WorldWideScience

Sample records for building large genomic

  1. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  2. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  3. Energy conservation in large buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, A.; Hafemeister, D.

    1985-11-01

    As energy prices rise, newly energy aware designers use better tools and technology to create energy efficient buildings. Thus the U.S. office stock (average age 20 years) uses 250 kBTU/ft2 of resource energy, but the guzzler of 1972 uses 500 (up×2), and the 1986 ASHRAE standards call for 100-125 (less than 25% of their 1972 ancestors). Surprisingly, the first real cost of these efficient buildings has not risen since 1972. Scaling laws are used to calculate heat gains and losses of buildings to obtain the ΔT(free) which can be as large as 15-30 °C (30-60 °F) for large buildings. The net thermal demand and thermal time constants are determined for the Swedish Thermodeck buildings which need essentially no heat in the winter and no chillers in summer. The BECA and other data bases for large buildings are discussed. Off-peak cooling for large buildings is analyzed in terms of saving peak-electrical power. By downsizing chillers and using cheaper, off-peak power, cost-effective thermal storage in new commercial buildings can reduce U.S. peak power demands by 10-20 GW in 15 years. A further potential of about 40 GW is available from adopting partial thermal storage and more efficient air conditioners in existing buildings.

  4. Genome build information is an essential part of genomic track files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Domanska, Diana; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil

    2017-09-14

    Genomic locations are represented as coordinates on a specific genome build version, but the build information is frequently missing when coordinates are provided. We show that this information is essential to correctly interpret and analyse the genomic intervals contained in genomic track files. Although not a substitute for best practices, we also provide a tool to predict the genome build version of genomic track files.

  5. Beyond editing to writing large genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Raj; Church, George M

    2017-08-30

    Recent exponential advances in genome sequencing and engineering technologies have enabled an unprecedented level of interrogation into the impact of DNA variation (genotype) on cellular function (phenotype). Furthermore, these advances have also prompted realistic discussion of writing and radically re-writing complex genomes. In this Perspective, we detail the motivation for large-scale engineering, discuss the progress made from such projects in bacteria and yeast and describe how various genome-engineering technologies will contribute to this effort. Finally, we describe the features of an ideal platform and provide a roadmap to facilitate the efficient writing of large genomes.

  6. myGenomeBrowser: building and sharing your own genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    myGenomeBrowser is a web-based environment that provides biologists with a way to build, query and share their genome browsers. This tool, that builds on JBrowse, is designed to give users more autonomy while simplifying and minimizing intervention from system administrators. We have extended genome browser basic features to allow users to query, analyze and share their data. myGenomeBrowser is freely available at https://bbric-pipelines.toulouse.inra.fr/myGenomeBrowser and includes tutorial screencasts. Source code and installation instructions can be found at https://framagit.org/BBRIC/myGenomeBrowser . myGenomeBrowser is open-source and mainly implemented in Perl, JavaScript, Apache and Docker. sebastien.carrere@inra.fr.

  7. Dynamics of airborne fungal populations in a large office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, H. A.; Pierson, D. L.; Groves, T. O.; Strawn, K. F.; Mishra, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing concern with bioaerosols in large office buildings prompted this prospective study of airborne fungal concentrations in a newly constructed building on the Gulf coast. We collected volumetric culture plate air samples on 14 occasions over the 18-month period immediately following building occupancy. On each sampling occasion, we collected duplicate samples from three sites on three floors of this six-story building, and an outdoor sample. Fungal concentrations indoors were consistently below those outdoors, and no sample clearly indicated fungal contamination in the building, although visible growth appeared in the ventilation system during the course of the study. We conclude that modern mechanically ventilated buildings prevent the intrusion of most of the outdoor fungal aerosol, and that even relatively extensive air sampling protocols may not sufficiently document the microbial status of buildings.

  8. Mixing Metaphors: Building Infrastructure for Large Scale School Turnaround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, Donald J.; Neumerski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to increase understanding of the possibilities and challenges of building educational infrastructure--the basic, foundational structures, systems, and resources--to support large-scale school turnaround. Building educational infrastructure often exceeds the capacity of schools, districts, and state education…

  9. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach

  10. In the fast lane: large-scale bacterial genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Tamás; Burland, Valerie; Pósfai, György

    2012-07-31

    The last few years have witnessed rapid progress in bacterial genome engineering. The long-established, standard ways of DNA synthesis, modification, transfer into living cells, and incorporation into genomes have given way to more effective, large-scale, robust genome modification protocols. Expansion of these engineering capabilities is due to several factors. Key advances include: (i) progress in oligonucleotide synthesis and in vitro and in vivo assembly methods, (ii) optimization of recombineering techniques, (iii) introduction of parallel, large-scale, combinatorial, and automated genome modification procedures, and (iv) rapid identification of the modifications by barcode-based analysis and sequencing. Combination of the brute force of these techniques with sophisticated bioinformatic design and modeling opens up new avenues for the analysis of gene functions and cellular network interactions, but also in engineering more effective producer strains. This review presents a summary of recent technological advances in bacterial genome engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comfort Study of Office Buildings with Large Glazed Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Motuzienė

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the buildings with large glazed areas the biggest problem is the space overheating during the warm season. This causes increased energy demand for cooling. The survey was carried out during the warm and cold seasons in two office buildings with large glazed areas. The methodology was prepared for evaluating indoor climate parameters using objective and subjective evaluation. The measurements have shown that there are problems with lighting in workplaces of both buildings during both the warm and cold seasons. The biggest problem is too dry air during the cold period, an acceptable temperature is also not always in the building No. 2. The survey has shown that some employees are dissatisfied with the indoor climate in the workplace, the bigger dissatisfaction is in building No. 2. Assessing according to the O. Fanger methodology was obtained that the number of PPD is in the normal range during the cold period, whereas close to the limit when the building can not be operated in the warm period.

  12. Dose reduction factors from a radioactive cloud for large buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, J. le; Roux, Y.; Patau, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    A set of complex and accurate computer codes has been established to determine the transport of photons emitted from a radioactive cloud through various media. The geometrical and physical description of large buildings with various numbers of floors and rooms can be done by the user. The codes can calculate, in any room or apartment, the characteristics of the photon fields (photon flux, energy flux and distribution, direction distribution) and whole-body absorbed dose rates in a phantom standing or lying on the floor. The dose reduction factor is then the quotient of the mean absorbed dose rate in the apartment to the absorbed dose rate in the phantom standing on the ground outdoors. Applications to several modern multistorey buildings are presented. The results show the influence of various parameters such as density and composition of building materials, the fraction of the external building surface containing apertures and initial photon energy.

  13. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  14. Large Scale Software Building with CMake in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmsheuser, J.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Obreshkov, E.; Undrus, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The offline software of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) serves as the platform for detector data reconstruction, simulation and analysis. It is also used in the detector’s trigger system to select LHC collision events during data taking. The ATLAS offline software consists of several million lines of C++ and Python code organized in a modular design of more than 2000 specialized packages. Because of different workflows, many stable numbered releases are in parallel production use. To accommodate specific workflow requests, software patches with modified libraries are distributed on top of existing software releases on a daily basis. The different ATLAS software applications also require a flexible build system that strongly supports unit and integration tests. Within the last year this build system was migrated to CMake. A CMake configuration has been developed that allows one to easily set up and build the above mentioned software packages. This also makes it possible to develop and test new and modified packages on top of existing releases. The system also allows one to detect and execute partial rebuilds of the release based on single package changes. The build system makes use of CPack for building RPM packages out of the software releases, and CTest for running unit and integration tests. We report on the migration and integration of the ATLAS software to CMake and show working examples of this large scale project in production.

  15. Energy Savings Modeling of Standard Commercial Building Re-tuning Measures: Large Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2012-06-01

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BAS's capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This report investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system retuning measures on a typical large office building prototype model, using the Department of Energy's building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated - each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All of these measures and combinations were simulated in 16 cities representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy

  16. Large scale software building with CMake in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218447; The ATLAS collaboration; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Obreshkov, Emil; Undrus, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The offline software of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) serves as the platform for detector data reconstruction, simulation and analysis. It is also used in the detector trigger system to select LHC collision events during data taking. ATLAS offline software consists of several million lines of C++ and Python code organized in a modular design of more than 2000 specialized packages. Because of different workflows many stable numbered releases are in parallel production use. To accommodate specific workflow requests, software patches with modified libraries are distributed on top of existing software releases on a daily basis. The different ATLAS software applications require a flexible build system that strongly supports unit and integration tests. Within the last year this build system was migrated to CMake. A CMake configuration has been developed that allows one to easily set up and build the mentioned software packages. This also makes it possible to develop and test new and modifi...

  17. Large Scale Software Building with CMake in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration; Obreshkov, Emil; Undrus, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The offline software of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) serves as the platform for detector data reconstruction, simulation and analysis. It is also used in the detector trigger system to select LHC collision events during data taking. ATLAS offline software consists of several million lines of C++ and Python code organized in a modular design of more than 2000 specialized packages. Because of different workflows many stable numbered releases are in parallel production use. To accommodate specific workflow requests, software patches with modified libraries are distributed on top of existing software releases on a daily basis. The different ATLAS software applications require a flexible build system that strongly supports unit and integration tests. Within the last year this build system was migrated to CMake. A CMake configuration has been developed that allows one to easily set up and build the mentioned software packages. This also makes it possible to develop and test new and modifi...

  18. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. Results In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. Conclusion GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of

  19. Application issues for large-area electrochromic windows incommercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    Projections of performance from small-area devices to large-area windows and enterprise marketing have created high expectations for electrochromic glazings. As a result, this paper seeks to precipitate an objective dialog between material scientists and building-application scientists to determine whether actual large-area electrochromic devices will result in significant performance benefits and what material improvements are needed, if any, to make electrochromics more practical for commercial building applications. Few in-situ tests have been conducted with large-area electrochromic windows applied in buildings. This study presents monitored results from a full-scale field test of large-area electrochromic windows to illustrate how this technology will perform in commercial buildings. The visible transmittance (Tv) of the installed electrochromic ranged from 0.11 to 0.38. The data are limited to the winter period for a south-east-facing window. The effect of actual device performance on lighting energy use, direct sun control, discomfort glare, and interior illumination is discussed. No mechanical system loads were monitored. These data demonstrate the use of electrochromics in a moderate climate and focus on the most restrictive visual task: computer use in offices. Through this small demonstration, we were able to determine that electrochromic windows can indeed provide unmitigated transparent views and a level of dynamic illumination control never before seen in architectural glazing materials. Daily lighting energy use was 6-24 percent less compared to the 11 percent-glazing, with improved interior brightness levels. Daily lighting energy use was 3 percent less to 13 percent more compared to the 38 percent-glazing, with improved window brightness control. The electrochromic window may not be able to fulfill both energy-efficiency and visual comfort objectives when low winter direct sun is present, particularly for computer tasks using cathode-ray tube (CRT

  20. Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

  1. Building International Genomics Collaboration for Global Health Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H Cui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways, and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement and installation of next generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  2. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  3. Large telescopes and the art of bridge building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärcher, H. J.

    2008-07-01

    In the last decade the evolution of large or extreme large earthbound optical telescopes speeded up in an unforeseen manner. The technological development is driven by the issues of the complex and challenging active and adaptive optics. But the design of the telescope structure and mechanics - as the backbone of the optics - is also increasing in the importance for costs and later performance. Structural mechanics is an old art, starting a long time ago with building bridges and gothic cathedrals etc. Essence of this art is the understanding of forces, load paths, weight and balance, strength and related deformations. The paper develops a perception of the structural subsystems of telescopes ("tube structure", "alidade") from the viewpoint of structural mechanics as learned from the "bridge builders". Actual example is a proposal for the design of ESO's 42m E-ELT.

  4. Procedures and tools for building large Ada systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Ben

    1986-01-01

    Some of the problems unique to building a very large Ada system are addressed. This is done through examples from experience. In the winter of 1985 and 1986, Intermetrics bootstrapped the Ada compiler, which was being built over the last few years. This system consists of about one million lines of full Ada. Over the last few years a number of procedures and tools were adopted for managing the life cycle of each of the many parts of an Ada system. Many of these procedures are well known to most system builders: release management, quality assurance testing; and source file revision control. Others are unique to working in an Ada language environment; i.e., recompilation management, Ada program library management, and managing multiple implementations. First a look is taken at how a large Ada system is broken down into pieces. The Ada definition leaves unspecified a number of issues that the system builder must address: versions, subsystems, multiple implementations, and synchronization of branched development paths. Having introduced how the Ada systems are decomposed, a look is taken, via a series of examples, at how the life cylces of those parts is managed. The procedures and tools used to manage the evolution of the system are examined. It is hoped that other Ada system builders can build upon the experience of the last few years.

  5. Genomic divergences among cattle, dog and human estimated from large-scale alignments of genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shade Larry L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 11 Mb of finished high quality genomic sequences were sampled from cattle, dog and human to estimate genomic divergences and their regional variation among these lineages. Results Optimal three-way multi-species global sequence alignments for 84 cattle clones or loci (each >50 kb of genomic sequence were constructed using the human and dog genome assemblies as references. Genomic divergences and substitution rates were examined for each clone and for various sequence classes under different functional constraints. Analysis of these alignments revealed that the overall genomic divergences are relatively constant (0.32–0.37 change/site for pairwise comparisons among cattle, dog and human; however substitution rates vary across genomic regions and among different sequence classes. A neutral mutation rate (2.0–2.2 × 10(-9 change/site/year was derived from ancestral repetitive sequences, whereas the substitution rate in coding sequences (1.1 × 10(-9 change/site/year was approximately half of the overall rate (1.9–2.0 × 10(-9 change/site/year. Relative rate tests also indicated that cattle have a significantly faster rate of substitution as compared to dog and that this difference is about 6%. Conclusion This analysis provides a large-scale and unbiased assessment of genomic divergences and regional variation of substitution rates among cattle, dog and human. It is expected that these data will serve as a baseline for future mammalian molecular evolution studies.

  6. BFAST: an alignment tool for large scale genome resequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Homer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of massively parallel DNA sequencers, combined with the challenge of whole human genome resequencing, result in the need for rapid and accurate alignment of billions of short DNA sequence reads to a large reference genome. Speed is obviously of great importance, but equally important is maintaining alignment accuracy of short reads, in the 25-100 base range, in the presence of errors and true biological variation.We introduce a new algorithm specifically optimized for this task, as well as a freely available implementation, BFAST, which can align data produced by any of current sequencing platforms, allows for user-customizable levels of speed and accuracy, supports paired end data, and provides for efficient parallel and multi-threaded computation on a computer cluster. The new method is based on creating flexible, efficient whole genome indexes to rapidly map reads to candidate alignment locations, with arbitrary multiple independent indexes allowed to achieve robustness against read errors and sequence variants. The final local alignment uses a Smith-Waterman method, with gaps to support the detection of small indels.We compare BFAST to a selection of large-scale alignment tools -- BLAT, MAQ, SHRiMP, and SOAP -- in terms of both speed and accuracy, using simulated and real-world datasets. We show BFAST can achieve substantially greater sensitivity of alignment in the context of errors and true variants, especially insertions and deletions, and minimize false mappings, while maintaining adequate speed compared to other current methods. We show BFAST can align the amount of data needed to fully resequence a human genome, one billion reads, with high sensitivity and accuracy, on a modest computer cluster in less than 24 hours. BFAST is available at (http://bfast.sourceforge.net.

  7. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and the various molecular techniques it has enabled have revolutionized the field of microbiology. Examining and comparing the genetic sequences borne by microbes - including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes - provides researchers insights into the processes microbes carry out, their pathogenic traits, and new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing. Until recently, sequencing entire microbial genomes has been laborious and expensive, and the decision to sequence the genome of an organism was made on a case-by-case basis by individual researchers and funding agencies. Now, thanks to new technologies, the cost and effort of sequencing is within reach for even the smallest facilities, and the ability to sequence the genomes of a significant fraction of microbial life may be possible. The availability of numerous microbial genomes will enable unprecedented insights into microbial evolution, function, and physiology. However, the current ad hoc approach to gathering sequence data has resulted in an unbalanced and highly biased sampling of microbial diversity. A well-coordinated, large-scale effort to target the breadth and depth of microbial diversity would result in the greatest impact. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss the scientific benefits of engaging in a large-scale, taxonomically-based sequencing project. A group of individuals with expertise in microbiology, genomics, informatics, ecology, and evolution deliberated on the issues inherent in such an effort and generated a set of specific recommendations for how best to proceed. The vast majority of microbes are presently uncultured and, thus, pose significant challenges to such a taxonomically-based approach to sampling genome diversity. However, we have yet to even scratch the surface of the genomic diversity among cultured microbes. A coordinated sequencing effort of cultured organisms is an appropriate place to begin

  8. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005. The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002. The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are supposed to function as boundary objects across different disciplines can lead to misinterpretation of requirements, project content and objectives. In this research, knowledge is seen as resulting from social interactions; knowledge resides in communities and it is generated through social relationships (Wenger 1998, Olsson et al. 2008. Knowledge is often tacit, intangible and context-dependent and it is articulated in the changing responsibilities, roles, attitudes and values that are present in the work environment (Bresnen et al., 2003. In a project environment, knowledge enables individuals to solve problems, take decisions, and apply these decisions to actions. In order to achieve a shared understanding and minimize the misunderstanding and misinterpretations among project actors, it is necessary to share knowledge (Fong 2003. Sharing knowledge is particularly crucial in large complex building projects (LCBPs in order to accelerate the building process, improve architectural quality and prevent mistakes or undesirable results. However, knowledge sharing is often hampered through professional or organizational boundaries or contractual concerns. When knowledge is seen as an organizational asset, there is little willingness among project organizations to share their knowledge. Individual people may recognize the need to promote knowledge sharing throughout the project, but typically there is no deliberate strategy agreed by all project partners to address

  9. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005. The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002. The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are supposed to function as boundary objects across different disciplines can lead to misinterpretation of requirements, project content and objectives. In this research, knowledge is seen as resulting from social interactions; knowledge resides in communities and it is generated through social relationships (Wenger 1998, Olsson et al. 2008. Knowledge is often tacit, intangible and context-dependent and it is articulated in the changing responsibilities, roles, attitudes and values that are present in the work environment (Bresnen et al., 2003. In a project environment, knowledge enables individuals to solve problems, take decisions, and apply these decisions to actions. In order to achieve a shared understanding and minimize the misunderstanding and misinterpretations among project actors, it is necessary to share knowledge (Fong 2003.Sharing knowledge is particularly crucial in large complex building projects (LCBPs in order to accelerate the building process, improve architectural quality and prevent mistakes or undesirable results. However, knowledge sharing is often hampered through professional or organizational boundaries or contractual concerns. When knowledge is seen as an organizational asset, there is little willingness among project organizations to share their knowledge. Individual people may recognize the need to promote knowledge sharing throughout the project, but typically there is no deliberate strategy agreed by all project partners to address

  10. Genomic characterization of large heterochromatic gaps in the human genome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Altemose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest gaps in the human genome assembly correspond to multi-megabase heterochromatic regions composed primarily of two related families of tandem repeats, Human Satellites 2 and 3 (HSat2,3. The abundance of repetitive DNA in these regions challenges standard mapping and assembly algorithms, and as a result, the sequence composition and potential biological functions of these regions remain largely unexplored. Furthermore, existing genomic tools designed to predict consensus-based descriptions of repeat families cannot be readily applied to complex satellite repeats such as HSat2,3, which lack a consistent repeat unit reference sequence. Here we present an alignment-free method to characterize complex satellites using whole-genome shotgun read datasets. Utilizing this approach, we classify HSat2,3 sequences into fourteen subfamilies and predict their chromosomal distributions, resulting in a comprehensive satellite reference database to further enable genomic studies of heterochromatic regions. We also identify 1.3 Mb of non-repetitive sequence interspersed with HSat2,3 across 17 unmapped assembly scaffolds, including eight annotated gene predictions. Finally, we apply our satellite reference database to high-throughput sequence data from 396 males to estimate array size variation of the predominant HSat3 array on the Y chromosome, confirming that satellite array sizes can vary between individuals over an order of magnitude (7 to 98 Mb and further demonstrating that array sizes are distributed differently within distinct Y haplogroups. In summary, we present a novel framework for generating initial reference databases for unassembled genomic regions enriched with complex satellite DNA, and we further demonstrate the utility of these reference databases for studying patterns of sequence variation within human populations.

  11. Genomes as geography: using GIS technology to build interactive genome feature maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beard M Kate

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many commonly used genome browsers display sequence annotations and related attributes as horizontal data tracks that can be toggled on and off according to user preferences. Most genome browsers use only simple keyword searches and limit the display of detailed annotations to one chromosomal region of the genome at a time. We have employed concepts, methodologies, and tools that were developed for the display of geographic data to develop a Genome Spatial Information System (GenoSIS for displaying genomes spatially, and interacting with genome annotations and related attribute data. In contrast to the paradigm of horizontally stacked data tracks used by most genome browsers, GenoSIS uses the concept of registered spatial layers composed of spatial objects for integrated display of diverse data. In addition to basic keyword searches, GenoSIS supports complex queries, including spatial queries, and dynamically generates genome maps. Our adaptation of the geographic information system (GIS model in a genome context supports spatial representation of genome features at multiple scales with a versatile and expressive query capability beyond that supported by existing genome browsers. Results We implemented an interactive genome sequence feature map for the mouse genome in GenoSIS, an application that uses ArcGIS, a commercially available GIS software system. The genome features and their attributes are represented as spatial objects and data layers that can be toggled on and off according to user preferences or displayed selectively in response to user queries. GenoSIS supports the generation of custom genome maps in response to complex queries about genome features based on both their attributes and locations. Our example application of GenoSIS to the mouse genome demonstrates the powerful visualization and query capability of mature GIS technology applied in a novel domain. Conclusion Mapping tools developed specifically for

  12. Genomes as geography: using GIS technology to build interactive genome feature maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Mary E; Holden, Constance C; Beard, M Kate; Bult, Carol J

    2006-09-19

    Many commonly used genome browsers display sequence annotations and related attributes as horizontal data tracks that can be toggled on and off according to user preferences. Most genome browsers use only simple keyword searches and limit the display of detailed annotations to one chromosomal region of the genome at a time. We have employed concepts, methodologies, and tools that were developed for the display of geographic data to develop a Genome Spatial Information System (GenoSIS) for displaying genomes spatially, and interacting with genome annotations and related attribute data. In contrast to the paradigm of horizontally stacked data tracks used by most genome browsers, GenoSIS uses the concept of registered spatial layers composed of spatial objects for integrated display of diverse data. In addition to basic keyword searches, GenoSIS supports complex queries, including spatial queries, and dynamically generates genome maps. Our adaptation of the geographic information system (GIS) model in a genome context supports spatial representation of genome features at multiple scales with a versatile and expressive query capability beyond that supported by existing genome browsers. We implemented an interactive genome sequence feature map for the mouse genome in GenoSIS, an application that uses ArcGIS, a commercially available GIS software system. The genome features and their attributes are represented as spatial objects and data layers that can be toggled on and off according to user preferences or displayed selectively in response to user queries. GenoSIS supports the generation of custom genome maps in response to complex queries about genome features based on both their attributes and locations. Our example application of GenoSIS to the mouse genome demonstrates the powerful visualization and query capability of mature GIS technology applied in a novel domain. Mapping tools developed specifically for geographic data can be exploited to display, explore and

  13. Volume visualization of multiple alignment of large genomicDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Nameeta; Dillard, Scott E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd

    2005-07-25

    Genomes of hundreds of species have been sequenced to date, and many more are being sequenced. As more and more sequence data sets become available, and as the challenge of comparing these massive ''billion basepair DNA sequences'' becomes substantial, so does the need for more powerful tools supporting the exploration of these data sets. Similarity score data used to compare aligned DNA sequences is inherently one-dimensional. One-dimensional (1D) representations of these data sets do not effectively utilize screen real estate. As a result, tools using 1D representations are incapable of providing informatory overview for extremely large data sets. We present a technique to arrange 1D data in 3D space to allow us to apply state-of-the-art interactive volume visualization techniques for data exploration. We demonstrate our technique using multi-millions-basepair-long aligned DNA sequence data and compare it with traditional 1D line plots. The results show that our technique is superior in providing an overview of entire data sets. Our technique, coupled with 1D line plots, results in effective multi-resolution visualization of very large aligned sequence data sets.

  14. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading: application of reliability analysis in structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunham Robert C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We establish that the occurrence of protein folds among genomes can be accurately described with a Weibull function. Systems which exhibit Weibull character can be interpreted with reliability theory commonly used in engineering analysis. For instance, Weibull distributions are widely used in reliability, maintainability and safety work to model time-to-failure of mechanical devices, mechanisms, building constructions and equipment. Results We have found that the Weibull function describes protein fold distribution within and among genomes more accurately than conventional power functions which have been used in a number of structural genomic studies reported to date. It has also been found that the Weibull reliability parameter β for protein fold distributions varies between genomes and may reflect differences in rates of gene duplication in evolutionary history of organisms. Conclusions The results of this work demonstrate that reliability analysis can provide useful insights and testable predictions in the fields of comparative and structural genomics.

  15. CGCI Investigators Reveal Comprehensive Landscape of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Genomes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers from British Columbia Cancer Agency used whole genome sequencing to analyze 40 DLBCL cases and 13 cell lines in order to fill in the gaps of the complex landscape of DLBCL genomes. Their analysis, “Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing,” was published online in Blood on May 22. The authors are Ryan Morin, Marco Marra, and colleagues.  

  16. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca with low coverage genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitemier Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L. have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L. could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp and 5S rDNA (120 bp sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp, with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae unigenes (median coverage of 0.29× and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×. From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species

  17. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L.) have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp) and 5S rDNA (120 bp) sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp), with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae) unigenes (median coverage of 0.29×) and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII) in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×). From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites) and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes) studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species and its relatives

  18. Large-scale parallel genome assembler over cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arghya Kusum; Koppa, Praveen Kumar; Goswami, Sayan; Platania, Richard; Park, Seung-Jong

    2017-06-01

    The size of high throughput DNA sequencing data has already reached the terabyte scale. To manage this huge volume of data, many downstream sequencing applications started using locality-based computing over different cloud infrastructures to take advantage of elastic (pay as you go) resources at a lower cost. However, the locality-based programming model (e.g. MapReduce) is relatively new. Consequently, developing scalable data-intensive bioinformatics applications using this model and understanding the hardware environment that these applications require for good performance, both require further research. In this paper, we present a de Bruijn graph oriented Parallel Giraph-based Genome Assembler (GiGA), as well as the hardware platform required for its optimal performance. GiGA uses the power of Hadoop (MapReduce) and Giraph (large-scale graph analysis) to achieve high scalability over hundreds of compute nodes by collocating the computation and data. GiGA achieves significantly higher scalability with competitive assembly quality compared to contemporary parallel assemblers (e.g. ABySS and Contrail) over traditional HPC cluster. Moreover, we show that the performance of GiGA is significantly improved by using an SSD-based private cloud infrastructure over traditional HPC cluster. We observe that the performance of GiGA on 256 cores of this SSD-based cloud infrastructure closely matches that of 512 cores of traditional HPC cluster.

  19. Cloud-Scale Genomic Signals Processing for Robust Large-Scale Cancer Genomic Microarray Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin Simeon; Ji, Soo-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    As microarray data available to scientists continues to increase in size and complexity, it has become overwhelmingly important to find multiple ways to bring forth oncological inference to the bioinformatics community through the analysis of large-scale cancer genomic (LSCG) DNA and mRNA microarray data that is useful to scientists. Though there have been many attempts to elucidate the issue of bringing forth biological interpretation by means of wavelet preprocessing and classification, there has not been a research effort that focuses on a cloud-scale distributed parallel (CSDP) separable 1-D wavelet decomposition technique for denoising through differential expression thresholding and classification of LSCG microarray data. This research presents a novel methodology that utilizes a CSDP separable 1-D method for wavelet-based transformation in order to initialize a threshold which will retain significantly expressed genes through the denoising process for robust classification of cancer patients. Additionally, the overall study was implemented and encompassed within CSDP environment. The utilization of cloud computing and wavelet-based thresholding for denoising was used for the classification of samples within the Global Cancer Map, Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, and The Cancer Genome Atlas. The results proved that separable 1-D parallel distributed wavelet denoising in the cloud and differential expression thresholding increased the computational performance and enabled the generation of higher quality LSCG microarray datasets, which led to more accurate classification results.

  20. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    OpenAIRE

    Esra Bektas

    2013-01-01

    The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005). The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002). The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are sup...

  1. Mass spectrometry allows direct identification of proteins in large genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küster, B; Mortensen, Peter V.; Andersen, Jens S.

    2001-01-01

    Proteome projects seek to provide systematic functional analysis of the genes uncovered by genome sequencing initiatives. Mass spectrometric protein identification is a key requirement in these studies but to date, database searching tools rely on the availability of protein sequences derived fro...... genome and allows identification, mapping, cloning and assistance in gene prediction of any protein for which minimal mass spectrometric information can be obtained. Several novel proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana and human have been discovered in this way....

  2. Characterization of large-insert DNA libraries from soil for environmental genomic studies of Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treusch, Alexander H; Kletzin, Arnulf; Raddatz, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    Complex genomic libraries are increasingly being used to retrieve complete genes, operons or large genomic fragments directly from environmental samples, without the need to cultivate the respective microorganisms. We report on the construction of three large-insert fosmid libraries in total cove......, are presented and discussed. We thereby extend the genomic information of uncultivated crenarchaeota from soil and offer hints to specific metabolic traits present in this group....

  3. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  4. MSDB: a user-friendly program for reporting distribution and building databases of microsatellites from genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lianming; Li, Yuzhi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite Search and Building Database (MSDB) is a new Perl program providing a user-friendly interface for identification and building databases of microsatellites from complete genome sequences. The general aims of MSDB are to use the database to store the information of microsatellites and to facilitate the management, classification, and statistics of microsatellites. A user-friendly interface facilitates the treatment of large datasets. The program is powerful in finding various types of pure, compound, and complex microsatellites from sequences as well as generating a detailed statistical report in worksheet format. MSDB also contains other two subprograms: SWR, which is used to export microsatellites from the database to meet user's requirements, and SWP, which is used to automatically invoke R to draw a sliding window plot for displaying the distribution of density or frequency of identified microsatellites. MSDB is freely available under the GNU General Public license for Windows and Linux from the following website: http://msdb.biosv.com/.

  5. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon C.K. Straub; Mark Fishbein; Tatyana Livshult; Zachary Foster; Matthew Parks; Kevin Weitemier; Richard C. Cronn; Aaron. Liston

    2011-01-01

    Milkweeds (Asclepias L.) have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in...

  6. Building accountability in large land acquisitions in Africa | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-20

    Apr 20, 2016 ... Large-scale land deals can bring benefits such as jobs, infrastructure, and access to food and markets. But when badly managed, they can dispossess people in rural communities and spark conflict. Women and other vulnerable groups face the greatest risks. IDRC is funding research in Africa to find ways ...

  7. MEBS, a software platform to evaluate large (meta)genomic collections according to their metabolic machinery: unraveling the sulfur cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anda, Valerie; Zapata-Peñasco, Icoquih; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Eguiarte, Luis E; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Souza, Valeria

    2017-11-01

    The increasing number of metagenomic and genomic sequences has dramatically improved our understanding of microbial diversity, yet our ability to infer metabolic capabilities in such datasets remains challenging. We describe the Multigenomic Entropy Based Score pipeline (MEBS), a software platform designed to evaluate, compare, and infer complex metabolic pathways in large "omic" datasets, including entire biogeochemical cycles. MEBS is open source and available through https://github.com/eead-csic-compbio/metagenome_Pfam_score. To demonstrate its use, we modeled the sulfur cycle by exhaustively curating the molecular and ecological elements involved (compounds, genes, metabolic pathways, and microbial taxa). This information was reduced to a collection of 112 characteristic Pfam protein domains and a list of complete-sequenced sulfur genomes. Using the mathematical framework of relative entropy (H΄), we quantitatively measured the enrichment of these domains among sulfur genomes. The entropy of each domain was used both to build up a final score that indicates whether a (meta)genomic sample contains the metabolic machinery of interest and to propose marker domains in metagenomic sequences such as DsrC (PF04358). MEBS was benchmarked with a dataset of 2107 non-redundant microbial genomes from RefSeq and 935 metagenomes from MG-RAST. Its performance, reproducibility, and robustness were evaluated using several approaches, including random sampling, linear regression models, receiver operator characteristic plots, and the area under the curve metric (AUC). Our results support the broad applicability of this algorithm to accurately classify (AUC = 0.985) hard-to-culture genomes (e.g., Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator), previously characterized ones, and metagenomic environments such as hydrothermal vents, or deep-sea sediment. Our benchmark indicates that an entropy-based score can capture the metabolic machinery of interest and can be used to efficiently classify

  8. Genome engineering reveals large dispensable regions in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westers, Helga; Dorenbos, Ronald; Dijl, Jan Maarten van; Kabel, Jorrit; Flanagan, Tony; Devine, Kevin M.; Jude, Florence; Séror, Simone J.; Beekman, Aäron C.; Darmon, Elise; Eschevins, Caroline; Jong, Anne de; Bron, Sierd; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Albertini, Alessandra M.; Antelmann, Haike; Hecker, Michael; Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe; Bruand, Claude; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Alonso, Juan C.; Salas, Margarita; Quax, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial genomes contain 250 to 500 essential genes, as suggested by single gene disruptions and theoretical considerations. If this view is correct, the remaining nonessential genes of an organism, such as Bacillus subtilis, have been acquired during evolution in its perpetually changing

  9. NAVIGATION IN LARGE-FORMAT BUILDINGS BASED ON RFID SENSORS AND QR AND AR MARKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Szymczyk; Jerzy Montusiewicz; Dariusz Gutek

    2016-01-01

    The authors address the problem of passive navigation in large buildings. Based on the example of several interconnected buildings housing departments of the Lublin University of Technology, as well as the conceptual navigation system, the paper presents one of the possible ways of leading the user from the entrance of the building to a particular room. An analysis of different types of users is made and different (best for them) ways of navigating the intricate corridors are proposed. Three ...

  10. Macro-economic benefit analysis of large scale building energy efficiency programs in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef Krarti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the economic, environmental, and social benefits of large-scale energy efficiency programs for new and existing buildings in Qatar. Using data obtained from detailed energy audits, several proven energy efficiency measures have been analyzed through optimized based analysis to assess their impact on the energy performance for both new and existing buildings in Qatar. Moreover, a bottom-up analysis approach is considered to quantify the multiple benefits for implementing large-scale building energy efficiency programs for the building stock in Qatar. In particular, a more stringent energy efficiency code for the new constructions and three energy retrofit levels for the existing buildings are considered in the analysis. A novel macro-economic analysis using the concept of energy productivity is used to assess the cost-benefit of large-scale energy efficiency programs in Qatar. It is determined that the implementation of a government funded large-scale energy retrofit program for the existing building stock is highly cost-effective in Qatar. In particular, it is found that a large-scale energy efficiency retrofit program of existing buildings can provide a reduction of 11,000 GWh in annual electricity consumption and 2500 MW in peak demand as well as over 5400 kilo-ton per year in carbon emissions. In addition, over 4000 jobs per year can be created when this large-scale energy retrofit program is implemented over 10-year period.

  11. Genoviz Software Development Kit: Java tool kit for building genomics visualization applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chervitz Stephen A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visualization software can expose previously undiscovered patterns in genomic data and advance biological science. Results The Genoviz Software Development Kit (SDK is an open source, Java-based framework designed for rapid assembly of visualization software applications for genomics. The Genoviz SDK framework provides a mechanism for incorporating adaptive, dynamic zooming into applications, a desirable feature of genome viewers. Visualization capabilities of the Genoviz SDK include automated layout of features along genetic or genomic axes; support for user interactions with graphical elements (Glyphs in a map; a variety of Glyph sub-classes that promote experimentation with new ways of representing data in graphical formats; and support for adaptive, semantic zooming, whereby objects change their appearance depending on zoom level and zooming rate adapts to the current scale. Freely available demonstration and production quality applications, including the Integrated Genome Browser, illustrate Genoviz SDK capabilities. Conclusion Separation between graphics components and genomic data models makes it easy for developers to add visualization capability to pre-existing applications or build new applications using third-party data models. Source code, documentation, sample applications, and tutorials are available at http://genoviz.sourceforge.net/.

  12. LARGE BUILDINGS CHARACTERISTICS AS RELATED TO RADON RESISTANCE: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a literature review to determine to what useful extent buildings have been characterized and a data base developed in relation to radon entry and mitigation. Prior to 1993, most radon research in large buildings was focused on developing diagnostic and...

  13. On Building and Processing of Large Digitalized Map Archive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Simunek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A tall list of problems needs to be solved during a long-time work on a virtual model of Prague aim of which is to show historical development of the city in virtual reality. This paper presents an integrated solution to digitalizing, cataloguing and processing of a large number of maps from different periods and from variety of sources. A specialized (GIS software application was developed to allow for a fast georeferencing (using an evolutionary algorithm, for cataloguing in an internal database, and subsequently for an easy lookup of relevant maps. So the maps could be processed further to serve as a main input for a proper modeling of a changing face of the city through times.

  14. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Energy Impacts for Large Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasnik, Michael [Blasnik & Associates, Roslindale, MA (United States); Dalhoff, Greg [Dalhoff & Associates, Verona, WI (United States); Carroll, David [APPRISE, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Ucar, Ferit [APPRISE, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report estimates energy savings, energy cost savings, and cost effectiveness attributable to weatherizing large multifamily buildings under the auspices of the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program during Program Year 2008.

  15. Large-scale building integrated photovoltaics field trial. First technical report - installation phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarises the results of the first eighteen months of the Large-Scale Building Integrated Photovoltaic Field Trial focussing on technical aspects. The project aims included increasing awareness and application of the technology, raising the UK capabilities in application of the technology, and assessing the potential for building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). Details are given of technology choices; project organisation, cost, and status; and the evaluation criteria. Installations of BIPV described include University buildings, commercial centres, and a sports stadium, wildlife park, church hall, and district council building. Lessons learnt are discussed, and a further report covering monitoring aspects is planned.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in premise plumbing of large buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Emilie; Prévost, Michèle; Déziel, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is widely occurring in the environment and is recognized for its capacity to form or join biofilms. The present review consolidates current knowledge on P. aeruginosa ecology and its implication in healthcare facilities premise plumbing. The adaptability of P. aeruginosa and its capacity to integrate the biofilm from the faucet and the drain highlight the role premise plumbing devices can play in promoting growth and persistence. A meta-analysis of P. aeruginosa prevalence in faucets (manual and electronic) and drains reveals the large variation in device positivity reported and suggest the high variability in the sampling approach and context as the main reason for this variation. The effects of the operating conditions that prevail within water distribution systems (disinfection, temperature, and hydraulic regime) on the persistence of P. aeruginosa are summarized. As a result from the review, recommendations for proactive control measures of water contamination by P. aeruginosa are presented. A better understanding of the ecology of P. aeruginosa and key influencing factors in premise plumbing are essential to identify culprit areas and implement effective control measures. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Building large telescopes in orbit using small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Chris; Lobb, Dan; Sweeting, Martin; Gao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    In many types of space mission there is a constant desire for larger and larger instrument apertures, primarily for the purposes of increased resolution or sensitivity. In the Radio Frequency domain, this is currently addressed by antennas that unfold or deploy on-orbit. However, in the optical and infrared domains, this is a significantly more challenging problem, and has up to now either been addressed by simply having large monolithic mirrors (which are fundamentally limited by the volume and mass lifting capacity of any launch vehicle) or by complex 'semi-folding' designs such as the James Webb Space Telescope. An alternative is to consider a fractionated instrument which is launched as a collection of individual smaller elements which are then assembled (or self-assemble) once in space, to form a much larger overall instrument. SSTL has been performing early concept assessment work on such systems for high resolution science observations from high orbits (potentially also for persistent surveillance of Earth). A point design of a 25 m sparse aperture (annular ring) telescope is presented. Key characteristics of 1) multiple small elements launched separately and 2) on-orbit assembly to form a larger instrument are included in the architecture. However, on-orbit assembly brings its own challenges in terms of guidance navigation and control, robotics, docking mechanisms, system control and data handling, optical alignment and stability, and many other elements. The number and type of launchers used, and the technologies and systems used heavily affect the outcome and general cost of the telescope. The paper describes one of the fractionated architecture concepts currently being studied by SSTL, including the key technologies and operational concepts that may be possible in the future.

  18. A protocol for large scale genomic DNA isolation for cacao genetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advances in DNA technology, such as marker assisted selection, detection of quantitative trait loci and genomic selection also require the isolation of DNA from a large number of samples and the preservation of tissue samples for future use in cacao genome studies. The present study proposes a method for the ...

  19. Large-scale chromosome folding versus genomic DNA sequences: A discrete double Fourier transform technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechetkin, V R; Lobzin, V V

    2017-08-07

    Using state-of-the-art techniques combining imaging methods and high-throughput genomic mapping tools leaded to the significant progress in detailing chromosome architecture of various organisms. However, a gap still remains between the rapidly growing structural data on the chromosome folding and the large-scale genome organization. Could a part of information on the chromosome folding be obtained directly from underlying genomic DNA sequences abundantly stored in the databanks? To answer this question, we developed an original discrete double Fourier transform (DDFT). DDFT serves for the detection of large-scale genome regularities associated with domains/units at the different levels of hierarchical chromosome folding. The method is versatile and can be applied to both genomic DNA sequences and corresponding physico-chemical parameters such as base-pairing free energy. The latter characteristic is closely related to the replication and transcription and can also be used for the assessment of temperature or supercoiling effects on the chromosome folding. We tested the method on the genome of E. coli K-12 and found good correspondence with the annotated domains/units established experimentally. As a brief illustration of further abilities of DDFT, the study of large-scale genome organization for bacteriophage PHIX174 and bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was also added. The combined experimental, modeling, and bioinformatic DDFT analysis should yield more complete knowledge on the chromosome architecture and genome organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer comprising at least two molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease.

  1. GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app): a new software tool for large-scale collaborative genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Michael A; Lebrigio, Rafael F Acosta; Van Booven, Derek; Ulloa, Rick H; Powell, Eric; Speziani, Fiorella; Tekin, Mustafa; Schüle, Rebecca; Züchner, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Novel genes are now identified at a rapid pace for many Mendelian disorders, and increasingly, for genetically complex phenotypes. However, new challenges have also become evident: (1) effectively managing larger exome and/or genome datasets, especially for smaller labs; (2) direct hands-on analysis and contextual interpretation of variant data in large genomic datasets; and (3) many small and medium-sized clinical and research-based investigative teams around the world are generating data that, if combined and shared, will significantly increase the opportunities for the entire community to identify new genes. To address these challenges, we have developed GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app), a software tool to annotate, manage, visualize, and analyze large genomic datasets (https://genomics.med.miami.edu/). GEM.app currently contains ∼1,600 whole exomes from 50 different phenotypes studied by 40 principal investigators from 15 different countries. The focus of GEM.app is on user-friendly analysis for nonbioinformaticians to make next-generation sequencing data directly accessible. Yet, GEM.app provides powerful and flexible filter options, including single family filtering, across family/phenotype queries, nested filtering, and evaluation of segregation in families. In addition, the system is fast, obtaining results within 4 sec across ∼1,200 exomes. We believe that this system will further enhance identification of genetic causes of human disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Small genomes and large seeds: chromosome numbers, genome size and seed mass in diploid Aesculus species (Sapindaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahulcová, Anna; Trávnícek, Pavel; Krahulec, František; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    Aesculus L. (horse chestnut, buckeye) is a genus of 12-19 extant woody species native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. This genus is known for unusually large seeds among angiosperms. While chromosome counts are available for many Aesculus species, only one has had its genome size measured. The aim of this study is to provide more genome size data and analyse the relationship between genome size and seed mass in this genus. Chromosome numbers in root tip cuttings were confirmed for four species and reported for the first time for three additional species. Flow cytometric measurements of 2C nuclear DNA values were conducted on eight species, and mean seed mass values were estimated for the same taxa. The same chromosome number, 2 n = 40, was determined in all investigated taxa. Original measurements of 2C values for seven Aesculus species (eight taxa), added to just one reliable datum for A. hippocastanum , confirmed the notion that the genome size in this genus with relatively large seeds is surprisingly low, ranging from 0·955 pg 2C -1 in A. parviflora to 1·275 pg 2C -1 in A. glabra var. glabra. The chromosome number of 2 n = 40 seems to be conclusively the universal 2 n number for non-hybrid species in this genus. Aesculus genome sizes are relatively small, not only within its own family, Sapindaceae, but also within woody angiosperms. The genome sizes seem to be distinct and non-overlapping among the four major Aesculus clades. These results provide an extra support for the most recent reconstruction of Aesculus phylogeny. The correlation between the 2C values and seed masses in examined Aesculus species is slightly negative and not significant. However, when the four major clades are treated separately, there is consistent positive association between larger genome size and larger seed mass within individual lineages.

  3. Large-scale genomic 2D visualization reveals extensive CG-AT skew correlation in bird genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xuemei

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bird genomes have very different compositional structure compared with other warm-blooded animals. The variation in the base skew rules in the vertebrate genomes remains puzzling, but it must relate somehow to large-scale genome evolution. Current research is inclined to relate base skew with mutations and their fixation. Here we wish to explore base skew correlations in bird genomes, to develop methods for displaying and quantifying such correlations at different scales, and to discuss possible explanations for the peculiarities of the bird genomes in skew correlation. Results We have developed a method called Base Skew Double Triangle (BSDT for exhibiting the genome-scale change of AT/CG skew as a two-dimensional square picture, showing base skews at many scales simultaneously in a single image. By this method we found that most chicken chromosomes have high AT/CG skew correlation (symmetry in 2D picture, except for some microchromosomes. No other organisms studied (18 species show such high skew correlations. This visualized high correlation was validated by three kinds of quantitative calculations with overlapping and non-overlapping windows, all indicating that chicken and birds in general have a special genome structure. Similar features were also found in some of the mammal genomes, but clearly much weaker than in chickens. We presume that the skew correlation feature evolved near the time that birds separated from other vertebrate lineages. When we eliminated the repeat sequences from the genomes, the AT and CG skews correlation increased for some mammal genomes, but were still clearly lower than in chickens. Conclusion Our results suggest that BSDT is an expressive visualization method for AT and CG skew and enabled the discovery of the very high skew correlation in bird genomes; this peculiarity is worth further study. Computational analysis indicated that this correlation might be a compositional characteristic

  4. Ways of modernization of large-panel residential buildings in Yerevan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakobyan Tigran Davidovich

    Full Text Available The present article discusses some problems of renovation and modernization of large-panel residential buildings built in the postwar period in Yerevan. The analysis of the current situation showed that today these buildings have many problems related to their functional and aesthetic aspects of quality and become obsolete. The floor plans don’t satisfy modern functional requirements of inhabitants: similar and repeatable types of buildings became the reason of large arrays of monotonously built up districts with low indicators of quality. Furthermore, there are many low quality extensions and add-ins to the buildings made by inhabitants without control, which destroy the architectural appearance of habitat. Yard places of large-panel residential buildings are occupied by car parks and road travel, buildings are cut off from courtyard areas, which as a consequence don’t meet tsocial and functional requirements of the people. The consideration of the international experience of large-panel old housing renovation in European countries has shown that the main activities include improving the energy efficiency of residential buildings with removing heat loss and using solar panels, contrast changes in architectural appearance with large terraces, loggias, using wide range of colors, add-in attics and enlarging the height and the use of space-planning decisions to increase the living space. Analyzing the current situation of the housing and the international experience of modernization the concept of complex modernization of large-panel buildings was offered, which suggested bringing it to life on three main levels of habitat: apartments, building shapes, residential environment and areas. The main goals of the concept are increasing the comfort of planning decisions as well as the total size of the apartment, improving architectural appearance of the building and introducing areas for public services to housing, increasing energy efficiency and

  5. Using an Energy Performance Based Design-Build Process to Procure a Large Scale Low-Energy Building: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Shelton, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper will review a procurement, acquisition, and contract process of a large-scale replicable net zero energy (ZEB) office building. The owners developed and implemented an energy performance based design-build process to procure a 220,000 ft2 office building with contractual requirements to meet demand side energy and LEED goals. We will outline the key procurement steps needed to ensure achievement of our energy efficiency and ZEB goals. The development of a clear and comprehensive Request for Proposals (RFP) that includes specific and measurable energy use intensity goals is critical to ensure energy goals are met in a cost effective manner. The RFP includes a contractual requirement to meet an absolute demand side energy use requirement of 25 kBtu/ft2, with specific calculation methods on what loads are included, how to normalize the energy goal based on increased space efficiency and data center allocation, specific plug loads and schedules, and calculation details on how to account for energy used from the campus hot and chilled water supply. Additional advantages of integrating energy requirements into this procurement process include leveraging the voluntary incentive program, which is a financial incentive based on how well the owner feels the design-build team is meeting the RFP goals.

  6. Small and large scale genomic DNA isolation protocol for chickpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both small and large scale preparations were essentially suitable for PCR and Southern blot hybridization analyses, which are the key steps in crop improvement programme through marker development and genetic engineering techniques. Key words: Cicer arietinum L., phenolics, restriction enzyme digestion, PCR ...

  7. Teaching Synthetic Biology, Bioinformatics and Engineering to Undergraduates: The Interdisciplinary Build-a-Genome Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Jessica S.; Scheifele, Lisa Z.; Richardson, Sarah; Lee, Pablo; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in undergraduate life science curricula is the continual evaluation and development of courses that reflect the constantly shifting face of contemporary biological research. Synthetic biology offers an excellent framework within which students may participate in cutting-edge interdisciplinary research and is therefore an attractive addition to the undergraduate biology curriculum. This new discipline offers the promise of a deeper understanding of gene function, gene order, and chromosome structure through the de novo synthesis of genetic information, much as synthetic approaches informed organic chemistry. While considerable progress has been achieved in the synthesis of entire viral and prokaryotic genomes, fabrication of eukaryotic genomes requires synthesis on a scale that is orders of magnitude higher. These high-throughput but labor-intensive projects serve as an ideal way to introduce undergraduates to hands-on synthetic biology research. We are pursuing synthesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes in an undergraduate laboratory setting, the Build-a-Genome course, thereby exposing students to the engineering of biology on a genomewide scale while focusing on a limited region of the genome. A synthetic chromosome III sequence was designed, ordered from commercial suppliers in the form of oligonucleotides, and subsequently assembled by students into ∼750-bp fragments. Once trained in assembly of such DNA “building blocks” by PCR, the students accomplish high-yield gene synthesis, becoming not only technically proficient but also constructively critical and capable of adapting their protocols as independent researchers. Regular “lab meeting” sessions help prepare them for future roles in laboratory science. PMID:19015540

  8. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    by visualizing coworkers’ task progress, automatic notifications based on context awareness, and record filing of task statuses and completions. This paper presents methods to sense and detect highly mobile workers’ tasks phases in large building complexes. Large building complexes restrict the technologies...... requirements on the accuracy of the indoor positioning, and thus come with low deployment and maintenance effort in real-world settings. We evaluated the proposed methods in a large hospital complex, where the highly mobile workers were recruited among the non-clinical workforce. The evaluation is based...... on manually labelled real-world data collected over 4 days of regular work life of the mobile workforce. The collected data yields 83 tasks in total involving 8 different orderlies from a major university hospital with a building area of 160, 000 m2. The results show that the proposed methods can distinguish...

  9. Genic regions of a large salamander genome contain long introns and novel genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basis of genome size variation remains an outstanding question because DNA sequence data are lacking for organisms with large genomes. Sixteen BAC clones from the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum: c-value = 32 × 109 bp were isolated and sequenced to characterize the structure of genic regions. Results Annotation of genes within BACs showed that axolotl introns are on average 10× longer than orthologous vertebrate introns and they are predicted to contain more functional elements, including miRNAs and snoRNAs. Loci were discovered within BACs for two novel EST transcripts that are differentially expressed during spinal cord regeneration and skin metamorphosis. Unexpectedly, a third novel gene was also discovered while manually annotating BACs. Analysis of human-axolotl protein-coding sequences suggests there are 2% more lineage specific genes in the axolotl genome than the human genome, but the great majority (86% of genes between axolotl and human are predicted to be 1:1 orthologs. Considering that axolotl genes are on average 5× larger than human genes, the genic component of the salamander genome is estimated to be incredibly large, approximately 2.8 gigabases! Conclusion This study shows that a large salamander genome has a correspondingly large genic component, primarily because genes have incredibly long introns. These intronic sequences may harbor novel coding and non-coding sequences that regulate biological processes that are unique to salamanders.

  10. Analysis of two large functionally uncharacterized regions in the Methanopyrus kandleri AV19 genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Skovgaard, Marie; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    , analysis of their lengths, codon usage, and Ribosomal Binding Site (RBS) sequences shows that they are most likely true protein coding genes and not random open reading frames.Conclusions: Although these regions can be considered as candidates for massive lateral gene transfer, our bioinformatics analysis......Background: For most sequenced prokaryotic genomes, about a third of the protein coding genes annotated are "orphan proteins", that is, they lack homology to known proteins. These hypothetical genes are typically short and randomly scattered throughout the genome. This trend is seen for most...... of the bacterial and archaeal genomes published to date.Results: In contrast we have found that a large fraction of the genes coding for such orphan proteins in the Methanopyrus kandleri AV19 genome occur within two large regions. These genes have no known homologs except from other M. kandleri genes. However...

  11. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  12. A comparative analysis of Indoor WiFi Positioning at a large building complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren; Stisen, Allan

    2016-01-01

    are in daily use. The positioning methods covered utilizes received signal strength from existing WiFi infrastructure to ease deployment and maintenance. We identify meaningful key metrics which describe different aspects of the methods’ performance. Using these metrics, we furthermore report on experiences...... with implementing and using indoor positioning solutions in a highly diverse environment, in which building types and materials, as well as building use differ across the complex. Correspondingly, the evaluation data we use is gathered at different complex parts, days, and daytimes, and both at static locations...... as well as traveling within the building complex. Our results illustrate and quantify the challenges and breakdowns in transferring performance results from a small controlled setting, such as a small office environment, to a large dynamic building complex....

  13. Analysis of savings due to multiple energy retrofits in a large office building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLain, H.A.; Leigh, S.B.; MacDonald, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this analysis was to characterize the benefits of the individual energy conservation measures that were applied to an existing large office building. The measures included those for lighting; those for the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; and an energy management and control system (EMCS). The purpose was to improve our understanding of the impacts of the individual measures in contrast to the entire group of measures that were installed during a building improvement project. The scope of the study was primarily analytical; it used an hourly building simulation model to estimate the benefits. Input parameters for this model were adjusted so that the calculated results matched closely with the available monthly electrical billing data. Supplemental building energy use data were collected and used to improve the adjustment of these parameters. The benefits of the individual measures were then calculated using the matched model.

  14. Study of the optimum haplotype length to build genomic relationship matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdosi, Mohammad H; Henshall, John; Tier, Bruce

    2016-09-29

    As genomic data becomes more abundant, genomic prediction is more routinely used to estimate breeding values. In genomic prediction, the relationship matrix ([Formula: see text]), which is traditionally used in genetic evaluations is replaced by the genomic relationship matrix ([Formula: see text]). This paper considers alternative ways of building relationship matrices either using single markers or haplotypes of different lengths. We compared the prediction accuracies and log-likelihoods when using these alternative relationship matrices and the traditional [Formula: see text] matrix, for real and simulated data. For real data, we built relationship matrices using 50k genotype data for a population of Brahman cattle to analyze three traits: scrotal circumference (SC), age at puberty (AGECL) and weight at first corpus luteum (WTCL). Haplotypes were phased with hsphase and imputed with BEAGLE. The relationship matrices were built using three methods based on haplotypes of different lengths. The log-likelihood was considered to define the optimum haplotype lengths for each trait and each haplotype-based relationship matrix. Based on simulated data, we showed that the inverse of [Formula: see text] matrix and the inverse of the haplotype relationship matrices for methods using one-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phased haplotypes provided coefficients of determination (R(2)) close to 1, although the estimated genetic variances differed across methods. Using real data and multiple SNPs in the haplotype segments to build the relationship matrices provided better results than the [Formula: see text] matrix based on one-SNP haplotypes. However, the optimal haplotype length to achieve the highest log-likelihood depended on the method used and the trait. The optimal haplotype length (7 to 8 SNPs) was similar for SC and AGECL. One of the haplotype-based methods achieved the largest increase in log-likelihood for SC, i.e. from -1330 when using [Formula: see text] to

  15. Panoptes: web-based exploration of large scale genome variation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauterin, Paul; Jeffery, Ben; Miles, Alistair; Amato, Roberto; Hart, Lee; Wright, Ian; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2017-10-15

    The size and complexity of modern large-scale genome variation studies demand novel approaches for exploring and sharing the data. In order to unlock the potential of these data for a broad audience of scientists with various areas of expertise, a unified exploration framework is required that is accessible, coherent and user-friendly. Panoptes is an open-source software framework for collaborative visual exploration of large-scale genome variation data and associated metadata in a web browser. It relies on technology choices that allow it to operate in near real-time on very large datasets. It can be used to browse rich, hybrid content in a coherent way, and offers interactive visual analytics approaches to assist the exploration. We illustrate its application using genome variation data of Anopheles gambiae, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Freely available at https://github.com/cggh/panoptes, under the GNU Affero General Public License. paul.vauterin@gmail.com.

  16. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  17. RADON PREVENTION IN THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOLS AND OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses radon prevention in the design and construction of schools and other large buildings. ased on studies in progress for the past 3 years, the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has started incorporating radon control measures into the design and...

  18. The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Workgroup: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Enters the Age of Large-Scale Genomic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Mark W; Amstadter, Ananda B; Baker, Dewleen G; Duncan, Laramie; Koenen, Karestan C; Liberzon, Israel; Miller, Mark W; Morey, Rajendra A; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Ressler, Kerry J; Smith, Alicia K; Smoller, Jordan W; Stein, Murray B; Sumner, Jennifer A; Uddin, Monica

    2015-09-01

    The development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is influenced by genetic factors. Although there have been some replicated candidates, the identification of risk variants for PTSD has lagged behind genetic research of other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder. Psychiatric genetics has moved beyond examination of specific candidate genes in favor of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) strategy of very large numbers of samples, which allows for the discovery of previously unsuspected genes and molecular pathways. The successes of genetic studies of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have been aided by the formation of a large-scale GWAS consortium: the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). In contrast, only a handful of GWAS of PTSD have appeared in the literature to date. Here we describe the formation of a group dedicated to large-scale study of PTSD genetics: the PGC-PTSD. The PGC-PTSD faces challenges related to the contingency on trauma exposure and the large degree of ancestral genetic diversity within and across participating studies. Using the PGC analysis pipeline supplemented by analyses tailored to address these challenges, we anticipate that our first large-scale GWAS of PTSD will comprise over 10 000 cases and 30 000 trauma-exposed controls. Following in the footsteps of our PGC forerunners, this collaboration-of a scope that is unprecedented in the field of traumatic stress-will lead the search for replicable genetic associations and new insights into the biological underpinnings of PTSD.

  19. A New Perspective on Polyploid Fragaria (Strawberry) Genome Composition Based on Large-Scale, Multi-Locus Phylogenetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yilong; Davis, Thomas M

    2017-12-01

    The subgenomic compositions of the octoploid (2n = 8× = 56) strawberry (Fragaria) species, including the economically important cultivated species Fragaria x ananassa, have been a topic of long-standing interest. Phylogenomic approaches utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies offer a new window into species relationships and the subgenomic compositions of polyploids. We have conducted a large-scale phylogenetic analysis of Fragaria (strawberry) species using the Fluidigm Access Array system and 454 sequencing platform. About 24 single-copy or low-copy nuclear genes distributed across the genome were amplified and sequenced from 96 genomic DNA samples representing 16 Fragaria species from diploid (2×) to decaploid (10×), including the most extensive sampling of octoploid taxa yet reported. Individual gene trees were constructed by different tree-building methods. Mosaic genomic structures of diploid Fragaria species consisting of sequences at different phylogenetic positions were observed. Our findings support the presence in octoploid species of genetic signatures from at least five diploid ancestors (F. vesca, F. iinumae, F. bucharica, F. viridis, and at least one additional allele contributor of unknown identity), and questions the extent to which distinct subgenomes are preserved over evolutionary time in the allopolyploid Fragaria species. In addition, our data support divergence between the two wild octoploid species, F. virginiana and F. chiloensis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Evaluation of exposure to lead from drinking water in large buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshommes, Elise; Andrews, Robert C; Gagnon, Graham; McCluskey, Tim; McIlwain, Brad; Doré, Evelyne; Nour, Shokoufeh; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Lead results from 78,971 water samples collected in four Canadian provinces from elementary schools, daycares, and other large buildings using regulatory and investigative sampling protocols were analyzed to provide lead concentration distributions. Maximum concentrations reached 13,200 and 3890 μg/L following long and short stagnation periods respectively. High lead levels were persistent in some large buildings, reflected by high median values considering all taps, or specific to a few taps in the building. Simulations using the Integrated Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and lead concentrations after 30 min of stagnation in the dataset showed that, for most buildings, exposure to lead at the tap does not increase children's blood lead levels (BLLs). However, buildings or taps with extreme concentrations represent a significant health risk to young children attending school or daycare, as the estimated BLL far exceeded the 5 μg/dL threshold. Ingestion of water from specific taps could lead to acute exposure. Finally, for a few taps, the total daily lead intake reached the former World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable level for adults, suggesting potential health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Building rooftop classification using random forests for large-scale PV deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Dan; Mohajeri, Nahid; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis

    2017-10-01

    Large scale solar Photovoltaic (PV) deployment on existing building rooftops has proven to be one of the most efficient and viable sources of renewable energy in urban areas. As it usually requires a potential analysis over the area of interest, a crucial step is to estimate the geometric characteristics of the building rooftops. In this paper, we introduce a multi-layer machine learning methodology to classify 6 roof types, 9 aspect (azimuth) classes and 5 slope (tilt) classes for all building rooftops in Switzerland, using GIS processing. We train Random Forests (RF), an ensemble learning algorithm, to build the classifiers. We use (2 × 2) [m2 ] LiDAR data (considering buildings and vegetation) to extract several rooftop features, and a generalised footprint polygon data to localize buildings. The roof classifier is trained and tested with 1252 labeled roofs from three different urban areas, namely Baden, Luzern, and Winterthur. The results for roof type classification show an average accuracy of 67%. The aspect and slope classifiers are trained and tested with 11449 labeled roofs in the Zurich periphery area. The results for aspect and slope classification show different accuracies depending on the classes: while some classes are well identified, other under-represented classes remain challenging to detect.

  2. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  3. Low frequency of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose female carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The majority of mutations identified are small deletions or insertions or are nonsense mutations. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 are found with varying frequencies in different populations......, but BRCA2 rearrangements have not been investigated thoroughly. The objective in this study was to determine the frequency of large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a large group of Danish families with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 617 families previously tested...... negative for mutations involving few bases were screened with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two deletions in BRCA1 were identified in three families; no large rearrangements were detected in BRCA2. The large deletions constitute 3.8% of the BRCA1 mutations identified, which...

  4. Genomic DNA from animals shows contrasting strand bias in large and small subsequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Kenneth J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For eukaryotes, there is almost no strand bias with regard to base composition, with exceptions for origins of replication and transcription start sites and transcribed regions. This paper revisits the question for subsequences of DNA taken at random from the genome. Results For a typical mammal, for example mouse or human, there is a small strand bias throughout the genomic DNA: there is a correlation between (G - C and (A - T on the same strand, (that is between the difference in the number of guanine and cytosine bases and the difference in the number of adenine and thymine bases. For small subsequences – up to 1 kb – this correlation is weak but positive; but for large windows – around 50 kb to 2 Mb – the correlation is strong and negative. This effect is largely independent of GC%. Transcribed and untranscribed regions give similar correlations both for small and large subsequences, but there is a difference in these regions for intermediate sized subsequences. An analysis of the human genome showed that position within the isochore structure did not affect these correlations. An analysis of available genomes of different species shows that this contrast between large and small windows is a general feature of mammals and birds. Further down the evolutionary tree, other organisms show a similar but smaller effect. Except for the nematode, all the animals analysed showed at least a small effect. Conclusion The correlations on the large scale may be explained by DNA replication. Transcription may be a modifier of these effects but is not the fundamental cause. These results cast light on how DNA mutations affect the genome over evolutionary time. At least for vertebrates, there is a broad relationship between body temperature and the size of the correlation. The genome of mammals and birds has a structure marked by strand bias segments.

  5. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  6. Investigation on mechanical exhaust of cabin fire in large-space building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A calculation model for mechanical exhaust rate in large-space building in the case of cabin fire is proposed through theoretical analysis. Full-scale hot smoke tests are then performed to study the cabin fire spreading to large-space building at different air change rates (ACH). The result indicates that under the standard prescribed ACH, the effective air heights in the large spaces are respectively 6, 4 and 2 m in the case of cabin fires of 0.34, 0.67 and 1 MW. Numerical experiment has been conducted using self-developing two-zone model. The smoke control efficiency is compared by varying the large space's air change rate in the case of cabin fires ranging from 0.25 to 4 MW. The calculation results show that the air change rates are respectively 3, 6, 10 and 10 ACH when the smoke layer is kept above 5 m, indicating that the centralized exhaust rates far exceed the standard prescribed value. To address this problem, a set of subsidiary distributed mechanical exhaust installing in the cabin with high fire loads is proposed. The simulation shows that both from the safety and economy point of view, the adoption of subsidiary distributed cabin exhaust design may effectively reduce the demand of designed air change rate for large-space building.

  7. Investigation on mechanical exhaust of cabin fire in large-space building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A calculation model for mechanical exhaust rate in large-space building in the case of cabin fire is proposed through theoretical analysis. Full-scale hot smoke tests are then performed to study the cabin fire spreading to large-space building at dif- ferent air change rates (ACH). The result indicates that under the standard pre- scribed ACH, the effective air heights in the large spaces are respectively 6, 4 and 2 m in the case of cabin fires of 0.34, 0.67 and 1 MW. Numerical experiment has been conducted using self-developing two-zone model. The smoke control effi- ciency is compared by varying the large space’s air change rate in the case of cabin fires ranging from 0.25 to 4 MW. The calculation results show that the air change rates are respectively 3, 6, 10 and 10 ACH when the smoke layer is kept above 5 m, indicating that the centralized exhaust rates far exceed the standard prescribed value. To address this problem, a set of subsidiary distributed mechanical exhaust installing in the cabin with high fire loads is proposed. The simulation shows that both from the safety and economy point of view, the adoption of subsidiary dis- tributed cabin exhaust design may effectively reduce the demand of designed air change rate for large-space building.

  8. Glass-covering of large building volumes. An interdisciplinary evaluation of a shopping centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeman, R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Technology

    1994-12-31

    Systematized experiences of the function of large glass-covered spaces related to shopping centres, hotels, office buildings etc. are still relatively limited. With the glazed pedestrian precincts of the rebuilt Skaerholmen Centre in Stockholm as the main object of interdisciplinary studies, the aim of this thesis is to provide additional knowledge of large glass-covered spaces (atrium buildings). The studies comprises thermal comfort, temperature conditions, ventilation, energy balance, humidity - mycology, acoustics, operation - maintenance - durability and sociology. To sum up, it is clear that in the Scandinavian climate there is every likelihood of large glass-covered spaces in the public places functioning well from a technical as well as a social point of view. The energy consumption on heating the whole complex, based on theoretical calculations and measurement, is shown to have been reduced by the order of 10%. figs., tabs., refs.

  9. Preconditions of emergence of large-span buildings in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sysoeva Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the design and construction of Olympic facilities in the world, preconditions of the emergence of large-span buildings and structures. Every example includes information about the building structural systems, names of architects and engineers, some interesting facts about the construction technology. There is a review about several Olympic stadiums in the world, including the stadium “Friendship”, Small Olympic Palace in Rome, indoor ice arena Makomanai in Sapporo (Japan, the Olympic stadium in Montreal, Kanteerava Indoor Stadium (India etc. The article includes opinions of scientists on the development of long-span structures in the coming years.

  10. Large-scale prokaryotic gene prediction and comparison to genome annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2005-01-01

    comparison either on a large or small scale would be facilitated by using a single standard for annotation, which incorporates a transparency of why an open reading frame (ORF) is considered to be a gene. Results: A total of 143 prokaryotic genomes were scored with an updated version of the prokaryotic...

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerhan, James R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Vijai, Joseph; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Wang, Sophia S.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Conde, Lucia; De Bakker, Paul I W; Nieters, Alexandra; Cox, David; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kane, Eleanor; Teras, Lauren R.; Purdue, Mark P.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Spinelli, John J.; Giles, Graham G.; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S.; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M.; Link, Brian K.; Novak, Anne J.; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W.; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Veron, Amelie S.; Zelenika, Diana; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans Olov; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Tinker, Lesley F.; North, Kari E.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W. Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J.; Villano, Danylo J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R.; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; Birmann, Brenda M.; Laden, Francine; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Sampson, Joshua; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju Hyun; Chung, Charles C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Slager, Susan L.; Wu, Xifeng; De Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Salles, Gilles; Skibola, Christine F.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of

  12. Assessment of Retrofitting Measures for a Large Historic Research Facility Using a Building Energy Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Tae Chae

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A calibrated building simulation model was developed to assess the energy performance of a large historic research building. The complexity of space functions and operational conditions with limited availability of energy meters makes it hard to understand the end-used energy consumption in detail and to identify appropriate retrofitting options for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. An energy simulation model was developed to study the energy usage patterns not only at a building level, but also of the internal thermal zones, and system operations. The model was validated using site measurements of energy usage and a detailed audit of the internal load conditions, system operation, and space programs to minimize the discrepancy between the documented status and actual operational conditions. Based on the results of the calibrated model and end-used energy consumption, the study proposed potential energy conservation measures (ECMs for the building envelope, HVAC system operational methods, and system replacement. It also evaluated each ECM from the perspective of both energy and utility cost saving potentials to help retrofitting plan decision making. The study shows that the energy consumption of the building was highly dominated by the thermal requirements of laboratory spaces. Among other ECMs the demand management option of overriding the setpoint temperature is the most cost effective measure.

  13. E-MEM: efficient computation of maximal exact matches for very large genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiste, Nilesh; Ilie, Lucian

    2015-02-15

    Alignment of similar whole genomes is often performed using anchors given by the maximal exact matches (MEMs) between their sequences. In spite of significant amount of research on this problem, the computation of MEMs for large genomes remains a challenging problem. The leading current algorithms employ full text indexes, the sparse suffix array giving the best results. Still, their memory requirements are high, the parallelization is not very efficient, and they cannot handle very large genomes. We present a new algorithm, efficient computation of MEMs (E-MEM) that does not use full text indexes. Our algorithm uses much less space and is highly amenable to parallelization. It can compute all MEMs of minimum length 100 between the whole human and mouse genomes on a 12 core machine in 10 min and 2 GB of memory; the required memory can be as low as 600 MB. It can run efficiently genomes of any size. Extensive testing and comparison with currently best algorithms is provided. The source code of E-MEM is freely available at: http://www.csd.uwo.ca/∼ilie/E-MEM/ CONTACT: ilie@csd.uwo.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. HiPiler: Visual Exploration of Large Genome Interaction Matrices with Interactive Small Multiples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekschas, Fritz; Bach, Benjamin; Kerpedjiev, Peter; Gehlenborg, Nils; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2017-08-29

    This paper presents an interactive visualization interface-HiPiler-for the exploration and visualization of regions-of-interest in large genome interaction matrices. Genome interaction matrices approximate the physical distance of pairs of regions on the genome to each other and can contain up to 3 million rows and columns with many sparse regions. Regions of interest (ROIs) can be defined, e.g., by sets of adjacent rows and columns, or by specific visual patterns in the matrix. However, traditional matrix aggregation or pan-and-zoom interfaces fail in supporting search, inspection, and comparison of ROIs in such large matrices. In HiPiler, ROIs are first-class objects, represented as thumbnail-like "snippets". Snippets can be interactively explored and grouped or laid out automatically in scatterplots, or through dimension reduction methods. Snippets are linked to the entire navigable genome interaction matrix through brushing and linking. The design of HiPiler is based on a series of semi-structured interviews with 10 domain experts involved in the analysis and interpretation of genome interaction matrices. We describe six exploration tasks that are crucial for analysis of interaction matrices and demonstrate how HiPiler supports these tasks. We report on a user study with a series of data exploration sessions with domain experts to assess the usability of HiPiler as well as to demonstrate respective findings in the data.

  15. Digital genotyping of sorghum – a diverse plant species with a large repeat-rich genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid acquisition of accurate genotyping information is essential for all genetic marker-based studies. For species with relatively small genomes, complete genome resequencing is a feasible approach for genotyping; however, for species with large and highly repetitive genomes, the acquisition of whole genome sequences for the purpose of genotyping is still relatively inefficient and too expensive to be carried out on a high-throughput basis. Sorghum bicolor is a C4 grass with a sequenced genome size of ~730 Mb, of which ~80% is highly repetitive. We have developed a restriction enzyme targeted genome resequencing method for genetic analysis, termed Digital Genotyping (DG), to be applied to sorghum and other grass species with large repeat-rich genomes. Results DG templates are generated using one of three methylation sensitive restriction enzymes that recognize a nested set of 4, 6 or 8 bp GC-rich sequences, enabling varying depth of analysis and integration of results among assays. Variation in sequencing efficiency among DG markers was correlated with template GC-content and length. The expected DG allele sequence was obtained 97.3% of the time with a ratio of expected to alternative allele sequence acquisition of >20:1. A genetic map aligned to the sorghum genome sequence with an average resolution of 1.47 cM was constructed using 1,772 DG markers from 137 recombinant inbred lines. The DG map enhanced the detection of QTL for variation in plant height and precisely aligned QTL such as Dw3 to underlying genes/alleles. Higher-resolution NgoMIV-based DG haplotypes were used to trace the origin of DNA on SBI-06, spanning Ma1 and Dw2 from progenitors to BTx623 and IS3620C. DG marker analysis identified the correct location of two miss-assembled regions and located seven super contigs in the sorghum reference genome sequence. Conclusion DG technology provides a cost-effective approach to rapidly generate accurate genotyping data in sorghum. Currently

  16. Use of adaptive optimal control to provide energy conservation in large buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farris, D.R.; Miller, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of an adaptive linear regulator approach for controlling heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in large buildings is discussed. The control manifestations of this approach are compared with those found in conventional applications. The salient features of the approach are discussed, and simulation results are presented. Implementation is discussed, and economic estimates for commercial use of this approach are also presented.

  17. Genomic characterization of large rearrangements of the LDLR gene in Czech patients with familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajkus Jiří

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the LDLR gene are the most frequent cause of Familial hypercholesterolemia, an autosomal dominant disease characterised by elevated concentrations of LDL in blood plasma. In many populations, large genomic rearrangements account for approximately 10% of mutations in the LDLR gene. Methods DNA diagnostics of large genomic rearrangements was based on Multiple Ligation dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA. Subsequent analyses of deletion and duplication breakpoints were performed using long-range PCR, PCR, and DNA sequencing. Results In set of 1441 unrelated FH patients, large genomic rearrangements were found in 37 probands. Eight different types of rearrangements were detected, from them 6 types were novel, not described so far. In all rearrangements, we characterized their exact extent and breakpoint sequences. Conclusions Sequence analysis of deletion and duplication breakpoints indicates that intrachromatid non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR between Alu elements is involved in 6 events, while a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is implicated in 2 rearrangements. Our study thus describes for the first time NHEJ as a mechanism involved in genomic rearrangements in the LDLR gene.

  18. [Indoor air pollution by volatile organic compounds in large buildings: pollution levels and remaining issues after revision of the Act on Maintenance of Sanitation in Buildings in 2002].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kamijima, Michihiro; Shibata, Eiji; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Tamie

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to clarify indoor air pollution levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), especially 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) in large buildings after revising of the Act on Maintenance of Sanitation in Buildings in 2002. We measured indoor air VOC concentrations in 57 (97%) out of a total of 61 large buildings completed within one year in half of the area of Nagoya, Japan, from 2003 through 2007. Airborne concentrations of 13 carbonyl compounds were determined with diffusion samplers and high-performance liquid chromatography, and of the other 32 VOCs with diffusion samplers and gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer. Formaldehyde was detected in all samples of indoor air but the concentrations were lower than the indoor air quality standard value set in Japan (100 microg/m3). Geometric mean concentrations of the other major VOCs, namely toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, styrene, p-dichlorobenzene and acetaldehyde were also low. 2E1H was found to be one of the predominating VOCs in indoor air of large buildings. A few rooms in a small number of buildings surveyed showed high concentrations of 2E1H, while low concentrations were observed in most rooms of those buildings as well as in other buildings. It was estimated that about 310 buildings had high indoor air pollution levels of 2E1H, with increase during the 5 years from 2003 in Japan. Indoor air pollution levels of VOCs in new large buildings are generally good, although a few rooms in a small number of buildings showed high concentrations in 2E1H, a possible causative chemical in sick building symptoms. Therefore, 2E1H needs particular attention as an important indoor air pollutant.

  19. Rainbow: a tool for large-scale whole-genome sequencing data analysis using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Prenger, Kurt; Smith, Lance; Messina, Thomas; Fan, Hongtao; Jaeger, Edward; Stephens, Susan

    2013-06-27

    Technical improvements have decreased sequencing costs and, as a result, the size and number of genomic datasets have increased rapidly. Because of the lower cost, large amounts of sequence data are now being produced by small to midsize research groups. Crossbow is a software tool that can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from a single subject; however, Crossbow has a number of limitations when applied to multiple subjects from large-scale WGS projects. The data storage and CPU resources that are required for large-scale whole genome sequencing data analyses are too large for many core facilities and individual laboratories to provide. To help meet these challenges, we have developed Rainbow, a cloud-based software package that can assist in the automation of large-scale WGS data analyses. Here, we evaluated the performance of Rainbow by analyzing 44 different whole-genome-sequenced subjects. Rainbow has the capacity to process genomic data from more than 500 subjects in two weeks using cloud computing provided by the Amazon Web Service. The time includes the import and export of the data using Amazon Import/Export service. The average cost of processing a single sample in the cloud was less than 120 US dollars. Compared with Crossbow, the main improvements incorporated into Rainbow include the ability: (1) to handle BAM as well as FASTQ input files; (2) to split large sequence files for better load balance downstream; (3) to log the running metrics in data processing and monitoring multiple Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances; and (4) to merge SOAPsnp outputs for multiple individuals into a single file to facilitate downstream genome-wide association studies. Rainbow is a scalable, cost-effective, and open-source tool for large-scale WGS data analysis. For human WGS data sequenced by either the Illumina HiSeq 2000 or HiSeq 2500 platforms, Rainbow can be used straight out of the box. Rainbow is available

  20. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  1. Large-scale genomic sequencing of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salipante, Stephen J.; Roach, David J.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Snyder, Matthew W.; Stackhouse, Bethany; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Lee, Choli; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale bacterial genome sequencing efforts to date have provided limited information on the most prevalent category of disease: sporadically acquired infections caused by common pathogenic bacteria. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing and de novo assembly of 312 blood- or urine-derived isolates of extraintestinal pathogenic (ExPEC) Escherichia coli, a common agent of sepsis and community-acquired urinary tract infections, obtained during the course of routine clinical care at a single institution. We find that ExPEC E. coli are highly genomically heterogeneous, consistent with pan-genome analyses encompassing the larger species. Investigation of differential virulence factor content and antibiotic resistance phenotypes reveals markedly different profiles among lineages and among strains infecting different body sites. We use high-resolution molecular epidemiology to explore the dynamics of infections at the level of individual patients, including identification of possible person-to-person transmission. Notably, a limited number of discrete lineages caused the majority of bloodstream infections, including one subclone (ST131-H30) responsible for 28% of bacteremic E. coli infections over a 3-yr period. We additionally use a microbial genome-wide-association study (GWAS) approach to identify individual genes responsible for antibiotic resistance, successfully recovering known genes but notably not identifying any novel factors. We anticipate that in the near future, whole-genome sequencing of microorganisms associated with clinical disease will become routine. Our study reveals what kind of information can be obtained from sequencing clinical isolates on a large scale, even well-characterized organisms such as E. coli, and provides insight into how this information might be utilized in a healthcare setting. PMID:25373147

  2. PopGeV: a web-based large-scale population genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinyi; Peng, Jing; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Dongye; Liu, Baohui; Kong, Fanjiang; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2015-09-15

    The development of high-throughput sequencing technology has made it possible for more and more researchers to use population sequencing data to mine genes associated with specific traits. However, the massive amounts of sequencing data have also brought new challenges to the researchers. The question of how to browse population genomic data in an easy and intuitive manner must be addressed. Web-based genome browsers allow user to conveniently view the results of genomic analyses, but heavy usage can reduce the response speed of the webpage, which limits its usefulness in the display of large-scale genome data. IndexedDB technology is a good solution to this problem; it supports web browsers and so creates local databases. In this way, data can be read from the local storage, achieving a smooth display of population genomic data. PopGeV has the following characteristics. First, it uses a new encoding method for compression of population SNP and INDEL data. IndexedDB technology is used to download the results to local storage so that users can browse the results smoothly even when the network traffic is heavy. Second, PopGeV identify similar genomic regions between two individuals based on SNP data. Population diversity indexes are calculated when comparing two populations. Third, user defined annotation information can be integrated for user-friendly mining of gene functions. Simulation shows that PopGeV can smoothly display analysis results of population genome containing over 500 individuals with 2 millions SNP data. PopGeV is available at www.soyomics.com/popgev/ yuanxh@iga.ac.cn. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hyper-expansion of large DNA segments in the genome of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondo Hidehiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher crustaceans (class Malacostraca represent the most species-rich and morphologically diverse group of non-insect arthropods and many of its members are commercially important. Although the crustacean DNA sequence information is growing exponentially, little is known about the genome organization of Malacostraca. Here, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and performed BAC-end sequencing to provide genomic information for kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus, one of the most widely cultured species among crustaceans, and found the presence of a redundant sequence in the BAC library. We examined the BAC clone that includes the redundant sequence to further analyze its length, copy number and location in the kuruma shrimp genome. Results Mj024A04 BAC clone, which includes one redundant sequence, contained 27 putative genes and seemed to display a normal genomic DNA structure. Notably, of the putative genes, 3 genes encode homologous proteins to the inhibitor of apoptosis protein and 7 genes encode homologous proteins to white spot syndrome virus, a virulent pathogen known to affect crustaceans. Colony hybridization and PCR analysis of 381 BAC clones showed that almost half of the BAC clones maintain DNA segments whose sequences are homologous to the representative BAC clone Mj024A04. The Mj024A04 partial sequence was detected multiple times in the kuruma shrimp nuclear genome with a calculated copy number of at least 100. Microsatellites based BAC genotyping clearly showed that Mj024A04 homologous sequences were cloned from at least 48 different chromosomal loci. The absence of micro-syntenic relationships with the available genomic sequences of Daphnia and Drosophila suggests the uniqueness of these fragments in kuruma shrimp from current arthropod genome sequences. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that hyper-expansion of large DNA segments took place in the kuruma shrimp genome. Although we

  4. Hyper-expansion of large DNA segments in the genome of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Takashi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Katagiri, Takayuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Fagutao, Fernand F; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Santos, Mudjekeewis D; Fuji, Kanako; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kitakado, Toshihide; Kondo, Hidehiro; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo

    2010-02-26

    Higher crustaceans (class Malacostraca) represent the most species-rich and morphologically diverse group of non-insect arthropods and many of its members are commercially important. Although the crustacean DNA sequence information is growing exponentially, little is known about the genome organization of Malacostraca. Here, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and performed BAC-end sequencing to provide genomic information for kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus), one of the most widely cultured species among crustaceans, and found the presence of a redundant sequence in the BAC library. We examined the BAC clone that includes the redundant sequence to further analyze its length, copy number and location in the kuruma shrimp genome. Mj024A04 BAC clone, which includes one redundant sequence, contained 27 putative genes and seemed to display a normal genomic DNA structure. Notably, of the putative genes, 3 genes encode homologous proteins to the inhibitor of apoptosis protein and 7 genes encode homologous proteins to white spot syndrome virus, a virulent pathogen known to affect crustaceans. Colony hybridization and PCR analysis of 381 BAC clones showed that almost half of the BAC clones maintain DNA segments whose sequences are homologous to the representative BAC clone Mj024A04. The Mj024A04 partial sequence was detected multiple times in the kuruma shrimp nuclear genome with a calculated copy number of at least 100. Microsatellites based BAC genotyping clearly showed that Mj024A04 homologous sequences were cloned from at least 48 different chromosomal loci. The absence of micro-syntenic relationships with the available genomic sequences of Daphnia and Drosophila suggests the uniqueness of these fragments in kuruma shrimp from current arthropod genome sequences. Our results demonstrate that hyper-expansion of large DNA segments took place in the kuruma shrimp genome. Although we analyzed only a part of the duplicated DNA segments, our

  5. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  6. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Roy; Lee, Robert W; Cushman, John C; Magnuson, Jon K; Tran, Duc; Polle, Jürgen E W

    2010-05-07

    Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of beta-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with approximately 60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: approximately 1.5 and approximately 0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  7. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Duc

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the

  8. Technical Support Document: Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.; Lobato, C.; Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) documents technical analysis that informs design guidance for designing and constructing large office buildings that achieve 50% net site energy savings over baseline buildings defined by minimal compliance with respect to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This report also represents a step toward developing a methodology for using energy modeling in the design process to achieve aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling and analysis methods used to identify design recommendations for six climate zones that capture the range of U.S. climate variability; demonstrates how energy savings change between ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and Standard 90.1-2004 to determine baseline energy use; uses a four-story 'low-rise' prototype to analyze the effect of building aspect ratio on energy use intensity; explores comparisons between baseline and low-energy building energy use for alternate energy metrics (net source energy, energy emissions, and energy cost); and examines the extent to which glass curtain construction limits achieve energy savings by using a 12-story 'high-rise' prototype.

  9. Government regulation and associated innovations in building energy-efficiency supervisory systems for large-scale public buildings in a market economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Xuezhi [China Academy of Building Research, Beijing 100013 (China)], E-mail: daixz9999@126.com; Wu Yong [Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100835 (China); Di Yanqiang [China Academy of Building Research, Beijing 100013 (China); Li Qiaoyan [Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-06-15

    The supervision of energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings is the main embodiment for government implementation of Public Administration in the fields of resource saving and environmental protection. Aimed at improving the current situation of lack of government administration in building energy efficiency, this paper proposes the concept of 'change and redesign of governmental supervision in building energy efficiency', repositioning the role of government supervision. Based on this theory and other related theories in regulation economic and modern management, this paper analyzes and researches the action and function of all level governments in execution of the supervisory system of building energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings. This paper also defines the importance of government supervision in energy-efficiency system. Finally, this paper analyzes and researches the interaction mechanism between government and owners of different type buildings, government and energy-efficiency service institution with gambling as main features. This paper also presents some measurements to achieve a common benefit community in implementation of building energy-efficiency supervisory system.

  10. Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH: revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xin-Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Studies have suggested that tumors with PL morphology represent a group of neoplasms with clinopathologic characteristics corresponding to different entities including extramedullary plasmablastic tumors associated with plasma cell myeloma (PCM. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the genetic similarities and differences among PL, DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related and PCM using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Results Examination of genomic data in PL revealed that the most frequent segmental gain (> 40% include: 1p36.11-1p36.33, 1p34.1-1p36.13, 1q21.1-1q23.1, 7q11.2-7q11.23, 11q12-11q13.2 and 22q12.2-22q13.3. This correlated with segmental gains occurring in high frequency in DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related cases. There were some segmental gains and some segmental loss that occurred in PL but not in the other types of lymphoma suggesting that these foci may contain genes responsible for the differentiation of this lymphoma. Additionally, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and AIDS associated DLBCL suggesting that these foci may be associated with HIV infection. Furthermore, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and PCM suggesting that these lesions may be related to plasmacytic differentiation. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first genomic exploration of PL. The genomic aberration pattern of PL appears to be more similar to that of DLBCL (AIDS-related or non AIDS-related than to PCM. Our findings suggest that PL may remain best classified as a subtype of DLBCL at least at the genome level.

  11. Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH): revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo; Taylor, Jesalyn J; Huang, Wan-Ting; Ren, Xianwen; Monzon, Federico; Feng, Yongdong; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Lu, Xin-Yan; Fabio, Facchetti; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Creighton, Chad J; Jaffe, Elaine S; Lau, Ching-Ching

    2009-11-12

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Studies have suggested that tumors with PL morphology represent a group of neoplasms with clinopathologic characteristics corresponding to different entities including extramedullary plasmablastic tumors associated with plasma cell myeloma (PCM). The goal of the current study was to evaluate the genetic similarities and differences among PL, DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related) and PCM using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Examination of genomic data in PL revealed that the most frequent segmental gain (> 40%) include: 1p36.11-1p36.33, 1p34.1-1p36.13, 1q21.1-1q23.1, 7q11.2-7q11.23, 11q12-11q13.2 and 22q12.2-22q13.3. This correlated with segmental gains occurring in high frequency in DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related) cases. There were some segmental gains and some segmental loss that occurred in PL but not in the other types of lymphoma suggesting that these foci may contain genes responsible for the differentiation of this lymphoma. Additionally, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and AIDS associated DLBCL suggesting that these foci may be associated with HIV infection. Furthermore, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and PCM suggesting that these lesions may be related to plasmacytic differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first genomic exploration of PL. The genomic aberration pattern of PL appears to be more similar to that of DLBCL (AIDS-related or non AIDS-related) than to PCM. Our findings suggest that PL may remain best classified as a subtype of DLBCL at least at the genome level.

  12. Bionimbus: a cloud for managing, analyzing and sharing large genomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Allison P; Greenway, Matthew; Powell, Raymond; Spring, Jonathan; Suarez, Rafael; Hanley, David; Bandlamudi, Chai; McNerney, Megan E; White, Kevin P; Grossman, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    As large genomics and phenotypic datasets are becoming more common, it is increasingly difficult for most researchers to access, manage, and analyze them. One possible approach is to provide the research community with several petabyte-scale cloud-based computing platforms containing these data, along with tools and resources to analyze it. Bionimbus is an open source cloud-computing platform that is based primarily upon OpenStack, which manages on-demand virtual machines that provide the required computational resources, and GlusterFS, which is a high-performance clustered file system. Bionimbus also includes Tukey, which is a portal, and associated middleware that provides a single entry point and a single sign on for the various Bionimbus resources; and Yates, which automates the installation, configuration, and maintenance of the software infrastructure required. Bionimbus is used by a variety of projects to process genomics and phenotypic data. For example, it is used by an acute myeloid leukemia resequencing project at the University of Chicago. The project requires several computational pipelines, including pipelines for quality control, alignment, variant calling, and annotation. For each sample, the alignment step requires eight CPUs for about 12 h. BAM file sizes ranged from 5 GB to 10 GB for each sample. Most members of the research community have difficulty downloading large genomics datasets and obtaining sufficient storage and computer resources to manage and analyze the data. Cloud computing platforms, such as Bionimbus, with data commons that contain large genomics datasets, are one choice for broadening access to research data in genomics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. The use of weighted graphs for large-scale genome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhou

    Full Text Available There is an acute need for better tools to extract knowledge from the growing flood of sequence data. For example, thousands of complete genomes have been sequenced, and their metabolic networks inferred. Such data should enable a better understanding of evolution. However, most existing network analysis methods are based on pair-wise comparisons, and these do not scale to thousands of genomes. Here we propose the use of weighted graphs as a data structure to enable large-scale phylogenetic analysis of networks. We have developed three types of weighted graph for enzymes: taxonomic (these summarize phylogenetic importance, isoenzymatic (these summarize enzymatic variety/redundancy, and sequence-similarity (these summarize sequence conservation; and we applied these types of weighted graph to survey prokaryotic metabolism. To demonstrate the utility of this approach we have compared and contrasted the large-scale evolution of metabolism in Archaea and Eubacteria. Our results provide evidence for limits to the contingency of evolution.

  14. Global repeat discovery and estimation of genomic copy number in a large, complex genome using a high-throughput 454 sequence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varala Kranthi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive computational and database tools are available to mine genomic and genetic databases for model organisms, but little genomic data is available for many species of ecological or agricultural significance, especially those with large genomes. Genome surveys using conventional sequencing techniques are powerful, particularly for detecting sequences present in many copies per genome. However these methods are time-consuming and have potential drawbacks. High throughput 454 sequencing provides an alternative method by which much information can be gained quickly and cheaply from high-coverage surveys of genomic DNA. Results We sequenced 78 million base-pairs of randomly sheared soybean DNA which passed our quality criteria. Computational analysis of the survey sequences provided global information on the abundant repetitive sequences in soybean. The sequence was used to determine the copy number across regions of large genomic clones or contigs and discover higher-order structures within satellite repeats. We have created an annotated, online database of sequences present in multiple copies in the soybean genome. The low bias of pyrosequencing against repeat sequences is demonstrated by the overall composition of the survey data, which matches well with past estimates of repetitive DNA content obtained by DNA re-association kinetics (Cot analysis. Conclusion This approach provides a potential aid to conventional or shotgun genome assembly, by allowing rapid assessment of copy number in any clone or clone-end sequence. In addition, we show that partial sequencing can provide access to partial protein-coding sequences.

  15. Building Participation in Large-scale Conservation: Lessons from Belize and Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Guite Hastings

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by biogeography and a desire for alignment with the funding priorities of donors, the twenty-first century has seen big international NGOs shifting towards a large-scale conservation approach. This shift has meant that even before stakeholders at the national and local scale are involved, conservation programmes often have their objectives defined and funding allocated. This paper uses the experiences of Conservation International′s Marine Management Area Science (MMAS programme in Belize and Panama to explore how to build participation at the national and local scale while working within the bounds of the current conservation paradigm. Qualitative data about MMAS was gathered through a multi-sited ethnographic research process, utilising document review, direct observation, and semi-structured interviews with 82 informants in Belize, Panama, and the United States of America. Results indicate that while a large-scale approach to conservation disadvantages early national and local stakeholder participation, this effect can be mediated through focusing engagement efforts, paying attention to context, building horizontal and vertical partnerships, and using deliberative processes that promote learning. While explicit consideration of geopolitics and local complexity alongside biogeography in the planning phase of a large-scale conservation programme is ideal, actions taken by programme managers during implementation can still have a substantial impact on conservation outcomes.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Unstably Stratified Turbulent Flow over Urban-Like Building Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal instability induced by solar radiation is the most common condition of urban atmosphere in daytime. Compared to researches under neutral conditions, only a few numerical works studied the unstable urban boundary layer and the effect of buoyancy force is unclear. In this paper, unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over three-dimensional urban-like building arrays with ground heating is simulated. Large eddy simulation is applied to capture main turbulence structures and the effect of buoyancy force on turbulence can be investigated. Lagrangian dynamic subgrid scale model is used for complex flow together with a wall function, taking into account the large pressure gradient near buildings. The numerical model and method are verified with the results measured in wind tunnel experiment. The simulated results satisfy well with the experiment in mean velocity and temperature, as well as turbulent intensities. Mean flow structure inside canopy layer varies with thermal instability, while no large secondary vortex is observed. Turbulent intensities are enhanced, as buoyancy force contributes to the production of turbulent kinetic energy.

  17. Fusion of large-scale genomic knowledge and frequency data computationally prioritizes variants in epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Campbell

    Full Text Available Curation and interpretation of copy number variants identified by genome-wide testing is challenged by the large number of events harbored in each personal genome. Conventional determination of phenotypic relevance relies on patterns of higher frequency in affected individuals versus controls; however, an increasing amount of ascertained variation is rare or private to clans. Consequently, frequency data have less utility to resolve pathogenic from benign. One solution is disease-specific algorithms that leverage gene knowledge together with variant frequency to aid prioritization. We used large-scale resources including Gene Ontology, protein-protein interactions and other annotation systems together with a broad set of 83 genes with known associations to epilepsy to construct a pathogenicity score for the phenotype. We evaluated the score for all annotated human genes and applied Bayesian methods to combine the derived pathogenicity score with frequency information from our diagnostic laboratory. Analysis determined Bayes factors and posterior distributions for each gene. We applied our method to subjects with abnormal chromosomal microarray results and confirmed epilepsy diagnoses gathered by electronic medical record review. Genes deleted in our subjects with epilepsy had significantly higher pathogenicity scores and Bayes factors compared to subjects referred for non-neurologic indications. We also applied our scores to identify a recently validated epilepsy gene in a complex genomic region and to reveal candidate genes for epilepsy. We propose a potential use in clinical decision support for our results in the context of genome-wide screening. Our approach demonstrates the utility of integrative data in medical genomics.

  18. Optimizing the Design of Chilled Water Plants in Large Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Dante'E.

    The design of chilled water plants has a very large impact on building energy use and energy operating costs. This thesis proposes procedures and analysis techniques for energy efficiency design of chilled water plants. The approach that leads to optimal design variables can achieve a significant saving in cooling cost. The optimal variables include piping sizing, chilled water temperature difference, and chilled water supply temperature. The objective function is the total cooling energy cost. The proposed design method depends on detailed cooling load analysis, head and energy calculations, and an optimization solver. The pump head calculations including piping, all fittings, valves, and devices are achieved by using the Darcy-Weisbach Equation and given flow parameters. The energy calculations are done by using generic chiller, fan, and pump models. The method is tested on an existing four-story building located in Greensboro, NC, equipped with a packaged water-cooled chiller. A whole building energy simulation model is used to generate the hourly cooling loads and then the optimal design variables are found to minimize the total energy cost. The testing results show this approach will achieve better results than rules-of-thumb or traditional design procedures. The cooling energy saving could be up to 10% depending on particular projects.

  19. NAVIGATION IN LARGE-FORMAT BUILDINGS BASED ON RFID SENSORS AND QR AND AR MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Szymczyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors address the problem of passive navigation in large buildings. Based on the example of several interconnected buildings housing departments of the Lublin University of Technology, as well as the conceptual navigation system, the paper presents one of the possible ways of leading the user from the entrance of the building to a particular room. An analysis of different types of users is made and different (best for them ways of navigating the intricate corridors are proposed. Three ways of user localisation are suggested: RFID, AR and QR markers. A graph of connections between specific rooms was made and weights proposed, representing “the difficulty of covering a given distance”. In the process of navigation Dijkstra’s algorithm was used. The road is indicated as multimedia information: a voice-over or animated arrow showing the direction displayed on the smart phone screen with proprietary software installed. It is also possible to inform the user of the position of the location in which he currently is, based on the static information stored in the QR code.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of vortex streets and dispersion behind high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Beom-Soon; Park, Seung-Bu; Baik, Jong-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Understanding flow and dispersion in densely built-up urban areas is one of the important problems in the field of urban fluid mechanics. Nowadays, sophisticated numerical models and high-resolution urban morphology data enable us to study detailed flow structures in real urban areas. Simulations with high-resolution urban morphology data show very complex flow structures in several studies. Here, we examine turbulent flow patterns and associated pollutant dispersion near and, particularly, behind high-rise buildings using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM) and high-resolution urban morphology data. The study area selected is a highly built-up area of Seoul, South Korea. It is shown that turbulent wakes are produced behind high-rise buildings and vortex streets appear in the places where turbulent wakes occur. The vortex street seems to be related to strong updrafts and ejections that appear downwind of high-rise buildings. The vortex street is found to affect pollutant dispersion. Various factors that influence the evolution and structure of vortex streets will be presented and discussed along with involved dispersion mechanisms.

  1. Evidence for large inversion polymorphisms in the human genome from HapMap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vikas; Bashir, Ali; Bafna, Vineet

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about structural variation in the human genome has grown tremendously in the past few years. However, inversions represent a class of structural variation that remains difficult to detect. We present a statistical method to identify large inversion polymorphisms using unusual Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) patterns from high-density SNP data. The method is designed to detect chromosomal segments that are inverted (in a majority of the chromosomes) in a population with respect to the reference human genome sequence. We demonstrate the power of this method to detect such inversion polymorphisms through simulations done using the HapMap data. Application of this method to the data from the first phase of the International HapMap project resulted in 176 candidate inversions ranging from 200 kb to several megabases in length. Our predicted inversions include an 800-kb polymorphic inversion at 7p22, a 1.1-Mb inversion at 16p12, and a novel 1.2-Mb inversion on chromosome 10 that is supported by the presence of two discordant fosmids. Analysis of the genomic sequence around inversion breakpoints showed that 11 predicted inversions are flanked by pairs of highly homologous repeats in the inverted orientation. In addition, for three candidate inversions, the inverted orientation is represented in the Celera genome assembly. Although the power of our method to detect inversions is restricted because of inherently noisy LD patterns in population data, inversions predicted by our method represent strong candidates for experimental validation and analysis. PMID:17185644

  2. Trans-oceanic genomic divergence of Atlantic cod ecotypes is associated with large inversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, P R; Star, B; Pampoulie, C; Bradbury, I R; Bentzen, P; Hutchings, J A; Jentoft, S; Jakobsen, K S

    2017-12-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions can play a crucial role in maintaining polymorphism underlying complex traits and contribute to the process of speciation. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), inversions of several megabases have been identified that dominate genomic differentiation between migratory and nonmigratory ecotypes in the Northeast Atlantic. Here, we show that the same genomic regions display elevated divergence and contribute to ecotype divergence in the Northwest Atlantic as well. The occurrence of these inversions on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean reveals a common evolutionary origin, predating the >100 000-year-old trans-Atlantic separation of Atlantic cod. The long-term persistence of these inversions indicates that they are maintained by selection, possibly facilitated by coevolution of genes underlying complex traits. Our data suggest that migratory behaviour is derived from more stationary, ancestral ecotypes. Overall, we identify several large genomic regions-each containing hundreds of genes-likely involved in the maintenance of genomic divergence in Atlantic cod on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

  3. KCNQ1 Gene Variants in Large Asymptomatic Populations: Considerations for Genomic Screening of Military Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszka, Paul; Weiss, Karin; Hadley, Donald W

    2017-03-01

    The advances in genomic technology of large populations make the potential for genomic screening of military cohorts and recruits feasible, affording the potential to identify at-risk individuals before occurrence of potentially life-threatening events. Exploring sudden cardiac death, known to cause significant morbidity and mortality in young military service members, we focused on the most common gene associated with long QT syndrome (LQTS), KCNQ1. Using the publicly available database Exome Aggregation Consortium as a surrogate for a military population, variants in KCNQ1 were filtered on the basis of population prevalence, classification as a disease mutation in the Human Gene Mutation database, and classification as pathogenic or likely pathogenic in the ClinVar database. Variant prevalence and penetrance estimates were derived using reports from the medical literature. We showed that in a population of over 60,000 individuals, at least 97 (0.2%) individuals would harbor a potentially pathogenic mutation in KCNQ1, which is more prevalent than expected on the basis of current medical literature (p = 0.0004). KCNQ1 variant penetrance was estimated to be only 9% to 17%. Identifying the importance of large genomic studies, our study demonstrates that 46% of pathogenic mutations in KCNQ1 had a population frequency of less than 1:50,000. Screening a large database with genomic screening for a condition that is relevant to active duty service members results in the identification of many individuals with potentially pathogenic mutations in the KCNQ1 gene, which has profound implications for screening military or other adult cohorts in terms of over diagnosis, overtreatment, and increased medical resource usage. This study of KCNQ1 provides a platform for consideration of other genes that cause sudden cardiac death as well as other medically actionable hereditary disorders for which genomic screening is available. We review the potential benefits of genomic screening

  4. Large scale rooftop photovoltaics grid connected system at Charoenphol-Rama I green building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketjoy, N.; Rakwichian, W. [School of Renewable Energy Technology (SERT) (Thailand); Wongchupan, V. [Panya Consultants Co., Ltd (Thailand); Sankarat, T. [Tesco Lotus, Ek-Chai Distribution System Co., Ltd. (Thailand)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a technical feasibility study project for the large scale rooftop photovoltaics (PV) grid connected system at Charoenphol-Rama I green building super store of TESCO LOTUS (TL) in Thailand. The objective of this project is (i) to study the technical feasibility of installation 350 kWp PV systems on the top of the roof in this site (ii) and to determine the energy produce from this system. The technical factors are examined using a computerized PVS 2000 simulation and assessment tool. This super store building located in Bangkok, with latitude 14 N, longitude 100 E and the building direction is 16 from North direction. The building roof area is 14,000 m2; with 3 degree face East and 3 degree face West pitch. Average daily solar energy in this area is approximately 5.0 kWh. The study team for this project consists of educational institution as School of Renewable Energy Technology (SERT) and private institution as Panya Consultants (PC). TL is the project owner, PC is responsible for project management, and SERT is a third party and responsible for PV system study, conceptual design and all technical process. In this feasibility studies SERT will identify the most attractive scenarios of photovoltaic cell technology (mono, poly-crystalline or thin film amorphous), system design concepts for owners (TL) and determine possibility of the energy yield of the system from different module orientation and tilt angle. The result of this study is a guide to help TL to make decision to select proper rooftop PV system option for this store with proper technology view. The economic view will not be considered in this study. (orig.)

  5. Optimization of a hybrid electric power system design for large commercial buildings: An application design guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun

    with the optimization of the hybrid system design (which consists of PV panels and/or wind turbines and/or storage devices for building applications) by developing an algorithm designed to make the system cost effective and energy efficient. Input data includes electrical load demand profile of the buildings, buildings' structural and geographical characteristics, real time pricing of electricity, and the costs of hybrid systems and storage devices. When the electrical load demand profile of a building that is being studied is available, a measured demand profile is directly used as input data. However, if that information is not available, a building's electric load demand is estimated using a developed algorithm based on three large data sources from a public domain, and used as input data. Using the acquired input data, the algorithm of this research is designed and programmed in order to determine the size of renewable components and to minimize the total yearly net cost. This dissertation also addresses the parametric sensitivity analysis to determine which factors are more significant and are expected to produce useful guidelines in the decision making process. An engineered and more practical, simplified solution has been provided for the optimized design process.

  6. High-efficiency targeted editing of large viral genomes by RNA-guided nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Bi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile and efficient method for the precise editing of large viral genomes is required for the selection of attenuated vaccine strains and the construction of gene therapy vectors. The type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-associated (Cas RNA-guided nuclease system can be introduced into host cells during viral replication. The CRISPR-Cas9 system robustly stimulates targeted double-stranded breaks in the genomes of DNA viruses, where the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ and homology-directed repair (HDR pathways can be exploited to introduce site-specific indels or insert heterologous genes with high frequency. Furthermore, CRISPR-Cas9 can specifically inhibit the replication of the original virus, thereby significantly increasing the abundance of the recombinant virus among progeny virus. As a result, purified recombinant virus can be obtained with only a single round of selection. In this study, we used recombinant adenovirus and type I herpes simplex virus as examples to demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system is a valuable tool for editing the genomes of large DNA viruses.

  7. DETERMINATION OF AIR EXCHANGE IN PUBLIC BUILDING PREMISES HAVING LARGE AREA OF TRANSLUCENT STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Borukhava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers reasons of internal air parameter mismatch in warm season of the year for public building premises having large area of translucent structures. The main reason of uncomfortable air environment is an underestimated value of air supply volume due to air exchange calculation according to multiplicity factor or air exchange rate per one person which are determinative values only for cold period and transient conditions. In other words multiplicity factor and air exchange rate do not take into account equipment abundance in modern offices and heat input of the office equipment is rather significant value. The paper contains an analysis and comparison of the existing air exchange rates for the Republic of Belarus, Russian Federation, European countries and USA. Calculation of heat input and air exchange for public building premises during warm season of the year for assimilation of evident heat excess has been made at various orientations of curtain walls. The paper provides structure of heat input into premises. The required rate of air supply volume per one person has been determined on the basis of air exchange and it has been compared with the existing air exchange rate. The required rate averagely exceeds the standard one by 12-fold. But this does not mean that there is necessity to increase the rate in such a way because it entails an increase in capital and operational costs. In this connection the paper reviews variants for improvement of micro-climate in the building premises with large area of translucent structures: automatic regulation of heat transfer in heating appliances during cold period of the year; usage of air conditioning and increase in temperature difference of input and output air during warm period.

  8. Towards Building a High Performance Spatial Query System for Large Scale Medical Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Saltz, Joel H

    2012-11-06

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of scientific spatial data is becoming increasingly important in many applications. This growth is driven by not only geospatial problems in numerous fields, but also emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. For example, digital pathology imaging has become an emerging field during the past decade, where examination of high resolution images of human tissue specimens enables more effective diagnosis, prediction and treatment of diseases. Systematic analysis of large-scale pathology images generates tremendous amounts of spatially derived quantifications of micro-anatomic objects, such as nuclei, blood vessels, and tissue regions. Analytical pathology imaging provides high potential to support image based computer aided diagnosis. One major requirement for this is effective querying of such enormous amount of data with fast response, which is faced with two major challenges: the "big data" challenge and the high computation complexity. In this paper, we present our work towards building a high performance spatial query system for querying massive spatial data on MapReduce. Our framework takes an on demand index building approach for processing spatial queries and a partition-merge approach for building parallel spatial query pipelines, which fits nicely with the computing model of MapReduce. We demonstrate our framework on supporting multi-way spatial joins for algorithm evaluation and nearest neighbor queries for microanatomic objects. To reduce query response time, we propose cost based query optimization to mitigate the effect of data skew. Our experiments show that the framework can efficiently support complex analytical spatial queries on MapReduce.

  9. High-throughput genome sequencing of two Listeria monocytogenes clinical isolates during a large foodborne outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trout-Yakel Keri M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large, multi-province outbreak of listeriosis associated with ready-to-eat meat products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a occurred in Canada in 2008. Subtyping of outbreak-associated isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE revealed two similar but distinct AscI PFGE patterns. High-throughput pyrosequencing of two L. monocytogenes isolates was used to rapidly provide the genome sequence of the primary outbreak strain and to investigate the extent of genetic diversity associated with a change of a single restriction enzyme fragment during PFGE. Results The chromosomes were collinear, but differences included 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and three indels, including a 33 kbp prophage that accounted for the observed difference in AscI PFGE patterns. The distribution of these traits was assessed within further clinical, environmental and food isolates associated with the outbreak, and this comparison indicated that three distinct, but highly related strains may have been involved in this nationwide outbreak. Notably, these two isolates were found to harbor a 50 kbp putative mobile genomic island encoding translocation and efflux functions that has not been observed in other Listeria genomes. Conclusions High-throughput genome sequencing provided a more detailed real-time assessment of genetic traits characteristic of the outbreak strains than could be achieved with routine subtyping methods. This study confirms that the latest generation of DNA sequencing technologies can be applied during high priority public health events, and laboratories need to prepare for this inevitability and assess how to properly analyze and interpret whole genome sequences in the context of molecular epidemiology.

  10. Sequence variants from whole genome sequencing a large group of Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sulem, Patrick; Helgason, Hannes; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Zink, Florian; Oddson, Asmundur; Magnusson, Gisli; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Hjartarson, Eirikur; Sigurdsson, Gunnar Th; Kong, Augustine; Helgason, Agnar; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    We have accumulated considerable data on the genetic makeup of the Icelandic population by sequencing the whole genomes of 2,636 Icelanders to depth of at least 10X and by chip genotyping 101,584 more. The sequencing was done with Illumina technology. The median sequencing depth was 20X and 909 individuals were sequenced to a depth of at least 30X. We found 20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1.5 million insertions/deletions (indels) that passed stringent quality control. Almost all the common SNPs (derived allele frequency (DAF) over 2%) that we identified in Iceland have been observed by either dbSNP (build 137) or the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) while only 60 and 20% of rare (DAFgenome, have been observed in the public databases. Features of our variant data, such as the transition/transversion ratio and the length distribution of indels, are similar to published reports.

  11. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauser, Loren [ORNL; Land, Miriam [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  12. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkasov Artem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using sequence-structure threading we have conducted structural characterization of complete proteomes of 37 archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic organisms (including worm, fly, mouse and human totaling 167,888 genes. Results The reported data represent first rather general evaluation of performance of full sequence-structure threading on multiple genomes providing opportunity to evaluate its general applicability for large scale studies. According to the estimated results the sequence-structure threading has assigned protein folds to more then 60% of eukaryotic, 68% of archaeal and 70% of bacterial proteomes. The repertoires of protein classes, architectures, topologies and homologous superfamilies (according to the CATH 2.4 classification have been established for distant organisms and superkingdoms. It has been found that the average abundance of CATH classes decreases from "alpha and beta" to "mainly beta", followed by "mainly alpha" and "few secondary structures". 3-Layer (aba Sandwich has been characterized as the most abundant protein architecture and Rossman fold as the most common topology. Conclusion The analysis of genomic occurrences of CATH 2.4 protein homologous superfamilies and topologies has revealed the power-law character of their distributions. The corresponding double logarithmic "frequency – genomic occurrence" dependences characteristic of scale-free systems have been established for individual organisms and for three superkingdoms. Supplementary materials to this works are available at 1.

  13. An optimized approach for annotation of large eukaryotic genomic sequences using genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Biswanath; Garai, Arnav; Garai, Gautam

    2017-10-24

    Detection of important functional and/or structural elements and identification of their positions in a large eukaryotic genomic sequence are an active research area. Gene is an important functional and structural unit of DNA. The computation of gene prediction is, therefore, very essential for detailed genome annotation. In this paper, we propose a new gene prediction technique based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) to determine the optimal positions of exons of a gene in a chromosome or genome. The correct identification of the coding and non-coding regions is difficult and computationally demanding. The proposed genetic-based method, named Gene Prediction with Genetic Algorithm (GPGA), reduces this problem by searching only one exon at a time instead of all exons along with its introns. This representation carries a significant advantage in that it breaks the entire gene-finding problem into a number of smaller sub-problems, thereby reducing the computational complexity. We tested the performance of the GPGA with existing benchmark datasets and compared the results with well-known and relevant techniques. The comparison shows the better or comparable performance of the proposed method. We also used GPGA for annotating the human chromosome 21 (HS21) using cross-species comparisons with the mouse orthologs. It was noted that the GPGA predicted true genes with better accuracy than other well-known approaches.

  14. BUSINESS STRATEGY OF LARGE CONTRACTORS IN ADOPTING INDUSTRIALISED BUILDING SYSTEM (IBS: THE MALAYSIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANKY AMBON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrialised Building System (IBS is the term coined by the government and industry in Malaysia to represent the construction industry and the application of prefabrication method in building construction. The purpose of this exploratory research paper is to highlight business strategy being pursued by large Malaysian contractors in adopting IBS. The paper uses case study as research method. The analysis is based primarily on cross-case analysis and pattern matching technique. The paper observes contractors which involved in IBS are part of larger holding companies in a corporate set-up include design and manufacturing subsidiaries. The companies positioned themselves as one-stop total solution provider for IBS and offer a wider range of services from design, production, and installation to clients. To become competitive and able to create total solution, contractors need to establish cluster and consortium of integrated project team by creating a partnership when and where it is needed. A vendor development programme modelled along the lines of the development of automotive industry should also be established. Future empirical studies should extensively examine these areas, especially the development of business model for contractors. The availability of this model could help to accelerate the uptake of IBS among contractors.

  15. Simplified large-scale Sanger genome sequencing for influenza A/H3N2 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kai Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and the resultant lower costs of sequencing have enabled production of massive amounts of data, including the generation of full genome sequences of pathogens. However, the small genome size of the influenza virus arguably justifies the use of the more conventional Sanger sequencing technology which is still currently more readily available in most diagnostic laboratories. RESULTS: We present a simplified Sanger-based genome sequencing method for sequencing the influenza A/H3N2 virus in a large-scale format. The entire genome sequencing was completed with 19 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs and 39 sequencing reactions. This method was tested on 15 native clinical samples and 15 culture isolates, respectively, collected between 2009 and 2011. The 15 native clinical samples registered quantification cycle values ranging from 21.0 to 30.56, which were equivalent to 2.4×10(3-1.4×10(6 viral copies/µL of RNA extract. All the PCR-amplified products were sequenced directly without PCR product purification. Notably, high quality sequencing data up to 700 bp were generated for all the samples tested. The completed sequence covered 408,810 nucleotides in total, with 13,627 nucleotides per genome, attaining 100% coding completeness. Of all the bases produced, an average of 89.49% were Phred quality value 40 (QV40 bases (representing an accuracy of circa one miscall for every 10,000 bases or higher, and an average of 93.46% were QV30 bases (one miscall every 1000 bases or higher. CONCLUSIONS: This sequencing protocol has been shown to be cost-effective and less labor-intensive in obtaining full influenza genomes. The constant high quality of sequences generated imparts confidence in extending the application of this non-purified amplicon sequencing approach to other gene sequencing assays, with appropriate use of suitably designed primers.

  16. Building Community Disaster Resilience: Perspectives From a Large Urban County Department of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Jonathan E.; Chandra, Anita; Williams, Malcolm; Eisenman, David; Wells, Kenneth B.; Law, Grace Y.; Fogleman, Stella; Magaña, Aizita

    2013-01-01

    An emerging approach to public health emergency preparedness and response, community resilience encompasses individual preparedness as well as establishing a supportive social context in communities to withstand and recover from disasters. We examine why building community resilience has become a key component of national policy across multiple federal agencies and discuss the core principles embodied in community resilience theory—specifically, the focus on incorporating equity and social justice considerations in preparedness planning and response. We also examine the challenges of integrating community resilience with traditional public health practices and the importance of developing metrics for evaluation and strategic planning purposes. Using the example of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project, we discuss our experience and perspective from a large urban county to better understand how to implement a community resilience framework in public health practice. PMID:23678937

  17. Axiomatic design in large systems complex products, buildings and manufacturing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Nam

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a synthesis of recent developments in Axiomatic Design theory and its application in large complex systems. Introductory chapters provide concise tutorial materials for graduate students and new practitioners, presenting the fundamentals of Axiomatic Design and relating its key concepts to those of model-based systems engineering. A mathematical exposition of design axioms is also provided. The main body of the book, which represents a concentrated treatment of several applications, is divided into three parts covering work on: complex products; buildings; and manufacturing systems. The book shows how design work in these areas can benefit from the scientific and systematic underpinning provided by Axiomatic Design, and in so doing effectively combines the state of the art in design research with practice. All contributions were written by an international group of leading proponents of Axiomatic Design. The book concludes with a call to action motivating further research into the engineeri...

  18. Building community disaster resilience: perspectives from a large urban county department of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plough, Alonzo; Fielding, Jonathan E; Chandra, Anita; Williams, Malcolm; Eisenman, David; Wells, Kenneth B; Law, Grace Y; Fogleman, Stella; Magaña, Aizita

    2013-07-01

    An emerging approach to public health emergency preparedness and response, community resilience encompasses individual preparedness as well as establishing a supportive social context in communities to withstand and recover from disasters. We examine why building community resilience has become a key component of national policy across multiple federal agencies and discuss the core principles embodied in community resilience theory-specifically, the focus on incorporating equity and social justice considerations in preparedness planning and response. We also examine the challenges of integrating community resilience with traditional public health practices and the importance of developing metrics for evaluation and strategic planning purposes. Using the example of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project, we discuss our experience and perspective from a large urban county to better understand how to implement a community resilience framework in public health practice.

  19. A forest-based feature screening approach for large-scale genome data with complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Fu, Guifang; Corcoran, Christopher

    2015-12-23

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) interrogate large-scale whole genome to characterize the complex genetic architecture for biomedical traits. When the number of SNPs dramatically increases to half million but the sample size is still limited to thousands, the traditional p-value based statistical approaches suffer from unprecedented limitations. Feature screening has proved to be an effective and powerful approach to handle ultrahigh dimensional data statistically, yet it has not received much attention in GWAS. Feature screening reduces the feature space from millions to hundreds by removing non-informative noise. However, the univariate measures used to rank features are mainly based on individual effect without considering the mutual interactions with other features. In this article, we explore the performance of a random forest (RF) based feature screening procedure to emphasize the SNPs that have complex effects for a continuous phenotype. Both simulation and real data analysis are conducted to examine the power of the forest-based feature screening. We compare it with five other popular feature screening approaches via simulation and conclude that RF can serve as a decent feature screening tool to accommodate complex genetic effects such as nonlinear, interactive, correlative, and joint effects. Unlike the traditional p-value based Manhattan plot, we use the Permutation Variable Importance Measure (PVIM) to display the relative significance and believe that it will provide as much useful information as the traditional plot. Most complex traits are found to be regulated by epistatic and polygenic variants. The forest-based feature screening is proven to be an efficient, easily implemented, and accurate approach to cope whole genome data with complex structures. Our explorations should add to a growing body of enlargement of feature screening better serving the demands of contemporary genome data.

  20. TwoPaCo: an efficient algorithm to build the compacted de Bruijn graph from many complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkin, Ilia; Pham, Son; Medvedev, Paul

    2016-09-21

    de Bruijn graphs have been proposed as a data structure to facilitate the analysis of related whole genome sequences, in both a population and comparative genomic settings. However, current approaches do not scale well to many genomes of large size (such as mammalian genomes). In this article, we present TwoPaCo, a simple and scalable low memory algorithm for the direct construction of the compacted de Bruijn graph from a set of complete genomes. We demonstrate that it can construct the graph for 100 simulated human genomes in less than a day and eight real primates in < 2 h, on a typical shared-memory machine. We believe that this progress will enable novel biological analyses of hundreds of mammalian-sized genomes. Our code and data is available for download from github.com/medvedevgroup/TwoPaCo. ium125@psu.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 genomes reference panels in a large-scale genome-wide association study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. de Vries (Paul); M. Sabater-Lleal (Maria); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); S. Trompet (Stella); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); M.-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); J. Attia (John); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); M. Steri (Maristella); Weng, L.-C. (Lu-Chen); R. Pool (Reńe); V. Grossmann (Vera); J. Brody (Jennifer); C. Venturini (Cristina); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); L.M. Rose (Lynda); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); J. Mazur (Johanna); S. Basu (Saonli); M. Frånberg (Mattias); Q. Yang (Qiong); S. Ligthart (Symen); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Rumley (Ann); Mulas, A. (Antonella); A.J. de Craen (Anton); A. Grotevendt (Anne); K.D. Taylor (Kent D.); G. Delgado; A. Kifley (Annette); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); T.L. Berentzen (Tina L.); M. Mangino (Massimo); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); Morrison, A.C. (Alanna C.); A. Hamsten (Anders); G.H. Tofler (Geoffrey); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); G. Draisma (Gerrit); G.D. Lowe (Gordon D.); M. Zoledziewska (Magdalena); N. Sattar (Naveed); Lackner, K.J. (Karl J.); U. Völker (Uwe); McKnight, B. (Barbara); J. Huang (Jian); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); McEvoy, M.A. (Mark A.); J.M. Starr (John); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); W. Guan (Weihua); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); Zeller, T. (Tanja); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); D.J. Stott (David J.); H. Binder (Harald); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Spector, T.D. (Tim D.); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); W. März (Winfried); A. Greinacher (Andreas); P.S. Wild (Philipp S.); F. Cucca (Francesco); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); Watkins, H. (Hugh); Tang, W. (Weihong); P.M. Ridker (Paul); J.W. Jukema; R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); T. Hansen (T.); O'Donnell, C.J. (Christopher J.); Smith, N.L. (Nicholas L.); D.P. Strachan (David P.); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAn increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G) for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap

  2. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Paul S; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Teumer, Alexander; Kleber, Marcus E; Chen, Ming-Huei; Wang, Jie Jin; Attia, John R; Marioni, Riccardo E; Steri, Maristella; Weng, Lu-Chen; Pool, Rene; Grossmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Frånberg, Mattias; Yang, Qiong; Ligthart, Symen; Hottenga, Jouke J; Rumley, Ann; Mulas, Antonella; De Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Kifley, Annette; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Morrison, Alanna C; Hamsten, Anders; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; Draisma, Harmen H M; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Lackner, Karl J; Völker, Uwe; McKnight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark A; Starr, John M; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Guan, Weihua; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McArdle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P. Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Psaty, Bruce M; Uitterlinden, André G; de Geus, Eco J C; Stott, David J; Binder, Harald; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Rotter, Jerome I; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Deary, Ian J; März, Winfried; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Cucca, Francesco; Boomsma, Dorret I; Watkins, Hugh; Tang, Weihong; Ridker, Paul M; Jukema, Jan W; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; Hansen, Torben; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G) for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap imputation. In

  3. Paleogenomic data suggest mammal-like genome size in the ancestral amniote and derived large genome size in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, C L; Canoville, A; Reisz, R R; Laurin, M

    2011-02-01

    An unsolved question in evolutionary genomics is whether amniote genomes have been expanding or contracting since the common ancestor of this diverse group. Here, we report on the polarity of amniote genome size evolution using genome size estimates for 14 extinct tetrapod genera from the Paleozoic and early Mesozoic Eras using osteocyte lacunae size as a correlate. We find substantial support for a phylogenetically controlled regression model relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae size (P of slopes <0.01, r²=0.65, phylogenetic signal λ=0.83). Genome size appears to have been homogeneous across Paleozoic crown-tetrapod lineages (average haploid genome size 2.9-3.7 pg) with values similar to those of extant mammals. The differentiation in genome size and underlying architecture among extant tetrapod lineages likely evolved in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras, with expansion in amphibians, contractions along the diapsid lineage, and no directional change within the synapsid lineage leading to mammals. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. Estimating demographic parameters from large-scale population genomic data using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC approach has been used to infer demographic parameters for numerous species, including humans. However, most applications of ABC still use limited amounts of data, from a small number of loci, compared to the large amount of genome-wide population-genetic data which have become available in the last few years. Results We evaluated the performance of the ABC approach for three 'population divergence' models - similar to the 'isolation with migration' model - when the data consists of several hundred thousand SNPs typed for multiple individuals by simulating data from known demographic models. The ABC approach was used to infer demographic parameters of interest and we compared the inferred values to the true parameter values that was used to generate hypothetical "observed" data. For all three case models, the ABC approach inferred most demographic parameters quite well with narrow credible intervals, for example, population divergence times and past population sizes, but some parameters were more difficult to infer, such as population sizes at present and migration rates. We compared the ability of different summary statistics to infer demographic parameters, including haplotype and LD based statistics, and found that the accuracy of the parameter estimates can be improved by combining summary statistics that capture different parts of information in the data. Furthermore, our results suggest that poor choices of prior distributions can in some circumstances be detected using ABC. Finally, increasing the amount of data beyond some hundred loci will substantially improve the accuracy of many parameter estimates using ABC. Conclusions We conclude that the ABC approach can accommodate realistic genome-wide population genetic data, which may be difficult to analyze with full likelihood approaches, and that the ABC can provide accurate and precise inference of demographic parameters from

  5. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: can genomics improve treatment options for a curable cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Peters, Tara L.; Li, Lingxiao; Rajan, Soumya Sundara; Choudhari, Ramesh; Puvvada, Soham D.

    2017-01-01

    Gene-expression profiling and next-generation sequencing have defined diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma diagnosis, as a heterogeneous group of subentities. Despite ongoing explosions of data illuminating disparate pathogenic mechanisms, however, the five-drug chemoimmunotherapy combination R-CHOP remains the frontline standard treatment. This has not changed in 15 years, since the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab was added to the CHOP backbone, which first entered use in the 1970s. At least a third of patients are not cured by R-CHOP, and relapsed or refractory DLBCL is fatal in ∼90%. Targeted small-molecule inhibitors against distinct molecular pathways activated in different subgroups of DLBCL have so far translated poorly into the clinic, justifying the ongoing reliance on R-CHOP and other long-established chemotherapy-driven combinations. New drugs and improved identification of biomarkers in real time, however, show potential to change the situation eventually, despite some recent setbacks. Here, we review established and putative molecular drivers of DLBCL identified through large-scale genomics, highlighting among other things the care that must be taken when differentiating drivers from passengers, which is influenced by the promiscuity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Furthermore, we discuss why, despite having so much genomic data available, it has been difficult to move toward personalized medicine for this umbrella disorder and some steps that may be taken to hasten the process. PMID:28487884

  6. Building a locally diploid genome and transcriptome of the diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paajanen, Pirita; Strauss, Jan; van Oosterhout, Cock; McMullan, Mark; Clark, Matthew D; Mock, Thomas

    2017-10-10

    The genome of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus is characterized by highly diverged haplotypes that intersperse its homozygous genome. Here, we describe how a combination of PacBio DNA and Illumina RNA sequencing can be used to resolve this complex genomic landscape locally into the highly diverged haplotypes, and how to map various environmentally controlled transcripts onto individual haplotypes. We assembled PacBio sequence data with the FALCON assembler and created a haplotype resolved annotation of the assembly using annotations of a Sanger sequenced F. cylindrus genome. RNA-seq datasets from six different growth conditions were used to resolve allele-specifc gene expression in F. cylindrus. This approach enables to study differential expression of alleles in a complex genomic landscape and provides a useful tool to study how diverged haplotypes in diploid organisms are used for adaptation and evolution to highly variable environments.

  7. RADON PREVENTION IN THE DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOLS & OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is typically easier and much less expensive to design and construct a new building with radon-resistant and/or easy-to-mitigate features, than to add these features after the building is completed and occupied. Therefore, when building in an area with the potential for elevate...

  8. PGen: large-scale genomic variations analysis workflow and browser in SoyKB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Khan, Saad M; Wang, Juexin; Rynge, Mats; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zeng, Shuai; Chen, Shiyuan; Maldonado Dos Santos, Joao V; Valliyodan, Babu; Calyam, Prasad P; Merchant, Nirav; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong; Joshi, Trupti

    2016-10-06

    With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and significant reductions in sequencing costs, it is now possible to sequence large collections of germplasm in crops for detecting genome-scale genetic variations and to apply the knowledge towards improvements in traits. To efficiently facilitate large-scale NGS resequencing data analysis of genomic variations, we have developed "PGen", an integrated and optimized workflow using the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) high-performance computing (HPC) virtual system, iPlant cloud data storage resources and Pegasus workflow management system (Pegasus-WMS). The workflow allows users to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletions (indels), perform SNP annotations and conduct copy number variation analyses on multiple resequencing datasets in a user-friendly and seamless way. We have developed both a Linux version in GitHub ( https://github.com/pegasus-isi/PGen-GenomicVariations-Workflow ) and a web-based implementation of the PGen workflow integrated within the Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB), ( http://soykb.org/Pegasus/index.php ). Using PGen, we identified 10,218,140 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,398,982 indels from analysis of 106 soybean lines sequenced at 15X coverage. 297,245 non-synonymous SNPs and 3330 copy number variation (CNV) regions were identified from this analysis. SNPs identified using PGen from additional soybean resequencing projects adding to 500+ soybean germplasm lines in total have been integrated. These SNPs are being utilized for trait improvement using genotype to phenotype prediction approaches developed in-house. In order to browse and access NGS data easily, we have also developed an NGS resequencing data browser ( http://soykb.org/NGS_Resequence/NGS_index.php ) within SoyKB to provide easy access to SNP and downstream analysis results for soybean researchers. PGen workflow has been optimized for the most

  9. First Insights into the Large Genome of Epimedium sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc) Maxim, a Chinese Traditional Medicinal Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Zeng, Shao-Hua; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xiao, Gong; Zhu, Lin-Yao; Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Epimedium sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc) Maxim is a member of the Berberidaceae family of basal eudicot plants, widely distributed and used as a traditional medicinal plant in China for therapeutic effects on many diseases with a long history. Recent data shows that E. sagittatum has a relatively large genome, with a haploid genome size of ~4496 Mbp, divided into a small number of only 12 diploid chromosomes (2n = 2x = 12). However, little is known about Epimedium genome structure and composition. Here we present the analysis of 691 kb of high-quality genomic sequence derived from 672 randomly selected plasmid clones of E. sagittatum genomic DNA, representing ~0.0154% of the genome. The sampled sequences comprised at least 78.41% repetitive DNA elements and 2.51% confirmed annotated gene sequences, with a total GC% content of 39%. Retrotransposons represented the major class of transposable element (TE) repeats identified (65.37% of all TE repeats), particularly LTR (Long Terminal Repeat) retrotransposons (52.27% of all TE repeats). Chromosome analysis and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization of Gypsy-Ty3 retrotransposons were performed to survey the E. sagittatum genome at the cytological level. Our data provide the first insights into the composition and structure of the E. sagittatum genome, and will facilitate the functional genomic analysis of this valuable medicinal plant. PMID:23807511

  10. First insights into the large genome of Epimedium sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc) Maxim, a Chinese Ttaditional medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Zeng, Shao-Hua; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xiao, Gong; Zhu, Lin-Yao; Wang, Ying

    2013-06-27

    Epimedium sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc) Maxim is a member of the Berberidaceae family of basal eudicot plants, widely distributed and used as a traditional medicinal plant in China for therapeutic effects on many diseases with a long history. Recent data shows that E. sagittatum has a relatively large genome, with a haploid genome size of ~4496 Mbp, divided into a small number of only 12 diploid chromosomes (2n = 2x = 12). However, little is known about Epimedium genome structure and composition. Here we present the analysis of 691 kb of high-quality genomic sequence derived from 672 randomly selected plasmid clones of E. sagittatum genomic DNA, representing ~0.0154% of the genome. The sampled sequences comprised at least 78.41% repetitive DNA elements and 2.51% confirmed annotated gene sequences, with a total GC% content of 39%. Retrotransposons represented the major class of transposable element (TE) repeats identified (65.37% of all TE repeats), particularly LTR (Long Terminal Repeat) retrotransposons (52.27% of all TE repeats). Chromosome analysis and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization of Gypsy-Ty3 retrotransposons were performed to survey the E. sagittatum genome at the cytological level. Our data provide the first insights into the composition and structure of the E. sagittatum genome, and will facilitate the functional genomic analysis of this valuable medicinal plant.

  11. Genome Partitioner: A web tool for multi-level partitioning of large-scale DNA constructs for synthetic biology applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Christen

    Full Text Available Recent advances in lower-cost DNA synthesis techniques have enabled new innovations in the field of synthetic biology. Still, efficient design and higher-order assembly of genome-scale DNA constructs remains a labor-intensive process. Given the complexity, computer assisted design tools that fragment large DNA sequences into fabricable DNA blocks are needed to pave the way towards streamlined assembly of biological systems. Here, we present the Genome Partitioner software implemented as a web-based interface that permits multi-level partitioning of genome-scale DNA designs. Without the need for specialized computing skills, biologists can submit their DNA designs to a fully automated pipeline that generates the optimal retrosynthetic route for higher-order DNA assembly. To test the algorithm, we partitioned a 783 kb Caulobacter crescentus genome design. We validated the partitioning strategy by assembling a 20 kb test segment encompassing a difficult to synthesize DNA sequence. Successful assembly from 1 kb subblocks into the 20 kb segment highlights the effectiveness of the Genome Partitioner for reducing synthesis costs and timelines for higher-order DNA assembly. The Genome Partitioner is broadly applicable to translate DNA designs into ready to order sequences that can be assembled with standardized protocols, thus offering new opportunities to harness the diversity of microbial genomes for synthetic biology applications. The Genome Partitioner web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomePartitioner.

  12. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags in the extreme large genomes Lilium and Tulipa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Arwa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bulbous flowers such as lily and tulip (Liliaceae family are monocot perennial herbs that are economically very important ornamental plants worldwide. However, there are hardly any genetic studies performed and genomic resources are lacking. To build genomic resources and develop tools to speed up the breeding in both crops, next generation sequencing was implemented. We sequenced and assembled transcriptomes of four lily and five tulip genotypes using 454 pyro-sequencing technology. Results Successfully, we developed the first set of 81,791 contigs with an average length of 514 bp for tulip, and enriched the very limited number of 3,329 available ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags for lily with 52,172 contigs with an average length of 555 bp. The contigs together with singletons covered on average 37% of lily and 39% of tulip estimated transcriptome. Mining lily and tulip sequence data for SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats showed that di-nucleotide repeats were twice more abundant in UTRs (UnTranslated Regions compared to coding regions, while tri-nucleotide repeats were equally spread over coding and UTR regions. Two sets of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers suitable for high throughput genotyping were developed. In the first set, no SNPs flanking the target SNP (50 bp on either side were allowed. In the second set, one SNP in the flanking regions was allowed, which resulted in a 2 to 3 fold increase in SNP marker numbers compared with the first set. Orthologous groups between the two flower bulbs: lily and tulip (12,017 groups and among the three monocot species: lily, tulip, and rice (6,900 groups were determined using OrthoMCL. Orthologous groups were screened for common SNP markers and EST-SSRs to study synteny between lily and tulip, which resulted in 113 common SNP markers and 292 common EST-SSR. Lily and tulip contigs generated were annotated and described according to Gene Ontology terminology. Conclusions

  13. Impact of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the ventilation of a cubic building with two large opposite openings

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Alain; Lucas, Franck; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to show the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the distribution of velocity in a building having two large openings. The knowledge of the flow form inside a building is useful to define a thermal environment favourable with thermal comfort and good air quality. In computational fluid dynamics, several profiles of atmospheric boundary layer can be used like logarithmic profiles or power profiles. This paper shows the impact o...

  14. Genetical Genomics Reveals Large Scale Genotype-By-Environment Interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, L Basten; Terpstra, Inez R; Dekter, René; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Peeters, Anton J M

    2012-01-01

    One of the major goals of quantitative genetics is to unravel the complex interactions between molecular genetic factors and the environment. The effects of these genotype-by-environment interactions also affect and cause variation in gene expression. The regulatory loci responsible for this variation can be found by genetical genomics that involves the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression traits also called expression-QTL (eQTLs). Most genetical genomics experiments published so far, are performed in a single environment and hence do not allow investigation of the role of genotype-by-environment interactions. Furthermore, most studies have been done in a steady state environment leading to acclimated expression patterns. However a response to the environment or change therein can be highly plastic and possibly lead to more and larger differences between genotypes. Here we present a genetical genomics study on 120 Arabidopsis thaliana, Landsberg erecta × Cape Verde Islands, recombinant inbred lines (RILs) in active response to the environment by treating them with 3 h of shade. The results of this experiment are compared to a previous study on seedlings of the same RILs from a steady state environment. The combination of two highly different conditions but exactly the same RILs with a fixed genetic variation showed the large role of genotype-by-environment interactions on gene expression levels. We found environment-dependent hotspots of transcript regulation. The major hotspot was confirmed by the expression profile of a near isogenic line. Our combined analysis leads us to propose CSN5A, a COP9 signalosome component, as a candidate regulator for the gene expression response to shade.

  15. Genetical genomics reveals large scale genotype-by-environment interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Basten eSnoek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals of quantitative genetics is to unravel the complex interactions between molecular genetic factors and the environment. The effects of these genotype-by-environment interactions also affect and cause variation in gene expression. The regulatory loci responsible for this variation can be found by genetical genomics that involves the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs for gene expression traits also called expression QTL (eQTLs. Most genetical genomics experiments published so far, are performed in a single environment and hence do not allow investigation of the role of genotype-by-environment interactions. Furthermore, most studies have been done in a steady state environment leading to acclimated expression patterns. However a response to the environment or change therein can be highly plastic and possibly lead to more and larger differences between genotypes. Here we present a genetical genomics study on 120 Arabidopsis thaliana, Landsberg erecta x Cape Verde Islands, recombinant inbred lines (RILs in active response to the environment by treating them with 3 hours of shade. The results of this experiment are compared to a previous study on seedlings of the same RILs from a steady state environment. The combination of two highly different conditions but exactly the same RILs with a fixed genetic variation showed the large role of genotype-by-environment interactions on gene expression levels.We found environment-dependent hotspots of transcript regulation. The major hotspot was confirmed by the expression profile of a near isogenic line. Our combined analysis leads us to propose CSN5A, a COP9 signalosome component, as a candidate regulator for the gene expression response to shade.

  16. Repair of base damage and genome maintenance in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, María L

    2014-01-22

    Among the DNA viruses, the so-called nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute a monophyletic group that currently consists of seven families of viruses infecting a very broad variety of eukaryotes, from unicellular marine protists to humans. Many recent papers have analyzed the sequence and structure of NCLDV genomes and their phylogeny, providing detailed analysis about their genomic structure and evolutionary history and proposing their inclusion in a new viral order named Megavirales that, according to some authors, should be considered as a fourth domain of life, aside from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The maintenance of genetic information protected from environmental attacks and mutations is essential not only for the survival of cellular organisms but also viruses. In cellular organisms, damaged DNA bases are removed in two major repair pathways: base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) that constitute the major pathways responsible for repairing most endogenous base lesions and abnormal bases in the genome by precise repair procedures. Like cells, many NCLDV encode proteins that might constitute viral DNA repair pathways that would remove damages through BER/NIR pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms and, specially, the biological roles of those viral repair pathways have not been deeply addressed in the literature so far. In this paper, we review viral-encoded BER proteins and the genetic and biochemical data available about them. We propose and discuss probable viral-encoded DNA repair mechanisms and pathways, as compared with the functional and molecular features of known homologs proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. SWAP-Assembler 2: Optimization of De Novo Genome Assembler at Large Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jintao; Seo, Sangmin; Balaji, Pavan; Wei, Yanjie; Wang, Bingqiang; Feng, Shengzhong

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we analyze and optimize the most time-consuming steps of the SWAP-Assembler, a parallel genome assembler, so that it can scale to a large number of cores for huge genomes with the size of sequencing data ranging from terabyes to petabytes. According to the performance analysis results, the most time-consuming steps are input parallelization, k-mer graph construction, and graph simplification (edge merging). For the input parallelization, the input data is divided into virtual fragments with nearly equal size, and the start position and end position of each fragment are automatically separated at the beginning of the reads. In k-mer graph construction, in order to improve the communication efficiency, the message size is kept constant between any two processes by proportionally increasing the number of nucleotides to the number of processes in the input parallelization step for each round. The memory usage is also decreased because only a small part of the input data is processed in each round. With graph simplification, the communication protocol reduces the number of communication loops from four to two loops and decreases the idle communication time. The optimized assembler is denoted as SWAP-Assembler 2 (SWAP2). In our experiments using a 1000 Genomes project dataset of 4 terabytes (the largest dataset ever used for assembling) on the supercomputer Mira, the results show that SWAP2 scales to 131,072 cores with an efficiency of 40%. We also compared our work with both the HipMER assembler and the SWAP-Assembler. On the Yanhuang dataset of 300 gigabytes, SWAP2 shows a 3X speedup and 4X better scalability compared with the HipMer assembler and is 45 times faster than the SWAP-Assembler. The SWAP2 software is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/swapassembler.

  18. Comparative genomics of 12 strains of Erwinia amylovora identifies a pan-genome with a large conserved core.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Mann

    Full Text Available The plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora can be divided into two host-specific groupings; strains infecting a broad range of hosts within the Rosaceae subfamily Spiraeoideae (e.g., Malus, Pyrus, Crataegus, Sorbus and strains infecting Rubus (raspberries and blackberries. Comparative genomic analysis of 12 strains representing distinct populations (e.g., geographic, temporal, host origin of E. amylovora was used to describe the pan-genome of this major pathogen. The pan-genome contains 5751 coding sequences and is highly conserved relative to other phytopathogenic bacteria comprising on average 89% conserved, core genes. The chromosomes of Spiraeoideae-infecting strains were highly homogeneous, while greater genetic diversity was observed between Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains (and among individual Rubus-infecting strains, the majority of which was attributed to variable genomic islands. Based on genomic distance scores and phylogenetic analysis, the Rubus-infecting strain ATCC BAA-2158 was genetically more closely related to the Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora than it was to the other Rubus-infecting strains. Analysis of the accessory genomes of Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains has identified putative host-specific determinants including variation in the effector protein HopX1(Ea and a putative secondary metabolite pathway only present in Rubus-infecting strains.

  19. The Centers for Mendelian Genomics: a new large-scale initiative to identify the genes underlying rare Mendelian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay A; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lifton, Richard P; Gerstein, Mark; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2012-07-01

    Next generation exome sequencing (ES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) are new powerful tools for discovering the gene(s) that underlie Mendelian disorders. To accelerate these discoveries, the National Institutes of Health has established three Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs): the Center for Mendelian Genomics at the University of Washington; the Center for Mendelian Genomics at Yale University; and the Baylor-Johns Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics at Baylor College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University. The CMGs will provide ES/WGS and extensive analysis expertise at no cost to collaborating investigators where the causal gene(s) for a Mendelian phenotype has yet to be uncovered. Over the next few years and in collaboration with the global human genetics community, the CMGs hope to facilitate the identification of the genes underlying a very large fraction of all Mendelian disorders; see http://mendelian.org. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Building a semantic web-based metadata repository for facilitating detailed clinical modeling in cancer genome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak K; Solbrig, Harold R; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Chute, Christopher G; Jiang, Guoqian

    2017-06-05

    Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) have been regarded as the basis for retaining computable meaning when data are exchanged between heterogeneous computer systems. To better support clinical cancer data capturing and reporting, there is an emerging need to develop informatics solutions for standards-based clinical models in cancer study domains. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a cancer genome study metadata management system that serves as a key infrastructure in supporting clinical information modeling in cancer genome study domains. We leveraged a Semantic Web-based metadata repository enhanced with both ISO11179 metadata standard and Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) Reference Model. We used the common data elements (CDEs) defined in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data dictionary, and extracted the metadata of the CDEs using the NCI Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) CDE dataset rendered in the Resource Description Framework (RDF). The ITEM/ITEM_GROUP pattern defined in the latest CIMI Reference Model is used to represent reusable model elements (mini-Archetypes). We produced a metadata repository with 38 clinical cancer genome study domains, comprising a rich collection of mini-Archetype pattern instances. We performed a case study of the domain "clinical pharmaceutical" in the TCGA data dictionary and demonstrated enriched data elements in the metadata repository are very useful in support of building detailed clinical models. Our informatics approach leveraging Semantic Web technologies provides an effective way to build a CIMI-compliant metadata repository that would facilitate the detailed clinical modeling to support use cases beyond TCGA in clinical cancer study domains.

  1. Fast and high precision algorithms for optimization in large-scale genomic problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, D I; Ronin, Y I; Nevo, E; Korol, A B

    2004-10-01

    There are several very difficult problems related to genetic or genomic analysis that belong to the field of discrete optimization in a set of all possible orders. With n elements (points, markers, clones, sequences, etc.), the number of all possible orders is n!/2 and only one of these is considered to be the true order. A classical formulation of a similar mathematical problem is the well-known traveling salesperson problem model (TSP). Genetic analogues of this problem include: ordering in multilocus genetic mapping, evolutionary tree reconstruction, building physical maps (contig assembling for overlapping clones and radiation hybrid mapping), and others. A novel, fast and reliable hybrid algorithm based on evolution strategy and guided local search discrete optimization was developed for TSP formulation of the multilocus mapping problems. High performance and high precision of the employed algorithm named guided evolution strategy (GES) allows verification of the obtained multilocus orders based on different computing-intensive approaches (e.g., bootstrap or jackknife) for detection and removing unreliable marker loci, hence, stabilizing the resulting paths. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated on standard TSP problems and on simulated data of multilocus genetic maps up to 1000 points per linkage group.

  2. Determining spatial chromatin organization of large genomic regions using 5C technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Nynke L; Dekker, Job

    2009-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromatin plays an important role at multiple levels of genome regulation. On a global scale, its function is evident in processes like metaphase and chromosome segregation. On a detailed level, long-range interactions between regulatory elements and promoters are essential for proper gene regulation. Microscopic techniques like FISH can detect chromatin contacts, although the resolution is generally low making detection of enhancer-promoter interaction difficult. The 3C methodology allows for high-resolution analysis of chromatin interactions. 3C is now widely used and has revealed that long-range looping interactions between genomic elements are widespread. However, studying chromatin interactions in large genomic regions by 3C is very labor intensive. This limitation is overcome by the 5C technology. 5C is an adaptation of 3C, in which the concurrent use of thousands of primers permits the simultaneous detection of millions of chromatin contacts. The design of the 5C primers is critical because this will determine which and how many chromatin interactions will be examined in the assay. Starting material for 5C is a 3C template. To make a 3C template, chromatin interactions in living cells are cross-linked using formaldehyde. Next, chromatin is digested and subsequently ligated under conditions favoring ligation events between cross-linked fragments. This yields a genome-wide 3C library of ligation products representing all chromatin interactions in vivo. 5C then employs multiplex ligation-mediated amplification to detect, in a single assay, up to millions of unique ligation products present in the 3C library. The resulting 5C library can be analyzed by microarray analysis or deep sequencing. The observed abundance of a 5C product is a measure of the interaction frequency between the two corresponding chromatin fragments. The power of the 5C technique described in this chapter is the high-throughput, high-resolution, and quantitative way

  3. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early...... adulthood, asthma is frequently associated also with quantitative measures of atopy. Genome wide quantitative multipoint linkage analysis was conducted for serum IgE levels and percentage of positive skin prick test (SPT(per)) using three large groups of families originally ascertained for asthma....... In this report, 438 and 429 asthma families were informative for linkage using IgE and SPT(per) which represents 690 independent families. Suggestive linkage (LOD >/= 2) was found on chromosomes 1, 3, and 8q with maximum LODs of 2.34 (IgE), 2.03 (SPT(per)), and 2.25 (IgE) near markers D1S1653, D3S2322-D3S1764...

  4. Ethical issues and GenomEUtwin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, J.R.; Willemsen, G.; Aitlahti, T.; Petrini, C.; Evans, A.; Silander, K.; Cirrincione, L.; Kyvik, K.

    2003-01-01

    The post-genomic era is witnessing a proliferation of large-scale and population based genetic and genomic research projects. Many countries have or are establishing research biobanks and, as with GenomEUtwin, there is great interest in building multinational projects that link genotypic and

  5. Software engineering the mixed model for genome-wide association studies on large samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Buckler, Edward S; Casstevens, Terry M; Bradbury, Peter J

    2009-11-01

    Mixed models improve the ability to detect phenotype-genotype associations in the presence of population stratification and multiple levels of relatedness in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but for large data sets the resource consumption becomes impractical. At the same time, the sample size and number of markers used for GWAS is increasing dramatically, resulting in greater statistical power to detect those associations. The use of mixed models with increasingly large data sets depends on the availability of software for analyzing those models. While multiple software packages implement the mixed model method, no single package provides the best combination of fast computation, ability to handle large samples, flexible modeling and ease of use. Key elements of association analysis with mixed models are reviewed, including modeling phenotype-genotype associations using mixed models, population stratification, kinship and its estimation, variance component estimation, use of best linear unbiased predictors or residuals in place of raw phenotype, improving efficiency and software-user interaction. The available software packages are evaluated, and suggestions made for future software development.

  6. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Paul S; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chasman, Daniel I

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G) for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap imputation....... In order to assess the improvement of 1000G over HapMap imputation in identifying associated loci, we compared the results of GWA studies of circulating fibrinogen based on the two reference panels. Using both HapMap and 1000G imputation we performed a meta-analysis of 22 studies comprising the same 91......,953 individuals. We identified six additional signals using 1000G imputation, while 29 loci were associated using both HapMap and 1000G imputation. One locus identified using HapMap imputation was not significant using 1000G imputation. The genome-wide significance threshold of 5×10-8 is based on the number...

  7. ENERGY DEMANDS OF THE EXISTING COLLECTIVE BUILDINGS WITH BEARING STRUCTURE OF LARGE PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS FROM TIMISOARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pescari S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the targets of EU Directives on the energy performance of buildings is to reduce the energy consumption of the existing buildings by finding efficient solutions for thermal rehabilitation. In order to find the adequate solutions, the first step is to establish the current state of the buildings and to determine their actual energy consumption. The current paper aims to present the energy demands of the existing buildings with bearing structure of large precast concrete panels in the city of Timisoara. Timisoara is one of the most important cities in the west side of Romania, being on the third place in terms of size and economic development. The Census of Population and Housing of 2011 states that Timisoara has about 127841 private dwellings and 60 percent of them are collective buildings. Energy demand values of the existing buildings with bearing structure of large precast concrete panels in Timisoara, in their current condition, are higher than the accepted values provided in the Romanian normative, C107. The difference between these two values can reach up to 300 percent.

  8. Improving mammalian genome scaffolding using large insert mate-pair next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Lansu, Nico; Ruzius, Frans-Paul; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Lee, Clarence C.; Zhou, Shiguo; Goldstein, Steve; Schwartz, David C.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Paired-tag sequencing approaches are commonly used for the analysis of genome structure. However, mammalian genomes have a complex organization with a variety of repetitive elements that complicate comprehensive genome-wide analyses. Results: Here, we systematically assessed the utility

  9. A Review on Genomics APIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Huang, Yungui; Moosavinasab, Soheil; Buckley, Ronald; Bartlett, Christopher W; Lin, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API) for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a) Google Genomics, b) SMART Genomics, and c) 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available) and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  10. A Review on Genomics APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  11. A Tool for Optimizing the Build Performance of Large Software Code Bases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Voinea, Lucian; Kontogiannis, K; Tjortjis, C; Winter, A

    2008-01-01

    We present Build Analyzer, a tool that helps developers optimize the build performance of huge systems written in C Due to complex C header dependencies, even small code changes can cause extremely long rebuilds, which are problematic when code is shared and modified by teams of hundreds of

  12. Enabling the 2nd Generation in Space: Building Blocks for Large Scale Space Endeavours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, D.; Garretson, P.; Will, P.

    Today the world operates within a "first generation" space industrial enterprise, i.e. all industry is on Earth, all value from space is from bits (data essentially), and the focus is Earth-centric, with very limited parts of our population and industry participating in space. We are limited in access, manoeuvring, on-orbit servicing, in-space power, in-space manufacturing and assembly. The transition to a "Starship culture" requires the Earth to progress to a "second generation" space industrial base, which implies the need to expand the economic sphere of activity of mankind outside of an Earth-centric zone and into CIS-lunar space and beyond, with an equal ability to tap the indigenous resources in space (energy, location, materials) that will contribute to an expanding space economy. Right now, there is no comfortable place for space applications that are not discovery science, exploration, military, or established earth bound services. For the most part, space applications leave out -- or at least leave nebulous, unconsolidated, and without a critical mass -- programs and development efforts for infrastructure, industrialization, space resources (survey and process maturation), non-traditional and persistent security situational awareness, and global utilities -- all of which, to a far greater extent than a discovery and exploration program, may help determine the elements of a 2nd generation space capability. We propose a focus to seed the pre-competitive research that will enable global industry to develop the necessary competencies that we currently lack to build large scale space structures on-orbit, that in turn would lay the foundation for long duration spacecraft travel (i.e. key technologies in access, manoeuvrability, etc.). This paper will posit a vision-to-reality for a step wise approach to the types of activities the US and global space providers could embark upon to lay the foundation for the 2nd generation of Earth in space.

  13. The homologous recombination protein RAD51D protects the genome from large deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Wade A; Nairn, Rodney S; Lowery, Megan P; Vasquez, Karen M

    2017-02-28

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that protects the genome from chromosomal instability. RAD51 mediator proteins (i.e. paralogs) are critical for efficient HR in mammalian cells. However, how HR-deficient cells process DSBs is not clear. Here, we utilized a loss-of-function HR-reporter substrate to simultaneously monitor HR-mediated gene conversion and non-conservative mutation events. The assay is designed around a heteroallelic duplication of the Aprt gene at its endogenous locus in isogenic Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. We found that RAD51D-deficient cells had a reduced capacity for HR-mediated gene conversion both spontaneously and in response to I-SceI-induced DSBs. Further, RAD51D-deficiency shifted DSB repair toward highly deleterious single-strand annealing (SSA) and end-joining processes that led to the loss of large chromosomal segments surrounding site-specific DSBs at an exceptionally high frequency. Deletions in the proximity of the break were due to a non-homologous end-joining pathway, while larger deletions were processed via a SSA pathway. Overall, our data revealed that, in addition to leading to chromosomal abnormalities, RAD51D-deficiency resulted in a high frequency of deletions advancing our understanding of how a RAD51 paralog is involved in maintaining genomic stability and how its deficiency may predispose cells to tumorigenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Experiences Building Globus Genomics: A Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis Service using Galaxy, Globus, and Amazon Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madduri, Ravi K; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Lacinski, Lukasz; Liu, Bo; Rodriguez, Alex; Chard, Kyle; Dave, Utpal J; Foster, Ian T

    2014-09-10

    We describe Globus Genomics, a system that we have developed for rapid analysis of large quantities of next-generation sequencing (NGS) genomic data. This system achieves a high degree of end-to-end automation that encompasses every stage of data analysis including initial data retrieval from remote sequencing centers or storage (via the Globus file transfer system); specification, configuration, and reuse of multi-step processing pipelines (via the Galaxy workflow system); creation of custom Amazon Machine Images and on-demand resource acquisition via a specialized elastic provisioner (on Amazon EC2); and efficient scheduling of these pipelines over many processors (via the HTCondor scheduler). The system allows biomedical researchers to perform rapid analysis of large NGS datasets in a fully automated manner, without software installation or a need for any local computing infrastructure. We report performance and cost results for some representative workloads.

  15. Radiation hybrid maps of the D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Seetan, Raed; Mergoum, Mohamed; Tiwari, Vijay K; Iqbal, Muhammad J; Wang, Yi; Al-Azzam, Omar; Šimková, Hana; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Gu, Yong Q; Denton, Anne; Kilian, Andrzej; Lazo, Gerard R; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2015-10-16

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high resolution genome maps with saturated marker scaffolds to anchor and orient BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an excellent tool for the development of such maps for it offers much higher and more uniform marker resolution across the length of the chromosome compared to genetic mapping and does not require marker polymorphism per se, as it is based on presence (retention) vs. absence (deletion) marker assay. In this study, a 178 line RH panel was genotyped with SSRs and DArT markers to develop the first high resolution RH maps of the entire D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. To confirm map order accuracy, the AL8/78-RH maps were compared with:1) a DArT consensus genetic map constructed using more than 100 bi-parental populations, 2) a RH map of the D-genome of reference hexaploid wheat 'Chinese Spring', and 3) two SNP-based genetic maps, one with anchored D-genome BAC contigs and another with anchored D-genome sequence scaffolds. Using marker sequences, the RH maps were also anchored with a BAC contig based physical map and draft sequence of the D-genome of Ae. tauschii. A total of 609 markers were mapped to 503 unique positions on the seven D-genome chromosomes, with a total map length of 14,706.7 cR. The average distance between any two marker loci was 29.2 cR which corresponds to 2.1 cM or 9.8 Mb. The average mapping resolution across the D-genome was estimated to be 0.34 Mb (Mb/cR) or 0.07 cM (cM/cR). The RH maps showed almost perfect agreement with several published maps with regard to chromosome assignments of markers. The mean rank correlations between the position of markers on AL8/78 maps and the four published maps, ranged from 0.75 to 0.92, suggesting a good agreement in marker order. With 609 mapped markers, a total of 2481 deletions for the whole D-genome were detected with an average

  16. Functional Genome Mining for Metabolites Encoded by Large Gene Clusters through Heterologous Expression of a Whole-Genome Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Wang, Yemin; Zhao, Zhilong; Gao, Guixi; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Kang, Qianjin; He, Xinyi; Lin, Shuangjun; Pang, Xiuhua; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2016-10-01

    Genome sequencing projects in the last decade revealed numerous cryptic biosynthetic pathways for unknown secondary metabolites in microbes, revitalizing drug discovery from microbial metabolites by approaches called genome mining. In this work, we developed a heterologous expression and functional screening approach for genome mining from genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries in Streptomyces spp. We demonstrate mining from a strain of Streptomyces rochei, which is known to produce streptothricins and borrelidin, by expressing its BAC library in the surrogate host Streptomyces lividans SBT5, and screening for antimicrobial activity. In addition to the successful capture of the streptothricin and borrelidin biosynthetic gene clusters, we discovered two novel linear lipopeptides and their corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster, as well as a novel cryptic gene cluster for an unknown antibiotic from S. rochei This high-throughput functional genome mining approach can be easily applied to other streptomycetes, and it is very suitable for the large-scale screening of genomic BAC libraries for bioactive natural products and the corresponding biosynthetic pathways. Microbial genomes encode numerous cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters for unknown small metabolites with potential biological activities. Several genome mining approaches have been developed to activate and bring these cryptic metabolites to biological tests for future drug discovery. Previous sequence-guided procedures relied on bioinformatic analysis to predict potentially interesting biosynthetic gene clusters. In this study, we describe an efficient approach based on heterologous expression and functional screening of a whole-genome library for the mining of bioactive metabolites from Streptomyces The usefulness of this function-driven approach was demonstrated by the capture of four large biosynthetic gene clusters for metabolites of various chemical types, including streptothricins

  17. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Yin, Rongxin; Brown, Carrie; Kim, DongEun

    2009-06-01

    The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones. This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates ? one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

  18. Bedside Back to Bench: Building Bridges between Basic and Clinical Genomic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A.; Fowler, Douglas M.; Starita, Lea M.; Haendel, Melissa A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Worthey, Elizabeth; Chisholm, Rex L.; Green, Eric D.; Jacob, Howard J.; McLeod, Howard L.; Roden, Dan; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Williams, Marc S.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Herman, Gail E.; Kingsmore, Stephen; Lo, Cecilia; Lutz, Cathleen; MacRae, Calum A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Ramos, Erin M.; Robinson, Peter N.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Seidman, Christine; Stranger, Barbara E.; Wang, Haoyi; Westerfield, Monte; Bult, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Summary Genome sequencing has revolutionized the diagnosis of genetic diseases. Close collaborations between basic scientists and clinical genomicists are now needed to link genetic variants with disease causation. To facilitate such collaborations we recommend prioritizing clinically relevant genes for functional studies, developing reference variant-phenotype databases, adopting phenotype description standards, and promoting data sharing. PMID:28340351

  19. Bedside Back to Bench: Building Bridges between Basic and Clinical Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A; Fowler, Douglas M; Starita, Lea M; Haendel, Melissa A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Biesecker, Leslie G; Worthey, Elizabeth; Chisholm, Rex L; Green, Eric D; Jacob, Howard J; McLeod, Howard L; Roden, Dan; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Williams, Marc S; Cooper, Gregory M; Cox, Nancy J; Herman, Gail E; Kingsmore, Stephen; Lo, Cecilia; Lutz, Cathleen; MacRae, Calum A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ordovas, Jose M; Ramos, Erin M; Robinson, Peter N; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Seidman, Christine; Stranger, Barbara E; Wang, Haoyi; Westerfield, Monte; Bult, Carol

    2017-03-23

    Genome sequencing has revolutionized the diagnosis of genetic diseases. Close collaborations between basic scientists and clinical genomicists are now needed to link genetic variants with disease causation. To facilitate such collaborations, we recommend prioritizing clinically relevant genes for functional studies, developing reference variant-phenotype databases, adopting phenotype description standards, and promoting data sharing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Large genomic fragment deletions and insertions in mouse using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqing Zhang

    Full Text Available ZFN, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 system have been used to generate point mutations and large fragment deletions and insertions in genomic modifications. CRISPR/Cas9 system is the most flexible and fast developing technology that has been extensively used to make mutations in all kinds of organisms. However, the most mutations reported up to date are small insertions and deletions. In this report, CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to make large DNA fragment deletions and insertions, including entire Dip2a gene deletion, about 65kb in size, and β-galactosidase (lacZ reporter gene insertion of larger than 5kb in mouse. About 11.8% (11/93 are positive for 65kb deletion from transfected and diluted ES clones. High targeting efficiencies in ES cells were also achieved with G418 selection, 46.2% (12/26 and 73.1% (19/26 for left and right arms respectively. Targeted large fragment deletion efficiency is about 21.4% of live pups or 6.0% of injected embryos. Targeted insertion of lacZ reporter with NEO cassette showed 27.1% (13/48 of targeting rate by ES cell transfection and 11.1% (2/18 by direct zygote injection. The procedures have bypassed in vitro transcription by directly co-injection of zygotes or co-transfection of embryonic stem cells with circular plasmid DNA. The methods are technically easy, time saving, and cost effective in generating mouse models and will certainly facilitate gene function studies.

  1. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  2. Building a large magma chamber at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. M.; Karlstrom, L.; Bacon, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Crater Lake caldera, Oregon, a structure produced by the 50 km3 eruption of Mount Mazama ~7.7 ka, is one of only three identified Quaternary calderas in the Cascades volcanic chain (Hildreth 2007). What were the conditions necessary to build a large volume magma chamber capable of producing this caldera-forming eruption at Mount Mazama? Using the well-documented >400,000 year volcanic history at Mazama (Bacon and Lanphere 2006), an approximation of vent locations for each eruptive unit (Bacon 2008), and a compilation of over 900 whole-rock compositions from Mount Mazama and regional volcanic rocks, we examine questions of magma chamber assembly in an active volcanic arc. These questions include: (1) is magmatic input approximately constant in composition between Mazama and regional monogenetic volcanic centers? (2) how did melt evolution differ in the two cases (Mazama vs. regional volcanism)? (3) is there spatiotemporal evidence in eruption data (including eruptive volume and chemistry) for a growing magma chamber at depth? and (4) does stability of that chamber require pre-warming of the surrounding country rock? An assumption of approximately constant major-element composition magmatic input is consistent with observed compositional overlap between basaltic to basaltic andesitic eruptive products at Mount Mazama and its vicinity (within 15 km of the volcano). MELTS modeling (Ghiorso and Sack 1995) from an initial composition of magnesian basaltic andesite of monogenetic Red Cone (erupted at a distance of ~8 km from the climactic vent) is consistent with water-saturated magmatic evolution at relatively shallow depths (<500 MPa, with the caveat that shallow pressure calibration data are largely lacking from MELTS models). Within this pressure range, differences in whole-rock compositions indicate that regional magmatic rocks evolved at shallower depths and/or drier conditions than those at the Mazama center. Observations of eruptive ages, compositions, vent

  3. Using large-scale genome variation cohorts to decipher the molecular mechanism of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Nina; Mardin, Balca R; Yakneen, Sergei; Korbel, Jan O

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing genomic structural variations (SVs) in the human genome remains challenging, and there is a growing interest to understand somatic SVs occurring in cancer, a disease of the genome. A havoc-causing SV process known as chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occur in a one-off catastrophe. Recent efforts led to the development of a set of conceptual criteria for the inference of chromothripsis events in cancer genomes and to the development of experimental model systems for studying this striking DNA alteration process in vitro. We discuss these approaches, and additionally touch upon current "Big Data" efforts that employ hybrid cloud computing to enable studies of numerous cancer genomes in an effort to search for commonalities and differences in molecular DNA alteration processes in cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Continuing Evolution of Burkholderia mallei Through Genome Reduction and Large-Scale Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    Myers GS, et al. 2006. Skewed genomic variability in strains of the toxigenic bacterial pathogen, Clostridium perfringens . Genome Res. 16:1031–1040...and Roth 1987; Kothapalli et al. 2005). In addition, Escherichia coli strains with differently sized replichores are at a growth disadvantage...Lesterlin et al. 2008). Thus, it is possible that the attenuation in virulence in NCTC10247 can be explained by these genomic constraints. The growth rate of

  5. GIGGLE: a search engine for large-scale integrated genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Ryan M; Pedersen, Brent S; DiSera, Tonya; Marth, Gabor T; Gertz, Jason; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2018-01-08

    GIGGLE is a genomics search engine that identifies and ranks the significance of genomic loci shared between query features and thousands of genome interval files. GIGGLE (https://github.com/ryanlayer/giggle) scales to billions of intervals and is over three orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. Its speed extends the accessibility and utility of resources such as ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and GTEx by facilitating data integration and hypothesis generation.

  6. Analysis Methods for Extracting Knowledge from Large-Scale WiFi Monitoring to Inform Building Facility Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Antonio; Blunck, Henrik; Prentow, Thor Siiger

    2014-01-01

    realistic data to inform facility planning. In this paper, we propose analysis methods to extract knowledge from large sets of network collected WiFi traces to better inform facility management and planning in large building complexes. The analysis methods, which build on a rich set of temporal and spatial....... Spatio-temporal visualization tools built on top of these methods enable planners to inspect and explore extracted information to inform facility-planning activities. To evaluate the methods, we present results for a large hospital complex covering more than 10 hectares. The evaluation is based on Wi......Fi traces collected in the hospital’s WiFi infrastructure over two weeks observing around 18000 different devices recording more than a billion individual WiFi measurements. For the presented analysis methods we present quantitative performance results, e.g., demonstrating over 95% accuracy for correct...

  7. VIRUS GENOME IMAGING VIA a2GRAMS: BUILDING A MATLAB TOOLBOX FOR PROKARYOTIC DNA ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dantas Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Much of genomic signal analysis approaches  for feature extraction and functional cataloguing  have been focused on oligonucleotide  patterns in the  linear  primary  sequences of genomes.  New DNA-imaging tools  for genomic signal  processing  namely  codongrams  and  a2grams  had  recently  been  offered for extracting meaningful  genomic features  embedded  in DNA. A MatlabT M   toolbox  was implemented for allowing the image analysis of viruses and bacteriophages. Twenty different a2grams are defined for a genome, one for each amino acid (valgram  is an a2 gram for valine; alagram  is an a2 gram for alanine, etc.  They  furnish information about  the distribution and occurrence  of the investigated amino acid. The codongram  describes the distribution of a specific codon through  the genome.  The a2gram  for a particular amino acid provides  information about the sections of the  DNA strand, which potentially leads to the synthesis  of such an amino acid.  DNA ×grams are among powerful visual tools for GSA like spectrograms,  which can  be applied  when searching  for particular nucleotide  patterns.   Among such  patterns, the  software  includes  built-in  options  the  following:  metgram  to  find out  potential start position of genes, Shine-Dalgarno sequence localizer (translation mRNA → protein, TATA  Box (replication DNA → mRNA, Enter  a sequence (DNA particular sequence finder.  A few genomes of viruses and  bacteriophage were made available  in the  DEMO  version:  Bacteriophage ΦX 174, phage MS2, Tomato Bushy  Stunt Virus  (TBSV,  Tobacco  Mosaic Virus  (TMV,  Phage  M13, and  Simian virus  SV40 (genome  lengths ranging  from 3,569 to  6,400 bp.   This  tool  is particularly helpful  for comparing  viruses, and it is also particularly valuable  for educational purposes.

  8. Gametic phase estimation over large genomic regions using an adaptive window approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Excoffier Laurent

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors present ELB, an easy to programme and computationally fast algorithm for inferring gametic phase in population samples of multilocus genotypes. Phase updates are made on the basis of a window of neighbouring loci, and the window size varies according to the local level of linkage disequilibrium. Thus, ELB is particularly well suited to problems involving many loci and/or relatively large genomic regions, including those with variable recombination rate. The authors have simulated population samples of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with varying levels of recombination and marker density, and find that ELB provides better local estimation of gametic phase than the PHASE or HTYPER programs, while its global accuracy is broadly similar. The relative improvement in local accuracy increases both with increasing recombination and with increasing marker density. Short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite simulation studies demonstrate ELB's superiority over PHASE both globally and locally. Missing data are handled by ELB; simulations show that phase recovery is virtually unaffected by up to 2 per cent of missing data, but that phase estimation is noticeably impaired beyond this amount. The authors also applied ELB to datasets obtained from random pairings of 42 human X chromosomes typed at 97 diallelic markers in a 200 kb low-recombination region. Once again, they found ELB to have consistently better local accuracy than PHASE or HTYPER, while its global accuracy was close to the best.

  9. Overcoming the dichotomy between open and isolated populations using genomic data from a large European dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Dominici, Valentina; Battaggia, Cinzia; Pagani, Luca; Vilar, Miguel; Wells, R Spencer; Pettener, Davide; Sarno, Stefania; Boattini, Alessio; Francalacci, Paolo; Colonna, Vincenza; Vona, Giuseppe; Calò, Carla; Destro Bisol, Giovanni; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Human populations are often dichotomized into "isolated" and "open" categories using cultural and/or geographical barriers to gene flow as differential criteria. Although widespread, the use of these alternative categories could obscure further heterogeneity due to inter-population differences in effective size, growth rate, and timing or amount of gene flow. We compared intra and inter-population variation measures combining novel and literature data relative to 87,818 autosomal SNPs in 14 open populations and 10 geographic and/or linguistic European isolates. Patterns of intra-population diversity were found to vary considerably more among isolates, probably due to differential levels of drift and inbreeding. The relatively large effective size estimated for some population isolates challenges the generalized view that they originate from small founding groups. Principal component scores based on measures of intra-population variation of isolated and open populations were found to be distributed along a continuum, with an area of intersection between the two groups. Patterns of inter-population diversity were even closer, as we were able to detect some differences between population groups only for a few multidimensional scaling dimensions. Therefore, different lines of evidence suggest that dichotomizing human populations into open and isolated groups fails to capture the actual relations among their genomic features.

  10. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S.; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chasman, Daniel I.; Trompet, Stella; Kleber, Marcus E.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Wang, Jie Jin; Attia, John R.; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Weng, Lu-Chen; Grossmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A.; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Rose, Lynda M.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Yang, Qiong; Ligthart, Symen; Hottenga, Jouke J.; Rumley, Ann; Mulas, Antonella; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Grotevendt, Anne; Taylor, Kent D.; Delgado, Graciela E.; Kifley, Annette; Lopez, Lorna M.; Berentzen, Tina L.; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hamsten, Anders; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P. M.; Draisma, Harmen H. M.; Lowe, Gordon D.; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Lackner, Karl J.; Völker, Uwe; McKnight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark A.; Starr, John M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Guan, Weihua; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McArdle, Wendy L.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Psaty, Bruce M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Stott, David J.; Binder, Harald; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D.; Deary, Ian J.; März, Winfried; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Cucca, Francesco; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Watkins, Hugh; Tang, Weihong; Ridker, Paul M.; Jukema, Jan W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Mitchell, Paul; Hansen, Torben; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Strachan, David P.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G) for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap imputation. In order to assess the improvement of 1000G over HapMap imputation in identifying associated loci, we compared the results of GWA studies of circulating fibrinogen based on the two reference panels. Using both HapMap and 1000G imputation we performed a meta-analysis of 22 studies comprising the same 91,953 individuals. We identified six additional signals using 1000G imputation, while 29 loci were associated using both HapMap and 1000G imputation. One locus identified using HapMap imputation was not significant using 1000G imputation. The genome-wide significance threshold of 5×10−8 is based on the number of independent statistical tests using HapMap imputation, and 1000G imputation may lead to further independent tests that should be corrected for. When using a stricter Bonferroni correction for the 1000G GWA study (P-value < 2.5×10−8), the number of loci significant only using HapMap imputation increased to 4 while the number of loci significant only using 1000G decreased to 5. In conclusion, 1000G imputation enabled the identification of 20% more loci than HapMap imputation, although the advantage of 1000G imputation became less clear when a stricter Bonferroni correction was used. More generally, our results provide insights that are applicable to the implementation of other dense reference panels that are under development. PMID:28107422

  11. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S de Vries

    Full Text Available An increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap imputation. In order to assess the improvement of 1000G over HapMap imputation in identifying associated loci, we compared the results of GWA studies of circulating fibrinogen based on the two reference panels. Using both HapMap and 1000G imputation we performed a meta-analysis of 22 studies comprising the same 91,953 individuals. We identified six additional signals using 1000G imputation, while 29 loci were associated using both HapMap and 1000G imputation. One locus identified using HapMap imputation was not significant using 1000G imputation. The genome-wide significance threshold of 5×10-8 is based on the number of independent statistical tests using HapMap imputation, and 1000G imputation may lead to further independent tests that should be corrected for. When using a stricter Bonferroni correction for the 1000G GWA study (P-value < 2.5×10-8, the number of loci significant only using HapMap imputation increased to 4 while the number of loci significant only using 1000G decreased to 5. In conclusion, 1000G imputation enabled the identification of 20% more loci than HapMap imputation, although the advantage of 1000G imputation became less clear when a stricter Bonferroni correction was used. More generally, our results provide insights that are applicable to the implementation of other dense reference panels that are under development.

  12. Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Teumer, Alexander; Kleber, Marcus E; Chen, Ming-Huei; Wang, Jie Jin; Attia, John R; Marioni, Riccardo E; Steri, Maristella; Weng, Lu-Chen; Pool, Rene; Grossmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Frånberg, Mattias; Yang, Qiong; Ligthart, Symen; Hottenga, Jouke J; Rumley, Ann; Mulas, Antonella; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Kifley, Annette; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Morrison, Alanna C; Hamsten, Anders; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; Draisma, Harmen H M; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Lackner, Karl J; Völker, Uwe; McKnight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark A; Starr, John M; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Guan, Weihua; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McArdle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Psaty, Bruce M; Uitterlinden, André G; de Geus, Eco J C; Stott, David J; Binder, Harald; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Rotter, Jerome I; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Deary, Ian J; März, Winfried; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Cucca, Francesco; Boomsma, Dorret I; Watkins, Hugh; Tang, Weihong; Ridker, Paul M; Jukema, Jan W; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; Hansen, Torben; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of genome-wide association (GWA) studies are now using the higher resolution 1000 Genomes Project reference panel (1000G) for imputation, with the expectation that 1000G imputation will lead to the discovery of additional associated loci when compared to HapMap imputation. In order to assess the improvement of 1000G over HapMap imputation in identifying associated loci, we compared the results of GWA studies of circulating fibrinogen based on the two reference panels. Using both HapMap and 1000G imputation we performed a meta-analysis of 22 studies comprising the same 91,953 individuals. We identified six additional signals using 1000G imputation, while 29 loci were associated using both HapMap and 1000G imputation. One locus identified using HapMap imputation was not significant using 1000G imputation. The genome-wide significance threshold of 5×10-8 is based on the number of independent statistical tests using HapMap imputation, and 1000G imputation may lead to further independent tests that should be corrected for. When using a stricter Bonferroni correction for the 1000G GWA study (P-value HapMap imputation increased to 4 while the number of loci significant only using 1000G decreased to 5. In conclusion, 1000G imputation enabled the identification of 20% more loci than HapMap imputation, although the advantage of 1000G imputation became less clear when a stricter Bonferroni correction was used. More generally, our results provide insights that are applicable to the implementation of other dense reference panels that are under development.

  13. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S

    2007-01-01

    suspected to have JPS. RESULTS: By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis...

  14. Who ate whom? Adaptive Helicobacter genomic changes that accompanied a host jump from early humans to large felines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection of humans is so old that its population genetic structure reflects that of ancient human migrations. A closely related species, Helicobacter acinonychis, is specific for large felines, including cheetahs, lions, and tigers, whereas hosts more closely related to humans harbor more distantly related Helicobacter species. This observation suggests a jump between host species. But who ate whom and when did it happen? In order to resolve this question, we determined the genomic sequence of H. acinonychis strain Sheeba and compared it to genomes from H. pylori. The conserved core genes between the genomes are so similar that the host jump probably occurred within the last 200,000 (range 50,000-400,000 years. However, the Sheeba genome also possesses unique features that indicate the direction of the host jump, namely from early humans to cats. Sheeba possesses an unusually large number of highly fragmented genes, many encoding outer membrane proteins, which may have been destroyed in order to bypass deleterious responses from the feline host immune system. In addition, the few Sheeba-specific genes that were found include a cluster of genes encoding sialylation of the bacterial cell surface carbohydrates, which were imported by horizontal genetic exchange and might also help to evade host immune defenses. These results provide a genomic basis for elucidating molecular events that allow bacteria to adapt to novel animal hosts.

  15. Who Ate Whom? Adaptive Helicobacter Genomic Changes That Accompanied a Host Jump from Early Humans to Large Felines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Bodo; Raddatz, Günter; Lanz, Christa; Keller, Heike; Morelli, Giovanna; Gressmann, Helga; Achtman, Mark; Schuster, Stephan C

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of humans is so old that its population genetic structure reflects that of ancient human migrations. A closely related species, Helicobacter acinonychis, is specific for large felines, including cheetahs, lions, and tigers, whereas hosts more closely related to humans harbor more distantly related Helicobacter species. This observation suggests a jump between host species. But who ate whom and when did it happen? In order to resolve this question, we determined the genomic sequence of H. acinonychis strain Sheeba and compared it to genomes from H. pylori. The conserved core genes between the genomes are so similar that the host jump probably occurred within the last 200,000 (range 50,000–400,000) years. However, the Sheeba genome also possesses unique features that indicate the direction of the host jump, namely from early humans to cats. Sheeba possesses an unusually large number of highly fragmented genes, many encoding outer membrane proteins, which may have been destroyed in order to bypass deleterious responses from the feline host immune system. In addition, the few Sheeba-specific genes that were found include a cluster of genes encoding sialylation of the bacterial cell surface carbohydrates, which were imported by horizontal genetic exchange and might also help to evade host immune defenses. These results provide a genomic basis for elucidating molecular events that allow bacteria to adapt to novel animal hosts. PMID:16789826

  16. Multi-objective and multidisciplinary design optimization of large sports building envelopes : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, D.; Sun, Y.; Turrin, M.; von Buelow, P.; Paul, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the conceptual envelope design of sports facilities, multiple engineering performance feedbacks (e.g. daylight, energy and structural performance) are expected to assist architectural design decision-making. In general, it is known as Building Performance Optimization in the conceptual

  17. buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the formation of the blasting seismic wave transmission is a complex mechanical process. Blasting seismic wave in different geological structure formation of the interface, diffraction, reflection, projection as the incident Angle is different, all kinds of waveform transformation, formation of different types, different amplitude, frequency and phase of various wave superimposition of random composite wave. Blasting seismic wave propagation distance (horizontal distance and height difference, and the performance of the explosive, explosive charge, charge structure, priming method, congestion state what international airport, the plane and direction, topography and geological conditions will affect the blasting vibration effect. In engineering by empirical formula to estimate main parameters of blasting seismic wave and the structure of the empirical formula is the result of the use of theoretical analysis, by blasting of similar rate to determine the parameters in the formula is made up of many engineering measured data from statistical analysis, or directly by the measured parameters of the blasting seismic wave is given. In this paper, through various points were set in the prison line large speed is the most value, using the mathematical statistics regression analysis method, attenuation coefficient is obtained, and then back to the formula of single ring allows maximum dose safety distance calculated.

  18. Large Genomic Rearrangements of Desmosomal Genes in Italian Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Rigato, Ilaria; Celeghin, Rudy; De Bortoli, Marzia; Perazzolo Marra, Marina; Cason, Marco; Jongbloed, Jan; Calore, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Regazzo, Daniela; Poloni, Giulia; Iliceto, Sabino; Daliento, Luciano; Delise, Pietro; Corrado, Domenico; Van Tintelen, J Peter; Thiene, Gaetano; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Lorenzon, Alessandra; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-10-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is an inherited heart muscle disease associated with point mutations in genes encoding for cardiac desmosome proteins. Conventional mutation screening is positive in ≈50% of probands. Copy number variations (CNVs) have recently been linked to AC pointing to the need to determine the prevalence of CNVs in desmosomal genes and to evaluate disease penetrance by cosegregation analysis in family members. A total of 160 AC genotype-negative probands for 5 AC desmosomal genes by conventional mutation screening underwent multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Nine heterozygous CNVs were identified in 11 (6.9%) of the 160 probands. Five carried a deletion of the entire plakophilin-2 ( PKP2 ) gene, 2 a deletion of only PKP2 exon 4, 1 a deletion of the PKP2 exons 6 to 11, 1 a PKP2 duplication of 5' untranslated region till exon 1, 1 the desmocollin-2 ( DSC2 ) duplication of exons 7 to 9, and 1 a large deletion of chromosome 18 comprising both DSC2 and desmoglein-2 genes. All probands were affected by moderate-severe forms of the disease, whereas 10 (32%) of the 31 family members carrying one of these deletions fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. Genomic rearrangements were detected in ≈7% of AC probands negative for pathogenic point mutations in desmosomal genes, highlighting the potential of CNVs analysis to substantially increase the diagnostic yield of genetic testing. Genotype-phenotype correlation demonstrated the presence of the disease in about one third of family members carrying the CNV, underlying the role of other factors in the development and progression of the disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Large Genomic Deletions in CACNA1A Cause Episodic Ataxia Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun eWan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic ataxia (EA syndromes are heritable diseases characterized by dramatic episodes of imbalance and incoordination. Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, the most common and the best characterized subtype, is caused by mostly nonsense, splice site, small indel and sometimes missense mutations in CACNA1A. Direct sequencing of CACNA1A fails to identify mutations in some patients with EA2-like features, possibly due to incomplete interrogation of CACNA1A or defects in other EA genes not yet defined. Previous reports described genomic deletions between 4-40kb in EA2. In 47 subjects with EA (26 with EA2-like features who tested negative for mutations in the known EA genes, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA to analyze CACNA1A for exonic copy number variations. Breakpoints were further defined by long-range PCR. We identified distinct multi-exonic deletions in three probands with classic EA2-like features: episodes of prolonged vertigo and ataxia triggered by stress and fatigue, interictal nystagmus, with onset during infancy or early childhood. The breakpoints in all three probands are located in Alu sequences, indicating errors in homologous recombination of Alu sequences as the underlying mechanism. The smallest deletion spanned exons 39 and 40, while the largest deletion spanned 200kb, missing all but the first three exons. One deletion involving exons 39 through 47 arose spontaneously. The search for mutations in CACNA1A appears most fruitful in EA patients with interictal nystagmus and onset early in life. The finding of large heterozygous deletions suggests haploinsufficiency as a possible pathomechanism of EA2.

  20. Large-scale genome-wide analysis identifies genetic variants associated with cardiac structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Philipp S.; Felix, Janine F.; Schillert, Arne; Chen, Ming-Huei; Leening, Maarten J.G.; Völker, Uwe; Großmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Pramana, Setia; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Reinhold; Stanton, Alice V.; Malzahn, Dörthe; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Tiller, Daniel; Smith, J. Gustav; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Musani, Solomon K.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pers, Tune H.; Morley, Michael; Kleber, Marcus E.; Aragam, Jayashri; Bis, Joshua C.; Bisping, Egbert; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cheng, Susan; Deckers, Jaap W.; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Edelmann, Frank; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Lude; Friedrich, Nele; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jie; Hughes, Alun D.; Kähönen, Mika; investigators, KNHI; Kruppa, Jochen; Lackner, Karl J.; Lannfelt, Lars; Laskowski, Rafael; Launer, Lenore J.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Loley, Christina; Mayet, Jamil; Medenwald, Daniel; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Christian; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nappo, Stefania; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nuding, Sebastian; Nutile, Teresa; Peters, Annette; Pfeufer, Arne; Pietzner, Diana; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruohonen, Saku T.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Sharp, Andrew S.P.; Shields, Denis C.; Sorice, Rossella; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stricker, Bruno H.; Surendran, Praveen; Töglhofer, Anna M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Ziegler, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; März, Winfried; Cappola, Thomas P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Fox, Ervin R.; Dueker, Nicole D.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Melander, Olle; Lehtimäki, Terho; Ciullo, Marina; Hicks, Andrew A.; Lind, Lars; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pieske, Burkert; Barron, Anthony J.; Zweiker, Robert; Schunkert, Heribert; Ingelsson, Erik; Liu, Kiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Larson, Martin G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Franco, Oscar H.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Dörr, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Understanding the genetic architecture of cardiac structure and function may help to prevent and treat heart disease. This investigation sought to identify common genetic variations associated with inter-individual variability in cardiac structure and function. METHODS. A GWAS meta-analysis of echocardiographic traits was performed, including 46,533 individuals from 30 studies (EchoGen consortium). The analysis included 16 traits of left ventricular (LV) structure, and systolic and diastolic function. RESULTS. The discovery analysis included 21 cohorts for structural and systolic function traits (n = 32,212) and 17 cohorts for diastolic function traits (n = 21,852). Replication was performed in 5 cohorts (n = 14,321) and 6 cohorts (n = 16,308), respectively. Besides 5 previously reported loci, the combined meta-analysis identified 10 additional genome-wide significant SNPs: rs12541595 near MTSS1 and rs10774625 in ATXN2 for LV end-diastolic internal dimension; rs806322 near KCNRG, rs4765663 in CACNA1C, rs6702619 near PALMD, rs7127129 in TMEM16A, rs11207426 near FGGY, rs17608766 in GOSR2, and rs17696696 in CFDP1 for aortic root diameter; and rs12440869 in IQCH for Doppler transmitral A-wave peak velocity. Findings were in part validated in other cohorts and in GWAS of related disease traits. The genetic loci showed associations with putative signaling pathways, and with gene expression in whole blood, monocytes, and myocardial tissue. CONCLUSION. The additional genetic loci identified in this large meta-analysis of cardiac structure and function provide insights into the underlying genetic architecture of cardiac structure and warrant follow-up in future functional studies. FUNDING. For detailed information per study, see Acknowledgments. PMID:28394258

  1. Assembling large genomes with single-molecule sequencing and locality-sensitive hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Konstantin; Koren, Sergey; Chin, Chen-Shan; Drake, James P; Landolin, Jane M; Phillippy, Adam M

    2015-06-01

    Long-read, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing is routinely used to finish microbial genomes, but available assembly methods have not scaled well to larger genomes. We introduce the MinHash Alignment Process (MHAP) for overlapping noisy, long reads using probabilistic, locality-sensitive hashing. Integrating MHAP with the Celera Assembler enabled reference-grade de novo assemblies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and a human hydatidiform mole cell line (CHM1) from SMRT sequencing. The resulting assemblies are highly continuous, include fully resolved chromosome arms and close persistent gaps in these reference genomes. Our assembly of D. melanogaster revealed previously unknown heterochromatic and telomeric transition sequences, and we assembled low-complexity sequences from CHM1 that fill gaps in the human GRCh38 reference. Using MHAP and the Celera Assembler, single-molecule sequencing can produce de novo near-complete eukaryotic assemblies that are 99.99% accurate when compared with available reference genomes.

  2. Building A NGS Genomic Resource: Towards Molecular Breeding In L. Perenne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruttink, Tom; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Asp, Torben

    predicted genes from seven completely sequenced genomes together with the Lolium contigs, orthologous groups are established and most probable candidate orthologues in Lolium are assigned. We are currently validating the de novo transcriptome assembly by Sanger sequencing and will develop and validate a set......To advance the application of molecular breeding in Lolium perenne, we have generated a sequence resource to facilitate gene discovery and SNP marker development. Illumina GAII transcriptome sequencing was performed on meristem-enriched samples of 14 Lolium genotypes. De novo assemblies...... Brachypodium genes a homologous Lolium sequence has been identified. We are subsequently merging these 14 individual transcriptomes to a common reference transcriptome for Lolium. The data resource is currently functional for interrogation of individual candidate genes. Through phylogenetic analysis using...

  3. Insights into the genome of large sulfur bacteria revealed by analysis of single filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Marc; Hu, Fen Z.; Richter, Michael

    2007-01-01

    . We propose a mechanism of vacuolar nitrate accumulation that is linked to proton translocation by vacuolar-type ATPases. Comparative genomics indicates substantial horizontal gene transfer of storage, metabolic, and gliding capabilities between Beggiatoa and cyanobacteria. These capabilities enable...... Beggiatoa to overcome non-overlapping availabilities of electron donors and acceptors while gliding between oxic and sulfidic zones. The first look into the genome of these filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria substantially deepens the understanding of their evolution and their contribution to sulfur...

  4. Sequencing and Analysis of Common Bean ESTs. Building a Foundation for Functional Genomics1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Mario; Graham, Michelle A.; Blanco-López, Lourdes; Silvente, Sonia; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Blair, Matthew W.; Hernández, Georgina; Vance, Carroll P.; Lara, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Although common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important grain legume in the developing world for human consumption, few genomic resources exist for this species. The objectives of this research were to develop expressed sequence tag (EST) resources for common bean and assess nodule gene expression through high-density macroarrays. We sequenced a total of 21,026 ESTs derived from 5 different cDNA libraries, including nitrogen-fixing root nodules, phosphorus-deficient roots, developing pods, and leaves of the Mesoamerican genotype, Negro Jamapa 81. The fifth source of ESTs was a leaf cDNA library derived from the Andean genotype, G19833. Of the total high-quality sequences, 5,703 ESTs were classified as singletons, while 10,078 were assembled into 2,226 contigs producing a nonredundant set of 7,969 different transcripts. Sequences were grouped according to 4 main categories, metabolism (34%), cell cycle and plant development (11%), interaction with the environment (19%), and unknown function (36%), and further subdivided into 15 subcategories. Comparisons to other legume EST projects suggest that an entirely different repertoire of genes is expressed in common bean nodules. Phaseolus-specific contigs, gene families, and single nucleotide polymorphisms were also identified from the EST collection. Functional aspects of individual bean organs were reflected by the 20 contigs from each library composed of the most redundant ESTs. The abundance of transcripts corresponding to selected contigs was evaluated by RNA blots to determine whether gene expression determined by laboratory methods correlated with in silico expression. Evaluation of root nodule gene expression by macroarrays and RNA blots showed that genes related to nitrogen and carbon metabolism are integrated for ureide production. Resources developed in this project provide genetic and genomic tools for an international consortium devoted to bean improvement. PMID:15824284

  5. Ceratocystis cacaofunesta genome analysis reveals a large expansion of extracellular phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C genes (PI-PLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molano, Eddy Patricia Lopez; Cabrera, Odalys García; Jose, Juliana; do Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Alvarez, Javier Correa; Tiburcio, Ricardo Augusto; Tokimatu Filho, Paulo Massanari; de Lima, Gustavo Machado Alvares; Guido, Rafael Victório Carvalho; Corrêa, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2018-01-17

    The Ceratocystis genus harbors a large number of phytopathogenic fungi that cause xylem parenchyma degradation and vascular destruction on a broad range of economically important plants. Ceratocystis cacaofunesta is a necrotrophic fungus responsible for lethal wilt disease in cacao. The aim of this work is to analyze the genome of C. cacaofunesta through a comparative approach with genomes of other Sordariomycetes in order to better understand the molecular basis of pathogenicity in the Ceratocystis genus. We present an analysis of the C. cacaofunesta genome focusing on secreted proteins that might constitute pathogenicity factors. Comparative genome analyses among five Ceratocystidaceae species and 23 other Sordariomycetes fungi showed a strong reduction in gene content of the Ceratocystis genus. However, some gene families displayed a remarkable expansion, in particular, the Phosphatidylinositol specific phospholipases-C (PI-PLC) family. Also, evolutionary rate calculations suggest that the evolution process of this family was guided by positive selection. Interestingly, among the 82 PI-PLCs genes identified in the C. cacaofunesta genome, 70 genes encoding extracellular PI-PLCs are grouped in eight small scaffolds surrounded by transposon fragments and scars that could be involved in the rapid evolution of the PI-PLC family. Experimental secretome using LC-MS/MS validated 24% (86 proteins) of the total predicted secretome (342 proteins), including four PI-PLCs and other important pathogenicity factors. Analysis of the Ceratocystis cacaofunesta genome provides evidence that PI-PLCs may play a role in pathogenicity. Subsequent functional studies will be aimed at evaluating this hypothesis. The observed genetic arsenals, together with the analysis of the PI-PLC family shown in this work, reveal significant differences in the Ceratocystis genome compared to the classical vascular fungi, Verticillium and Fusarium. Altogether, our analyses provide new insights into the

  6. Selection for Unequal Densities of Sigma70 Promoter-like Signalsin Different Regions of Large Bacterial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, Araceli M.; Francino, M. Pilar; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-03-01

    distribution of promoter-like signals between regulatory and nonregulatory regions detected in large bacterial genomes confers a significant, although small, fitness advantage. This study paves the way for further identification of the specific types of selective constraints that affect the organization of regulatory regions and the overall distribution of promoter-like signals through more detailed comparative analyses among closely-related bacterial genomes.

  7. Expanding Access to Large-Scale Genomic Data While Promoting Privacy: A Game Theoretic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Xia, Weiyi; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-02-02

    Emerging scientific endeavors are creating big data repositories of data from millions of individuals. Sharing data in a privacy-respecting manner could lead to important discoveries, but high-profile demonstrations show that links between de-identified genomic data and named persons can sometimes be reestablished. Such re-identification attacks have focused on worst-case scenarios and spurred the adoption of data-sharing practices that unnecessarily impede research. To mitigate concerns, organizations have traditionally relied upon legal deterrents, like data use agreements, and are considering suppressing or adding noise to genomic variants. In this report, we use a game theoretic lens to develop more effective, quantifiable protections for genomic data sharing. This is a fundamentally different approach because it accounts for adversarial behavior and capabilities and tailors protections to anticipated recipients with reasonable resources, not adversaries with unlimited means. We demonstrate this approach via a new public resource with genomic summary data from over 8,000 individuals-the Sequence and Phenotype Integration Exchange (SPHINX)-and show that risks can be balanced against utility more effectively than with traditional approaches. We further show the generalizability of this framework by applying it to other genomic data collection and sharing endeavors. Recognizing that such models are dependent on a variety of parameters, we perform extensive sensitivity analyses to show that our findings are robust to their fluctuations. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Merlin: Computer-Aided Oligonucleotide Design for Large Scale Genome Engineering with MAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintin, Michael; Ma, Natalie J; Ahmed, Samir; Bhatia, Swapnil; Lewis, Aaron; Isaacs, Farren J; Densmore, Douglas

    2016-06-17

    Genome engineering technologies now enable precise manipulation of organism genotype, but can be limited in scalability by their design requirements. Here we describe Merlin ( http://merlincad.org ), an open-source web-based tool to assist biologists in designing experiments using multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE). Merlin provides methods to generate pools of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for MAGE experiments by performing free energy calculation and BLAST scoring on a sliding window spanning the targeted site. These oligos are designed not only to improve recombination efficiency, but also to minimize off-target interactions. The application further assists experiment planning by reporting predicted allelic replacement rates after multiple MAGE cycles, and enables rapid result validation by generating primer sequences for multiplexed allele-specific colony PCR. Here we describe the Merlin oligo and primer design procedures and validate their functionality compared to OptMAGE by eliminating seven AvrII restriction sites from the Escherichia coli genome.

  9. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  10. RNAseq versus genome-predicted transcriptomes: a large population of novel transcripts identified in an Illumina-454 Hydra transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Yvan; Galliot, Brigitte

    2013-03-25

    Evolutionary studies benefit from deep sequencing technologies that generate genomic and transcriptomic sequences from a variety of organisms. Genome sequencing and RNAseq have complementary strengths. In this study, we present the assembly of the most complete Hydra transcriptome to date along with a comparative analysis of the specific features of RNAseq and genome-predicted transcriptomes currently available in the freshwater hydrozoan Hydra vulgaris. To produce an accurate and extensive Hydra transcriptome, we combined Illumina and 454 Titanium reads, giving the primacy to Illumina over 454 reads to correct homopolymer errors. This strategy yielded an RNAseq transcriptome that contains 48'909 unique sequences including splice variants, representing approximately 24'450 distinct genes. Comparative analysis to the available genome-predicted transcriptomes identified 10'597 novel Hydra transcripts that encode 529 evolutionarily-conserved proteins. The annotation of 170 human orthologs points to critical functions in protein biosynthesis, FGF and TOR signaling, vesicle transport, immunity, cell cycle regulation, cell death, mitochondrial metabolism, transcription and chromatin regulation. However, a majority of these novel transcripts encodes short ORFs, at least 767 of them corresponding to pseudogenes. This RNAseq transcriptome also lacks 11'270 predicted transcripts that correspond either to silent genes or to genes expressed below the detection level of this study. We established a simple and powerful strategy to combine Illumina and 454 reads and we produced, with genome assistance, an extensive and accurate Hydra transcriptome. The comparative analysis of the RNAseq transcriptome with genome-predicted transcriptomes lead to the identification of large populations of novel as well as missing transcripts that might reflect Hydra-specific evolutionary events.

  11. The analysis of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of a large-scale commercial building in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reasonable test, diagnosis, and analysis are meaningful for building energy efficiency retrofit and management. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission of a large-scale commercial building are described in this article. Basic information about energy consumption equipment is included in the investigation. Further diagnoses about the operational state of air-conditioning water systems, and ducted systems were implemented. Energy consumption decreased 200 kWh/m2 per year from 2007 to 2009 after energy-saving reconstruction in 2006. Next, a carbon audit was carried out; this comprised CO2 emission statistics associated with the energy use and categorization and structural analysis (categorization refers to energy categorization and structural analysis means the composition and its proportion relationship of all kinds of primary energy and secondary energy in energy production or consumption. Greenhouse gas emissions could be less than 150 kg/m2 per year from 2007 to 2009. An analysis of the correlation between CO2 emissions, building gross domestic product, and energy efficiency is also presented. This article makes an analysis on the energy utilization and energy-saving reconstruction of a public commercial building in Shanghai and then makes an analysis of carbon audit about greenhouse gas emissions related to energy utilization (it analyzes the status of building’s energy utilization and greenhouse gas emissions, to have a more comprehensive understanding on the internal relationship between energy consumption and its greenhouse gas emissions and provide researchful reference data for the development with reduction strategies of greenhouse gas emission in future building.

  12. Large Scale Sequencing of Dothideomycetes Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and Adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Crous, Pedro; Binder, Manfred; Spatafora, Joseph; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-16

    Dothideomycetes is the largest and most diverse class of ascomycete fungi with 23 orders 110 families, 1300 genera and over 19,000 known species. We present comparative analysis of 70 Dothideomycete genomes including over 50 that we sequenced and are as yet unpublished. This extensive sampling has almost quadrupled the previous study of 18 species and uncovered a 10 fold range of genome sizes. We were able to clarify the phylogenetic positions of several species whose origins were unclear in previous morphological and sequence comparison studies. We analyzed selected gene families including proteases, transporters and small secreted proteins and show that major differences in gene content is influenced by speciation.

  13. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Danish high risk breast-ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 account for 0-36% of all disease causing mutations in various populations, while large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 are more rare. We examined 642 East Danish breast and/or ovarian...... cancer patients in whom a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 was not detected by sequencing using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay. We identified 15 patients with 7 different genomic rearrangements, including a BRCA1 exon 5-7 deletion with a novel breakpoint, a BRCA1...... exon 13 duplication, a BRCA1 exon 17-19 deletion, a BRCA1 exon 3-16 deletion, and a BRCA2 exon 20 deletion with a novel breakpoint as well as two novel BRCA1 exon 17-18 and BRCA1 exon 19 deletions. The large rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounted for 9.2% (15/163) of all BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations...

  14. Symbiodinium transcriptomes: genome insights into the dinoflagellate symbionts of reef-building corals.

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Till

    2012-04-18

    Dinoflagellates are unicellular algae that are ubiquitously abundant in aquatic environments. Species of the genus Symbiodinium form symbiotic relationships with reef-building corals and other marine invertebrates. Despite their ecologic importance, little is known about the genetics of dinoflagellates in general and Symbiodinium in particular. Here, we used 454 sequencing to generate transcriptome data from two Symbiodinium species from different clades (clade A and clade B). With more than 56,000 assembled sequences per species, these data represent the largest transcriptomic resource for dinoflagellates to date. Our results corroborate previous observations that dinoflagellates possess the complete nucleosome machinery. We found a complete set of core histones as well as several H3 variants and H2A.Z in one species. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis points toward a low number of transcription factors in Symbiodinium spp. that also differ in the distribution of DNA-binding domains relative to other eukaryotes. In particular the cold shock domain was predominant among transcription factors. Additionally, we found a high number of antioxidative genes in comparison to non-symbiotic but evolutionary related organisms. These findings might be of relevance in the context of the role that Symbiodinium spp. play as coral symbionts.Our data represent the most comprehensive dinoflagellate EST data set to date. This study provides a comprehensive resource to further analyze the genetic makeup, metabolic capacities, and gene repertoire of Symbiodinium and dinoflagellates. Overall, our findings indicate that Symbiodinium possesses some unique characteristics, in particular the transcriptional regulation in Symbiodinium may differ from the currently known mechanisms of eukaryotic gene regulation.

  15. Symbiodinium transcriptomes: genome insights into the dinoflagellate symbionts of reef-building corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Bayer

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are unicellular algae that are ubiquitously abundant in aquatic environments. Species of the genus Symbiodinium form symbiotic relationships with reef-building corals and other marine invertebrates. Despite their ecologic importance, little is known about the genetics of dinoflagellates in general and Symbiodinium in particular. Here, we used 454 sequencing to generate transcriptome data from two Symbiodinium species from different clades (clade A and clade B. With more than 56,000 assembled sequences per species, these data represent the largest transcriptomic resource for dinoflagellates to date. Our results corroborate previous observations that dinoflagellates possess the complete nucleosome machinery. We found a complete set of core histones as well as several H3 variants and H2A.Z in one species. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis points toward a low number of transcription factors in Symbiodinium spp. that also differ in the distribution of DNA-binding domains relative to other eukaryotes. In particular the cold shock domain was predominant among transcription factors. Additionally, we found a high number of antioxidative genes in comparison to non-symbiotic but evolutionary related organisms. These findings might be of relevance in the context of the role that Symbiodinium spp. play as coral symbionts.Our data represent the most comprehensive dinoflagellate EST data set to date. This study provides a comprehensive resource to further analyze the genetic makeup, metabolic capacities, and gene repertoire of Symbiodinium and dinoflagellates. Overall, our findings indicate that Symbiodinium possesses some unique characteristics, in particular the transcriptional regulation in Symbiodinium may differ from the currently known mechanisms of eukaryotic gene regulation.

  16. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  17. Evolutionary analysis of a large mtDNA translocation (numt) into the nuclear genome of the Panthera genus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Heup; Antunes, Agostinho; Luo, Shu-Jin; Menninger, Joan; Nash, William G.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Johnson, Warren E.

    2006-01-01

    Translocation of cymtDNA into the nuclear genome, also referred to as numt, has been reported in many species, including several closely related to the domestic cat (Felis catus). We describe the recent transposition of 12,536 bp of the 17 kb mitochondrial genome into the nucleus of the common ancestor of the five Panthera genus species: tiger, P. tigris; snow leopard, P. uncia; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus; and lion, P. leo. This nuclear integration, representing 74% of the mitochondrial genome, is one of the largest to be reported in eukaryotes. The Panthera genus numt differs from the numt previously described in the Felis genus in: (1) chromosomal location (F2 – telomeric region vs. D2 – centromeric region), (2) gene make up (from the ND5 to the ATP8 vs. from the CR to the COII), (3) size (12.5 kb vs. 7.9 kb), and (4) structure (single monomer vs. tandemly repeated in Felis). These distinctions indicate that the origin of this large numt fragment in the nuclear genome of the Panthera species is an independent insertion from that of the domestic cat lineage, which has been further supported by phylogenetic analyses. The tiger cymtDNA shared around 90% sequence identity with the homologous numt sequence, suggesting an origin for the Panthera numt at around 3.5 million years ago, prior to the radiation of the five extant Panthera species. PMID:16380222

  18. Efficient Construction of Large Genomic Deletion in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by Combination of Cre/loxP System and Triple Recombineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yali; Zhang, Xu; Hu, Xiaofeng; Li, Yusheng; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao

    2016-04-01

    In order to develop an efficient system for deleting genomic segment in Agrobacterium tumefaciens to analyze gene functions and construct marker gene-free recombinant strains, a Cre recombinase expression plasmid was constructed by placing its encoding gene under the control of Ptet promoter and cloning into the plasmid replicable in both A. tumefaciens and E. coli. Triple recombineering was applied to efficiently construct integrative vectors which were used to introduce loxP sites and selection markers into the chromosome of A. tumefaciens. Cre recombinase could be properly induced by anhydrotetracycline in A. tumefaciens, which was revealed by the fact that kanamycin resistance gene flanked by two parallel loxP sites was excised from the genome of A. tumefaciens with virtually 100% efficiency. And what is more, an A. tumefaciens mutant carrying large-deletion (~85 kb) in genome was successfully constructed by Cre/loxP system. Here, we described the application of combination of Cre/loxP system and triple recombineering to efficiently excise genomic segment in A. tumefaciens, which also would facilitate efficient construction of multiple gene disruptions in A. tumefaciens.

  19. Building and breaking a Large Igneous Province: An example from the High Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing Andreasen, Arne; Gaina, Carmen; Brozena, John M.

    2017-01-01

    The genesis of the Amerasia Basin in the Arctic Ocean has been difficult to discern due to overprint of the Cretaceous High-Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). Based on detailed analysis of bathymetry data, new Arctic magnetic and gravity compilations, and recently published radiometric...

  20. Evaluation of Various Retrofitting Concepts of Building Envelope for Offices Equipped with Large Radiant Ceiling Panels by Dynamic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve significant savings in energy and an improved level of thermal comfort in retrofitted existing buildings, specific retrofitting concepts that combine new technologies and design need to be developed and implemented. Large radiant surfaces systems are now among the most promising future technologies to be used both in retrofitted and in new low-energy buildings. These kinds of systems have been the topic of several studies dealing with thermal comfort and energy utilization, but some specific issues concerning their possible use in various concepts for retrofitting are still poorly understood. In the present paper, some results of dynamic simulations, with the transient system simulation tool (TRNSYS model, of the retrofitted offices equipped with radiant ceiling panels are presented and thoroughly analysed. Based on a precise comparison of the results of these simulations with actual measurements in the offices, certain input data for the model were added, so that the model was consequently validated. The model was then applied to the evaluation of various concepts of building envelopes for office retrofitting. By means of dynamic simulations of indoor environment it was possible to determine the benefits and limitations of individual retrofitting concepts. Some specific parameters, which are relevant to these concepts, were also identified.

  1. Automatic classification of histopathological diagnoses for building a large scale tissue catalogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihs, Robert; Müller, Heimo; Sauer, Stefan; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an automatic classification system for pathological findings is presented. The starting point in our undertaking was a pathologic tissue collection with about 1.4 million tissue samples described by free text records over 23 years. Exploring knowledge out of this "big data" pool is a challenging task, especially when dealing with unstructured data spanning over many years. The classification is based on an ontology-based term extraction and decision tree build with a manually curated classification system. The information extracting system is based on regular expressions and a text substitution system. We describe the generation of the decision trees by medical experts using a visual editor. Also the evaluation of the classification process with a reference data set is described. We achieved an F-Score of 89,7% for ICD-10 and an F-Score of 94,7% for ICD-O classification. For the information extraction of the tumor staging and receptors we achieved am F-Score ranging from 81,8 to 96,8%.

  2. Twenty years of artificial directional selection have shaped the genome of the Italian Large White pig breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, G; Galimberti, G; Calò, D G; Samorè, A B; Bertolini, F; Russo, V; Gallo, M; Buttazzoni, L; Fontanesi, L

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated at the genome-wide level if 20 years of artificial directional selection based on boar genetic evaluation obtained with a classical BLUP animal model shaped the genome of the Italian Large White pig breed. The most influential boars of this breed (n = 192), born from 1992 (the beginning of the selection program of this breed) to 2012, with an estimated breeding value reliability of >0.85, were genotyped with the Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. After grouping the boars in eight classes according to their year of birth, filtered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to evaluate the effects of time on genotype frequency changes using multinomial logistic regression models. Of these markers, 493 had a PBonferroni  selection program. The obtained results indicated that the genome of the Italian Large White pigs was shaped by a directional selection program derived by the application of methodologies assuming the infinitesimal model that captured a continuous trend of allele frequency changes in the boar population. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. A life cycle cost analysis of large-scale thermal energy storage technologies for buildings using combined heat and power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaine, K.; Duffy, A.

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Buildings account for approximately 40% of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in developed economies, of which approximately 55% of building energy is used for heating and cooling. The reduction of building-related GHG emissions is a high international policy priority. For this reason and because there are many technical solutions for this, these polices should involve significant improvements in the uptake of small-scale energy efficient (EE) systems. However the widespread deployment of many technologies, must overcome a number of barriers, one of which is a temporal (diurnal or seasonal) mismatch between supply and demand. For example, in office applications, peak combined heat and power (CHP) thermal output may coincide with peak electrical demand in the late morning or afternoon, whereas heating may be required early in the morning. For this reason, cost-effective thermal storage solutions have the potential to improve financial performance, while simultaneously reducing associated GHG emissions. The aim of this paper is to identify existing thermal energy storage (TES) technologies and to present and asses the economic and technical performance of each for a typical large scale mixed development. Technologies identified include: Borehole Thermal Energy Storage (BTES); Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES); Pitt Thermal Energy Storage (PTES) and Energy Piles. Of these the most appropriate for large scale storage in buildings were BTES and ATES because of they are relatively cheap and are installed under a building and do not use valuable floor area A Heat transfer analyses and system simulations of a variety of BTES systems are carried out using a Finite Element Analysis package (ANSYS) and energy balance simulation software (TRNSYS) is to determine the optimal system design. Financial models for each system are developed, including capital, installation, running and maintenance costs. Using this information the unit costs of

  4. Large-scale Inference Problems in Astronomy: Building a 3D Galactic Dust Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The term ''Big Data'' has become trite, as modern technology has made data sets of terabytes or even petabytes easy to store. Such data sets provide a sandbox in which to develop new statistical inference techniques that can extract interesting results from increasingly rich (and large) databases. I will give an example from my work on mapping the interstellar dust of the Milky Way. 2D emission-based maps have been used for decades to estimate the reddening and emission from interstellar dust, with applications from CMB foregrounds to surveys of large-scale structure. For studies within the Milky Way, however, the third dimension is required. I will present our work on a 3D dust map based on Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS over 3/4 of the sky (http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.01005), assess its usefulness relative to other dust maps, and discuss future work. Supported by the NSF.

  5. Building automation system of payment platform weight component for large spacecraft reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Badanina, J. O.

    2016-04-01

    Considered Design and the logic of opening large convertible antenna. The necessity of compensation weight component in the assembly and testing of the design. Given the logic of the movement elements of power spokes, concluded that the use of the tracking system to compensate for the weight component. The analysis of the existing equipment and control systems. Produced selection of the manufacturer of automated equipment that meets the stated objectives of management and control. It is concluded that the design component of the weight compensation system based on servo controllers and sensors combined platform automation, controlled by special software. The structure of the platform automation, consistent workflow testing. It defines the principles of interaction between subsystems of the weight compensation component for receiving, processing and monitoring of process parameters testing. It is concluded that the proposed system can be integrated into the automation system and the perspective of process control testing of disclosure of large spacecraft.

  6. The build up of the correlation between halo spin and the large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Kang, Xi

    2018-01-01

    Both simulations and observations have confirmed that the spin of haloes/galaxies is correlated with the large-scale structure (LSS) with a mass dependence such that the spin of low-mass haloes/galaxies tend to be parallel with the LSS, while that of massive haloes/galaxies tend to be perpendicular with the LSS. It is still unclear how this mass dependence is built up over time. We use N-body simulations to trace the evolution of the halo spin-LSS correlation and find that at early times the spin of all halo progenitors is parallel with the LSS. As time goes on, mass collapsing around massive halo is more isotropic, especially the recent mass accretion along the slowest collapsing direction is significant and it brings the halo spin to be perpendicular with the LSS. Adopting the fractional anisotropy (FA) parameter to describe the degree of anisotropy of the large-scale environment, we find that the spin-LSS correlation is a strong function of the environment such that a higher FA (more anisotropic environment) leads to an aligned signal, and a lower anisotropy leads to a misaligned signal. In general, our results show that the spin-LSS correlation is a combined consequence of mass flow and halo growth within the cosmic web. Our predicted environmental dependence between spin and large-scale structure can be further tested using galaxy surveys.

  7. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early...... represents one of the biggest genome scans so far reported for asthma related phenotypes. This study also demonstrates the utility of increased sample sizes and quantitative phenotypes in linkage analysis of complex disorders....

  8. Pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium and identification of a large transferable pathogenicity island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonten Marc JM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of nosocomial infections in immunocompromized patients. Results We present a pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of seven E. faecium strains that were isolated from various sources. In the genomes of clinical isolates several antibiotic resistance genes were identified, including the vanA transposon that confers resistance to vancomycin in two strains. A functional comparison between E. faecium and the related opportunistic pathogen E. faecalis based on differences in the presence of protein families, revealed divergence in plant carbohydrate metabolic pathways and oxidative stress defense mechanisms. The E. faecium pan-genome was estimated to be essentially unlimited in size, indicating that E. faecium can efficiently acquire and incorporate exogenous DNA in its gene pool. One of the most prominent sources of genomic diversity consists of bacteriophages that have integrated in the genome. The CRISPR-Cas system, which contributes to immunity against bacteriophage infection in prokaryotes, is not present in the sequenced strains. Three sequenced isolates carry the esp gene, which is involved in urinary tract infections and biofilm formation. The esp gene is located on a large pathogenicity island (PAI, which is between 64 and 104 kb in size. Conjugation experiments showed that the entire esp PAI can be transferred horizontally and inserts in a site-specific manner. Conclusions Genes involved in environmental persistence, colonization and virulence can easily be aquired by E. faecium. This will make the development of successful treatment strategies targeted against this organism a challenge for years to come.

  9. Pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium and identification of a large transferable pathogenicity island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of nosocomial infections in immunocompromized patients. Results We present a pyrosequencing-based comparative genome analysis of seven E. faecium strains that were isolated from various sources. In the genomes of clinical isolates several antibiotic resistance genes were identified, including the vanA transposon that confers resistance to vancomycin in two strains. A functional comparison between E. faecium and the related opportunistic pathogen E. faecalis based on differences in the presence of protein families, revealed divergence in plant carbohydrate metabolic pathways and oxidative stress defense mechanisms. The E. faecium pan-genome was estimated to be essentially unlimited in size, indicating that E. faecium can efficiently acquire and incorporate exogenous DNA in its gene pool. One of the most prominent sources of genomic diversity consists of bacteriophages that have integrated in the genome. The CRISPR-Cas system, which contributes to immunity against bacteriophage infection in prokaryotes, is not present in the sequenced strains. Three sequenced isolates carry the esp gene, which is involved in urinary tract infections and biofilm formation. The esp gene is located on a large pathogenicity island (PAI), which is between 64 and 104 kb in size. Conjugation experiments showed that the entire esp PAI can be transferred horizontally and inserts in a site-specific manner. Conclusions Genes involved in environmental persistence, colonization and virulence can easily be aquired by E. faecium. This will make the development of successful treatment strategies targeted against this organism a challenge for years to come. PMID:20398277

  10. Building local capacity for genomics research in Africa: recommendations from analysis of publications in Sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Babatunde O; Olopade, Christopher O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2016-01-01

    The poor genomics research capacity of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) could prevent maximal benefits from the applications of genomics in the practice of medicine and research. The objective of this study is to examine the author affiliations of genomic epidemiology publications in order to make recommendations for building local genomics research capacity in SSA. SSA genomic epidemiology articles published between 2004 and 2013 were extracted from the Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) database. Data on authorship details, country of population studied, and phenotype or disease were extracted. Factors associated with the first author, who has an SSA institution affiliation (AIAFA), were determined using a Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. The most commonly studied population was South Africa, accounting for 31.1%, followed by Ghana (10.6%) and Kenya (7.5%). About one-tenth of the papers were related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer (6.1%) and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) (4.3%). Fewer than half of the first authors (46.9%) were affiliated with an African institution. Among the 238 articles with an African first author, over three-quarters (79.8%) belonged to a university or medical school, 16.8% were affiliated with a research institute, and 3.4% had affiliations with other institutions. Significant disparities currently exist among SSA countries in genomics research capacity. South Africa has the highest genomics research output, which is reflected in the investments made in its genomics and biotechnology sector. These findings underscore the need to focus on developing local capacity, especially among those affiliated with SSA universities where there are more opportunities for teaching and research.

  11. Large Homogeneous Genome Regions (Isochores in Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Lynn Woody

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of plant genomes, while slowly being characterized and defined, is still composed primarily of regions of undefined function. Many eukaryotic genomes contain isochore regions, mosaics of homogeneous GC content that can abruptly change from one neighboring isochore to the next. Isochores are broken into families which are characterized by their GC levels. We identified 4,339 compositionally distinct domains and 331 of these were identified as Long Homogeneous Genome Regions (LHGRs. We assigned these to four families based on finite mixture models of GC content. We then characterized each family with respect to exon length, gene content, and transposeable elements. The LHGR pattern of soybeans is unique in that while the majority of the genes within LHGRs are found within a single LHGR family with a narrow GC-range (Family B, that family is not the highest in GC content as seen in vertebrates and invertebrates. Instead Family B has a mean GC content of 35%. The range of GC content for all LHGRs is 16-59% GC which is a larger range than what is typical of vertebrates. This is the first study in which LHGRs have been identified in soybeans and the functions of the genes within the LHGRs have been analyzed.

  12. Completion of the swine genome will simplify the production of swine as a large animal biomedical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Eric M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anatomic and physiological similarities to the human make swine an excellent large animal model for human health and disease. Methods Cloning from a modified somatic cell, which can be determined in cells prior to making the animal, is the only method available for the production of targeted modifications in swine. Results Since some strains of swine are similar in size to humans, technologies that have been developed for swine can be readily adapted to humans and vice versa. Here the importance of swine as a biomedical model, current technologies to produce genetically enhanced swine, current biomedical models, and how the completion of the swine genome will promote swine as a biomedical model are discussed. Conclusions The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions.

  13. Building flexibility and managing complexity in community mental health: lessons learned in a large urban centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Saab, Dima; Francombe Pridham, Kate; Aery, Anjana; Nakhost, Arash

    2018-01-24

    Across many jurisdictions, adults with complex mental health and social needs face challenges accessing appropriate supports due to system fragmentation and strict eligibility criteria of existing services. To support this underserviced population, Toronto's local health authority launched two novel community mental health models in 2014, inspired by Flexible Assertive Community Team principles. This study explores service user and provider perspectives on the acceptability of these services, and lessons learned during early implementation. We purposively sampled 49 stakeholders (staff, physicians, service users, health systems stakeholders) and conducted 17 semi-structured qualitative interviews and 5 focus groups between October 23, 2014 and March 2, 2015, exploring stakeholder perspectives on the newly launched team based models, as well as activities and strategies employed to support early implementation. Interviews and focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings revealed wide-ranging endorsement for the two team-based models' success in engaging the target population of adults with complex service needs. Implementation strengths included the broad recognition of existing service gaps, the use of interdisciplinary teams and experienced service providers, broad partnerships and collaboration among various service sectors, training and team building activities. Emerging challenges included lack of complementary support services such as suitable housing, organizational contexts reluctant to embrace change and risk associated with complexity, as well as limited service provider and organizational capacity to deliver evidence-based interventions. Findings identified implementation drivers at the practitioner, program, and system levels, specific to the implementation of community mental health interventions for adults with complex health and social needs. These can inform future efforts to address the health

  14. EBV-Positive and EBV-Negative Posttransplant Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphomas Have Distinct Genomic and Transcriptomic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, J Finalet; Morscio, J; Dierickx, D; Vandenberghe, P; Gheysens, O; Verhoef, G; Zamani, M; Tousseyn, T; Wlodarska, I

    2016-02-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of posttransplant diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PT-DLBCL) is largely unknown. We have recently shown that Epstein-Barr virus-positive (EBV(+)) and -negative (EBV(-)) PT-DLBCL have distinct gene expression profiles, and the transcriptomic profile of EBV(-) PT-DLBCL is similar to that of DLBCL in immunocompetent individuals (IC-DLBCL). To validate these observations at the genomic level, we performed array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) analysis of 21 EBV(+) PT-DLBCL, 6 EBV(-) PT-DLBCL, and 11 control IC-DLBCL, and subsequently combined genomic and transcriptomic data. The analysis showed that EBV(+) and EBV(-) PT-DLBCL have distinct aCGH profiles and shared only one recurrent imbalance. EBV(-) PT-DLBCL, however, displayed at least 10 aberrations recurrent in IC-DLBCL, among which characteristic gain of 3/3q and 18q, and loss of 6q23/TNFAIP3 as well as 9p21/CDKN2A. The most prevalent aberration in EBV(+) PT-DLBCL was gain/amplification of 9p24.1 targeting PDCD1LG2/PDL2. Our data indicate that the FOXP1 oncogene and the tumor suppressor CDKNA2 implicated in EBV(-) DLBCL, do not play a critical role in the pathogenesis of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL. Altogether, genomic profiling of PT-/IC-DLBCL confirms that EBV(-) and EBV(+) PT-DLBCL are distinct entities, while EBV(-) PT-DLBCL has features in common with IC-DLBCL. These findings support the hypothesis that EBV(-) PT-DLBCL are de novo lymphomas in transplant recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. Re-annotation, improved large-scale assembly and establishment of a catalogue of noncoding loci for the genome of the model brown alga Ectocarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Alexandre; Avia, Komlan; Sterck, Lieven; Derrien, Thomas; Wucher, Valentin; Andres, Gwendoline; Monsoor, Misharl; Godfroy, Olivier; Lipinska, Agnieszka; Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Van De Peer, Yves; Hitte, Christophe; Corre, Erwan; Coelho, Susana M; Cock, J Mark

    2017-04-01

    The genome of the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus was the first to be completely sequenced from within the brown algal group and has served as a key reference genome both for this lineage and for the stramenopiles. We present a complete structural and functional reannotation of the Ectocarpus genome. The large-scale assembly of the Ectocarpus genome was significantly improved and genome-wide gene re-annotation using extensive RNA-seq data improved the structure of 11 108 existing protein-coding genes and added 2030 new loci. A genome-wide analysis of splicing isoforms identified an average of 1.6 transcripts per locus. A large number of previously undescribed noncoding genes were identified and annotated, including 717 loci that produce long noncoding RNAs. Conservation of lncRNAs between Ectocarpus and another brown alga, the kelp Saccharina japonica, suggests that at least a proportion of these loci serve a function. Finally, a large collection of single nucleotide polymorphism-based markers was developed for genetic analyses. These resources are available through an updated and improved genome database. This study significantly improves the utility of the Ectocarpus genome as a high-quality reference for the study of many important aspects of brown algal biology and as a reference for genomic analyses across the stramenopiles. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2011-02-01

    This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

  17. Putting interoperability to the test: building a large reusable assessment item bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Sclater

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The COLA project has been developing a large bank of assessment items for units across the Scottish further education curriculum since May 2003. These will be made available to learners mainly via colleges' virtual learning environments (VLEs. Many people have been involved in the development of the COLA assessment item bank to ensure a high level of technical and pedagogical quality. Processes have included deciding on appropriate item types and subject areas, training authors, peer-reviewing and quality assuring the items and assessments, and ensuring they are tagged with appropriate metadata. One of the biggest challenges has been to ensure that the assessments are deliverable across the four main virtual learning environments in use in Scottish colleges–and also through a stand-alone assessment system. COLA is significant because no other large project appears to have successfully developed standards-compliant assessment content for delivery across multiple VLEs. This paper discusses how COLA has dealt with the organizational, pedagogical and technical issues which arise when commissioning items from many authors for delivery across an educational sector.

  18. An ethnically relevant consensus Korean reference genome is a step towards personal reference genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunho; Kim, Hak-Min; Jho, Sungwoong; Jun, JeHoon; Lee, Yong Joo; Chae, Kyun Shik; Kim, Chang Geun; Kim, Sangsoo; Eriksson, Anders; Edwards, Jeremy S; Lee, Semin; Kim, Byung Chul; Manica, Andrea; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Church, George M; Bhak, Jong

    2016-11-24

    Human genomes are routinely compared against a universal reference. However, this strategy could miss population-specific and personal genomic variations, which may be detected more efficiently using an ethnically relevant or personal reference. Here we report a hybrid assembly of a Korean reference genome (KOREF) for constructing personal and ethnic references by combining sequencing and mapping methods. We also build its consensus variome reference, providing information on millions of variants from 40 additional ethnically homogeneous genomes from the Korean Personal Genome Project. We find that the ethnically relevant consensus reference can be beneficial for efficient variant detection. Systematic comparison of human assemblies shows the importance of assembly quality, suggesting the necessity of new technologies to comprehensively map ethnic and personal genomic structure variations. In the era of large-scale population genome projects, the leveraging of ethnicity-specific genome assemblies as well as the human reference genome will accelerate mapping all human genome diversity.

  19. Building an Undergraduate Book Approval Plan for a Large Academic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The University of Alberta Libraries (UAL, working with two book vendors, created large-scale undergraduate book approval plans to deliver new publications. Detailed selections profiles were created for many subject areas, designed to deliver books that would have been obvious choices by subject selectors. More than 5800 monographs were received through the book approval plans during the pilot period. These volumes proved to be highly relevant to users, showing twice as much circulation as other monographs acquired during the same time period. Goals achieved through this project include: release of selectors’ time from routine work, systematic acquisition of a broadly based high-demand undergraduate collection and faster delivery of undergraduate materials. This successful program will be expanded and incorporated into UAL’s normal acquisitions processes for undergraduate materials.

  20. The  Big, Large and Huge Case of State-Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    of organization, war, finance, law and politics. This offers a picture of structures, semantic differentiations and for elites as well as commoners that have interests in operations that paves ways for state formation as an evolutionary learning process. In order to fulfill that aim, aspects of Luhmann's theory......  Using communication theory as point of departure it is not evident how to study macro phenomena. Michel Foucault delimited his studies to a non-Grand Theory when he studied discursive events. At the same time Charles Tilly wrote about Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons when he...... tried to establish a perspective on a macro phenomena as European state formation. With Luhmann's system theory, the claim is that there is no such contradiction between Grand evolution and particular semantic history. Passing through some classic studies of the historical establishment of interaction...

  1. The big, large and huge case of state-building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    of organization, war, finance, law and politics. This offers a picture of structures, semantic differentiations and of elites and commoners who have an interest in operations that pave the way for state formation as an evolutionary learning process. In order to fulfill that aim, aspects of Luhmann's theory have......  Using communication theory as point of departure, it is not evident how to study macro phenomena. Michel Foucault limited his studies to a non-Grand Theory when studying discursive events. At the same time, Charles Tilly wrote about Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons when trying...... to establish a perspective on a macro phenomena as European state formation. With Luhmann's system theory, the claim is that there is no such contradiction between Grand evolution and particular semantic history. Passing through some classic studies of the historical establishment of interaction systems...

  2. Building the Foundations for a Large-Scale, Cross-Sector Collaboration for a Sustainable and Permanent Return to the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoglou, A.

    2017-10-01

    This presentation will describe how to build the foundations needed for a large scale, cross-industry collaboration to enable a sustainable and permanent return to the Moon based on system leadership, cross-sector partnership, and inclusive business.

  3. Large-scale experiments for the vulnerability analysis of buildings impacted and intruded by fluviatile torrential hazard processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Michael; Gems, Bernhard; Fuchs, Sven; Mazzorana, Bruno; Papathoma-Köhle, Maria; Aufleger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In European mountain regions, losses due to torrential hazards are still considerable high despite the ongoing debate on an overall increasing or decreasing trend. Recent events in Austria severely revealed that due to technical and economic reasons, an overall protection of settlements in the alpine environment against torrential hazards is not feasible. On the side of the hazard process, events with unpredictable intensities may represent overload scenarios for existent protection structures in the torrent catchments. They bear a particular risk of significant losses in the living space. Although the importance of vulnerability is widely recognised, there is still a research gap concerning its assessment. Currently, potential losses at buildings due to torrential hazards and their comparison with reinstatement costs are determined by the use of empirical functions. Hence, relations of process intensities and the extent of losses, gathered by the analysis of historic hazard events and the information of object-specific restoration values, are used. This approach does not represent a physics-based and integral concept since relevant and often crucial processes, as the intrusion of the fluid-sediment-mixture into elements at risk, are not considered. Based on these findings, our work is targeted at extending these findings and models of present risk research in the context of an integral, more physics-based vulnerability analysis concept. Fluviatile torrential hazard processes and their impacts on the building envelope are experimentally modelled. Material intrusion processes are thereby explicitly considered. Dynamic impacts are gathered quantitatively and spatially distributed by the use of a large set of force transducers. The experimental tests are accomplished with artificial, vertical and skewed plates, including also openings for material intrusion. Further, the impacts on specific buildings within the test site of the work, the fan apex of the Schnannerbach

  4. Comparison of histological grading and large-scale genomic status (DNA ploidy) as prognostic tools in oral dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudbø, J; Bryne, M; Johannessen, A C; Kildal, W; Danielsen, H E; Reith, A

    2001-07-01

    Approximately one in ten oral white patches (leukoplakia) are histologically classified as dysplasia, with a well-documented potential for developing into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Histological grading in oral dysplasia has limited prognostic value, whereas large-scale genomic status (DNA ploidy, nuclear DNA content) is an early marker of malignant transformation in several tissues. Biopsies from 196 patients with oral leukoplakia histologically typed as dysplasia were investigated. Inter-observer agreement among four experienced pathologists performing a simplified grading was assessed by Cohen's kappa values. For 150 of the 196 cases, it was also possible to assess large-scale genomic status and compare its prognostic impact with that of histological grading. Disease-free survival was estimated by life-table methods, with a mean follow-up time of 103 months (range 4-165 months). The primary considered end-point was the subsequent occurrence of OSCC. For grading of the total of 196 cases, kappa values ranged from 0.17 to 0.33 when three grading groups (mild, moderate, and severe dysplasia) were considered, and from 0.21 to 0.32 when two groups (low grade and high grade) were considered (p=0.41). For the 150 cases in which large-scale genomic status was also assessed, kappa values for the histological grading ranged from 0.21 to 0.33 for three grading groups and from 0.27 to 0.34 for two grading groups (p=0.47). In survival analysis, histological grading was without significant prognostic value for any of the four observers (p 0.14-0.44), in contrast to DNA ploidy (p=0.001). It is concluded that DNA ploidy in oral dysplasia has a practical prognostic value, unlike histological grading of the same lesions. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Large-Scale Science Observatories: Building on What We Have Learned from USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Frassetto, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the NSF-sponsored EarthScope USArray observatory, the Earth science community has built the operational capability and experience to tackle scientific challenges at the largest scales, such as a Subduction Zone Observatory. In the first ten years of USArray, geophysical instruments were deployed across roughly 2% of the Earth's surface. The USArray operated a rolling deployment of seismic stations that occupied ~1,700 sites across the USA, made co-located atmospheric observations, occupied hundreds of sites with magnetotelluric sensors, expanded a backbone reference network of seismic stations, and provided instruments to PI-led teams that deployed thousands of additional seismic stations. USArray included a comprehensive outreach component that directly engaged hundreds of students at over 50 colleges and universities to locate station sites and provided Earth science exposure to roughly 1,000 landowners who hosted stations. The project also included a comprehensive data management capability that received, archived and distributed data, metadata, and data products; data were acquired and distributed in real time. The USArray project was completed on time and under budget and developed a number of best practices that can inform other large-scale science initiatives that the Earth science community is contemplating. Key strategies employed by USArray included: using a survey, rather than hypothesis-driven, mode of observation to generate comprehensive, high quality data on a large-scale for exploration and discovery; making data freely and openly available to any investigator from the very onset of the project; and using proven, commercial, off-the-shelf systems to ensure a fast start and avoid delays due to over-reliance on unproven technology or concepts. Scope was set ambitiously, but managed carefully to avoid overextending. Configuration was controlled to ensure efficient operations while providing consistent, uniform observations. Finally, community

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara de Melo Rodovalho

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS, and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp, given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  7. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4 has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3 as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution.

  8. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs and bioinformatics (BI represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  9. Predicting clinical outcomes from large scale cancer genomic profiles with deep survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Safoora; Amrollahi, Fatemeh; Amgad, Mohamed; Dong, Chengliang; Lewis, Joshua E; Song, Congzheng; Gutman, David A; Halani, Sameer H; Velazquez Vega, Jose Enrique; Brat, Daniel J; Cooper, Lee A D

    2017-09-15

    Translating the vast data generated by genomic platforms into accurate predictions of clinical outcomes is a fundamental challenge in genomic medicine. Many prediction methods face limitations in learning from the high-dimensional profiles generated by these platforms, and rely on experts to hand-select a small number of features for training prediction models. In this paper, we demonstrate how deep learning and Bayesian optimization methods that have been remarkably successful in general high-dimensional prediction tasks can be adapted to the problem of predicting cancer outcomes. We perform an extensive comparison of Bayesian optimized deep survival models and other state of the art machine learning methods for survival analysis, and describe a framework for interpreting deep survival models using a risk backpropagation technique. Finally, we illustrate that deep survival models can successfully transfer information across diseases to improve prognostic accuracy. We provide an open-source software implementation of this framework called SurvivalNet that enables automatic training, evaluation and interpretation of deep survival models.

  10. Large-scale robot-assisted genome shuffling yields industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts with increased ethanol tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Tim; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Mertens, Stijn; Saels, Veerle; Verplaetse, Alex; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    of 0.90 g ethanol/l/h and a yield of 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose. We report the use of several different large-scale genome shuffling strategies to obtain novel hybrids with increased ethanol tolerance and fermentation capacity. Several of the novel hybrids show best-parent heterosis and outperform the commonly used bioethanol strain Ethanol Red, making them interesting candidate strains for industrial production.

  11. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  12. Inferring Population Size History from Large Samples of Genome-Wide Molecular Data - An Approximate Bayesian Computation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Boitard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the ancestral dynamics of effective population size is a long-standing question in population genetics, which can now be tackled much more accurately thanks to the massive genomic data available in many species. Several promising methods that take advantage of whole-genome sequences have been recently developed in this context. However, they can only be applied to rather small samples, which limits their ability to estimate recent population size history. Besides, they can be very sensitive to sequencing or phasing errors. Here we introduce a new approximate Bayesian computation approach named PopSizeABC that allows estimating the evolution of the effective population size through time, using a large sample of complete genomes. This sample is summarized using the folded allele frequency spectrum and the average zygotic linkage disequilibrium at different bins of physical distance, two classes of statistics that are widely used in population genetics and can be easily computed from unphased and unpolarized SNP data. Our approach provides accurate estimations of past population sizes, from the very first generations before present back to the expected time to the most recent common ancestor of the sample, as shown by simulations under a wide range of demographic scenarios. When applied to samples of 15 or 25 complete genomes in four cattle breeds (Angus, Fleckvieh, Holstein and Jersey, PopSizeABC revealed a series of population declines, related to historical events such as domestication or modern breed creation. We further highlight that our approach is robust to sequencing errors, provided summary statistics are computed from SNPs with common alleles.

  13. Detection of variations and identifying genomic breakpoints for large deletions in the LDLR by Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Fathimath; Allcock, Richard J; Hooper, Amanda J; van Bockxmeer, Frank M

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this study were to 1) compare LDLR variant detection between Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing and conventional methods used for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) diagnosis i.e. exon-by-exon sequence analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and 2) identify genomic breakpoints for 12 cases of large deletions in LDLR previously identified by MLPA. Thirty FH patient samples were selected, 22 with mutations previously determined. Primers were designed and optimised to generate six amplicons covering the entire LDLR and sequenced on a PGM. An additional twelve samples carrying MLPA variants were sequenced on the PGM followed by Sanger sequencing to establish the breakpoints. A total of 2179 LDLR variants were identified in the 30 samples, with 383 variants in the region sequenced that was common to both PGM and Sanger methods. Three discrepancies were identified; two of these were identified by visual inspection of the BAM files, whilst the remaining discrepancy was likely an artefact of the PCR approach. Approximate genomic breakpoints for the 12 MLPA variants were identified using PGM sequencing, and Sanger sequencing of these regions established causative breakpoints. Eleven different rearrangements/mutational events were found, with eight out of eleven occurring in Alus. Two of the three samples with exons 2-6del had identical breakpoints. Two samples with exons 11-12del had unique breakpoints, indicating separate ancestral origin or mutational events. This study showed that Ion Torrent PGM sequencing is an accurate and efficient method to detect LDLR variants while providing additional information such as genomic breakpoints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) relationships: a large family with eight clusters common to human, animal, and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallberg, Yvonne; Oppermann, Udo; Jörnvall, Hans; Persson, Bengt

    2002-03-01

    The progress in genome characterizations has opened new routes for studying enzyme families. The availability of the human genome enabled us to delineate the large family of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) members. Although the human genome releases are not yet final, we have already found 63 members. We have also compared these SDR forms with those of three model organisms: Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana. We detect eight SDR ortholog clusters in a cross-genome comparison. Four of these clusters represent extended SDR forms, a subgroup found in all life forms. The other four are classical SDRs with activities involved in cellular differentiation and signalling. We also find 18 SDR genes that are present only in the human genome of the four genomes studied, reflecting enzyme forms specific to mammals. Close to half of these gene products represent steroid dehydrogenases, emphasizing the regulatory importance of these enzymes.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Research on Tensile Performance of Inter-Panel Fastener Joints of Large-Panel Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyakin, A. A.; Derbentsev, I. S.; Tarasov, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    When designing large-panel buildings, it is necessary to take into account the work of wall panel joints. In addition to welded joints, monolithic joints in the form of pinned joints of the loop releases of adjacent wall panels are widely used. The main characteristics of a joint in the design scheme are its rigidity and bearing capacity under the action of shear and tensile (compressive) forces. This paper studies a new type of an inter-panel joint in the form of a fastener junction of wall panels made using a bracket of reinforcing steel and a metal plate joining the ends of the bracket. Due to the creation of a closed loop of voltages in the node, its high load-bearing capacity is assumed as well as the possibility of using this connection under dynamic effects on the building. An experimental study of the strength and rigidity of the joint at tensile loading along the joint axis was carried out, the breakdown of the joint, the stiffness characteristics and the bearing capacity of the samples were determined. The numerical modeling of the joint’s work on stretching to the formation of cracks is carried out.

  16. Long-term performance of ETICS on external walls of large-panel buildings; Dauerbestaendigkeit von WDVS auf Plattenbau - Fassaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuschel, M. [Materialforschungs- und Pruefungsanstalt fuer Bauwesen Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Urgently required renovation work on external walls of large panel buildings makes novel demands on thermal insulation composites. In the quest for a practice-oriented test method, a pilot project was carried out. Separate parts of a completely renovated housefront were covered with different thermal insulation composites in a way permitting to carry out investigations for a period of several years. The test methods used and the installed thermal insulation composites are described. The results are pointed out. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die dringend erforderlichen Fassadeninstandsetzungen von Plattenbauten stellen an Waermedaemmverbundsysteme neue Anforderungen. Auf der Suche nach einer praxisgerechten Pruefmethode wurde ein Demopruefstand errichtet, der es ermoeglicht im Rahmen einer Komplettsanierung einen separaten Fassadenbereich mit unterschiedlichen Waermedaemmverbundsystemen so zu bekleiden, dass Untersuchungen ueber mehrere Jahre durchgefuehrt werden koennen. Im Folgenden werden die angewendeten Pruefmethoden und die installierten WDV-Systeme erlaeutert. Die einzelnen Ergebnisse werden aufgezeigt.

  17. Rapid volatile metabolomics and genomics in large strawberry populations segregating for aroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in strawberry (Fragaria spp.) represent a large portion of the fruit secondary metabolome, and contribute significantly to aroma, flavor, disease resistance, pest resistance and overall fruit quality. Understanding the basis for volatile compound biosynthesis and it...

  18. Distinct origin of the Y and St genome in Elymus species: evidence from the analysis of a large sample of St genome species using two nuclear genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous cytological and single copy nuclear genes data suggested the St and Y genome in the StY-genomic Elymus species originated from different donors: the St from a diploid species in Pseudoroegneria and the Y from an unknown diploid species, which are now extinct or undiscovered. However, ITS data suggested that the Y and St genome shared the same progenitor although rather few St genome species were studied. In a recent analysis of many samples of St genome species Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh À. Löve suggested that one accession of P. spicata species was the most likely donor of the Y genome. The present study tested whether intraspecific variation during sampling could affect the outcome of analyses to determining the origin of Y genome in allotetraploid StY species. We also explored the evolutionary dynamics of these species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two single copy nuclear genes, the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2 and the translation elongation factor G (EF-G sequences from 58 accessions of Pseudoroegneria and Elymus species, together with those from Hordeum (H, Agropyron (P, Australopyrum (W, Lophopyrum (E(e, Thinopyrum (E(a, Thinopyrum (E(b, and Dasypyrum (V were analyzed using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Sequence comparisons among all these genomes revealed that the St and Y genomes are relatively dissimilar. Extensive sequence variations have been detected not only between the sequences from St and Y genome, but also among the sequences from diploid St genome species. Phylogenetic analyses separated the Y sequences from the St sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results confirmed that St and Y genome in Elymus species have originated from different donors, and demonstrated that intraspecific variation does not affect the identification of genome origin in polyploids. Moreover, sequence data showed evidence to support the suggestion of the genome

  19. Large gene overlaps in prokaryotic genomes: result of functional constraints or mispredictions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrington Eoghan D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Across the fully sequenced microbial genomes there are thousands of examples of overlapping genes. Many of these are only a few nucleotides long and are thought to function by permitting the coordinated regulation of gene expression. However, there should also be selective pressure against long overlaps, as the existence of overlapping reading frames increases the risk of deleterious mutations. Here we examine the longest overlaps and assess whether they are the product of special functional constraints or of erroneous annotation. Results We analysed the genes that overlap by 60 bps or more among 338 fully-sequenced prokaryotic genomes. The likely functional significance of an overlap was determined by comparing each of the genes to its respective orthologs. If a gene showed a significantly different length from its orthologs it was considered unlikely to be functional and therefore the result of an error either in sequencing or gene prediction. Focusing on 715 co-directional overlaps longer than 60 bps, we classified the erroneous ones into five categories: i 5'-end extension of the downstream gene due to either a mispredicted start codon or a frameshift at 5'-end of the gene (409 overlaps, ii fragmentation of a gene caused by a frameshift (163, iii 3'-end extension of the upstream gene due to either a frameshift at 3'-end of a gene or point mutation at the stop codon (68, iv Redundant gene predictions (4, v 5' & 3'-end extension which is a combination of i and iii (71. We also studied 75 divergent overlaps that could be classified as misannotations of group i. Nevertheless we found some convergent long overlaps (54 that might be true overlaps, although an important part of convergent overlaps could be classified as group iii (124. Conclusion Among the 968 overlaps larger than 60 bps which we analysed, we did not find a single real one among the co-directional and divergent orientations and concluded that there had been an

  20. A new way to protect privacy in large-scale genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Liina; Bogdanov, Dan; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2013-04-01

    Increased availability of various genotyping techniques has initiated a race for finding genetic markers that can be used in diagnostics and personalized medicine. Although many genetic risk factors are known, key causes of common diseases with complex heritage patterns are still unknown. Identification of such complex traits requires a targeted study over a large collection of data. Ideally, such studies bring together data from many biobanks. However, data aggregation on such a large scale raises many privacy issues. We show how to conduct such studies without violating privacy of individual donors and without leaking the data to third parties. The presented solution has provable security guarantees. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Inference and Evolutionary Analysis of Genome-Scale Regulatory Networks in Large Phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christopher; Konieczka, Jay; Delorey, Toni; Lyons, Ana; Socha, Amanda; Davis, Kathleen; Knaack, Sara A; Thompson, Dawn; O'Shea, Erin K; Regev, Aviv; Roy, Sushmita

    2017-05-24

    Changes in transcriptional regulatory networks can significantly contribute to species evolution and adaptation. However, identification of genome-scale regulatory networks is an open challenge, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we introduce multi-species regulatory network learning (MRTLE), a computational approach that uses phylogenetic structure, sequence-specific motifs, and transcriptomic data, to infer the regulatory networks in different species. Using simulated data from known networks and transcriptomic data from six divergent yeasts, we demonstrate that MRTLE predicts networks with greater accuracy than existing methods because it incorporates phylogenetic information. We used MRTLE to infer the structure of the transcriptional networks that control the osmotic stress responses of divergent, non-model yeast species and then validated our predictions experimentally. Interrogating these networks reveals that gene duplication promotes network divergence across evolution. Taken together, our approach facilitates study of regulatory network evolutionary dynamics across multiple poorly studied species. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus contains a series of viral DNA pieces, suggesting an ancient association with large dsDNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boland Wilhelm

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectocarpus siliculosus virus-1 (EsV-1 is a lysogenic dsDNA virus belonging to the super family of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV that infect Ectocarpus siliculosus, a marine filamentous brown alga. Previous studies indicated that the viral genome is integrated into the host DNA. In order to find the integration sites of the viral genome, a genomic library from EsV-1-infected algae was screened using labelled EsV-1 DNA. Several fragments were isolated and some of them were sequenced and analyzed in detail. Results Analysis revealed that the algal genome is split by a copy of viral sequences that have a high identity to EsV-1 DNA sequences. These fragments are interspersed with DNA repeats, pseudogenes and genes coding for products involved in DNA replication, integration and transposition. Some of these gene products are not encoded by EsV-1 but are present in the genome of other members of the NCLDV family. Further analysis suggests that the Ectocarpus algal genome contains traces of the integration of a large dsDNA viral genome; this genome could be the ancestor of the extant NCLDV genomes. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that the EsV-1 genome might have originated in these viral DNA pieces, implying the existence of a complex integration and recombination system. A protein similar to a new class of tyrosine recombinases might be a key enzyme of this system. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that some dsDNA viruses are monophyletic and evolved principally through genome reduction. Moreover, we hypothesize that phaeoviruses have probably developed an original replication system.

  3. Insights into the genome of large sulfur bacteria revealed by analysis of single filaments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussmann, M.; Hu, F.Z.; Richter, M.; Beer, D. de; Preisler, A.; Jorgensen, B.B.; Huntemann, M.; Glockner, F.O.; Amann, R.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Lasken, R.S.; Janto, B.; Hogg, J.; Stoodley, P.; Boissy, R.; Ehrlich, G.D.

    2007-01-01

    Marine sediments are frequently covered by mats of the filamentous Beggiatoa and other large nitrate-storing bacteria that oxidize hydrogen sulfide using either oxygen or nitrate, which they store in intracellular vacuoles. Despite their conspicuous metabolic properties and their biogeochemical

  4. Analysis of Large Genomic Data in Silico: The EPICNorfolk Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Tan, Qihua

    In human genetics, large-scale data are now available with advances in genotyping technologies and international collaborative projects. Our ongoing study of obesity involves Affymetrix 500k genechips on approximately 7000 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC...

  5. A protocol for large scale genomic DNA isolation for cacao genetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... assessed and compared with conventional method using mortar. The best ... important tropical species that provides sustainable eco- nomic and ... the mortar to tubes. This step is usually performed using mortar and pestle (conventional method) in the presence of large amounts of liquid nitrogen.

  6. Genome-wide linkage analysis of cardiovascular disease biomarkers in a large, multigenerational family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nolan

    Full Text Available Given the importance of cardiovascular disease (CVD to public health and the demonstrated heritability of both disease status and its related risk factors, identifying the genetic variation underlying these susceptibilities is a critical step in understanding the pathogenesis of CVD and informing prevention and treatment strategies. Although one can look for genetic variation underlying susceptibility to CVD per se, it can be difficult to define the disease phenotype for such a qualitative analysis and CVD itself represents a convergence of diverse etiologic pathways. Alternatively, one can study the genetics of intermediate traits that are known risk factors for CVD, which can be measured quantitatively. Using the latter strategy, we have measured 21 cardiovascular-related biomarkers in an extended multigenerational pedigree, the CARRIAGE family (Carolinas Region Interaction of Aging, Genes, and Environment. These biomarkers belong to inflammatory and immune, connective tissue, lipid, and hemostasis pathways. Of these, 18 met our quality control standards. Using the pedigree and biomarker data, we have estimated the broad sense heritability (H2 of each biomarker (ranging from 0.09-0.56. A genome-wide panel of 6,015 SNPs was used subsequently to map these biomarkers as quantitative traits. Four showed noteworthy evidence for linkage in multipoint analysis (LOD score ≥ 2.6: paraoxonase (chromosome 8p11, 21, the chemokine RANTES (22q13.33, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3, 17p13.3, and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF, 8q22.1. Identifying the causal variation underlying each linkage score will help to unravel the genetic architecture of these quantitative traits and, by extension, the genetic architecture of cardiovascular risk.

  7. Genome-wide association studies identify the loci for 5 exterior traits in a Large White × Minzhu pig population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Wang

    Full Text Available As one of the main breeding selection criteria, external appearance has special economic importance in the hog industry. In this study, an Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip was used to conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 605 pigs of the F2 generation derived from a Large White × Minzhu intercross. Traits under study were abdominal circumference (AC, body height (BH, body length (BL, cannon bone circumference (CBC, chest depth (CD, chest width (CW, rump circumference (RC, rump width (RW, scapula width (SW, and waist width (WW. A total of 138 SNPs (the most significant being MARC0033464 on chromosome 7 were found to be associated with BH, BL, CBC, and RC (P-value= 4.15E-6. One SNP on chromosome 1 was found to be associated with CD at genome-wide significance levels. The percentage phenotypic variance of these significant SNPs ranged from 0.1-25.48%. Moreover, a conditional analysis revealed that the significant SNPs were derived from a single quantitative trait locus (QTL and indicated additional chromosome-wide significant association for 25 SNPs on SSC4 (BL, CBC and 9 SNPs on SSC7 (RC. Linkage analysis revealed two complete linkage disequilibrium haplotype blocks that contained seven and four SNPs, respectively. In block 1, the most significant SNP, MARC0033464, was present. Annotations from pig reference genome suggested six genes (GRM4, HMGA1, NUDT3, RPS10, SPDEF and PACSIN1 in block 1 (495 kb, and one gene (SCUBE3 in block 3 (124 kb. Functional analysis indicated that HMGA1 and SCUBE3 genes are the potential genes controlling BH, BL, and RC in pigs, with an application in breeding programs. We screened several candidate intervals and genes based on SNP location and gene function, and predicted their function using bioinformatics analyses.

  8. Integrating large-scale functional genomics data to dissect metabolic networks for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwood, Caroline S

    2012-12-17

    The goal of this project is to identify gene networks that are critical for efficient biohydrogen production by leveraging variation in gene content and gene expression in independently isolated Rhodopseudomonas palustris strains. Coexpression methods were applied to large data sets that we have collected to define probabilistic causal gene networks. To our knowledge this a first systems level approach that takes advantage of strain-to strain variability to computationally define networks critical for a particular bacterial phenotypic trait.

  9. Natural ventilation - A new method based on the Walton model applied to cross-ventilated buildings having two large external openings

    CERN Document Server

    Bastide, Alain; Boyer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide comfort in a low energy consumption building, it is preferable to use natural ventilation rather than HVAC systems. To achieve this, engineers need tools that predict the heat and mass transfers between the building's interior and exterior. This article presents a method implemented in some building software, and the results are compared to CFD. The results show that the knowledge model is not sufficiently well-described to identify all the physical phenomena and the relationships between them. A model is developed which introduces a new building-dependent coefficient allowing the use of Walton's model, as extended by Roldan to large external openings, and which better represents the turbulent phenomena near large external openings. The formulation of the mass flow rates is inversed to identify modeling problems. It appears that the discharge coefficient is not the only or best parameter to obtain an indoor static pressure compatible with CFD results, or to calculate more realistic mass fl...

  10. The brightest galaxies in the first 700 Myr: Building Hubble's legacy of large area IR imaging for JWST and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele

    2017-08-01

    Hubble's WFC3 has been a game changer for the study of early galaxy formation in the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. Reliable samples of sources to redshift z 11, which can be discovered only from space, are now constraining the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function into the epoch of reionization. Unexpectedly but excitingly, the recent spectroscopic confirmations of L>L* galaxies at z>8.5 demonstrate that objects brighter than our own Galaxy are already present 500 Myr after the Big Bang, creating a challenge to current theoretical/numerical models that struggle to explain how galaxies can grow so luminous so quickly. Yet, the existing HST observations do not cover sufficient area, nor sample a large enough diversity of environments to provide an unbiased sample of sources, especially at z 9-11 where only a handful of bright candidates are known. To double this currently insufficient sample size, to constrain effectively the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function at z 9-10, and to provide targets for follow-up imaging and spectroscopy with JWST, we propose a large-area pure-parallel survey that will discover the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[4JWST]). We will observe 580 arcmin^2 over 125 sightlines in five WFC3 bands (0.35 to 1.7 micron) using high-quality pure-parallel opportunities available in the cycle (3 orbits or longer). These public observations will identify more than 80 intrinsically bright galaxies at z 8-11, investigate the connection between halo mass, star formation and feedback in progenitors of groups and clusters, and build HST lasting legacy of large-area, near-IR imaging.

  11. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. FlyBase: introduction of the Drosophila melanogaster Release 6 reference genome assembly and large-scale migration of genome annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Gilberto; Schroeder, Andrew J; Goodman, Joshua L; Strelets, Victor B; Crosby, Madeline A; Thurmond, Jim; Emmert, David B; Gelbart, William M

    2015-01-01

    Release 6, the latest reference genome assembly of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, was released by the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project in 2014; it replaces their previous Release 5 genome assembly, which had been the reference genome assembly for over 7 years. With the enormous amount of information now attached to the D. melanogaster genome in public repositories and individual laboratories, the replacement of the previous assembly by the new one is a major event requiring careful migration of annotations and genome-anchored data to the new, improved assembly. In this report, we describe the attributes of the new Release 6 reference genome assembly, the migration of FlyBase genome annotations to this new assembly, how genome features on this new assembly can be viewed in FlyBase (http://flybase.org) and how users can convert coordinates for their own data to the corresponding Release 6 coordinates. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Large-Scale Isolation of Microsatellites from Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis via a Solexa Genomic Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are simple sequence repeats with a high degree of polymorphism in the genome; they are used as DNA markers in many molecular genetic studies. Using traditional methods such as the magnetic beads enrichment method, only a few microsatellite markers have been isolated from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis, as the crab genome sequence information is unavailable. Here, we have identified a large number of microsatellites from the Chinese mitten crab by taking advantage of Solexa genomic surveying. A total of 141,737 SSR (simple sequence repeats motifs were identified via analysis of 883 Mb of the crab genomic DNA information, including mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat motifs. The number of di-nucleotide repeat motifs was 82,979, making this the most abundant type of repeat motif (58.54%; the second most abundant were the tri-nucleotide repeats (42,657, 30.11%. Among di-nucleotide repeats, the most frequent repeats were AC motifs, accounting for 67.55% of the total number. AGG motifs were the most frequent (59.32% of the tri-nucleotide motifs. A total of 15,125 microsatellite loci had a flanking sequence suitable for setting the primer of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR. To verify the identified SSRs, a subset of 100 primer pairs was randomly selected for PCR. Eighty two primer sets (82% produced strong PCR products matching expected sizes, and 78% were polymorphic. In an analysis of 30 wild individuals from the Yangtze River with 20 primer sets, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2–14 and the mean allelic richness was 7.4. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test showed significant deviation in four of the 20 microsatellite loci after sequential Bonferroni corrections. This method is cost- and time-effective in comparison to traditional approaches for the isolation of microsatellites.

  14. Planning, Designing, Building, and Moving a Large Volume Maternity Service to a New Labor and Birth Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Heather; Legorreta, Kimberly; Maher, Mary Ann; Lavin, Melanie M

    Our health system recognized the need to update facility space and associated technology for the labor and birth unit within our large volume perinatal service to improve the patient experience, and enhance safety, quality of care, and staff satisfaction. When an organization decides to invest $30 million dollars in a construction project such as a new labor and birth unit, many factors and considerations are involved. Financial support, planning, design, and construction phases of building a new unit are complex and therefore require strong interdisciplinary collaboration, leadership, and project management. The new labor and birth unit required nearly 3 years of planning, designing, and construction. Patient and family preferences were elicited through consumer focus groups. Multiple meetings with the administrative and nursing leadership teams, staff nurses, nurse midwives, and physicians were held to generate ideas for improvement in the new space. Involving frontline clinicians and childbearing women in the process was critical to success. The labor and birth unit moved to a new patient tower in a space that was doubled in square footage and geographically now on three separate floors. In the 6 months prior to the move, many efforts were made in our community to share our new space. The marketing strategy was very detailed and creative with ongoing input from the nursing leadership team. The nursing staff was involved in every step along the way. It was critical to have champions as workflow teams emerged. We hosted simulation drills and tested scenarios with new workflows. Move day was rehearsed with representatives of all members of the perinatal team participating. These efforts ultimately resulted in a move time of ~5 hours. Birth volumes increased 7% within the first 6 months. After 3 years in our new space, our birth volumes have risen nearly 15% and are still growing. Key processes and roles responsible for a successful build, efficient and safe move

  15. Evolution of the Banana Genome (Musa acuminata) Is Impacted by Large Chromosomal Translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Guillaume; Carreel, Françoise; Coriton, Olivier; Hervouet, Catherine; Cardi, Céline; Derouault, Paco; Roques, Danièle; Salmon, Frédéric; Rouard, Mathieu; Sardos, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; D'Hont, Angélique

    2017-09-01

    Most banana cultivars are triploid seedless parthenocarpic clones derived from hybridization between Musa acuminata subspecies and sometimes M. balbisiana. M. acuminata subspecies were suggested to differ by a few large chromosomal rearrangements based on chromosome pairing configurations in intersubspecies hybrids. We searched for large chromosomal rearrangements in a seedy M. acuminata ssp. malaccensis banana accession through mate-pair sequencing, BAC-FISH, targeted PCR and marker (DArTseq) segregation in its progeny. We identified a heterozygous reciprocal translocation involving two distal 3 and 10 Mb segments from chromosomes 01 and 04, respectively, and showed that it generated high segregation distortion, reduced recombination and linkage between chromosomes 01 and 04 in its progeny. The two chromosome structures were found to be mutually exclusive in gametes and the rearranged structure was preferentially transmitted to the progeny. The rearranged chromosome structure was frequently found in triploid cultivars but present only in wild malaccensis ssp. accessions, thus suggesting that this rearrangement occurred in M. acuminata ssp. malaccensis. We propose a mechanism for the spread of this rearrangement in Musa diversity and suggest that this rearrangement could have played a role in the emergence of triploid cultivars. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Unifying the genomics-based classes of cancer fusion gene partners: large cancer fusion genes are evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Libia M; Morton, Daniel T; Chen, Ren; Blanck, George

    2012-11-01

    Genes that fuse to cause cancer have been studied to determine molecular bases for proliferation, to develop diagnostic tools, and as targets for drugs. To facilitate identification of additional, cancer fusion genes, following observation of a chromosomal translocation, we have characterized the genomic features of the fusion gene partners. Previous work indicated that cancer fusion gene partners, are either large or evolutionarily conserved in comparison to the neighboring genes in the region of a chromosomal translocation. These results raised the question of whether large cancer fusion gene partners were also evolutionarily conserved. We developed two methods for quantifying evolutionary conservation values, allowing the conclusion that both large and small cancer fusion gene partners are more evolutionarily conserved than their neighbors. Additionally, we determined that cancer fusion gene partners have more 3' untranslated region secondary structures than do their neighbors. Coupled with previous algorithms, with or without transcriptome approaches, we expect these results to assist in the rapid and efficient use of chromosomal translocations to identify cancer fusion genes. The above parameters for any gene of interest can be accessed at www.cancerfusiongenes.com.

  17. Bioinformatic evidence and characterization of novel putative large conjugative transposons residing in genomes of genera Bacteroides and Prevotella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenc, Katja; Accetto, Tomaž; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2012-07-01

    Bioinformatic evidence of the presence of a large conjugative transposon in ruminal bacterium Prevotella bryantii B(1)4(T) is presented. The described transposon appears to be related to another large conjugative transposon CTnBST, described in Bacteroides uniformis WH207 and to the conjugative transposon CTn3-Bf, which was observed in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis strain YCH46. All three transposons share tra gene regions with high amino acid identity and clearly conserved gene order. Additionally, a second conserved region consisting of hypothetical genes was discovered in all three transposons and named the GG region. This region served as a specific sequence signature and made possible the discovery of several other apparently related hypothetical conjugative transposons in bacteria from the genus Bacteroides. A cluster of genes involved in sugar utilization and metabolism was discovered within the hypothetical CTnB(1)4, to a certain extent resembling the polysaccharide utilization loci which were described recently in some Bacteroides strains. This is the first firm report on the presence of a large mobile genetic element in any strain from the genus Prevotella.

  18. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural antisense transcripts (NATs are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded or a different locus (trans-encoded. They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation. NATs give rise to sense-antisense transcript pairs and the number of these identified has escalated greatly with the availability of DNA sequencing resources and public databases. Traditionally, NATs were identified by the alignment of full-length cDNAs or expressed sequence tags to genome sequences, but an alternative method for large-scale detection of sense-antisense transcript pairs involves the use of microarrays. In this study we developed a novel protocol to assay sense- and antisense-strand transcription on the 55 K Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array, which is a 3' in vitro transcription (3'IVT expression array. We selected five different tissue types for assay to enable maximum discovery, and used the 'Chinese Spring' wheat genotype because most of the wheat GeneChip probe sequences were based on its genomic sequence. This study is the first report of using a 3'IVT expression array to discover the expression of natural sense-antisense transcript pairs, and may be considered as proof-of-concept. Results By using alternative target preparation schemes, both the sense- and antisense-strand derived transcripts were labeled and hybridized to the Wheat GeneChip. Quality assurance verified that successful hybridization did occur in the antisense-strand assay. A stringent threshold for positive hybridization was applied, which resulted in the identification of 110 sense-antisense transcript pairs, as well as 80 potentially antisense-specific transcripts. Strand-specific RT-PCR validated the microarray observations, and showed that antisense transcription is likely to be tissue specific. For the annotated sense

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Event-Free Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With Immunochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghesquieres, Hervé; Slager, Susan L.; Jardin, Fabrice; Veron, Amelie S.; Asmann, Yan W.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Fest, Thierry; Habermann, Thomas M.; Bene, Marie C.; Novak, Anne J.; Mareschal, Sylvain; Haioun, Corinne; Lamy, Thierry; Ansell, Stephen M.; Tilly, Herve; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Dogan, Ahmet; Cunningham, Julie M.; Olswold, Curtis L.; Molina, Thierry Jo; Link, Brian K.; Milpied, Noel; Cox, David G.; Salles, Gilles A.; Cerhan, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a multistage genome-wide association study to identify inherited genetic variants that predict outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with immunochemotherapy. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association study data sets, one from the LNH2003B trial (N = 540), a prospective clinical trial from the Lymphoma Study Association, and the other from the Molecular Epidemiology Resource study (N = 312), a prospective observational study from the University of Iowa–Mayo Clinic Lymphoma Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Top single nucleotide polymorphisms were then genotyped in independent cohorts of patients from the Specialized Program of Research Excellence (N = 391) and the Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies Aiguës et Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) -075 randomized trial (N = 294). We calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) using a log-additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, and age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Results In a meta-analysis of the four studies, the top loci for EFS were marked by rs7712513 at 5q23.2 (near SNX2 and SNCAIP; HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.57; P = 2.08 × 10−7), and rs7765004 at 6q21 (near MARCKS and HDAC2; HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.57; P = 7.09 × 10−7), although they did not reach conventional genome-wide significance (P = 5 × 10−8). Both rs7712513 (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.72; P = 3.53 × 10−8) and rs7765004 (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.71; P = 5.36 × 10−7) were also associated with OS. In exploratory analyses, a two–single nucleotide polymorphism risk score was highly predictive of EFS (P = 1.78 × 10−12) and was independent of treatment, IPI, and cell-of-origin classification. Conclusion Our study provides encouraging evidence for associations between loci at 5q23.2 and 6q21 with EFS and OS in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with immunochemotherapy

  20. Fragmentation of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene in oyster mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milbury Coren A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discontinuous genes have been observed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Gene discontinuity occurs in multiple forms: the two most frequent forms result from introns that are spliced out of the RNA and the resulting exons are spliced together to form a single transcript, and fragmented gene transcripts that are not covalently attached post-transcriptionally. Within the past few years, fragmented ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes have been discovered in bilateral metazoan mitochondria, all within a group of related oysters. Results In this study, we have characterized this fragmentation with comparative analysis and experimentation. We present secondary structures, modeled using comparative sequence analysis of the discontinuous mitochondrial large subunit rRNA genes of the cupped oysters C. virginica, C. gigas, and C. hongkongensis. Comparative structure models for the large subunit rRNA in each of the three oyster species are generally similar to those for other bilateral metazoans. We also used RT-PCR and analyzed ESTs to determine if the two fragmented LSU rRNAs are spliced together. The two segments are transcribed separately, and not spliced together although they still form functional rRNAs and ribosomes. Conclusions Although many examples of discontinuous ribosomal genes have been documented in bacteria and archaea, as well as the nuclei, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotes, oysters are some of the first characterized examples of fragmented bilateral animal mitochondrial rRNA genes. The secondary structures of the oyster LSU rRNA fragments have been predicted on the basis of previous comparative metazoan mitochondrial LSU rRNA structure models.

  1. The Centers for Mendelian Genomics: a new large-scale initiative to identify the genes underlying rare Mendelian conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada; James R Lupski; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lifton, Rick P.; Gerstein, Mark; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Nickersonon, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation exome sequencing (ES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) are new powerful tools for discovering the gene(s) that underlie Mendelian disorders. To accelerate these discoveries, the National Institutes of Health has established three Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs): the Center for Mendelian Genomics at the University of Washington; the Center for Mendelian Disorders at Yale University; and the Baylor-Johns Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics at Baylor College of Medicine ...

  2. deBWT: parallel construction of Burrows–Wheeler Transform for large collection of genomes with de Bruijn-branch encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhu, Dixian; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: With the development of high-throughput sequencing, the number of assembled genomes continues to rise. It is critical to well organize and index many assembled genomes to promote future genomics studies. Burrows–Wheeler Transform (BWT) is an important data structure of genome indexing, which has many fundamental applications; however, it is still non-trivial to construct BWT for large collection of genomes, especially for highly similar or repetitive genomes. Moreover, the state-of-the-art approaches cannot well support scalable parallel computing owing to their incremental nature, which is a bottleneck to use modern computers to accelerate BWT construction. Results: We propose de Bruijn branch-based BWT constructor (deBWT), a novel parallel BWT construction approach. DeBWT innovatively represents and organizes the suffixes of input sequence with a novel data structure, de Bruijn branch encoding. This data structure takes the advantage of de Bruijn graph to facilitate the comparison between the suffixes with long common prefix, which breaks the bottleneck of the BWT construction of repetitive genomic sequences. Meanwhile, deBWT also uses the structure of de Bruijn graph for reducing unnecessary comparisons between suffixes. The benchmarking suggests that, deBWT is efficient and scalable to construct BWT for large dataset by parallel computing. It is well-suited to index many genomes, such as a collection of individual human genomes, with multiple-core servers or clusters. Availability and implementation: deBWT is implemented in C language, the source code is available at https://github.com/hitbc/deBWT or https://github.com/DixianZhu/deBWT Contact: ydwang@hit.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307614

  3. A genome-wide association study in large white and landrace pig populations for number piglets born alive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Bergfelder-Drüing

    Full Text Available The number of piglets born alive (NBA per litter is one of the most important traits in pig breeding due to its influence on production efficiency. It is difficult to improve NBA because the heritability of the trait is low and it is governed by a high number of loci with low to moderate effects. To clarify the biological and genetic background of NBA, genome-wide association studies (GWAS were performed using 4,012 Large White and Landrace pigs from herdbook and commercial breeding companies in Germany (3, Austria (1 and Switzerland (1. The animals were genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Because of population stratifications within and between breeds, clusters were formed using the genetic distances between the populations. Five clusters for each breed were formed and analysed by GWAS approaches. In total, 17 different significant markers affecting NBA were found in regions with known effects on female reproduction. No overlapping significant chromosome areas or QTL between Large White and Landrace breed were detected.

  4. Large-scale genome-wide association studies and meta-analyses of longitudinal change in adult lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Tang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous loci influencing cross-sectional lung function, but less is known about genes influencing longitudinal change in lung function.We performed GWAS of the rate of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 in 14 longitudinal, population-based cohort studies comprising 27,249 adults of European ancestry using linear mixed effects model and combined cohort-specific results using fixed effect meta-analysis to identify novel genetic loci associated with longitudinal change in lung function. Gene expression analyses were subsequently performed for identified genetic loci. As a secondary aim, we estimated the mean rate of decline in FEV1 by smoking pattern, irrespective of genotypes, across these 14 studies using meta-analysis.The overall meta-analysis produced suggestive evidence for association at the novel IL16/STARD5/TMC3 locus on chromosome 15 (P  =  5.71 × 10(-7. In addition, meta-analysis using the five cohorts with ≥3 FEV1 measurements per participant identified the novel ME3 locus on chromosome 11 (P  =  2.18 × 10(-8 at genome-wide significance. Neither locus was associated with FEV1 decline in two additional cohort studies. We confirmed gene expression of IL16, STARD5, and ME3 in multiple lung tissues. Publicly available microarray data confirmed differential expression of all three genes in lung samples from COPD patients compared with controls. Irrespective of genotypes, the combined estimate for FEV1 decline was 26.9, 29.2 and 35.7 mL/year in never, former, and persistent smokers, respectively.In this large-scale GWAS, we identified two novel genetic loci in association with the rate of change in FEV1 that harbor candidate genes with biologically plausible functional links to lung function.

  5. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of the D-genome of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat genomics. The barley diploid genome also provides a good model for the Triticeae and T. aestivum since it is only slightly larger than the ancestor wheat D genome. Gene co-linearity between the grasses can be exploited by extrapolating from rice and Brachypodium distachyon to Ae. tauschii or barley, and then to wheat. Results We report the use of Ae. tauschii for the construction of the physical map of a large distal region of chromosome arm 3DS. A physical map of 25.4 Mb was constructed by anchoring BAC clones of Ae. tauschii with 85 EST on the Ae. tauschii and barley genetic maps. The 24 contigs were aligned to the rice and B. distachyon genomic sequences and a high density SNP genetic map of barley. As expected, the mapped region is highly collinear to the orthologous chromosome 1 in rice, chromosome 2 in B. distachyon and chromosome 3H in barley. However, the chromosome scale of the comparative maps presented provides new insights into grass genome organization. The disruptions of the Ae. tauschii-rice and Ae. tauschii-Brachypodium syntenies were identical. We observed chromosomal rearrangements between Ae. tauschii and barley. The comparison of Ae. tauschii physical and genetic maps showed that the recombination rate across the region dropped from 2.19 cM/Mb in the distal region to 0.09 cM/Mb in the proximal region. The size of the gaps between contigs was evaluated by comparing the recombination rate along the map with the local recombination rates calculated on single contigs. Conclusions The physical map reported here is the first physical map using fingerprinting of a complete

  6. Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmetti , R.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini , P.; Petro, R.

    2011-03-01

    Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) - particularly the roles of daylighting, electric lighting, and simulation. With a rapid construction schedule, the procurement, design, and construction had to be tightly integrated; with low energy use. We outline the process and measures required to manage a building design that could expect to operate at an efficiency previously unheard of for a building of this type, size, and density. Rigorous simulation of the daylighting and the electric lighting control response was a given, but the oft-ignored disconnect between lighting simulation and whole-building energy use simulation had to be addressed. The RSF project will be thoroughly evaluated for its performance for one year; preliminary data from the postoccupancy monitoring efforts will also be presented with an eye toward the current efficacy of building energy and lighting simulation.

  7. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Karen Y; Ge, Dongliang; He, Max M

    2017-02-15

    Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients' genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs) on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  8. Building a genomic framework for prospective MRSA surveillance in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuter, Sandra; Toeroek, M. Estee; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Reynolds, Rosy; Raven, Kathy E.; Blane, Beth; Donker, Tjibbe; Bentley, Stephen D.; Aanensen, David M.; Grundmann, Hajo; Feil, Edward J.; Spratt, Brian G.; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.

    The correct interpretation of microbial sequencing data applied to surveillance and outbreak investigation depends on accessible genomic databases to provide vital genetic context. Our aim was to construct and describe a United Kingdom MRSA database containing over 1000 methicillin-resistant

  9. Implementation of genomic recursions in single-step genomic best linear unbiased predictor for US Holsteins with a large number of genotyped animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Y; Misztal, I; Tsuruta, S; Legarra, A; Aguilar, I; Lourenco, D A L; Fragomeni, B O; Lawlor, T J

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate an efficient implementation in the computation of the inverse of genomic relationship matrix with the recursion algorithm, called the algorithm for proven and young (APY), in single-step genomic BLUP. We validated genomic predictions for young bulls with more than 500,000 genotyped animals in final score for US Holsteins. Phenotypic data included 11,626,576 final scores on 7,093,380 US Holstein cows, and genotypes were available for 569,404 animals. Daughter deviations for young bulls with no classified daughters in 2009, but at least 30 classified daughters in 2014 were computed using all the phenotypic data. Genomic predictions for the same bulls were calculated with single-step genomic BLUP using phenotypes up to 2009. We calculated the inverse of the genomic relationship matrix GAPY(-1) based on a direct inversion of genomic relationship matrix on a small subset of genotyped animals (core animals) and extended that information to noncore animals by recursion. We tested several sets of core animals including 9,406 bulls with at least 1 classified daughter, 9,406 bulls and 1,052 classified dams of bulls, 9,406 bulls and 7,422 classified cows, and random samples of 5,000 to 30,000 animals. Validation reliability was assessed by the coefficient of determination from regression of daughter deviation on genomic predictions for the predicted young bulls. The reliabilities were 0.39 with 5,000 randomly chosen core animals, 0.45 with the 9,406 bulls, and 7,422 cows as core animals, and 0.44 with the remaining sets. With phenotypes truncated in 2009 and the preconditioned conjugate gradient to solve mixed model equations, the number of rounds to convergence for core animals defined by bulls was 1,343; defined by bulls and cows, 2,066; and defined by 10,000 random animals, at most 1,629. With complete phenotype data, the number of rounds decreased to 858, 1,299, and at most 1,092, respectively. Setting up GAPY(-1

  10. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tory motifs and other non-coding DNA motifs, and genome flux and dynamics. Finally the article describes how the information one can extract from a comparative analysis of genomes depends to a large extent, on the specific aspect of the genomes that is being compared and the phylogenetic distances of the organisms ...

  11. The large-scale blast score ratio (LS-BSR pipeline: a method to rapidly compare genetic content between bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Sahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. As whole genome sequence data from bacterial isolates becomes cheaper to generate, computational methods are needed to correlate sequence data with biological observations. Here we present the large-scale BLAST score ratio (LS-BSR pipeline, which rapidly compares the genetic content of hundreds to thousands of bacterial genomes, and returns a matrix that describes the relatedness of all coding sequences (CDSs in all genomes surveyed. This matrix can be easily parsed in order to identify genetic relationships between bacterial genomes. Although pipelines have been published that group peptides by sequence similarity, no other software performs the rapid, large-scale, full-genome comparative analyses carried out by LS-BSR.Results. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the LS-BSR pipeline was tested on 96 Escherichia coli and Shigella genomes; the pipeline ran in 163 min using 16 processors, which is a greater than 7-fold speedup compared to using a single processor. The BSR values for each CDS, which indicate a relative level of relatedness, were then mapped to each genome on an independent core genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP based phylogeny. Comparisons were then used to identify clade specific CDS markers and validate the LS-BSR pipeline based on molecular markers that delineate between classical E. coli pathogenic variant (pathovar designations. Scalability tests demonstrated that the LS-BSR pipeline can process 1,000 E. coli genomes in 27–57 h, depending upon the alignment method, using 16 processors.Conclusions. LS-BSR is an open-source, parallel implementation of the BSR algorithm, enabling rapid comparison of the genetic content of large numbers of genomes. The results of the pipeline can be used to identify specific markers between user-defined phylogenetic groups, and to identify the loss and/or acquisition of genetic information between bacterial isolates. Taxa-specific genetic markers can then be translated

  12. Molecular and Genomic Impact of Large and Small Lateral Dimension Graphene Oxide Sheets on Human Immune Cells from Healthy Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchioni, Marco; Jasim, Dhifaf A; Pescatori, Mario; Manetti, Roberto; Fozza, Claudio; Sgarrella, Francesco; Bedognetti, Davide; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas; Delogu, Lucia Gemma

    2016-01-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) is attracting great interest in biomedical sciences. The impact of GO on immune cells is one fundamental area of study that is often overlooked, but critical in terms of clinical translation. This work investigates the effects of two types of thoroughly characterized GO sheets, different in their lateral dimension, on human peripheral immune cells provided from healthy donors using a wide range of assays. After evaluation of cell viability, the gene expression was analyzed, following GO exposure on 84 genes related to innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to GO small sheets was found to have a more significant impact on immune cells compared to GO large sheets, reflected in the upregulation of critical genes implicated in immune responses and the release of cytokines IL1β and TNFα. These findings were further confirmed by whole-genome microarray analysis of the impact of small GO sheets on T cells and monocytes. Activation in both cell types was underlined by the overexpression of genes such as CXCL10 and receptor CXCR3. Significant energy-dependent pathway modulation was identified. These findings can potentially pave the foundations for further design of graphene that can be used for immune modulation applications, for example in cancer immunotherapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The next generation of target capture technologies - large DNA fragment enrichment and sequencing determines regional genomic variation of high complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapprich, Johannes; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Kate; Clark, Peter M; Rappaport, Eric; D'Arcy, Monica; Sasson, Ariella; Gai, Xiaowu; Schug, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H; Monos, Dimitri

    2016-07-09

    The ability to capture and sequence large contiguous DNA fragments represents a significant advancement towards the comprehensive characterization of complex genomic regions. While emerging sequencing platforms are capable of producing several kilobases-long reads, the fragment sizes generated by current DNA target enrichment technologies remain a limiting factor, producing DNA fragments generally shorter than 1 kbp. The DNA enrichment methodology described herein, Region-Specific Extraction (RSE), produces DNA segments in excess of 20 kbp in length. Coupling this enrichment method to appropriate sequencing platforms will significantly enhance the ability to generate complete and accurate sequence characterization of any genomic region without the need for reference-based assembly. RSE is a long-range DNA target capture methodology that relies on the specific hybridization of short (20-25 base) oligonucleotide primers to selected sequence motifs within the DNA target region. These capture primers are then enzymatically extended on the 3'-end, incorporating biotinylated nucleotides into the DNA. Streptavidin-coated beads are subsequently used to pull-down the original, long DNA template molecules via the newly synthesized, biotinylated DNA that is bound to them. We demonstrate the accuracy, simplicity and utility of the RSE method by capturing and sequencing a 4 Mbp stretch of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our results show an average depth of coverage of 164X for the entire MHC. This depth of coverage contributes significantly to a 99.94 % total coverage of the targeted region and to an accuracy that is over 99.99 %. RSE represents a cost-effective target enrichment method capable of producing sequencing templates in excess of 20 kbp in length. The utility of our method has been proven to generate superior coverage across the MHC as compared to other commercially available methodologies, with the added advantage of producing longer sequencing

  14. Large and variable genome size unrelated to serpentine adaptation but supportive of cryptic sexuality in Cenococcum geophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Elizabeth C; Mina, Diogo; Gonçalves, Susana C; Loureiro, João; Freitas, Helena; Muller, Ludo A H

    2014-01-01

    Estimations of genome size and its variation can provide valuable information regarding the genetic diversity of organisms and their adaptation potential to heterogeneous environments. We used flow cytometry to characterize the variation in genome size among 40 isolates of Cenococcum geophilum, an ectomycorrhizal fungus with a wide ecological and geographical distribution, obtained from two serpentine and two non-serpentine sites in Portugal. Besides determining the genome size and its intraspecies variation, we wanted to assess whether a relationship exists between genome size and the edaphic background of the C. geophilum isolates. Our results reveal C. geophilum to have one of the largest genome sizes so far measured in the Ascomycota, with a mean haploid genome size estimate of 0.208 pg (203 Mbp). However, no relationship was found between genome size and the edaphic background of the sampled isolates, indicating genetic and demographic processes to be more important for shaping the genome size variation in this species than environmental selection. The detection of variation in ploidy level among our isolates, including a single individual with both presumed haploid and diploid nuclei, provides supportive evidence for a possible cryptic sexual or parasexual cycle in C. geophilum (although other mechanisms may have caused this variation). The existence of such a cycle would have wide significance, explaining the high levels of genetic diversity and likelihood of recombination previously reported in this species, and adds to the increasing number of studies suggesting sexual cycles in previously assumed asexual fungi.

  15. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, Mike A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M.; Do, Chuong B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L.; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F.; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W.; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K.; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B.; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Hardy, John; Factor, S.; Higgins, D.; Evans, S.; Shill, H.; Stacy, M.; Danielson, J.; Marlor, L.; Williamson, K.; Jankovic, J.; Hunter, C.; Simon, D.; Ryan, P.; Scollins, L.; Saunders-Pullman, R.; Boyar, K.; Costan-Toth, C.; Ohmann, E.; Sudarsky, L.; Joubert, C.; Friedman, J.; Chou, K.; Fernandez, H.; Lannon, M.; Galvez-Jimenez, N.; Podichetty, A.; Thompson, K.; Lewitt, P.; Deangelis, M.; O'Brien, C.; Seeberger, L.; Dingmann, C.; Judd, D.; Marder, K.; Fraser, J.; Harris, J.; Bertoni, J.; Peterson, C.; Rezak, M.; Medalle, G.; Chouinard, S.; Panisset, M.; Hall, J.; Poiffaut, H.; Calabrese, V.; Roberge, P.; Wojcieszek, J.; Belden, J.; Jennings, D.; Marek, K.; Mendick, S.; Reich, S.; Dunlop, B.; Jog, M.; Horn, C.; Uitti, R.; Turk, M.; Ajax, T.; Mannetter, J.; Sethi, K.; Carpenter, J.; Dill, B.; Hatch, L.; Ligon, K.; Narayan, S.; Blindauer, K.; Abou-Samra, K.; Petit, J.; Elmer, L.; Aiken, E.; Davis, K.; Schell, C.; Wilson, S.; Velickovic, M.; Koller, W.; Phipps, S.; Feigin, A.; Gordon, M.; Hamann, J.; Licari, E.; Marotta-Kollarus, M.; Shannon, B.; Winnick, R.; Simuni, T.; Videnovic, A.; Kaczmarek, A.; Williams, K.; Wolff, M.; Rao, J.; Cook, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kostyk, S.; Hubble, J.; Campbell, A.; Reider, C.; Seward, A.; Camicioli, R.; Carter, J.; Nutt, J.; Andrews, P.; Morehouse, S.; Stone, C.; Mendis, T.; Grimes, D.; Alcorn-Costa, C.; Gray, P.; Haas, K.; Vendette, J.; Sutton, J.; Hutchinson, B.; Young, J.; Rajput, A.; Klassen, L.; Shirley, T.; Manyam, B.; Simpson, P.; Whetteckey, J.; Wulbrecht, B.; Truong, D.; Pathak, M.; Frei, K.; Luong, N.; Tra, T.; Tran, A.; Vo, J.; Lang, A.; Kleiner- Fisman, G.; Nieves, A.; Johnston, L.; So, J.; Podskalny, G.; Giffin, L.; Atchison, P.; Allen, C.; Martin, W.; Wieler, M.; Suchowersky, O.; Furtado, S.; Klimek, M.; Hermanowicz, N.; Niswonger, S.; Shults, C.; Fontaine, D.; Aminoff, M.; Christine, C.; Diminno, M.; Hevezi, J.; Dalvi, A.; Kang, U.; Richman, J.; Uy, S.; Sahay, A.; Gartner, M.; Schwieterman, D.; Hall, D.; Leehey, M.; Culver, S.; Derian, T.; Demarcaida, T.; Thurlow, S.; Rodnitzky, R.; Dobson, J.; Lyons, K.; Pahwa, R.; Gales, T.; Thomas, S.; Shulman, L.; Weiner, W.; Dustin, K.; Singer, C.; Zelaya, L.; Tuite, P.; Hagen, V.; Rolandelli, S.; Schacherer, R.; Kosowicz, J.; Gordon, P.; Werner, J.; Serrano, C.; Roque, S.; Kurlan, R.; Berry, D.; Gardiner, I.; Hauser, R.; Sanchez-Ramos, J.; Zesiewicz, T.; Delgado, H.; Price, K.; Rodriguez, P.; Wolfrath, S.; Pfeiffer, R.; Davis, L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Dewey, R.; Hayward, B.; Johnson, A.; Meacham, M.; Estes, B.; Walker, F.; Hunt, V.; O'Neill, C.; Racette, B.; Swisher, L.; Dijamco, Cheri; Conley, Emily Drabant; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Wojcicki, Anne; Lew, M.; Klein, C.; Golbe, L.; Growdon, J.; Wooten, G. F.; Watts, R.; Guttman, M.; Goldwurm, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M. H.; Baker, K.; Litvan, I.; Nicholson, G.; Nance, M.; Drasby, E.; Isaacson, S.; Burn, D.; Pramstaller, P.; Al-hinti, J.; Moller, A.; Sherman, S.; Roxburgh, R.; Slevin, J.; Perlmutter, J.; Mark, M. H.; Huggins, N.; Pezzoli, G.; Massood, T.; Itin, I.; Corbett, A.; Chinnery, P.; Ostergaard, K.; Snow, B.; Cambi, F.; Kay, D.; Samii, A.; Agarwal, P.; Roberts, J. W.; Higgins, D. S.; Molho, Eric; Rosen, Ami; Montimurro, J.; Martinez, E.; Griffith, A.; Kusel, V.; Yearout, D.; Zabetian, C.; Clark, L. N.; Liu, X.; Lee, J. H.; Taub, R. Cheng; Louis, E. D.; Cote, L. J.; Waters, C.; Ford, B.; Fahn, S.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Nuytemans, Karen; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; DeStefano, Anita; Seshadri, Sudha; Choi, Seung Hoan; Frank, Samuel; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth; Longstreth, W. T.; Ton, Thanh G. N.; Jain, Samay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vana; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas; Bozi, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas; Vassilatis, Dimitris; Koutsis, Georgios; Panas, Marios; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle; Powell, John; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were

  16. PhyloMap: an algorithm for visualizing relationships of large sequence data sets and its application to the influenza A virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinetz Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of phylogenetic analysis are often visualized as phylogenetic trees. Such a tree can typically only include up to a few hundred sequences. When more than a few thousand sequences are to be included, analyzing the phylogenetic relationships among them becomes a challenging task. The recent frequent outbreaks of influenza A viruses have resulted in the rapid accumulation of corresponding genome sequences. Currently, there are more than 7500 influenza A virus genomes in the database. There are no efficient ways of representing this huge data set as a whole, thus preventing a further understanding of the diversity of the influenza A virus genome. Results Here we present a new algorithm, "PhyloMap", which combines ordination, vector quantization, and phylogenetic tree construction to give an elegant representation of a large sequence data set. The use of PhyloMap on influenza A virus genome sequences reveals the phylogenetic relationships of the internal genes that cannot be seen when only a subset of sequences are analyzed. Conclusions The application of PhyloMap to influenza A virus genome data shows that it is a robust algorithm for analyzing large sequence data sets. It utilizes the entire data set, minimizes bias, and provides intuitive visualization. PhyloMap is implemented in JAVA, and the source code is freely available at http://www.biochem.uni-luebeck.de/public/software/phylomap.html

  17. Environmental genomics of "Haloquadratum walsbyi" in a saltern crystallizer indicates a large pool of accessory genes in an otherwise coherent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolhuis Henk

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mature saturated brine (crystallizers communities are largely dominated (>80% of cells by the square halophilic archaeon "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The recent cultivation of the strain HBSQ001 and thesequencing of its genome allows comparison with the metagenome of this taxonomically simplified environment. Similar studies carried out in other extreme environments have revealed very little diversity in gene content among the cell lineages present. Results The metagenome of the microbial community of a crystallizer pond has been analyzed by end sequencing a 2000 clone fosmid library and comparing the sequences obtained with the genome sequence of "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The genome of the sequenced strain was retrieved nearly complete within this environmental DNA library. However, many ORF's that could be ascribed to the "Haloquadratum" metapopulation by common genome characteristics or scaffolding to the strain genome were not present in the specific sequenced isolate. Particularly, three regions of the sequenced genome were associated with multiple rearrangements and the presence of different genes from the metapopulation. Many transposition and phage related genes were found within this pool which, together with the associated atypical GC content in these areas, supports lateral gene transfer mediated by these elements as the most probable genetic cause of this variability. Additionally, these sequences were highly enriched in putative regulatory and signal transduction functions. Conclusion These results point to a large pan-genome (total gene repertoire of the genus/species even in this highly specialized extremophile and at a single geographic location. The extensive gene repertoire is what might be expected of a population that exploits a diverse nutrient pool, resulting from the degradation of biomass produced at lower salinities.

  18. The Cancer Genomics Cloud: Collaborative, Reproducible, and Democratized-A New Paradigm in Large-Scale Computational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jessica W; Lehnert, Erik; Sethi, Anurag; Malhotra, Raunaq; Kaushik, Gaurav; Onder, Zeynep; Groves-Kirkby, Nick; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar; DiGiovanna, Jack; Srdic, Mladen; Bajcic, Dragan; Radenkovic, Jelena; Mladenovic, Vladimir; Krstanovic, Damir; Arsenijevic, Vladan; Klisic, Djordje; Mitrovic, Milan; Bogicevic, Igor; Kural, Deniz; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi

    2017-11-01

    The Seven Bridges Cancer Genomics Cloud (CGC; www.cancergenomicscloud.org) enables researchers to rapidly access and collaborate on massive public cancer genomic datasets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas. It provides secure on-demand access to data, analysis tools, and computing resources. Researchers from diverse backgrounds can easily visualize, query, and explore cancer genomic datasets visually or programmatically. Data of interest can be immediately analyzed in the cloud using more than 200 preinstalled, curated bioinformatics tools and workflows. Researchers can also extend the functionality of the platform by adding their own data and tools via an intuitive software development kit. By colocalizing these resources in the cloud, the CGC enables scalable, reproducible analyses. Researchers worldwide can use the CGC to investigate key questions in cancer genomics. Cancer Res; 77(21); e3-6. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  20. Design of intelligent power consumption optimization and visualization management platform for large buildings based on internet of things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Shulan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The buildings provide a significant contribution to total energy consumption and CO2 emission. It has been estimated that the development of an intelligent power consumption monitor and control system will result in about 30% savings in energy consumption. This design innovatively integrates the advanced technologies such as the internet of things, the internet, intelligent buildings and intelligent electricity which can offer open, efficient, convenient energy consumption detection platform in demand side and visual management demonstration application platform in power enterprises side. The system was created to maximize the effective and efficient the use of energy resource. It was development around sensor networks and intelligent gateway and the monitoring center software. This will realize the highly integration and comprehensive application in energy and information to meet the needs with intelligent buildings

  1. Methylation Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism Sequencing (MSAP-Seq)-A Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Differentially Methylated CCGG Sites in Plants with Large Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwialkowska, Karolina; Korotko, Urszula; Kosinska, Joanna; Szarejko, Iwona; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, including histone modifications and DNA methylation, mutually regulate chromatin structure, maintain genome integrity, and affect gene expression and transposon mobility. Variations in DNA methylation within plant populations, as well as methylation in response to internal and external factors, are of increasing interest, especially in the crop research field. Methylation Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP) is one of the most commonly used methods for assessing DNA methylation changes in plants. This method involves gel-based visualization of PCR fragments from selectively amplified DNA that are cleaved using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. In this study, we developed and validated a new method based on the conventional MSAP approach called Methylation Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism Sequencing (MSAP-Seq). We improved the MSAP-based approach by replacing the conventional separation of amplicons on polyacrylamide gels with direct, high-throughput sequencing using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and automated data analysis. MSAP-Seq allows for global sequence-based identification of changes in DNA methylation. This technique was validated in Hordeum vulgare. However, MSAP-Seq can be straightforwardly implemented in different plant species, including crops with large, complex and highly repetitive genomes. The incorporation of high-throughput sequencing into MSAP-Seq enables parallel and direct analysis of DNA methylation in hundreds of thousands of sites across the genome. MSAP-Seq provides direct genomic localization of changes and enables quantitative evaluation. We have shown that the MSAP-Seq method specifically targets gene-containing regions and that a single analysis can cover three-quarters of all genes in large genomes. Moreover, MSAP-Seq's simplicity, cost effectiveness, and high-multiplexing capability make this method highly affordable. Therefore, MSAP-Seq can be used for DNA methylation analysis in crop

  2. Large scale experiments simulating hydrogen distribution in a spent fuel pool building during a hypothetical fuel uncovery accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, Guillaume; Paranjape, Sidharth; Paladino, Domenico; Jaeckel, Bernd; Rydl, Adolf [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Following the Fukushima accident and its extended station blackout, attention was brought to the importance of the spent fuel pools' (SFPs) behavior in case of a prolonged loss of the cooling system. Since then, many analytical works have been performed to estimate the timing of hypothetical fuel uncovery for various SFP types. Experimentally, however, little was done to investigate issues related to the formation of a flammable gas mixture, distribution, and stratification in the SFP building itself and to some extent assess the capability for the code to correctly predict it. This paper presents the main outcomes of the Experiments on Spent Fuel Pool (ESFP) project carried out under the auspices of Swissnuclear (Framework 2012–2013) in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. It consists of an experimental investigation focused on hydrogen concentration build-up into a SFP building during a predefined scaled scenario for different venting positions. Tests follow a two-phase scenario. Initially steam is released to mimic the boiling of the pool followed by a helium/steam mixture release to simulate the deterioration of the oxidizing spent fuel. Results shows that while the SFP building would mainly be inerted by the presence of a high concentration of steam, the volume located below the level of the pool in adjacent rooms would maintain a high air content. The interface of the two-gas mixture presents the highest risk of flammability. Additionally, it was observed that the gas mixture could become stagnant leading locally to high hydrogen concentration while steam condenses. Overall, the experiments provide relevant information for the potentially hazardous gas distribution formed in the SFP building and hints on accident management and on eventual retrofitting measures to be implemented in the SFP building.

  3. Are building users prepared for energy flexible buildings—A large-scale survey in the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Rongling; Dane, Gamze; Finck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    of the ideal user of flexible buildings. A questionnaire was designed and administered as an online survey in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of questions about the sociodemographic characteristics of the current users, house type, household composition, current energy use behaviour, willingness...... would be most in favour of acquiring smart dishwashers (65% of the respondents) and refrigerator/freezers (60%). Statistical analysis shows that people who are willing to use smart technologies are also willing to change their behaviour, and can thus be categorised as potentially flexible building users...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, Associated with a Large Outbreak of Foodborne Illness in Fukuoka, Japan, in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Yamamoto, Shiori; Maruyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-15

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, which were associated with a large outbreak of foodborne illness originating from undercooked chicken sushi in Fukuoka, Japan, in May 2016. Their genome sizes were 1,690,901 and 1,704,736 bp, with 22 and 23 rRNAs, 9 and 9 tRNAs, and 411× and 419× coverage for C. jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Asakura et al.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain from Vietnam, HUA-14PED96, with a Large Genomic Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Se-Eun; Park, Kee-Hwan; Lim, Seong-In; Le, Van Phan; Hien, Nguyen Ba; Thach, Pham Ngoc; Phuong, Le Huynh Thanh; An, Byung-Hyun; Han, Song Hee; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-02-18

    A highly virulent strain of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causing severe diarrhea has recently emerged in Vietnam. Genomic sequences from a novel strain, HUA-14PED96, isolated from a Vietnamese piglet with serious diarrhea show relatively high identity with U.S.-like PEDV strains, and have a 72-nt deletion in the open reading frame 1a (ORF1a) gene. Copyright © 2016 Choe et al.

  6. Methodological Considerations in Estimation of Phenotype Heritability Using Genome-Wide SNP Data, Illustrated by an Analysis of the Heritability of Height in a Large Sample of African Ancestry Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available Height has an extremely polygenic pattern of inheritance. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed hundreds of common variants that are associated with human height at genome-wide levels of significance. However, only a small fraction of phenotypic variation can be explained by the aggregate of these common variants. In a large study of African-American men and women (n = 14,419, we genotyped and analyzed 966,578 autosomal SNPs across the entire genome using a linear mixed model variance components approach implemented in the program GCTA (Yang et al Nat Genet 2010, and estimated an additive heritability of 44.7% (se: 3.7% for this phenotype in a sample of evidently unrelated individuals. While this estimated value is similar to that given by Yang et al in their analyses, we remain concerned about two related issues: (1 whether in the complete absence of hidden relatedness, variance components methods have adequate power to estimate heritability when a very large number of SNPs are used in the analysis; and (2 whether estimation of heritability may be biased, in real studies, by low levels of residual hidden relatedness. We addressed the first question in a semi-analytic fashion by directly simulating the distribution of the score statistic for a test of zero heritability with and without low levels of relatedness. The second question was addressed by a very careful comparison of the behavior of estimated heritability for both observed (self-reported height and simulated phenotypes compared to imputation R2 as a function of the number of SNPs used in the analysis. These simulations help to address the important question about whether today's GWAS SNPs will remain useful for imputing causal variants that are discovered using very large sample sizes in future studies of height, or whether the causal variants themselves will need to be genotyped de novo in order to build a prediction model that ultimately captures a large fraction of the

  7. Methodological Considerations in Estimation of Phenotype Heritability Using Genome-Wide SNP Data, Illustrated by an Analysis of the Heritability of Height in a Large Sample of African Ancestry Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; He, Jing; Zhang, Jianqi; Chen, Gary K.; Thomas, Venetta; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Cai, Qiuyin; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cheng, Iona; Chu, Lisa; Deming, Sandra L.; Driver, W. Ryan; Goodman, Phyllis; Hayes, Richard B.; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Hsing, Ann W.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolb, Suzanne; Leske, M. Cristina; Monroe, Kristine R.; Murphy, Adam; Nemesure, Barbara; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Ostrander, Elaine A; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rybicki, Ben A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stanford, Janet L.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Strom, Sara S.; Stevens, Victoria; Van Den Berg, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Witte, John S.; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Yamamura, Yuko; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Stram, Alexander H.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Marchand, Loïc Le; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2015-01-01

    Height has an extremely polygenic pattern of inheritance. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed hundreds of common variants that are associated with human height at genome-wide levels of significance. However, only a small fraction of phenotypic variation can be explained by the aggregate of these common variants. In a large study of African-American men and women (n = 14,419), we genotyped and analyzed 966,578 autosomal SNPs across the entire genome using a linear mixed model variance components approach implemented in the program GCTA (Yang et al Nat Genet 2010), and estimated an additive heritability of 44.7% (se: 3.7%) for this phenotype in a sample of evidently unrelated individuals. While this estimated value is similar to that given by Yang et al in their analyses, we remain concerned about two related issues: (1) whether in the complete absence of hidden relatedness, variance components methods have adequate power to estimate heritability when a very large number of SNPs are used in the analysis; and (2) whether estimation of heritability may be biased, in real studies, by low levels of residual hidden relatedness. We addressed the first question in a semi-analytic fashion by directly simulating the distribution of the score statistic for a test of zero heritability with and without low levels of relatedness. The second question was addressed by a very careful comparison of the behavior of estimated heritability for both observed (self-reported) height and simulated phenotypes compared to imputation R2 as a function of the number of SNPs used in the analysis. These simulations help to address the important question about whether today's GWAS SNPs will remain useful for imputing causal variants that are discovered using very large sample sizes in future studies of height, or whether the causal variants themselves will need to be genotyped de novo in order to build a prediction model that ultimately captures a large fraction of the variability

  8. Selective isolation of large chromosomal regions by transformation-associated recombination cloning for structural and functional analysis of mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Noskov, Vladimir N; Larionov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning allows selective isolation of full-size genes and genomic loci as circular yeast artificial chromosomes in yeast. The method has a broad application for structural and functional genomics, long-range haplotyping, characterization of chromosomal rearrangements, and evolutionary studies. This chapter describes a basic protocol of gene isolation by TAR, as well as a method of conversion of TAR isolates into bacterial artificial chromosomes.

  9. MISSEL: a method to identify a large number of small species-specific genomic subsequences and its application to viruses classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscon, Giulia; Weitschek, Emanuel; Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciotti, Marco; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Bertolazzi, Paola; Felici, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Continuous improvements in next generation sequencing technologies led to ever-increasing collections of genomic sequences, which have not been easily characterized by biologists, and whose analysis requires huge computational effort. The classification of species emerged as one of the main applications of DNA analysis and has been addressed with several approaches, e.g., multiple alignments-, phylogenetic trees-, statistical- and character-based methods. We propose a supervised method based on a genetic algorithm to identify small genomic subsequences that discriminate among different species. The method identifies multiple subsequences of bounded length with the same information power in a given genomic region. The algorithm has been successfully evaluated through its integration into a rule-based classification framework and applied to three different biological data sets: Influenza, Polyoma, and Rhino virus sequences. We discover a large number of small subsequences that can be used to identify each virus type with high accuracy and low computational time, and moreover help to characterize different genomic regions. Bounding their length to 20, our method found 1164 characterizing subsequences for all the Influenza virus subtypes, 194 for all the Polyoma viruses, and 11 for Rhino viruses. The abundance of small separating subsequences extracted for each genomic region may be an important support for quick and robust virus identification. Finally, useful biological information can be derived by the relative location and abundance of such subsequences along the different regions.

  10. State of the art of IT-based high precision patch/implant system technology development for building/large structure safety management in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Tae; Yu, Young-Jun; Lee, Bomi; Lee, Jin-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    Damage to infrastructure is a real concern at present, caused primarily by worldwide climate anomalies, global warming, and natural disasters. Korea has begun research to develop a high precision patch/implant system using new IT as a basis, as critical element in building/large structure safety management, to adjust to this situation. Technologies which must be developed for this research are those which measure and evaluate the soundness and safety of structures based on the measurements of an attached sensor. During the research period, optical fiber sensor patches and wireless sensor capsule implants along with various sensor technologies, stress sensing and structure condition evaluation technologies, high durability sensors and low-power compact smart structure sensors will be developed effectively for network hardware technologies. Similarly high precision image processing for automatic crack extraction will be developed along with radiation sensor application technologies, combined management/control technologies for development systems, and practical technologies for building/large structure development systems. Through the results, we hope to acquire higher sensor system performance with a measurement scope (for precision, etc.) goal at least 200% better than conventional sensor systems. The goal is to attain safety management planning and commercialization for automatic and high technology buildings/large structures. If such research is successfully developed, groundbreaking developments for maintenance related facilities is expected.

  11. Fire dynamics simulation of large multi-story buildings Case study: Umm Al-Qura university campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gawad, A. F.; Ghulman, H. A.

    2013-06-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is used to predict the fire dynamics in some main buildings of the campuses of Umm Al-Qura University using the Fire Dynamic Simulator (FDS). Important aspects of fire dynamics such as smoke propagation and temperature distribution were investigated. The study contributes in reducing the risks of fires by early prediction of the expected scenarios of fires and associated smoke movement. Hence, early evacuation plans can be established by authorities such as the civil defense. It was found that emergency openings (vents) in the ceiling or side walls that operate in cases of fire, according to appropriate sensors, have a significant role in directing the smoke outside the building. Based on the study, interesting conclusions are drawn and fruitful recommendations/suggestions are introduced. A simple smoke control-scheme is recommended to minimize smoke hazards.

  12. INTERNAL MARKETING: USING MARKETING-LIKE APPROACHES TO BUILD BUSINESS COMPETENCIES AND IMPROVE PERFORMANCE IN LARGE MALAYSIAN CORPORATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Norizan M. Saad; Pervaiz K. Ahmed; Mohammed Rafiq

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to make substantial progress in building theory about customer-focused organisations and its impact on business competencies and performance. To date, it is the first empirical attempt to gain knowledge on internal marketing (IM) implementation using a 'marketing-like' approach. The results of thestudy suggest that this approach is imperative to create organisational competencies and business performance. This study therefore serves to develop and test a conceptual mo...

  13. Mobilisation and remobilisation of a large archetypal pathogenicity island of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in vitro support the role of conjugation for horizontal transfer of genomic islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochhut Bianca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial amount of data has been accumulated supporting the important role of genomic islands (GEIs - including pathogenicity islands (PAIs - in bacterial genome plasticity and the evolution of bacterial pathogens. Their instability and the high level sequence similarity of different (partial islands suggest an exchange of PAIs between strains of the same or even different bacterial species by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Transfer events of archetypal large genomic islands of enterobacteria which often lack genes required for mobilisation or transfer have been rarely investigated so far. Results To study mobilisation of such large genomic regions in prototypic uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC strain 536, PAI II536 was supplemented with the mobRP4 region, an origin of replication (oriVR6K, an origin of transfer (oriTRP4 and a chloramphenicol resistance selection marker. In the presence of helper plasmid RP4, conjugative transfer of the 107-kb PAI II536 construct occured from strain 536 into an E. coli K-12 recipient. In transconjugants, PAI II536 existed either as a cytoplasmic circular intermediate (CI or integrated site-specifically into the recipient's chromosome at the leuX tRNA gene. This locus is the chromosomal integration site of PAI II536 in UPEC strain 536. From the E. coli K-12 recipient, the chromosomal PAI II536 construct as well as the CIs could be successfully remobilised and inserted into leuX in a PAI II536 deletion mutant of E. coli 536. Conclusions Our results corroborate that mobilisation and conjugal transfer may contribute to evolution of bacterial pathogens through horizontal transfer of large chromosomal regions such as PAIs. Stabilisation of these mobile genetic elements in the bacterial chromosome result from selective loss of mobilisation and transfer functions of genomic islands.

  14. Life-cycle and genome of OtV5, a large DNA virus of the pelagic marine unicellular green alga Ostreococcus tauri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Derelle

    Full Text Available Large DNA viruses are ubiquitous, infecting diverse organisms ranging from algae to man, and have probably evolved from an ancient common ancestor. In aquatic environments, such algal viruses control blooms and shape the evolution of biodiversity in phytoplankton, but little is known about their biological functions. We show that Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest known marine photosynthetic eukaryote, whose genome is completely characterized, is a host for large DNA viruses, and present an analysis of the life-cycle and 186,234 bp long linear genome of OtV5. OtV5 is a lytic phycodnavirus which unexpectedly does not degrade its host chromosomes before the host cell bursts. Analysis of its complete genome sequence confirmed that it lacks expected site-specific endonucleases, and revealed the presence of 16 genes whose predicted functions are novel to this group of viruses. OtV5 carries at least one predicted gene whose protein closely resembles its host counterpart and several other host-like sequences, suggesting that horizontal gene transfers between host and viral genomes may occur frequently on an evolutionary scale. Fifty seven percent of the 268 predicted proteins present no similarities with any known protein in Genbank, underlining the wealth of undiscovered biological diversity present in oceanic viruses, which are estimated to harbour 200Mt of carbon.

  15. Life-Cycle and Genome of OtV5, a Large DNA Virus of the Pelagic Marine Unicellular Green Alga Ostreococcus tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derelle, Evelyne; Ferraz, Conchita; Escande, Marie-Line; Eychenié, Sophie; Cooke, Richard; Piganeau, Gwenaël; Desdevises, Yves; Bellec, Laure; Moreau, Hervé; Grimsley, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    Large DNA viruses are ubiquitous, infecting diverse organisms ranging from algae to man, and have probably evolved from an ancient common ancestor. In aquatic environments, such algal viruses control blooms and shape the evolution of biodiversity in phytoplankton, but little is known about their biological functions. We show that Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest known marine photosynthetic eukaryote, whose genome is completely characterized, is a host for large DNA viruses, and present an analysis of the life-cycle and 186,234 bp long linear genome of OtV5. OtV5 is a lytic phycodnavirus which unexpectedly does not degrade its host chromosomes before the host cell bursts. Analysis of its complete genome sequence confirmed that it lacks expected site-specific endonucleases, and revealed the presence of 16 genes whose predicted functions are novel to this group of viruses. OtV5 carries at least one predicted gene whose protein closely resembles its host counterpart and several other host-like sequences, suggesting that horizontal gene transfers between host and viral genomes may occur frequently on an evolutionary scale. Fifty seven percent of the 268 predicted proteins present no similarities with any known protein in Genbank, underlining the wealth of undiscovered biological diversity present in oceanic viruses, which are estimated to harbour 200Mt of carbon. PMID:18509524

  16. A difference in the pattern of repair in a large genomic region in UV-irradiated normal human and Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanower, G A; Kantor, G J

    1997-11-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells repair DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation in an unusual pattern throughout the genome. They remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers only from the DNA of transcriptionally active chromatin regions and only from the strand that contains the transcribed strand. The repair proceeds in a manner that creates damage-free islands which are in some cases much larger than the active gene associated with them. For example, the small transcriptionally active beta-actin gene (3.5 kb) is repaired as part of a 50 kb single-stranded region. The repair responsible for creating these islands requires active transcription, suggesting that the two activities are coupled. A preferential repair pathway in normal human cells promotes repair of actively transcribed DNA strands and is coupled to transcription. It is not known if similar large islands, referred to as repair domains, are preferentially created as a result of the coupling. Data are presented showing that in normal cells, preferential repair in the beta-actin region is associated with the creation of a large, completely repaired region in the partially repaired genome. Repair at other genomic locations which contain inactive genes (insulin, 754) does not create similar large regions as quickly. In contrast, repair in Cockayne syndrome cells, which are defective in the preferential repair pathway but not in genome-overall repair, proceeds in the beta-actin region by a mechanism which does not create preferentially a large repaired region. Thus a correlation between the activity required to preferentially repair active genes and that required to create repaired domains is detected. We propose an involvement of the transcription-repair coupling factor in a coordinated repair pathway for removing DNA damage from entire transcription units.

  17. SVA retrotransposon insertion-associated deletion represents a novel mutational mechanism underlying large genomic copy number changes with non-recurrent breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; Bengesser, Kathrin; Claes, Kathleen B M; Wimmer, Katharina; Mautner, Victor-Felix; van Minkelen, Rick; Legius, Eric; Brems, Hilde; Upadhyaya, Meena; Högel, Josef; Lazaro, Conxi; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Bammert, Simone; Messiaen, Ludwine; Cooper, David N; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2014-06-02

    Genomic disorders are caused by copy number changes that may exhibit recurrent breakpoints processed by nonallelic homologous recombination. However, region-specific disease-associated copy number changes have also been observed which exhibit non-recurrent breakpoints. The mechanisms underlying these non-recurrent copy number changes have not yet been fully elucidated. We analyze large NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints as a model to investigate the full spectrum of causative mechanisms, and observe that they are mediated by various DNA double strand break repair mechanisms, as well as aberrant replication. Further, two of the 17 NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints, identified in unrelated patients, occur in association with the concomitant insertion of SINE/variable number of tandem repeats/Alu (SVA) retrotransposons at the deletion breakpoints. The respective breakpoints are refractory to analysis by standard breakpoint-spanning PCRs and are only identified by means of optimized PCR protocols designed to amplify across GC-rich sequences. The SVA elements are integrated within SUZ12P intron 8 in both patients, and were mediated by target-primed reverse transcription of SVA mRNA intermediates derived from retrotranspositionally active source elements. Both SVA insertions occurred during early postzygotic development and are uniquely associated with large deletions of 1 Mb and 867 kb, respectively, at the insertion sites. Since active SVA elements are abundant in the human genome and the retrotranspositional activity of many SVA source elements is high, SVA insertion-associated large genomic deletions encompassing many hundreds of kilobases could constitute a novel and as yet under-appreciated mechanism underlying large-scale copy number changes in the human genome.

  18. INTERNAL MARKETING: USING MARKETING-LIKE APPROACHES TO BUILD BUSINESS COMPETENCIES AND IMPROVE PERFORMANCE IN LARGE MALAYSIAN CORPORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norizan M. Saad

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to make substantial progress in building theory about customer-focused organisations and its impact on business competencies and performance. To date, it is the first empirical attempt to gain knowledge on internal marketing (IM implementation using a 'marketing-like' approach. The results of thestudy suggest that this approach is imperative to create organisational competencies and business performance. This study therefore serves to develop and test a conceptual model linking IM mix components, competencies and business performance that addsknowledge to the IM implementation framework in particular and other organisational development theories in general.

  19. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan; Seto Donald

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the v...

  20. The mosquito Aedes aegypti has a large genome size and high transposable element load but contains a low proportion of transposon-specific piRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arensburger Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The piRNA pathway has been shown in model organisms to be involved in silencing of transposons thereby providing genome stability. In D. melanogaster the majority of piRNAs map to these sequences. The medically important mosquito species Aedes aegypti has a large genome size, a high transposon load which includes Miniature Inverted repeat Transposable Elements (MITES and an expansion of the piRNA biogenesis genes. Studies of transgenic lines of Ae. aegypti have indicated that introduced transposons are poorly remobilized and we sought to explore the basis of this. We wished to analyze the piRNA profile of Ae. aegypti and thereby determine if it is responsible for transposon silencing in this mosquito. Results Estimated piRNA sequence diversity was comparable between Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster, but surprisingly only 19% of mosquito piRNAs mapped to transposons compared to 51% for D. melanogaster. Ae. aegypti piRNA clusters made up a larger percentage of the total genome than those of D. melanogaster but did not contain significantly higher percentages of transposon derived sequences than other regions of the genome. Ae. aegypti contains a number of protein coding genes that may be sources of piRNA biogenesis with two, traffic jam and maelstrom, implicated in this process in model organisms. Several genes of viral origin were also targeted by piRNAs. Examination of six mosquito libraries that had previously been transformed with transposon derived sequence revealed that new piRNA sequences had been generated to the transformed sequences, suggesting that they may have stimulated a transposon inactivation mechanism. Conclusions Ae. aegypti has a large piRNA complement that maps to transposons but primarily gene sequences, including many viral-derived sequences. This, together the more uniform distribution of piRNA clusters throughout its genome, suggest that some aspects of the piRNA system differ between Ae. aegypti and D

  1. Building foundations for transcatheter intervascular anastomoses: 3D anatomy of the great vessels in large experimental animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sizarov, Aleksander; de Bakker, Bernadette S.; Klein, Karina; Ohlerth, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    To provide comprehensive illustrations of anatomy of the relevant vessels in large experimental animals in an interactive format as preparation for developing an effective and safe transcatheter technique of aortopulmonary and bidirectional cavopulmonary intervascular anastomoses. Computed

  2. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zillikens, M Carola; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray absorpt...

  3. Genome-wide association and large-scale follow up identifies 16 new loci influencing lung function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler Artigas, María; Loth, Daan W; Wain, Louise V; Gharib, Sina A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Tang, Wenbo; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Smith, Albert Vernon; Huffman, Jennifer E; Albrecht, Eva; Jackson, Catherine M; Evans, David M; Cadby, Gemma; Fornage, Myriam; Manichaikul, Ani; Lopez, Lorna M; Johnson, Toby; Aldrich, Melinda C; Aspelund, Thor; Barroso, Inês; Campbell, Harry; Cassano, Patricia A; Couper, David J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Grkovic, Ivica; Hammond, Christopher J; Hancock, Dana B; Harris, Tamara B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Heckbert, Susan R; Heliövaara, Markku; Homuth, Georg; Hysi, Pirro G; James, Alan L; Jankovic, Stipan; Joubert, Bonnie R; Karrasch, Stefan; Klopp, Norman; Koch, Beate; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Launer, Lenore J; Liu, Yongmei; Loehr, Laura R; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J F; Lumley, Thomas; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ang, Wei Q; Barr, R Graham; Beilby, John; Blakey, John D; Boban, Mladen; Boraska, Vesna; Brisman, Jonas; Britton, John R; Brusselle, Guy G; Cooper, Cyrus; Curjuric, Ivan; Dahgam, Santosh; Deary, Ian J; Ebrahim, Shah; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Francks, Clyde; Gaysina, Darya; Granell, Raquel; Gu, Xiangjun; Hankinson, John L; Hardy, Rebecca; Harris, Sarah E; Henderson, John; Henry, Amanda; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Holt, Patrick G; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael L; Imboden, Medea; Jameson, Karen A; Kerr, Shona M; Kolcic, Ivana; Kronenberg, Florian; Liu, Jason Z; Marchini, Jonathan; McKeever, Tricia; Morris, Andrew D; Olin, Anna-Carin; Porteous, David J; Postma, Dirkje S; Rich, Stephen S; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rochat, Thierry; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Sayers, Ian; Sly, Peter D; Smith, George Davey; Sood, Akshay; Starr, John M; Uitterlinden, André G; Vonk, Judith M; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Williams, O Dale; Wong, Andrew; Mangino, Massimo; Marciante, Kristin D; McArdle, Wendy L; Meibohm, Bernd; Morrison, Alanna C; North, Kari E; Omenaas, Ernst; Palmer, Lyle J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pin, Isabelle; Pola Sbreve Ek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Psaty, Bruce M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Rantanen, Taina; Ripatti, Samuli; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Schulz, Holger; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Warrington, Nicole M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Sarah H; Wilk, Jemma B; Wjst, Matthias; Wright, Alan F; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Pennell, Craig E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Holloway, John W; Boezen, Hendrika; Lawlor, Debbie A; Morris, Richard W; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Kähönen, Mika; Heinrich, Joachim; Musk, Arthur W; Jarvis, Deborah L; Gläser, Sven; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Elliott, Paul; O'Connor, George T; Strachan, David P; London, Stephanie J; Hall, Ian P; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tobin, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function measures reflect respiratory health and are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We tested genome-wide association with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity in 48,201

  4. Optimization of AFLP fingerprinting of organisms with a large-sized genome: a study on Alstroemeria spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, T.H.; Eck, van H.J.; Jeu, de M.J.; Jacobsen, E.

    1999-01-01

    The recently introduced PCR-based DNA fingerprinting technique AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) allows the selective amplification of subsets of genomic restriction fragments. AFLP has been used for multiple purposes such as the construction of linkage maps, marker saturation at

  5. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillikens, M.C.; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Chou, Wen Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, J.A.; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S.; Smith, Albert V.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weihua; Aghdassi, Ali; Åkesson, Kristina; Amin, Najaf; Baier, Leslie J.; Barroso, Inês; Bennett, David A.; Bertram, Lars; Biffar, Rainer; Bochud, Murielle; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Buchman, Aron S.; Byberg, Liisa; Campbell, Harry; Campos Obanda, Natalia; Cauley, Jane A.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Cederberg, Henna; Chen, Zhao; Cho, Nam H.; Jin Choi, Hyung; Claussnitzer, Melina; Collins, Francis; Cummings, Steven R.; Jager, De Philip L.; Demuth, Ilja; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A.M.; DIatchenko, Luda; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Enneman, Anke W.; Erdos, Mike; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eriksson, Joel; Estrada, Karol; Evans, Daniel S.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fu, Mao; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Girke, Thomas; Glazer, Nicole L.; Grallert, Harald; Grewal, Jagvir; Han, Bok Ghee; Hanson, Robert L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Hoffman, Eric P.; Homuth, Georg; Hsueh, Wen Chi; Hubal, Monica J.; Hubbard, Alan; Huffman, Kim M.; Husted, Lise B.; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ittermann, Till; Jansson, John Olov; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Karlsson, Magnus; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kilpelaïnen, Tuomas O.; Klopp, Norman; Kloth, Jacqueline S.L.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kraus, William E.; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lahti, Jari; Lang, Thomas; Langdahl, Bente L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Lee, Jong Young; Lerch, Markus M.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Maixner, William; McGuigan, Fiona E.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Meitinger, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Mellström, Dan; Melov, Simon; Michaëlsson, Karl; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mosekilde, Leif; Newman, Anne; Nielson, Carrie M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Palotie, Aarno; Parker, Stephan; Peacock, Munro; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Prince, Richard L.; Raïkkönen, Katri; Ralston, Stuart H.; Ripatti, Samuli; Robbins, John A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Satterfield, Suzanne; Schadt, Eric E.; Schipf, Sabine; Scott, Laura; Sehmi, Joban; Shen, Jian; Soo Shin, Chan; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Smith, Shad; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Swart, Karin M.A.; Tan, Sian Tsung; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Thompson, Patricia; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tranah, Gregory J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Schoor, van Natasja M.; Verma, Arjun; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N.; Welch, Ryan; Wichman, H.E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Williams, Frances M.K.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Nicole C.; Xie, Weijia; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Yanhua; Chambers, John C.; Döring, Angela; Duijn, Van Cornelia M.; Econs, Michael J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ossowski, Vicky; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Karasik, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Ohlsson, Claes; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2017-01-01

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray

  6. Robust and rapid algorithms facilitate large-scale whole genome sequencing downstream analysis in an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaoxin; Li, Jiang; Li, Mulin Jun; Pan, Zhicheng; Hsu, Jacob Shujui; Liu, Dajiang J; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wang, Junwen; Song, Youqiang; Sham, Pak Chung

    2017-05-19

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising strategy to unravel variants or genes responsible for human diseases and traits. However, there is a lack of robust platforms for a comprehensive downstream analysis. In the present study, we first proposed three novel algorithms, sequence gap-filled gene feature annotation, bit-block encoded genotypes and sectional fast access to text lines to address three fundamental problems. The three algorithms then formed the infrastructure of a robust parallel computing framework, KGGSeq, for integrating downstream analysis functions for whole genome sequencing data. KGGSeq has been equipped with a comprehensive set of analysis functions for quality control, filtration, annotation, pathogenic prediction and statistical tests. In the tests with whole genome sequencing data from 1000 Genomes Project, KGGSeq annotated several thousand more reliable non-synonymous variants than other widely used tools (e.g. ANNOVAR and SNPEff). It took only around half an hour on a small server with 10 CPUs to access genotypes of ∼60 million variants of 2504 subjects, while a popular alternative tool required around one day. KGGSeq's bit-block genotype format used 1.5% or less space to flexibly represent phased or unphased genotypes with multiple alleles and achieved a speed of over 1000 times faster to calculate genotypic correlation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Hybrid assembly of the large and highly repetitive genome of Aegilops tauschii, a progenitor of bread wheat, with the MaSuRCA mega-reads algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimin, Aleksey V; Puiu, Daniela; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Zhu, Tingting; Koren, Sergey; Marçais, Guillaume; Yorke, James A; Dvořák, Jan; Salzberg, Steven L

    2017-05-01

    Long sequencing reads generated by single-molecule sequencing technology offer the possibility of dramatically improving the contiguity of genome assemblies. The biggest challenge today is that long reads have relatively high error rates, currently around 15%. The high error rates make it difficult to use this data alone, particularly with highly repetitive plant genomes. Errors in the raw data can lead to insertion or deletion errors (indels) in the consensus genome sequence, which in turn create significant problems for downstream analysis; for example, a single indel may shift the reading frame and incorrectly truncate a protein sequence. Here, we describe an algorithm that solves the high error rate problem by combining long, high-error reads with shorter but much more accurate Illumina sequencing reads, whose error rates average assembly algorithm combines these two types of reads to construct mega-reads, which are both long and accurate, and then assembles the mega-reads using the CABOG assembler, which was designed for long reads. We apply this technique to a large data set of Illumina and PacBio sequences from the species Aegilops tauschii, a large and extremely repetitive plant genome that has resisted previous attempts at assembly. We show that the resulting assembled contigs are far larger than in any previous assembly, with an N50 contig size of 486,807 nucleotides. We compare the contigs to independently produced optical maps to evaluate their large-scale accuracy, and to a set of high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based assemblies to evaluate base-level accuracy. © 2017 Zimin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Coral life history and symbiosis: Functional genomic resources for two reef building Caribbean corals, Acropora palmata and Montastraea faveolata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szmant Alina M

    2008-02-01

    -scleractinian cnidarians Nematostella vectensis and Hydra magnipapillata. Conclusion Partial sequencing of 5 cDNA libraries each for A. palmata and M. faveolata has produced a rich set of candidate genes (4,980 genes from A. palmata, and 1,732 genes from M. faveolata that we can use as a starting point for examining the life history and symbiosis of these two species, as well as to further expand the dataset of cnidarian genes for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies.

  9. Scaffolder - software for manual genome scaffolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly of next-generation short-read sequencing data can result in a fragmented non-contiguous set of genomic sequences. Therefore a common step in a genome project is to join neighbouring sequence regions together and fill gaps. This scaffolding step is non-trivial and requires manually editing large blocks of nucleotide sequence. Joining these sequences together also hides the source of each region in the final genome sequence. Taken together these considerations may make reproducing or editing an existing genome scaffold difficult. Methods The software outlined here, “Scaffolder,” is implemented in the Ruby programming language and can be installed via the RubyGems software management system. Genome scaffolds are defined using YAML - a data format which is both human and machine-readable. Command line binaries and extensive documentation are available. Results This software allows a genome build to be defined in terms of the constituent sequences using a relatively simple syntax. This syntax further allows unknown regions to be specified and additional sequence to be used to fill known gaps in the scaffold. Defining the genome construction in a file makes the scaffolding process reproducible and easier to edit compared with large FASTA nucleotide sequences. Conclusions Scaffolder is easy-to-use genome scaffolding software which promotes reproducibility and continuous development in a genome project. Scaffolder can be found at http://next.gs.

  10. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass

    OpenAIRE

    Zillikens, M. C.; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Laura M Yerges-Armstrong; Chou, Wen?Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, J.A.; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S.; Smith, Albert V.

    2017-01-01

    We acknowledge the essential role of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genome Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium in development and support of this manuscript. CHARGE members include the Netherland’s Rotterdam Study (RS), Framingham Heart Study (FHS), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), the NHLBI’s Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, and Iceland’s Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) Reykjavik Study. Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykja...

  11. Large-scale robot-assisted genome shuffling yields industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts with increased ethanol tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Snoek, Tim; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Mertens, Stijn; Saels, Veerle; Verplaetse, Alex; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Background During the final phases of bioethanol fermentation, yeast cells face high ethanol concentrations. This stress results in slower or arrested fermentations and limits ethanol production. Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with superior ethanol tolerance may therefore allow increased yield and efficiency. Genome shuffling has emerged as a powerful approach to rapidly enhance complex traits including ethanol tolerance, yet previous efforts have mostly relied on a mutagenized pool o...

  12. Characterization of rubber tree microRNA in phytohormone response using large genomic DNA libraries, promoter sequence and gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanawattanawong, Supanath; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Ruang-areerate, Panthita; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Poopear, Supannee; Somyong, Suthasinee; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2014-10-01

    The para rubber tree is the most widely cultivated tree species for producing natural rubber (NR) latex. Unfortunately, rubber tree characteristics such as a long life cycle, heterozygous genetic backgrounds, and poorly understood genetic profiles are the obstacles to breeding new rubber tree varieties, such as those with improved NR yields. Recent evidence has revealed the potential importance of controlling microRNA (miRNA) decay in some aspects of NR regulation. To gain a better understanding of miRNAs and their relationship with rubber tree gene regulation networks, large genomic DNA insert-containing libraries were generated to complement the incomplete draft genome sequence and applied as a new powerful tool to predict a function of interested genes. Bacterial artificial chromosome and fosmid libraries, containing a total of 120,576 clones with an average insert size of 43.35 kb, provided approximately 2.42 haploid genome equivalents of coverage based on the estimated 2.15 gb rubber tree genome. Based on these library sequences, the precursors of 1 member of rubber tree-specific miRNAs and 12 members of conserved miRNAs were successfully identified. A panel of miRNAs was characterized for phytohormone response by precisely identifying phytohormone-responsive motifs in their promoter sequences. Furthermore, the quantitative real-time PCR on ethylene stimulation of rubber trees was performed to demonstrate that the miR2118, miR159, miR164 and miR166 are responsive to ethylene, thus confirmed the prediction by genomic DNA analysis. The cis-regulatory elements identified in the promoter regions of these miRNA genes help augment our understanding of miRNA gene regulation and provide a foundation for further investigation of the regulation of rubber tree miRNAs.

  13. 某大型建筑长廊排烟设计分析%Design analysis on smoke exhaust in a large building corridor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛

    2017-01-01

    以某建筑长廊为例,通过分析长廊内的火灾荷载分布,确定火灾场景并建立火灾模型,采用FDS对建筑内的火灾烟气蔓延情况进行模拟计算,得到各火灾场景下的火灾蔓延及烟气流动状态.分析国内类似高大空间建筑的排烟形式,确定自然排烟的方式满足排烟要求,适合此建筑.介绍必要位置需设置的消防联动、远程控制等设施.%With the example of a large building corridor, the fire scenarios were set and the fire model was established based on the analysis on fire load in corridor. The fire was simulated by FDS and the fire spread and smoke movement under different scenarios were obtained. Based on the analysis of smoke control in some sim-ilar tall space buildings, it was found out that natural smoke vent isthe suitable smoke control plan which can meet the requirements of this building. The corresponding facilities including fire protec-tion linkage and remote control on the necessary location were il-lustrated.

  14. Assembly of 500,000 inter-specific catfish expressed sequence tags and large scale gene-associated marker development for whole genome association studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catfish Genome Consortium; Wang, Shaolin; Peatman, Eric; Abernathy, Jason; Waldbieser, Geoff; Lindquist, Erika; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan; Wang, Mei; Li, Ping; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Liu, Lei; Vullaganti, Deepika; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Murdock, Christopher; Small, Brian C; Wilson, Melanie; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Yanliang; Lee, Yoona; Chen, Fei; Lu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqi; Xu, Peng; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Baoprasertkul, Puttharat; Quilang, Jonas; Sha, Zhenxia; Bao, Baolong; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Qun; Takano, Tomokazu; Nandi, Samiran; Liu, Shikai; Wong, Lilian; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Quiniou, Sylvie; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman; Trant, John; Rokhsar, Daniel; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-03-23

    Background-Through the Community Sequencing Program, a catfish EST sequencing project was carried out through a collaboration between the catfish research community and the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute. Prior to this project, only a limited EST resource from catfish was available for the purpose of SNP identification. Results-A total of 438,321 quality ESTs were generated from 8 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and 4 blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) libraries, bringing the number of catfish ESTs to nearly 500,000. Assembly of all catfish ESTs resulted in 45,306 contigs and 66,272 singletons. Over 35percent of the unique sequences had significant similarities to known genes, allowing the identification of 14,776 unique genes in catfish. Over 300,000 putative SNPs have been identified, of which approximately 48,000 are high-quality SNPs identified from contigs with at least four sequences and the minor allele presence of at least two sequences in the contig. The EST resource should be valuable for identification of microsatellites, genome annotation, large-scale expression analysis, and comparative genome analysis. Conclusions-This project generated a large EST resource for catfish that captured the majority of the catfish transcriptome. The parallel analysis of ESTs from two closely related Ictalurid catfishes should also provide powerful means for the evaluation of ancient and recent gene duplications, and for the development of high-density microarrays in catfish. The inter- and intra-specific SNPs identified from all catfish EST dataset assembly will greatly benefit the catfish introgression breeding program and whole genome association studies.

  15. Assembly of 500,000 inter-specific catfish expressed sequence tags and large scale gene-associated marker development for whole genome association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaolin; Peatman, Eric; Abernathy, Jason; Waldbieser, Geoff; Lindquist, Erika; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan; Wang, Mei; Li, Ping; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Liu, Lei; Vullaganti, Deepika; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Murdock, Christopher; Small, Brian C; Wilson, Melanie; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Yanliang; Lee, Yoona; Chen, Fei; Lu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqi; Xu, Peng; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Baoprasertkul, Puttharat; Quilang, Jonas; Sha, Zhenxia; Bao, Baolong; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Qun; Takano, Tomokazu; Nandi, Samiran; Liu, Shikai; Wong, Lilian; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Quiniou, Sylvie; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman; Trant, John; Rokhsar, Daniel; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-01-22

    Through the Community Sequencing Program, a catfish EST sequencing project was carried out through a collaboration between the catfish research community and the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute. Prior to this project, only a limited EST resource from catfish was available for the purpose of SNP identification. A total of 438,321 quality ESTs were generated from 8 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and 4 blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) libraries, bringing the number of catfish ESTs to nearly 500,000. Assembly of all catfish ESTs resulted in 45,306 contigs and 66,272 singletons. Over 35% of the unique sequences had significant similarities to known genes, allowing the identification of 14,776 unique genes in catfish. Over 300,000 putative SNPs have been identified, of which approximately 48,000 are high-quality SNPs identified from contigs with at least four sequences and the minor allele presence of at least two sequences in the contig. The EST resource should be valuable for identification of microsatellites, genome annotation, large-scale expression analysis, and comparative genome analysis. This project generated a large EST resource for catfish that captured the majority of the catfish transcriptome. The parallel analysis of ESTs from two closely related Ictalurid catfishes should also provide powerful means for the evaluation of ancient and recent gene duplications, and for the development of high-density microarrays in catfish. The inter- and intra-specific SNPs identified from all catfish EST dataset assembly will greatly benefit the catfish introgression breeding program and whole genome association studies.

  16. An integrative structural health monitoring system for the local/global responses of a large-scale irregular building under construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo Seon; Shin, Yunah; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-07-15

    In this study, a practical and integrative SHM system was developed and applied to a large-scale irregular building under construction, where many challenging issues exist. In the proposed sensor network, customized energy-efficient wireless sensing units (sensor nodes, repeater nodes, and master nodes) were employed and comprehensive communications from the sensor node to the remote monitoring server were conducted through wireless communications. The long-term (13-month) monitoring results recorded from a large number of sensors (75 vibrating wire strain gauges, 10 inclinometers, and three laser displacement sensors) indicated that the construction event exhibiting the largest influence on structural behavior was the removal of bents that were temporarily installed to support the free end of the cantilevered members during their construction. The safety of each member could be confirmed based on the quantitative evaluation of each response. Furthermore, it was also confirmed that the relation between these responses (i.e., deflection, strain, and inclination) can provide information about the global behavior of structures induced from specific events. Analysis of the measurement results demonstrates the proposed sensor network system is capable of automatic and real-time monitoring and can be applied and utilized for both the safety evaluation and precise implementation of buildings under construction.

  17. Large-scale genome-wide association analysis of bipolar disorder identifies a new susceptibility locus near ODZ4

    OpenAIRE

    Sklar, Pamela; Ripke, Stephan; Laura J. Scott; Andreassen, Ole A; Cichon, Sven; Craddock, Nick; Edenberg, Howard J; Nurnberger, John I.; Rietschel, Marcella; Blackwood, Douglas; Corvin, Aiden; Flickinger, Matthew; Guan, Weihua; Mattingsdal, Morten; McQuillin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a combined genome-wide association (GWAS) analysis of 7,481 individuals affected with bipolar disorder and 9,250 control individuals within the Psychiatric Genomewide Association Study Consortium Bipolar Disorder group (PGC-BD). We performed a replication study in which we tested 34 independent SNPs in 4,493 independent bipolar disorder cases and 42,542 independent controls and found strong evidence for replication. In the replication sample, 18 of 34 SNPs had P value < 0.05, and...

  18. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies......, gene and protein level alterations have fatal consequences. We used genome-wide protein-protein interaction data to identify chromosome-specific patterns of protein interactions. We found that some chromosomes encode proteins that interact infrequently with each other, chromosome 21 in particular. We...

  19. Building a large-area GEM-based readout chamber for the upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Gasik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged-particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019-2020, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate up to 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 100 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. To fully exploit the LHC potential the TPC will be upgraded based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. A prototype of an ALICE TPC Outer Read-Out Chamber (OROC) was equipped with twelve large-size GEM foils as amplification stage to demonstrate the feasibility of replacing the current Multi Wire Proportional Chambers with the new technology. With a total area of $\\sim$0.76 m$^2$ it is the largest GEM-based detector built to date. The GEM OROC was installed within a test field cage and commissioned with radioactive sources.

  20. Systematic CpT (ApG) Depletion and CpG Excess Are Unique Genomic Signatures of Large DNA Viruses Infecting Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Neha; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the relative abundance of dinucleotides, if any may provide important clues on host-driven evolution of viruses. We studied dinucleotide frequencies of large DNA viruses infecting vertebrates (n = 105; viruses infecting mammals = 99; viruses infecting aves = 6; viruses infecting reptiles = 1) and invertebrates (n = 88; viruses infecting insects = 84; viruses infecting crustaceans = 4). We have identified systematic depletion of CpT(ApG) dinucleotides and over-representation of CpG dinucleotides as the unique genomic signature of large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates. Detailed investigation of this unique genomic signature suggests the existence of invertebrate host-induced pressures specifically targeting CpT(ApG) and CpG dinucleotides. The depletion of CpT dinucleotides among large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates is at least in part, explained by non-canonical DNA methylation by the infected host. Our findings highlight the role of invertebrate host-related factors in shaping virus evolution and they also provide the necessary framework for future studies on evolution, epigenetics and molecular biology of viruses infecting this group of hosts. PMID:25369195

  1. Assessment of large copy number variants in patients with apparently isolated congenital left-sided cardiac lesions reveals clinically relevant genomic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchard, Neil A; Umana, Luis A; D'Alessandro, Lisa; Azamian, Mahshid; Poopola, Mojisola; Morris, Shaine A; Fernbach, Susan; Lalani, Seema R; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Zender, Gloria A; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara; Garg, Vidu; Bowman, Jessica; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia; Arrington, Cammon B; Furthner, Dieter; Prakash, Siddharth K; Bowles, Neil E; McBride, Kim L; Belmont, John W

    2017-08-01

    Congenital left-sided cardiac lesions (LSLs) are a significant contributor to the mortality and morbidity of congenital heart disease (CHD). Structural copy number variants (CNVs) have been implicated in LSL without extra-cardiac features; however, non-penetrance and variable expressivity have created uncertainty over the use of CNV analyses in such patients. High-density SNP microarray genotyping data were used to infer large, likely-pathogenic, autosomal CNVs in a cohort of 1,139 probands with LSL and their families. CNVs were molecularly confirmed and the medical records of individual carriers reviewed. The gene content of novel CNVs was then compared with public CNV data from CHD patients. Large CNVs (>1 MB) were observed in 33 probands (∼3%). Six of these were de novo and 14 were not observed in the only available parent sample. Associated cardiac phenotypes spanned a broad spectrum without clear predilection. Candidate CNVs were largely non-recurrent, associated with heterozygous loss of copy number, and overlapped known CHD genomic regions. Novel CNV regions were enriched for cardiac development genes, including seven that have not been previously associated with human CHD. CNV analysis can be a clinically useful and molecularly informative tool in LSLs without obvious extra-cardiac defects, and may identify a clinically relevant genomic disorder in a small but important proportion of these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Experimental evolution and genome sequencing reveal variation in levels of clonal interference in large populations of bacteriophage φX174

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepin Kim M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In large asexual populations where beneficial mutations may co-occur and recombination is absent, the fate of beneficial mutations can be significantly affected by competition (i.e., clonal interference. Theoretical models predict that clonal interference (CI can slow adaptation, alter the distribution of fixed beneficial mutations, and affect disease progression by impacting within-host evolution of pathogens. While phenotypic data support that CI is a significant determinant of adaptive outcome, genetic data are needed to verify the patterns and to inform evolutionary models. We adapted replicate populations of the bacteriophage φX174 under two levels of CaCl2 to create benign and harsh environments. Genomic sequences of multiple individuals from evolved populations were used to detect competing beneficial mutations. Results There were several competing genotypes in most of the populations where CaCl2 was abundant, but no evidence of CI where CaCl2 was scarce, even though rates of adaptation and population sizes among the treatments were similar. The sequence data revealed that observed mutations were limited to a single portion of one gene in the harsh treatment, but spanned a different and larger region of the genome under the benign treatments, suggesting that there were more adaptive solutions to the benign treatment. Conclusion Beneficial mutations with relatively large selection coefficients can be excluded by CI. CI may commonly determine the fate of beneficial mutations in large microbial populations, but its occurrence depends on selective conditions. CI was more frequent in benign selective conditions possibly due to a greater number of adaptive targets under this treatment. Additionally, the genomic sequence data showed that selection can target different types and numbers of phenotypes in environments that differ by only a single continuous variable.

  3. Renovation of Large-Panel Buildings in Context of Urban Renewal/ Remonty Budynków Wielkopłytowych, Jako Element Rewitalizacji Miast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiesław Ligęza

    2015-01-01

    The article presents issues connected with renovating multi-storey precast concrete buildings, resulting from the consequences of construction defects occurring over the course of the building process...

  4. PartTree: an algorithm to build an approximate tree from a large number of unaligned sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    To construct a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of a large number (> approximately 10,000) of sequences, the calculation of a guide tree with a complexity of O(N2) to O(N3), where N is the number of sequences, is the most time-consuming process. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an approximate algorithm, PartTree, to construct a guide tree with an average time complexity of O(N log N). The new MSA method with the PartTree algorithm can align approximately 60,000 sequences in several minutes on a standard desktop computer. The loss of accuracy in MSA caused by this approximation was estimated to be several percent in benchmark tests using Pfam. The present algorithm has been implemented in the MAFFT sequence alignment package (http://align.bmr.kyushu-u.ac.jp/mafft/software/). Supplementary information is available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. CUSHAW: a CUDA compatible short read aligner to large genomes based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchao; Schmidt, Bertil; Maskell, Douglas L

    2012-07-15

    New high-throughput sequencing technologies have promoted the production of short reads with dramatically low unit cost. The explosive growth of short read datasets poses a challenge to the mapping of short reads to reference genomes, such as the human genome, in terms of alignment quality and execution speed. We present CUSHAW, a parallelized short read aligner based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) parallel programming model. We exploit CUDA-compatible graphics hardware as accelerators to achieve fast speed. Our algorithm uses a quality-aware bounded search approach based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) and the Ferragina-Manzini index to reduce the search space and achieve high alignment quality. Performance evaluation, using simulated as well as real short read datasets, reveals that our algorithm running on one or two graphics processing units achieves significant speedups in terms of execution time, while yielding comparable or even better alignment quality for paired-end alignments compared with three popular BWT-based aligners: Bowtie, BWA and SOAP2. CUSHAW also delivers competitive performance in terms of single-nucleotide polymorphism calling for an Escherichia coli test dataset. http://cushaw.sourceforge.net

  6. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John A.; Kremer, Philip H. C.; Manso, Ana S.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R.; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood–brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness. PMID:28348877

  7. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John A; Kremer, Philip H C; Manso, Ana S; Croucher, Nicholas J; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik; Bentley, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood-brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness.

  8. Large-scale genome-wide association analysis of bipolar disorder identifies a new susceptibility locus near ODZ4.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sklar, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    We conducted a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 7,481 individuals with bipolar disorder (cases) and 9,250 controls as part of the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium. Our replication study tested 34 SNPs in 4,496 independent cases with bipolar disorder and 42,422 independent controls and found that 18 of 34 SNPs had P < 0.05, with 31 of 34 SNPs having signals with the same direction of effect (P = 3.8 × 10(-7)). An analysis of all 11,974 bipolar disorder cases and 51,792 controls confirmed genome-wide significant evidence of association for CACNA1C and identified a new intronic variant in ODZ4. We identified a pathway comprised of subunits of calcium channels enriched in bipolar disorder association intervals. Finally, a combined GWAS analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder yielded strong association evidence for SNPs in CACNA1C and in the region of NEK4-ITIH1-ITIH3-ITIH4. Our replication results imply that increasing sample sizes in bipolar disorder will confirm many additional loci.

  9. SEQSpark: A Complete Analysis Tool for Large-Scale Rare Variant Association Studies Using Whole-Genome and Exome Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Zhao, Linhai; Li, Biao; He, Zongxiao; Wang, Gao T; Liu, Dajiang J; Leal, Suzanne M

    2017-07-06

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies provide great opportunities for discovering rare susceptibility variants involved in complex disease etiology via large-scale imputation and exome and whole-genome sequence-based association studies. Due to modest effect sizes, large sample sizes of tens to hundreds of thousands of individuals are required for adequately powered studies. Current analytical tools are obsolete when it comes to handling these large datasets. To facilitate the analysis of large-scale sequence-based studies, we developed SEQSpark which implements parallel processing based on Spark to increase the speed and efficiency of performing data quality control, annotation, and association analysis. To demonstrate the versatility and speed of SEQSpark, we analyzed whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K, testing for associations with waist-to-hip ratios. The analysis, which was completed in 1.5 hr, included loading data, annotation, principal component analysis, and single variant and rare variant aggregate association analysis of >9 million variants. For rare variant aggregate analysis, an exome-wide significant association (p analysis of a quantitative trait using several rare variant aggregate association methods. Additionally, the performance of SEQSpark was compared to Variant Association Tools and PLINK/SEQ. SEQSpark was always faster and in some situations computation was reduced to a hundredth of the time. SEQSpark will empower large sequence-based epidemiological studies to quickly elucidate genetic variation involved in the etiology of complex traits. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent dispersion from a localized source in a build-up environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing-Chen; Saeedi, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Turbulent dispersion from a continuous ground-level point-source within an array of 16x16 cubes has been simulated using wall-modelling large-eddy simulations. The major challenges associated with this problem involve obtaining a deeper understanding of the interaction of the dynamically evolving flow structures with the complex boundary conditions, coupling of the momentum and scalar transport processes, and a high Reynolds number tested for an modeled urban atmospheric boundary layer (Re = 12,005 based on the free stream velocity and obstacle height). A fully-parallelized in-house computer code was used for performing the simulation. An advanced dynamic nonlinear model (DNM) and dynamic full linear eddy diffusivity model (DFLTDM) have been used for closure of the filtered momentum and scalar transport equations, respectively. A non-equilibrium thin boundary-layer wall model is applied to all solid surfaces. Inlet boundary conditions based on solid grids have also been investigated in order to generate high turbulence levels typical for an approaching urban atmospheric boundary-layer flow. The predicted results for the flow and concentration field have been thoroughly validated against a set of high-quality water-channel measurement data.

  11. How to make a minimal genome for synthetic minimal cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu-Yan; Chang, Su-Hua; Wang, Jing

    2010-05-01

    As a key focus of synthetic biology, building a minimal artificial cell has given rise to many discussions. A synthetic minimal cell will provide an appropriate chassis to integrate functional synthetic parts, devices and systems with functions that cannot generally be found in nature. The design and construction of a functional minimal genome is a key step while building such a cell/chassis since all the cell functions can be traced back to the genome. Kinds of approaches, based on bioinformatics and molecular biology, have been developed and proceeded to derive essential genes and minimal gene sets for the synthetic minimal genome. Experiments about streamlining genomes of model bacteria revealed genome reduction led to unanticipated beneficial properties, such as high electroporation efficiency and accurate propagation of recombinant genes and plasmids that were unstable in other strains. Recent achievements in chemical synthesis technology for large DNA segments together with the rapid development of the whole-genome sequencing, have transferred synthesis of genes to assembly of the whole genomes based on oligonucleotides, and thus created strong preconditions for synthesis of artificial minimal genome. Here in this article, we review briefly the history and current state of research in this field and summarize the main methods for making a minimal genome. We also discuss the impacts of minimized genome on metabolism and regulation of artificial cell.

  12. Genomic profiling using array comparative genomic hybridization define distinct subtypes of diffuse large b-cell lymphoma: a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma comprising of greater than 30% of adult non-Hodgkin Lymphomas. DLBCL represents a diverse set of lymphomas, defined as diffuse proliferation of large B lymphoid cells. Numerous cytogenetic studies including karyotypes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as well as morphological, biological, clinical, microarray and sequencing technologies have attempted to categorize DLBCL into morphological variants, molecular and immunophenotypic subgroups, as well as distinct disease entities. Despite such efforts, most lymphoma remains undistinguishable and falls into DLBCL, not otherwise specified (DLBCL-NOS). The advent of microarray-based studies (chromosome, RNA, gene expression, etc) has provided a plethora of high-resolution data that could potentially facilitate the finer classification of DLBCL. This review covers the microarray data currently published for DLBCL. We will focus on these types of data; 1) array based CGH; 2) classical CGH; and 3) gene expression profiling studies. The aims of this review were three-fold: (1) to catalog chromosome loci that are present in at least 20% or more of distinct DLBCL subtypes; a detailed list of gains and losses for different subtypes was generated in a table form to illustrate specific chromosome loci affected in selected subtypes; (2) to determine common and distinct copy number alterations among the different subtypes and based on this information, characteristic and similar chromosome loci for the different subtypes were depicted in two separate chromosome ideograms; and, (3) to list re-classified subtypes and those that remained indistinguishable after review of the microarray data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort to compile and review available literatures on microarray analysis data and their practical utility in classifying DLBCL subtypes. Although conventional cytogenetic methods such as Karyotypes and

  13. The evolutionary history of the Arabidopsis lyrata complex: a hybrid in the amphi-Beringian area closes a large distribution gap and builds up a genetic barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Marcus A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of higher plants are, on the majority, polyploid, and hybridisation is more frequent in plants than in animals. Both polyploidisation and hybridisation contribute to increased variability within species, and may transfer adaptations between species in a changing environment. Studying these aspects of evolution within a diversified species complex could help to clarify overall spatial and temporal patterns of plant speciation. The Arabidopsis lyrata complex, which is closely related to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is a perennial, outcrossing, herbaceous species complex with a circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere as well as a disjunct Central European distribution in relictual habitats. This species complex comprises three species and four subspecies, mainly diploids but also several tetraploids, including one natural hybrid. The complex is ecologically, but not fully geographically, separated from members of the closely related species complex of Arabidopsis halleri, and the evolutionary histories of both species compexes have largely been influenced by Pleistocene climate oscillations. Results Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear encoded cytosolic phosphoglucoisomerase and Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and 2 of the ribosomal DNA, as well as the trnL/F region from the chloroplast genome, we unravelled the phylogeography of the various taxonomic units of the A. lyrata complex. We demonstrate the existence of two major gene pools in Central Europe and Northern America. These two major gene pools are constructed from different taxonomic units. We also confirmed that A. kamchatica is the allotetraploid hybrid between A. lyrata and A. halleri, occupying the amphi-Beringian area in Eastern Asia and Northern America. This species closes the large distribution gap of the various other A. lyrata segregates. Furthermore, we revealed a threefold independent allopolyploid origin of this hybrid

  14. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  16. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  17. Large-scale integration of small molecule-induced genome-wide transcriptional responses, Kinome-wide binding affinities and cell-growth inhibition profiles reveal global trends characterizing systems-level drug action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eVidovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily accessible. LINCS data include genome-wide transcriptional signatures, biochemical protein binding profiles, cellular phenotypic response profiles and various other datasets for a wide range of cell model systems and molecular and genetic perturbations. Here we present a partial survey of this data facilitated by data standards and in particular a robust compound standardization workflow; we integrated several types of LINCS signatures and analyzed the results with a focus on mechanism of action and chemical compounds. We illustrate how kinase targets can be related to disease models and relevant drugs. We identified some fundamental trends that appear to link Kinome binding profiles and transcriptional signatures to chemical information and biochemical binding profiles to transcriptional responses independent of chemical similarity. To fill gaps in the datasets we developed and applied predictive models. The results can be interpreted at the systems level as demonstrated based on a large number of signaling pathways. We can identify clear global relationships, suggesting robustness of cellular responses to chemical perturbation. Overall, the results suggest that chemical similarity is a useful measure at the systems level, which would support phenotypic drug optimization efforts. With this study we demonstrate the potential of such integrated analysis approaches and suggest prioritizing further experiments to fill the gaps in the current data.

  18. Large-surface retail trade buildings and wind power systems in regional and urban development; Grossflaechiger Einzelhandel und Windkraftanlagen in Raumordnung und Staedtebau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannowsky, W.; Kraemer, T. (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    Large-surface retail trade buildings and wind power systems influence the regional structure and functions and may cause a conflict of interest between private and public interests both on a local and a regional level. Based on the rulings of the BVerwG (Federal Administrative Court), this conference discussed the requirements on site selection from technical and legal considerations as well as, in each case, the deficiencies of the available control instruments. (orig.) [German] Die Ansiedlung von grossflaechigen Einzelhandelsbetrieben und Windkraftanlagen hat zunehmend raumstrukturelle und -funktionelle Auswirkungen, die zu Interessenkonflikten zwischen privaten und oeffentlichen Interessen auf oertlicher und regionaler Ebene fuehren. Unter Beruecksichtigung der Rechtsprechung des BVerwG behandelt dieser Tagungsband die Anforderungen an eine sachgerechte Standortsteuerung unter fachlichen und rechtlichen Gesichtspunkten sowie die gegenwaertigen Defizite der jeweiligen Steuerungsinstrumente. (orig.)

  19. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Salzberg

    Full Text Available A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1, undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated "repressed" chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations.

  20. Targeted capture sequencing in whitebark pine reveals range-wide demographic and adaptive patterns despite challenges of a large, repetitive genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eSyring

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats – climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion – and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as ‘globally endangered’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN and ‘endangered’ by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 30+ GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp, and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits, targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect

  1. Comparative Genomics of Chrysochromulina Ericina Virus and Other Microalga-Infecting Large DNA Viruses Highlights Their Intricate Evolutionary Relationship with the Established Mimiviridae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot-Lavallée, Lucie; Blanc, Guillaume; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2017-07-15

    Chrysochromulina ericina virus CeV-01B (CeV) was isolated from Norwegian coastal waters in 1998. Its icosahedral particle is 160 nm in diameter and encloses a 474-kb double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome. This virus, although infecting a microalga (the haptophyceae Haptolina ericina, formerly Chrysochromulina ericina), is phylogenetically related to members of the Mimiviridae family, initially established with the acanthamoeba-infecting mimivirus and megavirus as prototypes. This family was later split into two genera (Mimivirus and Cafeteriavirus) following the characterization of a virus infecting the heterotrophic stramenopile Cafeteria roenbergensis (CroV). CeV, as well as two of its close relatives, which infect the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes Phaeocystis globosa (Phaeocystis globosa virus [PgV]) and Aureococcus anophagefferens (Aureococcus anophagefferens virus [AaV]), are currently unclassified by the International Committee on Viral Taxonomy (ICTV). The detailed comparative analysis of the CeV genome presented here confirms the phylogenetic affinity of this emerging group of microalga-infecting viruses with the Mimiviridae but argues in favor of their classification inside a distinct clade within the family. Although CeV, PgV, and AaV share more common features among them than with the larger Mimiviridae, they also exhibit a large complement of unique genes, attesting to their complex evolutionary history. We identified several gene fusion events and cases of convergent evolution involving independent lateral gene acquisitions. Finally, CeV possesses an unusual number of inteins, some of which are closely related despite being inserted in nonhomologous genes. This appears to contradict the paradigm of allele-specific inteins and suggests that the Mimiviridae are especially efficient in spreading inteins while enlarging their repertoire of homing genes.IMPORTANCE Although it infects the microalga Chrysochromulina ericina, CeV is more closely related

  2. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the large-headed frog, Limnonectes bannaensis (Amphibia: Anura), and a novel gene organization in the vertebrate mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Feng; Nie, Liu-Wang; Wang, Yang; Hu, Li-Li

    2009-08-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the large-headed frog, Limnonectes bannaensis (Amphibia, Anura) by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The entire mtDNA sequence is 16,867 bp in length with a novel case of tRNAs in vertebrates. This mt genome is characterized by three distinctive features: (1) a tandem duplication of tRNA(Met) gene is observed, (2) the tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Asn), tRNA(Cys) and tRNA(Glu) genes coded on the L-strand are absent from the L. bannaensis mtDNA, the tRNA(Cys) and tRNA(Glu) genes change into tRNA pseudogenes by reason of degenerative anticodon, and a noncoding sequence of 206 nt long (NC1) has replaced the original position of other two tRNAs, (3) besides NC1, another three noncoding spacers (NC2-4) longer than 50 bp are found in the broken WANCY region and the region NC3-ND5-NC4-ND6-PsiE-Cytb-CR of the new sequence. These features could be explained by a model of gene duplication and deletion. The new sequence data was used to assess the phylogenetic relationships among 25 species of Anura using neighbor-joining, Bayesian, and maximum likelihood methods, and the phylogenetic tree shows the rice frog Fejervarya limnocharis is closest to L. bannaensis in the study.

  4. Annotation Of Novel And Conserved MicroRNA Genes In The Build 10 Sus scrofa Reference Genome And Determination Of Their Expression Levels In Ten Different Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Nielsen, Mathilde; Hedegaard, Jakob

    The DNA template used in the pig genome sequencing project was provided by a Duroc pig named TJ Tabasco. In an effort to annotate microRNA (miRNA) genes in the reference genome we have conducted deep sequencing to determine the miRNA transcriptomes in ten different tissues isolated from Pinky, a ...

  5. Rice Genome Research: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Han; Qifa Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Rice ( L.) is the leading genomics system among the crop plants. The sequence of the rice genome, the first cereal plant genome, was published in 2005. This review summarizes progress made in rice genome annotations, comparative genomics, and functional genomics researches. It also maps out the status of rice genomics globally and provides a vision of future research directions and resource building.

  6. CNV Analysis in Tourette Syndrome Implicates Large Genomic Rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Abhishek; Bochukova, Elena G.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Campbell, Desmond D.; Muller, Heike; Valencia-Duarte, Ana V.; Cardona, Julio; Rivas, Isabel C.; Mesa, Sandra C.; Cuartas, Mauricio; Garcia, Jharley; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cornejo, William; Herrera, Luis D.; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Mathews, Carol A.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Yu, Dongmei; Cook, Ed; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Pauls, David L.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Plagnol, Vincent; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179) have a significant excess (P = 0.006) of large CNV (>500 kb) calls compared to controls (N = 234). Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases) validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions. PMID:23533600

  7. Moving into a new era of periodontal genetic studies: relevance of large case-control samples using severe phenotypes for genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, R D; Safii, S H; Baharuddin, N A; Ng, C C; Cheong, S C; Bartold, P M; Schaefer, A S; Loos, B G

    2014-12-01

    Studies to elucidate the role of genetics as a risk factor for periodontal disease have gone through various phases. In the majority of cases, the initial 'hypothesis-dependent' candidate-gene polymorphism studies did not report valid genetic risk loci. Following a large-scale replication study, these initially positive results are believed to be caused by type 1 errors. However, susceptibility genes, such as CDKN2BAS (Cyclin Dependend KiNase 2B AntiSense RNA; alias ANRIL [ANtisense Rna In the Ink locus]), glycosyltransferase 6 domain containing 1 (GLT6D1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), have been reported as conclusive risk loci of periodontitis. The search for genetic risk factors accelerated with the advent of 'hypothesis-free' genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, despite many different GWAS being performed for almost all human diseases, only three GWAS on periodontitis have been published - one reported genome-wide association of GLT6D1 with aggressive periodontitis (a severe phenotype of periodontitis), whereas the remaining two, which were performed on patients with chronic periodontitis, were not able to find significant associations. This review discusses the problems faced and the lessons learned from the search for genetic risk variants of periodontitis. Current and future strategies for identifying genetic variance in periodontitis, and the importance of planning a well-designed genetic study with large and sufficiently powered case-control samples of severe phenotypes, are also discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Expanding Genomics of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eKuo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant and soil health, and carbon and nutrient cycles. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphological types (e.g. arbuscular [AM], ectomycorrhizal [ECM] in multiple fungal clades (e.g. phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota. The accessibility and culturability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first 3 mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing 3 fungal phyla and 2 mycorrhizal types. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant-degrading enzymes (PDEs and expansion of lineage-specific gene families, including short secreted protein (SSP effectors and other symbiosis genes. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of gene families in contrast to Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other 2 fungi, the symbiosis can involve similar solutions as loss of PDEs and mycorrhiza-induced SSPs. The mycorrhizal community is building on these studies with 3 large-scale initiatives. The Mycorrhizal Genomics Initiative (MGI is sequencing 35 genomes of multiple fungal clades and mycorrhizal types for phylogenomic and population analyses. 17 MGI species whose symbiosis is reconstitutable in vitro are targeted for comprehensive transcriptomics of mycorrhiza formation. MGI genomes are seeding a set of 50+ reference fungal genomes for annotating metatranscriptomes sampled from 7 diverse well-described soil sites. These 3 projects address fundamental questions about the nature and role of a

  9. Plant Functional Genomics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chris Somerville; Shauna Somerville

    1999-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome is nearing completion, sequencing of the rice genome has begun, and large amounts of expressed sequence tag information are being obtained for many other plants...

  10. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Felix R; Ruth, Katherine S; Thompson, Deborah J; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D; Elks, Cathy E; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A; Franke, Lude L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Keller, Margaux F; McArdle, Patrick F; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Smith, Jennifer A; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Goncalo; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chapman, J Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M; Eicher, John D; Fasching, Peter A; Faul, Jessica D; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Girotto, Giorgia G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian'an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Ben M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Olson, Janet E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pirastu, Nicola N; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Scott, Robert A; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B H R; Wright, Alan F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Gasparini, Paolo P; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C; Reiner, Alex P; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Price, Alkes L; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A; Ong, Ken K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M; Perry, John R B; Murray, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms.

  11. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive ageing to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I.; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K.; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy E.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franke, Lude L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Keller, Margaux F.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Goncalo; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M.; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chapman, J. Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Eicher, John D.; Fasching, Peter A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Girotto, Giorgia G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank B.; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E.; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian’an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Ben M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Olson, Janet E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Pirastu, Nicola N.; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Scott, Robert A.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T.; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B.H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Gasparini, Paolo P.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Price, Alkes L.; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A.; Ong, Ken K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R.B.; Murray, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ~70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two harbouring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in/near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses revealed a major association with DNA damage-response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomisation analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (~6% risk increase per-year, P=3×10−14), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure, rather than DDR mechanisms. PMID:26414677

  12. Whole-genome sequence, SNP chips and pedigree structure: building demographic profiles in domestic dog breeds to optimize genetic-trait mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Dayna L.; Rimbault, Maud; Davis, Brian W.; Bhatnagar, Adrienne; Parker, Heidi G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the decade following publication of the draft genome sequence of the domestic dog, extraordinary advances with application to several fields have been credited to the canine genetic system. Taking advantage of closed breeding populations and the subsequent selection for aesthetic and behavioral characteristics, researchers have leveraged the dog as an effective natural model for the study of complex traits, such as disease susceptibility, behavior and morphology, generating unique contributions to human health and biology. When designing genetic studies using purebred dogs, it is essential to consider the unique demography of each population, including estimation of effective population size and timing of population bottlenecks. The analytical design approach for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and analysis of whole-genome sequence (WGS) experiments are inextricable from demographic data. We have performed a comprehensive study of genomic homozygosity, using high-depth WGS data for 90 individuals, and Illumina HD SNP data from 800 individuals representing 80 breeds. These data were coupled with extensive pedigree data analyses for 11 breeds that, together, allowed us to compute breed structure, demography, and molecular measures of genome diversity. Our comparative analyses characterize the extent, formation and implication of breed-specific diversity as it relates to population structure. These data demonstrate the relationship between breed-specific genome dynamics and population architecture, and provide important considerations influencing the technological and cohort design of association and other genomic studies. PMID:27874836

  13. Whole-genome sequence, SNP chips and pedigree structure: building demographic profiles in domestic dog breeds to optimize genetic-trait mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Dayna L; Rimbault, Maud; Davis, Brian W; Bhatnagar, Adrienne; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-12-01

    In the decade following publication of the draft genome sequence of the domestic dog, extraordinary advances with application to several fields have been credited to the canine genetic system. Taking advantage of closed breeding populations and the subsequent selection for aesthetic and behavioral characteristics, researchers have leveraged the dog as an effective natural model for the study of complex traits, such as disease susceptibility, behavior and morphology, generating unique contributions to human health and biology. When designing genetic studies using purebred dogs, it is essential to consider the unique demography of each population, including estimation of effective population size and timing of population bottlenecks. The analytical design approach for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and analysis of whole-genome sequence (WGS) experiments are inextricable from demographic data. We have performed a comprehensive study of genomic homozygosity, using high-depth WGS data for 90 individuals, and Illumina HD SNP data from 800 individuals representing 80 breeds. These data were coupled with extensive pedigree data analyses for 11 breeds that, together, allowed us to compute breed structure, demography, and molecular measures of genome diversity. Our comparative analyses characterize the extent, formation and implication of breed-specific diversity as it relates to population structure. These data demonstrate the relationship between breed-specific genome dynamics and population architecture, and provide important considerations influencing the technological and cohort design of association and other genomic studies. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Whole-genome sequence, SNP chips and pedigree structure: building demographic profiles in domestic dog breeds to optimize genetic-trait mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayna L. Dreger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the decade following publication of the draft genome sequence of the domestic dog, extraordinary advances with application to several fields have been credited to the canine genetic system. Taking advantage of closed breeding populations and the subsequent selection for aesthetic and behavioral characteristics, researchers have leveraged the dog as an effective natural model for the study of complex traits, such as disease susceptibility, behavior and morphology, generating unique contributions to human health and biology. When designing genetic studies using purebred dogs, it is essential to consider the unique demography of each population, including estimation of effective population size and timing of population bottlenecks. The analytical design approach for genome-wide association studies (GWAS and analysis of whole-genome sequence (WGS experiments are inextricable from demographic data. We have performed a comprehensive study of genomic homozygosity, using high-depth WGS data for 90 individuals, and Illumina HD SNP data from 800 individuals representing 80 breeds. These data were coupled with extensive pedigree data analyses for 11 breeds that, together, allowed us to compute breed structure, demography, and molecular measures of genome diversity. Our comparative analyses characterize the extent, formation and implication of breed-specific diversity as it relates to population structure. These data demonstrate the relationship between breed-specific genome dynamics and population architecture, and provide important considerations influencing the technological and cohort design of association and other genomic studies.

  15. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Lars G.; Igl, Wilmar; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Grassmann, Felix; Sengupta, Sebanti; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Wen, Cindy; Gorski, Mathias; Kim, Ivana K.; Cho, David; Zack, Donald; Souied, Eric; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Bala, Elisa; Lee, Kristine E.; Hunter, David J.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Mitchell, Paul; Merriam, Joanna E.; Cipriani, Valentina; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Schick, Tina; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Jiang, Yingda; Stanton, Chloe M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kwong, Alan M.; Boleda, Alexis; Brooks, Matthew; Gieser, Linn; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Branham, Kari E.; Foerster, Johanna R.; Heckenlively, John R.; Othman, Mohammad I.; Vote, Brendan J.; Liang, Helena Hai; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Hall, Janette; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Craig, Jamie E.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Yang, Zhenglin; Su, Zhiguang; Luo, Hongrong; Chen, Daniel; Ouyang, Hong; Flagg, Ken; Lin, Danni; Mao, Guanping; Ferreyra, Henry; Stark, Klaus; von Strachwitz, Claudia N.; Wolf, Armin; Brandl, Caroline; Rudolph, Guenther; Olden, Matthias; Morrison, Margaux A.; Morgan, Denise J.; Schu, Matthew; Ahn, Jeeyun; Silvestri, Giuliana; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Park, Kyu Hyung; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Orlin, Anton; Brucker, Alexander; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Cree, Angela J.; Rennie, Christina A.; Goverdhan, Srinivas V.; Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira; Campochiaro, Peter; Katsanis, Nicholas; Holz, Frank G.; Blond, Frédéric; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Peachey, Neal S.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Moore, Emily L.; Klein, Ronald; Hauser, Michael A.; Postel, Eric A.; Courtenay, Monique D.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Scott, William K.; Liew, Gerald; Tƒan, Ava G.; Gopinath, Bamini; Merriam, John C.; Smith, R. Theodore; Khan, Jane C.; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T.; McGrath, J. Allie; Laux, Reneé; Brantley, Milam A.; Agarwal, Anita; Ersoy, Lebriz; Caramoy, Albert; Langmann, Thomas; Saksens, Nicole T. M.; de Jong, Eiko K.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cain, Melinda S.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Martin, Tammy M.; Blangero, John; Weeks, Daniel E.; Dhillon, Bal; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Romm, Jane; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Gorin, Michael B.; Klein, Michael L.; Baird, Paul N.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Fauser, Sascha; Yates, John R. W.; Allikmets, Rando; Wang, Jie Jin; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Chowers, Itay; Lotery, Andrew J.; Léveillard, Thierry; Zhang, Kang; Brilliant, Murray H.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; DeAngelis, Margaret; Stambolian, Dwight; Haines, Jonathan L.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Heid, Iris M.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly with limited therapeutic options. Here, we report on a study of >12 million variants including 163,714 directly genotyped, most rare, protein-altering variant. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832 controls, we identify 52 independently associated common and rare variants (P < 5×10–8) distributed across 34 loci. While wet and dry AMD subtypes exhibit predominantly shared genetics, we identify the first signal specific to wet AMD, near MMP9 (difference-P = 4.1×10–10). Very rare coding variants (frequency < 0.1%) in CFH, CFI, and TIMP3 suggest causal roles for these genes, as does a splice variant in SLC16A8. Our results support the hypothesis that rare coding variants can pinpoint causal genes within known genetic loci and illustrate that applying the approach systematically to detect new loci requires extremely large sample sizes. PMID:26691988

  16. GEGEINTOOL: A Computer-Based Tool for Automated Analysis of Gene-Gene Interactions in Large Epidemiological Studies in Cardiovascular Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Coltell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of data analysis of gene-gene interactions in complex diseases, after taking into account environmental factors using traditional approaches, are inefficient. High-throughput methods of analysis in large scale studies including thousands of subjects and hundreds of SNPs should be implemented. We developed an integrative computer tool, GEGEINTOOL (GEne- GEne INTeraction tOOL, for large-scale analysis of gene-gene interactions, in human studies of complex diseases including a large number of subjects, SNPs, as well as environmental factors. That resource uses standard statistical packages (SPSS, etc. to build and fit the gene-gene interaction models by means of syntax scripts in predicting one or more continuous or dichotomic phenotypes. Codominant, dominant and recessive genetic interaction models including control for covariates are automatically created for each SNP in order to test the best model. From the standard outputs, GEGEINTOOL extracts a selected set of parameters (regression coefficients, p-values, adjusted means, etc., and groups them in a single MS Excel Spreadsheet. The tool allows editing the set of filter parameters, filtering the selected results depending on p-values, as well as plotting the selected gene-gene interactions to check consistency. In conclusion, GEGEINTOOL is a useful and friendly tool for exploring and identifying gene-gene interactions in complex diseases.

  17. Natural ventilation - A new method based on the Walton model applied to cross-ventilated buildings having two large external openings

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Alain; Allard, Francis; Boyer, Harry

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In order to provide comfort in a low energy consumption building, it is preferable to use natural ventilation rather than HVAC systems. To achieve this, engineers need tools that predict the heat and mass transfers between the building's interior and exterior. This article presents a method implemented in some building software, and the results are compared to CFD. The results show that the knowledge model is not sufficiently well-described to identify all the physical...

  18. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical...

  19. The mitochondrial genome of the Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia: large repetitive sequences between trnE and trnF in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Ma, Chuan; Edwards, Owain; Fuller, Susan; Kang, Le

    2014-01-01

    To characterize aphid mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) features, we sequenced the complete mitogenome of the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia. The 15,784-bp mitogenome with a high A+T content (84.76%) and strong C skew (-0.26) was arranged in the same gene order as that of the ancestral insect. Unlike typical insect mitogenomes, D. noxia possessed a large tandem repeat region (644 bp) located between trnE and trnF. Sequencing partial mitogenome of the cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii) further confirmed the presence of the large repeat region in aphids, but with different repeat length and copy number. Another motif (58 bp) tandemly repeated 2.3 times in the control region of D. noxia. All repeat units in D. noxia could be folded into stem-loop secondary structures, which could further promote an increase in copy numbers. Characterization of the D. noxia mitogenome revealed distinct mitogenome architectures, thus advancing our understanding of insect mitogenomic diversities and evolution. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide association analysis for heat tolerance at flowering detected a large set of genes involved in adaptation to thermal and other stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Lafarge

    Full Text Available Fertilization sensitivity to heat in rice is a major issue within climate change scenarios in the tropics. A panel of 167 indica landraces and improved varieties was phenotyped for spikelet sterility (SPKST under 38°C during anthesis and for several secondary traits potentially affecting panicle micro-climate and thus the fertilization process. The panel was genotyped with an average density of one marker per 29 kb using genotyping by sequencing. Genome-wide association analyses (GWAS were conducted using three methods based on single marker regression, haplotype regression and simultaneous fitting of all markers, respectively. Fourteen loci significantly associated with SPKST under at least two GWAS methods were detected. A large number of associations was also detected for the secondary traits. Analysis of co-localization of SPKST associated loci with QTLs detected in progenies of bi-parental crosses reported in the literature allowed to narrow -down the position of eight of those QTLs, including the most documented one, qHTSF4.1. Gene families underlying loci associated with SPKST corresponded to functions ranging from sensing abiotic stresses and regulating plant response, such as wall-associated kinases and heat shock proteins, to cell division and gametophyte development. Analysis of diversity at the vicinity of loci associated with SPKST within the rice three thousand genomes, revealed widespread distribution of the favourable alleles across O. sativa genetic groups. However, few accessions assembled the favourable alleles at all loci. Effective donors included the heat tolerant variety N22 and some Indian and Taiwanese varieties. These results provide a basis for breeding for heat tolerance during anthesis and for functional validation of major loci governing this trait.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Uhl, James R; Cunningham, Scott A; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Sampathkumar, Priya; Nelson, Heidi; Patel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS). 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa) typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome MLST (cgMLST) were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs) and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084). By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs), including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%), CC30 (19%), CC8 (15%) and CC15 (11%). Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67%) and CC8 (25%); there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hwa Park

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS. 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST and core genome MLST (cgMLST were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084. By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs, including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%, CC30 (19%, CC8 (15% and CC15 (11%. Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67% and CC8 (25%; there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  3. Building and calibrating a large-extent and high resolution coupled groundwater-land surface model using globally available data-sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, E. H.; Van Beek, L. P.; de Jong, S. M.; van Geer, F.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The current generation of large-scale hydrological models generally lacks a groundwater model component simulating lateral groundwater flow. Large-scale groundwater models are rare due to a lack of hydro-geological data required for their parameterization and a lack of groundwater head data required for their calibration. In this study, we propose an approach to develop a large-extent fully-coupled land surface-groundwater model by using globally available datasets and calibrate it using a combination of discharge observations and remotely-sensed soil moisture data. The underlying objective is to devise a collection of methods that enables one to build and parameterize large-scale groundwater models in data-poor regions. The model used, PCR-GLOBWB-MOD, has a spatial resolution of 1 km x 1 km and operates on a daily basis. It consists of a single-layer MODFLOW groundwater model that is dynamically coupled to the PCR-GLOBWB land surface model. This fully-coupled model accommodates two-way interactions between surface water levels and groundwater head dynamics, as well as between upper soil moisture states and groundwater levels, including a capillary rise mechanism to sustain upper soil storage and thus to fulfill high evaporation demands (during dry conditions). As a test bed, we used the Rhine-Meuse basin, where more than 4000 groundwater head time series have been collected for validation purposes. The model was parameterized using globally available data-sets on surface elevation, drainage direction, land-cover, soil and lithology. Next, the model was calibrated using a brute force approach and massive parallel computing, i.e. by running the coupled groundwater-land surface model for more than 3000 different parameter sets. Here, we varied minimal soil moisture storage and saturated conductivities of the soil layers as well as aquifer transmissivities. Using different regularization strategies and calibration criteria we compared three calibration scenarios

  4. Co-circulation and genomic recombination of coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71 during a large outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyong Liu

    Full Text Available A total of 1844 patients with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, most of them were children of age 1-3-year-old, in Central China were hospitalized from 2011 to 2012. Among them, 422 were infected with coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16, 334 were infected with enterovirus 71 (EV71, 38 were co-infected with EV71 and CVA16, and 35 were infected with other enteroviruses. Molecular epidemiology analysis revealed that EV71 and CVA16 were detected year-round, but EV71 circulated mainly in July and CVA16 circulated predominantly in November, and incidence of HFMD was reduced in January and February and increased in March. Clinical data showed that hyperglycemia and neurologic complications were significantly higher in EV71-infected patients, while upper respiratory tract infection and C-reactive protein were significantly higher in CVA16-associated patients. 124 EV71 and 80 CVA16 strains were isolated, among them 56 and 68 EV71 strains were C4a and C4b, while 25 and 55 CVA16 strains were B1a and B1b, respectively. Similarity plots and bootscan analyses based on entire genomic sequences revealed that the three C4a sub-genotype EV71 strains were recombinant with C4b sub-genotype EV71 in 2B-2C region, and the three CVA16 strains were recombinant with EV71 in 2A-2B region. Thus, CVA16 and EV71 were the major causative agents in a large HFMD outbreak in Central China. HFMD incidence was high for children among household contact and was detected year-round, but outbreak was seasonal dependent. CVA16 B1b and EV71 C4b reemerged and caused a large epidemic in China after a quiet period of many years. Moreover, EV71 and CVA16 were co-circulated during the outbreak, which may have contributed to the genomic recombination between the pathogens. It should gain more attention as there may be an upward trend in co-circulation of the two pathogens globally and the new role recombination plays in the emergence of new enterovirus variants.

  5. DNA Sequence Patterns – A Successful Example of Grid Computing in Genome Research and Building Virtual Super-Computers for the Research Commons of e-Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Tobias; Abuseiris, Anis; Lesnussa, Michael; Kepper, Nick; Graaf, Rob; Grosveld, Frank

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe amount of information is growing exponentially with ever-new technologies emerging and is believed to be always at the limit. In contrast, huge resources are obviously available, which are underused in the IT sector, similar as e.g. in the renewable energy sector. Genome research is one of the boosting areas, which needs an extreme amount of IT resources to analyse the sequential organization of genomes, i.e. the relations between distant base pairs and regions within sequence...

  6. Whole Genome Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole genome selection (WGS) is an approach to using DNA markers that are distributed throughout the entire genome. Genes affecting most economically-important traits are distributed throughout the genome and there are relatively few that have large effects with many more genes with progressively sm...

  7. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large and small subunits from sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xi; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], the world's seventh most important food crop, is also a major industrial raw material for starch and ethanol production. In the plant starch biosynthesis pathway, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step and plays a pivotal role in regulating this process. In spite of the importance of sweet potato as a starch source, only a few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of starch biosynthesis in sweet potato and almost no intensive research has been carried out on the AGPase gene family in this species. In this study, cDNAs encoding two small subunits (SSs) and four large subunits (LSs) of AGPase isoforms were cloned from sweet potato and the genomic organizations of the corresponding AGPase genes were elucidated. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the two SSs were constitutively expressed, whereas the four LSs displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Co-expression of SSs with different LSs in Escherichia coli yielded eight heterotetramers showing different catalytic activities. Interactions between different SSs and LSs were confirmed by a yeast two-hybrid experiment. Our findings provide comprehensive information about AGPase gene sequences, structures, expression profiles, and subunit interactions in sweet potato. The results can serve as a foundation for elucidation of molecular mechanisms of starch synthesis in tuberous roots, and should contribute to future regulation of starch biosynthesis to improve sweet potato starch yield.

  8. A systematic search for linkage with nonsyndromic recessive deafness in two large Middle Eastern inbred kindreds excludes more than 30% of the genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.; Korostishevsky, M. [Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Frydman, M. [Haim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 35 loci may individually cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. The extreme genetic heterogeneity, limited clinical differentiation and phenotypic assortative mating in many western countries make many families unsuitable for genetic linkage studies. Recently the first of those loci was mapped (to 13q) in two consanguineous families from northern Tunisia. We are studying two large highly consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds (a total of 26 deaf in 98 sampled individuals). Examination in each family showed no evidence of clinical heterogeneity and indicated an uncomplicated profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have been able to exclude the 13q locus as the cause of deafness in each kindred and have also excluded such `candidate` loci as regions as those causing Usher`s syndrome type 1 (11q13)(11p), Usher`s syndrome type II (1q32-q41), Waardenburg syndrome type I (2q37), branchio-oto-renal syndrome (8q12-q13), Monge`s deafness (5q31), and Treacher Collins syndrome (5q31.3-q33.3). To date, no lod scores greater than 1 have been obtained in either kindred using 150 RFLT`s, VNTR`s and highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (CA repeats and tetranucleotides). By Morton`s criterion a minimum of 30% of the autosomal genome can be excluded for each kindred separately.

  9. Patterns of Metabolite Changes Identified from Large-Scale Gene Perturbations in Arabidopsis Using a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyong; Dreher, Kate; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Lee, Insuk; Fiehn, Oliver; Lange, Bernd Markus; Nikolau, Basil J.; Sumner, Lloyd; Welti, Ruth; Wurtele, Eve S.; Rhee, Seung Y.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics enables quantitative evaluation of metabolic changes caused by genetic or environmental perturbations. However, little is known about how perturbing a single gene changes the metabolic system as a whole and which network and functional properties are involved in this response. To answer this question, we investigated the metabolite profiles from 136 mutants with single gene perturbations of functionally diverse Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes. Fewer than 10 metabolites were changed significantly relative to the wild type in most of the mutants, indicating that the metabolic network was robust to perturbations of single metabolic genes. These changed metabolites were closer to each other in a genome-scale metabolic network than expected by chance, supporting the notion that the genetic perturbations changed the network more locally than globally. Surprisingly, the changed metabolites were close to the perturbed reactions in only 30% of the mutants of the well-characterized genes. To determine the factors that contributed to the distance between the observed metabolic changes and the perturbation site in the network, we examined nine network and functional properties of the perturbed genes. Only the isozyme number affected the distance between the perturbed reactions and changed metabolites. This study revealed patterns of metabolic changes from large-scale gene perturbations and relationships between characteristics of the perturbed genes and metabolic changes. PMID:25670818

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tianle; de Bakker, Paul I W; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Chia-Jen; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbaek, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2008-05-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to identify variants with modest effects, we carried out meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans comprising 10,128 individuals of European descent and approximately 2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed), followed by replication testing in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. We detected at least six previously unknown loci with robust evidence for association, including the JAZF1 (P = 5.0 x 10(-14)), CDC123-CAMK1D (P = 1.2 x 10(-10)), TSPAN8-LGR5 (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), THADA (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), ADAMTS9 (P = 1.2 x 10(-8)) and NOTCH2 (P = 4.1 x 10(-8)) gene regions. Our results illustrate the value of large discovery and follow-up samples for gaining further insights into the inherited basis of T2D.

  11. DNA Sequence Patterns – A Successful Example of Grid Computing in Genome Research and Building Virtual Super-Computers for the Research Commons of e-Societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); A. Abuseiris (Anis); M. Lesnussa (Michael); F.N. Kepper (Nick); R.M. de Graaf (Rob); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe amount of information is growing exponentially with ever-new technologies emerging and is believed to be always at the limit. In contrast, huge resources are obviously available, which are underused in the IT sector, similar as e.g. in the renewable energy sector. Genome research is

  12. Concept, design and implementation of a cardiovascular gene-centric 50 k SNP array for large-scale genomic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J Keating

    Full Text Available A wealth of genetic associations for cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes in humans has been accumulating over the last decade, in particular a large number of loci derived from recent genome wide association studies (GWAS. True complex disease-associated loci often exert modest effects, so their delineation currently requires integration of diverse phenotypic data from large studies to ensure robust meta-analyses. We have designed a gene-centric 50 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array to assess potentially relevant loci across a range of cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory syndromes. The array utilizes a "cosmopolitan" tagging approach to capture the genetic diversity across approximately 2,000 loci in populations represented in the HapMap and SeattleSNPs projects. The array content is informed by GWAS of vascular and inflammatory disease, expression quantitative trait loci implicated in atherosclerosis, pathway based approaches and comprehensive literature searching. The custom flexibility of the array platform facilitated interrogation of loci at differing stringencies, according to a gene prioritization strategy that allows saturation of high priority loci with a greater density of markers than the existing GWAS tools, particularly in African HapMap samples. We also demonstrate that the IBC array can be used to complement GWAS, increasing coverage in high priority CVD-related loci across all major HapMap populations. DNA from over 200,000 extensively phenotyped individuals will be genotyped with this array with a significant portion of the generated data being released into the academic domain facilitating in silico replication attempts, analyses of rare variants and cross-cohort meta-analyses in diverse populations. These datasets will also facilitate more robust secondary analyses, such as explorations with alternative genetic models, epistasis and gene-environment interactions.

  13. One Size Doesn't Fit All - RefEditor: Building Personalized Diploid Reference Genome to Improve Read Mapping and Genotype Calling in Next Generation Sequencing Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With rapid decline of the sequencing cost, researchers today rush to embrace whole genome sequencing (WGS, or whole exome sequencing (WES approach as the next powerful tool for relating genetic variants to human diseases and phenotypes. A fundamental step in analyzing WGS and WES data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. This is an important issue because incorrectly mapped reads affect the downstream variant discovery, genotype calling and association analysis. Although many read mapping algorithms have been developed, the majority of them uses the universal reference genome and do not take sequence variants into consideration. Given that genetic variants are ubiquitous, it is highly desirable if they can be factored into the read mapping procedure. In this work, we developed a novel strategy that utilizes genotypes obtained a priori to customize the universal haploid reference genome into a personalized diploid reference genome. The new strategy is implemented in a program named RefEditor. When applying RefEditor to real data, we achieved encouraging improvements in read mapping, variant discovery and genotype calling. Compared to standard approaches, RefEditor can significantly increase genotype calling consistency (from 43% to 61% at 4X coverage; from 82% to 92% at 20X coverage and reduce Mendelian inconsistency across various sequencing depths. Because many WGS and WES studies are conducted on cohorts that have been genotyped using array-based genotyping platforms previously or concurrently, we believe the proposed strategy will be of high value in practice, which can also be applied to the scenario where multiple NGS experiments are conducted on the same cohort. The RefEditor sources are available at https://github.com/superyuan/refeditor.

  14. Changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in occupants of a large office building over a period of moisture damage remediation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Sook Ja; White, Sandra K; Cox-Ganser, Jean M

    2018-01-01

    There is limited information on the natural history of building occupants' health in relation to attempts to remediate moisture damage. We examined changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in 1,175 office building occupants over seven years with multiple remediation attempts. During each of four surveys, we categorized participants using a severity score: 0 = asymptomatic; 1 = mild, symptomatic in the last 12 months, but not frequently in the last 4 weeks; 2 = severe, symptomatic at least once weekly in the last 4 weeks. Building-related symptoms were defined as improving away from the building. We used random intercept models adjusted for demographics, smoking, building tenure, and microbial exposures to estimate temporal changes in the odds of building-related symptoms or severity scores independent of the effect of microbial exposures. Trend analyses of combined mild/severe symptoms showed no changes in the odds of respiratory symptoms but significant improvement in non-respiratory symptoms over time. Separate analyses showed increases in the odds of severe respiratory symptoms (odds ratio/year = 1.15‒1.16, p-valuesrespiratory symptoms, we found no changes in the odds of severe symptoms but improvement in severity scores (-0.04‒-0.01/year, p-valuesrespiratory and severe non-respiratory symptoms associated with dampness/mold, remediation efforts might not be effective in improving occupants' health.

  15. A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Yun J; Winkler, Thomas W; de Las Fuentes, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome...

  16. A review of genomic data warehousing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplet, Thomas; Butler, Gregory

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate the integration and querying of genomics data, a number of generic data warehousing frameworks have been developed. They differ in their design and capabilities, as well as their intended audience. We provide a comprehensive and quantitative review of those genomic data warehousing frameworks in the context of large-scale systems biology. We reviewed in detail four genomic data warehouses (BioMart, BioXRT, InterMine and PathwayTools) freely available to the academic community. We quantified 20 aspects of the warehouses, covering the accuracy of their responses, their computational requirements and development efforts. Performance of the warehouses was evaluated under various hardware configurations to help laboratories optimize hardware expenses. Each aspect of the benchmark may be dynamically weighted by scientists using our online tool BenchDW (http://warehousebenchmark.fungalgenomics.ca/benchmark/) to build custom warehouse profiles and tailor our results to their specific needs.

  17. Genome Mapping in Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Sharp, Aaron R; Evans, Carrie R; Udall, Joshua A

    2016-09-01

    Genome mapping produces fingerprints of DNA sequences to construct a physical map of the whole genome. It provides contiguous, long-range information that complements and, in some cases, replaces sequencing data. Recent advances in genome-mapping technology will better allow researchers to detect large (>1kbp) structural variations between plant genomes. Some molecular and informatics complications need to be overcome for this novel technology to achieve its full utility. This technology will be useful for understanding phenotype responses due to DNA rearrangements and will yield insights into genome evolution, particularly in polyploids. In this review, we outline recent advances in genome-mapping technology, including the processes required for data collection and analysis, and applications in plant comparative genomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Small- and large-scale heterogeneity in genetic variation across the collard flycatcher genome: implications for estimating genetic diversity in nonmodel organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvarsson, Pär K; Wang, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Population genetic studies in nonmodel organisms are often hampered by a lack of reference genomes that are essential for whole-genome resequencing. In the light of this, genotyping methods have been developed to effectively eliminate the need for a reference genome, such as genotyping by sequencing or restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). However, what remains relatively poorly studied is how accurately these methods capture both average and variation in genetic diversity across an organism's genome. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Dutoit et al. (2016) use whole-genome resequencing data from the collard flycatcher to assess what factors drive heterogeneity in nucleotide diversity across the genome. Using these data, they then simulate how well different sequencing designs, including RAD sequencing, could capture most of the variation in genetic diversity. They conclude that for evolutionary and conservation-related studies focused on the estimating genomic diversity, researchers should emphasize the number of loci analysed over the number of individuals sequenced. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sustainable Building Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    Energy-savings in the existing building stock have becomes a main goal in national and international policies. Often focus is on building-renovations, whereas the potential of sustainable building operation to a large extent has been neglected. Nevertheless, international research as well...... as practical experiences from Danish housing estates indicates that there are large potentials for energy savings by focusing on the operation of the buildings. We suggest that in order to achieve sustainability in the existing housing, renovation and operations should be seen as integrated parts...... and that sustainable building operation can pave the way for sustainable building renovation. This paper discusses the use of sustainability building operation in Danish housing estates: Which tools, methods and technologies is being used, where are the barriers and where are the potentials? We define sustainable...

  20. Energy-oriented and structural modernisation of industrial large-panel buildings, type ``Hoyerswerda``; Energetische und bautechnische Sanierung von industriellen Wohnbauten der Wohnbauserie Typ ``Hoyerswerda``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeber, H.; Derlig, R. [Hochschule fuer Technik, Wirtschaft und Sozialwesen Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany); Sprenger, S. [Wohnungsgenossenschaft Hoyerswerda e.G. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The condition of the building prior to redevelopment is described with the following regards: layout of the building, construction material specifications and layers of structural components, condition of the thermally insulating shell of the building and condition of its technical equipment. Executed modernization measures are discussed. Heat energy consumption before and after modernization is compared and put in relation to external temperature. Finally, area-specific heat energy consumption and ventilation are discussed in detail. Information as to the cost of modernization rounds off the report. (MSK.) [Deutsch] Der Gebaeudezustand vor der Sanierung wird in folgenden Punkten beschrieben: Bausystem, Baustoffdaten und Schichtaufbau der Bauteile, Bauzustand der waermedaemmenden Gebaeudehuelle sowie Bauzustand der technischen Gebaeudeausruestung. Die Sanierungsmassnahmen werden erlaeutert. Der Heiwaermeverbrauch vor und nach der Sanierung wird verglichen und in Beziehung zur Aussentemperatur gesetzt. Ausserdem werden der flaechenspezifische Heizwaermeverbrauch und die Wohnungslueftung naeher erlaeutert. Angaben zu den Sanierungskosten schliessen den Bericht ab.

  1. Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method for building genetic networks for complex diseases and traits using whole genome genotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput genotype (HTG) data has been used primarily in genome-wide association (GWA) studies; however, GWA results explain only a limited part of the complete genetic variation of traits. In systems genetics, network approaches have been shown to be able to identify pathways and their underlying causal genes to unravel the biological and genetic background of complex diseases and traits, e.g., the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) method based on microarray gene expression data. The main objective of this study was to develop a scale-free weighted genetic interaction network method using whole genome HTG data in order to detect biologically relevant pathways and potential genetic biomarkers for complex diseases and traits. We developed the Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method that uses HTG data to detect genome-wide interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and its relationship with complex traits. Data dimensionality reduction was achieved by selecting SNPs based on its: 1) degree of genome-wide significance and 2) degree of genetic variation in a population. Network construction was based on pairwise Pearson's correlation between SNP genotypes or the epistatic interaction effect between SNP pairs. To identify modules the Topological Overlap Measure (TOM) was calculated, reflecting the degree of overlap in shared neighbours between SNP pairs. Modules, clusters of highly interconnected SNPs, were defined using a tree-cutting algorithm on the SNP dendrogram created from the dissimilarity TOM (1-TOM). Modules were selected for functional annotation based on their association with the trait of interest, defined by the Genome-wide Module Association Test (GMAT). We successfully tested the established WISH network method using simulated and real SNP interaction data and GWA study results for carcass weight in a pig resource population; this resulted in detecting modules and key functional and biological pathways

  2. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  3. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Dave B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephan, Eric G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widergren, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  4. A novel MMP12 locus is associated with large artery atherosclerotic stroke using a genome-wide age-at-onset informed approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Traylor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have begun to identify the common genetic component to ischaemic stroke (IS. However, IS has considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. Where clinical covariates explain a large fraction of disease risk, covariate informed designs can increase power to detect associations. As prevalence rates in IS are markedly affected by age, and younger onset cases may have higher genetic predisposition, we investigated whether an age-at-onset informed approach could detect novel associations with IS and its subtypes; cardioembolic (CE, large artery atherosclerosis (LAA and small vessel disease (SVD in 6,778 cases of European ancestry and 12,095 ancestry-matched controls. Regression analysis to identify SNP associations was performed on posterior liabilities after conditioning on age-at-onset and affection status. We sought further evidence of an association with LAA in 1,881 cases and 50,817 controls, and examined mRNA expression levels of the nearby genes in atherosclerotic carotid artery plaques. Secondly, we performed permutation analyses to evaluate the extent to which age-at-onset informed analysis improves significance for novel loci. We identified a novel association with an MMP12 locus in LAA (rs660599; p = 2.5×10⁻⁷, with independent replication in a second population (p = 0.0048, OR(95% CI = 1.18(1.05-1.32; meta-analysis p = 2.6×10⁻⁸. The nearby gene, MMP12, was significantly overexpressed in carotid plaques compared to atherosclerosis-free control arteries (p = 1.2×10⁻¹⁵; fold change = 335.6. Permutation analyses demonstrated improved significance for associations when accounting for age-at-onset in all four stroke phenotypes (p<0.001. Our results show that a covariate-informed design, by adjusting for age-at-onset of stroke, can detect variants not identified by conventional GWAS.

  5. Clinical implication of genome-wide profiling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other subtypes of B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Javeed; Joshi, Shantaram; Patel, Kavita N

    2007-01-01

    of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL) and World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. These classification methods were based on histological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic markers and widely accepted by pathologists and oncologists worldwide. During last several decades, great progress has been made...... technology. The genome-wide transcriptional measurement, also called gene expression profile (GEP) can accurately define the biological phenotype of the tumor. In this review, important discoveries made by genome-wide GEP in understanding the biology of lymphoma and additionally the diagnostic and prognostic...

  6. Large-scale phylogenetic classification of fungal chitin synthases and identification of a putative cell-wall metabolism gene cluster in Aspergillus genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ramon Pacheco-Arjona

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a protective and versatile structure distributed in all fungi. The component responsible for its rigidity is chitin, a product of chitin synthase (Chsp enzymes. There are seven classes of chitin synthase genes (CHS and the amount and type encoded in fungal genomes varies considerably from one species to another. Previous Chsp sequence analyses focused on their study as individual units, regardless of genomic context. The identification of blocks of conserved genes between genomes can provide important clues about the interactions and localization of chitin synthases. On the present study, we carried out an in silico search of all putative Chsp encoded in 54 full fungal genomes, encompassing 21 orders from five phyla. Phylogenetic studies of these Chsp were able to confidently classify 347 out of the 369 Chsp identified (94%. Patterns in the distribution of Chsp related to taxonomy were identified, the most prominent being related to the type of fungal growth. More importantly, a synteny analysis for genomic blocks centered on class IV Chsp (the most abundant and widely distributed Chsp class identified a putative cell wall metabolism gene cluster in members of the genus Aspergillus, the first such association reported for any fungal genome.

  7. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Mari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. Results To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706 was estimated to be 0.061%. Conclusion The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the

  8. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ayako; Kawamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suda, Kunihiro; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tsugane, Taneaki; Watanabe, Manabu; Ooga, Kazuhide; Torii, Maiko; Narita, Takanori; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Egusa, Mayumi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Ichinose, Yuki; Kikuchi, Mari; Fukushima, Sumire; Okabe, Akiko; Arie, Tsutomu; Sato, Yuko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Satoh, Shinobu; Omura, Toshikazu; Ezura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2010-03-30

    The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs) was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706) was estimated to be 0.061%. The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the tomato whole-genome sequence and aid in tomato functional

  9. Complete molecular genome analyses of equine rotavirus A strains from different continents reveal several novel genotypes and a largely conserved genotype constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Miño, Samuel; Papp, Hajnalka; Potgieter, Christiaan; Novo, Luis; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Garaicoechea, Lorena; Badaracco, Alejandra; Lengyel, György; Kisfali, Péter; Cullinane, Ann; Collins, P J; Ciarlet, Max; O'Shea, Helen; Parreño, Viviana; Bányai, Krisztián; Barrandeguy, María; Van Ranst, Marc

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the complete genome sequences of seven equine group A rotavirus (RVA) strains (RVA/Horse-tc/GBR/L338/1991/G13P[18], RVA/Horse-wt/IRL/03V04954/2003/G3P[12] and RVA/Horse-wt/IRL/04V2024/2004/G14P[12] from Europe; RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E30/1993/G3P[12], RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E403/2006/G14P[12] and RVA/Horse-wt/ARG/E4040/2008/G14P[12] from Argentina; and RVA/Horse-wt/ZAF/EqRV-SA1/2006/G14P[12] from South Africa) were determined. Multiple novel genotypes were identified and genotype numbers were assigned by the Rotavirus Classification Working Group: R9 (VP1), C9 (VP2), N9 (NSP2), T12 (NSP3), E14 (NSP4), and H7 and H11 (NSP5). The genotype constellation of L338 was unique: G13-P[18]-I6-R9-C9-M6-A6-N9-T12-E14-H11. The six remaining equine RVA strains showed a largely conserved genotype constellation: G3/G14-P[12]-I2/I6-R2-C2-M3-A10-N2-T3-E2/E12-H7, which is highly divergent from other known non-equine RVA genotype constellations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the sequences of these equine RVA strains are related distantly to non-equine RVA strains, and that at least three lineages exist within equine RVA strains. A small number of reassortment events were observed. Interestingly, the three RVA strains from Argentina possessed the E12 genotype, whereas the three RVA strains from Ireland and South Africa possessed the E2 genotype. The unusual E12 genotype has until now only been described in Argentina among RVA strains collected from guanaco, cattle and horses, suggesting geographical isolation of this NSP4 genotype. This conserved genetic configuration of equine RVA strains could be useful for future vaccine development or improvement of currently used equine RVA vaccines.

  10. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 among patients referred for genetic analysis in Galicia (NW Spain): delimitation and mechanism of three novel BRCA1 rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachal, Laura; Blanco, Ana; Santamariña, Marta; Carracedo, Angel; Vega, Ana

    2014-01-01

    In the Iberian Peninsula, which includes mainly Spain and Portugal, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 have respectively been found in up to 2.33% and 8.4% of families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) that lack point mutations and small indels. In Galicia (Northwest Spain), the spectrum and frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations differs from the rest of the Iberian populations. However, to date there are no Galician frequency reports of BRCA1/BRCA2 LGRs. Here we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to screen 651 Galician index cases (out of the 830 individuals referred for genetic analysis) without point mutations or small indels. We identified three different BRCA1 LGRs in four families. Two of them have been previously classified as pathogenic LGRs: the complete deletion of BRCA1 (identified in two unrelated families) and the deletion of exons 1 to 13. We also identified the duplication of exons 1 and 2 that is a LGR with unknown pathogenicity. Determination of the breakpoints of the BRCA1 LGRs using CNV/SNP arrays and sequencing identified them as NG_005905.2:g.70536_180359del, NG_005905.2:g.90012_97270dup, and NC_000017.10:g.41230935_41399840delinsAluSx1, respectively; previous observations of BRCA1 exon1-24del, exon1-2dup, and exon1-13del LGRs have not characterized them in such detail. All the BRCA1 LGRs arose from unequal homologous recombination events involving Alu elements. We also detected, by sequencing, one BRCA2 LGR, the Portuguese founder mutation c.156_157insAluYa5. The low frequency of BRCA1 LGRs within BRCA1 mutation carriers in Galicia (2.34%, 95% CI: 0.61-7.22) seems to differ from the Spanish population (9.93%, 95% CI: 6.76-14.27, P-value = 0.013) and from the rest of the Iberian population (9.76%, 95% CI: 6.69-13.94, P-value = 0.014).

  11. Development, implementation and evaluation of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a large Australian health care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misso, Marie L; Ilic, Dragan; Haines, Terry P; Hutchinson, Alison M; East, Christine E; Teede, Helena J

    2016-01-14

    Health professionals need to be integrated more effectively in clinical research to ensure that research addresses clinical needs and provides practical solutions at the coal face of care. In light of limited evidence on how best to achieve this, evaluation of strategies to introduce, adapt and sustain evidence-based practices across different populations and settings is required. This project aims to address this gap through the co-design, development, implementation, evaluation, refinement and ultimately scale-up of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a clinical setting with little to no co-ordinated approach to clinical research engagement and education. The protocol is based on principles of research capacity building and on a six-step framework, which have previously led to successful implementation and long-term sustainability. A mixed methods study design will be used. Methods will include: (1) a review of the literature about strategies that engage health professionals in research through capacity building and/or education in research methods; (2) a review of existing local research education and support elements; (3) a needs assessment in the local clinical setting, including an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews; (4) co-design and development of an educational and support program; (5) implementation of the program in the clinical environment; and (6) pre- and post-implementation evaluation and ultimately program scale-up. The evaluation focuses on research activity and knowledge, attitudes and preferences about clinical research, evidence-based practice and leadership and post implementation, about their satisfaction with the program. The investigators will evaluate the feasibility and effect of the program according to capacity building measures and will revise where appropriate prior to scale-up. It is anticipated that this clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building

  12. Genomic Organization of Fungal Plant Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent large scale genomic sequencing of fungal phytopathogens has revolutionized the study of plant pathogenesis. Initially, having whole genome sequence (WGS) data for individual fungal genomes has accelerated classical forward and reverse genetic approaches for identifying pathogenicity genes...

  13. A Review on Genomics APIs

    OpenAIRE

    Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Huang, Yungui; Moosavinasab, Soheil; Buckley, Ronald; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Lin, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API) for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, plat...

  14. Assembly of Metal−Organic Frameworks from Large Organic and Inorganic Secondary Building Units: New Examples and Simplifying Principles for Complex Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaheon; Chen, Banglin; Reineke, Theresa M.; Li, Hailian; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Moler, David B.; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2001-01-01

    The secondary building unit (SBU) has been identified as a useful tool in the analysis of complex metal−organic frameworks (MOFs). We illustrate its applicability to rationalizing MOF crystal structures by analysis of nine new MOFs which have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Tetrahedral SBUs in Zn(ADC)_2·(HTEA)_2 (MOF-31), Cd(ATC)·[Cd(H2O)_6](H2O)_5 (MOF-32), and Zn_2(ATB)(H_2O)·(H_2O)_3(DMF)_3 (MOF-33) are linked into diamond networks, while those of Ni_2(ATC)(H_2O)_4·...

  15. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the “invertebrates,” but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a “Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance” (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  16. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): developing community resources to study diverse invertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Mónica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W; Ryan, Joseph F; Schulze, Anja; Wörheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E; Diaz, M Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-François; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, François; Moroz, Leonid L; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rhodes, Adelaide; Santos, Scott R; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the "invertebrates," but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a "Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance" (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture.

  17. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather

    2013-12-12

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the invertebrates, but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site () has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture.

  18. Assembly and Multiplex Genome Integration of Metabolic Pathways in Yeast Using CasEMBLR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Jensen, Emil D.; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2018-01-01

    Genome integration is a vital step for implementing large biochemical pathways to build a stable microbial cell factory. Although traditional strain construction strategies are well established for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome......EMBLR capitalizes on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology to generate double-strand breaks in genomic loci, thus prompting native homologous recombination (HR) machinery to integrate exogenously derived homology templates. As proof-of-principle for microbial cell factory development, CasEMBLR was used for one-step assembly...

  19. Large genomic differences between Moraxella bovoculi isolates acquired from the eyes of cattle with conjunctivitis versus the deep nasopharynx of asymptomatic cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraxella bovoculi is a recently described bacterium that is associated with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) or "pinkeye" in cattle. In this study, closed circularized genomes were generated for seven M. bovoculi isolates: three that originated from the eyes of clinical IBK bovine case...

  20. SVA retrotransposon insertion-associated deletion represents a novel mutational mechanism underlying large genomic copy number changes with non-recurrent breakpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vogt (Julia); K. Bengesser (Kathrin); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. Wimmer (Katharina); V.-F. Mautner (Victor-Felix); R. van Minkelen (Rick); E. Legius (Eric); H. Brems (Hilde); M. Upadhyaya (Meena); J. Högel (Josef); C. Lazaro (Conxi); T. Rosenbaum (Thorsten); S. Bammert (Simone); L. Messiaen (Ludwine); D.N. Cooper (David); H. Kehrer-Sawatzki (Hildegard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genomic disorders are caused by copy number changes that may exhibit recurrent breakpoints processed by nonallelic homologous recombination. However, region-specific disease-associated copy number changes have also been observed which exhibit non-recurrent breakpoints. The

  1. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape : A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Thomas W.; Justice, Anne E.; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F.; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Lu, Yingchang; Magi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H.; Rueeger, Sina; Teumer, Alexander; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferreira, Teresa; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mahajan, Anubha; Neinast, Michael D.; Prokopenko, Inga; Simino, Jeannette; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Jansen, Rick; Westra, Harm-Jan; White, Charles C.; Absher, Devin; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ahmad, Shafqat; Albrecht, Eva; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cadby, Gemma; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Delgado, Graciela; Demirkan, Ayse; Dueker, Nicole; Eklund, Niina; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Joel; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fischer, Krista; Frau, Francesca; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Geller, Frank; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Grammer, Tanja B.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haitjema, Saskia; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Johansson, Asa; Kaakinen, Marika; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lehne, Benjamin; Liu, Youfang; Lo, Ken Sin; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luan, Jian'an; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mangino, Massimo; McKnight, Barbara; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L.; Montasser, May E.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Rizzi, Federica; Rose, Lynda M.; Ryan, Kathy A.; Salo, Perttu; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert Vernon; Southam, Lorraine; Stancakova, Alena; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Trompet, Stella; Pervjakova, Natalia; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van der Laan, Sander W.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Setten, Jessica|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345493990; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wang, Sophie R.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wild, Sarah H.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Andrew; Yang, Jian; Yengo, Loic; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andersson, Ehm A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Banasik, Karina; Barcella, Matteo; Barlassina, Cristina; Bellis, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Blangero, John; Blueher, Matthias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buchman, Aron S.; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S.; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cole, John; Collins, Francis S.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Dimitriou, Maria; Duan, Jubao; Enroth, Stefan; Eury, Elodie; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Go, Alan S.; Gottesman, Omri; Graessler, Juergen; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gu, Yu-Mei; Broer, Linda; Ham, Annelies C.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise L.; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Hysi, Pirro G.; Illig, Thomas; De Jager, Philip L.; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Juonala, Markus; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karaleftheri, Maria; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kinnunen, Leena; Kittner, Steven J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Krarup, Nikolaj T.; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Krueger, Janine; Kuh, Diana; Kumari, Meena; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Langenberg, Claudia; Lannfelt, Lars; Lanzani, Chiara; Lotay, Vaneet; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Lindstrom, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yan-Ping; Lobbens, Stephane; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mannisto, Satu; Magnusson, Patrik K.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew P.; Narisu, Narisu; Nelis, Mari; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Perusse, Louis; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G.; Pouta, Anneli; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Richards, Marcus; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivolta, Carlo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A.; Scott, William R.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sengupta, Sebanti; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Silveira, Angela; Slagboom, P. Eline; Smit, Jan H.; Sparso, Thomas H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J.; Voelker, Uwe; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Walker, Ryan W.; Wennauer, Roman; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; de Bakker, Paul I. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342957082; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John; Bennett, David A.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Boeger, Carsten A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; de Faire, Ulf; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Franke, Lude; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Gronberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heliovaara, Markku; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Hveem, Kristian; James, Alan L.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kaehoenen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kivimaki, Mika; Knekt, Paul B.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lind, Lars; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Mantyselka, Pekka; Melbye, Mads; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Moll, Frans L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070246882; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njolstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pankow, James S.; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Quertermous, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; den Ruijter, Hester M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304123846; Saltevo, Juha; Sattar, Naveed; Schunkert, Heribert; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stefania, Bandinelli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Voelzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clegg, Deborah J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Rao, D. C.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Ines; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Hunter, David J.; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert C.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Heid, Iris M.; North, Kari E.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially

  2. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published ...

  3. Rice Genome Research: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Han

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice ( L. is the leading genomics system among the crop plants. The sequence of the rice genome, the first cereal plant genome, was published in 2005. This review summarizes progress made in rice genome annotations, comparative genomics, and functional genomics researches. It also maps out the status of rice genomics globally and provides a vision of future research directions and resource building.

  4. Analysis of the impact of large scale seismic retrofitting strategies through the application of a vulnerability-based approach on traditional masonry buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago Miguel; Maio, Rui; Vicente, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    The buildings' capacity to maintain minimum structural safety levels during natural disasters, such as earthquakes, is recognisably one of the aspects that most influence urban resilience. Moreover, the public investment in risk mitigation strategies is fundamental, not only to promote social and urban and resilience, but also to limit consequent material, human and environmental losses. Despite the growing awareness of this issue, there is still a vast number of traditional masonry buildings spread throughout many European old city centres that lacks of adequate seismic resistance, requiring therefore urgent retrofitting interventions in order to both reduce their seismic vulnerability and to cope with the increased seismic requirements of recent code standards. Thus, this paper aims at contributing to mitigate the social and economic impacts of earthquake damage scenarios through the development of vulnerability-based comparative analysis of some of the most popular retrofitting techniques applied after the 1998 Azores earthquake. The influence of each technique individually and globally studied resorting to a seismic vulnerability index methodology integrated into a GIS tool and damage and loss scenarios are constructed and critically discussed. Finally, the economic balance resulting from the implementation of that techniques are also examined.

  5. Genomic research in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poke, Fiona S; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Reid, James B

    2005-09-01

    Eucalyptus L'Hérit. is a genus comprised of more than 700 species that is of vital importance ecologically to Australia and to the forestry industry world-wide, being grown in plantations for the production of solid wood products as well as pulp for paper. With the sequencing of the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the recent completion of the first tree genome sequence, Populus trichocarpa, attention has turned to the current status of genomic research in Eucalyptus. For several eucalypt species, large segregating families have been established, high-resolution genetic maps constructed and large EST databases generated. Collaborative efforts have been initiated for the integration of diverse genomic projects and will provide the framework for future research including exploiting the sequence of the entire eucalypt genome which is currently being sequenced. This review summarises the current position of genomic research in Eucalyptus and discusses the direction of future research.

  6. Company profile: Complete Genomics Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Clifford

    2011-02-01

    Complete Genomics Inc. is a life sciences company that focuses on complete human genome sequencing. It is taking a completely different approach to DNA sequencing than other companies in the industry. Rather than building a general-purpose platform for sequencing all organisms and all applications, it has focused on a single application - complete human genome sequencing. The company's Complete Genomics Analysis Platform (CGA™ Platform) comprises an integrated package of biochemistry, instrumentation and software that sequences human genomes at the highest quality, lowest cost and largest scale available. Complete Genomics offers a turnkey service that enables customers to outsource their human genome sequencing to the company's genome sequencing center in Mountain View, CA, USA. Customers send in their DNA samples, the company does all the library preparation, DNA sequencing, assembly and variant analysis, and customers receive research-ready data that they can use for biological discovery.

  7. Validation of rice genome sequence by optical mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pape Louise

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice feeds much of the world, and possesses the simplest genome analyzed to date within the grass family, making it an economically relevant model system for other cereal crops. Although the rice genome is sequenced, validation and gap closing efforts require purely independent means for accurate finishing of sequence build data. Results To facilitate ongoing sequencing finishing and validation efforts, we have constructed a whole-genome SwaI optical restriction map of the rice genome. The physical map consists of 14 contigs, covering 12 chromosomes, with a total genome size of 382.17 Mb; this value is about 11% smaller than original estimates. 9 of the 14 optical map contigs are without gaps, covering chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 10, and 12 in their entirety – including centromeres and telomeres. Alignments between optical and in silico restriction maps constructed from IRGSP (International Rice Genome Sequencing Project and TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research genome sequence sources are comprehensive and informative, evidenced by map coverage across virtually all published gaps, discovery of new ones, and characterization of sequence misassemblies; all totalling ~14 Mb. Furthermore, since optical maps are ordered restriction maps, identified discordances are pinpointed on a reliable physical scaffold providing an independent resource for closure of gaps and rectification of misassemblies. Conclusion Analysis of sequence and optical mapping data effectively validates genome sequence assemblies constructed from large, repeat-rich genomes. Given this conclusion we envision new applications of such single molecule analysis that will merge advantages offered by high-resolution optical maps with inexpensive, but short sequence reads generated by emerging sequencing platforms. Lastly, map construction techniques presented here points the way to new types of comparative genome analysis that would focus on discernment of

  8. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

    2011-12-01

    This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully

  9. How big is too big or how many partners are needed to build a large project which still can be managed successfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, the number of large research projects has increased and therewith the requirement for multidisciplinary, multisectoral collaboration. Such complex and large-scale projects pose new competencies to form, manage, and use large, diverse teams as a competitive advantage. For complex projects the effort is magnified because multiple large international research consortia involving academic and non-academic partners, including big industries, NGOs, private and public bodies, all with cultural differences, individually discrepant expectations on teamwork and differences in the collaboration between national and multi-national administrations and research organisations, challenge the organisation and management of such multi-partner research consortia. How many partners are needed to establish and conduct collaboration with a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach? How much personnel effort and what kinds of management techniques are required for such projects. This presentation identifies advantages and challenges of large research projects based on the experiences made in the context of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions of the European HORIZON 2020 program. Possible strategies are discussed to circumvent and avoid conflicts already at the beginning of the project.

  10. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry

    OpenAIRE

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P.; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V.; Tatiana V Andreeva; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Sergey N. Illarioshkin; Rogaev, Evgeny I.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previous...

  11. Genome-wide detection of loss of heterozygosity and copy number variation in a human lung large cell carcinoma cell line by affymetrix single-nucleotide polymorphism array 500K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin HU

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Loss of heterozygosity (LOH and Copy number copy number variation (CNV of DNA sequences is a common feature of cancer genomes, which is thought to be linked to tumorigenesis and progression. High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping array are able to provided a genotype and copy number information with genome-wide coverage, which is suitable for the analysis of complex genetic alterations present in cancer. Thus a human lung large cell carcinoma cell line NL9980 was assayed for the global profile of LOH and CNV. Methods Genomic DNA from the cell line was screened for LOH and CNV using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Mapping array 500K Set. The hybridization intensity data of 500 000 SNP loci was analyzed using Affymetrix proprietary software for genotyping and copy number of each locus, and a genome-wide map of LOH and CNV of the cell line was constructed. Results The SNP call rate of array Nsp I (-262K was 95.14%, and the rate of Sty I (-238K was 97.15%. The both call rates of the components of 500K array set were in excess of 93%, the cardinal quality control standard. LOH profiles of the sample were across all chromosomes, and most of CN gains and losses regions were found on chromosomes such as 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, and 18. Conclusion The results have shown that there were complex genetic alterations present in NL9980. And it is possible to achieve high performance outcomes using Affymetrix SNP array 500K to interrogate LOH and CNV in lung cancer genome. This advance of high-resolution with allelic information should substantially improve the ability to further understanding of the genetic basis of lung cancers.

  12. Genome-wide identification of QTL for age at puberty in gilts using a large intercross F2 population between White Duroc × Erhualian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Junwu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Puberty is a fundamental development process experienced by all reproductively competent adults, yet the specific factors regulating age at puberty remain elusive in pigs. In this study, we performed a genome scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting age at puberty in gilts using a White Duroc × Erhualian intercross. A total of 183 microsatellites covering 19 porcine chromosomes were genotyped in 454 F2 gilts and their parents and grandparents in the White Duroc × Erhualian intercross. A linear regression method was used to map QTL for age at puberty via QTLexpress. One 1% genome-wise significant QTL and one 0.1% genome-wise significant QTL were detected at 114 cM (centimorgan on SSC1 and at 54 cM on SSC7, respectively. Moreover, two suggestive QTL were found on SSC8 and SSC17, respectively. This study confirmed the QTL for age at puberty previously identified on SSC1, 7 and 8, and reports for the first time a QTL for age at puberty in gilts on SSC17. Interestingly, the Chinese Erhualian alleles were not systematically favourable for younger age at puberty.

  13. Genome-tools: a flexible package for genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William; Chen, Swaine L

    2002-12-01

    Genome-tools is a Perl module, a set of programs, and a user interface that facilitates access to genome sequence information. The package is flexible, extensible, and designed to be accessible and useful to both nonprogrammers and programmers. Any relatively well-annotated genome available with standard GenBank genome files may be used with genome-tools. A simple Web-based front end permits searching any available genome with an intuitive interface. Flexible design choices also make it simple to handle revised versions of genome annotation files as they change. In addition, programmers can develop cross-genomic tools and analyses with minimal additional overhead by combining genome-tools modules with newly written modules. Genome-tools runs on any computer platform for which Perl is available, including Unix, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS. By simplifying the access to large amounts of genomic data, genome-tools may be especially useful for molecular biologists looking at newly sequenced genomes, for which few informatics tools are available. The genome-tools Web interface is accessible at http://genome-tools.sourceforge.net, and the source code is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/genome-tools.

  14. Development of Tandem Amorphous/Microcrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Large-Area See-Through Color Solar Panels with Reflective Layer and 4-Step Laser Scribing for Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, tandem amorphous/microcrystalline silicon thin-film large-area see-through color solar modules were successfully designed and developed for building-integrated photovoltaic applications. Novel and key technologies of reflective layers and 4-step laser scribing were researched, developed, and introduced into the production line to produce solar panels with various colors, such as purple, dark blue, light blue, silver, golden, orange, red wine, and coffee. The highest module power is 105 W and the highest visible light transmittance is near 20%.

  15. Ecological and evolutionary genomics of marine photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Susana M; Simon, Nathalie; Ahmed, Sophia; Cock, J Mark; Partensky, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Environmental (ecological) genomics aims to understand the genetic basis of relationships between organisms and their abiotic and biotic environments. It is a rapidly progressing field of research largely due to recent advances in the speed and volume of genomic data being produced by next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Building on information generated by NGS-based approaches, functional genomic methodologies are being applied to identify and characterize genes and gene systems of both environmental and evolutionary relevance. Marine photosynthetic organisms (MPOs) were poorly represented amongst the early genomic models, but this situation is changing rapidly. Here we provide an overview of the recent advances in the application of ecological genomic approaches to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic MPOs. We describe how these approaches are being used to explore the biology and ecology of marine cyanobacteria and algae, particularly with regard to their functions in a broad range of marine ecosystems. Specifically, we review the ecological and evolutionary insights gained from whole genome and transcriptome sequencing projects applied to MPOs and illustrate how their genomes are yielding information on the specific features of these organisms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Status seminar 1997: Energetic improvement of buildings, with particular regard to large-panel structures in East Germany. Proceedings; Statusseminar 1997: Energetische Verbesserung der Bausubstanz mit Schwerpunkt energiegerechte Sanierung von in industrieller Bauweise errichteten Wohnbauten der neuen Bundeslaender. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This R and D report deals with the redevelopment of large-panel buildings, especially apartment houses and school buildings, with a view to energy conservation. Measures carried out range from thermal insulation over the fitting of new heating systems and improved ventilation systems to the automatic control of space air temperature. Further topics concern costs and the economy of redevelopment measures. Moreover, information on thermal energy consumption and energy conservation potentials is given. Modernization of school buildings includes lighting systems. 23 individual contributions are listed in the energy database. (MSK) [Deutsch] Es werden Forschungs-und Entwicklungsergebnisse von Sanierungsprojekten an Plattenbauten, v.a. Wohnhaeuser und Schulgebaeude, zur Energieeinsparung vorgestellt. Die durchgefuehrten Massnahmen reichen von Waermedaemmung ueber Einbau neuer Heizungssysteme, verbesserte Lueftungsanlagen bis zur Automatisierung der Raumtemperaturregelung. Weitere Themen befassen sich mit den Kosten und der Wirtschaftlichkeit der Sanierungsmassnahmen. Ausserdem werden Angaben zum Heizenergieverbrauch und den Energieeinsparungspotentialen gemacht. Bei der Sanierung von Schulgebaeude werden lichttechnische Anlagen miteinbezogen. Fuer die Datenbank Energy wurden 23 Artikel einzeln aufgenommen.

  17. The Brachypodium genome sequence: a resource for oat genomics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oat (Avena sativa) is an important cereal crop used as both an animal feed and for human consumption. Genetic and genomic research on oat is hindered because it is hexaploid and possesses a large (13 Gb) genome. Diploid Avena relatives have been employed for genetic and genomic studies, but only mod...

  18. Evaluating the role of genome downsizing and size thresholds from genome size distributions in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana; Ponciano, José M; Burleigh, J Gordon

    2016-07-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) can rapidly increase genome size in angiosperms. Yet their mean genome size is not correlated with ploidy. We compared three hypotheses to explain the constancy of genome size means across ploidies. The genome downsizing hypothesis suggests that genome size will decrease by a given percentage after a WGD. The genome size threshold hypothesis assumes that taxa with large genomes or large monoploid numbers will fail to undergo or survive WGDs. Finally, the genome downsizing and threshold hypothesis suggests that both genome downsizing and thresholds affect the relationship between genome size means and ploidy. We performed nonparametric bootstrap simulations to compare observed angiosperm genome size means among species or genera against simulated genome sizes under the three different hypotheses. We evaluated the hypotheses using a decision theory approach and estimated the expected percentage of genome downsizing. The threshold hypothesis improves the approximations between mean genome size and simulated genome size. At the species level, the genome downsizing with thresholds hypothesis best explains the genome size means with a 15% genome downsizing percentage. In the genus level simulations, the monoploid number threshold hypothesis best explains the data. Thresholds of genome size and monoploid number added to genome downsizing at species level simulations explain the observed means of angiosperm genome sizes, and monoploid number is important for determining the genome size mean at the genus level. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counseling Genomic Testing Pathogen Genomics Epidemiology Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: ... Page The Need for Reliable Information on Genetic Testing In 2008, the former Secretary’s Advisory Committee on ...

  20. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape: A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Thomas W.; Anne E Justice; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Lu, Yingchang; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H.; Rüeger, Sina

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age-and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of Eur...

  1. Large-scale whole genome sequencing identifies country-wide spread of an emerging G9P[8] rotavirus strain in Hungary, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóró, Renáta; Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Marton, Szilvia; László, Brigitta; Deák, Judit; Jakab, Ferenc; Juhász, Ágnes; Kisfali, Péter; Martella, Vito; Melegh, Béla; Molnár, Péter; Sántha, Ildikó; Schneider, Ferenc; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    With the availability of rotavirus vaccines routine strain surveillance has been launched or continued in many countries worldwide. In this study relevant information is provided from Hungary in order to extend knowledge about circulating rotavirus strains. Direct sequencing of the RT-PCR products obtained by VP7 and VP4 genes specific primer sets was utilized as routine laboratory method. In addition we explored the advantage of random primed RT-PCR and semiconductor sequencing of the whole genome of selected strains. During the study year, 2012, we identified an increase in the prevalence of G9P[8] strains across the country. This genotype combination predominated in seven out of nine study sites (detection rates, 45-83%). In addition to G9P[8]s, epidemiologically major strains included genotypes G1P[8] (34.2%), G2P[4] (13.5%), and G4P[8] (7.4%), whereas unusual and rare strains were G3P[8] (1%), G2P[8] (0.5%), G1P[4] (0.2%), G3P[4] (0.2%), and G3P[9] (0.2%). Whole genome analysis of 125 Hungarian human rotaviruses identified nine major genotype constellations and uncovered both intra- and intergenogroup reassortment events in circulating strains. Intergenogroup reassortment resulted in several unusual genotype constellations, including mono-reassortant G1P[8] and G9P[8] strains whose genotype 1 (Wa-like) backbone gene constellations contained DS1-like NSP2 and VP3 genes, respectively, as well as, a putative bovine-feline G3P[9] reassortant strain. The conserved genomic constellations of epidemiologically major genotypes suggested the clonal spread of the re-emerging G9P[8] genotype and several co-circulating strains (e.g., G1P[8] and G2P[4]) in many study sites during 2012. Of interest, medically important G2P[4] strains carried bovine-like VP1 and VP6 genes in their genotype constellation. No evidence for vaccine associated selection, or, interaction between wild-type and vaccine strains was obtained. In conclusion, this study reports the reemergence of G9P[8

  2. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand...... the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur, amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two...... misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan-and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity...

  3. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  4. Reference Based Genome Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Chern, Bobbie; Manolakos, Alexandros; No, Albert; Venkat, Kartik; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing technology has advanced to a point where storage is becoming the central bottleneck in the acquisition and mining of more data. Large amounts of data are vital for genomics research, and generic compression tools, while viable, cannot offer the same savings as approaches tuned to inherent biological properties. We propose an algorithm to compress a target genome given a known reference genome. The proposed algorithm first generates a mapping from the reference to the target genome, and then compresses this mapping with an entropy coder. As an illustration of the performance: applying our algorithm to James Watson's genome with hg18 as a reference, we are able to reduce the 2991 megabyte (MB) genome down to 6.99 MB, while Gzip compresses it to 834.8 MB.

  5. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  6. Development of a unified sizing method for gas radiation heating facilities used in large-volume buildings; Developpement d'une methode de dimensionnement unifiee d'installations de chauffage radiant gaz pour les batiments de grand volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, M.; Bego, L.; Douls, Y.; Le Dean, P.; Paradowski, V. [Gaz de France, GDF, Dir. de la Recherche, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    Builders now have perfect command of the natural gas heating technique used for large-volume buildings. However, the sizing of heating facilities still leaves grounds for discussion, whatever the energies actually used. Accordingly, between 1997 and 1999, the ATG (technical association of the Gas industry in France), seven French manufacturers of 'large volume' heating equipment, the Chaleur Et Rayonnement (CER) association and Gaz de France decided to collaborate and develop a 'unified sizing method' for heating facilities using radiating emitters. During the first year of the study, the above partners worked on the said method (theoretical thermal study of the radiative phenomena, and then adaptation to the methods currently used by the various manufacturers). In 1998, with the support of the ADEME (the French environment and energy control agency), the partners tested the method on five industrial buildings (studying the thermal behavior and making air renewal measurements with search gases). This work made it possible to either confirm or adapt the theoretical evaluations which had been made originally. In 1999, a software program was produced to make the developed method more user friendly. The program can be used to determine the power to be installed, but also to assess the quality of the chosen configuration of the emitters (unit power, inclination, orientation) for optimum customer comfort. (authors)

  7. Building envelope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the way building envelopes can contribute to developing green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also proposes a number of approaches that can be used to help design green building envelopes...

  8. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  9. The Challenge of Building Large Area, High Precision Small-Strip Thin Gap Trigger Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maleev, Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon end-cap system must be upgraded in 2018 and 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Large area small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) up to 2 $m^2$ in size and totaling an active area of 1200 $m^2$ will be employed for fast and precise triggering. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 $\\mu m$ while the Level-1 trigger track segments need to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of 1 mrad. The upgraded detector will consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and sTGC’s detectors together forming the ATLAS New Small Wheels. The position of each strip must be known with an accuracy of 40 $\\mu m$ along the precision coordinate and 80 $\\mu m$ along the beam. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and then must be controlled and monitored all along the process of cons...

  10. The challenge of building large area,