation rate in the windward direction regardless of the wind speed. This is because, for windward cases, the overhang produces a vortex with strong flow separation near the tip of the overhang, which promotes a net airflow exchange at the entrance and increases the ventilation rate. However, the ventilation rates for the leeward and side cases are slightly decreased with the overhang. Using an overhang with single-sided ventilation greatly reduces the local mean age of air (LMA in the windward direction but increases it in the leeward direction.

  13. Passive Cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    Due to an overall trend towards an increasing cooling energy demand in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising concept. However, because of uncertainties in thermal comfort predictions, architects and engineers...... will remain, especially if night-time ventilation is applied in combination with other cooling methods. Building energy simulations showed that the performance of night-time ventilation is also affected by the heat transfer at internal room surfaces, as the cooling effect is very limited for heat transfer...

  14. Assessment of Pollutant Spread from a Building Basement with three Ventilation Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Koffi, Juslin

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation aims at providing a sufficient air renewal for ensuring a good indoor air quality (IAQ), yet building energy policies are leading to adapting various ventilation strategies minimising energy losses through air renewal. A recent IAQ evaluation campaign in French dwellings shows important pollution of living spaces by VOCs such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde or hexanal, particularly in buildings equipped with a garage. Besides, radon emission from soil is a subject of concern in many countries. Several studies are done to understand its release mode and deal with the spread of this carcinogen gas. This paper aims to experimentally assess a contaminant spread from a house basement using mechanical exhaust and balanced ventilation systems, and natural ventilation.

  15. Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Mirer, Anna G.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Data from published studies were combined and analyzed to develop best-fit equations and curves quantifying the change in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptom prevalence in office workers with ventilation rate. For each study, slopes were calculated, representing the fractional change in SBS symptom prevalence per unit change in ventilation rate per person. Values of ventilation rate, associated with each value of slope, were also calculated. Linear regression equations were fitted to the resulting data points, after weighting by study size. Integration of the slope-ventilation rate equations yielded curves of relative SBS symptom prevalence versus ventilation rate. Based on these analyses, as the ventilation rate drops from 10 to 5 L/s-person, relative SBS symptom prevalence increases approximately 23percent (12percent to 32percent), and as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person, relative prevalence decreases approximately 29percent (15percent to 42percent). Variations in SBS symptom types, building features, and outdoor air quality may cause the relationship ofSBS symptom prevalence with ventilation rate in specific situations to differ from the average relationship predicted in this paper.

  16. Investigation of Indoor Climate in a Naturally Ventilated Office Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2008-01-01

    A measuring program in a naturally ventilated office building in Copenhagen was carried out to document the indoor climate and ventilation system performance during a year. It included a questionnaire regarding the perceived indoor environmental quality and physical measurements of thermal comfort...... to a combination of poor control of solar shading and a very high local heat load that was above the Danish recommendations for naturally ventilated office buildings. Both measured and perceived indoor air quality in the building was in general very high. The measured air flow rates was relatively high due...... to the need for cooling in the office building, while the level of infiltration was quite low indicating an airtight construction....

  17. Efficient ventilation in school buildings. Design guidebook; Ventilation performante dans les ecoles. Guide de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook aims at giving practical advices for the design of ventilation systems for school buildings in order to maintain air quality levels and energy consumptions conformable with the real needs: 1 - the specific problem of schools (various types of rooms, particular indoor pollutions); 2 - main criteria to consider (air quality and hygiene, hygro-thermal comfort, ventilation efficiency, acoustic comfort, energy mastery); 3 - main existing solutions (simple-flux blow-off or blow-in mechanical ventilation systems, dual-flux systems, air conditioning systems); 4 - choice of an adapted solution (selection criteria, global solution for the school); setting-up and follow-up (rules, training, maintenance). (J.S.)

  18. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  19. Thermal Comfort Studies in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Jakarta, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Karyono, Tri; Sri, Elita; Sulistiawan, Jevi; Triswanti, Yenny

    2015-01-01

    Many thermal comfort studies have been conducted in offices, classrooms and dwellings, but few in public buildings such as cathedrals, museums and markets. A recent thermal comfort study has been conducted in three naturally ventilated (NV) buildings, a cathedral, a museum and a market, in Jakarta, between March and April 2014. There is a curiosity as to whether people doing slightly different activities with slightly different clothing insulation values, in different building types, might ha...

  20. Cooling of the Building Structure by Night-time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai

    seen as a promising passive cooling concept. Many successful examples of passively cooled buildings demonstrate the possibility of providing good thermal comfort conditions without the need for energy-intensive air conditioning systems. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort......, architects and engineers are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. The basic concept of night-time ventilation involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink during the occupancy period. As this requires a sufficiently high temperature difference between...... the ambient air and the building structure, the efficiency of night cooling is highly sensitive to climatic conditions and hence also to climate warming. In the first part of this PhD study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data...

  1. Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from published studies were combined and analyzed to develop best-fit equations and curves quantifying the change in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptom prevalence in office workers with ventilation rate. For each study, slopes were calculated, representing the fractional...

  2. Improving Stack Effect in Hot Humid Building Interiors with Hybrid Turbine Ventilator(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifa Radia Tashkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation strategies have been applied through the ages to offer thermal comfort. At present, these techniques could be employed as one of the methods to overcome the electric consumption that comes from the burning of disproportionate fossil fuel to operate air conditioners. This air conditioning process is the main contributor of CO2 emissions. This paper focuses on the efficiency of stack ventilation which is one of the natural ventilation strategies, and at the same time attempts to overcome the problem of erratic wind flow and the low indoor/outdoor temperature difference in the hot, humid Malaysian climate. Wind flow and sufficient pressure difference are essential for stack ventilation, and as such the irregularity can be overcome with the use of the Hybrid Turbine Ventilator (HTV which extracts hot air from the interior of the building via the roof level. The extraction of hot air is constant and consistent throughout the day time as long as there is sunlight falling on the solar panel for solar electricity. The aim of this paper is to explore the different HTV strategies and find out which building dimensions is most expected to reduce maximum indoor air temperature of a given room in a real weather condition.

  3. Impact of ventilation systems and energy savings in a building on the mechanisms governing the indoor radon activity concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2017-11-23

    For a given radon potential in the ground and a given building, the parameters affecting the indoor radon activity concentration (IRnAC) are indoor depressurization of a building and its air change rate. These parameters depend mainly on the building characteristics, such as airtightness, and on the nature and performances of the ventilation system. This study involves a numerical sensitivity assessment of the indoor environmental conditions on the IRnAC in buildings. A numerical ventilation model has been adapted to take into account the effects of variations in the indoor environmental conditions (depressurization and air change rate) on the radon entry rate and on the IRnAC. In the context of the development of a policy to reduce energy consumption in a building, the results obtained showed that IRnAC could be strongly affected by variations in the air permeability of the building associated with the ventilation regime. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

  5. Energy Performance of a Novel System Combining Natural Ventilation with Diffuse Ceiling Inlet and Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao

    As a response to new stringent energy policies in the building sector, office buildings have become well-insulated and highly-airtight, resulting in an increasing cooling need in both summer and winter. This study proposes a novel system combining natural ventilation with diffuse ceiling inlet...... and thermally activated building systems (TABS) for cooling and ventilation in future Danish office buildings. The new solution would have the special potential of using natural ventilation all year round even in the extremely cold seasons without any draught risk. The main focuses of this study are the energy...... saving potential and the steady-state and dynamic energy performance of this system. The presented work utilizes building simulation method to investigate the energy saving potential of this novel system. Afterwards, an experimental set-up is built in the laboratory to simulate a real office environment...

  6. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Zuluaga, M. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent. CARB researchers have found that most new high performance, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. In this research project, CARB evaluated the four ventilation strategies in the field to validate system performance.

  7. Thermal Comfort in a Naturally-Ventilated Educational Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mwale Ogoli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of thermal comfort in a naturally ventilated education building (88,000 ft2 in a Chicago suburb will be conducted with 120 student subjects in 2007. This paper discusses some recent trends in worldwide thermal comfort studies and presents a proposal of research for this building through a series of questionnaire tables. Two research methods used inthermal comfort studies are field studies and laboratory experiments in climate-chambers. The various elements that constitute a “comfortable” thermal environment include physical factors (ambient air temperature, mean radiant temperature, air movement and humidity, personal factors(activity and clothing, classifications (gender, age, education, etc. and psychological expectations (knowledge, experience, psychological effect of visual warmth by, say, a fireplace. Comparisons are made using data gathered from Nairobi, Kenya.Keywords: Comfort, temperature, humidity and ventilation

  8. Evaluation of a Natural Ventilation Configuration at a Public Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, K.; Belias, C.; Vlachakis, N.; Statharas, I.

    2007-12-01

    Wind is regarded as the popular passive cooling resource against hot climate in summer. It can transfer heat from human bodies, when the air temperature is lower than the skin temperature. This concept works indoors as well as outdoors. The present paper refers to the numerical simulation of air velocity and temperature concerning single—sided naturally ventilated buildings and more specifically the special case in which air from the external environment is brought inside the building through openings that have the same direction. The paper draws attention to the physical procedures governing air movement during the single—sided natural ventilation. The study presents a mathematical model, implemented in a general computer code, that can provide detailed information on velocity and temperature, prevailing in three-dimensional single—sided ventilated buildings with openings of any geometrical complexity, for given external meteorological conditions. The mathematical model involves the partial differential equations governing flow and heat transfer, in large enclosures. Turbulent flow is simulated and buoyancy effects are taken into account.

  9. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil-Baez Maite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  10. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Baez, Maite; Barrios-Padura, Ángela; Molina-Huelva, Marta; Chacartegui, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  11. Energy and cost associated with ventilating office buildings in a tropical climate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    .... This study evaluates the energy consumption and associated cost for thermally conditioning outdoor air provided for building ventilation in tropical climates, considering Singapore as an example locale...

  12. Thermal comfort and ventilation criteria for low energy residential buildings in building codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Guangyu; Kurnitski, Jarek; Awbi, Hazim

    2012-01-01

    of the indoor air quality in such buildings. Currently, there are no global guidelines for specifying the indoor thermal environment in such low-energy buildings. The objective of this paper is to analyse the classification of indoor thermal comfort levels and recommended ventilation rates for different low......Indoor environmental quality and energy performance of buildings are becoming more and more important in the design and construction of low energy, passive and zero energy buildings. At the same time, improved insulation and air tightness have the potential to resulting in a deterioration...... energy buildings, and propose a set of indices that would enable better quantification and comparison among low energy buildings. In this study, the building codes and voluntary guidelines have been reviewed on the basis of experience of Finland, UK, Denmark, USA and Germany. The analysis in this paper...

  13. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David; Eliseeva, Ekaterina

    2010-03-17

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO{sub 2} data that are used, in a process called demand-controlled ventilation, to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air ventilation. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. Demand controlled ventilation is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. Reasonably accurate CO{sub 2} measurements are needed for successful demand controlled ventilation; however, prior research has suggested substantial measurement errors. Accordingly, this study evaluated: (a) the accuracy of 208 CO{sub 2} single-location sensors located in 34 commercial buildings, (b) the accuracy of four multi-location CO{sub 2} measurement systems that utilize tubing, valves, and pumps to measure at multiple locations with single CO{sub 2} sensors, and (c) the spatial variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations within meeting rooms. The field studies of the accuracy of single-location CO{sub 2} sensors included multi-concentration calibration checks of 90 sensors in which sensor accuracy was checked at multiple CO{sub 2} concentrations using primary standard calibration gases. From these evaluations, average errors were small, -26 ppm and -9 ppm at 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively; however, the averages of the absolute values of error were 118 ppm (16%) and 138 ppm (14%), at concentrations of 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively. The calibration data are generally well fit by a straight line as indicated by high values of R{sup 2}. The Title 24 standard specifies that sensor error must be certified as no greater than 75 ppm for a period of five years after sensor installation. At 1010 ppm, 40% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 31% of sensors has errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. At 760 ppm, 47% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 37% of

  14. Energy saving technologies of the decentralized ventilation of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, R. Sh; Rafalskaya, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The growing aspiration to energy saving and efficiency of energy leads to necessity to build tight enough buildings. As a result of this the quantity of infiltration air appears insufficient for realization of necessary air exchange in. One of decisions of the given problem is development and application for ventilation of premises of the decentralized forced-air and exhaust systems (DFAES) with recuperative or regenerative heat-exchangers. For an estimation of efficiency of DFAES following basic parameters have been certain: factor of energy saving; factor of efficiency of energy; factor of a heat transfer; factor of an effective utilization of a surface of heat exchange. Were estimated temperature of forced air; actual speed of an air jet on an entrance in a served zone; actual noise level; the charge of external air. Tests of DFAES were spent in natural conditions at which DFAES influenced all set of factors both an external climate, and an internal microclimate of a premise, and also the arrangement on a wind side or behind wind side of a building, influence of surrounding building, fluctuation of temperature of external air is considered. Proceeding from results and the analysis of the lead researches recommendations have been developed for development and manufacture of new sample of DFAES.

  15. Solar chimney: A sustainable approach for ventilation and building space conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal, S.,

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The residential and commercial buildings demand increase with rapidly growing population. It leads to the vertical growth of the buildings and needs proper ventilation and day-lighting. The natural air ventilation system is not significantly works in conventional structure, so fans and air conditioners are mandatory to meet the proper ventilation and space conditioning. Globally building sector consumed largest energy and utmost consumed in heating, ventilation and space conditioning. This load can be reduced by application of solar chimney and integrated approaches in buildings for heating, ventilation and space conditioning. It is a sustainable approach for these applications in buildings. The authors are reviewed the concept, various method of evaluation, modelings and performance of solar chimney variables, applications and integrated approaches.

  16. Design guidelines for natural ventilation systems in tertiary sector buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Van Moeseke, Geoffrey; Bruyère, Isabelle; De Herde, André; CISBAT 2005: Renewables in a changing climate

    2005-01-01

    Parameters determining efficiency of natural ventilation systems are numerous. The most important are architecture and system design. This article get onto both but focuses on system design. Through dynamic simulations it shows that natural ventilation management has a large impact on energy saving but most of all on thermal comfort. Natural ventilation techniques are also weighted against hybrid solutions and high efficiency mechanical cooling solutions. Natural ventilation techniques show t...

  17. Comparison of mixing and displacement ventilation in a low energy office building during heating season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Wu, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    ventilation compared to those for displacement ventilation. Due to the heat emission from equipments and occupants, heating system was not needed in the low energy office building in a mild winter. In such a situation, indoor thermal environment was still acceptable in terms of the general thermal comfort......The present study investigated the performance of mixing and displacement ventilation systems in a low energy office building during heating season. Measurements were performed with regard to air distribution and ventilation effectiveness. The results show that indoor air temperatures in occupied...

  18. Natural ventilation in high-rise buildings with double facades, saving or waste of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquay, T. [Schmidt Reuter Partner , Engineering Co., Research and Development, Koln (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Double facades are built to allow natural ventilation in high-rise buildings and buildings with high outside noise levels. To evaluate the energetic performance, three buildings with double facades were monitored for at least a year (Siemens building in Dortmund, Victoria Insurance Company in Dusseldorf and RWE Tower in Essen). In one building all the air conditioning facilities had been removed and the facade replaced by a double facade, one building had cooling equipment without mechanical ventilation (concrete core tempered ceiling) and one building had cooling equipment combined with mechanical ventilation. The results document the indoor climate, the boundary conditions for further planning and the possibilities for high-rise buildings with no or only limited cooling facilities. The research was carried out at the University of Dortmund and founded by the state of Nordrhein-Westfahlen (AG-Solar). (author)

  19. Natural ventilation in high-rise buildings with double facades, saving or waste of energy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquay, T. [Schmidt Reuter Partner, Engineering Company, Research and Development, Koeln (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Double facades are built to allow natural ventilation in high-rise buildings and buildings with high outside noise levels. To evaluate the energetic performance, three buildings with double facades were monitored for at least one year (Siemens building in Dortmund, Victoria Insurance Company in Duesseldorf and RWE Tower in Essen, all in Germany). In one building all the air conditioning facilities had been removed and the facade replaced by a double facade, one building had cooling equipment without mechanical ventilation (concrete core tempered ceiling) and one building had cooling equipment combined with mechanical ventilation. The results document the indoor climate, the boundary conditions for further planning and the possibilities for high-rise buildings with no or only limited cooling facilities. The research was carried out at the University of Dortmund and founded by the state of Nordrhein-Westfahlen (AG-Solar). (author)

  20. Quantification of the association of ventilation rates with sick building syndrome symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Mirer, Anna G.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2009-06-01

    Data from published studies were combined and analyzed to develop best-fit equations and curves quantifying the change in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptom prevalence with ventilation rate. For each study, slopes were calculated, representing the fractional change in SBS symptom prevalence per unit change in ventilation rate per person. Values of ventilation rate, associated with each value of slope, were also calculated. Linear regression equations were fit to the resulting data points, after weighting by study size. Integration of the slope-ventilation rate equations yielded curves of relative SBS symptom prevalence versus ventilation rate. Based on these analyses, relative SBS symptom prevalence increases approximately 23percent (12percent to 32percent) as the ventilation rate drops from 10 to 5 L/s-person and relative prevalence decreases approximately 29percent (15percent to 42percent) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.

  1. Assessment of Natural Ventilation Potential for Residential Buildings across Different Climate Zones in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijing Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural ventilation potential of residential buildings was numerically investigated based on a typical single-story house in the three most populous climate zones in Australia. Simulations using the commercial simulation software TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation Tool were performed for all seasons in three representative cities, i.e., Darwin for the hot humid summer and warm winter zone, Sydney for the mild temperate zone, and Melbourne for the cool temperate zone. A natural ventilation control strategy was generated by the rule-based decision-tree method based on the local climates. Natural ventilation hour (NVH and satisfied natural ventilation hour (SNVH were employed to evaluate the potential of natural ventilation in each city considering local climate and local indoor thermal comfort requirements, respectively. The numerical results revealed that natural ventilation potential was related to the local climate. The greatest natural ventilation potential for the case study building was observed in Darwin with an annual 4141 SNVH out of 4728 NVH, while the least natural ventilation potential was found in the Melbourne case. Moreover, summer and transition seasons (spring and autumn were found to be the optimal periods to sustain indoor thermal comfort by utilising natural ventilation in Sydney and Melbourne. By contrast, natural ventilation was found applicable over the whole year in Darwin. In addition, the indoor operative temperature results demonstrated that indoor thermal comfort can be maintained only by utilising natural ventilation for all cases during the whole year, except for the non-natural ventilation periods in summer in Darwin and winter in Melbourne. These findings could improve the understanding of natural ventilation potential in different climates, and are beneficial for the climate-conscious design of residential buildings in Australia.

  2. [Sanitary and epidemiological evaluation of the ventilation and air-conditioning systems of public buildings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorianov, V V

    2012-01-01

    The microbial contamination of ventilation and air conditioning systems was examined in the administrative buildings. The author proposes a set of indicators, methods for determining the scope of investigations, as well as sampling tactics and criteria for evaluating the microbial contamination of the ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The content of yeasts and molds in the delivered air has been found to be of importance for evaluating the sanitary-and epidemiological state of ventilation systems.

  3. Integrated Solution in an Office Room with Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation and Thermally Activated Building Constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    An integrated system is proposed in this study to combine diffuse ceiling ventilation with a thermally activated building construction (TABS), aiming to provide cooling/ heating and ventilation to an office room all year around. The performance of the integrated system is evaluated by full...

  4. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Wind Driven Natural Ventilation in a Building Scale Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; True, Jan Per Jensen; Sandberg, Mats

    2004-01-01

    Airflow through openings in a cross ventilated building scale model was investigated in a wind tunnel and by numerical predictions. Predictions for a wind direction perpendicular to the building showed an airflow pattern consisting of streamlines entering the room, that originated from approximat......Airflow through openings in a cross ventilated building scale model was investigated in a wind tunnel and by numerical predictions. Predictions for a wind direction perpendicular to the building showed an airflow pattern consisting of streamlines entering the room, that originated from...... and leeward sides and the airflow rate was found to be a linear function of the local pressure difference across the building....

  5. Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D H; Fisk, W; Apte, M G; Wu, X; Trout, A; Faulkner, D; Sullivan, D

    2012-08-01

    This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Multivariate analysis comparing microbial air content of an air-conditioned building and a naturally ventilated building over one year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, Sylvie; Perdrix, Alain; Fricker-Hidalgo, Hélène; Saude, Isabelle; Grillot, Renee; Baconnier, Pierre

    Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) may be responsible for the production and spread of airborne microorganisms in office buildings. In order to compare airborne microbiological flora in an air-conditioned building with that in a naturally ventilated building, eight sets of measurements were made over a 1-year period. Concurrently with other environmental measurements, air samples were collected in each building, from three offices and from the outdoor air, using the Andersen single-stage sampler. Three different media were used to culture fungi, staphylococci and mesophilic bacteria. Multivariate analysis revealed a group of offices more contaminated than others, and a marked seasonal variation in fungal concentrations. A comparison of mean levels of microorganisms measured in the two buildings showed that the air microbial content was significantly higher and more variable in the naturally ventilated building than in the air-conditioned building. Moreover, in the naturally ventilated building, the interior fungal content was strongly dependent on the outdoor content, while in the air-conditioned building fungal concentrations remained constant despite significant variations measured outside. This was confirmed by a statistical comparison of the correlation coefficients between indoor and outdoor concentrations. No difference was observed regarding gaseous pollutants and temperature, but relative humidity was significantly higher in the air-conditioned building. The effect of HVAC was to prevent the intake of outdoor particles and to dilute the indoor concentrations. These results are consistent with the presence of high-efficiency filters and a steam humidifier in the HVAC system under study.

  7. Policy Pathways: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Improving energy efficiency is one of the most effective measures to address energy security, climate change and economic objectives. The Policy Pathways series can help countries capture this potential by assisting with the implementation of the 25 energy efficiency policy recommendations that were published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2008. This policy pathway on energy performance certification of buildings is the second in the series. It aims to provide a 'how-to' guide to policy makers and relevant stakeholders on the essential elements in implementing energy performance certification of buildings programmes. Energy performance certification of buildings is a way to rate the energy efficiency of individual buildings -- whether they be residential, commercial or public. It is a key policy instrument that can assist governments in reducing energy consumption in buildings. This policy pathway showcases experiences from countries around the world to show examples of good practice and delivers a pathway of ten critical steps to implement energy performance certification of buildings programmes.

  8. Power Efficiency of Systems Applied for Heating Building and Structure External Walls with Ventilated Air Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    I. F. Fialko; A. S. Statsenko

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers power-efficient systems applied for heating building and structure external walls with ventilated air spaces and prescribes directions and problems pertaining to power-efficiency improvement of such systems.

  9. Use of VOC sensors for air quality control of building ventilation systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Großklos

    2015-01-01

    .... An air quality control was developed and tested in four single-family passive house dwellings to control the building ventilation system via VOC sensors and a special adaptation algorithm to handle...

  10. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-08-01

    ?Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy.

  11. An Evaluation of a Proposed Ventilation System for Melbourne's CH2 Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aye

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of ventilation requirements in commercial buildings has been significantly revised in the last 10-15 years. A link between health, productivity and increased fresh air use has been established by some research and this understanding underpins the ventilation philosophy adopted for the CH2 building. The ventilation system design for CH2 that has been evaluated in this paper envisages a mechanically driven system during the day, using the displacement technique to distribute filtered air. All introduced air will be drawn from outside and no recycling of air will occur. Natural ventilation will be employed at night using the stack effect, enhanced by turbine ventilators. This paper critiques the proposed ventilation system in the light of international experience and the particular conditions of the building's location. The evidence suggests that natural ventilation sometimes may be inadequate to achieve the desired objectives. Minimization of indoor pollutants, adequate filtration and high levels of ventilation should, however, ensure satisfactory air quality during occupied hours.

  12. Change-over natural and mechanical ventilation system energy consumption in single-family buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Maria; Szulgowska-Zgrzywa, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The parameters of the outside air in Poland cause that in winter it is reasonable to use a mechanical ventilation equipped with a heat recovery exchanger. The time of spring, autumn, summer evenings and nights are often characterized by the parameters of the air, which allow for a natural ventilation and reduce the electricity consumption. The article presents the possibilities of energy consumption reduction for three energy standards of buildings located in Poland, ventilated by a change-over hybrid system. The analysis was prepared on the assumption that the air-to-water heat pump is the heat source for the buildings.

  13. Suite Ventilation Characteristics of Current Canadian Mid-andHigh-Rise Residential Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper characterizes ventilation in residential suiteslocated in ll buildings were between six and thirty-two stories tall andwere built between 1990 and 1995. The key findings from field performancetests of these buildings were: 1. Corridor supply airflows usually didnot meet design flows.2. Makeup air paths for suite exhaust were notproperly designed.3. Suite access door leakage was highly variable andusually did not meet smoke control requirements.4. Airflow from thecorridor through the suite access door leakage appeared to be the primaryventilation air supply for suites.5. Suites were usually well-ventilated,but some were marginally- or under-ventilated.6. Poor pressure controloften allowed transfer air from one suite to another. Inter-suitetransfer air fractions ranged from 0 to 45 percent, with an average of 19percent. In summary, this work showed suite ventilation can be highlyinfluenced by corridor supply flows, by the treatment of corridor accessdoors, and by transfer airflows. As a result, suite ventilation at anygiven time in current mid- and high-rise residential buildings is verydifficult to predict. To ensure suite ventilation performs as intendedunder all operating conditions, the building industry needs to addressthe identified problems through improved ventilation design, operation,and maintenance practices.

  14. Climatic potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    , Eastern and Northern Europe. The basic concept involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink that is available during the occupancy period. In this study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data......Due to an overall trend towards less heating and more cooling demands in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising technique, particularly for commercial buildings in the moderate or cold climates of Central...

  15. Summarized Data of Test Space Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Inspections from the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on the characteristics of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system(s) in the entire BASE building including types of ventilation, equipment configurations, and operation and maintenance issues

  16. Supply Ventilation and Prevention of Carbon Monoxide (II) Ingress into Building Premises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article contains the relationships of carbon monoxide (II) concentration versus height-above-ground near buildings derived based on results of studies. The results of studies are crucial in preventing external pollutants ingress into a ventilation system. Being generated by external emission sources, such as motor vehicles and city heating plants, carbon monoxide (II) enters the premises during operation of a supply ventilation system. Fresh air nomographic charts were drawn to select the height of a fresh air intake into the ventilation system. Nomographic charts take into account external sources. The selected emission sources are located at various levels above ground relative to the building. The recommendations allow designing supply ventilation taking into account the quality of ambient air through the whole building height.

  17. Policy Pathways: Modernising Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    Buildings are the largest consumers of energy worldwide and will continue to be a source of increasing energy demand in the future. Globally, the sector’s final energy consumption doubled between 1971 and 2010 to reach 2 794 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe), driven primarily by population increase and economic growth. Under current policies, the global energy demand of buildings is projected by the IEA experts to grow by an additional 838 Mtoe by 2035 compared to 2010. The challenges of the projected increase of energy consumption due to the built environment vary by country. In IEA member countries, much of the future buildings stock is already in place, and so the main challenge is to renovate existing buildings stock. In non-IEA countries, more than half of the buildings stock needed by 2050 has yet to be built. The IEA and the UNDP partnered to analyse current practices in the design and implementation of building energy codes. The aim is to consolidate existing efforts and to encourage more attention to the role of the built environment in a low-carbon and climate-resilient world. This joint IEA-UNDP Policy Pathway aims to share lessons learned between IEA member countries and non-IEA countries. The objective is to spread best practices, limit pressures on global energy supply, improve energy security, and contribute to environmental sustainability. Part of the IEA Policy Pathway series, Modernising building energy codes to secure our global energy future sets out key steps in planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The Policy Pathway series aims to help policy makers implement the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations endorsed by IEA Ministers (2011).

  18. Ventilation systems for multi-unit residential buildings : performance requirements and alternative approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.

    2003-09-01

    A growing proportion of housing in Canada consists of multi-unit residential buildings (MURBs). Ventilation strategies have not changed much over the past three decades. Research conducted by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and others has shown that conventional ventilation strategies consume significant amounts of energy, are noisy, consume internal floor area, and can become conduits for pests and smoke. As a result, a research project was initiated to develop performance requirements and alternative approaches for ventilation systems in MURBs. The issues to be addressed by alternative ventilation systems were identified through literature review. The various codes and standards applicable to ventilation capacities for apartments in MURBs in Canada were evaluated. It was revealed that the ventilation system airflow rates required for any given apartment and the amount of ventilation that should be provided by infiltration varies greatly depending on the codes or standards selected. The performance parameters that were identified in this paper were: ventilation performance, capital and operating costs, maintenance, fire and smoke control, noise issues, comfort, system issues, and owner and designer construction issues. The following four different alternative ventilation systems were discussed: (1) passive vents with suite-based mechanical exhaust, (2) balanced individual suites with heat recovery (HRV) units, (3) balanced floor-by-floor systems with heat recovery, and (4) balanced central systems with heat recovery. Further testing and assessment is needed before these proposed systems can enter the marketable phase. More research is also needed into the characterization of stack and wind pressures in MURBs. 5 tabs.

  19. Ventilated buildings optimisation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This work shows the optimization of natural ventilation within buildings at the stage of design and behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is done by coupled multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation by using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others climate, l...

  20. A method for evaluating the problem complex of choosing the ventilation system for a new building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2007-01-01

    The application of a ventilation system in a new building is a multidimensional complex problem that involves quantifiable and non-quantifiable data like energy consump¬tion, indoor environment, building integration and architectural expression. This paper presents a structured method for evaluat...

  1. Model for Naturally Ventilated Cavities on the Exteriors of Opaque Building Thermal Envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, B.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes a model for naturally ventilated cavities on the exterior of opaque building thermal envelopes that are formed by the presence of a lightweight baffle. The model can be used for building components that are slightly detached from the main envelope (but do not connect to the interior).

  2. Parameter study on performance of building cooling by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    of different parameters such as building construction, heat gains, air change rates, heat transfer coefficients and climatic conditions including annual variations on the number of overheating degree hours (operative room temperature >26 °C) was evaluated. Climatic conditions and air flow rate during night......Especially for commercial buildings in moderate climates, night-time ventilation seems to be a simple and energy-efficient approach to improve thermal comfort in summer. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort in buildings with night-time ventilation, architects...... and engineers are still hesitant to apply this technique. In order to reduce the uncertainties, the most important parameters affecting night ventilation performance need to be identified. A typical office room was therefore modelled using a building energy simulation programme (HELIOS), and the effect...

  3. The effect of using low-polluting building materials on ventilation requirements and energy use in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wargocki, P.; Frontczak, M. (International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK)); Knudsen, Henrik N. (Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg Univ., Hoersholm (DK))

    2007-07-01

    The main objective of the ongoing research project described in this paper was to study the potential for reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials, without compromising the indoor air quality. To quantify this potential, the exposure-response relationships, i.e. the relationships between ventilation rate and perceived indoor air quality, were established for rooms furnished with different categories of polluting materials and the simulations of energy used for ventilation were carried out. The exposure-response relationships were based on a summary of data reported in the literature on exposure-response relationships for materials tested in laboratory settings in small-scale glass chambers, and in full-scale in climate chambers, test rooms or normal offices. New experiments were also considered in which the effect of using low-polluting materials on perceived air quality was examined in test rooms ventilated with different outdoor air supply rates, low-polluting materials being selected in small glass chambers. The results suggest that the exposure-response relationships vary between different building materials and that the perceived air quality can be improved considerably when polluting building materials are substituted with materials that pollute less. The preliminary energy simulations indicate that selecting low-polluting materials will result in considerable energy savings as a result of reducing the ventilation rates required to achieve acceptable indoor air quality. (au)

  4. An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-22

    An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

  5. Bringing voice in policy building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Kane, Mary; Zocchi, Mark S; Gosa, Jessica; Lazar, Danielle; Pines, Jesse M

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of group concept mapping (GCM) as a tool for developing a conceptual model of an episode of acute, unscheduled care from illness or injury to outcomes such as recovery, death and chronic illness. Design/methodology/approach After generating a literature review drafting an initial conceptual model, GCM software (CS Global MAXTM) is used to organize and identify strengths and directionality between concepts generated through feedback about the model from several stakeholder groups: acute care and non-acute care providers, patients, payers and policymakers. Through online and in-person population-specific focus groups, the GCM approach seeks feedback, assigned relationships and articulated priorities from participants to produce an output map that described overarching concepts and relationships within and across subsamples. Findings A clustered concept map made up of relational data points that produced a taxonomy of feedback was used to update the model for use in soliciting additional feedback from two technical expert panels (TEPs), and finally, a public comment exercise was performed. The results were a stakeholder-informed improved model for an acute care episode, identified factors that influence process and outcomes, and policy recommendations, which were delivered to the Department of Health and Human Services's (DHHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Practical implications This study provides an example of the value of cross-population multi-stakeholder input to increase voice in shared problem health stakeholder groups. Originality/value This paper provides GCM results and a visual analysis of the relational characteristics both within and across sub-populations involved in the study. It also provides an assessment of observational key factors supporting how different stakeholder voices can be integrated to inform model development and policy recommendations.

  6. Solar ventilation: The use of solar chimneys for natural ventilation of buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macquoy, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written for the TIDO-course AR0532 Smart & Bioclimatic Design Theory. A very old principle is the system of the solar chimney for ventilation, which in recent years has regained interests. This essay will explore the potentials of solar chimneys in a modern application.

  7. Appropriate Ventilation Solutions for the Iconographic Buildings from the Fifties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge; Blyt, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    . The paper concludes that interdisciplinary ways of working will improve both architecture and preservation and comfort, and that higher value hereby is created. Furthermore the new initiatives from the industry are shown, which indicates a movement towards innovation of decentralized ventilation solutions....

  8. Energy and cost associated with ventilating office buildings in a tropical climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyun Rim

    Full Text Available Providing sufficient amounts of outdoor air to occupants is a critical building function for supporting occupant health, well-being and productivity. In tropical climates, high ventilation rates require substantial amounts of energy to cool and dehumidify supply air. This study evaluates the energy consumption and associated cost for thermally conditioning outdoor air provided for building ventilation in tropical climates, considering Singapore as an example locale. We investigated the influence on energy consumption and cost of the following factors: outdoor air temperature and humidity, ventilation rate (L/s per person, indoor air temperature and humidity, air conditioning system coefficient of performance (COP, and cost of electricity. Results show that dehumidification of outdoor air accounts for more than 80% of the energy needed for building ventilation in Singapore's tropical climate. Improved system performance and/or a small increase in the indoor temperature set point would permit relatively large ventilation rates (such as 25 L/s per person at modest or no cost increment. Overall, even in a thermally demanding tropical climate, the energy cost associated with increasing ventilation rate up to 25 L/s per person is less than 1% of the wages of an office worker in an advanced economy like Singapore's. This result implies that the benefits of increasing outdoor air ventilation rate up to 25 L/s per person--which is suggested to provide for productivity increases, lower sick building syndrome symptom prevalence, and reduced sick leave--can be much larger than the incremental cost of ventilation.

  9. A First Approach to Natural Thermoventilation of Residential Buildings through Ventilation Chimneys Supplied by Solar Ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinando Salata; Chiara Alippi; Anna Tarsitano; Iacopo Golasi; Massimo Coppi

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of natural ventilation is a good solution to improve buildings from an energetic point of view and to fulfill the requirements demanded by the thermohygrometric comfort and the air quality in enclosed spaces. Some past researches demonstrated how some devices, useful to this purpose, follow the principles of solar chimneys and are able to move air masses while exploiting the Archimedes thrust. The natural ventilation must be supplied by a flow moving upward, generated by a he...

  10. (LIRNEasia) : Building Capacity in ICT Policy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Learning Initiatives for Network Economies in Asia (LIRNEasia) : Building Capacity in ICT Policy. It is now generally accepted that affordable, effective telecommunication services play an integral role in development. Although there has been strong growth in connectivity in Asia, those who have benefited most are the urban ...

  11. The Vexing Problem of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Observations on Pathophysiology, Public Policy, and Clinical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H

    2015-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired infection related primarily to the consequences of prolonged endotracheal intubation. It is considered the most important infectious challenge in the critical care setting. Preventable complications of hospital care are considered an important source of wasted health-care costs believed to consume up to 47% of annual expenditures in the United States. Whether VAP is preventable has become a highly contentious debate since public reporting commenced a decade ago. This selective review focuses on specific aspects of this debate, including the inherent vagaries in the diagnosis of VAP and the marked disparities between VAP rates based on clinical diagnosis versus surveillance data. Also discussed is how this debate has impacted public policy, leading to the new paradigm of ventilator-associated events. The limited ability of artificial airways to prevent microaspiration and biofilm build-up, as well as non-modifiable conditions increasing the risk of VAP, is described in detail. In addition, the origins of the mistaken but widely embraced notion that zero VAP is a realistic achievement are examined. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  12. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  13. Demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  14. Development of mechanical ventilation system with low energy consumption for renovation of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkildsen, Søren

    in reducing CO2-emmissions. Over the last decade, initiatives have been taken to reduce its energy consumption e.g. by the European Union, national governments or NGOs. The initiatives have mostly focused on improving the thermal properties of the building envelope to reduce heat losses. Building services......A general reduction in total energy consumption is needed, due to the increasing concerns about climate change caused by CO2-emmissions from fossil fuels. In 2004, the building sector accounted for 40% of the total energy consumption in the EU and the US and therefore must play a crucial role......, including ventilation, therefore now represent a larger part of the total energy consumption. Mechanical ventilation has been the most widely used principle of ventilation over the last 50 years, but the conventional system design needs revising to meet future energy requirements. The increase in the use...

  15. Computational Analysis of Natural Ventilation Flows in Geodesic Dome Building in Hot Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Soleimani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, dome roofs were used in traditional houses in hot regions such as the Middle East and Mediterranean basin due to its thermal advantages, structural benefits and availability of construction materials. This article presents the computational modelling of the wind- and buoyancy-induced ventilation in a geodesic dome building in a hot climate. The airflow and temperature distributions and ventilation flow rates were predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations were solved using the CFD tool ANSYS FLUENT15. The standard k-epsilon was used as turbulence model. The modelling was verified using grid sensitivity and flux balance analysis. In order to validate the modelling method used in the current study, additional simulation of a similar domed-roof building was conducted for comparison. For wind-induced ventilation, the dome building was modelled with upper roof vents. For buoyancy-induced ventilation, the geometry was modelled with roof vents and also with two windows open in the lower level. The results showed that using the upper roof openings as a natural ventilation strategy during winter periods is advantageous and could reduce the indoor temperature and also introduce fresh air. The results also revealed that natural ventilation using roof vents cannot satisfy thermal requirements during hot summer periods and complementary cooling solutions should be considered. The analysis showed that buoyancy-induced ventilation model can still generate air movement inside the building during periods with no or very low wind.

  16. On the thermal interaction of building structure and heating and ventilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Joannes Laurentius Maria

    Developments in the field of building performance evaluation tools for thermal interaction of building structure and heating and ventilating systems are described. The technique employed is computer simulation of the integrated dynamic system comprising the occupants, the building and its heating and ventilating system. Assessment criteria from a literature review in thermal comfort to examine acceptable fluctuations in indoor climate are defined. Building and plant energy simulation within the context of Computer Aided Building Design (CABD) is described. An exisiting energy simulation environment ESP(R) (Environmental Systems Performance (Research version)) is chosen. A fluid flow network simulation module is described. Extensions to ESP(R) to predict the dynamic behavior of the heating and ventilation system are described. The coupling of fluid flow, plant side energy and mass, and building side energy simulation into one integrated program is described. A multistage verification and validation methodology is demonstrated by examples addressing each successive step. Imaginary and real world cases are described to demonstrate application of the study in a modeling orientated and a building engineering context.

  17. Combining a building simulation with energy systems analysis to assess the benefits of natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    a thermal air flow simulation program - Into the energy systems analysis model. Descriptions of the energy systems in two geographical locations, i.e. Mexico and Denmark, are set up as inputs. Then, the assessment is done by calculating the energy impacts as well as environmental benefits in the energy......This article shows the combination of a thermal air flow simulation program with an energy systems analysis model in order to assess the use of natural ventilation as a method for saving energy within residential buildings in large-scale scenarios. The aim is to show the benefits for utilizing...... natural airflow instead of active systems such as mechanical ventilation or air-conditioning in buildings where the indoor temperature is over the upper limit of the comfort range. The combination is done by introducing the energy saving output - calculated with a model of natural ventilation using...

  18. Experimental Study of an Integrated System with Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation and Thermally Activated Building Constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per

    The experiments are carried out in a climate chamber located at the Department of Civil Engineering Aalborg University. The objective of the experiments is to evaluate the performance of the system combining diffuse ceiling ventilation and thermally activated building construction (TABS) in terms...

  19. Breathing architecture: Conceptual architectural design based on the investigation into the natural ventilation of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia D. Stavridou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores architectural design by examining air, fluid mechanics, and the natural ventilation of buildings. In this context, this research introduces a new way of dealing with the process of architectural synthesis. The proposed way can be used either to create new architectural projects or to rethink existing ones. This study is supported by previous investigation into the natural ventilation of buildings via computational and laboratory simulation (Stavridou, 2011; Stavridou and Prinos, 2013. The investigation into the natural ventilation of buildings provides information and data that affect architectural design through various parameters. The parameters of architectural synthesis that are influenced and discussed in this paper are the following: (i inspiration and analogical transfer, (ii initial conception of the main idea using computational fluid dynamics (digital design, (iii development of the main idea through an investigatory process toward building form optimization, and (iv form configuration, shape investigation, and other morphogenetic prospects. This study illustrates the effect of natural ventilation research on architectural design and thus produces a new approach to the architectural design process. This approach leads to an innovative kind of architecture called “breathing architecture.”

  20. Reduced energy use for ventilation of buildings through selection of low-polluting building materials and furniture. Final Report; Reduceret energiforbrug til ventilation af bygninger hvori der systematisk er valgt lav-forurenende materialer og inventar. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-15

    The main objective of the research project was to study the potential of reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials and thereby ensuring that indoor air quality will not be compromised. To quantify this potential, the exposure-response relationships, i.e. the relationships between ventilation rate and the perceived indoor air quality (indoor air quality perceived by humans as opposed to indoor air quality evaluated by chemical measurements), were established for rooms furnished with different more or less polluting materials. Based on these results simulations of energy used for ventilation were carried out for selected building scenarios. The exposure-response relationships were established by summarizing existing data reported in the literature and by a series of new experiments. The data summarized by reviewing the literature included data for building materials and furnishing tested in a laboratory setting in small-scale ventilated glass chambers, and in full-scale in ventilated climate chambers, test rooms or normal offices. Relevant low-polluting building materials were selected based on the literature review and a series of new experiments performed in ventilated small-scale glass chambers. Then the final experiments in which the effects of using low-polluting materials on perceived air quality were carried out in ventilated small-scale glass chambers and in full-scale test rooms ventilated with different outdoor air supply rates. Simulations of energy used for ventilation were carried out using BSim software. During simulations the ventilation rate was varied to obtain different levels of air quality when low-polluting building materials had been used, and it was examined how these changes influence the energy use. The results show that the exposure-response relationships vary between different building materials and thus the ventilation requirement to achieve a certain level of perceived indoor air quality vary

  1. Air ventilation impacts of the "wall effect" resulting from the alignment of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, S. H. L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Lau, A. K. H.; Kot, S. C.

    The objective of this study is to investigate the air ventilation impacts of the so called "wall effect" caused by the alignment of high-rise buildings in complex building clusters. The research method employs the numerical algorithm of computational fluid dynamics (CFD - FLUENT) to simulate the steady-state wind field in a typical Hong Kong urban setting and investigate pollutant dispersion inside the street canyon utilizing a pollutant transport model. The model settings of validation study were accomplished by comparing the simulation wind field around a single building block to wind tunnel data. The results revealed that our model simulation is fairly close to the wind tunnel measurements. In this paper, a typical dense building distribution in Hong Kong with 2 incident wind directions (0° and 22.5°) is studied. Two performance indicators are used to quantify the air ventilation impacts, namely the velocity ratio ( VR) and the retention time ( T r) of pollutants at the street level. The results indicated that the velocity ratio at 2 m above ground was reduced 40% and retention time of pollutants increased 80% inside the street canyon when high-rise buildings with 4 times height of the street canyon were aligned as a "wall" upstream. While this reduction of air ventilation was anticipated, the magnitude is significant and this result clearly has important implications for building and urban planning.

  2. Effect of using low-polluting building materials and increasing ventilation on perceived indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wargocki, P.; Zuczek, P. (International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK)); Knudsen, Henrik N. (Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg Univ., Hoersholm (DK))

    2007-07-01

    The potential of improving perceived air quality indoors was quantified when low-polluting materials are used and when building ventilation is increased. This was done by studying the relationships between ventilation rate and the perceived indoor air quality. A sensory panel assessed the air quality in test rooms ventilated with realistic outdoor air supply rates, where combinations of high- and low-polluting wall, floor and ceiling materials were set up. These materials were ranked as high- and low-polluting using sensory assessments of air quality in small-scale glass chambers, where they were tested individually. Substituting materials ranked as high-polluting with materials ranked as lower-polluting improved the perceived air quality in the test rooms. This improvement was greater than what was achieved by a realistic increase of the ventilation rate in the test rooms. Thus reducing pollution emitted from building materials that affects the perceived air quality has a considerable potential of limiting the energy for ventilation without compromising indoor air quality. (au)

  3. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Spencer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  4. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings in Maceio, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamila, Harimi

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results from thermal comfort survey carried out in classrooms over two different seasons in Maceio, Brazil. The secondary data were collected from thermal comfort field study conducted in naturally ventilated classrooms. Objective and subjective parameters were explored to evaluate thermal comfort conditions. The potential effect of air movement on subjects' vote under neutrality was evaluated. Overall, the indoor climate of the surveyed location was classified warm and humid. Conflicting results were depicted when analyzing the effect of air movements on subjects' vote. The mean air temperature for subjects feeling hot was found to be lower than those feeling warm. A reasonable approach to tackle these two unpredictable results was suggested. Correlation matrix between selected thermal comfort variables was developed. Globe temperature recorded the highest correlation with subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale. The correlation was significant at the 0.01 level. On the other hand, the correlation between air movement and subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale was weak but significant. Further field studies on the current topic were recommended.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Solar Chimney for Ventilation in Low Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zha, Xinyu; Zhang, Jun; Qin, Menghao

    2017-01-01

    As an effective way to protect environment and save energy in buildings, passive ventilation method has generated intense interest for improving indoor thermal environment in recent years. Among these passive ventilation solutions, design of solar chimney in buildings is a promising approach...... the performance of a full-scale solar chimney in a real building in East-ern China. The measured performance is compared with theoretical calculation and numerical simulation. In a solar chimney of 6.2m length, 2.8m width and 0.35m air gap, the experimental results show that air flow rate of 70.6 m3/h~1887.6 m3/h...... can be achieved during the daytime in the testing day. Comparing measured value with theoretical value, the flow rate is generally lower than the theoretical value. By data analysis, the suggested discharge coefficient Cd of solar energy in real engineering project is 0.51. With the use...

  6. Emissions of ammonia and methane from a livestock building natural cross ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Fiedler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture, especially animal husbandry, is a major source of the greenhouse gas methane as well as the gas ammonia. In order to develop reduction measures for emissions and immissions, two factors prove to be: firstly, to determine the emission mass flow from livestock buildings, and secondly, to understand the dispersion processes in its surroundings. The quantification of emissions from livestock buildings with naturally ventilation is a particularly difficult task. The experimental uncertainties are largely unknown but are expected to be considerable. Using poor quality emission data as model input in dispersion studies (wind tunnel or numerical simulations will produce results with limited significance. Accordingly a field study has been conducted to quantify the emission mass flow from naturally ventilated livestock buildings. During two field campaigns in summer tracer gas experiments and measurements of gas concentrations within and around two naturally ventilated cow sheds in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern were carried out, in order to estimate the emission mass flow. It was found that the measured concentrations within the livestock building strongly depend on outside conditions such as e.g. the wind direction. Large uncertainties also arise from estimates of the air ventilation rate, which determines the emission mass flow. The data analysis shows high estimated ventilation rates of 1280-1380 m3/h/LU (1 LU = 500kg body weight for cow shed 1 and 1140-1180 m3/h/LU for cow shed 2. These results suggest ammonia emission mass flow rates of about 4 g/h/LU for cow shed 1 and about 2 g/h/LU for cow shed 2, respectively.

  7. Cost optimization for buildings with hybrid ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Kun; Lu, Yan

    2018-02-13

    A method including: computing a total cost for a first zone in a building, wherein the total cost is equal to an actual energy cost of the first zone plus a thermal discomfort cost of the first zone; and heuristically optimizing the total cost to identify temperature setpoints for a mechanical heating/cooling system and a start time and an end time of the mechanical heating/cooling system, based on external weather data and occupancy data of the first zone.

  8. A First Approach to Natural Thermoventilation of Residential Buildings through Ventilation Chimneys Supplied by Solar Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Salata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of natural ventilation is a good solution to improve buildings from an energetic point of view and to fulfill the requirements demanded by the thermohygrometric comfort and the air quality in enclosed spaces. Some past researches demonstrated how some devices, useful to this purpose, follow the principles of solar chimneys and are able to move air masses while exploiting the Archimedes thrust. The natural ventilation must be supplied by a flow moving upward, generated by a heat source performing at temperatures slightly higher than the one present in the environment. To have a minimum energetic effect, the heat can be extracted from solar ponds; solar ponds are able to collect and store solar energy in the geographical regions characterized by sufficient values of solar radiation. Thus it is possible, in summer, to provoke a nocturnal natural ventilation useful for the air change in indoor spaces (in those climatic areas where, during the night, there is a temperature gradient.

  9. Enhancement of Fire Safety of an Existing Green Building due to Natural Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sheng Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, natural ventilation technology is extensively used in order to improve indoor environment quality and reduce power consumption of air-conditioning systems in green buildings. However, the effect of natural ventilation on fires needs to be evaluated carefully, and how to make these energy-saving buildings safe is a topic worth studying. This study uses Fire Dynamics Simulator on some fire safety enhancement measures for an existing green building without installation of a smoke exhaust system. Since the building is located on a school campus, it does not require a smoke exhaust system according to Taiwan fire regulations. Referential results, obtained after a series of improvement strategies are tested, show that kiln natural ventilation can generate a comfortable air flow. Unfortunately, due to the stack effect, hot air and fatal smoke are blown into the evacuation route area behind the room when a fire occurs. The findings showed that there are two feasible improvement measures, “controlling the off state of each air inlet” and “setting up an exhaust port in the rear of room”, which can effectively resolve the fire safety issues; the construction of which can be undertaken at a reasonable cost.

  10. Indoor air quality and occupant satisfaction in five mechanically and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelgarrd, John; Juhl, Peter; Sæbjörnsson, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The indoor air quality and occupant satisfaction was studied in five mechanically ventilated and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings in Copenhagen, using a simplified assessment procedure. Temperature and the concentration of CO2 were monitored in 2-10 locations per office...... on the same day within that week. The study indicated that occupants in naturally ventilated offices have a lower prevalence of symptoms than those in mechanically ventilated offices. Although the room air temperature varied more and the concentration of CO2 was higher in the naturally ventilated offices...... the results showed that the occupants' satisfaction with the indoor environment was higher in naturally ventilated than in mechanically ventilated offices....

  11. Airtightness and ventilation system performance of apartments in new multi-unit residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, G. [Air Solutions Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Kokko, J.; Greene, T. [Enermodal Engineering Ltd., Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    There are growing concerns that conventional air handling systems in apartment buildings cannot ventilate individual apartments, are expensive in terms of initial cost and maintenance, have little impact on indoor air quality, and negatively impact the integrity of fire and smoke control separations. This paper discusses the strategy of compartmentalizing individual apartments to eliminate uncontrolled air movement as well as providing efficient and effective ventilation in each suite. The findings of recent air leakage testing and ventilation system performance testing in several recently constructed high-rise buildings were documented in this paper. Results indicated that compartmentalization was a viable strategy. However, ventilation strategies for both common corridors and apartments required adjustments. Air leakage testing showed that individual apartments were relatively airtight. However, concerns were raised that continuous negative pressure could induce water leakage through the building envelope. Testing also discovered that airflow capacities of in-suite exhaust equipment was less than manufacturer's specifications. Duct lengths, diameters, fittings, elbows and termination details had an impact on airflow performance. Testing also confirmed that the corridor ventilation systems were not energy efficient as a significant amount of outdoor air was required to pressurize leaks in the corridors and to ensure sufficient air was available to make-up air requirements in each apartment in response to intermittent exhaust fan operation. It was also determined that a very small positive pressure was required to accomplish the task of pressurizing corridors to minimize odour transmission. The provision of weather-stripping on corridor to apartment doors would reduce the quantity of airflow required for pressurization, helping to prevent shifts in pressure due to opening doors, elevators and wind and stack pressures acting in varying ways. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 2

  12. Augmenting natural ventilation using solar heat and free cool energy for residential buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In many urban buildings ventilation is not sufficient that will increase the temperature and also create unhealthy atmosphere inside the room. In such buildings artificially induced ventilation through freely available energy promote comfort conditions by reducing the temperature by 2 to 3°C and also creating good circulation of fresh air inside the room. In the present work the concept of improving the ventilation by excess hot energy available during summer days from the solar flat plate collector and by storing cool energy available during the early morning hour in the Phase Change Material (PCM based storage system is attempted. An experimental setup is made to study the effect of improvement in natural ventilation and the results are reported. A visible reduction in temperature is observed through circulation of air from the bottom side of the room to the roof of the house using the stored hot and cool energy. A CFD analysis is also carried out using ANSYS-CFX software to simulate and evaluate the mass flow of air at the inlet and at the selected RTD location by matching the transient temperature profile of the simulated result with the experimental results at the selected RTD location.

  13. Natural ventilation - A new method based on the Walton model applied to cross-ventilated buildings having two large external openings

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Alain; Allard, Francis; Boyer, Harry

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In order to provide comfort in a low energy consumption building, it is preferable to use natural ventilation rather than HVAC systems. To achieve this, engineers need tools that predict the heat and mass transfers between the building's interior and exterior. This article presents a method implemented in some building software, and the results are compared to CFD. The results show that the knowledge model is not sufficiently well-described to identify all the physical...

  14. A Prospective Study of Ventilation Rates and Illness Absence in California Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseeva, Ekaterina A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spears, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chan, Wanyu R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Background – This study investigated the associations of ventilation rates (VRs), estimated from indoor CO2 concentrations, in offices with the amount of respiratory infections, illness absences, and building-related health symptoms in occupants. Methods – Office buildings were recruited from three California climate zones. In one or more study spaces within each building, real-time logging sensors measured carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity for one year. Ventilation rates were estimated using daily peak CO2 levels, and also using an alternative metric. Data on occupants and health outcomes were collected through web-based surveys every three months. Multivariate models were used to assess relationships between metrics of ventilation rate or CO2 and occupant outcomes. For all outcomes, negative associations were hypothesized with VR metrics, and positive associations with CO2 metrics. Results – Difficulty recruiting buildings and low survey response limited sample size and study power. In 16 studied spaces within 9 office buildings, VRs were uniformly high over the year, from twice to over nine times the California office VR standard (7 L/s or 15 cfm per person). VR and CO2 metrics had no statistically significant relationships with occupant outcomes, except for a small significantly positive association of the alternative VR metric with respiratory illness-related absence, contrary to hypotheses. Conclusions– The very high time-averaged VRs in the California office buildings studied presumably resulted from “economizer cycles” bringing in large volumes of outdoor air; however, in almost all buildings even the estimated minimum VRs supplied (without the economizer) substantially exceeded the minimum required VR. These high VRs may explain the absence of hypothesized relationships with occupant outcomes. Among uniformly high VRs, little variation in contaminant concentration and occupant effects would be expected. These findings may

  15. Methane emission from naturally ventilated livestock buildings can be determined from gas concentration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Bjarne; Zhang, Guoqiang; Madsen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Determination of emission of contaminant gases as ammonia, methane, or laughing gas from natural ventilated livestock buildings with large opening is a challenge due to the large variations in gas concentration and air velocity in the openings. The close relation between calculated animal heat...... gas emission and the precision of the estimation are influenced by different calculation procedures, measuring period length, measure point locations, measure point numbers, and criteria for excluding measuring data. The analyses were based on existing data from a 6-day measuring period in a naturally...... ventilated, 150 milking cow building. The results showed that the methane emission can be determined with much higher precision than ammonia or laughing gas emissions, and, for methane, relatively precise estimations can be based on measure periods as short as 3 h. This result makes it feasible...

  16. Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David

    2003-06-01

    The indoor temperature can be controlled with different levels of accuracy depending on the building and its HVAC system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity benefits of improved temperature control, and to apply the information for a cost-benefit analyses of night-time ventilative cooling, which is a very energy efficient method of reducing indoor daytime temperatures. We analyzed the literature relating work performance with temperature, and found a general decrement in work performance when temperatures exceeded those associated with thermal neutrality. These studies included physiological modelling, performance of various tasks in laboratory experiments and measured productivity at work in real buildings. The studies indicate an average 2% decrement in work performance per degree C temperature rise, when the temperature is above 25 C. When we use this relationship to evaluate night-time ventilative cooling, the resulting benefit to cost ratio varies from 32 to 120.

  17. Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Apte, Michael G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-04-29

    This report summarizes the screening procedure and its results for selecting contaminants of concern (COC), whose concentrations are affected by ventilation in commercial buildings. Many pollutants comprising criteria pollutants, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and biological contaminants are found in commercial buildings. In this report, we focus primarily on identifying potential volatile organic COC, which are impacted by ventilation. In the future we plan to extend this effort to inorganic gases and particles. Our screening considers compounds detected frequently in indoor air and compares the concentrations to health-guidelines and thresholds. However, given the range of buildings under consideration, the contaminant sources and their concentrations will vary depending on the activity and use of the buildings. We used a literature review to identify a large list of chemicals found in commercial-building indoor air. The VOCs selected were subject to a two stage screening process, and the compounds of greater interest are included in priority List A. Other VOCs that have been detected in commercial buildings are included in priority List B. The compounds in List B, were further classified into groups B1, B2, B3, B4 in order of decreasing interest.

  18. Assessment of buildings with ventilated facade systems and evaluation of point thermal bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Šadauskienė, Jolanta; Šeduikytė, Lina; Juozas RAMANAUSKAS; Buska, Andrius

    2017-01-01

    Analyzes of influence of the point thermal bridges of buildings with ventilated facade systems on the thermal properties of envelops are presented in the paper. The relation between the separate components of the envelop were made: thermal properties and thickness of supporting wall's layer; value of thermal conductivity and thickness of insulation layer. Studies have shown, that the value of the point thermal transmittance, which depended on the thermal properties of the envelop and thicknes...

  19. Hybrid ventilation in residential buildings – the proposal of research for the Polish climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostka Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the geographic location and the influence of the polar maritime and polar continental air masses we observe a large variety and variability of external air parameters in Poland. Both during the whole year and also in shorter, even several-day periods. The parameters of outside air indicate that combination of mechanical and natural ventilation in detached buildings can be cost-effective and allows keeping the thermal comfort and good indoor air quality.

  20. Assessment of Natural Ventilation Potential for Residential Buildings across Different Climate Zones in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Zijing Tan; Xiang Deng

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the natural ventilation potential of residential buildings was numerically investigated based on a typical single-story house in the three most populous climate zones in Australia. Simulations using the commercial simulation software TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation Tool) were performed for all seasons in three representative cities, i.e., Darwin for the hot humid summer and warm winter zone, Sydney for the mild temperate zone, and Melbourne for the cool temperate zone. A na...

  1. Use of VOC sensors for air quality control of building ventilation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Großklos, M.

    2015-01-01

    Air quality control with VOC (volatile organic compound) sensors in residential buildings could increase user comfort by adapting to the actual contaminant level. Preliminary tests assessed the dynamics of VOC levels in single-family passive houses with a ventilation system. At normal and exceptional usages, sufficient signal variations were measured for air quality control. An air quality control was developed and tested in four single-family passive house dwellings to cont...

  2. The integration of engineering and architecture: A perspective on natural ventilation for the new San Francisco Federal Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConahey, Erin; Haves, Philip; Christ, Tim

    2002-05-31

    A description of the in-progress design of a new Federal Office Building for San Francisco is used to illustrate a number of issues arising in the design of large, naturally ventilated office buildings. These issues include the need for an integrated approach to design involving the architects, mechanical and structural engineers, lighting designers and specialist simulation modelers. In particular, the use of natural ventilation, and the avoidance of air-conditioning, depends on the high degree of exposed thermal mass made possible by the structural scheme and by the minimization of solar heat gains while maintaining the good daylighting that results from optimization of the fagade. Another issue was the need for a radical change in interior space planning in order to enhance the natural ventilation; all the individual enclosed offices are located along the central spine of each floorplate rather than at the perimeter. The role of integration in deterring the undermining of the design through value engineering is discussed. The comfort criteria for the building were established based on the recent extension to the ASHRAE comfort standard based on the adaptive model for naturally ventilated buildings. The building energy simulation program EnergyPlus was used to compare the performance of different natural ventilation strategies. The results indicate that, in the San Francisco climate, wind-driven ventilation provides sufficient nocturnal cooling to maintain comfortable conditions and that external chimneys do not provide significant additional ventilation at times when it when it would be beneficial.

  3. Indoor air quality in mechanically ventilated residential dwellings/low-rise buildings: A review of existing information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aganovic, Amar; Hamon, Mathieu; Kolarik, Jakub

    Mechanical ventilation has become a mandatory requirement in multiple European standards addressing indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation in residential dwellings (single family houses and low-rise apartment buildings). This article presents the state of the art study through a review of the e......Mechanical ventilation has become a mandatory requirement in multiple European standards addressing indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation in residential dwellings (single family houses and low-rise apartment buildings). This article presents the state of the art study through a review...... concentrations. The authors additionally noted that the literature frequently reported the role of improper maintenance and use on deterioration of IAQ in residential dwellings. The summarized data and comments may provide useful information for future guidelines related to ventilation strategies designed...

  4. A Model for Air Flow in Ventilated Cavities Implemented in a Tool for Whole-Building Hygrothermal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Karl; Rode, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    A model for calculating air flows in ventilated cavities has been implemented in the whole-building hygrothermal simulation tool BSim. The tool is able to predict indoor humidity conditions using a transient model for the moisture conditions in the building envelope.......A model for calculating air flows in ventilated cavities has been implemented in the whole-building hygrothermal simulation tool BSim. The tool is able to predict indoor humidity conditions using a transient model for the moisture conditions in the building envelope....

  5. CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

  6. Airborne Particulate Matter in Two Multi-Family Green Buildings: Concentrations and Effect of Ventilation and Occupant Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison P. Patton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are limited data on air quality parameters, including airborne particulate matter (PM in residential green buildings, which are increasing in prevalence. Exposure to PM is associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, and since Americans spend almost 90% of their time indoors, residential exposures may substantially contribute to overall airborne PM exposure. Our objectives were to: (1 measure various PM fractions longitudinally in apartments in multi-family green buildings with natural (Building E and mechanical (Building L ventilation; (2 compare indoor and outdoor PM mass concentrations and their ratios (I/O in these buildings, taking into account the effects of occupant behavior; and (3 evaluate the effect of green building designs and operations on indoor PM. We evaluated effects of ventilation, occupant behaviors, and overall building design on PM mass concentrations and I/O. Median PMTOTAL was higher in Building E (56 µg/m3 than in Building L (37 µg/m3; I/O was higher in Building E (1.3–2.0 than in Building L (0.5–0.8 for all particle size fractions. Our data show that the building design and occupant behaviors that either produce or dilute indoor PM (e.g., ventilation systems, combustion sources, and window operation are important factors affecting residents’ exposure to PM in residential green buildings.

  7. Building Energy Codes: Policy Overview and Good Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Globally, 32% of total final energy consumption is attributed to the building sector. To reduce energy consumption, energy codes set minimum energy efficiency standards for the building sector. With effective implementation, building energy codes can support energy cost savings and complementary benefits associated with electricity reliability, air quality improvement, greenhouse gas emission reduction, increased comfort, and economic and social development. This policy brief seeks to support building code policymakers and implementers in designing effective building code programs.

  8. Composition and distribution of particulate matter (PM10) in a mechanically ventilated University building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamed Yasreen Mohamed; Hanafiah, Marlia Mohd; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-11-01

    This study analyses the composition and distribution of particulate matter (PM10) in the Biology department building, in UKM. PM10 were collected using SENSIDYNE Gillian GilAir-5 Personal Air Sampling System, a low-volume sampler, whereas the concentration of heavy metals was determined using Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentration of PM10 recorded in the mechanically ventilated building ranges from 89 µgm-3 to 910 µgm-3. The composition of the selected heavy metals in PM10 were dominated by zinc, followed by copper, lead and cadmium. It was found that the present of indoor-related particulate matter were originated from the poorly maintained ventilation system, the activity of occupants and typical office equipments such as printers and photocopy machines. The haze event occured during sampling periods was also affected the PM10 concentration in the building. This results can serve as a starting point to assess the potential human health damage using the life cycle impact assessment, expressed in term of disability adjusted life year (DALY).

  9. Thermal Comfort and Ventilation Criteria for low Energy Residential Buildings in Building Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Guangyu; Kurnitski, Jarek; Awbi, Hazim

    2012-01-01

    Indoor environmental quality and energy performance of buildings are becoming more and more important in the design and construction of low energy, passive and zero energy buildings. At the same time, improved insulation and air tightness have the potential to resulting in a deterioration of the ...

  10. Air movement preferences observed in naturally ventilated buildings in humid subtropical climate zone in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    Occupants' preferences for air movement in naturally ventilated buildings have been extracted from a database of three thermal comfort surveys conducted in the humid subtropical climate zone in China, during winter, spring, and summer seasons. The distribution of draft sensation shows that only 25.7, 38.5, and 28.7% of the subjects in winter, spring, and summer, respectively, felt that the available air movement was just right, suggesting that indoor air velocity may be a big problem in naturally ventilated buildings in humid subtropical China. Air movement preferences show that 15.8, 61.3, and 80.6% of subjects in winter, spring, and summer, respectively, wanted more air movement. Only a handful of subjects wanted less air movement than they were actually experiencing in any season, suggesting that draft was not much of an issue for thermal comfort. Occupants' preference for air movement is strongly related to thermal sensation, showing that people want to control air movement as a means of improving their comfort. The demand for less air movement under cool sensation is much smaller than the overwhelming demand for more air movement when the sensation was warm. The above results indicate that air movement might have a significant influence over the respondents' comfort sensation and that people required a high level of air movement in order to be comfortable during the summer season. Thus, one efficient way to improve the thermal environment in summer in humid subtropical China could be to provide occupants with effective natural ventilation and allow personal control of the air movement. Our findings are also applicable to other buildings, to encourage designers to provide air movement as a low energy cooling strategy and to ensure that sufficient levels of air movement are available.

  11. Possible User-Dependent CFD Predictions of Transitional Flow in Building Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Lei; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    among different teams. It indicates that the combined effects of a lack of general turbulence model, and possible errors in multiple decisions based on users’ experience may have caused the observed significant difference. Prediction of transitional flows, as often observed in building ventilation......, is shown to be still a very challenging task. This calls for a solid approach of validation and uncertainty assessment in CFD “experiments”. The users are recommended to follow an existing guideline of uncertainty assessment of CFD predictions to minimize the errors and uncertainties in the future....

  12. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4 degrees C and 17.6-30.0 degrees C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7 degrees C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  13. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4°C and 17.6-30.0°C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7°C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  14. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  15. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings in humid subtropical climate zone in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2008-05-01

    A thermal comfort field study has been carried out in five cities in the humid subtropical climate zone in China. The survey was performed in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings during the summer season in 2006. There were 229 occupants from 111 buildings who participated in this study and 229 questionnaire responses were collected. Thermal acceptability assessment reveals that the indoor environment in naturally ventilated buildings could not meet the 80% acceptability criteria prescribed by ASHRAE Standard 55, and people tended to feel more comfortable in air-conditioned buildings with the air-conditioned occupants voting with higher acceptability (89%) than the naturally ventilated occupants (58%). The neutral temperatures in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings were 28.3 degrees C and 27.7 degrees C, respectively. The range of accepted temperature in naturally ventilated buildings (25.0-31.6 degrees C) was wider than that in air-conditioned buildings (25.1-30.3 degrees C), which suggests that occupants in naturally ventilated buildings seemed to be more tolerant of higher temperatures. Preferred temperatures were 27.9 degrees C and 27.3 degrees C in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings, respectively, both of which were 0.4 degrees C cooler than neutral temperatures. This result suggests that people of hot climates may use words like "slightly cool" to describe their preferred thermal state. The relationship between draught sensation and indoor air velocity at different temperature ranges indicates that indoor air velocity had a significant influence over the occupants' comfort sensation, and air velocities required by occupants increased with the increasing of operative temperatures. Thus, an effective way of natural ventilation which can create the preferred higher air movement is called for. Finally, the indoor set-point temperature of 26 degrees C or even higher in air-conditioned buildings was confirmed as making

  16. Improving building energy efficiency in India: State-level analysis of building energy efficiency policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sha; Tan, Qing; Evans, Meredydd; Kyle, Page; Vu, Linh; Patel, Pralit L.

    2017-11-01

    India is expected to add 40 billion m2 of new buildings till 2050. Buildings are responsible for one third of India’s total energy consumption today and building energy use is expected to continue growing driven by rapid income and population growth. The implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) is one of the measures to improve building energy efficiency. Using the Global Change Assessment Model, this study assesses growth in the buildings sector and impacts of building energy policies in Gujarat, which would help the state adopt ECBC and expand building energy efficiency programs. Without building energy policies, building energy use in Gujarat would grow by 15 times in commercial buildings and 4 times in urban residential buildings between 2010 and 2050. ECBC improves energy efficiency in commercial buildings and could reduce building electricity use in Gujarat by 20% in 2050, compared to the no policy scenario. Having energy codes for both commercial and residential buildings could result in additional 10% savings in electricity use. To achieve these intended savings, it is critical to build capacity and institution for robust code implementation.

  17. Modeling ventilation rates in bedrooms based on building characteristics and occupant behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2011-01-01

    (lowest ACR in buildings from early 1970s), observed condensation on the bedroom window (higher ACR at less condensation), etc. The best-fitting model explained 46% of the variability in the air change rates. Variables related to occupant behavior were stronger predictors of ventilation rate (model R2 ¼ 0.......30) than those related to building characteristics (model R2 ¼ 0.09). Although not perfectly accurate on a room-to-room basis, our best-fitting model may be useful when a rough estimate of the average air change rate for larger study populations is required in future indoor air quality models.......Air change rate (ACR) data obtained from the bedrooms of 500 Danish children and presented in an earlier paper were analyzed in more detail. Questionnaires distributed to the families, home inspections and interviews with the parents provided information about a broad range of residential...

  18. Role of mechanical ventilation in the airborne transmission of infectious agents in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, J C; Fennelly, K P; Keen, J A; Zhai, Z J; Jones, B W; Miller, S L

    2016-10-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics such as those due to SARS, influenza, measles, tuberculosis, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus have raised concern about the airborne transmission of pathogens in indoor environments. Significant gaps in knowledge still exist regarding the role of mechanical ventilation in airborne pathogen transmission. This review, prepared by a multidisciplinary group of researchers, focuses on summarizing the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic studies that specifically addressed the association of at least one heating, ventilating and/or air-conditioning (HVAC) system-related parameter with airborne disease transmission in buildings. The purpose of this literature review was to assess the quality and quantity of available data and to identify research needs. This review suggests that there is a need for well-designed observational and intervention studies in buildings with better HVAC system characterization and measurements of both airborne exposures and disease outcomes. Studies should also be designed so that they may be used in future quantitative meta-analyses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Influence of placement and height of high-rise buildings on wind pressure distribution and natural ventilation of low- and medium-rise buildings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Butova, A.; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, 3/4 (2016), s. 253-266 ISSN 1473-3315 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12892S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : natural ventilation * high-rise buildings * low- and medium-rise buildings * wind pressure coefficient * wind tunnel tests Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.391, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14733315.2016.1214396

  20. Natural Ventilation of Buildings through Light Shafts. Design-Based Solution Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel Padilla-Marcos, Miguel; Meiss, Alberto; Feijó-Muñoz, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    This work analyses how the built environment affects the quality of the air to be introduced into buildings from light shafts. Several factors such as urban environment and building design intervene in the ability of the light shaft to produce its air change process. Urban areas continuously pollute the air in cities which affects the human health and the environment sustainability. Poor air quality outside buildings supposes a big energy waste to promote an acceptable air quality inside buildings. That requires a large flow rate to maintain the indoor air quality which is translated to an energy efficiency term. The main objective focuses on the impact of standardized architecture design in the quality of the indoor air dependent on the air change in the light shaft. The air change capacity of the outdoor space is numbered analysed using the concept of air change efficiency (ACE). ACE is determined by the built environment, the wind conditions and the design of the building containing light shafts. This concept is comparatively evaluated inside a control domain virtually defined to obtain the mean age of the air for a known air volume. The longer the light shaft in the wind direction is, the better the ACE is compared with other options. Light shafts up to 12 metres high are the most suitable in order to obtain acceptable efficiency results. Other studied cases verify that assumption. Different simplified tools for the technicians to evaluate the design of buildings containing light shafts are proposed. Some strategies of architectural design of buildings with light shafts to be used for ventilation are presented.

  1. Building a New South Africa Volume 2 : Urban Policy | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building a New South Africa Volume 2 : Urban Policy. Couverture du livre Building a New South Africa Volume 2 : Urban Policy. Directeur(s) : Marc Van Ameringen ... Le soutien apporté par le CRDI à BetterEvaluation, un réseau international visant à améliorer la théorie et la pratique de l'évaluation, a mené à la création ...

  2. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-02-01

    Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each

  3. Comparative study on the ventilation mode of the residential building in Beijing area in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. J.; Li, Q. P.; Guo, Y.; Hu, Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    With the development of residential energy conservation technology, the air tightness requirement of the window is higher and higher. So in winter the cold penetration wind cannot satisfy the requirement of indoor personnel to fresh air. The common ventilation mode includes natural ventilation, natural inlet and mechanical exhaust, wall type ventilator with heat exchange, ventilation unit with heat exchange. Looking for energy saving, comfortable way of ventilation, the application effect of the way of ventilation is evaluated in air distribution and comfort performance and the initial investment by FLUENT software. The conclusion is that the mode of ventilation unit with heat exchange has higher superiority compared with the others.

  4. Moisture condensation on building envelopes in differential ventilated spaces in the tropics: quantitative assessment of influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maisarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilation systems play a significant role in maintaining the indoor thermal and hygric balance. Nevertheless, the systems had been implicated to result in many problems. In the tropical climate, especially for energy efficiency purposes, building spaces are operated with differential ventilation. Such spaces operate on 24-hrs basis, some on 8-hrs while others are either naturally ventilated or served with mechanical supply-exhaust fan systems with non-conditioned outdoor air. This practice had been found to result in condensation problems. This study involves a quantitative appraisal of the effect of operative conditions and hygrothermal quality of building envelopes on condensation risk. The in-situ experiment is combined with an analytical approach to assessing the hygrothermal quality of building envelopes in a tropical climate building under differential ventilation between adjacent spaces. The case-studied building is with a known history of condensation and associated damages including mould growth. The microclimate measurement and hygrothermal performance of the wall and floor against condensation and mould growth risks had been previously reported elsewhere. As a step further, the present study evaluates the effects of various envelope insulation types and configurations together with the HVAC cooling set-points on envelope hygrothermal performance. The results revealed that overcooling the air-conditioned side increases condensation risk on the non-air-conditioned side of the envelopes. The envelopes failed criteria for surface condensation at existing operative conditions irrespective of envelope hygrothermal quality improvements. However, the envelope performed well at improved cooling operative conditions even at existing envelope hygrothermal quality. It is, therefore, important to ascertain the envelope hygrothermal quality as well the cooling operative conditions while embarking on energy efficiency operations in mechanical

  5. Natural Ventilation Building Design Approach in Mediterranean Regions—A Case Study at the Valencian Coastal Regional Scale (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mora-Pérez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental awareness has led to an increased concern about low carbon technologies implementation. Among these technologies, the following research is focused on the natural ventilation effect evaluation in buildings prior to its construction. The aim is to select the most suitable architectural solution to ensure comfortable indoor environment in the most efficient way in the early building design stage. The design approach takes into account the wind conditions in the region and the building surroundings to evaluate the façade opening distribution impact on natural ventilation performance. The design approach is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD. In this article, a case study located in the Valencian Community (Spain is depicted. The Valencian Community coastal climatic conditions are evaluated to assess the low carbon technology energy saving potential. Moreover, the main drivers and barriers involved in the design approach implementation in the region are discussed. The conclusions show that the natural ventilation design approach can improve up to 9.7% the building energy performance respect an initial building design, in which natural ventilation has not been considered. The results contribute to an assessment of the complete low carbon technology effect in the region.

  6. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    -of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  7. Natural ventilation - A new method based on the Walton model applied to cross-ventilated buildings having two large external openings

    CERN Document Server

    Bastide, Alain; Boyer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide comfort in a low energy consumption building, it is preferable to use natural ventilation rather than HVAC systems. To achieve this, engineers need tools that predict the heat and mass transfers between the building's interior and exterior. This article presents a method implemented in some building software, and the results are compared to CFD. The results show that the knowledge model is not sufficiently well-described to identify all the physical phenomena and the relationships between them. A model is developed which introduces a new building-dependent coefficient allowing the use of Walton's model, as extended by Roldan to large external openings, and which better represents the turbulent phenomena near large external openings. The formulation of the mass flow rates is inversed to identify modeling problems. It appears that the discharge coefficient is not the only or best parameter to obtain an indoor static pressure compatible with CFD results, or to calculate more realistic mass fl...

  8. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); de la Rue de Can, Stephane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zheng, Nina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Amann, Jennifer Thorne [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C. (United States); Staniaszek, Dan [Sustainability Consulting Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-26

    This report addresses the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and the greatest opportunity to reduce these emissions. The IPCC 4th Assessment Report estimates that globally 35% to 40% of all energy-related CO2 emissions (relative to a growing baseline) result from energy use in buildings. Emissions reductions from a combination of energy efficiency and conservation (using less energy) in buildings have the potential to cut emissions as much as all other energy-using sectors combined. This is especially the case for China, India and other developing countries that are expected to account for 80% or more of growth in building energy use worldwide over the coming decades. In short, buildings constitute the largest opportunity to mitigate climate change and special attention needs to be devoted to developing countries.

  9. Building a New South Africa Volume 2: Urban Policy | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At the request of the democratic movement, the Mission was charged with identifying the building blocks for a new national urban policy. Its September 1992 report set out the requirements for the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of urban policy and the long-term management of the urban sector in South Africa.

  10. Exploring Ventilation Efficiency in Poultry Buildings: The Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in a Cross-Mechanically Ventilated Broiler Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Hospitaler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Broiler production in modern poultry farms commonly uses mechanical ventilation systems. This mechanical ventilation requires an amount of electric energy and a high level of investment in technology. Nevertheless, broiler production is affected by periodic problems of mortality because of thermal stress, thus being crucial to explore the ventilation efficiency. In this article, we analyze a cross-mechanical ventilation system focusing on air velocity distribution. In this way, two methodologies were used to explore indoor environment in livestock buildings: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations and direct measurements for verification and validation (V&V of CFD. In this study, a validation model using a Generalized Linear Model (GLM was conducted to compare these methodologies. The results showed that both methodologies were similar in results: the average of air velocities values were 0.60 ± 0.56 m s−1 for CFD and 0.64 ± 0.54 m s−1 for direct measurements. In conclusion, the air velocity was not affected by the methodology (CFD or direct measurements, and the CFD simulations were therefore validated to analyze indoor environment of poultry farms and its operations. A better knowledge of the indoor environment may contribute to reduce the demand of electric energy, increasing benefits and improving the thermal comfort of broilers.

  11. Occupant Time Period of Thermal Adaption to Change of Outdoor Air Temperature in Naturally Ventilated Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Wargocki, Pawel; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The present work proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption of occupants in naturally ventilated building, based on the relationship between their neutral temperatures and running mean outdoor air temperature. Based on the data of the field investigation, the subjects’ time...... period of thermal adaption was obtained with the proposed method. The result revealed that the subjects needed to take 4.25 days to fully adapt to a step-change in outdoor air temperature. The time period of thermal adaption for the occupants in five European countries was also calculated and compared...... with the value of the subjects in this study. The comparison shows that the occupants in China had a shorter time period of thermal adaption than European occupants, which means that Chinese occupants can adapt to a new outdoor climate condition faster....

  12. Optimization and Performance Study of Select Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technologies for Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Rajeev

    Buildings contribute a significant part to the electricity demand profile and peak demand for the electrical utilities. The addition of renewable energy generation adds additional variability and uncertainty to the power system. Demand side management in the buildings can help improve the demand profile for the utilities by shifting some of the demand from peak to off-peak times. Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning contribute around 45% to the overall demand of a building. This research studies two strategies for reducing the peak as well as shifting some demand from peak to off-peak periods in commercial buildings: 1. Use of gas heat pumps in place of electric heat pumps, and 2. Shifting demand for air conditioning from peak to off-peak by thermal energy storage in chilled water and ice. The first part of this study evaluates the field performance of gas engine-driven heat pumps (GEHP) tested in a commercial building in Florida. Four GEHP units of 8 Tons of Refrigeration (TR) capacity each providing air-conditioning to seven thermal zones in a commercial building, were instrumented for measuring their performance. The operation of these GEHPs was recorded for ten months, analyzed and compared with prior results reported in the literature. The instantaneous COPunit of these systems varied from 0.1 to 1.4 during typical summer week operation. The COP was low because the gas engines for the heat pumps were being used for loads that were much lower than design capacity which resulted in much lower efficiencies than expected. The performance of equivalent electric heat pump was simulated from a building energy model developed to mimic the measured building loads. An economic comparison of GEHPs and conventional electrical heat pumps was done based on the measured and simulated results. The average performance of the GEHP units was estimated to lie between those of EER-9.2 and EER-11.8 systems. The performance of GEHP systems suffers due to lower efficiency at

  13. Influence of input data on airflow network accuracy in residential buildings with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Krzysztof; Krzaczek, Marek; Tejchman, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The airflow network (AFN) modeling approach provides an attractive balance between the accuracy and computational demand for naturally ventilated buildings. Its accuracy depends on input parameters such as wind pressure and opening discharge coefficients. In most cases, these parameters...... is still poor. In this paper, the influence of wind pressure data on the accuracy of a coupled AFN-BES model for a real building with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation was analyzed. The results of 8 computation cases with different wind pressure data from secondary sources were compared...... are obtained from secondary sources which are solely representative for very simplified buildings, i.e. for buildings without facade details. Although studies comparing wind pressure coefficients or discharge coefficients from different sources exist, the knowledge regarding the effect of input data on AFN...

  14. Experimental study of diffuse ceiling ventilation coupled with a thermally activated building construction in an office room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents and analyses the performance of an integrated system with diffuse ceiling ventilation and a thermally activated building construction. A full-scale experiment is carried out in a hot box with an office setup. The performance of the integrated system is evaluated under different...

  15. Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted by building materials. A summary of reported data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wargocki, P.; Vondruskova, J. (International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK)); Knudsen, Henrik N. (Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg Univ., Hoersholm (DK))

    2007-02-15

    This paper summarizes existing data on how varying ventilation rates affect the perceived quality of air polluted by building materials. This is done by reviewing literature dealing with exposure-response relationships, i.e. the log-linear relationships between the concentration of pollutants (exposure) and the perceived air quality (response). The reviewed data originate from studies with single building materials performed in small-scale ventilated chambers and from studies carried out in a full-scale setting resembling normal offices. Perceived air quality expressed in terms of acceptability as assessed by untrained panels was included. The results show that the exposure-response relationships vary for different building materials as regards the impact of changing ventilation rate on perceived air quality and the level of perceived air quality at a constant ventilation rate. This applies both for the data collected in small-scale and in full-scale experiments. The differences may be caused by the experimental conditions, psychological factors, physiological factors, and chemical/physical factors. A well controlled study taking these factors into account with several different building materials, is thus recommended to further study whether the observed results have practical significance. These experiments should be carried out under realistic fullscale conditions. (au)

  16. NIGERIAN NATION-BUILDING AND PUBLIC POLICY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    Abstract. Seeing to the genuine completion of goods according to the set standard and effectuation of good ideas, have always been the problem of humanity in terms of nation building. Recorded failures amidst plethora of theories and practices adduced to remedy the situation are indicative of basic lack. It is lack of.

  17. Integrated coastal policy via Building with Nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterman, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    The thesis which appears here is excerpted from the book Integrated Coastal Zone Development via Building with Nature® (Waterman 2008a, 2008b). Although this approach was first applied in the Netherlands, it has gradually been recognized worldwide as a harmonious means of creating land areas for

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovations profile describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2, a residential ventilation standard that is critical to transforming the U.S. housing industry to high-performance homes.

  19. Negociatrix policy game: building capacities in trade policy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balie, J.; Hofwegen, van G.; Jongeneel, R.; Koning, N.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Negociatrix Policy Game is a tool for training in multilateral negotiation, which has been developed through a partnership between FAO and the University of Wageningen in the Netherlands. This tool is a software based on a quantitative model and a simulation that consents to underline the

  20. [Biological contamination in office buildings related to ventilation/air conditioning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bródka, Karolina; Sowiak, Małgorzata; Kozajda, Anna; Cyprowski, Marcin; Irena, Szadkowska-Stańczyk

    2012-01-01

    Indoor air is contaminated with microorganisms coming from both the atmospheric air and sources present in premises. The aim of this study was to analyze the concentrations of biological agents in office buildings, dependending on ventilation/air conditioning system and season. The study covered office buildings (different in the system of ventila-tion/air conditioning). Air samples for assessing the levels of inhalable dust, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans, were taken at the selected stationary points of each building during summer and winter. The air was sampled for 6 h, using portable sets consisting of the GilAir 5 pump and the head filled with a filter of fiber glass. The samples for the presence of airborne bacteria and fungi were collected twice during the day using the impaction method. Average concentrations of inhalable dust, bacteria, fungi, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans in office premises were 0.09 mg/m3, 6.00 x 10(2) cfu/m3, 4.59 x 10(1) cfu/m3, 0.42 ng/m3 and 3.91 ng/m3, respectively. Higher concentrations of the investigated agents were found in summer. In premises with air conditioning concentrations of airborne fungi, (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans and inhalable dust were significantly lower in winter. In summer the trend was reverse except for (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans. Concentrations of biological agents were affected by the season and the presence of air conditioning. Concentrations of inhalable dust, bacteria, fungi, endotoxins and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans, observed inside the office buildings, were significantly higher in summer than in winter. The presence of the air conditioning system modified in various ways the levels of biological agents. Its influence was greater on the concentration of fungi and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans than on that of bacteria and endotoxins.

  1. Humidity conditions in renovated high-rise buildings with three ventilation solutions. Luftfugtighed i renoverede hoejhuse med tre ventilationsloesninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, O.

    1989-01-01

    In connection with the renovation of two high-rise apartment buildings using different methods of ventilation The Danish Building Research Institute examined humidity conditions before and after renovation took place. Air velocities in the living area of one of the buildings were also examined. The methods of ventilation were those which occurs naturally through leaks and open windows only - with mechanical injection in living area and mechanical exhaust from kitchen and bathroom in addition to 20 cm2 outdoor air valve in living area facade and, thirdly, with sealed facades, windows and doors and a 30 cm2 valve in the facade of each room. Air velocity conditions were measured in three flats where mechanical injection and exhaust were established and where part of the indoor air was taken in unheated through valves in the facade. Significant variations were found in relation to the three ventilation methods. Significant variations in humidity conditions were found in relation to the three ventilation solutions. In the building with mechanical injection and exhaust the air humidity conditions were measured as satisfactory. Only in a few flats did the air humidity exceed the limit which might cause condensed moisture on normal double-glazed windows and above the value of about 45 per cent RF at 21 deg. C, often recommended as the upper limit in the coldest season to combat house dust mites. In the building with the original ventilation, with re-sealed facade and installation of a 30 cm2 valve in the facade of each room too high air humidities were measured in many of the flats. The mechanically injected air flow, and the air entering through the outdoor valves did not in general create too high air velocities in the living areas. (AB).

  2. Lifecycle performance. Special issue on management and maintenance, hybrid ventilation concepts, installation-low buildings; Lifecycle performance. Themanummer over beheer en onderhoud, hybride ventilatieconcepten, installatie-arme gebouwen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierauf, I. [Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kurvers, S.R.; Van den Ham, E.R.; Leijten, J.L. [Sectie Climate Design and Sustainability, Afdeling Architectural Engineering and Technology, Faculteit Bouwkunde, Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands); Juricic, S. [Ecole National des Travaux Publics de l' Etat, Lyon (France); Jacobs, P. [Afdeling Energy and Comfort Systems, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Versteeg, H. [LBP Sight, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Van Loon, P.P.M. [Stichting Scholen van Morgen, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoek, H.C.; Van Eeden, H.; Nibbelink, J. [Collectief C-on, Haarlem (Netherlands); Veerman, J.; Maassen, W.H. [Royal Haskoning DHV, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Derksen, A.H.P. [ISSO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Morren, K. [Universiteit Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    In 9 articles various aspects regarding the title topic are discussed: energy efficiency and user comfort, ventilation in new houses with balanced ventilation, the revised assessment for ventilation performance, air quality in school buildings, buildings with only a few installations, hybrid ventilation, the management and maintenance process, and future performance requirements [Dutch] In 9 artikelen wordt aandacht besteed aan diverse aspecten m.b.t. het titelonderwerp: energie-efficientie en gebruikerscomfort, ventilatie in nieuwbouwwoningen met balansventilatie, de herziene beoordelingsrichtlijn ventilatie prestatie, luchtkwaliteit in schoolgebouwen, installatie-arme gebouwen, hybride ventilatie, het beheer- en onderhoudsproces, en de toekomstige prestatie-eisen.

  3. Potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in present and future climates in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Given the general shift in recent decades towards a lower heating and higher cooling demand for buildings in many European countries, passive cooling by night-time ventilation has come to be seen as a promising option, particularly in the moderate or cold climates of Central, Eastern and Northern......-time ventilation alone might not suffice to guarantee thermal comfort. It should also be remembered that climatic cooling potential is likely to have fallen appreciably by the end of the 21st century due to climate warming....

  4. The Dutch sustainable building policy: A model for developing countries?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchert, Luciana [Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Lago, 876, CEP 05508.900, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2007-02-15

    This article explores the institutionalization of environmental policies in the Dutch building sector and the applicability of the current model to developing countries. First, it analyzes the transition of sustainable building practices in the Netherlands from the 1970s until today, exploring how these were originally embedded in a discourse on 'de-modernization', which attempted to improve the environmental performance of building stocks by means of self-sufficient technologies, whereas nowadays they adopt a framework of 'ecological modernization', with integrative approaches seeking to improve the environmental performance of building stocks through more efficient-rather than self-sufficient-technologies. The study subsequently shows how the current Dutch sustainable building framework has thereby managed to achieve a pragmatic and widely accepted rationale, which can serve to orient the ecological restructuring of building stocks in developing countries. (author)

  5. The Effects of Air Permeability, Background Ventilation and Lifestyle on Energy Performance, Indoor Air Quality and Risk of Condensation in Domestic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Hashemi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective and efficient ventilation is essential when improving energy performance and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ of buildings. Reducing air permeability can considerably improve the energy performance of buildings; however, making the buildings more airtight may result in lower rates of natural ventilation which may in turn increase the risks of condensation and unacceptable IAQ. This study evaluates the effects of different air permeability rates, background ventilation and occupants’ lifestyles on the energy performance as well as the risk of condensation and CO2 concentration in domestic buildings. Dynamic computer simulations were conducted in EnergyPlus. Results indicated direct relations between the ventilation rates, energy performance and IAQ. Higher air permeability along with background ventilation resulted in considerably better IAQ while energy consumption increased by up to four times. Occupants’ lifestyles were identified as a major contributor to the risk of condensation.

  6. Indoor air quality and occupant satisfaction in five mechanically and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelgaard, J.; Juhl, P.; Saebjornsson, K.O.

    2007-01-01

    Occupant responses and indoor environment characteristics were recorded and compared in five mechanically and four naturally ventilated open-plan office buildings by using a simple approach that enabled us to survey many buildings simultaneously. All occupant responses were obtained during one...... afternoon. In a pre-experiment, temperature and the concentration Of CO2 were monitored in 2-10 locations/office to evaluate the variation throughout the offices. A representative measurement point was subsequently selected and measurements of the same parameters were made during one week. All offices were...... monitored during the same week and occupant responses to the indoor environment were collected via the internet on the same day within that week. The temperature and the CO2 concentration varied more and were in some cases higher in the naturally ventilated buildings, but occupant responses in terms...

  7. Natural Ventilation: A Mitigation Strategy to Reduce Overheating In Buildings under Urban Heat Island Effect in South American Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Massimo; Carrasco, Claudio; Ángel Gálvez, Miguel; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Urban heat island effect often produces an increase of overheating sensation inside of buildings. To evacuate this heat, the current use of air conditioning increases the energy consumption of buildings. As a good alternative, natural ventilation is one of the best strategies to obtain indoor comfort conditions, even in summer season, if buildings and urban designs are appropriated. In this work, the overheating risk of a small house is evaluated in four South American cities: Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso, with and without considering the UHI effect. Then, natural ventilation is assessed in order to understand the capability of this passive strategy to assure comfort inside the house. Results show that an important portion of the indoor heat can be evacuated, however the temperature rising (especially during the night) due to UHI can generate a saturation effect if appropriate technical solutions, like the increase in the air speed that can be obtained with good urban design, are not considered.

  8. Simulations of the impacts of building height layout on air quality in natural-ventilated rooms around street canyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Zhong, Ke; Chen, Yonghang; Kang, Yanming

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of building height ratio (i.e., HR, the height ratio of the upstream building to the downstream building) on the air quality in buildings beside street canyons, and both regular and staggered canyons were considered for the simulations. The results show that the building height ratio affects not only the ventilation fluxes of the rooms in the downstream building but also the pollutant concentrations around the building. The parameter, outdoor effective source intensity of a room, is then proposed to calculate the amount of vehicular pollutants that enters into building rooms. Smaller value of this parameter indicates less pollutant enters the room. The numerical results reveal that HRs from 2/7 to 7/2 are the favorable height ratios for the regular canyons, as they obtain smaller values than the other cases. While HR values of 5/7, 7/7, and 7/5 are appropriate for staggered canyons. In addition, in terms of improving indoor air quality by natural ventilation, the staggered canyons with favorable HR are better than those of the regular canyons.

  9. [Optimizing antibiotics policy in the Netherlands. VI. SWAB advice: no selective decontamination of intensive care patients on mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, M.J.; Kullberg, B.J.; Filius, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (Dutch acronym is SWAB) has issued a guideline in which the pro and cons of the routine use of selective decontamination (SD) in patients in intensive care (IC) on mechanical ventilation are compared in order to decide whether SD is indicated. The effectiveness

  10. African Health Economics and Policy Research Capacity Building ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    African Health Economics and Policy Research Capacity Building and Dissemination. As African countries move toward universal health coverage, it is clear there is a shortage of African experts with applied research skills in health financing such as fiscal space analysis, needs-based resource allocation methods, and ...

  11. Building Capacity in Health Systems and Policy Analysis in sub ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Capacity in Health Systems and Policy Analysis in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2005, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has been financing the master's program in health and population at the Institut supérieure des sciences de la population (ISSP), Université de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. However, after ...

  12. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy...

  13. Energy Efficiency Requirements in Building Codes, Energy Efficiency Policies for New Buildings. IEA Information Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laustsen, Jens

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse current approaches to encourage energy efficiency in building codes for new buildings. Based on this analysis the paper enumerates policy recommendations for enhancing how energy efficiency is addressed in building codes and other policies for new buildings. This paper forms part of the IEA work for the G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action. These recommendations reflect the study of different policy options for increasing energy efficiency in new buildings and examination of other energy efficiency requirements in standards or building codes, such as energy efficiency requirements by major renovation or refurbishment. In many countries, energy efficiency of buildings falls under the jurisdiction of the federal states. Different standards cover different regions or climatic conditions and different types of buildings, such as residential or simple buildings, commercial buildings and more complicated high-rise buildings. There are many different building codes in the world and the intention of this paper is not to cover all codes on each level in all countries. Instead, the paper details different regions of the world and different ways of standards. In this paper we also evaluate good practices based on local traditions. This project does not seek to identify one best practice amongst the building codes and standards. Instead, different types of codes and different parts of the regulation have been illustrated together with examples on how they have been successfully addressed. To complement this discussion of efficiency standards, this study illustrates how energy efficiency can be improved through such initiatives as efficiency labelling or certification, very best practice buildings with extremely low- or no-energy consumption and other policies to raise buildings' energy efficiency beyond minimum requirements. When referring to the energy saving potentials for buildings, this study uses the analysis of recent IEA

  14. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, J. M.; Turner, W. J.N.; Walker, I. S.; Singer, B. C.

    2015-07-01

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector’s energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level.

  15. NDIR gas sensor for spatial monitoring of carbon dioxide concentrations in naturally ventilated livestock buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, L.B.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Edouard, Nadège; Dooren, van H.J.C.; Tinoco, I.; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost

  16. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2010-04-08

    In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested

  17. Building sustainable policy framework for transport development: A review of national transport policy initiatives in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaila A.F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with building a sustainable policy framework for transport development in Nigeria. Its objective is to review the country’s transport policy initiatives in order to understand the extent to which it addresses Nigeria’s mobility and transportation problems. From published materials and official government documents and files, the study identifies four national policy initiatives which are reviewed and analysed with regard to their context, contents, and consequences. The study reveals that while the policy initiatives could be said to be adequate and comprehensive in terms of their context and contents, the major challenge is implementation of recommended solutions. The study therefore provides a general checklist to guide policy direction, while advocating for policy-based researches and empirical studies in order to provide the data base for formulation of a sustainable national transport policy for Nigeria.

  18. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report covers an assessment of 182 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. commercial buildings to identify and provide analysis on 17 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, description of technical maturity, description of non-energy benefits, description of current barriers for market adoption, and description of the technology’s applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  19. Designing and testing an air-PCM heat exchanger for building ventilation application coupled to energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Dechesne, Bertrand; Gendebien, Samuel; Martens, Jonathan; Gilbert, Jacques; Lemort, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies a PCM heat exchanger coupled to a building ventilation system. This PCM module can either store heat during the day (e.g. by cooling solar PV panels) and restore it to the building during the night for space heating purposes or store coolness during the night and give it back during the day and thus act as a free cooling system. This project aims to develop a performing air-PCM heat exchanger providing latent energy storage of 0.5 kWh, this energy is deliver...

  20. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Residential Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Zogg, Robert [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Young, Jim [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Schmidt, Justin [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report is an assessment of 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide analysis on 19 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, descriptions of technical maturity, descriptions of non-energy benefits, descriptions of current barriers for market adoption, and descriptions of the technology's applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  1. XACML to build access control policies for Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Atlam, Hany F.; Alassafi, Madini, Obad; Alenezi, Ahmed; Walters, Robert; Wills, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Although the Internet of things (IoT) brought unlimited benefits, it also brought many security issues. The access control is one of the main elements to address these issues. It provides the access to system resources only to authorized users and ensures that they behave in an authorized manner during their access sessions. One of the significant components of any access control model is access policies. They are used to build the criteria to permit or deny any access request. Building an ef...

  2. DNA accumulation on ventilation system filters in university buildings in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvan Luhung

    Full Text Available Biological particles deposit on air handling system filters as they process air. This study reports and interprets abundance and diversity information regarding biomass accumulation on ordinarily used filters acquired from several locations in a university environment.DNA-based analysis was applied both to quantify (via DNA fluorometry and qPCR and to characterize (via high-throughput sequencing the microbial material on filters, which mainly processed recirculated indoor air. Results were interpreted in relation to building occupancy and ventilation system operational parameters.Based on accumulated biomass, average DNA concentrations per AHU filter surface area across nine indoor locations after twelve weeks of filter use were in the respective ranges 1.1 to 41 ng per cm2 for total DNA, 0.02 to 3.3 ng per cm2 for bacterial DNA and 0.2 to 2.0 ng DNA per cm2 for fungal DNA. The most abundant genera detected on the AHU filter samples were Clostridium, Streptophyta, Bacillus, Acinetobacter and Ktedonobacter for bacteria and Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Nigrospora, Rigidoporus and Lentinus for fungi. Conditional indoor airborne DNA concentrations (median (range were estimated to be 13 (2.6-107 pg/m3 for total DNA, 0.4 (0.05-8.4 pg/m3 for bacterial DNA and 2.3 (1.0-5.1 pg/m3 for fungal DNA.Conditional airborne concentrations and the relative abundances of selected groups of genera correlate well with occupancy level. Bacterial DNA was found to be more responsive than fungal DNA to differences in occupancy level and indoor environmental conditions.

  3. Appropriate Ventilation Solutions For The Iconographic Buildings From The Fifties - A Cross Disciplinary Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge; Blyt, Henrik Jean

    2016-01-01

    : this integrated working methodology develops new renovation processes. Based on both quantitative measurements and on qualitative judgements the cases are analysed comparatively. Parameters such as ventilation solutions in facades are discussed as architectural consequence and value. User interviews will also...

  4. Methodology Applied to the Evaluation of Natural Ventilation in Residential Building Retrofits: A Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alberto Meiss; Miguel A Padilla-Marcos; Jesús Feijó-Muñoz

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to present the use of a steady model that is able to qualify and quantify available natural ventilation flows applied to the energy retrofitting of urban residential districts...

  5. Quantifying the impact of traffic-related air pollution on the indoor air quality of a naturally ventilated building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zheming; Chen, Yujiao; Malkawi, Ali; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Spengler, John D

    2016-01-01

    Improper natural ventilation practices may deteriorate indoor air quality when in close proximity to roadways, although the intention is often to reduce energy consumption. In this study, we employed a CFD-based air quality model to quantify the impact of traffic-related air pollution on the indoor air quality of a naturally ventilated building. Our study found that the building envelope restricts dispersion and dilution of particulate matter. The indoor concentration in the baseline condition located 10m away from the roadway is roughly 16-21% greater than that at the edge of the roadway. The indoor flow recirculation creates a well-mixed zone with little variation in fine particle concentration (i.e., 253nm). For ultrafine particles (indoors with increasing distance from the road is observed due to Brownian and turbulent diffusion. In addition, the indoor concentration strongly depends on the distance between the roadway and building, particle size, wind condition, and window size and location. A break-even point is observed at D'~2.1 (normalized distance from the roadway by the width of the road). The indoor particle concentration is greater than that at the highway where D'air intakes are important to the indoor air quality of existing buildings adjacent to roadways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, William J. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-19

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector's energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  7. Numerical analysis of the potential of using light radiant ceilings in combination with diffuse ventilation to achieve thermal comfort in NZEB buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusaa, Marie Rugholm; Hviid, Christian Anker; Kolarik, Jakub

    Renewable energy resources for heating and cooling of buildings have temperatures close to room temperature and therefore a limited convertibility potential, i.e. they are of low value. To exploit low-valued energy sources Low Temperature Heating and High Temperature Cooling (LTH-HTC) systems must...... ceiling panels. These panels make it possible to combine the heating/cooling ceiling with the diffuse ventilation method. The diffuse ventilation method or leak ventilation use larger surfaces to provide air into the room instead of diffusers. An office building is investigated an analysed on an annual...... basis in the dynamic building simulation tool IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (IDA ICE). The office building contains both offices and meeting rooms. Worst-case scenarios are investigated in the office building considering heat gains, solar gains and the temperature offset between supply water temperature...

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Tracer Gas Methodology in the Case of a Naturally Cross-Ventilated Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolopoulos, Nikos; Nikolopoulos, Aristeidis; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2012-01-01

    in this area of scientific research is provided, using the numerical predictions as a reference. It is concluded that velocity measurements in the inlet window are of high accuracy when the flow in this region has a steady character, whilst the accuracy of the tracer gas methodology depends significantly......The paper presents the investigation of a naturally cross – ventilated building using both experimental and numerical methods with the parameters being the free-stream and the incidence angle of the wind to the openings of the building. The experimental methodology calculates the air change rate......, focusing on the time dependent character of the induced flow field. The numerical results are compared with corresponding experimental data for the three aforementioned experimental methodologies in the case of a full scale building inside a wind-tunnel. The numerical investigation reveals that for large...

  9. To Investigate the Influence of Building Envelope and Natural Ventilation on Thermal Heat Balance in Office Buildings in Warm and Humid Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Pradeep G.; Garg, Naresh Kumar; Kamath, Kiran

    2017-07-01

    India’s commercial building sector is witnessing robust growth. India continues to be a key growth market among global corporates and this is reflective in the steady growth in demand for prime office space. A recent trend that has been noted is the increase in demand for office spaces not just in major cities but also in smaller tier II and Tier III cities. Growth in the commercial building sector projects a rising trend of energy intensive mechanical systems in office buildings in India. The air conditioning market in India is growing at 25% annually. This is due to the ever increasing demand to maintain thermal comfort in tropical regions. Air conditioning is one of the most energy intensive technologies which are used in buildings. As a result India is witnessing significant spike in energy demand and further widening the demand supply gap. Challenge in India is to identify passive measures in building envelope design in office buildings to reduce the cooling loads and conserve energy. This paper investigates the overall heat gain through building envelope components and natural ventilation in warm and humid climate region through experimental and simulation methods towards improved thermal environmental performance.

  10. Applied patent RFID systems for building reacting HEPA air ventilation system in hospital operation rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jesun; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    RFID technology, an automatic identification and data capture technology to provide identification, tracing, security and so on, was widely applied to healthcare industry in these years. Employing HEPA ventilation system in hospital is a way to ensure healthful indoor air quality to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections. However, the system consumes lots of electricity which cost a lot. This study aims to apply the RFID technology to offer a unique medical staff and patient identification, and reacting HEPA air ventilation system in order to reduce the cost, save energy and prevent the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection. The system, reacting HEPA air ventilation system, contains RFID tags (for medical staffs and patients), sensor, and reacting system which receives the information regarding the number of medical staff and the status of the surgery, and controls the air volume of the HEPA air ventilation system accordingly. A pilot program was carried out in a unit of operation rooms of a medical center with 1,500 beds located in central Taiwan from Jan to Aug 2010. The results found the air ventilation system was able to function much more efficiently with less energy consumed. Furthermore, the indoor air quality could still keep qualified and hospital-acquired infection or other occupational diseases could be prevented.

  11. Nonstationary heat and mass transfer in the multilayer building construction with ventilation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkov, N. S.

    2017-11-01

    Results of numerical modeling of the coupled nonstationary heat and mass transfer problem under conditions of a convective flow in facade system of a three-layer concrete panel for two different constructions (with ventilation channels and without) are presented. The positive effect of ventilation channels on the energy and humidity regime over a period of 12 months is shown. Used new method of replacement a solid zone (requiring specification of porosity and material structure, what complicates process of convergence of the solution) on quasi-solid in form of a multicomponent mixture (with restrictions on convection and mass fractions).

  12. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Luciano B.; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Edouard, Nad?ge; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C.; Tin?co, Ilda de F?tima F.; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo...

  13. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  14. Design and operation of ventilation in low energy residences – A survey on code requirements and building reality from six European countries and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Carmen Bocanegra-Yanez, Maria; Rojas, Gabriel; Zukowska-Tejsen, Daria

    One of the key objectives of the IEA Annex 68 research programme entitled “Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings” is to provide a generic guideline for the design and operation of ventilation in residential buildings. Modern and refurnished domestic buildings...... involved in the Annex. There were two main objectives, firstly, to describe and analyse a transition between actual requirements (national building codes and standards) and current practice. Secondly, to investigate current barriers and challenges regarding installation of mechanical ventilation...... resulting from poor construction, lack of commissioning and/or maintenance....

  15. Contribution to the study of hybrid ventilation system effectiveness in office and educational buildings; Contribution a l'etude de l'efficacite des systemes de ventilation hybride dans les batiments du secteur tertiaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cron, F.

    2004-06-15

    This study is part of the International Energy Agency Annex 35, 'Hybrid Ventilation in New and Retro-fitted Office Buildings', also called the HybVent Project. It presents the numerical analyses of a number of hybrid ventilation systems and their potential for several buildings in relation to local climate characteristics. The first part of this work reviews the state-of-the-art of existing ventilation systems and details the principles, expectations and features of hybrid ventilation systems. This first section also examines some examples of hybrid systems extracted from the collection of Annex 35 case studies. A comprehensive bibliography of numerical tools available for this type of analysis is given in the second section. The numerical models for building simulation and the object-oriented environment used to develop our simulation tool are presented in this section as well. Two single-zone studies undertaken in this project are reported in the third section. The first study concerns an experimental cell simulation. Numerical results are compared to experimental data to validate the use of the simulation tool developed. The second single-zone study predicts the potential of a specific hybrid ventilation system in a typical classroom, given climatic conditions. Finally, the last section presents a more complete study - a multi-zone study of the Tonga school, an Annex 35 case study located in Sweden. Three rooms were modelled initially to compare numerical results to experimental data and then to analyse the performance of the existing hybrid ventilation system and two other systems. This final study was completed for three European cities with very different climates. The overall analysis of the potential of the hybrid ventilation systems considered and the perspective for future work are outlined in the conclusion. (author)

  16. Design Principles for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system -Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and - principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  17. Evaluation of Heating, Ventilation, and Air conditioning (HVAC System Performance in an Administrative Building in Tehran (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mari Oriyad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the factors influencing on indoor air quality of the buildings is performance of HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. These systems supply clean and odorless air, with temperature, humidity, and air velocity within comfort ranges for the residents. The aim of this study was to evaluate performance HVAC system in an administrative building in Tehran. .Material and Method: A questionnaire, developed in their research was used to assess the building occupants’ perception about the performance of HVAC system. To evaluate the performance of HVAC systems, air velocities were measured in the diffusers using a thermal anemometer. Moreover, CO2 concentration, air temperature and relative humidity were measured in the whole floors of the building. Air distribution inside the building was evaluated using smoke test. .Results: Most of the studied people complained about the direction of airflow, thermal conditions and cigarette odor. The highest level of carbon dioxide was measured at 930 ppm inside the restaurant. The maximum and minimum air temperatures and relative humidity were measured 28.3-13.8° C and 28.4-23% respectively. Smoke test showed that the air distribution/direction wasn’t suitable in one third of air diffusers. .Conclusion: Improper air distribution / direction was the main problem with the studied HVAC system which could be corrected by adjusting and balancing of the system.

  18. Feedback effect of human physical and psychological adaption on time period of thermal adaption in naturally ventilated building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Huangfu, Hao; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This study proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption for occupants in naturally ventilated building, and analyzed the synergistic and separate feedback effect of the physical and psychological adaption modes on the time period of thermal adaption. Using the method, the values...... indicated that the psychological adaption mode can speed up the process of thermal adaption to the variation in the outdoor climate condition. This study presented a new insight into the feedback from the thermal adaption modes to occupant thermal comfort.......This study proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption for occupants in naturally ventilated building, and analyzed the synergistic and separate feedback effect of the physical and psychological adaption modes on the time period of thermal adaption. Using the method, the values......, under the synergistic feedback effect of the physical and psychological adaption modes. The time period of thermal adaption increased to 13 days, if only the feedback effect of the physical adaption mode was accounted for. The difference between the two values of the time period of thermal adaption...

  19. Ammonia and methane emissions from two naturally ventilated dairy cattle buildings and the influence of climatic factors on ammonia emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wentao; Zhang, Guoqiang; Kai, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Based on the requirement of the international conventions, there is a pressing need for inventory of NH3, CH4, CO2 and N2O emissions from livestock buildings. The main aim of this study was to quantify the gas emissions and investigate the influence of the climatic factors on ammonia emissions. The measurements were carried out in two naturally ventilated dairy cattle buildings with different layouts, floor types and manure management systems during three periods covering winter and summer time. Air temperature and the three dimensional air velocities inside and outside the buildings were recorded over the course of summer period. Emission rates were determined by CO2 production model. The results showed that the internal concentrations of NH3, CH4 and CO2 were increased or decreased simultaneously. Low concentration of N2O was measured outside and inside the buildings; the difference of the concentrations were also very low. The variation of CH4 and CO2 concentrations showed a strong correlation. The NH3 emission rates varied from 32 to 77 g HPU-1 d-1 in building 1 and varied from 18 to 30 g HPU-1 d-1 in building 2. The average emission of CH4 was 290 and 230 g HPU-1 d-1 from building 1 and 2, respectively. Diurnal pattern was found for NH3 and CH4 emission rates. From multiple linear regression models, there was a significant linear relationship between NH3 emission rates and climatic factors including the external wind speed as well as the air temperature (P 0.05).

  20. Building envelope design for renewal of air by natural ventilation in moderate climates. Proposition of a designing methodology; Conception des enveloppes de batiments pour le renouvellement d'air par ventilation naturelle en climats temperes. Proposition d'une methodologie de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The subject of this research is to produce methods and methodological tools for the architects to support the integration of natural ventilation systems in the building envelope design. Our research is situated to the interface between the architectural practice and the physical research on natural ventilation. We are interested in phenomena that can influence or force the strategy of ventilation. A morphological analysis of naturally ventilated buildings concerning the integration modes of natural ventilation systems is done permitting US to propose a typology and a topology of ventilation systems. We define criteria in relation to the thermal comfort, to the quality of air and the economy of energy to assess air renewal techniques. In complement of the sizing tool, we elaborate a methodology of conception for the integration of passives ventilation systems. Design guidelines permit US to conclude on an effective natural ventilation system which is well adapted to collective habitat. (author)

  1. A study of interunit dispersion around multistory buildings with single-sided ventilation under different wind directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Z. T.; Mak, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the interunit dispersion characteristics in and around multistory buildings under wind-induced single-sided ventilation conditions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method, under the hypothesis that infectious respiratory aerosols exhausted from a unit can reenter into another unit in a same building through opened windows. The effect of balconies on the interunit dispersion pattern is considered. The RNG k - ɛ model and the two-layer near-wall model are employed to establish the coupled indoor and outdoor airflow field, and the tracer gas technique is adopted to simulate pollutant dispersion. Reentry ratios from each unit to other units under prevailing wind directions are quantified and the possible interunit dispersion routes are then revealed. It is found that many reentry ratios appear to reach around 10.0%, suggesting that the interunit dispersion is an important pollutant transmission route. The interunit dispersion pattern is highly dependent on the incident wind direction and the fact whether the building has protrusive envelope features. On average, the strongest dispersion occurs on the windward wall of the buildings under oblique wind direction, owing to high ACH (air change per hour) values and unidirectional spread routes. Except under a normal incident wind, the presence of balconies intensifies the interunit dispersion by forming dispersion channels to increase the reentry ratios.

  2. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  3. A method for evaluating the problem complex of choosing the ventilation system for a new building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2007-01-01

    for evaluating the performance of a ventilation system in the design proces by treating quantifiable and non-quantifiable datasets together. The method is based on general morphological analysis and applies cross-consistency assessment for reducing the problem complex, thus treating the multi......-dimensionality, the uncertainty and the subjectivity that arises in the design proces on a sound methodological and scientific basis. Through a distance analysis of the shared parameter values the solution scenarios may be plotted relative to each other, hence providing the designer with an illustrated ‘space of solutions...

  4. Personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and air quality in buildings affects occupants' health, comfort and performance. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform room environment. However, large individual differences exist between occupants in regard...... microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This paper reviews...... existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analyzed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  5. Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-06-01

    This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

  6. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luciano B; Ogink, Nico W M; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-05-13

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns.

  7. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano B. Mendes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser. First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns.

  8. Detailed analysis of electricity consumption in tertiary buildings as a basis for energy efficiency policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Edelgard [Fraunhofer Inst. for Systems and Innovation Research (Fraunhofer ISI) (Germany); Sofronis, Ilias [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) (Greece); Dusee, Rinto [Weerdenburg Huisvesting Consultants (WHC) (Netherlands); Plesser, Stefan [Inst. for Building and Solar Technology (IGS), Technical Univ. Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Electricity consumption in the tertiary sector is still increasing - by 3 % per year between 1995 and 2005 in the EU-25 countries - and a further increase is expected of more than 2 % per year over the next 15 years. The tertiary sector includes companies and institutions of public and private services with very heterogeneous economic and energy-related characteristics. A study of the current state of data in the tertiary sector in European countries revealed that the availability of disaggregated data on electricity consumption and its use by purpose (lighting, office equipment, ventilation, air conditioning, etc.) is poor. Building managers and decision-makers are not well enough informed about the electricity consumption structure and electricity-saving potentials. EL-TERTIARY develops a harmonised methodology for monitoring electricity consumption and applies it in more than 100 cases in 12 EU countries. Implications for dissemination and energy efficiency policies will be derived. It is regarded as important to have an exchange of experiences on these issues within the scientific community and with actors and decision-makers in order to develop efficient instruments for practical use. EL-TERTIARY is an EU Intelligent Energy project under Key Action 4 'Energy efficient equipment and products'.

  9. Supporting Building Portfolio Investment and Policy Decision Making through an Integrated Building Utility Data Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Azizan [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lasternas, Bertrand [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Alschuler, Elena [US DOE; View Inc; Loftness, Vivian [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Haopeng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mo, Yunjeong [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Ting [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zhang, Chenlu [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sharma, Shilpi [Carnegie Mellon; Stevens, Ivana [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding of 2009 for smart grid projects resulted in the tripling of smart meters deployment. In 2012, the Green Button initiative provided utility customers with access to their real-time1 energy usage. The availability of finely granular data provides an enormous potential for energy data analytics and energy benchmarking. The sheer volume of time-series utility data from a large number of buildings also poses challenges in data collection, quality control, and database management for rigorous and meaningful analyses. In this paper, we will describe a building portfolio-level data analytics tool for operational optimization, business investment and policy assessment using 15-minute to monthly intervals utility data. The analytics tool is developed on top of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) platform, an open source software application that manages energy performance data of large groups of buildings. To support the significantly large volume of granular interval data, we integrated a parallel time-series database to the existing relational database. The time-series database improves on the current utility data input, focusing on real-time data collection, storage, analytics and data quality control. The fully integrated data platform supports APIs for utility apps development by third party software developers. These apps will provide actionable intelligence for building owners and facilities managers. Unlike a commercial system, this platform is an open source platform funded by the U.S. Government, accessible to the public, researchers and other developers, to support initiatives in reducing building energy consumption.

  10. Limiting the Temperatures in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Warm Climates. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 7/74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petherbridge, P.

    Formulas used in the calculation of cooling loads and indoor temperatures are employed to demonstrate the influence of various building parameters--such as thermal transmittance (U-value), solar absorptivity, and thermal storage--on the indoor thermal environment. The analysis leads to guidance on ways of limiting temperatures in naturally…

  11. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  12. Effects of animal activity and air temperature on methane and ammonia emissions from a naturally ventilated building for dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwabie, N. M.; Jeppsson, K.-H.; Gustafsson, G.; Nimmermark, S.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of how different factors affect gas emissions from animal buildings can be useful for emission prediction purposes and for the improvement of emission abatement techniques. In this study, the effects of dairy cow activity and indoor air temperature on gas emissions were examined. The concentrations of CH 4, NH 3, CO 2 and N 2O inside and outside a dairy cow building were measured continuously between February and May together with animal activity and air temperature. The building was naturally ventilated and had a solid concrete floor which sloped towards a central urine gutter. Manure was scraped from the floor once every hour in the daytime and once every second hour at night into a partly covered indoor pit which was emptied daily at 6 a.m. and at 5 p.m. Gas emissions were calculated from the measured gas concentrations and ventilation rates estimated by the CO 2 balance method. The animal activity and emission rates of CH 4 and NH 3 showed significant diurnal variations with two peaks which were probably related to the feeding routine. On an average day, CH 4 emissions ranged from 7 to 15 g LU -1 h -1 and NH 3 emissions ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 g LU -1 h -1 (1 LU = 500 kg animal weight). Mean emissions of CH 4 and NH 3 were 10.8 g LU -1 h -1 and 0.81 g LU -1 h -1, respectively. The NH 3 emissions were comparable to emissions from tied stall buildings and represented a 4% loss in manure nitrogen. At moderate levels, temperature seems to affect the behaviour of dairy cows and in this study where the daily indoor air temperature ranged from about 5 up to about 20 °C, the daily activity of the cows decreased with increasing indoor air temperature ( r = -0.78). Results suggest that enteric fermentation is the main source of CH 4 emissions from systems of the type in this study, while NH 3 is mainly emitted from the manure. Daily CH 4 emissions increased significantly with the activity of the cows ( r = 0.61) while daily NH 3 emissions increased

  13. Wind-induced single-sided natural ventilation in buildings near a long street canyon: CFD evaluation of street configuration and envelope design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Z.T.; Mak, C.M.

    2018-01-01

    an urban context, this study investigates the wind-induced single-sided natural ventilation in buildings near a long street canyon under a perpendicular wind direction using CFD method. Four aspect ratios (AR) of the street canyon, from 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 to 6.0, are investigated to examine the influence...

  14. Building ventilation: A pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, H; Adelard, L; Mara, T A

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of airflows is of great importance for detailed building thermal simulation computer codes, these airflows most frequently constituting an important thermal coupling between the building and the outside on one hand, and the different thermal zones on the other. The driving effects of air movement, which are the wind and the thermal buoyancy, are briefly outlined and we look closely at their coupling in the case of buildings, by exploring the difficulties associated with large openings. Some numerical problems tied to the resolving of the non-linear system established are also covered. Part of a detailled simulation software (CODYRUN), the numerical implementation of this airflow model is explained, insisting on data organization and processing allowing the calculation of the airflows. Comparisons are then made between the model results and in one hand analytical expressions and in another and experimental measurements in case of a collective dwelling.

  15. Investigation of the Indoor Environment in a Passive House Apartment Building Heated by Ventilation Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysholt Hansen, MathiasYoung Bok; Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2014-01-01

    comfort and the performance of the air heating system and solar shading. Thermal comfort category B according to ISO 7730 was obtained in the building during field measurements, indicating that the air heating system was able to maintain comfort conditions in winter, when the outdoor temperature had been...... building project finished medio 2012. The design challenge was met with a concept of air heating that is individually controlled in every room. It also applies external solar shading. This study used indoor climate measurements and dynamic simulations in one of these apartment buildings to evaluate thermal...... unusual low for a longer period. The dynamic simulations also indicated that air heating during winter can provide a comfortable thermal environment. Dynamic simulations also demonstrated that during summer, apartments with automatic external solar screens had no serious overheating, whereas in apartments...

  16. The influence of opening windows and doors on the natural ventilation rate of a residential building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased building energy efficiency is important in reducing national energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. An analysis of air change rates due to door and window openings in a research test house located in a residential environment are presented. These data inform developme...

  17. Sick building syndrome and perceived indoor environment in relation to energy saving by reduced ventilation flow during heating season: a 1 year intervention study in dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, K; Wickman, P; Norbäck, D

    2005-04-01

    Ventilation in Scandinavian buildings is commonly performed by means of a constant flow ventilation fan. By using a regulated fan, it is possible to make a seasonal adjustment of outdoor ventilation flow. Energy saving can be achieved by reducing the mechanical ventilation flow during the heating season, when natural ventilation driven by temperature differences between outdoor and indoor is relatively high. This ventilation principle has been called 'seasonally adapted ventilation (SAV)'. The aim was to study if a 25-30% reduction of outdoor ventilation flow during heating season influenced sick building syndrome (SBS) and the perception of the indoor environment. This was done in a 1-year cross-over intervention study in 44 subjects in a multi-family building. During the first heating season (November to April), one part of the building (A) got a reduced flow during the heating season [0.4-0.5 air exchanges per hour (ACH)] while the other part (B) had constant flow (0.5-0.8 ACH). The next heating season, part A got constant flow, while part B got reduced ventilation flow. Reduced ventilation increased the relative air humidity by 1-3% in the living room (mean 30-37% RH), 1-5% in the bathroom (mean 48-58% RH) during heating season. The room temperature increased 0.1-0.3 degrees C (mean 20.7-21.6 degrees C), mean carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the bedroom increased from 920 to 980 p.p.m. at reduced flow. The indoor air quality was perceived as poorer at reduced outdoor airflow, both in the bedroom and in the apartment as a whole. There was a significant increase of stuffy odor (P = 0.05) at reduced outdoor airflow and the indoor air quality was perceived as poorer, both in the bedroom (P = 0.03) and in the apartment as a whole (P = 0.04). No significant influence on SBS symptoms or specific perceptions such as odors, draught, temperature, air dryness or stuffy air could be detected. In conclusion, reducing the ventilation flow in dwellings to a level below

  18. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were

  19. Characterization of ventilation ductwork in Building K-33 at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrochek, J.E.

    1992-05-01

    An extensive sampling and analysis program was initiated in September 1991 to characterize the ductwork of Building K-33, which is located at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. This building, 32.4 acres under roof, contains nearly 3 miles of main plenums without considering the side laterals, which are extensive. A large number (i.e., 131) of hexane-moistened wipe samples were taken from within randomly selected locations in the 16 main plenums and the side lateral network. Samples were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), uranium, and technetium. These samples were augmented by 5 bulk material and 13 metal coupon samples that were subjected to TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) analyses for arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, selenium, silver, and mercury.

  20. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation Generated by the Double-Skin Façade of a High-Rise Building in Tropical Climate: Case Study Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziiz Akhlish Diinal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-rise buildings in tropical region is identical to the use of mechanical Air Conditioning in massive scale. Nevertheless, there is an encouragement to high-rise buildings to reduce its energy consumptions, since they consume quite large amount of energy. This challenge can be overcome with various of strategies, one of them, by means of reducing the cooling load of mechanical Air Conditioning in high-rise building. Prospects come from the modern tall building design strategies, for example the use of double-skin façade to give addition of building skin which could provide indoor temperature protection from outside. Double-skin façade system has continued to increase in buildings in a tropical region such as in Indonesia. However, there is another potential of double skin façade, which is the possibility to increase the buoyancy effect in the air gap between the skin and building envelope. The possibility needs to be studied in order to give a proper way in designing double-skin façade of a high-rise building, especially on Bandung-Indonesia tropical climate. This paper explores the potential of double-skin façade in driving the air inside the façade to generate natural ventilation for a high-rise building in Bandung climate condition. Two parameters are used in exploring the buoyancy force, the width of double-skin façade and the temperature of the skin façade. In general, double-skin façade of a high-rise building in tropical climate can generate buoyancy driven ventilation for the building, it relates strongly to the distance between of the double-skin façade and the building envelope.

  1. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Compared with conventional ventilation systems, diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk due to the low...... momentum supply. In addition, this ventilation system uses a ceiling plenum to deliver air and requires less energy consumption for air transport than full-ducted systems. There is a growing interest in applying diffuse ceiling ventilation in offices and other commercial buildings due to the benefits from...... both thermal comfort and energy efficient aspects. The present study aims to characterize the air distribution and thermal comfort in the rooms with diffuse ceiling ventilation. Both the stand-alone ventilation system and its integration with a radiant ceiling system are investigated. This study also...

  2. Modulating ventilation - low cost VAV for office buildings. [Variable Air Volume]; Modulerende ventilation - low cost VAV til kontor-bygninger. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoej Christensen, A.; Olsen, Hans; Drivsholm, C.

    2012-02-15

    The report describes a concept for renovating older existing Constant Air Volume (CAV) ventilation systems to modulating low-cost Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems. The concept is based on the total ventilated area being divided into appropriate indoor climate zones, which can cover from one to several offices with similar climate needs. For this initial climate assessment two relatively ''simple'' tools were developed that can estimate the temperature level in one room from the ventilation airflow, heat loads, etc.: - BSimFast (24-hour mean temperature calculation according to SBI-196, 2000); - BSimLight (Temperature simulation based on Danvak Textbook of Heat and Climate Technology). The concept of 'one room' can also be extended to 'one zone' with appropriate assumptions. However, only one mean room temperature is calculated. The different climate zones were equipped with Halton HFB control unit at the air supply and exhaust side. The project the following feedback options were used: - HFB unit's damper opening degree (0 to 90 degrees); - HFB unit's current flow; - HFB unit's exhaust temperature; and feedback from: - Frequency transformer (fan speed); - The central static duct pressure at the ventilation unit. In the project a control algorithm is developed that ensures a robust control of the entire ventilation system without adverse cyclic variations, based among other things on the exhaust temperature for each climate zone, and with the requirement that at least one throttle valve is always at least 80% open. It turned out that information on the current partial air volumes was necessary in addition to the individual throttle settings. Otherwise, a cyclic variations could not be controlled..Thus, it was the exhaust temperature from individual climate zones that defined the respective volumes of air. The concept was implemented on a complete CAV system and on part of a large CAV system, respectively. (LN)

  3. The ability of hospital ventilation systems to filter Aspergillus and other fungi following a building implosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Arjun; Beck, Christopher; Buckley, Timothy; Geyh, Allison; Bova, Greg; Merz, William; Perl, Trish M

    2002-09-01

    To assess the ability of hospital air handling systems to filter Aspergillus, other fungi, and particles following the implosion of an adjacent building; to measure the quantity and persistence of airborne fungi and particles at varying distances during a building implosion; and to determine whether manipulating air systems based on the movement of the dust cloud would be an effective strategy for managing the impact of the implosion. Air sampling study. A 976-bed teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Single-stage impactors and particle counters were placed at outdoor sites 100, 200, and 400 m from the implosion and in five locations in the hospital: two oncology floors, the human immunodeficiency virus unit, the cardiac surgical intensive care unit, and the ophthalmology unit. Air handling systems would operate normally unless the cloud approached the hospital. Wind carried the bulk of the cloud away from the hospital. Aspergillus counts rose more than tenfold at outdoor locations up to 200 m from the implosion, but did not increase at 400 m. Total fungal counts rose more than sixfold at 100 and 200 m and twofold at 400 m. Similar to Aspergillus, particle counts rose several-fold following the implosion at 100 and 200 m, but did not rise at 400 m. No increases in any fungi or particles were measured at indoor locations. Reacting to the movement of the cloud was effective, because normal operation of the hospital air handling systems was able to accommodate the modest increase in Aspergillus, other fungi, and particles generated by the implosion. Aspergillus measurements were paralleled by particle counts.

  4. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program Interim Report on Cross Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sidheswaran, Meera [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); sullivan, Douglas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-11-05

    The HZEB research program aims to generate information needed to develop new science-based commercial building ventilation rate (VR) standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. This interim report describes the preliminary results from one HZEB field study on retail stores. The primary purpose of this study is to estimate the whole-building source strengths of contaminant of concerns (COCs). This information is needed to determine the VRs necessary to maintain indoor concentrations of COCs below applicable health guidelines.The goal of this study is to identify contaminants in retail stores that should be controlled via ventilation, and to determine the minimum VRs that would satisfy the occupant health and odor criteria.

  5. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  6. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2000-01-01

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples.

  7. Personalized ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, A K

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and air quality in buildings affects occupants' health, comfort and performance. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform room environment. However, large individual differences exist between occupants in regard to physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, air temperature and air movement preference, etc. Environmental conditions acceptable for most occupants in rooms may be achieved by providing each occupant with the possibility to generate and control his/her own preferred microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This paper reviews existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analyzed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice. Performance criteria are defined. Recommendations for design of PV that would be in compliance with the criteria are given. Future research needed on the topic is outlined. Personalized ventilation can improve occupants' comfort, decrease SBS symptoms and reduce the risk of transmission of contagion between occupants in comparison with total volume ventilation. However in order to perform efficiently in rooms in practice, the design (air distribution, control, etc.) has to be carefully considered together with type of occupant activity (occupancy rate, occupied density, etc.).

  8. What does the scientific literature tell us about the ventilation-health relationship in public and residential buildings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrer, Paolo; Wargocki, Pawel; Fanetti, Annaclara

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this paper is to examine whether the available epidemiological evidence provides information on the link between outdoor air ventilation rates and health, and whether it can be used for regulatory purposes when setting ventilation requirements for non-industrial built environments. E...

  9. Building emerging leaders in communications policy in Africa and Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Africa and Asia, regulations governing communications are not designed to facilitate poverty reduction and economic growth. This is due in part to the shortage of locally-based policy and regulatory capacity within government, academia, and civil society, which has led to a lack of public interest policy research to support ...

  10. Natural ventilation for new technoloy center building of Mercedes-Benz Maybach; Keine kuenstliche Beatmung - fuer den Mercedes-Benz Maybach im neuen Technologie-Zentrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-11-01

    The buildings of the Mercedes-Benz technology centre at Sindelfingen are equipped with natural illumination and natural ventilation systems. This is achieved by daylighting and by circulation of fresh air. Temperature differences in the air flow are used for keeping a constant temperature level inside the buildings. [Deutsch] Im Technologie-Zentrum in Sindelfingen klimatisiert und beleuchtet Daimler-Benz die Gebaeude weitgehend auf eine natuerliche Art und Weise. Ermoeglicht wird dies durch Gebaeudefassaden, die Tageslicht blendfrei in die Tiefe der Raeume lenken, ferner durch die Zirkulation der Aussenluft, die vorhandene Temperaturdifferenzen fuer eine Vergleichmaessigung der Gebaeudetemperatur nutzbar macht. (orig.)

  11. Journal of Building and Land Development: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Architecture and Urban Design - Building Construction, Economics and Management - Housing - Environmental Management and Protection - Local Government - Poverty and Community Action - Land Use Planning - Urban Development and Management - Settlements Planning and Upgrading - Infrastructure Provision

  12. The use of fiscal instruments in sustainable building policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunikka, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Although progressive government guidelines and knowledge about sustainable building exist, sustainability measures are not adopted in large scale. Several barriers have been identified, especially the perceived costs of implementing environmental management and the lack of market demand. The choice

  13. Building policy leadership among HIV/AIDS health workers | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Learn more: Read a journal article on the reliability of data collected by community health workers for policy and planning in Kenya. Read project summaries​ of the Teasdale-Corti Global Research Partnership Program (PDF, 275KB) ...

  14. Principles for Nearly Zero-energy Buildings. Paving the way for effective implementation of policy requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boermans, T.; Hermelink, A.; Schimschar, S.; Groezinger, J.; Offermann, M. [Ecofys Germany, Berlin (Germany); Engelund Thomsen, K.; Rose, J.; Aggerholm, S.O. [Danish Building Research Institute SBi, Aalborg University, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    The overarching objective of this study is to contribute to a common and cross-national understanding on: an ambitious, clear definition and fast uptake of nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (nZEB) in all EU Member States; principles of sustainable, realistic nearly Zero-Energy Buildings, both new and existing; possible technical solutions and their implications for national building markets, buildings and market players. The study builds on existing concepts and building standards, analyses the main methodological challenges and their implications for the nZEB definition, and compiles a possible set of principles and assesses their impact on reference buildings. Subsequently the technological, financial and policy implications of these results are evaluated. Finally, the study concludes by providing an outlook on necessary further steps towards a successful implementation of nearly Zero-Energy Buildings.

  15. Building Bridges Across Frames? A Meta-Evaluation of Dutch Integration Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.A. Scholten (Peter); F.K.M. van Nispen tot Pannerden (Frans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe integration of immigrants is an intractable policy controversy in Dutch politics: the Blok Committee was established by Parliament to offer a resolution. However, its evaluation study ‘ Building Bridges’, itself became controversial. This paper asks: Why did the policy evaluation of

  16. Building and Strengthening Policy Research Capacity: Key Issues in Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Glen A.

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of higher education in social and economic development, governments need to build a strong higher education data and policy research infrastructure to support informed decision-making, provide policy advice, and offer a critical assessment of key trends and issues. The author discusses the decline of higher education policy…

  17. Building policy capacities: an interactive approach for linking knowledge to action in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, Alfred; Gelius, Peter

    2014-09-01

    This article outlines a theoretical framework for an interactive, research-driven approach to building policy capacities in health promotion. First, it illustrates how two important issues in the recent public health debate, capacity building and linking scientific knowledge to policy action, are connected to each other theoretically. It then introduces an international study on an interactive approach to capacity building in health promotion policy. The approach combines the ADEPT model of policy capacities with a co-operative planning process to foster the exchange of knowledge between policy-makers and researchers, thus improving intra- and inter-organizational capacities. A regional-level physical activity promotion project involving governmental and public-law institutions, NGOs and university researchers serves as a case study to illustrate the potential of the approach for capacity building. Analysis and comparison with a similar local-level project indicate that the approach provides an effective means of linking scientific knowledge to policy action and to planning concrete measures for capacity building in health promotion, but that it requires sufficiently long timelines and adequate resources to achieve adequate implementation and sustainability. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Building bridges between health economics research and public policy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrand, Thierry; Dourgnon, Paul

    2010-12-01

    The Institut de Recherche et Documentation en Economie de la Santé (IRDES) Workshop on Applied Health Economics and Policy Evaluation aims at disseminating health economic research's newest findings and enhancing the community's capacity to address issues that are relevant to public policy. The 2010 program consisted of 16 articles covering a vast range of topics, such as health insurance, social health inequalities and health services research. While most of the articles embedded theoretical material, all had to include empirical material in order to favor more applied and practical discussions and results. The 2010 workshop is to be the first of a series of annual workshops in Paris gathering together researchers on health economics and policy evaluation. The next workshop is to be held at IRDES in June 2011.

  19. School food research: building the evidence base for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael; Breda, João

    2013-06-01

    Following an international workshop on developing the evidence base for policy relating to school food held in London, UK, in January 2012, the objectives of the present paper were (i) to outline a rationale for school food research, monitoring and evaluation in relation to policy and (ii) to identify ways forward for future working. The authors analysed presentations, summaries of evidence, and notes from discussions held at the international workshop in London in 2012 to distil common themes and make recommendations for the development of coherent research programmes relating to food and nutrition in schools. International, with an emphasis on middle- and high-income countries. Overviews of existing school food and nutrition programmes from the UK, Hungary, Sweden, the USA, Australia, Brazil, China, Mexico and other countries were presented, along with information on monitoring, evaluation and other research to demonstrate the impact of school feeding on health, attainment, food sourcing, procurement and finances, in the context of interactions between the evidence base and policy decisions. This provided the material which, together with summaries and notes of discussions, was used to develop recommendations for the development and dissemination of robust approaches to sustainable and effective school food and nutrition programmes in middle- and high-income countries, including policy guidelines, standards, cost-effectiveness measures and the terms of political engagement. School food and nutrition can provide a cohesive core for health, education and agricultural improvement provided: (i) policy is appropriately framed and includes robust monitoring and evaluation; and (ii) all stakeholders are adequately engaged in the process. International exchange of information will be used to develop a comprehensive guide to the assessment of the impact of school food and nutrition policy and supporting infrastructure.

  20. Manchester Civil Justice Centre: Procuring and Managing an Institutional Building with a Mixed Mode Ventilation System—A Case for Post-Occupancy Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Napier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Manchester Civil Justice Centre is a striking contemporary 14 storey court building which has won awards for many different aspects of its design, construction and sustainability. From November 2002 to July 2005, the author was a key member of Denton Corker Marshall’s London project team having responsibility for key areas of design development, integration of technology and sustainable design including the East elevation’s “environmental veil”. This paper tracks the procurement of the building, describing its low energy features and their performance in practice. The paper reviews the low carbon elements of the design (daylight and natural ventilation systems in the context of similar buildings and the buildings operational performance. The building has a mixed mode ventilation system which is managed centrally; the paper describes the ongoing relationship between the Facilities Management and the building’s users and their expectations of comfort and offers an explanation as to why the building’s energy performance is not as good as predicted at design stage. A case is made that this building is a significant example of low energy design and would form a good example for a detailed Post Occupancy Evaluation. The energy performance of the building could be studied in more detail to encourage the users (judges, staff and the public to improve the building’s energy performance and to share knowledge within the construction industry. Institutional and commercial barriers to the more mainstream adoption of Post Occupancy Evaluation are discussed with respect to the Manchester Civil Justice Centre.

  1. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

    2010-09-15

    Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global

  2. Conserving energy in new buildings: analysis of nonregulatory policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, R.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.

    1981-05-01

    The costs and effectiveness of non-regulatory options relative to those of a regulatory approach are analyzed. Nonregulatory program alternatives identified are: information and education programs, tax incentives and disincentives, and mortage and finance programs. Chapter 2 briefly reviews survey data to assess present public awareness of energy issues and energy-efficient building design. Homebuyer and homebuilder surveys are reviewed and conservation motivations are discussed. Chapter 3 examines the provision of technical and economic information to various factors affecting building design decisions. This approach assumes that the economic incentives and technical means to achieve energy conservation goals already exist but that critical information is lacking. Chapter 4 examines how adjustments to the tax structure could enhance economic incentives and counter economic disincentives for energy conservation. Qualifying buildings for tax benefits would almost certainly require certification of design energy consumption. The effectiveness of tax incentives would depend in part on dissemination of public information regarding the incentives. Chapter 5 examines subsidies, such as subsidized mortgages and loan guarantees, which lower the cost of money or other costs but do not change the market structure facing the consumer. Certification that buildings qualify for such treatment would probably be required. Chapter 6 presents recommendations based on the study's findings. (MCW)

  3. Building Bridges: Linking political leaders and policy experts in Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... Building Bridges was conceived as a safe and constructive space for African leaders to foster a systematic and sustained dialogue about critical development issues in ... LeAD Campus develops the skills of current and future African leaders to contribute to sustainable and inclusive growth in the continent.

  4. Language reorientation and policy implementation for nation building

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is possible to argue that language is the only cultural economy unique to human beings. It is a medium through which humans have expressed their thoughts, imaginations, creativities, aspirations, desires, emotions, among others. One can also say that nation building can be possible through language, especially when ...

  5. Comparative Policy Study for Green Buildings in U.S. and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Nina; Romankiewicz, John; Feng, Wei; Zhou, Nan; Ye, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Prominent barriers facing the U.S. green building industry include the fact that government bodies that supervise health, fire safety, land, and other public operations are slow to revise codes to accommodate green building (regulatory barrier). In China, the lack of a green building professional accreditation process similar to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP process limits the green building workforce capacity development (informational barrier). The main policies highlighted in this report to tackle these barriers are 1) comprehensive codes and labeling plan (informational, institutional), 2) government-led targets and demonstrations (risk), 3) education and awareness programs (informational), 4) fiscal policy that supports green building investment (financial), and 5) integrated design promotion (institutional, financial).

  6. Building a New South Africa Volume 1: Economic Policy | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tanzania). Au départ la division tanzanienne du Réseau d'études sur la politique technologique en Afrique (African Technology Policy Studies Network), et ce, depuis 1984, ATPS-Tanzania est devenu... Voir davantageSoutien institutionnel à ...

  7. Building policy leadership among HIV/AIDS health workers | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... Learn more: Read a journal article on the reliability of data collected by community health workers for policy and planning in Kenya. Read project summaries​ of the Teasdale-Corti Global Research Partnership Program (PDF, 275KB) ...

  8. Building Capacity in Health Systems and Policy Analysis in sub ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 avr. 2010 ... This grant will support the design of a module worth six credits (120 hours) within the master's program in health and population, and a scholarship program for some 40 students to specialize in health systems and policy analysis. This will prepare them to undertake critical and comparative analysis of ...

  9. Policy research institutions and the health SDGs: Building ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will promote stakeholder inclusion and engagement around health and the SDGs, including through the evolution of the Think_SDG network and the design of the Think Health Initiative. ... Institution. Sustainable Development Policy Institute. Pays d' institution. Pakistan. Site internet. http://www.sdpi.org ...

  10. Building a New South Africa Volume 1: Economic Policy | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Let us use these ideas to ensure that our reconstruction and development go ahead in harmony. — Nelson Mandela Beginning with a discussion between Nelson Mandela and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, the 1991 economic policy mission looked at the requirements of the South African democratic ...

  11. Building emerging leaders in communications policy in Africa and Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This is due in part to the shortage of locally-based policy and regulatory capacity within government, academia, and civil society, which has led to a lack of public ... will be tutorials, conferences, development of a social media-based platform for practitioners, and organization of a workshop on big data and development.

  12. Hybrid Ventilation Air Flow Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    The scope of this annex is therefore to obtain better knowledge of the use of hybrid ventilation technologies. The annex focus on development of control strategies for hybrid ventilation, on development of methods to predict hybrid ventilation performance in office buildings and on implementation...

  13. Linking policy to research, capacity building and practice : A study to identify key factors for successful linkages between policy, research and capacity building, and practice within the Policy Support Cluster International (BOCI) Programme funded by LNV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hek, de S.; Kusters, C.S.L.; Schaap, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was “to identify the key factors that enhance successful linkages in terms of knowledge between policy and research & capacity building and practice in the international arena and to draw lessons of it that can support policy workers to improve these linkages”. This

  14. 24 CFR 570.205 - Eligible planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. 570.205 Section 570.205..., urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. (a) Planning... known or suspected environmental contamination. (5) (6) Policy—planning—management—capacity building...

  15. What Is a Ventilator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who are on ventilators for shorter periods. The advantage of this tube is that it can be ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding ...

  16. Building smart cannabis policy from the science up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Susan R B; Howlett, Katia D; Baler, Ruben D

    2017-04-01

    Social attitudes and cultural norms around the issue of substance abuse are shifting rapidly around the world, leading to complex and unpredictable consequences. On the positive side, efforts to more intensely disseminate the scientific evidence for the many connections between chronic substance use and the emergence of measurable and discrete brain dysfunctions, has ushered in an evolving climate of acceptance and a new era of improved access to more effective interventions, at least in the United States. On the negative side, there has been a steady erosion in the public perception of the harms associated with the use of popular drugs, especially cannabis. This worrisome trend has sprouted at the convergence of several forces that have combined, more or less fortuitously, to effectively change long-standing policies away from prohibition and toward decriminalization or legalization. These forces include the outsized popularity of the cannabis plant among recreational users, the unflagging campaign by corporate lobbyists and patient advocates to mainstream its medicinal use, and the honest realization in some quarters of the deleterious impact of the drug war and its draconian cannabis laws, in particular, on society's most vulnerable populations. Updating drug policies is a desirable goal, and significant changes may indeed be warranted. However, there is a real concern when policy changes are hurriedly implemented without the required input from the medical, scientific, or policy research communities. Regardless of how well intentioned, such initiatives are bound to magnify the potential for unintended adverse consequences in the form of far ranging health and social costs. To minimize this risk, science must be front and center in this important policy debate. Here, we review the state of the science on cannabis and cannabinoid health effects, both adverse and therapeutic. We focus on the prevalence of use in different populations, the mechanisms by which

  17. Environmental impact comparison of a ventilated and a non-ventilated building-integrated photovoltaic rooftop design in the Netherlands: Electricity output, energy payback time, and land claim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzen, M.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Rovers, R.; Lupíšek, A.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Building Integrated PV (BIPV) is considered as a key development for successful deployment of PV in the built environment. However, the effect of PV integration on environmental impact is not fully understood. In this study a single indicator for environmental impact assessment of BIPV is

  18. Predicting night-time natural ventilation in Stanford's Y2E2 building using an integral model in combination with a CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Giacomo; Gorle', Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Natural ventilation can significantly reduce energy consumption in buildings, but the presence of uncertainty makes robust design a challenging task. We will discuss the prediction of the natural ventilation performance during a 4 hour night-flush in Stanford's Y2E2 building using a combination of two models with different levels of fidelity: an integral model that solves for the average air and thermal mass temperature and a CFD model, used to calculate discharge and heat transfer coefficients to update the integral model. Uncertainties are propagated using polynomial chaos expansion to compute the mean and 95% confidence intervals of the quantities of interest. Comparison with building measurements shows that, despite a slightly to fast cooling rate, the measured air temperature is inside the 95% confidence interval predicted by the integral model. The use of information from the CFD model in the integral model reduces the maximum standard deviation of the volume-averaged air temperature by 20% when compared to using literature-based estimates for these quantities. The heat transfer coefficient resulting from the CFD model was found to be within the literature-based interval initially assumed for the integral model, but the discharge coefficients were found to be different.

  19. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

  20. High-Performance Buildings – Value, Messaging, Financial and Policy Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Molly

    2011-02-22

    At the request of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, an in-depth analysis of the rapidly evolving state of real estate investments, high-performance building technology, and interest in efficiency was conducted by HaydenTanner, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program. The analysis objectives were • to evaluate the link between high-performance buildings and their market value • to identify core messaging to motivate owners, investors, financiers, and others in the real estate sector to appropriately value and deploy high-performance strategies and technologies across new and existing buildings • to summarize financial mechanisms that facilitate increased investment in these buildings. To meet these objectives, work consisted of a literature review of relevant writings, examination of existing and emergent financial and policy mechanisms, interviews with industry stakeholders, and an evaluation of the value implications through financial modeling. This report documents the analysis methodology and findings, conclusion and recommendations. Its intent is to support and inform the DOE Building Technologies Program on policy and program planning for the financing of high-performance new buildings and building retrofit projects.

  1. Low home ventilation rate in combination with moldy odor from the building structure increase the risk for allergic symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägerhed-Engman, L; Sigsgaard, T; Samuelson, I; Sundell, J; Janson, S; Bornehag, C-G

    2009-06-01

    There are consistent findings on associations between asthma and allergy symptoms and residential mold and moisture. However, definitions of 'dampness' in studies are diverse because of differences in climate and building construction. Few studies have estimated mold problems inside the building structure by odor assessments. In a nested case-control study of 400 Swedish children, observations and measurements were performed in their homes by inspectors, and the children were examined by physicians for diagnoses of asthma, eczema, and rhinitis. In conclusion, we found an association between moldy odor along the skirting board and allergic symptoms among children, mainly rhinitis. No associations with any of the allergic symptoms were found for discoloured stains, 'floor dampness' or a general mold odor in the room. A moldy odor along the skirting board can be a proxy for hidden moisture problem inside the outer wall construction or in the foundation construction. There are indications that such dampness problems increase the risk for sensitization but the interpretation of data in respect of sensitization is difficult as about 80% of the children with rhinitis were sensitized. Furthermore, low ventilation rate in combination with moldy odor along the skirting board further increased the risk for three out of four studied outcomes, indicating that the ventilation rate is an effect modifier for indoor pollutants. This study showed that mold odor at the skirting board level is strongly associated with allergic symptoms among children. Such odor at that specific place can be seen as a proxy for some kind of hidden moisture or mold problem in the building structure, such as the foundation or wooden ground beam. In houses with odor along the skirting board, dismantling of the structure is required for an investigation of possible moisture damage, measurements, and choice of actions. In homes with low ventilation in combination with mold odor along the skirting board

  2. Building health impact assessment capacity as a lever for healthy public policy in urban planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jenny L; Kemp, Lynn A

    2007-01-01

    Building capacity to improve health through applying health impact assessment (HIA) increases the range of people, organisations and communities who are able to address health problems and, in particular, the problems that arise out of social inequity and social exclusion. To achieve this, a range of strategies is required across the areas of organisational development, workforce development, resource allocation, leadership and partnerships. A conceptual framework to guide understanding of capacity building evolved during a three-year capacity building project that supported the implementation of HIA. This is also applicable to the broader agenda of healthy public policy.

  3. Data Analysis of Heating Systems for Buildings : A Tool for Energy Planning, Policies and Systems Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noussan, Michel; Nastasi, B.

    2018-01-01

    Heating and cooling in buildings is a central aspect for adopting energy efficiency measures and implementing local policies for energy planning. The knowledge of features and performance of those existing systems is fundamental to conceiving realistic energy savings strategies. Thanks to

  4. ICT Capacity Building: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Rwandan Policies from Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byungura, Jean Claude; Hansson, Henrik; Masengesho, Kamuzinzi; Karunaratne, Thashmee

    2016-01-01

    With the development of technology in the 21st Century, education systems attempt to integrate technology-based tools to improve experiences in pedagogy and administration. It is becoming increasingly prominent to build human and ICT infrastructure capacities at universities from policy to implementation level. Using a critical discourse analysis,…

  5. Design Procedure for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Tjelflaat, Per Olaf

    Mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately during many years. The natural next step in this development is development of ventilation concepts that utilises and combines the best features from each system into a new type of ventilation system - Hybrid Ventilation....... Buildings with hybrid ventilation often include other sustainable technologies and an energy optimisation requires an integrated approach in the design of the building and its mechanical systems. Therefore, the hybrid ventilation design procedure differs from the design procedure for conventional HVAC....... The first ideas on a design procedure for hybrid ventilation is presented and the different types of design methods, that is needed in different phases of the design process, is discussed....

  6. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water...... evaporation. Two outdoor summer climates were simulated in the study, i.e. the design summer climate of Las Vegas and the extreme summer climate of Copenhagen represented hot/dry and warm/dry climates. The results showed that the flash evaporative cooling technology, a simple and green cooling technology......This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...

  7. On the association between building ventilation characteristics, some indoor environmental exposures, some allergic manifestations and subjective symptom reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundell, J. (Karolinska Institute, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-05-01

    The aims of the present thesis are (1) to assess the associations between ventilation characteristics of homes, house dust mite infestation and allergy among children; (2) to assess the association between ventilation characteristics and occurrence of reported SBS-related symptoms among office workers; (3) to analyze associations between reported SBS-related symptoms and the reported sensation of dryness and associations between the reported sensation of dryness and physical air humidity, room characteristics and chemical factors; and (4) to study changes in total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) or formaldehyde concentration from outdoor air to room air and to study the associations between SBS-related symptom reports and concentrations of TVOC and formaldehyde in room air. (au) (256 refs.)

  8. Building America Case Study: Energy Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates, Cocoa, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  9. Low-carbon Building Innovation Trends and Policy Pespectives in Hungary between 2020 and 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarassy Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the aspects of climate policy, the building sector in Hungary is one of the best performing industries. This means that the GHGs (Greenhouse Gasses the sector emits can be decreased more effectively and at less cost than in the case of other sectors. This is no surprise in the European Union, since there is a continual demand on behalf of society to develop old and outdated buildings, thus modern technological solutions also inherently result in operating efficacy. The ‘climate policy targeted’ development of the built environment based on EU funds is thus one of the most popular developments amongst European Union Member States. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to assess the climate policy effects of the presently preferred strategy approach(es between 2020 and 2030.

  10. Ventilation rates and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundell, Jan; Levin, H; Nazaroff, W W

    2011-01-01

    The scientific literature through 2005 on the effects of ventilation rates on health in indoor environments has been reviewed by a multidisciplinary group. The group judged 27 papers published in peer-reviewed scientific journals as providing sufficient information on both ventilation rates...... and health effects to inform the relationship. Consistency was found across multiple investigations and different epidemiologic designs for different populations. Multiple health endpoints show similar relationships with ventilation rate. There is biological plausibility for an association of health outcomes...... studies of the relationship between ventilation rates and health, especially in diverse climates, in locations with polluted outdoor air and in buildings other than offices. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ventilation with outdoor air plays an important role influencing human exposures to indoor pollutants...

  11. 24 CFR 1003.205 - Eligible planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. 1003.205 Section 1003.205... planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning-management-capacity building activities. (a... plans, general environmental studies, and strategies and action programs to implement plans, including...

  12. Displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Mundt, Elisabeth

    The aim of this Guidebook is to give the state-of-the art knowledge of the displacement ventilation technology, and to simplify and improve the practical design procedure. The Guidebook discusses methods of total volume ventilation by mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation and it gives...... insights of the performance of the displacement ventilation. It also shows practical case studies in some typical applications and the latest research findings to create good local micro-climatic conditions....

  13. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    -cooling period and night cooling potential. The investment cost of this ventilation system is about 5-10% lower than the conventional ones, because the acoustic ceiling could be directly applied as air diffuser and the use of plenum to distribute air reduces the cost of ductwork. There is a growing interest...... in applying diffuse ceiling ventilation in offices and other commercial buildings because of the benefits from both thermal comfort and energy efficiency aspects. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation and the design...

  14. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted......, with an average of 1.1 kJ/m3. The yearly mean SFP based on estimated runtime is approx. 0.8 kJ/m3. The case shows the unlocked potential that lies within mechanical ventilation for nearzero energy consuming buildings....

  15. Comparison of a Constant Air Volume (CAV) and a Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) System in a Residential Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Topp, Claus

    2008-01-01

    hygroscopic properties on indoor climate and energy consumption was investigated for the two systems. Dynamic simulations of the studio apartment were carried out in the program WUFI+ with weather data from Copenhagen including outside temperature end relative humidity. For the non-hygroscopic case...... it was found that the energy consumption for heating and operating the ventilation system could be reduced by respectively 8.0% and 10.6 % in the case of DCV without negative impact on the indoor climate. Including the hygroscopic properties of the materials resulted in a reduction of the energy consumption...

  16. Capacity building strategies and policy for desalination using renewable energies in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Hacene; Abdellah, Ouagued [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, BP151 (Algeria); Ghaffour, Noreddine [Middle East Desalination Research Center, P.O. Box 21, P.C. 133, Muscat (Oman)

    2009-05-15

    The integration of renewable resources in desalination and water purification is becoming increasingly attractive. This is justified by the fact that areas of fresh water shortages have plenty of solar energy and these technologies have low operating and maintenance costs. In this paper, an overview of capacity building strategy and policy for desalination in Algeria is presented. Importance of training and education on renewable energies is also outlined. The contribution of the Middle East Desalination Research Center in capacity building and research and development in desalination in Algeria is also presented. (author)

  17. Can life-cycle assessment produce reliable policy guidelines in the building sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säynäjoki, Antti; Heinonen, Jukka; Junnila, Seppo; Horvath, Arpad

    2017-01-01

    Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is an established methodology that can provide decision-makers with comprehensive data on the environmental impacts of products and processes during the entire life cycle. However, the literature on building LCAs consists of highly varying results between the studies, even when the assessed buildings are very similar. This makes it doubtful if LCA can actually produce reliable data for supporting policy-making in the building sector. However, no prior reviews looking into this issue in the building sector exist. This study includes an extensive literature review of LCA studies on the pre-use phase of buildings. The purpose of this study is to analyze the variation between the results of different studies and find out whether the differences can be explained by the contextual differences or if it is actually the methodological choices that cause the extremely high variation. We present 116 cases from 47 scientific articles and reports that used process LCA, input-output (IO) LCA or hybrid LCA to study the construction-phase GHG emissions of buildings. The results of the reviewed studies vary between 0.03 and 2.00 tons of GHG emissions per gross area. The lowest was assessed with process LCA and highest with IO LCA, and in general the lower end was found to be dominated by process LCA studies and the higher end by IO LCA studies, hybrid LCAs being placed in between. In general, it is the methodological issues and subjective choices of the LCA practitioner that cause the vast majority of the huge variance in the results. It thus seems that currently the published building LCAs do not offer solid background information for policy-making without deep understanding of the premises of a certain study and good methodological knowledge.

  18. Apartment building built to passive-house standard with solar balanced ventilation system; Mehrfamilien-Passivhaus mit solarem Luftsystem. Lueftung/Luftheizung/WRG/Solarfassade an der Rychenbergstrasse, Winterthur - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetermann, A.

    2002-04-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with an apartment building in Winterthur, Switzerland, built to passive-house standards and equipped with a solar balanced ventilation system. The building and its convective solar facade are described, as are the fan-assisted, balanced ventilation systems used. The operation of the systems in winter, during transitional periods and in summer is discussed. Domestic hot water preparation is looked at. The energy balance of the building is examined, as is the economic viability of the energy systems. The building, its energy installations and the measurement concept used are considered in detail. Finally, the findings of the study are summarised and commented on.

  19. Asheville, North Carolina: Reducing Electricity Demand through Building Programs & Policies (City Energy: From Data to Decisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Strategic Programs, Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team

    2017-09-29

    This fact sheet "Asheville, North Carolina: Reducing Electricity Demand through Building Programs & Policies" explains how the City of Asheville used data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) and the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) programs to inform its city energy planning. It is one of ten fact sheets in the "City Energy: From Data to Decisions" series.

  20. THE GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS COLLABORATION IN DESIGNING INDUSTRIAL POLICY IN THE RUSSIAN RAILWAY MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Pereversieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to improvement of the mechanism of the government and business collaboration in designing industrial policy. Materials and data of the passenger railway machine-building industry were basis for the analysis. The article draws a lot of attention to regional aspects of the issue. Proposals for the improvement of political mechanisms of the coordination of interests were worked out based on the business proposals and positions of government bodies.

  1. Building policy-making capacity in the Ministry of Health: the Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanturidze, Tata; Adams, Orvill; Tokezhanov, Bolat; Naylor, Mike; Richardson, Erica

    2015-01-20

    Recent economic growth in Kazakhstan has been accompanied by slower improvements in population health and this has renewed impetus for health system reform. Strengthening strategic planning and policy-making capacity in the Ministry of Health has been identified as an important priority, particularly as the Ministry of Health is leading the health system reform process. The intervention was informed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) framework for capacity building which views capacity building as an ongoing process embedded in local institutions and practices. In response to local needs extra elements were included in the framework to tailor the capacity building programme according to the existing policy and budget cycles and respective competence requirements, and link it with transparent career development structures of the Ministry of Health. This aspect of the programme was informed by the institutional capability assessment model used by the United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) which was adapted to examine the specific organizational and individual competences of the Ministry of Health in Kazakhstan. There were clear successes in building capacity for policy making and strategic planning within the Ministry of Health in Kazakhstan, including better planned, more timely and in-depth responses to policy assignments. Embedding career development as a part of this process was more challenging. This case study highlights the importance of strong political will and high level support for capacity building in ensuring the sustainability of programmes. It also shows that capacity-building programmes need to ensure full engagement with all local stakeholders, or where this is not possible, programmes need to be targeted narrowly to those stakeholders who will benefit most, for the greatest impact to be achieved. In sum, high quality tailor-made capacity development programmes should be based on thorough needs assessment of individual and

  2. Impact of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the ventilation of a cubic building with two large opposite openings

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Alain; Lucas, Franck; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to show the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the distribution of velocity in a building having two large openings. The knowledge of the flow form inside a building is useful to define a thermal environment favourable with thermal comfort and good air quality. In computational fluid dynamics, several profiles of atmospheric boundary layer can be used like logarithmic profiles or power profiles. This paper shows the impact o...

  3. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions......The use of Double Skin Façade (DSF) has increased during the last decade. There are many reasons for this including e.g. aesthetics, sound insulation, improved indoor environment and energy savings. However, the influence on the indoor environment and energy consumption are very difficult......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  4. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    The use of Double Skin Façade (DSF) has increased during the last decade. There are many reasons for this including e.g. aesthetics, sound insulation, improved indoor environment and energy savings. However, the influence on the indoor environment and energy consumption are very difficult...... to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  5. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated

  6. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  7. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  8. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  9. Effects of ventilation rate per person and per floor area on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms, and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, R; Mendell, M J; Eliseeva, K; Chan, W R; Sullivan, D P; Russell, M; Satish, U; Fisk, W J

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation rates (VRs) in buildings must adequately control indoor levels of pollutants; however, VRs are constrained by the energy costs. Experiments in a simulated office assessed the effects of VR per occupant on perceived air quality (PAQ), Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, and decision-making performance. A parallel set of experiments assessed the effects of VR per unit floor area on the same outcomes. Sixteen blinded healthy young adult subjects participated in each study. Each exposure lasted four hours and each subject experienced two conditions in a within-subject study design. The order of presentation of test conditions, day of testing, and gender were balanced. Temperature, relative humidity, VRs, and concentrations of pollutants were monitored. Online surveys assessed PAQ and SBS symptoms and a validated computer-based tool measured decision-making performance. Neither changing the VR per person nor changing the VR per floor area, had consistent statistically significant effects on PAQ or SBS symptoms. However, reductions in either occupant-based VR or floor-area-based VR had a significant and independent negative impact on most decision-making measures. These results indicate that the changes in VR employed in the study influence performance of healthy young adults even when PAQ and SBS symptoms are unaffected. The study results indicate the importance of avoiding low VRs per person and low VRs per floor area to minimize decrements in cognitive performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. CFD Simulation of Spread Risks of Infectious Disease due to Interactive Wind and Ventilation Airflows via Window Openings in High-Rise Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, J. L.; Gao, N. P.

    2010-05-01

    One of the concerns is that there may exist multiple infectious disease transmission routes across households in high-rise residential buildings, one of which is the natural ventilative airflow through open windows between flats, caused by buoyancy effects. This study presents the modeling of this cascade effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. It is found that the presence of the pollutants generated in the lower floor is generally lower in the immediate upper floor by two orders of magnitude, but the risk of infection calculated by the Wells-Riley equation is only around one order of magnitude lower. It is found that, with single-side open-window conditions, wind blowing perpendicularly to the building may either reinforce or suppress the upward transport, depending on the wind speed. High-speed winds can restrain the convective transfer of heat and mass between flats, functioning like an air curtain. Despite the complexities of the air flow involved, it is clear that this transmission route should be taken into account in infection control.

  11. CFD and Ventilation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part...... of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize...... the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest on-going needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical...

  12. Solar Heat Gain Reduction of Ventilated Double Skin Windows without a Shading Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokyoung Koo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With global efforts to strengthen various energy-saving policies for buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in South Korea, new laws and regulations have been in force since May 2015 to install shading devices in public buildings and to include the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC reduction performance of shading devices in the evaluation of building performance. By making a ventilated air layer outer glass and inner glass to lower the temperatures of the air layer and glass surface, it is possible to reduce the amount of heat flowing into the building while maintaining the same level of light transmission as plain window systems. This study proposes a double-skin façade window with a 20 mm ventilated air cavity, and assumes that insolation inflow indoors would be reduced through ventilation in the air cavity. The artificial solar lab test results show that the SHGC can be lowered through ventilation by 28% to 52.9%. Additionally, in an outdoor test cell experiment, the results show that the mean temperature was 0.6 K and the peak temperature was 0.9 K lower with ventilation in the air cavity than that without ventilation in the air cavity.

  13. Benefits of the use of thermal insulation in a naturally ventilated residential building in Brazilian temperate climate

    OpenAIRE

    Vinícius Linczuk; Fernando Simon Westphal

    2016-01-01

    The use of thermal insulation is not a common practice in civil construction in Brazil. The national standard for thermal performance and the energy efficiency labeling program do not require the use of thermal insulation in the building envelope, even for the hottest and for the coldest regions of the country. Brazil has a temperate climate region that covers 7.2% of its territory and contains important and populous cities. This paper explores the benefits of the use of thermal i...

  14. Ventilation for Free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, R.D.; Ter Haar, J.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. The goal of this manual is to give a clear and simple overview of some of the possibilities for using natural ventilation in buildings. These systems are described through their formulas to give an idea of

  15. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Apte, Mike G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These

  16. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    Displacement ventilation is an interesting new type of air distribution principle which should be considered in connection with design of comfort ventilation in both smal1 and large spaces. Research activities on displacement ventilation are large all over the world and new knowledge of design...... methods appears continuously. This book gives an easy introduction to the basis of displacement ventilation and the chapters are written in the order which is used in a design procedure. The main text is extended by five appendices which show some of the new research activities taking place at Aalborg...

  17. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  18. Summary of human responses to ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of ventilation on indoor air quality and health is a complex issue. It is known that ventilation is necessary to remove indoor generated pollutants from indoor air or dilute their concentration to acceptable levels. But, as the limit values of all pollutants are not known, the exact determination of required ventilation rates based on pollutant concentrations and associated risks is seldom possible. The selection of ventilation rates has to be based also on epidemiological research (e.g. Seppanen et al., 1999), laboratory and field experiments (e.g. CEN 1996, Wargocki et al., 2002a) and experience (e.g. ECA 2003). Ventilation may also have harmful effects on indoor air quality and climate if not properly designed, installed, maintained and operated as summarized by Seppdnen (2003). Ventilation may bring indoors harmful substances that deteriorate the indoor environment. Ventilation also affects air and moisture flow through the building envelope and may lead to moisture problems that deteriorate the structures of the building. Ventilation changes the pressure differences over the structures of building and may cause or prevent the infiltration of pollutants from structures or adjacent spaces. Ventilation is also in many cases used to control the thermal environment or humidity in buildings. Ventilation can be implemented with various methods which may also affect health (e.g. Seppdnen and Fisk, 2002, Wargocki et al., 2002a). In non residential buildings and hot climates, ventilation is often integrated with air-conditioning which makes the operation of ventilation system more complex. As ventilation is used for many purposes its health effects are also various and complex. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on positive and negative effects of ventilation on health and other human responses. The focus of the paper is on office-type working environment and residential buildings. In the industrial premises the problems of air quality are usually

  19. Seasonal and diel variations of ammonia and methane emissions from a naturally ventilated dairy building and the associated factors influencing emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, C K; Ammon, C; Berg, W; Fiedler, M; Loebsin, C; Sanftleben, P; Brunsch, R; Amon, T

    2014-01-15

    Understanding seasonal and diel variations of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) emissions from a naturally ventilated dairy (NVD) building may lead to develop successful control strategies for reducing emissions throughout the year. The main objective of this study was to quantify seasonal and diel variations of NH3 and CH4 emissions together with associated factors influencing emissions. Measurements were carried out with identical experimental set-up to cover three winter, spring and summer seasons, and two autumn seasons in the years 2010, 2011, and 2012. The data from 2010 and 2011 were used for developing emission prediction models and the data from 2012 were used for model validation. The results showed that NH3 emission varied seasonally following outside temperature whereas CH4 emission did not show clear seasonal trend. Diel variation of CH4 emission was less pronounced than NH3. The average NH3 and CH4 emissions between 6a.m. and 6p.m. were 66% and 33% higher than the average NH3 and CH4 emissions between 6p.m. and 6a.m., respectively for all seasons. The significant relationships (Pclimate factors, hours of the day and days of the year on CH4 emission might be directly related to activities of the cows. © 2013.

  20. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...... and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain...

  1. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

  2. Project-Based Market Competition and Policy Implications for Sustainable Developments in Building and Construction Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ren Yan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Building and construction sectors are significant contributors to the global economy, but their energy consumption necessitates greater commitment to sustainable developments. There is therefore a growing demand for green innovation in the form of cleaner production and policies to meet the modern requirements of sustainability. However, the nature in which public work is undertaken is in an environment of project-based market competition, whereby contractors routinely bid for contracts under specific project awarding systems, and variations are accompanied with the unique scope of individual projects before the final goods or services are delivered. A comprehensive understanding of the characteristics and contractors’ behavior in systems could help to identify the leverage points of policies. This paper proposes a system dynamics model, with quantitative analysis and simulations, to demonstrate the problems of a system with different project awarding systems and ineffective market performance. The framework of market efficiency and performance measures has been proposed to evaluate the project-based competition mechanism. Managerial policy implications for market efficiency and sustainable developments can thus be systematically discussed and compared through iterative computer simulations and scenario analysis.

  3. Application of Building Basement Ventilation Engineering, Smoke Engineering%浅谈建筑地下室中通风工程、防排烟工程的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程剑

    2015-01-01

    通过分析建筑地下室通风工程和防排烟工程的设计思路和存在的问题,提出了相应的优化设计和解决方法。%By analyzing the building basement ventilation and smoke control engineering project design ideas and problems, put forward the corresponding design and optimization solutions.

  4. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  5. Ventilator graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Priya; Sasser, William C; Kalra, Yuvrai; Rutledge, Chrystal; Tofil, Nancy M

    2016-12-01

    Providing optimal mechanical ventilation to critically-ill children remains a challenge. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony results frequently with numerous deleterious consequences on patient outcome including increased requirement for sedation, prolonged duration of ventilation, and greater imposed work of breathing. Most currently used ventilators have real-time, continuously-displayed graphics of pressure, volume, and flow versus time (scalars) as well as pressure, and flow versus volume (loops). A clear understanding of these graphics provides a lot of information about the mechanics of the respiratory system and the patient ventilator interaction in a dynamic fashion. Using this information will facilitate tailoring the support provided and the manner in which it is provided to best suit the dynamic needs of the patient. This paper starts with a description of the scalars and loops followed by a discussion of the information that can be obtained from each of these graphics. A review will follow, on the common types of dyssynchronous interactions and how each of these can be detected on the ventilator graphics. The final section discusses how graphics can be used to optimize the ventilator support provided to patients.

  6. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  7. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2010-06-07

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

  8. Wind Extraction for Natural Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Tadeu; Yaghoobian, Neda; Kumar, Rajan; Ordonez, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the depletion of energy resources and the environmental impact of pollution and unsustainable energy resources, energy consumption has become one of the main concerns in our rapidly growing world. Natural ventilation, a traditional method to remove anthropogenic and solar heat gains, proved to be a cost-effective, alternative method to mechanical ventilation. However, while natural ventilation is simple in theory, its detailed design can be a challenge, particularly for wind-driven ventilation, which its performance highly involves the buildings' form, surrounding topography, turbulent flow characteristics, and climate. One of the main challenges with wind-driven natural ventilation schemes is due to the turbulent and unpredictable nature of the wind around the building that impose complex pressure loads on the structure. In practice, these challenges have resulted in founding the natural ventilation mainly on buoyancy (rather than the wind), as the primary force. This study is the initial step for investigating the physical principals of wind extraction over building walls and investigating strategies to reduce the dependence of the wind extraction on the incoming flow characteristics and the target building form.

  9. Design of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  10. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low......The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...

  11. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  12. Experimental Study of Air Distribution and Ventilation Effectiveness in a Room with a Combination of Different Mechanical Ventilation and Heating/Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.; Simone, Angela; Krajcik, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Mixing and displacement ventilation are common systems in commercial buildings, while mixing ventilation is used in residential buildings. Displacement ventilation provides fresh air to the occupied zone in a more efficient way than mixing ventilation but it is important to know how well it works...

  13. Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part V. Energy efficient buildings: the causes of litigation against energy conservation building codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenson, P.; Codina, R.; Cornwall, B.

    1978-09-01

    The guidelines laid out for the five subjects investigated in this series are to take a holistic view of energy conservation policies by describing the overall system in which they are implemented; provide analytical tools and sufficiently disagregated data bases that can be adapted to answer a variety of questions by the users; identify and discuss some of the important issues behind successful energy conservation policy; and develop an energy conservation policy in depth. Three specific cases reviewed are: the California nonresidential code (1976); the California residential code (1978); and the Farmers Home Administration code (1978). Although these three suits were brought by the building industry, this report also discusses considerations relevant to architects, bankers, and building inspectors. These cases are discussed from three perspectives: (1) objections to the codes explicitly stated in court, (2) industry conditions and practices behind objections stated in court, and (3) general beliefs not stated in court. This discussion focuses on suits intended to limit those building codes which the building industry sees as too strong. However, some energy conservation industries may sue to strengthen codes which they consider too weak. An example of such a case is Polarized Corporation's current suit against the Lighting section of ASHRAE 90-75 (Los Angeles Federal District Court, see Murnane, 1978). (MCW)

  14. Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cared for in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU). People who need a ventilator for a longer time may be in a regular unit of a hospital, a rehabilitation facility, or cared for at home. Why are ...

  15. Low home ventilation rate in combination with moldy odor from the building structure increase the risk for allergic symptoms in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägerhed-Engman, L.; Sigsgaard, T.; Samuelson, I.

    2009-01-01

    ventilation rate in combination with moldy odor along the skirting board further increased the risk for three out of four studied outcomes, indicating that the ventilation rate is an effect modifier for indoor pollutants.This study showed that mold odor at the skirting board level is strongly associated...... for an investigation of possible moisture damage, measurements, and choice of actions. In homes with low ventilation in combination with mold odor along the skirting board, there was even a higher risk of health effects. This emphasizes the need for the appropriate remediation as this is an ever increasing problem...

  16. Inclusion in High - Achieving Singapore: Challenges of Building an Inclusive Society in Policy and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Walker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Building an inclusive society in which all people can participate effectively and live together requires understanding inclusive education and its impact on the social order. As countries of different regions face the vast array of challenges unique to their educational systems, it becomes apparent that inclusive societies are intricately tied to social inclusion policy initiatives and developments in education. Governments are becoming increasingly aware of the need to review their educational systems as they attempt to define what an inclusive society is and how to make inclusion truly effective. Singapore is a unique example of a country that has the resources and the vision, but currently lacks an educational system designed to fully include individuals with special needs. Although Singaporean students consistently score near the top in science, math, and reading achievement on international assessments, many students with special needs still receive their education in schools separated from their mainstream peers. In 2004, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong discussed a new vision of Singapore becoming an inclusive society that embraces all individuals with special learning needs. In this manuscript, the authors provide a brief history of Singapore and its education system and explore how PM Lee’s vision of an inclusive society has shaped practice and policy in Singapore schools in the last decade. Specific ideas and next steps for creating an inclusive Singapore for individuals with disabilities are discussed.

  17. Building trust and confidence in laboratory ES and H policy and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, J.

    2000-08-01

    This report describes a successful pilot event among LANL employees that can see as a model for employee involvement and community input. The conference was designed to begin building trust and confidence in Laboratory policy and practices in the area of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H). It represents a concrete step toward fostering better relationships among Lab employees and creating a new, innovative approach to communication that can also be used to build trust in the larger community. Based on the proven methods of the National Issues Forums and the Jefferson Center Citizen Jury Process, this conference enabled management to learn more about the thoughts and advice of LANL employees, During the course of the day, a random sample of Lab employees representing the LANL workforce learned about issues of health, safety and the environment, and some of the options available to increase trustworthiness in these areas. These Employee Advisors then discussed the options at some length and presented recommendations to senior Lab managers in the role of Decision Makers. At the end of the day, the participants offered their reflections and discussed what they learned during the conference, and Decision Makers responded to what they heard. The most common view expressed by the Employee Advisors was that a bottom-up approach was necessary to develop more relevant ES and H policies. They were unanimous in their desire for more employee inclusion into the decision making process. All Employee Advisors were in support of a Lab wide survey to determine employee concerns about ES and H issues. After listening to the deliberation, the Decision Makers responded with several commitments. The most significant was the pledge to meet with Employee Advisors by the end of February to discuss the status of their recommendations on ES and H policy and practices. The ensuing follow-up meeting explored employee concerns in greater depth resulting in forward-looking action steps

  18. Indoor Air Quality: Is Increased Ventilation the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Shirley

    1989-01-01

    Explains how indoor air quality is affected by pollutants in the air and also by temperature, humidity, and ventilation. Increased ventilation alone seldom solves the "sick building syndrome." Lists ways to improve indoor air quality and optimize energy efficiency. (MLF)

  19. Harnessing natural ventilation benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, John

    2013-04-01

    Making sure that a healthcare establishment has a good supply of clean fresh air is an important factor in keeping patients, staff, and visitors, free from the negative effects of CO2 and other contaminants. John O'Leary of Trend Controls, a major international supplier of building energy management solutions (BEMS), examines the growing use of natural ventilation, and the health, energy-saving, and financial benefits, that it offers.

  20. Moulds in floor dust - a particular problem in mechanically ventilated rooms? A study of adolescent schoolboys under the Danish moulds in buildings program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Harald W; Suadicani, Poul; Nielsen, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    form might be a result of the higher air flow keeping the dust in the breathing zone for a longer time, thereby increasing the exposure for the occupants of the classrooms. It is important in future indoor air research also to focus on the combination effects of risk factors, including the type......), the negative effect of high levels of mould in floor dust was more pronounced in rooms with mechanical ventilation system. With a variable combining high level of moulds in floor dust with type of ventilation in the classroom, a significantly increased risk was found for all symptoms in the mechanically...... ventilated classrooms with high mould concentrations. In multiple logistic regression models, significant odds ratios (OR) ranged from 3.9 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-10.1] (nasal congestion) to 17.0 (95% CI 2.1-138) (dizziness). CONCLUSIONS: The combined effect of moulds in dust and ventilation...

  1. Comparative performance assessment of a non-ventilated and ventilated BIPV rooftop configurations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzen, M.J.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Rovers, R.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Backside ventilation is one of the most common passive cooling methods of PV modules in the built environment, but might be under constraint when integrating PV in the building envelope. To investigate the short and long term effect of backside ventilation on Building Integrated PV (BIPV)

  2. Working Together: Building Successful Policy and Program Partnerships for Immigrant Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els de Graauw

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Supporting and investing in the integration of immigrants and their children is critically important to US society. Successful integration contributes to the nation’s economic vitality, its civic and political health, and its cultural diversity. But although the United States has a good track record on immigrant integration, outcomes could be better. A national, coherent immigrant integration policy infrastructure is needed. This infrastructure can build on long-standing partnerships between civil society and US public institutions. Such partnerships, advanced under Republican- and Democratic-led administrations, were initially established to facilitate European immigrants’ integration in large American cities, and later extended to help refugees fleeing religious persecution and war. In the twenty-first century, we must expand this foundation by drawing on the growing activism by cities and states, new civil society initiatives, and public-private partnerships that span the country. A robust national integration policy infrastructure must be vertically integrated to include different levels of government and horizontally applied across public and private sector actors and different types of immigrant destinations. The resultant policy should leverage public-private partnerships, drawing on the energy, ideas, and work of community-based nonprofit organizations as well as the leadership and support of philanthropy, business, education, faith-based, and other institutions. A new coordinating office to facilitate interagency cooperation is needed in the executive branch; the mandate and programs of the Office of Refugee Resettlement need to be secured and where possible expanded; the outreach and coordinating role of the Office of Citizenship needs to be extended, including through a more robust grant program to community-based organizations; and Congress needs to develop legislation and appropriate funding for a comprehensive integration

  3. Group model building: a framework for organizing healthy community program and policy initiatives in Columbia, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian M; Reilly, Stacia R

    2015-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2012, the multidisciplinary Healthy Community Partnership of Columbia, Missouri, participated in a national program to address child obesity. This article describes a systems-level evaluation of their work to implement healthy eating and active living policy, system, and environmental changes to support healthier communities for children. In 2011, the partnership participated in a Group Model Building session, consisting of 2 primary activities. First, participants sketched behavior-over-time graphs, illustrating the evolution of community variables related to child obesity, such as prevalence of walking to school or the marketing of high-sugar drinks. Later, the graphs were arranged on a large area of wall space and connections were drawn between those variables that were believed to influence each other--either positively (reinforcing connections) or negatively (opposing connections). The resulting causal loop diagram is a visual representation of the interacting systems, as perceived by the partnership. In reviewing the diagram, the group identified areas where they felt the diagram "made sense" and other areas where there were inconsistencies between the diagram and their own mental model of the processes at work. To address the inconsistencies, participants were surveyed to determine which specific modifications should be made to the diagram so it would become an accurate representation of the group's shared concept of the relevant relationships. The group felt that the final Modified causal loop diagram achieved this goal and that it provides useful insight into how their work addresses child obesity. They believe the diagram also has the potential to improve community engagement by serving as a visual model, improve planning through better resource allocation, improve implementation by identifying policy leverage points, and increase resources when used in grant applications.

  4. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the

  5. Short-term airing by natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perino, Marco; Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates...... that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ.......The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates...

  6. Policy-contribution assessment and field-building analysis of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Active Living Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoson, Judith M; Green, Lawrence W; Beery, William L; Senter, Sandra K; Cahill, Carol L; Pearson, David C; Greenwald, Howard P; Hamre, Robin; Leviton, Laura

    2009-02-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation requested this utilization-focused evaluation of its Active Living Research (ALR) program. This evaluation reports on the trajectory of influence of past and future ALR outcomes on field-building and policy contributions as well as on possible users of completed and disseminated ALR products. In 2006 and 2007, key-informant interviews were conducted with 136 representatives of first-line potential users of ALR research products, including state physical activity and nutrition program coordinators, policymakers, scientists, and funders. Literature reviews, bibliometric analyses, and document reviews served to describe the context for ALR's work and the ways it could enhance its utility for field building and policymaking. The contributions of ALR to the emerging transdisciplinary field included leadership in the development of measurement tools, epidemiologic studies, implementation research, the translation of research to practice, and the communication of learned lessons to diverse audiences. ALR's contributions to policy discussions were found across a spectrum of policy-development phases that included describing the problem, raising awareness of alternative strategies for increasing physical activity, convening nontraditional partners, and evaluating policy implementation. Policy-relevant research can make contributions to policymakers' thinking but almost never causes a change by itself. Five years after the original authorization of ALR, there is ample evidence of its recognition as a resource by key players, its field-building influence, and its contributions to policy discussions. All these bear promise for a broader contribution to obesity prevention. Recommendations for increasing ALR's impact on policy and practice are offered.

  7. Construction legislation and energy efficiency. A discussion on the covered open spaces for ventilation adopted by the Rio de Janeiro city building code, Brazil; Legislacao edilicia e eficiencia energetica. Uma discussao sobre os vaos de ventilacao adotados pelo codigo de obras do Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Gustavo Carvalho; Barroso-Krause, Claudia [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Arquitetura]. E-mails: gparj@terra.com.br; bkrause@ufrj.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper analyses, under the energetic efficiency viewpoint, the critical points of the Rio de Janeiro city construction legislation, by the time that decrees the directives for covered open spaces for ventilation in multi-familiar buildings. The paper also demonstrates where and how the building code influences the architectonic project to induce energy consumption not contributing for an efficient architecture.

  8. Capacity building and policy development in Belize marine protected areas, an example for Caribbean integrated coastal management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. James C. Crabbe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability science can, through capacity building, allow for integrated stakeholder management of the vital Caribbean marine ecosystems. We did a capacity building exercise in two major coral reef areas in Southern Belize. The key outcome was a six-month personal/professional action plan developed by each participant about tactics for leading, educating and supporting issues regarding sustainable development and tactics for collaboration to influence policy decisions. Our results can be applied across the Caribbean. Rev. Biol. Trop. 62 (Suppl. 3: 287-291. Epub 2014 September 01.

  9. A venturi-shaped roof for wind-induced natural ventilation of buildings : Wind tunnel and CFD evaluation of different design configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, T.; Blocken, B.; Aanen, L.; Bronsema, B.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are used to analyse the flow conditions in a venturi-shaped roof, with focus on the underpressure in the narrowest roof section (contraction). This underpressure can be used to partly or completely drive the natural ventilation of the

  10. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

  11. Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings. Program on Housing and Urban Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichholtz, P.; Kok, N. [Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Quigley, J.M. [Institute of Business and Economic Research IBER, Fisher Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    This paper provides the first credible evidence on the economic value of the certification of 'green buildings' - value derived from impersonal market transactions rather than engineering estimates. For some 10,000 subject and control buildings, we match publicly available information on the addresses of Energy Star and LEED-rated (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) office buildings to the characteristics of these buildings, their rental rates and selling prices. We find that buildings with a 'green rating' command rental rates that are roughly three percent higher per square foot than otherwise identical buildings - controlling for the quality and the specific location of office buildings. Ceteris paribus, premiums in effective rents are even higher - above six percent. Selling prices of green buildings are higher by about 16 percent. For the Energy-Star-certified buildings in this sample, we subsequently obtained detailed estimates of site and source energy usage from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Our analysis establishes that variations in the premium for green office buildings are systematically related to their energy-saving characteristics. For example, calculations show that a one dollar saving in energy costs from increased thermal efficiency yields roughly 18 dollars in the increased valuation of an Energy-Star certified building. Beyond the direct effects of energy savings, further evidence suggests that the intangible effects of the label itself also play a role in determining the value of green buildings in the marketplace.

  12. A mathematical/physics carbon emission reduction strategy for building supply chain network based on carbon tax policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xueying

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Under the background of a low carbon economy, this paper examines the impact of carbon tax policy on supply chain network emission reduction. The integer linear programming method is used to establish a supply chain network emission reduction such a model considers the cost of CO2 emissions, and analyses the impact of different carbon price on cost and carbon emissions in supply chains. The results show that the implementation of a carbon tax policy can reduce CO2 emissions in building supply chain, but the increase in carbon price does not produce a reduction effect, and may bring financial burden to the enterprise. This paper presents a reasonable carbon price range and provides decision makers with strategies towards realizing a low carbon building supply chain in an economical manner.

  13. A mathematical/physics carbon emission reduction strategy for building supply chain network based on carbon tax policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueying; Peng, Ying; Zhang, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Under the background of a low carbon economy, this paper examines the impact of carbon tax policy on supply chain network emission reduction. The integer linear programming method is used to establish a supply chain network emission reduction such a model considers the cost of CO2 emissions, and analyses the impact of different carbon price on cost and carbon emissions in supply chains. The results show that the implementation of a carbon tax policy can reduce CO2 emissions in building supply chain, but the increase in carbon price does not produce a reduction effect, and may bring financial burden to the enterprise. This paper presents a reasonable carbon price range and provides decision makers with strategies towards realizing a low carbon building supply chain in an economical manner.

  14. Displacement Ventilation in Hospital Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.; Sandberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Hospital differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors...

  15. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out, ...

  16. Building the effective innovation policy in the regions of the Russian Federation as a prerequisite for socio-economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Markovna Golova

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic problems and contradictions of regional innovation policy formation in Russia are revealed. The need to move the Russian economy on an innovative way of development is seen as a condition of economic security. With the usage of global experience, priorities in innovational activity of Russian companies and measures to address systemic gaps between science and industry are grounded. Particular attention is paid to the legal aspects of the state innovational policy. Methodological approaches to the formation of regional innovational policy in the Russian Federation, taking into account the spatial distribution of the scientific, technical and production capacities of the country, their state and structure are revealed. The necessity of a major upgrade of the existing system of intergovernmental relations as a prerequisite for building a functioning innovation system is substantiated. The proposals on division of competence between the Federation and the subjects of the Russian Federation in the regulation of relations in science, technology and innovations are given.

  17. The Effects of Ventilation in Homes on Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    and to reduce emissions. Often, especially in existing buildings, this strategy is difficult to implement, in which case exposures are controlled by providing sufficient, presumably clean, outdoor ventilation air to dilute and remove the contaminants. The present paper attempts to find out how much ventilation...... in existing homes. No data were found indicating that buildings having dedicated natural ventilation systems perform less well than the dwellings in which mechanical ventilation systems are installed. Newly installed mechanical ventilation systems were observed to improve health conditions. In homes...... Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality and improving ventilation measurements). Exposures should also be controlled using different ventilation methods for comparison. Future studies should also advance the understanding of how ventilation systems should be operated to achieve optimal performance. These data...

  18. Building research evidence for policy advocacy: a qualitative evaluation of existing smoke-free policies in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkash, Rima T; Khalil, Joanna; Chaaya, Monique; Afifi, Rema A

    2010-07-01

    Secondhand smoke is harmful to smokers and nonsmokers, and smoke-free legislation worldwide improves health status. Lebanon has one of the weakest tobacco control regulatory environments in the Eastern Mediterranean region. However, several Lebanese workplaces and hospitality venues have chosen to implement such policies on their own. The objective of this study was to document their experiences. Qualitative interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with management, employees, and clients. Thematic analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. describe the types of bans implemented; the reasons for adopting a policy; and the barriers and facilitators to implementation, enforcement, and compliance. A main facilitator was management support, whereas a main barrier was prosmoking norms. This analysis provides insight and lessons learned that can aid in scaling up tobacco control efforts in Lebanon and the Eastern Mediterranean region.

  19. Functionality of Ventilated Facades: Protection of Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrichenko Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses about methods of construction of the ventilated facades. The ventilated facade is not only the element of facing, it is the supporting structure. Their main objective - creation of air ventilating space between a facade and an external wall of the building. Moving of air in this gap protects a heater from destruction, interfering with a moisture congestion. In addition, the ventilated facade protect the building from aggressive influence of external environment, have a sound and thermal insulation properties. There are several problems of systems of the ventilated facades connected with an application of a heater. For more effective using it is necessary to minimize contact of a heater with environment.

  20. Living City: community mobilization to build active transport policies and programs in Santiago, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagaris

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the usefulness of walking and cycling to promote health is increasingly recognized, the importance of civil society leadership in developing new policies and activities is often overlooked. This case study, of Living City (Ciudad Viva a community-based organization in Santiago, Chile, examines how several communities used knowledge about transport’s impact on the environment and health, gained through opposition to a major highway project, to build effective sustainable urban transport initiatives.Inspired by urban reforms in Bogot´a, Living City now focuses mainly on “active transport” (formerly nonmotorized, building the policies, attitudes and infrastructure necessary to encourage walking and cycling, and the inclusion of the differently abled. It has won two major awards for innovation and now partners with NGOs in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Chile and Latin America.Moreover, Living City now organizes cycling-inclusive training programs, design charrettes and participatory processes in cooperation with Santiago’s regional and national authorities. Its publication, La Voz de La Chimba, distributed free throughout the city by volunteers, has helped to open people’s eyes to the implications of active transport for social equality and health, and provided support to other citizens’ initiatives, struggling to get off the ground.This experience illustrates how citizens’ and community organizations acquire important knowledge and practical experience in learning by doing situations, and how they can learn to reach out to ordinary people and key policymakers, building bridges across the citizen-policy divide to produce innovative, win-win programs that simultaneously bring change at micro- and macro-levels.Bien que la nécessité de marcher et de faire du vélo pour rester en bonne santé soit de plus en plus reconnue, l’importance du rôle prépondérant de la société civile dans le développement de nouvelles

  1. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  2. An Economic and Environmental Assessment Model for Selecting the Optimal Implementation Strategy of Fuel Cell Systems—A Focus on Building Energy Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeho Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Considerable effort is being made to reduce the primary energy consumption in buildings. As part of this effort, fuel cell systems are attracting attention as a new/renewable energy systems for several reasons: (i distributed generation system; (ii combined heat and power system; and (iii availability of various sources of hydrogen in the future. Therefore, this study aimed to develop an economic and environmental assessment model for selecting the optimal implementation strategy of the fuel cell system, focusing on building energy policy. This study selected two types of buildings (i.e., residential buildings and non-residential buildings as the target buildings and considered two types of building energy policies (i.e., the standard of energy cost calculation and the standard of a government subsidy. This study established the optimal implementation strategy of the fuel cell system in terms of the life cycle cost and life cycle CO2 emissions. For the residential building, it is recommended that the subsidy level and the system marginal price level be increased. For the non-residential building, it is recommended that gas energy cost be decreased and the system marginal price level be increased. The developed model could be applied to any other country or any other type of building according to building energy policy.

  3. Housing and natural ventilation. Indoor climate, energy, reliability; Bolig og naturlig ventilation: indeklima energi driftssikkerhed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R.; Lauring, M. (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this book is to show how natural ventilation can be used successfully in housing. Housing ventilation aims at balancing complex and often diametrically opposed demands. This book examines the complexity with different quantitative and qualitative approaches. In the first chapter, History, the Danish housing ventilation from 1850-2002 is examined. The requirements for natural ventilation have developed historically, based upon a spatial organisation with fresh air supply to the less polluted rooms and stack effect removal from the more polluted rooms. A series of important factors relating to a healthy indoor climate, energy savings and demands for functional stability have affected this development. In the second chapter, Models, a series of architectural models for natural ventilated large building types are analysed. There has for many years been much R and D activity aimed at using natural ventilation in large buildings. Much of the knowledge about the requirements for natural ventilation (spatial organisation, fresh air supply and stack effect removal) can therefore be used in the development of naturally ventilated housing. The third chapter, Principles, develops a set of principles for naturally ventilated housing by examining the requirements relating to spatial organisation, fresh air supply, and stack effect removal. By optimizing the architectural and technical design of a typical terraced house, the three aims for the successful use of natural ventilation in housing can be achieved; a very low energy consumption and environmental impact, a healthy indoor climate and a functionally stable ventilation system. The fourth chapter, Houses, presents architectural designs for a series of naturally ventilated terraced houses. The designs focus on the use of spatial organisation, fresh air supply and stack removal to optimize the natural ventilation. Architecture and technology are integrated in the design to achieve low energy consumption, a healthy

  4. Non-Compliance with Building Energy Regulations: The Profile, Issues, and Implications on Practice and Policy in England and Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Garmston

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The built environment consumes as much as 50% of many countries’ primary energy resources. Building energy regulations aim to reduce building energy consumption. However, non-compliance risks efficacy of such regulations and monetary costs to the construction industry and consumers. This paper examines the profile, issues and implications of non-compliance internationally with a focus on the case of new-build dwellings in England and Wales. Non-compliance has been observed internationally in both developed and developing countries. The issues underlying the non-compliance include perceptions of triviality towards the energy efficiency regulations, piecemeal dissemination, and a lack of familiarisation and training. Such lack of compliance may paradoxically risk ever more stringent regulations being accompanied by persistent non-compliance. To address the underlying issues, significant attention of both policy and practice must be paid to the formation, implementation and enforcement of building energy regulations, as well as to the training and education in building practices.

  5. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Mattsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Mats

    Full-scale experiments were made in a displacement ventilated room with two breathing thermal manikins to study the effect of movements and breathing on the vertical contaminant distribution, and on the personal exposure of occupants. Concentrations were measured with tracer gas equipment...... in the room and in the inhalation of both manikins. Tracer gas was added in the heat plume above a sitting manikin, or in the exhalation through either the nose or the mouth. The other manikin moved back and forth at different speeds on a low trolley. The mentioned experimental conditions have a significant...

  6. Kitchen ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). College of Architecture; Rousseau, C. [Newcomb and Boyd Consulting Engineers, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Kitchen ventilation is a subject that has not received the attention that has been given to more glamorous HVAC and R topics. Consequently, its theoretical and technical development has not advanced like these topics. However, a group has been working within the ASHRAE Technical Committee (TC) and Task Group (TG) framework to correct this situation. The group is TG5.KV and it achieved TG status last year after starting as an informal group and then a sub-committee of TC9.8. One of its efforts has been to write a Handbook chapter, which will appear in the 1995 ASHRAE Handbook -- Applications. This article is a survey of that chapter.

  7. Energy policy instruments and technical change in the residential building sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, W.M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The passing by the European Parliament of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) in 2003 obliges all European member states to implement energy regulations for buildings based on the concept of energy performance by the year 2009 ultimately. Given the importance of the development of

  8. Energy saving due to natural ventilation in housing blocks in Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Lezcano, RA; Hormigos-Jiménez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Getting a healthy and comfortable indoor environment in homes in southern Europe is a complicated task. In continental climates, with very cold temperatures in winter and very hot in summer, energy consumption greatly increases with air conditioning significant spending. To propose action guidelines for use of natural ventilation and to develop effective design strategies is essential. Therefore, and given a specific building type block of flats in Madrid, this article focuses on establishing what periods of the year natural ventilation is required to reduce energy consumption in air conditioning, also considering the quality of the outdoor environment and the design of the building. To develop this, a statistical study of the chosen type, that allows studying the direction and the wind speed in the area, is performed. Analysis of wind pressures in holes in the facade is performed by means of numerical simulations of fluid flow (CFD) inside to later infer in the natural ventilation rate required within policy parameters. With the data obtained, a study of energy saving is made as a function of natural ventilation rate established for the building type.

  9. Strengthening Ties: The Case for Building a Social Policy Centered on Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longman, Phillip; Mundy, Liza; Black, Rachel; Bornfreund, Laura; Byrum, Greta; Cramer, Reid; Gangadharan, Seeta Peña; Guernsey, Lisa; Lieberman, Abbie; Lynn, Barry; McCarthy, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    Most of the social and economic policies in the U.S. do not explicitly address or take into account the growing importance of families as sources of human capital and determinants of individual success. Even the small subsets of programs that we conventionally frame as part of "family policy" are often based on long-defunct assumptions…

  10. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-08-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall.

  11. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-01-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall. PMID:26066925

  12. Demand controlled ventilation for multi-family dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    for ventilation in residential buildings that depend on occupancy, pollutant emission, etc., and results in periods with poor air quality and/or unnecessary energy consumption. If the ventilation rate is varied according to the demand, the indoor climate can be improved and the energy consumption for ventilation...... specify desired levels of indoor air quality through ventilation rate requirements. The Danish Building Code requires a constant air flow rate equivalent to at least 0.5 air changes per hour in residential buildings. A constant air flow requirement is inconsistent with the time varying needs...

  13. Investigation of Ventilation Strategies for the Day-Care Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Olena Kalyanova; Afshari, Alireza; Heiselberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    Two existing nursery buildings, a mechanically and a naturally ventilated one, were chosen for investigations of energy saving potential and IAQ, using the different from present ventilation strategies and their control principles. These investigations are carried out applying a dynamic building ...

  14. Analysis of energy-saving potential in residential buildings in Xiamen City and its policy implications for southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei

    The buildings sector is the largest energy-consuming sector in the world. Residential buildings consume about three-quarters of the final energy in the buildings sector. Promoting residential energy savings is in consequence critical for addressing many energy-use-related environmental challenges, such as climate change and air pollution. Given China's robust economic growth and fast urbanization, it is now a critical time to develop policy interventions on residential energy use in the nation. With this as a background, this dissertation explores effective policy intervention opportunities in southern China through analyzing the residential energy-saving potential, using the city of Xiamen as a case study. Four types of residential energy-saving potential are analyzed: technical potential, economic potential, maximum achievable potential (MAP), and possible achievable potential (PAP). Of these, the first two types are characterized as static theoretical evaluation, while the last two represent dynamic evaluation within a certain time horizon. The achievable potential analyses are rarely seen in existing literature. The analytical results reveal that there exists a significant technical potential for residential energy savings of about 20.9-24.9% in the city of Xiamen. Of the technical potential, about two-thirds to four-fifths are cost-effective from the government or society perspective. The cost-effectiveness is evaluated by comparing the "Levelized Cost of Conserved Energy (LCOCE)" of available advanced technical measures with the "Actual Cost" of conserved energy. The "Actual Cost" of energy is defined by adding the environmental externalities costs and hidden government subsidies over the retail prices of energy. The achievable potential analyses are particularly based on two key realistic factors: 1) the gradual ramping-up adoption process of advanced technical measures; and 2) individuals' adoption-decision making on them. For implementing the achievable

  15. Nation-building policies in Timor-Leste: disaster risk reduction, including climate change adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jessica; Kelman, Ilan; do Rosario, Francisco; de Deus de Jesus Lima, Abilio; da Silva, Augusto; Beloff, Anna-Maija; McClean, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have explored the relationships between nation-building, disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. Focusing on small island developing states, this paper examines nation-building in Timor-Leste, a small island developing state that recently achieved independence. Nation-building in Timor-Leste is explored in the context of disaster risk reduction, which necessarily includes climate change adaptation. The study presents a synopsis of Timor-Leste's history and its nation-building efforts as well as an overview of the state of knowledge of disaster risk reduction including climate change adaptation. It also offers an analysis of significant gaps and challenges in terms of vertical and horizontal governance, large donor presence, data availability and the integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation for nation-building in Timor-Leste. Relevant and applicable lessons are provided from other small island developing states to assist Timor-Leste in identifying its own trajectory out of underdevelopment while it builds on existing strengths. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  16. A Study of Incentive Policies for Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Technology in Hong Kong

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Aotian; Lu, Lin; Liu, Zhizhao; Wong, Man

    2016-01-01

    .... Through a review of the PV development history of five leading PV countries, Germany, Japan, Italy, Mainland China, and the USA, this paper serves as a useful policy toolbox to aid PV development...

  17. The Development of Building Energy Conservation in China: A Review and Critical Assessment from the Perspective of Policy and Institutional System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Yuan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the building industry has become an important driving force for the fast growing energy use in China. The building industry contributed 26.4% of China’s GDP, and the building energy use accounted for 33% of the total energy use in China. Building energy conservation plays an important role in reaching the peak of carbon emissions before 2030, which was committed by the Chinese government in the Paris Agreement. Building energy conservation is a complex system. The guidance and support of government policies are one of the important issues. This research analyzed the institutional framework for building energy conservation in China. The roles and functions of each institution were critically reviewed. The policy system for building energy conservation was also analyzed, which included National Laws; Regulations of the State Council; Provisions of Ministries under the State Council; and National Standards, Plans and Programs. The suggestions for further improvements were drawn from the critical analysis such as defining clear and specific responsibility of management institutions, improving regulations and standard system, establishing the market leading mechanism, etc. This research draws an overall picture of the building energy conservation in China from the policy and institutional perspective. Findings provide a useful reference for increasing environmental performance in the building industry.

  18. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly

  19. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  20. Measurements of radon-daughter concentrations in and around dwellings in the northern part of the Netherlands; a search for the influences of building materials, construction and ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfs, F.; Hofstede, H.; De Meijer, R.J.; Put, L.W.

    1984-08-01

    The concentration of radon daughters has been determined in and around 80 dwellings located in the northern part of the Netherlands by using a one-filter method. Median values of 2.0 and 0.4 mWL were measured for the indoor and outdoor concentrations, respectively. On the average, dwellings with double-pain windows and/or concrete floors were to have significantly higher radon concentrations than those with single-pane windows and/or wooden floors. For the living room of a particular dwelling 18 measurements were carrried out. The data for this dwelling indicate a linear relation between the concentration indoors and outdoors with a slope of 3.8 +/- 2.0. This unexpected behaviour is thought to be related to ventilation via the crawl space.

  1. Achieving Natural and Hybrid Ventilation in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddament, Martin; Axley, James; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Case studies provide essential evidence about the performance of buildings. They also illustrate the methods by which a technology can be implemented as well as highlighting problems. Various case study buildings (both new and retrofit) that incorporate mixed mode, natural ventilation and low...... energy cooling are reviewed in this paper. An outline of the tasks that ventilation is required to perform is also presented. The results show that many buildings perform well and can provide good thermal comfort and air quality for much of the occupied period. Various solutions have been introduced...

  2. 8th International Symposium on Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yingxin; Li, Yuguo; Vol.1 Indoor and Outdoor Environment; Vol.2 HVAC&R Component and Energy System; Vol.3 Building Simulation and Information Management

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning is based on the 8th International Symposium of the same name (ISHVAC2013), which took place in Xi’an on October 19-21, 2013. The conference series was initiated at Tsinghua University in 1991 and has since become the premier international HVAC conference initiated in China, playing a significant part in the development of HVAC and indoor environmental research and industry around the world. This international conference provided an exclusive opportunity for policy-makers, designers, researchers, engineers and managers to share their experience. Considering the recent attention on building energy consumption and indoor environments, ISHVAC2013 provided a global platform for discussing recent research on and developments in different aspects of HVAC systems and components, with a focus on building energy consumption, energy efficiency and indoor environments. These categories span a broad range of topics, and the proce...

  3. Short Term Airing by Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Perino, M.

    2010-01-01

    that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working......The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies...... principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected...

  4. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV) in shop......The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...

  5. Inclusion in High-Achieving Singapore: Challenges of Building an Inclusive Society in Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Zachary; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2016-01-01

    Building an inclusive society in which all people can participate effectively and live together requires understanding inclusive education and its impact on the social order. As countries of different regions face the vast array of challenges unique to their educational systems, it becomes apparent that inclusive societies are intricately tied to…

  6. Building the New Socialist Countryside : Tracking public policy and public opinion changes in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stepan, Matthias; Han, Enze; Reeskens, Tim

    Ever since the introduction of the national political programme of “Building a new socialist countryside” (BNSC) in the early 2000s, renewed focus has been cast on how the Chinese government manages the gap between its rural and urban areas in the new millennium. Previous research has mostly studied

  7. Variable mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini Jr., Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Methods Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". Results A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Conclusion Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:28444076

  8. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  9. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  10. Building a Social Movement for Education in England: Policy and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the programmatic and strategic choices facing the progressive and left movement in education after the May general election. It draws a critical balance sheet of the education policies in Labour's election manifesto and of the strategy of attempting to influence them in a more progressive direction. An analysis of the…

  11. Academic collaborative centres for health promotion in the Netherlands: building bridges between research, policy and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, G.R.; Fransen, G.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    A logical and promising next step for the development of an effective infrastructure for health promotion in the Netherlands are Academic Collaborative Centres (ACCs). Their aims are to bridge the gap between research, policy and practice; make better use of available knowledge and strengthen the

  12. Internationalisation of Higher Education and Nation Building: Resolving Language Policy Dilemmas in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulajeva, Tatjana; Hogan-Brun, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Our paper discusses trends and challenges faced by Lithuanian Higher Education (HE) internationalisation policy processes in the context of European and global internationalisation tendencies. Using 2001-2011 EU mobility statistics and data from recent HE Lithuanian strategic programmes aimed at promoting the internationalisation of university…

  13. Building Political Participation: The Role of Family Policy and Political Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Emily

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the long-term associations between two kinds of politics courses--required political science courses and required family policy courses--and the political participation, knowledge, skill, efficacy, and politically engaged identity of child and family studies alumni. Two special cases were examined: those who…

  14. European Union research in support of environment and health: Building scientific evidence base for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Hoeveler, Arnd; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2017-06-01

    Opinion polls show that the European Union citizens are increasingly concerned about the impact of environmental factors on their health. In order to respond and provide solid scientific evidence for the numerous policies related to the protection of human health and the environment managed at the Union level, the European Union made a substantial investment in research and innovation in the past two decades through its Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development, including the current programme, Horizon 2020, which started in 2014. This policy review paper analysed the portfolio of forty collaborative projects relevant to environment and health, which received a total amount of around 228 million euros from the EU. It gives details on their contents and general scientific trends observed, the profiles of the participating countries and institutions, and the potential policy implications of the results obtained. The increasing knowledge base is needed to make informed policy decisions in Europe and beyond, and should be useful to many stakeholders including the scientific community and regulatory authorities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Building Capacity for Tracking Human Capital Development and Its Mobility across State Lines. Policy Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    This issue of "Policy Insights" provides a review of the past five years of the cost and value of higher education, which have gained increased policymaker, consumer, and media attention. The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has worked with four of its member states (Hawai'i, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington) to…

  16. Igniting the Policy Conversation: Bringing a Trauma-Informed Approach to Early Childhood System Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Julie; Oser, Cindy; Quigley, Kelsey

    2013-01-01

    The issue of early childhood trauma is becoming more prominent in early childhood policy discussions, driven by a growing recognition of the potentially devastating impacts of trauma and violence on infants, toddlers, and families. This article provides facts about the impacts of trauma and other adverse early experiences on child health and…

  17. Variable mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini Jr.,Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Methods Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE?, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". Results A total of 36 studies were selected. ...

  18. Meeting in the MIDDLE:BUILDING off Regional Policies to Promote Climate Education Partnerships on and off Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, M.; Stylinski, C.; Shea, N.; Veron, D. E.; Merrill, J.

    2013-12-01

    Both the impacts of climate change and the choices available to adapt and mitigate climate change largely function at the regional scale. Understanding and addressing climate change will require a concerted campaign involving a diverse array of educations from small to large organizations. By focusing on a specific region's climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation options, and existing policies, climate education networks will likely have a higher likelihood of sustainability. Building on this concept, we have developed a climate education partnership, Maryland Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment and Research (MADE CLEAR), to better understand effective ways to support formal-, informal- and higher-education practitioners in climate change education in this Mid-Atlantic region. We do so largely through face-to-face and web based professional development for each education practitioner group to improve their capacity to incorporate rigorous regionally-based climate science and solutions into their education strategies. We are promoting communities-of-practice within and across these groups as they share their successes and challenges and consider common messages and approaches. Our training and resources focus on impacts and solutions most relevant to our region including sea level rise, extreme events, and urban heat impacts. Our professional development approach aligns directly with existing education and natural resource, including the region's environmental literacy initiatives, the Next Generation Science Standards, and state climate adaptation and mitigation plans. We anticipate that by building off of existing policy, we will build the success of the network into the future. Our project includes design-based research of all three education groups, and thus we will identify effective climate change education strategies, in and out of schools, that are applicable in other regions.

  19. Modeling and Control of Livestock Ventilation Systems and Indoor Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhuang; Heiselberg, Per; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    The hybrid ventilation systems have been widely used for livestock barns to provide optimum indoor climate by controlling the ventilation rate and air flow distribution within the ventilated building structure. The purpose of this paper is to develop models for livestock ventilation systems and i...... constraints and random disturbances is designed through system linearization. The well designed control systems are able to determine the demand ventilation rate and airflow pattern, improve and optimize the indoor Thermal Comfort (TC), Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and energy use....

  20. Airborne fungi in non-problem buildings in a southern-hemisphere mediterranean climate: preliminary study of natural and mechanical ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, P.C.; Murry, F. [School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Murdoch (Australia); Neumeister-Kemp, H.G. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Lysek, G. [Fachbereich Botanik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence on fungal contamination in moisture-damaged and complaint buildings worldwide, but little is known about the occurrence and distribution of fungi in healthy non-complaint buildings in a southern-hemisphere climate. The study tested the hypothesis that fungi in healthy buildings are low in numbers and very similar to the numbers and mixtures of species in both the outdoor air and the outdoor air in other parts of the world. Fungi were collected using a 6-stage Andersen sampler, and various indoor air quality (IAQ) indicators and a sick-building syndrome (SBS) questionnaire were used in parallel. The results showed that all IAQ parameters were within USA and Canadian guidelines in all the buildings. There was also a low incidence of SBS complaints and symptoms. The total colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were also low, and the range of fungal species was low compared to buildings in other parts of the world. However, the mixture of fungal genera in the indoor air was different from the outdoor air. There were also substantial differences between indoor locations. At some locations fungi including 'Aspergillus niger', 'Penicillium' spp. and 'Alternaria alternata' were much higher indoors than outdoors or, as the pathogen 'Paecilomyces lilacinus', were absent in the outdoor air indicating indoor sources. Differentiation of fungal species was required to identify indoor fungal sources as the outdoor air was not the major source of indoor fungi. The study also demonstrated that evaluating the potential exposure to airborne fungi in indoor air requires differentiation to the species level as simple CFU counts could not differentiate between benign and potentially harmful fungi. (author)

  1. Building on research evidence to change health literacy policy and practice in England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, Gillian; Berry, Jonathan; Protheroe, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    service, and industry perspectives. Suggested topics for action fell into four areas; improving health services, building health literacy skills in the population and workforce, recognizing the importance of public information developed outside the health arena, and funding for health literacy research......Background: Health literacy is important because of the high proportion of the population with skills below those needed to become and stay healthy, and the resultant negative impact on people’s lives. A recent study in England has shown that, as is true in other industrialized nations......, a significant proportion of people (43–61%) have literacy and numeracy skills below those needed to fully understand and use health materials. This paper describes a project designed to build on these findings with key stakeholders to develop an action plan to address a mismatch between population skills...

  2. Calculation of Industrial Enterprise Ventilation System by Network Integral Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihienkova Evgeniya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe a ventilation system calculation of the technology building industrial enterprise. On the basis of the calculation model for the enterprise offered technical decision of ventilation systems, subject to a compliance exchange multiplicity, purification efficiency, decontamination from the work area; provided the required volume of gas extraction from process equipment according to the sanitary standards and environmental requirements. Produced selection of ventilation equipment parameters, solved the problem of the air exchange balancing between ventilation systems to prevent the emergence of parasitic flows between the rooms building. SigmaNet software package was used for the implement the calculation.

  3. A Study of Incentive Policies for Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Technology in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aotian Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Installing sustainable and renewable energy systems is a promising way of relieving Hong Kong’s dependence on imported fossil fuels. Solar photovoltaic (PV technology is a perfect solution for Hong Kong as it fits the economic and geographic situation. Through a review of the PV development history of five leading PV countries, Germany, Japan, Italy, Mainland China, and the USA, this paper serves as a useful policy toolbox to aid PV development. Based on the forerunners’ successful PV industry experiences and Hong Kong’s unique local situations, a series of incentive strategies were proposed for Hong Kong to help promote the utilization of solar PV systems by reducing the initial investment and providing reasonable subsidies at the initial stages and during the operation period of the PV systems. These results could be a practical reference for promoting renewable energy applications for local policy-makers.

  4. A NEW LANDSCAPE OF ARTS-BASED BUILDINGS AND COMPARATIVE CULTURAL POLICIES ON THE ISLAND OF IRELAND: THE CURSE OF JOCASTA’S NECKLACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Lappin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Much current cultural policy research focuses on activity traditionally viewed as arts practice: visual arts, music, literature and dance. Architecture’s role in the discussion of cultural policy is, however, less certain and thus less frequently interrogated. The study presented here both addresses this dearth of in-depth research while also contributing to the interdisciplinary discussion of cultural policy in wider terms. In seeking to better understand how architectural culture is regulated and administered in a specific case study, it unpacks how the complicated relationships of nominal and explicit policies on both sides of the Irish/Northern Irish border contributed to the significant expansion of arts-based buildings 1995-2008. It contrasts political and cultural motivations behind these projects during a period of significant economic growth, investment and inward immigration. Data has been gathered from both official published policies as well as interviews with elite actors in the decision-making field and architects who produced the buildings of interest in both countries. With the sizeable number of artsbased buildings now completed in both Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, one must wonder if this necklace of buildings is, like Jocasta’s, a thing of both beauty and redolent with a potential future curse. It is the goal of this project to contribute to the larger applied and critical discussion of these issues and to engage with future policy design, administration and, certainly, evaluation.

  5. Solar collector Suntherm. Laboratory test. Full scale test for preheating of ventilation air in a building for piglets. Solfaangare Suntherm. Laboratorieprovning. Fullskaletest foer foervaermning av stalluft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, G.; Hedstroem, R.

    1988-06-30

    A test of the solar collector 'SUNTHERM' has been performed. The solar collector has a suspended, permeable absorber covered with a corrugated plastic sheet. In the laboratory the momentary efficiency was measured when solar radiation exceeded 630 W/m/sup 2/. At specific air flows greater than 0.01 m/sup 3//(m/sup 2/ s), the upper absorber surface of the solar collector had the same temperature as the exhaust air. The air temperature in the exhaust air duct of the solar collector can therefore be controlled which means that conduction losses through the covering can be minimized. The effective heat transfer coefficient of the device was 17.3 W/(m/sup 2/k). A field study was made of a SUNTHERM heating device installed at a farm in southern Sweden. The area of the solar collector was 40 m/sup 2/. It was placed on the south gablewall of a pig house. It was used to preheat ventilation air. The energy supply from the collector during the test period, was about 1 300 kWh. The average efficiency of the device for the whole period was about 21 %. Some defects in the device were observed during the test period including some design errors. By correcting these errors it should be possible to increase the efficiency of the system to 25 to 30 %.

  6. Development of energy-efficient comfortable ventilation systems with air quality guided volume flow control and continuous monitoring of the window opening status. Part 1. Use of the LuQaS triple sensor for air quality guided volume flow control of mechanical ventilation systems in domestic buildings. Research project; Entwicklung energieeffizienter Komfortlueftungsanlagen mit luftqualitaetsgefuehrter Volumenstromregelung und kontinuierlicher Erfassung des Fensteroeffnungszustandes. Teilbericht 1. Einsatz des LuQaS-Triple-Sensors zur luftqualitaetsgefuehrten Volumenstromregelung von mechanischen Lueftungsanlagen in Wohngebaeuden. Forschungsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossklos, Marc; Ebel, Witta; Knissel, Jens

    2011-05-15

    The report presents the preparatory work on the research project of the above title. The first chapter presents a status report on air quality monitoring inside rooms and evaluates the projects so far in which the LuQaS air quality sensor was used. The second chapter is a documentation of preliminary measurements using the LuQaS sensor in two passive residential buildings and several individual measurements for sensor calibration. It was found that in apartments with mechanical ventilation, the sensor reflects the user activities; further, the measured values indicate signal changes also in the off-air of the building, so that control via central sensors in the ventilation and off-air systems appears feasible. The third chapter discusses control strategies for air quality control. Apart from a discussion of control unit types, operating regimes, methods to determine rated values, and additional control functions, the effects of threshold value control with different threshold limit values and volume flow changes on the air quality of a model building was simulated. The results prove the expectation that the air quality inside a building will be influenced positively by air quality control. Theoretical investigations of the DrD method will be presented in another part-report of the project.

  7. Tracking Invasive Alien Species (TrIAS: Building a data-driven framework to inform policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Vanderhoeven

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Imagine a future where dynamically, from year to year, we can track the progression of alien species (AS, identify emerging problem species, assess their current and future risk and timely inform policy in a seamless data-driven workflow. One that is built on open science and open data infrastructures. By using international biodiversity standards and facilities, we would ensure interoperability, repeatability and sustainability. This would make the process adaptable to future requirements in an evolving AS policy landscape both locally and internationally. In recent years, Belgium has developed decision support tools to inform invasive alien species (IAS policy, including information systems, early warning initiatives and risk assessment protocols. However, the current workflows from biodiversity observations to IAS science and policy are slow, not easily repeatable, and their scope is often taxonomically, spatially and temporally limited. This is mainly caused by the diversity of actors involved and the closed, fragmented nature of the sources of these biodiversity data, which leads to considerable knowledge gaps for IAS research and policy. We will leverage expertise and knowledge from nine former and current BELSPO projects and initiatives: Alien Alert, Invaxen, Diars, INPLANBEL, Alien Impact, Ensis, CORDEX.be, Speedy and the Belgian Biodiversity Platform. The project will be built on two components: 1 The establishment of a data mobilization framework for AS data from diverse data sources and 2 the development of data-driven procedures for risk evaluation based on risk modelling, risk mapping and risk assessment. We will use facilities from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF, standards from the Biodiversity Information Standards organization (TDWG and expertise from Lifewatch to create and facilitate a systematic workflow. Alien species data will be gathered from a large set of regional, national and international

  8. Ventilator associated pneumonia or ventilator induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahid Hussain; Ceriana, Piero; Donner, Claudio F

    2017-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia currently in vogue seems to have some pitfalls as far as the nomenclature is concerned and thus it imparts an erroneous impression to the reader. As the driving force is in fact the ventilator, the phraseology should preferably be changed to ventilator induced pneumonia to convey the in depth meaning of the term thus evading the terminology currently in practice. A new and emerging paradigm dealing with all side effects of mechanical ventilation can be helpful to solve this etymological conflict.

  9. Dengue research networks: building evidence for policy and planning in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Fonseca E Fonseca, Bruna; Zicker, Fabio

    2016-11-08

    The analysis of scientific networks has been applied in health research to map and measure relationships between researchers and institutions, describing collaboration structures, individual roles, and research outputs, and helping the identification of knowledge gaps and cooperation opportunities. Driven by dengue continued expansion in Brazil, we explore the contribution, dynamics and consolidation of dengue scientific networks that could ultimately inform the prioritisation of research, financial investments and health policy. Social network analysis (SNA) was used to produce a 20-year (1995-2014) retrospective longitudinal evaluation of dengue research networks within Brazil and with its partners abroad, with special interest in describing institutional collaboration and their research outputs. The analysis of institutional co-authorship showed a significant expansion of collaboration over the years, increased international involvement, and ensured a shift from public health research toward vector control and basic biomedical research, probably as a reflection of the expansion of transmission, high burden and increasing research funds from the Brazilian government. The analysis identified leading national organisations that maintained the research network connectivity, facilitated knowledge exchange and reduced network vulnerability. SNA proved to be a valuable tool that, along with other indicators, can strengthen a knowledge platform to inform future policy, planning and funding decisions. The paper provides relevant information to policy and planning for dengue research as it reveals: (1) the effectiveness of the research network in knowledge generation, sharing and diffusion; (2) the near-absence of collaboration with the private sector; and (3) the key central organisations that can support strategic decisions on investments, development and implementation of innovations. In addition, the increase in research activities and collaboration has not yet

  10. Ventilation effectiveness : health benefits of heat recovery ventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Studies have shown that the installation of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) in homes in northern Canada could improve indoor air quality and the respiratory health of inhabitants. Low ventilation rates are common in many homes in the North because the climate is severe, homes are smaller and lack basements, and occupancies are higher, leading to unhealthy indoor air quality. Northern communities also have a high rate of respiratory infections. HRVs recover much of the energy used to ventilate, which is desirable in cold regions with high heating costs. For the study, the test sample was divided into two types of houses, notably houses with active HRVs and those with control HRVs that were installed and operated but that did not function. The study results showed that HRVs provided increased ventilation. Complaints by residents about HRV noise, discomfort, or low humidity were common but equally spread between those with active and placebo HRVs. The study showed that the system design needs to be improved to better suit the needs of Inuit families. The nature of northern housing presents installation and maintenance challenges. It is hard to retrofit HRV ducting inside small, existing houses, and building supplies arrive infrequently, so detailed planning and careful take-offs of all supplies and materials must be done well in advance of construction. In addition, contractors are hard to locate and have variable expertise, and there is little technical follow-up. Robust technical support by local contractors and housing authorities is therefore important. 2 refs.

  11. Demand-controlled mechanical ventilation. Behovsstyret mekanisk ventilation; Fugt som reguleringsparameter - et pilotprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This report presents the results from the registration throughout a month of relative humidity, temperature and outdoor air exchanger as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide in each room of an inhabited single family house, in which all rooms are ventilated by a mechanical balanced ventilation system with variable air volume. The ventilation outdoor air rate is controlled by the relative humidity, which is kept on a value adequate to reduce the living conditions for house dust mites and prevent condensation on the indoor surfaces of the building. Due to the demand control ventilation of each individual room a higher efficiency for reducing water vapors in the dwelling as a whole is likely to be achieved. The results show that it is possible with this kind of ventilation system and in the context of Danish outdoor climate to maintain humidity conditions that is anticipated to reduce the number of house dust mites in all rooms of a dwelling during more than five months of the year. In all the months the mean daily mechanical ventilation rate is estimated to be 39% below the level recommended in the Danish Building Code. At the same time indoor condensation was avoided on poorly insulated surfaces of the building. The concentration of carbon dioxide was below the level recommended in international ventilation standards. (au) (13 refs.)

  12. Theoretical and Practical Premises in Building Up the Health Public Policies in the Field of Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina GAVRILUŢĂ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing data at European level situate Romania on the last places regarding the rate of organ donation. This fact is also an indicator of the effect of the health policies in Romania in the field of transplant. The research carried out (the study on the population’s attitudes towards the organ donation, the study on the theme of organ transplantation as presented in the Romanian media, and the study on the opinions of the ER doctors, neurologists and neurosurgeons regarding the organ donation and transplantation show different models of approaching the issue of transplant in the European area. The investigations carried out among doctors identify a series of issues which relate, on the one hand, to the cultural component, and, on the other hand, to the structure and functioning of the Romanian health system. The survey carried out in Iași in 2012 shows favorable attitudes towards organ donations in the conditions of a lack of information and of a less effective policy regarding organ donation.

  13. Building an integrated research/policy planning age-friendly agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, Allen; Clark, Kate; Kleban, Morton H; Ring, Lauren; Hoffman, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an innovative model for integrating research into a policy and planning agenda aimed to help neighborhoods become more supportive of older adults. Philadelphia Corporation for Aging (PCA) established Age-Friendly Philadelphia (AFP) to catalyze efforts to improve the physical and social environments for seniors. The Research Program at PCA became an important part of this effort by providing multiple types of supports to PCA staff and other stakeholders. Most notably, the research program worked with planners to adopt the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Aging Initiative model for Philadelphia. That model focuses on (1) staying active, connected, and engaged; (2) development and housing; (3) transportation and mobility; and (4) staying healthy. Examples of practice efforts actualized using this research are also presented. By developing a new approach to the way research can support practice initiatives, AFP has been able to increase its effectiveness, and researchers have found better ways to work collaboratively with professionals in policy, planning, and practice. The PCA model should be considered as a framework for similar efforts aimed at creating age-friendly communities.

  14. Low resource ventilation unit; Ressourcebesparende ventilationsenhed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drivsholm, C.

    2012-03-15

    In the project a resource-saving ventilation device was developed which is based on the use of a regenerator and a reversible air flow. The regenerator is placed in the building envelope, and the concept works in the way that the heat in the air during ventilation is stored in the regenerator and brought back into the building by a reversible air change. The heated air is blown from inside the building out through the regenerator. In this way the regenerator accumulates the heat in the air. Over a period of 30-120 seconds, the regenerator capacity is utilized. When the regenerator cannot be further heated, the air flow is reversed and there is now blown cold air through the regenerator. Thereby the heat from the regenerator is released to the cold fresh air. Thus, the fresh air brings heat back into the building, whereby the air is replaced with a limited heat loss. Ventilation with a regenerator is described as micro-ventilation. The developed micro-ventilation unit was tested by the Danish Technological Institute. The test results shows that the unit performs according to expectations: 1) The heat recovery is 85%; 2) The flow through the unit is 80m3 per hour in a 5 section unit; 3) The noise level is 30 db(A) in a representative room; 4) The energy consumption is <300 J/m3. The unit is introduced into the market, and the first plants have been sold. (LN)

  15. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  16. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  17. Patient-Ventilator Dyssynchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira-Markela Antonogiannaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In mechanically ventilated patients, assisted mechanical ventilation (MV is employed early, following the acute phase of critical illness, in order to eliminate the detrimental effects of controlled MV, most notably the development of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction. Nevertheless, the benefits of assisted MV are often counteracted by the development of patient-ventilator dyssynchrony. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony occurs when either the initiation and/or termination of mechanical breath is not in time agreement with the initiation and termination of neural inspiration, respectively, or if the magnitude of mechanical assist does not respond to the patient’s respiratory demand. As patient-ventilator dyssynchrony has been associated with several adverse effects and can adversely influence patient outcome, every effort should be made to recognize and correct this occurrence at bedside. To detect patient-ventilator dyssynchronies, the physician should assess patient comfort and carefully inspect the pressure- and flow-time waveforms, available on the ventilator screen of all modern ventilators. Modern ventilators offer several modifiable settings to improve patient-ventilator interaction. New proportional modes of ventilation are also very helpful in improving patient-ventilator interaction.

  18. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Guidance for Residential High-Performance New Construction - Multifamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corp., Westford, MA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The measure guideline provides ventilation guidance for residential high performance multifamily construction that incorporates the requirements of the ASHRAE 62.2 ventilation and indoor air quality standard. The measure guideline focus is on the decision criteria for weighing cost and performance of various ventilation systems. The measure guideline is intended for contractors, builders, developers, designers and building code officials. The guide may also be helpful to building owners wishing to learn more about ventilation strategies available for their buildings. The measure guideline includes specific design and installation instructions for the most cost effective and performance effective solutions for ventilation in multifamily units that satisfies the requirements of ASHRAE 62.2-2016.

  19. Evaluation of Policy Implementation at Norm Strategy Criteria Procedure Safety Management System that Influence the Safety Culture in Building Construction, Housing, Waterworks, Road and Bridge Project in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf Latief; Rossy Armyn Machfudiyanto; Brain Harryanto; Cahyadi Santoso

    2017-01-01

    Unideal Safety culture in Indonesia requires an evaluation of policy implementation refers to the construction safety regulation, Ministry Regulation 05/PRT/2014. Out of Norms, Standards, Procedures and Criteria (NSPK), we only have Norms and Procedure. As for Standard and Criteria are still being planned. This research on building, housing, water resource, roads and bridges construction at the Ministry of General Works and Housing resulted in having significant relation between safety policy...

  20. Shifting visions: "delegation" policies and the building of a "rights-based" approach to maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Lynn P

    2002-01-01

    "Rights-based" approaches fold human rights principles into the ongoing work of health policy making and programming. The example of delegation of anesthesia provision for emergency obstetric care is used to demonstrate how a rights-based approach, applied to this problem in the context of high-mortality countries, requires decision makers to shift from an individual, ethics-based, clinical perspective to a structural, rights-based, public health perspective. This fluid and context-sensitive approach to human rights also applies at the international level, where the direction of overall maternal mortality reduction strategy is set. By contrasting family planning programs and maternal mortality programs, this commentary argues for choosing the human rights approach that speaks most effectively to the power dynamics underlying the particular health problem being addressed. In the case of maternal death in high-mortality countries, this means a strategic focus on the health care system itself.

  1. Mechanical ventilator - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007240.htm Mechanical ventilator - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that assists with breathing. ...

  2. Building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynejad, Roxanne; Semrau, Maya; Toynbee, Mark; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Lund, Crick; Gureje, Oye; Ndyanabangi, Sheila; Courtin, Emilie; Abdulmalik, Jibril O; Alem, Atalay; Fekadu, Abebaw; Thornicroft, Graham; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2016-10-21

    Little is known about the interventions required to build the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We conducted a systematic review with the primary aim of identifying and synthesizing the evidence base for building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in LMICs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, LILACS, ScieELO, Google Scholar and Cochrane databases for studies reporting evidence, experience or evaluation of capacity-building of policy-makers, service planners or managers in mental health system strengthening in LMICs. Reports in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French or German were included. Additional papers were identified by hand-searching references and contacting experts and key informants. Database searches yielded 2922 abstracts and 28 additional papers were identified. Following screening, 409 full papers were reviewed, of which 14 fulfilled inclusion criteria for the review. Data were extracted from all included papers and synthesized into a narrative review. Only a small number of mental health system-related capacity-building interventions for policy-makers and planners in LMICs were described. Most models of capacity-building combined brief training with longer term mentorship, dialogue and/or the establishment of networks of support. However, rigorous research and evaluation methods were largely absent, with studies being of low quality, limiting the potential to separate mental health system strengthening outcomes from the effects of associated contextual factors. This review demonstrates the need for partnership approaches to building the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in LMICs, assessed rigorously against pre-specified conceptual frameworks and hypotheses, utilising longitudinal evaluation and mixed quantitative and qualitative approaches.

  3. Building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Keynejad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the interventions required to build the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. We conducted a systematic review with the primary aim of identifying and synthesizing the evidence base for building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in LMICs. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, LILACS, ScieELO, Google Scholar and Cochrane databases for studies reporting evidence, experience or evaluation of capacity-building of policy-makers, service planners or managers in mental health system strengthening in LMICs. Reports in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French or German were included. Additional papers were identified by hand-searching references and contacting experts and key informants. Database searches yielded 2922 abstracts and 28 additional papers were identified. Following screening, 409 full papers were reviewed, of which 14 fulfilled inclusion criteria for the review. Data were extracted from all included papers and synthesized into a narrative review. Results Only a small number of mental health system-related capacity-building interventions for policy-makers and planners in LMICs were described. Most models of capacity-building combined brief training with longer term mentorship, dialogue and/or the establishment of networks of support. However, rigorous research and evaluation methods were largely absent, with studies being of low quality, limiting the potential to separate mental health system strengthening outcomes from the effects of associated contextual factors. Conclusions This review demonstrates the need for partnership approaches to building the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in LMICs, assessed rigorously against pre-specified conceptual frameworks and hypotheses, utilising longitudinal evaluation and mixed

  4. Consensus Building Through Systems Thinking: the case of policy and planning in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz E. Maani

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a methodology and a case study using qualitative system dynamics to create consensus, team learning and shared vision in a public organisation. The case involves determining planning priorities for a Division of the Ministry of Health in New Zealand, leading to the creation of a business plan. The methodology involves Systems Thinking using Group Model Building (GMB - A three-step process starting with structured brainstorming using the partial KJ (Jiro Kawakita technique to identify priority areas and then clustering them into 'affinity' groups. Next, the priority clusters are used by the participants to construct causal loop diagrams representing 'systems of priorities'(in contrast with list of priorities. Finally, through a group process, leverage points or key priorities are identified as the basis for a business plan. While the above process was well agreed upon by the participants at the outset, strong group resistance was encountered when managers attempted to reduce the number of priority areas. Systems thinking approach was used to create consensus and the commitment to the outcome. The GMB approach offers significant promise in using qualitative system dynamics with non-systems experts. The methodology can be applied to change management initiative and complex decisions such as restructuring, reengineering, and supply chain design. The expected outcomes are greater commitment and shared vision.

  5. Building a maintenance policy through a multi-criterion decision-making model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihinia, Elahe; Mollaverdi, Naser

    2012-08-01

    A major competitive advantage of production and service systems is establishing a proper maintenance policy. Therefore, maintenance managers should make maintenance decisions that best fit their systems. Multi-criterion decision-making methods can take into account a number of aspects associated with the competitiveness factors of a system. This paper presents a multi-criterion decision-aided maintenance model with three criteria that have more influence on decision making: reliability, maintenance cost, and maintenance downtime. The Bayesian approach has been applied to confront maintenance failure data shortage. Therefore, the model seeks to make the best compromise between these three criteria and establish replacement intervals using Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE II), integrating the Bayesian approach with regard to the preference of the decision maker to the problem. Finally, using a numerical application, the model has been illustrated, and for a visual realization and an illustrative sensitivity analysis, PROMETHEE GAIA (the visual interactive module) has been used. Use of PROMETHEE II and PROMETHEE GAIA has been made with Decision Lab software. A sensitivity analysis has been made to verify the robustness of certain parameters of the model.

  6. Why we ventilate our houses - An historical look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matson, Nance E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2004-05-14

    The knowledge of how to ventilate buildings, and how much ventilation is necessary for human health and comfort, has evolved over centuries of trial and error. Humans and animals have developed successful solutions to the problems of regulating temperature and removing air pollutants through the use of ventilation. These solutions include ingenious construction methods, such as engineered passive ventilation (termite mounds and passive stacks), mechanical means (wing-powered, fans), and an evolving effort to identify problems and develop solutions. Ventilation can do more than help prevent building occupants from getting sick; it can provide an improved indoor environment. Codes and standards provide minimum legal requirements for ventilation, but the need for ventilation goes beyond code minima. In this paper we will look at indoor air pollutant sources over time, the evolution of ventilation strategies, current residential ventilation codes and standards (e.g., recently approved ASHRAE Standard 62.2), and briefly discuss ways in which we can go beyond the standards to optimize residential ventilation, reduce indoor air quality problems, and provide corresponding social and economic benefit.

  7. Monitoring results and analysis of thermal comfort conditions in experimental buildings for different heating systems and ventilation regimes during heating and cooling seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelis, S.; Jakovičs, A.; Ratnieks, J.; Bandeniece, L.

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the long-term monitoring of thermal comfort and discomfort parameters in five small test buildings equipped with different heating and cooling systems. Calculations of predicted percentage of dissatisfied people (PPD) index and discomfort factors are provided for the room in winter season running three different heating systems – electric heater, air-air heat pump and air-water heat pump, as well as for the summer cooling with split type air conditioning systems. It is shown that the type of heating/cooling system and its working regime has an important impact on thermal comfort conditions in observed room. Recommendations for the optimal operating regimes and choice of the heating system from the thermal comfort point of view are summarized.

  8. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, William J.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of outdoor air ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants to which occupants are exposed. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially older homes, weather-driven infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the total ventilation. As we seek to provide good indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to evaluate correctly the contribution infiltration makes to the total outdoor air ventilation rate. Because weather-driven infiltration is dependent on building air leakage and weather-induced pressure differences, a given amount of air leakage will provide different amounts of infiltration. Varying rates of infiltration will provide different levels of contaminant dilution and hence effective ventilation. This paper derives these interactions and then calculates the impact of weather-driven infiltration for different climates. A new “N-factor” is introduced to provide a convenient method for calculating the ventilation contribution of infiltration for over 1,000 locations across North America. The results of this work could be used in indoor air quality standards (specifically ASHRAE 62.2) to account for the contribution of weather-driven infiltration towards the dilution of indoor pollutants.

  9. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study Summarized Data - HVAC Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study Information on the characteristics of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system(s) in the entire BASE building including types of ventilation, equipment configurations, and operation and maintenance issues was acquired by examining the building plans, conducting a building walk-through, and speaking with the building owner, manager, and/or operator.

  10. Gender mainstreaming european transport research and policies. Building the knowledge base and mapping good practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer Christensen, H.; Poulsen, H.; Hjorth Oldrup, H.; Malthesen, T.; Hvidt Breengaard, M.; Holmen, M.

    2007-07-01

    This report documents that there are clear and persistent gender differences in travel patterns. Men consistently travel further than women, men are more likely to travel by car and women by public transport, and women's trips tend to be more local. Explanations to these differences are linked to unequal gendered relations in the household and labour market and urban structures as well as gender socialisation. This means that men and women make different uses of a shared system of transport. Transport is an overwhelmingly male-dominated sector. At the EU level, political committees in the transport sector as well as transport research and advisory boards have a marked gender imbalance with less than 15% female membership in most boards and none with equal representation. This also goes for transport-related committees at national levels. Yet with one notable exception: Sweden has a 50-50 balance in the National Transport Committee. Current gender mainstreaming initiatives in the transport sector relate to a wide range of issues: They relate to planning and policy, safety issues, gendering of technology as well as employment. The report substantiates that the implementation of equality programmes, and not their formulation makes up the biggest challenge. One programme does not solve all problems, but opens up new avenues for initiatives and intervention. Gender is a central stratifying factor in transport use at all levels. In order to provide a more complete picture of gender differences, and in order to qualify EU goals of combating multi-level inequalities, there is a need to link gender with the broader axes of inequalities, namely ethnicity, sexuality, age and handicap in future studies of transport and mobility. (au)

  11. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone-associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor-generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air-­exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

  12. Go with the Flow: Principles and examples of natural ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agtmaal, B.

    2011-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. With an increasing need for more sustainable buildings, natural ventilation presents us with a low-energy and low-cost solution. This manual inspires designers to apply natural ventilation, by offering

  13. Environmental building policy by the use of microalgae and decreasing of risks for Canadian oil sand sector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Armen B

    2017-09-01

    Environmental building recommendations aimed towards new environmental policies and management-changing decisions which as example demonstrated in consideration of the problems of Canadian oil sands operators. For the implementation of the circular economic strategy, we use an in-depth analysis of reported environmental after-consequence on all stages of the production process. The study addressed the promotion of innovative solutions for greenhouse gas emission, waste mitigation, and risk of falling in oil prices for operators of oil sands with creating market opportunities. They include the addition of microalgae biomass in tailings ponds for improvement of the microbial balance for the water speedily cleaning, recycling, and reusing with mitigation of GHG emissions. The use of food scraps for the nutrition of microalgae will reduce greenhouse gas emission minimally, on 0.33 MtCO2eq for Alberta and 2.63 MtCO2eq/year for Canada. Microalgae-derived biofuel can reduce this emission for Alberta on 11.9-17.9 MtCO2eq and for Canada on 71-106 MtCO2eq/year, and the manufacturing of other products will adsorb up to 135.6 MtCO2 and produce 99.2 MtO2. The development of the Live Conserve Industry and principal step from non-efficient protection of the environment to its cultivation in a large scale with mitigation of GHG emission and waste as well as generating of O2 and value-added products by the use of microalgae opens an important shift towards a new design and building of a biological system.

  14. Improving comfort and health with personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and air quality in buildings affects occupants¿ health, comfort and performance. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform room environment. However, large individual differences exist between occupants in regard...... microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfil the above requirements. This paper reviews...... existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analysed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  15. Building-Wide, Adaptive Energy Management Systems for High-Performance Buildings: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavala, Victor M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science

    2016-10-27

    Development and field demonstration of the minimum ratio policy for occupancy-driven, predictive control of outdoor air ventilation. Technology transfer of Argonne’s methods for occupancy estimation and forecasting and for M&V to BuildingIQ for their deployment. Selection of CO2 sensing as the currently best-available technology for occupancy-driven controls. Accelerated restart capability for the commercial BuildingIQ system using horizon shifting strategies applied to receding horizon optimal control problems. Empirical-based evidence of 30% chilled water energy savings and 22% total HVAC energy savings achievable with the BuildingIQ system operating in the APS Office Building on-site at Argonne.

  16. Natural Ventilation Driven by Wind and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when buildings are being ventilated. It can be controlled by openings in the building envelope, which open or close depending on the need of air inside the building. It can also be the simple action of just opening a door or a window to let the fresh...... air in. In both cases it is often necessary to have an idea of the amount of air coming through the window. Therefore, expressions for this prediction have been developed through the last decades. In cross-ventilation, the expressions are rather well defined and here the difficulty lies within...... the definition of the discharge coefficient that describes the characteristics of the opening, since it seems to fluctuate depending on the incidence angle of the wind. In single-sided ventilation where openings only exist in one side of the building, the flow through the opening is harder to predict. The main...

  17. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  18. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in cold climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    like the Northern Europe or in arctic climate like in Greenland or Alaska these ventilation systems will typically face problems with ice formation in the heat exchanger. When the warm humid room air comes in contact with the cold surfaces inside the exchanger (cooled by the outside air), the moisture......Building ventilation is necessary to achieve a healthy and comfortable indoor environment, but as energy prices continue to rise it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption. Using mechanical ventilation with heat recovery reduces the ventilation heat loss significantly, but in cold climates...

  19. Method to assess the performance of ventilation systems in dwellings considering the influence of uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Cauberg, J.J.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Normally, the design of a ventilation system in a dwelling is based on national regulations, related design rules, building tradition and general knowledge about healthy indoor air quality, ventilation and air handling units. In practice, the actual performance of ventilation systems is determined

  20. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  1. Improve train tunnel. A dynamical ventilation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phaff, J.C.; Gids, W.F. de

    1996-01-01

    Train tunnels and subways are an interesting field of ventilation. Trains move air through tunnels at rates of 600 m3/s (over 2 x 106 m3 per hour) which is much more than flow rates in buildings. Air pressures can vary up to some 3000 Pa leading to air velocities in the range of 10 to 50 m/s. This

  2. Implementation of ventilation in existing schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Petersen, Steffen

    ; they evaluate both scientific and practical implementation The analyses lead to a list of criteria associated with the implementation of ventilation in existing schools. Generic retrofitting scenarios which prioritize energy savings, indoor climate and building/facade integration are assembled and illustrated...

  3. Trends in Public Library Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Raymond M.

    1987-01-01

    Review of trends in public library buildings covers cycles in building activity; financial support; site selection; expansion, remodeling, or conversion of existing buildings; size of buildings; and such architectural concerns as flexible space, lighting, power, accommodation of computer systems, heat and ventilation, fire protection, security,…

  4. The State-of-the-Art for Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2016-01-01

    Ventilative cooling for buildings may lead to cooling energy savings and improvements in thermal comfort, especially in seasonally temperate and warm climates. But, codes and regulations need to better quantify its benefits.......Ventilative cooling for buildings may lead to cooling energy savings and improvements in thermal comfort, especially in seasonally temperate and warm climates. But, codes and regulations need to better quantify its benefits....

  5. An intervention to promote physical activity in Mexican elementary school students: building public policy to prevent noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo-Oteyza, Ernestina; Ancira-Moreno, Mónica; Rosel-Pech, Cecilia; Sánchez-Mendoza, María Teresa; Salinas-Martínez, Vicente; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is an important component of strategies for health promotion and prevention of noncommunicable diseases. It is also associated with decreased risk for cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese adults and children. This article addresses the initial description of a physical activity intervention for children attending public elementary schools in Mexico. The objective was to develop a replicable model based on a strategic public, private, academic, and social partnership that would have a short-term impact on the metabolic health of children and be useful for building effective public policy. Forty-nine schools (20 000 students) participated, and 5 schools were selected for evaluation. The intervention included a 30-minute supervised middle-effort interchangeable routine, 5 days a week for a complete school year, adapted for different school conditions and students of different ages. Evaluation included anthropometric measurements and biochemical markers. Actual prevalence of combined overweight and obesity in these children was 31.9%. The intervention was successfully implemented in all schools. No change in body mass index, waist circumference, or other anthropometric indicators was found. However, changes in biochemical markers showed a significant decrease in blood glucose, total cholesterol, and cholesterol-low-density lipoproteins, reflecting a positive effect on cardiovascular health indicators. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. RedVent. Turned off ventilation at night in schools - risks and opportunities; RedVent. Avstaengd ventilation paa natten i skolor - risker och moejligheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegerhed Engman, Linda; Fyhr, Kristina; Langer, Sarka; Ruud, Svein; Ylmen, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Reduced ventilation rates or shutdown ventilation during nights is often being used in school buildings in order to save energy and can decrease the energy cost for heating and ventilation with at least 30 %. Swedish Building Regulations (BBR) allows reduced ventilation flow in non-residential buildings when no one is using the building but it must not give rise to adverse health effects or damage the building or its installations. Potential risks are mould- and moisture damages and indoor air quality problems. Another question is whether the shut down itself might lead to indoor air quality problems due to chemical reactions between outdoor air and indoor emissions built-up during the night. The study was divided into three steps; an interview with property managers and care-taker, calculations of energy saving potentials and a field study. Measurements were per-formed in one classroom for two weeks in April 2010. Different set-ups for ventilation flow during night time and air tightness of the building envelope were studied; ventilation shut down, intermittent ventilation (15 min every second hour) and continuous full speed ventilation during night. In the studied classroom, shutdown ventilation during nights did not significantly affect the indoor air quality in the classroom during the school day even though there were effects seen during the night. We found a somewhat higher moisture accumulation those nights when the ventilation was shut down and some fractions of particles during intermittent ventilation compared to continues full ventilation during night time. This specific school and classroom were well ventilated and there was no moisture supply from new building material or other types of moisture producing activities. Schools with lower day-time ventilation rates, moisture in building construction, IAQ- or dampness problems as well as buildings close to heavy traffic should analyse the conditions for the specific building before reducing ventilation to

  7. Noxious gases in rabbit housing systems: effects of cross and longitudinal ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco da Borso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal welfare is a matter of increasing interest due to ethical and economical worries regarding animal rights and the sustainability of meat production. Ammonia, carbon dioxide, and methane can be produced in the livestock buildings and, if not adequately controlled by ventilation, can be dangerous for animals and farmers. The aim of the present paper is to study the effects of different ventilation systems in rabbit buildings based on the temporal patterns and the spatial distribution of these noxious gases. The experimental measurements were conducted in two rabbit farms with genetically homogeneous animals subjected to the same diet. Two buildings with different forced ventilation layouts (cross ventilation - building A and longitudinal ventilation - building B were subjected to the monitoring of indoor environmental conditions (temperature, relative humidity, ammonia, carbon dioxide, methane over a whole year. In both the buildings, ventilation was adjusted automatically by means of electronic control units, which were controlled by temperature sensors, located at the centre of the buildings. Gas concentrations inside the buildings followed clearly defined sinusoidal patterns on a daily basis with the highest values reached in winter during the morning hours for ammonia and during the night hours for carbon dioxide and methane. In particular, ammonia revealed a maximum concentration of 30.7 mg m–3 in building A (cross ventilation and 12.9 mg m–3 in building B (longitudinal ventilation, whereas the minimum values were 6.0 and 4.2 mg m–3, in building A and B, respectively. As a consequence, daily mean concentrations of noxious gases, solely could not be considered representative of the actual conditions of air quality in the buildings. The airflow direction clearly influenced the spatial concentration of ammonia, which showed different patterns in the two buildings. In building A, the highest ammonia concentration was in a diffuse

  8. Performance of personalized ventilation combined with chilled ceiling in an office room: inhaled air quality and contaminant distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipczynska, Aleksandra; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    In a simulated two persons’ office room inhaled air quality and contaminant distribution provided with personalized ventilation combined with chilled ceiling, mixing ventilation only, chilled ceiling with mixing ventilation and chilled ceiling with mixing and personalized ventilation was studied...... people (exhaled air, bioeffluents) and building materials (wall painting). Personalized ventilation combined with chilled ceiling ensured highest air quality at the workstation under all conditions. Pollutant concentration in the occupied zone away from the workstations did not differ substantially...... between the tested systems. Chilled ceiling combined with personalized ventilation working as the only air supplying system may be optimal solution in many buildings....

  9. Environmental Noise Exposure On Occupants In Naturally Ventilated Open-Plan Offices Case Of Selected Offices In Kumasi Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koranteng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of buildings in public educational institutions in Ghana predominantly adopts open-plan offices that are naturally ventilated with the aid of operable windows for reasons such as achieving adaptable spaces improved social climate and effective ventilation. However adoption of open-plan naturally ventilated offices in these educational institutions expose occupants to noise that emanates indoors and from outdoor sources which can interfere with and impede work performance. The study aimed at assessing noise exposure levels and occupants satisfaction with noise level in selected naturally ventilated open-plan offices in Ghana. The study employed an empirical assessment of the noise levels in and around three of the office buildings using a PCE222 Digital Sound Level Meter and a survey involving interviews to assess workers satisfaction of noise levels of the open-plan offices at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi. The results show that mean outdoor noise levels for offices ranged from 11 per cent below to 5 per cent above the WHO permissible limits while mean indoor noise levels exceeded the limit by between 20-40 per cent during the course of the day. In spite of the high levels of noise occupants generally considered the overall noise level in their offices as acceptable. Likewise the results indicate that there are no significant differences in occupants exposure to noise from their various sitting positions in an office space and floor levels in an office building. The paper recommends strategies to manage and improve ambient noise quality within naturally ventilated open-plan office spaces in Ghana. The study will be of relevance as a useful guide to organizations and policy makers concerned with built environmental issues.

  10. Mechanical ventilation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirli, Tanil; Kavaz, Asli; Yalaki, Zahide; Oztürk Hişmi, Burcu; Derelli, Emel; Ince, Erdal

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can be lifesaving, but > 50% of complications in conditions that require intensive care are related to ventilatory support, particularly if it is prolonged. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients who had mechanical ventilation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during a follow-up period between January 2002-May 2005. Medical records of 407 patients were reviewed. Ninety-one patients (22.3%) were treated with mechanical ventilation. Ages of all patients were between 1-180 (median: 8) months. The mechanical ventilation time was 18.8 +/- 14.1 days. Indication of mechanical ventilation could be divided into four groups as respiratory failure (64.8%), cardiovascular failure (19.7%), central nervous system disease (9.8%) and safety airway (5.4%). Tracheostomy was performed in four patients. The complication ratio of mechanically ventilated children was 42.8%, and diversity of complications was as follows: 26.3% atelectasia, 17.5% ventilator-associated pneumonia, 13.1% pneumothorax, 5.4% bleeding, 4.3% tracheal edema, and 2.1% chronic lung disease. The mortality rate of mechanically ventilated patients was 58.3%, but the overall mortality rate in the PICU was 12.2%. In conclusion, there are few published epidemiological data on the follow-up results and mortality in infants and children who are mechanically ventilated.

  11. Natural Ventilation in Atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Heiselberg, Per; Hendriksen, Ole Juhl

    This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions.......This case study comprises a monitoring programme as well as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a natural ventilated atrium. The purpose has been to analyse the performance of a typical natural ventilation system in Denmark under both summer and winter conditions....

  12. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, Daniel [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  13. Thermoregulation and ventilation of termite mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Some of the most sophisticated of all animal-built structures are the mounds of African termites of the subfamily Macrotermitinae, the fungus-growing termites. They have long been studied as fascinating textbook examples of thermoregulation or ventilation of animal buildings. However, little research has been designed to provide critical tests of these paradigms, derived from a very small number of original papers. Here I review results from recent studies on Macrotermes bellicosus that considered the interdependence of ambient temperature, thermoregulation, ventilation and mound architecture, and that question some of the fundamental paradigms of termite mounds. M. bellicosus achieves thermal homeostasis within the mound, but ambient temperature has an influence too. In colonies in comparably cool habitats, mound architecture is adapted to reduce the loss of metabolically produced heat to the environment. While this has no negative consequences in small colonies, it produces a trade-off with gas exchange in large colonies, resulting in suboptimally low nest temperatures and increased CO2 concentrations. Along with the alteration in mound architecture, the gas exchange/ventilation mechanism also changes. While mounds in the thermally appropriate savannah have a very efficient circular ventilation during the day, the ventilation in the cooler forest is a less efficient upward movement of air, with gas exchange restricted by reduced surface exchange area. These results, together with other recent findings, question entrenched ideas such as the thermosiphon-ventilation mechanism or the assumption that mounds function to dissipate internally produced heat. Models trying to explain the proximate mechanisms of mound building, or building elements, are discussed.

  14. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Eric [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the Building Ameerica program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this report is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  15. Numerical estimation of natural ventilation of cubical urban arrays with different packing density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhaimi Saidatul Sharin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an urban environment where buildings are closely packed, natural ventilation performance is undesirably disturbed by the effect of surrounding buildings. Cross-ventilation refers to the regulation of air within a building, which is essential in providing good air quality and thermal comfort for the occupants. Thus, this study focuses on the impact of packing density on ventilation rate of cross-ventilated buildings. The numerical estimation is performed by means of computational fluid dynamic (CFD using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS with RNG k – ε (RNG turbulence model. Three configurations of simplified generic cubes which are regularly aligned with packing density of 25%, 35%, and 50% were considered. Velocity distribution around and inside the buildings as well as the ventilation rate are analysed. The case with packing density of 25% exhibits a reduction of 90% in the ventilation rate compared to the isolated case and continues to decrease as the packing density increase up to 35%. However, further increase of packing density up to 50%, slightly increases the ventilation rate. Hence, the result of this study imposed that surrounding buildings have a substantial influence on ventilation performance of cross-ventilated buildings.

  16. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  17. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control. Demonstration project with 49 apartments in Soenderborg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The aim of the project is to demonstrate how the overall energy consumption in apartment buildings can be reduced through a combination of: 1) Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control; 2) Energy efficient design of the building shell including passive solar and seasonally flexible sunspaces; 3) Use of low temperature heating system. The 3 blocks in the project, each with 16 apartments, are furnished with 3 different ventilation systems: 1) Standard exhaust system according to building codes; 2) Ventilation system with humidity control. Each room is furnished with an air inlet valve controlled by a processor, which monitors the humidity; 3) Standard ventilation system with heat recovery. (au)

  19. Forest Science and forest policy in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East: Building Bridges to a sustainable future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Guldin; Niels Elers Koch; John A. Parrotta; Christian Gamborg; Bo J. Thorsen

    2004-01-01

    Making forest policies that help bridge from the current situation to a sustainable future requires sound scientific information. Too often, scientific information is available, yet policy makers do not use it. At a workshop in Denmark, attendees reviewed case studies where forest science influenced forest policies and identified six major reasons for success. Three...

  20. From green buildings to green supply chains:an integrated input-output life cycle assessment and optimization framework for carbon footprint reduction policy making

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdul Ghani, N. Muhammad Aslaam; Eğilmez, Gökhan; Küçükvar, Murat; S. Bhutta, M. Khurrum

    2017-01-01

    Purpose–ThepurposeofthispaperistofocusontracingGHGemissionsacrossthesupplychainindustries associated with the US residential, commercial and industrial building stock and provides optimized GHG reduction policy plans for sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach – A two-step hierarchical approach is developed. First, Economic Input-Output-based Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) is utilized to quantify the GHG emissions associated with the US residential, commercial and industrial bui...

  1. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Convective Heat Transfer during Night Cooling with Different Ventilation Systems and Surface Emissivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    Night-time ventilation is a promising approach to reduce the energy needed for cooling buildings without reducing thermal comfort. Nevertheless actual building simulation tools have showed their limits in predicting accurately the efficiency of night-time ventilation, mainly due to inappropriate ...

  3. Reducing the ingress of urban noise through natural ventilation openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, D J; de Salis, M H; Sharples, S

    2004-01-01

    For buildings in busy urban areas affected by high levels of road traffic noise the potential to use natural ventilation can be limited by excessive noise entering through ventilation openings. This paper is concerned with techniques to reduce noise ingress into naturally ventilated buildings while minimizing airflow path resistance. A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the interaction of airflow and sound transmission through ventilators for natural ventilation applications is described. A key element of the investigation has been the development of testing facilities capable of measuring the airflow and sound transmission losses for a range of ventilation noise control strategies. It is demonstrated that a combination of sound reduction mechanisms -- one covering low frequency sound and another covering high frequency sound -- is required to attenuate effectively noise from typical urban sources. A method is proposed for quantifying the acoustic performance of different strategies to enable comparisons and informed decisions to be made leading to the possibility of a design methodology for optimizing the ventilation and acoustic performance of different strategies. The need for employing techniques for combating low frequency sound in tandem with techniques for reducing high frequency sound in reducing the ingress of noise from urban sources such as road traffic to acceptable levels is demonstrated. A technique is proposed for enabling the acoustic and airflow performance of apertures for natural ventilation systems to be designed simultaneously.

  4. Existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    their homes. These policy measures include building regulations, energy tax and different types of incentives and information dissemination. The conclusion calls for new and innovative policy measures to cope with the realities of renovations of owner-occupied houses and how energy efficiency improvement...

  5. Ventilator waveform interpretation in mechanically ventilated small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Terry M; Aumann, Marcel

    2011-10-01

    To review the topic of ventilator waveforms analysis with emphasis on interpretation of ventilator waveforms and their use in the management and monitoring of mechanically ventilated small animal patients. Human clinical studies, scientific reviews, and textbooks, as well as veterinary textbooks and clinical examples of ventilator waveforms in mechanically ventilated dogs. Ventilator waveforms are graphic representations of data collected from the ventilator and reflect patient-ventilator interactions. The 4 parameters pressure, volume, flow, and time are most descriptive of mechanical ventilation. Typically, 3 different graphs, also referred to as scalars, consisting of pressure versus time, volume versus time, and flow versus time, with time always plotted on the x-axis, are used. Changes in the ventilator settings as well as in the characteristics of the lungs such as airway resistance (R(aw)) and respiratory system compliance (C(rs)) can be recognized from specific variations in the waveforms. Flow-volume and pressure-volume loops provide additional information about changes in lung function. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony is a common problem during mechanical ventilation and can lead to patient discomfort and an increased work of breathing. Ventilator waveforms are helpful to identify dyssynchrony, which can be divided into trigger, flow, cycle, and expiratory dyssynchrony. Ventilator waveforms allow the clinician to assess changes in respiratory mechanics, and can be useful in monitoring the progression of disease pathology and response to therapy. Adjustments in ventilator settings based on proper analysis and interpretation of these waveforms can help the clinician to optimize ventilation therapy. Ventilator waveforms are graphic representations of patient-ventilator interactions. Proper interpretation of ventilator waveforms affords the critical care clinician a better understanding of the patient's respiratory function, response to therapy, and causes

  6. The Role of Science in Advising the Decision Making Process: A Pathway for Building Effective Climate Change Mitigation Policies in Mexico at the Local Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Roberto; Velazquez-Angulo, Gilberto; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Romero-González, Jaime; Huertas-Cardozo, José Ignacio

    2016-04-27

    This study examines a pathway for building urban climate change mitigation policies by presenting a multi-dimensional and transdisciplinary approach in which technical, economic, environmental, social, and political dimensions interact. Now, more than ever, the gap between science and policymaking needs to be bridged; this will enable judicious choices to be made in regarding energy and climate change mitigation strategies, leading to positive social impacts, in particular for the populations at-risk at the local level. Through a case study in Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, we propose a multidimensional and transdisciplinary approach with the role of scientist as policy advisers to improve the role of science in decision-making on mitigation policies at the local level in Mexico.

  7. The Role of Science in Advising the Decision Making Process: A Pathway for Building Effective Climate Change Mitigation Policies in Mexico at the Local Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Barraza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a pathway for building urban climate change mitigation policies by presenting a multi-dimensional and transdisciplinary approach in which technical, economic, environmental, social, and political dimensions interact. Now, more than ever, the gap between science and policymaking needs to be bridged; this will enable judicious choices to be made in regarding energy and climate change mitigation strategies, leading to positive social impacts, in particular for the populations at-risk at the local level. Through a case study in Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, we propose a multidimensional and transdisciplinary approach with the role of scientist as policy advisers to improve the role of science in decision-making on mitigation policies at the local level in Mexico.

  8. Energy Analysis of the Ductless Personalized Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lelong, Cyril; Dalewski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of different occupancy profiles on the potential energy savings due to using ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) combined with displacement ventilation. Energy simulations were performed with the dynamic simulation software IDA-ICE in order to investigate optimal...... energy efficient strategies for implantation of DPV in practice. The impact of using DPV on annual energy use has been studied for different occupancy profiles in cold climates. The results suggest that using DPV combined with displacement ventilation may significantly reduce building energy use while...... providing good air quality and thermal comfort for the occupants. Matching DPV use with occupants’ presence at their workplaces may allow reducing the energy use of DPV significantly....

  9. Performance of displacement ventilation in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naidenov, K.; Pitchurov, G.; Langkilde, Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of a field study in offices with displacement ventilation. It comprises detailed physical measurements of the thermal environment and collection of occupants´ response at 227 workplaces. The results, both physical measurements and human response, identified draught...... as the major local discomfort in the rooms with displacement ventilation. Twenty-three percent of the occupants were daily bothered by draught. In some buildings the maintenance personnel tried to improve occupants´ thermal comfort by raising the supply air temperature or office workers themselves blocked...... the diffusers by rearranging the furniture. Half of the surveyed occupants were not satisfied with the indoor air quality. The main conclusion is that displacement ventilation needs careful design and room furnishing in order to ensure a comfortable environment. Occupants must understand the underlying...

  10. Energy efficiency buildings program, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A separate abstract was prepared on research progress in each group at LBL in the energy efficient buildings program. Two separate abstracts were prepared for the Windows and Lighting Program. Abstracts prepared on other programs are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program; DOE-21 Building Energy Analysis; and Building Energy Data Compilation, Analysis, and Demonstration. (MCW)

  11. Non-Compliance with Building Energy Regulations: The Profile, Issues, and Implications on Practice and Policy in England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Garmston; Wei Pan

    2013-01-01

    The built environment consumes as much as 50% of many countries’ primary energy resources. Building energy regulations aim to reduce building energy consumption. However, non-compliance risks efficacy of such regulations and monetary costs to the construction industry and consumers. This paper examines the profile, issues and implications of non-compliance internationally with a focus on the case of new-build dwellings in England and Wales. Non-compliance has been observed internationally in ...

  12. Mechanical Ventilation Antioxidant Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kimberly P; Clochesy, John M; Goldstein, Lawrence S; Owen, Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Many patients each year require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Inflammatory processes may prevent successful weaning, and evidence indicates that mechanical ventilation induces oxidative stress in the diaphragm, resulting in atrophy and contractile dysfunction of diaphragmatic myofibers. Antioxidant supplementation might mitigate the harmful effects of the oxidative stress induced by mechanical ventilation. To test the clinical effectiveness of antioxidant supplementation in reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation. A randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled double-blind design was used to test whether enterally administered antioxidant supplementation would decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation, all-cause mortality, and length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital. Patients received vitamin C 1000 mg plus vitamin E 1000 IU, vitamin C 1000 mg plus vitamin E 1000 IU plus N-acetylcysteine 400 mg, or placebo solution as a bolus injection via their enteral feeding tube every 8 hours. Clinical and statistically significant differences in duration of mechanical ventilation were seen among the 3 groups (Mantel-Cox log rank statistic = 5.69, df = 1, P = .017). The 3 groups did not differ significantly in all-cause mortality during hospitalization or in the length of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. Enteral administration of antioxidants is a simple, safe, inexpensive, and effective intervention that decreases the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Chaos in Ocean Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Marshall, D. P.; Johnson, H. L.; Lique, C.; Thomas, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Ventilation of the subtropical ocean is important for setting the ocean stratification, the oceanic cycling of biogeochemical elements and the storage of carbon dioxide and heat on inter-annual to decadal timescales. In the textbook view, subtropical ocean ventilation is achieved through advection by the time-mean gyre circulation, with fluid parcels moving along sloping density surfaces into the ocean interior. At the same time, it is well accepted that the ocean circulation is highly nonlinear, with the kinetic energy budget dominated by mesoscale eddies. Consequently, ventilated fluid parcels, rather than remaining coherent as they move into the ocean interior, will be rapidly strained and stirred into surrounding water. To investigate the role of this nonlinear circulation in the ventilation process, we calculate a non-dimensional `filamentation number' - the ratio of the Lagrangian ventilation timescale and the timescale of strain by the nonlinear flow - across two density surfaces in the subtropical North Atlantic in an ocean circulation model. This number predicts the filament width of a ventilated fluid parcel, and is found to be large across both density surfaces (indicating small filament width), particularly on the deeper surface. A Lagrangian mapping from distributions of particles to the year in which they were ventilated is thus shown to be highly chaotic, with particles located side-by-side having been ventilated decades apart, even where the density surface is close to the ocean surface. This novel Lagrangian approach avoids the loss of information through diffusion, and emphasises the importance of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of the subtropical ocean.

  14. An approach to building the case for nutrition policies to limit trans-fat intake - a Singapore case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L

    2011-05-01

    At present, Singapore health authorities are deliberating nutrition labeling and regulations to reduce trans-fat in the food supply. This paper reviews the case for enacting nutrition policies to reduce population trans-fat intake in Singapore. It further proposes a decision-making framework that may inform other jurisdictions in assessing the merits of nutrition policies. REVIEW FRAMEWORK: This case study reviews the necessity of interventions to reduce trans-fat intake, appropriateness of a policy-based approach, and feasibility of trans-fat policies in the Singapore context. Evidence is drawn from national health reports, measures of stakeholder support, resources for implementing these policies, and results from international precedents. The burden of cardiovascular disease and excessive intake of trans-fat in the adult population warrant consideration of interventions to reduce excessive trans-fat intake. Labeling of trans-fat content and regulating usage of trans-fat in the food supply may be effective and feasible in the Singapore context. Stakeholder support for these policies was present from members of the public and health agencies. Policy approaches to reduce trans-fat intake and cardiovascular disease risk in Singapore should be considered. The proposed nutrition policy decision framework may guide health agencies in assessing the appropriateness of trans-fat or other nutrition policies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sick building syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tjandra Y. Aditama; Sita L. Andarini

    2002-01-01

    Sick building syndrome describes a number of mostly unspesific complaints of some occupants of the building. The exact pathophysiological mechanism remains elusive. It is a multi factorial event which may include physical, chemical, biological as well as psycological factors. In many cases it is due to insufficient maintenance of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) system in the building. Sign and symptoms can be uncomfortable and even disabling, which may include mucus membrane...

  16. Evaluation Tool of Climate Potential for Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belleri, Annamaria; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2015-01-01

    . Within IEA Annex 62 project, national experts are working on the development of a climate evaluation tool, which aims at assessing the potential of ventilative cooling by taking into account also building envelope thermal properties, internal gains and ventilation needs. The analysis is based on a single......The new initiatives and regulations towards nearly zero energy buildings forces designers to exploit the cooling potential of the climate to reduce the overheating occurrence and to improve thermal comfort indoors. Climate analysis is particularly useful at early design stages to support decision...... making towards cost-effective passive cooling solution e.g. ventilative cooling. As buildings with different use patterns, envelope characteristics and internal loads level do not follow equally the external climate condition, the climate analysis cannot abstract from building characteristics and use...

  17. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  18. Energy efficient demand controlled ventilation in single family houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Drivsholm, Christian

    2010-01-01

    in the Danish building regulations and the low flow rate is based on minimum requirements in indoor air quality standards. Measurements were performed on an existing single family house where the controls were installed on the existing mechanical ventilation system. The results showed that the ventilation can......This paper presents a strategy for a simple demand controlled ventilation system for single family houses where all sensors and controls are located in the air handling unit. The strategy is based on sensing CO2-concentration and moisture content in the outdoor air and exhaust air. The CO2......-concentration is used to ensure adequate ventilation during occupancy and the moisture content is used to ensure adequate removal of moisture produced in the house. The ventilation rate can be switched between two flow rates: a high rate and a low rate. The high flow rate is based on existing requirements...

  19. Why We Ventilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  20. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    As a novel air distribution system, diffuse ceiling ventilation combines the suspended acoustic ceiling with ventilation supply. Due to the low-impulse supply from the large ceiling area, the system does not generate draught when supplying cold air. However, heat sources play an important role on...... temperature as well as optimizing the radiant cooling potential by combining with thermal mass is conducted and gives a direction for further investigation....

  1. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  2. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  3. A RESEARCH ON VENTILATION EFFICIENCY OF PIPED VENTILATION SYSTEMS IN GEOTHERMALLY HEATED GREENHOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Örüng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse play significant roles in human nutrition. Vegetable and fruit consumption at certain amounts is the basic pre-condition for a well nutrition. It is possible to produce sufficient quantities of fruits and vegetables in places with available climate conditions. However, fruits and vegetables should be grown in special buildings to have a year-long production in places without available climate conditions. These places include under-cover production facilities, greenhouses, low and high tunnel facilities. Environmental conditions are adjusted are adjusted in greenhouses as to provide proper conditions for plant growth and development. Ventilation is used to remove excess heat, moisture and carbon dioxide from the greenhouses. Either natural or mechanical ventilation is used in greenhouses. Mechanical ventilation systems have various advantages over natural systems. However, mostly natural ventilation systems are preferred because of their low installation and operational costs. Both systems operates based on negative pressure. Air exchange rates are usually low in winters and it is quite hard to evenly distribute cold fresh air within the greenhouse. Air inlets are usually placed over side walls and outlets are commonly placed along the ridge. In this study an alternative natural ventilation system was proposed for more efficient ventilation of the greenhouses. In this system, fresh air gets into the greenhouse through ventilation pipes installed beneath the greenhouse floor. The incoming fresh air also heated with geothermal hot water lines, thus direct contact of cold fresh air is prevented. The design and efficiency of piped ventilation systems were provided in this paper.

  4. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas.

  5. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2001-02-07

    This paper provides a review and synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms. Prevalences were typically higher by approximately 30% to 200% in the air conditioned buildings. In two of three assessments from a single study, symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. In approximately half of assessments, SBS symptom prevalences were significantly higher in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation than in buildings with natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building related confounders. The reasons for the increases in symptom prevalences with mechanical ventilation and particularly with air conditioning remain unclear. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences.

  6. Monitoring and Simulation of Mechanically Ventilated Underground Car Parks

    OpenAIRE

    Eshack, Adil; D.G., Leo Samuel; S.M., Shiva Nagendra; Maiya, M. Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Rapid motorization in developed and developing countries demands more parking spaces in urban areas. Underground car parking space in multi story buildings offers viable solution. However, lack of natural ventilation accumulates the harmful emissions from cars, operating in underground car parks. Exposure to these hazardous pollutants causes health risk to the users. Therefore, proper mechanical ventilation system should be adopted for the removal of harmful pollutants. This paper discusses t...

  7. Ökompakt 50 - ventilator with heat regenerate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Hölter

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presents ventilator with heat regenerate. The apparaturs are manufactured by f. Hölter, GmbH, and it patent schould. The quality aur in interier is on line relation to different alergical disease (Sick Building Syndrom - SBS.Ventilator with heat regenerate have result in improved of interiors air quality in whick a man dwelled more as 90 % of life.

  8. On analysis of operating efficiency of autonomous ventilation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostuganov Arman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the causes and consequences of malfunctioning of natural and mechanical ventilation systems in civil buildings of Russia. Furthermore it gives their classification and analysis based on the literature review. On the basis of the analysis technical solutions for improving the efficiency of ventilation systems in civil buildings are summarized and the field of their application is specified. Among the offered technical solutions the use of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery is highlighted as one of the most promising and understudied. Besides it has a wide range of applications. The paper reviews and analyzes the main Russian and foreign designs of ventilation systems with heat recovery that are mostly used in practice. Three types of such systems: UVRK-50, Prana-150, ТеFо are chosen for consideration. The sequence of field tests of selected autonomous ventilation systems have been carried out in order to determine the actual air exchange and efficiency of heat recovery. The paper presents the processed results of the research on the basis of which advantages and disadvantages of the tested ventilation systems are identified and recommendations for engineering and manufacturing of new design models of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery are formulated.

  9. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  10. Passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    In building design the requirements for energy consumption for ventilation, heating and cooling and the requirements for increasingly better indoor climate are two opposing factors. This paper presents the schematic layout and simulation results of an innovative multifunc-tional ventilation concept...... with little energy consumption and with satisfying indoor climate. The concept is based on using passive measures like stack and wind driven ventilation, effective night cooling and low pressure loss heat recovery using two fluid coupled water-to-air heat exchangers developed at the Technical University...

  11. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Cold Conditions Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the energy performance of natural ventilation as a passive cooling method of buildings within houses located in temperate countries using Denmark as a case study. The method consists in running simulations with a thermal-airflow program of a household...... the simulations are validated with measured data, and by applying a new assessment method presented in this article as the cooling rate due to natural ventilation instead of a constant mechanical ventilation rate in the thermal balance within the dwelling, the energy saving is calculated. Results show...

  12. Analysis of the systems of ventilation of residential houses of Ukraine and Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Olena; Zhelykh, Vasyl; Voll, Hendrik

    2017-12-01

    The most common ventilation system in residential buildings in Ukraine is natural ventilation. In recent years, due to increased tightness of structures, an increase in the content of synthetic finishing materials in them, the quality of microclimate parameters deteriorated. One of the measures to improve the parameters of indoor air in residential buildings is the use of mechanical inflow and exhaust ventilation system. In this article the regulatory documents concerning the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine and Estonia and the requirements for air exchange in residential buildings are considered. It is established that the existing normative documents in Ukraine are analogous to European norms, which allow design the system of ventilation of residential buildings according to European standards. However, the basis for the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine is the national standards, in which mechanical ventilation, unfortunately, is provided only for the design of high-rise buildings. To maintain acceptable microclimate parameters in residential buildings, it is advisable for designers to apply the requirements for designing ventilation systems in accordance with European standards.

  13. To build a bridge: the use of foreign models by domestic critics of U.S. drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, G M

    1991-01-01

    Domestic critics of American policy concerning illicit drugs have frequently looked abroad for evidence to bolster their agenda. Policies developed elsewhere, specifically heroin maintenance in Britain and harm reduction in Holland, have profoundly affected debate over the American approach to addiction. In each instance, the interest in foreign models was whetted by a perceived social emergency: the heroin epidemic following World War II and the HIV epidemic of the last decade.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Ventilation Efficiency in a Dentistry Surgical Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladokun Majeed Olaide

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a response to the need to provide an acceptable thermal comfort and air quality in indoor environments, various ventilation performance indicators were developed over the years. These metrics are mainly geared towards air distribution, heat and pollutant removals. Evidence exists of influencing factors on these indicators as centered on ventilation design and operations. Unlike other indoor environments, health care environment requires better performance of ventilation system to prevent an incidence of nosocomial and other hospital acquired illnesses. This study investigates, using in-situ experiments, the ventilation efficiency in a dentistry surgical room. Thermal and hygric parameters were monitored on the air terminal devices and occupied zone over a period of one week covering both occupied and unoccupied hours. The resulting time-series parameters were used to evaluate the room’s ventilation effectiveness. Also, the obtained parameters were benchmarked against ASHRAE 170 (2013 and MS1525 (2014 requirements for ventilation in health care environment and building energy efficiency respectively. The results show that the mean daily operative conditions failed to satisfy the provisions of both standards. Regarding effectiveness, the findings reveal that the surgical room ventilation is ineffective with ventilation efficiency values ranging between 0 and 0.5 indicating air distribution short-circuiting. These results suggest further investigations, through numerical simulation, on the effect of this short-circuiting on thermal comfort, infection risk assessments and possible design improvements, an endeavour that forms our next line of research inquiries.

  15. 76 FR 43298 - Building Energy Standards Program: Preliminary Determination Regarding Energy Efficiency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    .... 40 ap 6. Heating, Includes demand Major + (reduces Ventilating, and Air controlled ventilation energy... Ventilating, and Air demand controlled automatic zone reset Conditioning. ventilation to in multizone include... lighting and power requirements, and the building mechanical equipment requirements. The emphasis of DOE's...

  16. Triggering of the ventilator in patient-ventilator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Catherine Sh

    2011-01-01

    With current ventilator triggering design, in initiating ventilator breaths patient effort is only a small fraction of the total effort expended to overcome the inspiratory load. Similarly, advances in ventilator pressure or flow delivery and inspiratory flow termination improve patient effort or inspiratory muscle work during mechanical ventilation. Yet refinements in ventilator design do not necessarily allow optimal patient-ventilator interactions, as the clinician is key in managing patient factors and selecting appropriate ventilator factors to maintain patient-ventilator synchrony. In patient-ventilator interactions, unmatched patient flow demand by ventilator flow delivery results in flow asynchrony, whereas mismatches between mechanical inspiratory time (mechanical T(I)) and neural T(I) produce timing asynchrony. Wasted efforts are an example of timing asynchrony. In the triggering phase, trigger thresholds that are set too high or the type of triggering methods induces wasted efforts. Wasted efforts can be aggravated by respiratory muscle weakness or other conditions that reduce respiratory drive. In the post-triggering phase, ventilator factors play an important role in patient-ventilator interaction; this role includes the assistance level, set inspiratory flow rate, T(I), pressurization rate, and cycling-off threshold, and to some extent, applied PEEP. This paper proposes an algorithm that clinicians can use to adjust ventilator settings with the goal to eliminate or reduce patients' wasted efforts.

  17. Ventilation rates in recently constructed U.S. school classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterman, S; Su, F-C; Wald, A; Watkins, F; Godwin, C; Thun, G

    2017-09-01

    Low ventilation rates (VRs) in schools have been associated with absenteeism, poorer academic performance, and teacher dissatisfaction. We measured VRs in 37 recently constructed or renovated and mechanically ventilated U.S. schools, including LEED and EnergyStar-certified buildings, using CO2 and the steady-state, build-up, decay, and transient mass balance methods. The transient mass balance method better matched conditions (specifically, changes in occupancy) and minimized biases seen in the other methods. During the school day, air change rates (ACRs) averaged 2.0±1.3 hour(-1) , and only 22% of classrooms met recommended minimum ventilation rates. HVAC systems were shut off at the school day close, and ACRs dropped to 0.21±0.19 hour(-1) . VRs did not differ by building type, although cost-cutting and comfort measures resulted in low VRs and potentially impaired IAQ. VRs were lower in schools that used unit ventilators or radiant heating, in smaller schools and in larger classrooms. The steady-state, build-up, and decay methods had significant limitations and biases, showing the need to confirm that these methods are appropriate. Findings highlight the need to increase VRs and to ensure that energy saving and comfort measures do not compromise ventilation and IAQ. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  19. Public Participation in Water Planning in the Ebro River Basin (Spain and Tucson Basin (U.S., Arizona: Impact on Water Policy and Adaptive Capacity Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ballester

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of public participation in water management are recognized by governments, scholars, and stakeholders. These benefits, however, do not result from all engagement endeavors. This leads to the question: What are the determinants for effective public participation? Given a list of criteria for achieving the transformational capacity of participation, we analyze the benefits (including the influence on public policies gained through public participation and the determinant factors for obtaining these benefits in the Ebro River Basin in Spain and in the Tucson Basin in Arizona (U.S.. Furthermore, and considering that droughts and floods are major water management challenges in both case studies, we focus on the potential of participation to build adaptive capacity. Our analysis of these case studies concludes that influence on public policies is determined more by the context of the participatory process, i.e., legal framework, political leadership, and social awareness, whereas influence on adaptive capacity building depends more on the characteristics of the participatory process, particularly the existence of active on-site consultation and deliberation.

  20. Mechanical ventilation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszler, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Although only a small proportion of full term and late preterm infants require invasive respiratory support, they are not immune from ventilator-associated lung injury. The process of lung damage from mechanical ventilation is multifactorial and cannot be linked to any single variable. Atelectrauma and volutrauma have been identified as the most important and potentially preventable elements of lung injury. Respiratory support strategies for full term and late preterm infants have not been as thoroughly studied as those for preterm infants; consequently, a strong evidence base on which to make recommendations is lacking. The choice of modalities of support and ventilation strategies should be guided by the specific underlying pathophysiologic considerations and the ventilatory approach must be individualized for each patient based on the predominant pathophysiology at the time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  2. Solar assisted ventilation tower, Frederiksberg[Denmark]; Ventilationsanlaeggenes betydning for ejendommens varmeforbrug. Delrapport 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    The project has demonstrated a building integrated ventilation system with the ducts system installed outside the facade. The air ducts are installed in a solar tower parallel to the staircases in the courtyard. The towers utilise the solar energy for preheating the ventilation air. An air handling unit with counterflow heat exchanger is installed in the roof space. The system is designed for old building block, which are going to be renovated with mechanical ventilation. The system saves room space for the installations of the ventilation ducts. The monitoring of the system performance shows energy saving of 40% caused by new windows, individual heat meters and ventilation with heat recovery and solar tower. The system efficiency of the solar tower is high compared with other traditional solar wall constructions. The ventilation system is designed with a very low electricity consumption of the fans. The monitored electricity consumption is 22 W per dwellings. (au)

  3. Partnering with K-12 Education in Building Healthy, Sustainable, and Competitive Regions: A California Policy Symposium. Proceedings Summary & Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jeff; McKoy, Deborah; Alex, Ken; Mitchell, Connie; Moore, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    On December 6, 2012, UC Berkeley's Center for Cities & Schools, in collaboration with the California Department of Education, California Department of Public Health, Governor's Office of Planning and Research, Strategic Growth Council, and Health in All Policies Task Force, brought together leaders from across California to discuss the…

  4. Nation-Building without Mortar? Public Participation in Higher Education Policy-Making in South Africa. Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article tests a case study of public participation in the decision-making about restructuring South Africa's large cohort of higher education institutions, as inherited in 1994, against theories of South Africa's new democracy. It shows that people formally outside the higher education policy sector--students, academics, parents and the…

  5. Using findings from a public opinion poll to build political support for tobacco control policy in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, William K; Kitonyo, Rachael; Ogwell, Ahmed E O

    2013-11-01

    To assess the level of public support for tobacco control policies and to discuss how these findings could be used to influence the legislative process in the passing of tobacco control law in the country. A cross-sectional study conducted in Kenya between March and May 2007 on a random sample of 2021 (991 men and 1030 women) respondents aged 18 years and above. Interviews were done using a structured questionnaire by a research consultancy firm with long-standing experience in public polling. The majority of respondents supported tobacco control policies as proposed by WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. For example, 95% of the respondents supported smoking restrictions in all enclosed public places and workplaces, 94% supported visible health warnings on tobacco product packages, 83% supported a ban on advertisements of cigarettes and tobacco products and 69% supported a ban on sponsorship of events by tobacco companies. However, 60% perceived that there was very little commitment by legislators to tobacco control. There was overwhelming public support for tobacco control policies and a general view that government was not doing enough in implementing policies to protect the public from tobacco harm. This public opinion poll was used as an advocacy tool to generate support among legislators for national tobacco control law.

  6. Outcomes of an investment in administrative data infrastructure: An example of capacity building at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justine; Smith, Mark; Burchill, Charles; Katz, Alan; Fransoo, Randy

    2016-12-27

    Using the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy as an example, this commentary discusses how even small investments in population health data can create a multitude of research benefits. The authors highlight that through infrastructure development such as acquiring databases, facilitating access to data and developing data management practices, new, innovative research can be achieved at relatively low cost.

  7. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  8. Natural ventilation: it's as easy as opening the windows, or is it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebein, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The research consisted of an evaluation of the existing technologies available for passive cooling with an emphasis on strategies related to the use of natural ventilation. A preliminary data base for the study was established by three major efforts: 1. An extensive literature search of the architectural press was undertaken to ascertain the degree to which passive cooling strategies in general and natural ventilation in particular are designed into buildings at the present time. 2. An investigation of existing building stock profiles was undertaken to identify the existing and potential obstacles or advantages to the implementation of natural ventilation as a passive cooling strategy. The EIA Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey and two previous PNL studies were reviewed. 3. Components 1 and 2 were followed up with telephone interviews and site visits with the architects, building owners and operators of selected buildings from 1 and 2 above to gain more specific insights into the problems and pleasures typically associated with natural ventilation.

  9. Evaluation of Discharge Coefficients for Window Openings in Wind Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Sandberg, Mats

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation...... cannot be regarded as a constant and it is very difficult to estimate correct values resulting in less accuracy of prediction of natural ventilation.......This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation......, and therefore, the classical approach is not appropriate for prediction of airflow through large openings in buildings in the cross ventilation case. Using the approach for real openings and estimating the discharge coefficient for window openings has also not been very successful. The discharge coefficient...

  10. From the Mahanadi Delta to Sendai via South America: Building bridges between research, practice and international policy for disaster resilience assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchiotti, Margherita; Torres, Jair

    2017-04-01

    The concept of disaster resilience has gained momentum in recent decades and major international initiatives, such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 and the Paris Agreement, all recognise the importance of fostering community resilience to natural hazards to save lives and reduce losses. Despite significant advances in the policy settings for disaster resilience assessment, the interpretation of the concept itself and its implications for practice and policy remain clouded and more research is needed to gather evidence of what resilience means for governments and communities. This paper aims to bring together the research work the authors have conducted in the field of disaster resilience assessments at their respective institutions (University of Southampton, UK and the UME Graduate School at the Institute for Advanced Studies of Pavia, Italy) with the practical implementation projects and international policy consultations they have been involved in under UNESCO's umbrella. The main findings of a research study conducted as part of the 'Deltas, Vulnerability & Climate Change: Migration & Adaptation' (DECCMA) project to investigate the differential resilience of local communities in the Mahanadi Delta, India using a development approach will be presented. Statistical methods have been employed to identify development hotspots and have been combined with a qualitative analysis of community perceptions of development and the mutual implications of development for disaster resilience to build case studies of community resilience to inform theory, policy and practice. The authors will then discuss the practical implications of this research study for the implementation of UNESCO's 'Enhancing Natural HAzards resilience iN South America' (ENHANS) project, which seeks to train a critical mass of decision-makers, community leaders and experts on disaster risk and resilience assessments in four

  11. Energy Savings Modeling and Inspection Guidelines for Commercial Building Federal Tax Deductions for Buildings in 2016 and Later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Field-Macumber, Kristin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document provides guidance for modeling and inspecting energy-efficient property in commercial buildings for certification of the energy and power cost savings related to Section 179D of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) enacted in Section 1331 of the 2005 Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, noted in Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Notices 2006-52 (IRS 2006), 2008-40 (IRS 2008) and 2012-26 (IRS 2012), and updated by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015. Specifically, Section 179D provides federal tax deductions for energy-efficient property related to a commercial building's envelope; interior lighting; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC); and service hot water (SHW) systems. This document applies to buildings placed in service on or after January 1, 2016.

  12. Single-sided Natural Ventilation Driven by a Combination of Wind Pressure and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    . In both situations the aim is to obtain a good indoor environment but to control the amount of air, some basic knowledge of the flow through an opening is necessary. The amount of air going through the window opening in single-sided ventilation will depend on the wind speed near the building......, which make the prediction difficult. From earlier work, a few design expressions for single-sided ventilation already exist, but none of these include the wind direction, which here is an important parameter. Therefore several wind tunnel experiments are made in this work to find a new design expression......Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when ventilation systems for buildings are designed. The ventilation can either be obtained by automatically controlled openings in the building envelope, or it can just be the simple action of opening a door or a window to let the fresh air in...

  13. Ventilation Criteria for Aeromedical Evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    number) FIELD GROUP i SUB-GROUP Aeromedical evacuation; Ventilatory requirements; 06 11 06 12 iAir evacuation; and Mechanical ventilation . 19...ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) -., fr evacLation of patients requiring mechanical ventilation exposes these...reasonably stable from a medical standpoint; none required mechanical ventilation . Unfortunately, we find no .- , studies that describe the

  14. The amazing Minivent ventilator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TYYCVNCi2nM. Acknowledgements – The authors wish to thank Dr Christine Ball for the photograph of Dr Cohen and Dr Cohen for providing them with the last Minivent ventilator in his possession. It is still functioning and may be seen in the Nagin ...

  15. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  16. Understanding mechanical ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatburn, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    The respiratory care academic community has not yet adopted a standardized system for classifying and describing modes of ventilation. As a result, there is enough confusion that patient care, clinician education and even ventilator sales are all put at risk. This article summarizes a ventilator mode taxonomy that has been extensively published over the last 15 years. Specifically, the classification system has three components: a description of the control variables within breath; a description of the sequence of mandatory and spontaneous breaths; and a specification for the targeting scheme. This three-level specification provides scalability of detail to make the mode description appropriate for the particular need. At the bedside, we need only refer to a mode briefly using the first or perhaps first and second components. To distinguish between similar modes and brand names, we would need to include all components. This taxonomy uses the equation of motion for the respiratory system as the underlying theoretical framework. All terms relevant to describing modes of mechanical ventilation are defined in an extensive appendix.

  17. Mechanical ventilation of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarte, L. A.; Zuurbier, C. J.; Ince, C.

    2000-01-01

    Due to growing interest in murine functional genomics research, there is an increasing need for physiological stable in vivo murine models. Of special importance is support and control of ventilation by artificial respiration, which is difficult to execute as a consequence of the small size of the

  18. Elforbrug til mekanisk ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, P.

    I Energi 2000 er ventilationsområdet udpeget som et af de områder, hvor der bør tages initiativ til at fremme elbesparelser. I rapporten beskrives og analyseres målinger af elforbruget til ventilation i 12 bygninger, der alle anvendes til administration eller lignende formål. På grundlag af...

  19. Strengthening institutional and capacity building in the area of Competition and Consumer Policy for Bolivia and Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Evenett, Simon J.

    2004-01-01

    With the move towards democracy and measures to liberalise domestic sectors and foreign trade, policymakers in Central America and elsewhere have taken a greater interest in the linkages between consumer protection policies and economic and sustainable development. This has manifested itself in a greater commitment to implementing and enforcing national consumer protection statutes and to adhering more closely to the UN Guidelines For Consumer Protection (United Nations 1999).

  20. Not-recognizing policy within the minority EU members - Challenge for Kosovo’s Integration and Regional Peace-building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Samet Dalipi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Act of Recognition is the matter regulated by international law. After declaration of independence, Kosovo’s path toward EU integration is going to be problematic for Kosovo institutions and challenging for EU foreign policy.  Even though Kosovo was recognized by major international actors as sui generis case, some of them see this case as precedent and harmful for supposed developments within their jurisdictions, especially by 5 EU not recognizing countries. The article aims to justify the proclamation of independence by Kosovo institutions and to analyze the possible negative effects deriving from non-recognition policy for Kosovo and its new fragile democracy, hampering the democratic peace.  The policy of minor EU member states, contesting Kosovo’s statehood based on the assumption that the act of recognition will open a dangerous path for secession-minded national minorities in their own countries, taking into account that through (nonrecognition, states attempt to continue or change the existing order at international relations. Postponing Kosovo’s recognition by the rest of EU members will accumulate negative potentials within the new state, with possible consequences for the region.

  1. Increasing natural ventilation using solar chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakielska Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At a time when much attention is paid to the problem of energy saving is looking for new technical solutions, among others in the construction industry. At present, searching new solutions is a worldwide trend in creating buildings. Those solutions enable a comfortable use of building structures in harmony with natural environment and ensure reducing energy consumption. Solar chimneys, which facilitate the gravity ventilation by using solar energy, may be a solution to the problem. In hot climates solar chimney has been applied in the process of passive cooling of a building. In temperate zones and cold is used to assist natural ventilation. The problem of the solar chimney is not popular in Poland. Construction in Bydgoszcz two research positions, enabled the analysis of the impact of solar chimneys on the thermal comfort of rooms. This article presents experimental studies on solar chimney located in Poland. The analysis of the flow of air in the room during the day have been measured using two testmodels situated on the 3.1 building of UTP University of Science and Technology at 7 Kaliska street in Bydgoszcz.

  2. Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

    2002-04-28

    Traditionally, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening. However in recent years, the construction quality of residential building envelopes has been improved to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number of factors. Thus, there has been increased interest in engineered ventilation systems for residences. The amount of ventilation provided by an engineered system should be set to protect occupants from unhealthy or objectionable exposures to indoor pollutants, while minimizing energy costs for conditioning incoming air. Determining the correct ventilation rate is a complex task, as there are numerous pollutants of potential concern, each having poorly characterized emission rates, and poorly defined acceptable levels of exposure. One ubiquitous pollutant in residences is formaldehyde. The sources of formaldehyde in new houses are reasonably understood, and there is a large body of literature on human health effects. This report examines the use of formaldehyde as a means of determining ventilation rates and uses existing data on emission rates of formaldehyde in new houses to derive recommended levels. Based on current, widely accepted concentration guidelines for formaldehyde, the minimum and guideline ventilation rates for most new houses are 0.28 and 0.5 air changes per hour, respectively.

  3. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony during assisted invasive mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murias, G; Villagra, A; Blanch, L

    2013-04-01

    Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony is common during mechanical ventilation. Dyssynchrony decreases comfort, prolongs mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stays, and might lead to worse outcome. Dyssynchrony can occur during the triggering of the ventilator, the inspiration period after triggering, the transition from inspiration to expiration, and the expiratory phase. The most common dyssynchronies are delayed triggering, autotriggering, ineffective inspiratory efforts (which can occur at any point in the respiratory cycle), mismatch between the patient's and ventilator's inspiratory times, and double triggering. At present, the detection of dyssynchronies usually depends on healthcare staff observing ventilator waveforms; however, performance is suboptimal and many events go undetected. To date, technological complexity has made it impossible to evaluate patient-ventilator synchrony throughout the course of mechanical ventilation. Studies have shown that a high index of dyssynchrony may increase the duration of mechanical ventilation. Better training, better ventilatory modes, and/or computerized systems that permit better synchronization of patients' demands and ventilator outputs are necessary to improve patient-ventilator synchrony.

  4. Performance of ductless personalized ventilation in conjunction with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Vesely, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The performance of ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation was studied and compared with displacement ventilation alone and mixing ventilation. Thirty subjects were exposed in a climate chamber to environmental conditions representing three levels...... perception of the environment. The subjects could control the position of the DPV supply diffuser and the personalized air flow (air velocity). The use of DPV improved perceived air quality and thermal comfort compared to displacement ventilation alone. At 26 °C and 29 °C the percentage dissatisfied with air...... movement decreased with DPV compared to corresponding conditions with displacement ventilation alone and reached the same level as mixing or displacement ventilation at 23 °C. Subjects were able to control the volume and speed of the personalized air flow in order to avoid eye irritation. However...

  5. Human response to ductless personalized ventilation coupled with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Veselý, Michal; Melikov, Arsen K.

    2012-01-01

    A human subject experiment was carried out to investigate the extent to which ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation can improve perceived air quality (PAQ) and thermal comfort at elevated room air temperature in comparison with displacement ventilation...... alone. The experimental conditions comprised displacement ventilation alone (room air temperature of 23 °C, 26 °C, 29 °C) and DPV with displacement ventilation (26 °C, 29 °C), both operating at supply air temperatures 3, 5 or 6K lower than room air temperature, as well as mixing ventilation (23 °C, 3 K......). During one hour exposure participants answered questionnaires regarding PAQ and thermal comfort. PAQ was significantly better with DPV than without DPV at the same background conditions. Thermal comfort improved when DPV was used. Combining DPV with displacement ventilation showed the potential...

  6. A system to build distributed multivariate models and manage disparate data sharing policies: implementation in the scalable national network for effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Daniella; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Matheny, Michael E; Farcas, Claudiu; D'Arcy, Michel; Pearlman, Laura; Nookala, Lavanya; Day, Michele E; Kim, Katherine K; Kim, Hyeoneui; Boxwala, Aziz; El-Kareh, Robert; Kuo, Grace M; Resnic, Frederic S; Kesselman, Carl; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-11-01

    Centralized and federated models for sharing data in research networks currently exist. To build multivariate data analysis for centralized networks, transfer of patient-level data to a central computation resource is necessary. The authors implemented distributed multivariate models for federated networks in which patient-level data is kept at each site and data exchange policies are managed in a study-centric manner. The objective was to implement infrastructure that supports the functionality of some existing research networks (e.g., cohort discovery, workflow management, and estimation of multivariate analytic models on centralized data) while adding additional important new features, such as algorithms for distributed iterative multivariate models, a graphical interface for multivariate model specification, synchronous and asynchronous response to network queries, investigator-initiated studies, and study-based control of staff, protocols, and data sharing policies. Based on the requirements gathered from statisticians, administrators, and investigators from multiple institutions, the authors developed infrastructure and tools to support multisite comparative effectiveness studies using web services for multivariate statistical estimation in the SCANNER federated network. The authors implemented massively parallel (map-reduce) computation methods and a new policy management system to enable each study initiated by network participants to define the ways in which data may be processed, managed, queried, and shared. The authors illustrated the use of these systems among institutions with highly different policies and operating under different state laws. Federated research networks need not limit distributed query functionality to count queries, cohort discovery, or independently estimated analytic models. Multivariate analyses can be efficiently and securely conducted without patient-level data transport, allowing institutions with strict local data storage

  7. Estimation of NH3 emissions from a naturally ventilated livestock farm using local-scale atmospheric dispersion modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cellier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural livestock represents the main source of ammonia (NH3 in Europe. In recent years, reduction policies have been applied to reduce NH3 emissions. In order to estimate the impacts of these policies, robust estimates of the emissions from the main sources, i.e. livestock farms are needed. In this paper, the NH3 emissions were estimated from a naturally ventilated livestock farm in Braunschweig, Germany during a joint field experiment of the GRAMINAE European project. An inference method was used with a Gaussian-3D plume model and with the Huang 3-D model. NH3 concentrations downwind of the source were used together with micrometeorological data to estimate the source strength over time. Mobile NH3 concentration measurements provided information on the spatial distribution of source strength. The estimated emission strength ranged between 6.4±0.18 kg NH3 d−1 (Huang 3-D model and 9.2±0.7 kg NH3 d−1 (Gaussian-3D model. These estimates were 94% and 63% of what was obtained using emission factors from the German national inventory (9.6 kg d−1 NH3. The effect of deposition was evaluated with the FIDES-2D model. This increased the emission estimate to 11.7 kg NH3 d−1, showing that deposition can explain the observed difference. The daily pattern of the source was correlated with net radiation and with the temperature inside the animal houses. The daily pattern resulted from a combination of a temperature effect on the source concentration together with an effect of variations in free and forced convection of the building ventilation rate. Further development of the plume technique is especially relevant for naturally ventilated farms, since the variable ventilation rate makes other emission measurements difficult.

  8. Sealed Crawl Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Williamson, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Puttafunta, Srikanth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-30

    One method of code-compliance for crawlspaces is to seal and insulate the crawlspace, rather than venting to the outdoors. However, codes require mechanical ventilation; either via conditioned supply air from the HVAC system, or a continuous exhaust ventilation strategy. As the CARB's building partner, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, intended to use the unvented crawlspace in a recent

  9. Analysis of Natural Ventilation in a Passive House Located in Cold Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    This article shows the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive method of cooling buildings that are located in cold climate countries using Denmark as a case study. The energy saving potential of natural ventilation is found by performing thermal simulations of a household located in ...

  10. Ventrain: an ejector ventilator for emergency use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaekers, A E W; Borg, P A J; Enk, D

    2012-06-01

    A small, flow-regulated, manually operated ventilator designed for ventilation through a narrow-bore transtracheal catheter (TTC) has become available (Ventrain, Dolphys Medical BV, Eindhoven, The Netherlands). It is driven by a predetermined flow of oxygen from a high-pressure source and facilitates expiration by suction. The aim of this bench study was to test the efficacy of this new ventilator. The driving pressure, generated insufflation, and suction pressures and also the suction capacity of the Ventrain were measured at different oxygen flows. The minute volume achieved in an artificial lung through a TTC with an inner diameter (ID) of 2 mm was determined at different settings. Oxygen flows of 6-15 litre min(-1) resulted in driving pressures of 0.5-2.3 bar. Insufflation pressures, measured proximal to the TTC, ranged from 23 to 138 cm H(2)O. The maximal subatmospheric pressure build-up was -217 cm H(2)O. The suction capacity increased to a maximum of 12.4 litre min(-1) at an oxygen flow of 15 litre min(-1). At this flow, the achievable minute volume through the TTC ranged from 5.9 to 7.1 litres depending on the compliance of the artificial lung. The results of this bench study suggest that the Ventrain is capable of achieving a normal minute volume for an average adult through a 2 mm ID TTC. Further in vivo studies are needed to determine the value of the Ventrain as a portable emergency ventilator in a 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situation.

  11. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study: Summarized Data - Test Space HVAC Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on the characteristics of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system(s) in the entire BASE building including types of ventilation, equipment configurations, and operation and maintenance issues

  12. Building thermal loads: A case study for David Hellen Petta public secondary school

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter assesses the impact of appropriate passive interventions on building thermal loads. The passive interventions investigated are ceiling insulation, wall insulation, attic ventilation, natural ventilation and roof absorptance and also...

  13. Switching slips. Building blocks for a robust environmental policy for the 21st century; Wissels omzetten. Bouwstenen voor een robuust milieubeleid voor de 21e eeuw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogervorst, N.; Hajer, M.; Dietz, F.; Timmerhuis, J.; Kruitwagen, S.

    2013-06-15

    With this 'signal report', PBL (Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency) offers building blocks for a robust environmental policy for the twentyfirst century, such as changes in consumer behavior, new coalitions of interests and stakeholders, and the establishment of an investment fund for eco-innovation. Which track does the Netherlands want to follow? With this essay, PBL is calling for a broad public debate on this issue [Dutch] In dit signalenrapport reikt het PBL (Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving) bouwstenen aan voor een robuust milieubeleid voor de eenentwintigste eeuw, zoals gedragsverandering van consumenten, nieuwe coalities van belangen en betrokkenen, en de oprichting van een investeringsfonds voor eco-innovatie. Welk spoor wil Nederland bewandelen? Met dit essay roept het PBL op tot een breed maatschappelijk debat over deze vraag.

  14. Health services use and costs in people with intellectual disability: building a context knowledge base for evidence-informed policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Symonds, Steve

    2016-03-01

    We summarize the research published between 2011 and 2015 in healthcare utilization and costs for persons with intellectual disabilities/intellectual developmental disorders with a particular focus on context studies for evidence-informed policy. Persons with intellectual disability show higher unmet needs and lower use of promotion and prevention services and generic health services. Use of generic psychiatric services varies across countries. Persons with intellectual disability and comorbid mental disorders have the highest rates of specialized service use, costs, and unmet needs. International and national cost-of-illness studies show the high impact of intellectual disability in the total direct health costs of mental disorders at least in Europe. On the contrary, the burden-of-illness studies show conflicting results in intellectual disability. Contextual studies of healthcare and costs have improved the knowledge base for evidence-informed planning in intellectual disability in a number of countries. However, only two of these studies have used local atlases of healthcare for improving decision making. The paucity of information on prevalence, comorbidity, and demographic indicators hampers the advance of evidence-informed policy in intellectual disability.

  15. A review on control system algorithm for building automation systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Noubissie-Tientcheu, SI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The building with its components such as Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) and lighting constitute a bigger part of energy consumption in Southern Africa. Control system in a building reduced the energy consumption, according to different...

  16. [Ventilation-perfusion ratios].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, W

    1994-10-01

    Knowledge of normal and impaired pulmonary gas exchange is essential to the anaesthesiologist. Analysis of an arterial blood sample allows evaluation of whether or not pulmonary gas exchange is normal. For this purpose comparison with the oxygenation index or the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference is helpful. Pathological changes of these variables are mainly caused by ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) mismatch. In daily practice, venous admixture or intrapulmonary shunt can be calculated using arterial and mixed-venous blood. By analysing arterial and expired PCO2, dead-space ventilation can be determined, but extended analyses of VA/Q distribution are not possible in daily practice. However, knowledge of the principles of typical disturbances of pulmonary gas exchange in acute and chronic lung disease allows the use of therapeutic strategies based on the pathophysiological changes.

  17. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    -cooling period and night cooling potential. The investment cost of this ventilation system is about 5-10% lower than the conventional ones, because the acoustic ceiling could be directly applied as air diffuser and the use of plenum to distribute air reduces the cost of ductwork. There is a growing interest...... and manufacturers and the users of diffuse ceiling technology. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation. It provides an overview of potential benefit and limitations of this technology. The benefits include high thermal comfort, high...... cooling capacity, energy saving, low investment cost and low noise level; while the limitations include condensation risk and the limit on the room geometry. Furthermore, the crucial design parameters are summarized and their effects on the system performance are discussed. In addition to the stand...

  18. Analysis of Numerical Models for Dispersion of Chemical/Biological Agents in Complex Building Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    variation in ventilation rates over time and the distribution of ventilation air within a building, and to estimate the impact of envelope air...bio) contaminants. This CH2M HILL research: (1) analyzed existing filtration technologies for building heating, ventilating , and air-conditioning...009XGG, “ERASP (Environmental Response and Secu- rity Protection)/HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning).” The technical monitor was Dr

  19. BSim models for 2 case-studies of naturally and mechanically ventilated daycare institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyanova, O.; Heiselberg, P.

    2009-06-15

    The report intends to provide complete information necessary for evaluation of assumptions made in the models and conclusions derived from the results of simulation of two different institutions in various operational modes. Thermal models are prepared for two day-care buildings, one which is mechanically ventilated and one which is naturally ventilated. All simulations were preformed in BSim, and all the models are simulated in the current version og BSim which is version 6,8,9,8. The results of the simulations showed that it is possible to reduce energy use for ventilation, both in mechanically and naturally ventilated child care center without compromising indoor air quality. (ln)

  20. Subjective evaluation of different ventilation concepts combined with radiant heating and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Sixteen subjects evaluated the indoor environment in four experiments with different combinations of ventilation and radiant heating/cooling systems. Two test setups simulated a room in a low energy building with a single occupant during winter. The room was equipped either by a ventilation system...... with displacement ventilation. Vertical air temperature distribution was more uniform for floor heating than for warm air heating, but there was no significant difference in thermal perception between the two mixing ventilation systems. For the summer conditions the subjects voted warmer than predicted by the PMV...