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Sample records for building complex respiratory

  1. Brownie, a gene involved in building complex respiratory devices in insect eggshells.

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    Paula Irles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insect eggshells must combine protection for the yolk and embryo with provisions for respiration and for the entry of sperm, which are ensured by aeropyles and micropyles, respectively. Insects which oviposit the eggs in an egg-case have a double problem of respiration as gas exchange then involves two barriers. An example of this situation is found in the cockroach Blattella germanica, where the aeropyle and the micropyle are combined in a complex structure called the sponge-like body. The sponge-like body has been well described morphologically, but nothing is known about how it is built up. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a library designed to find genes expressed during late chorion formation in B. germanica, we isolated the novel sequence Bg30009 (now called Brownie, which was outstanding due to its high copy number. In the present work, we show that Brownie is expressed in the follicle cells localized in the anterior pole of the oocyte in late choriogenesis. RNA interference (RNAi of Brownie impaired correct formation of the sponge-like body and, as a result, the egg-case was also ill-formed and the eggs were not viable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results indicate that the novel gene Brownie plays a pivotal role in building up the sponge-like body. Brownie is the first reported gene involved in the construction of complex eggshell respiratory structures.

  2. The architecture of respiratory complex I.

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    Efremov, Rouslan G; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2010-05-27

    Complex I is the first enzyme of the respiratory chain and has a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation by an unknown mechanism. Dysfunction of complex I has been implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. We have determined the structure of its hydrophilic domain previously. Here, we report the alpha-helical structure of the membrane domain of complex I from Escherichia coli at 3.9 A resolution. The antiporter-like subunits NuoL/M/N each contain 14 conserved transmembrane (TM) helices. Two of them are discontinuous, as in some transporters. Unexpectedly, subunit NuoL also contains a 110-A long amphipathic alpha-helix, spanning almost the entire length of the domain. Furthermore, we have determined the structure of the entire complex I from Thermus thermophilus at 4.5 A resolution. The L-shaped assembly consists of the alpha-helical model for the membrane domain, with 63 TM helices, and the known structure of the hydrophilic domain. The architecture of the complex provides strong clues about the coupling mechanism: the conformational changes at the interface of the two main domains may drive the long amphipathic alpha-helix of NuoL in a piston-like motion, tilting nearby discontinuous TM helices, resulting in proton translocation.

  3. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

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    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  4. Office work exposures and respiratory and sick building syndrome symptoms

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    Jaakkola, Maritta S; Yang, Liyan; Ieromnimon, Antonia; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relation between exposure to carbonless copy paper (CCP), paper dust, and fumes from photocopiers and printers (FPP), and the occurrence of sick building syndrome (SBS)‐related symptoms, chronic respiratory symptoms and respiratory infections. Methods A population‐based cross‐sectional study with a random sample of 1016 adults, 21–63 years old, living in Pirkanmaa District in South Finland was conducted. This study focused on 342 office workers classified as professionals, clerks or administrative personnel according to their current occupation by the International Standard Classification of Occupations‐88. They answered a questionnaire about personal information, health, smoking, occupation, and exposures in the work environment and at home. Results In logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, sex and a set of other confounders, all three exposures were related to a significantly increased risk of general symptoms (headache and fatigue). Exposure to paper dust and to FPP was associated with upper respiratory and skin symptoms, breathlessness, tonsillitis and middle ear infections. Exposure to CCP increased the risk of eye symptoms, chronic bronchitis and breathlessness. It was also associated with increased occurrence of sinus and middle ear infections and diarrhoea. A dose–response relations was observed between the number of exposures and occurrence of headache. The risk of tonsillitis and sinus infections also increased with increasing number of exposures. All chronic respiratory symptoms, apart from cough, were increased in the highest exposure category (including all three exposures). Conclusions This study provides new evidence that exposure to paper dust and to FPP is related to the risk of SBS symptoms, breathlessness and upper respiratory infections. It strengthens the evidence that exposure to CCP increases the risk of eye symptoms, general symptoms, chronic respiratory symptoms and some respiratory infections

  5. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during the laryngeal chemoreflex

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    Curran Aidan K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laryngeal chemoreflex exists in infants as a primary sensory mechanism for defending the airway from the aspiration of liquids. Previous studies have hypothesized that prolonged apnea associated with this reflex may be life threatening and might be a cause of sudden infant death syndrome. Methods In this study we quantified the output of the respiratory neural network, the diaphragm EMG signal, during the laryngeal chemoreflex and eupnea in early postnatal (3–10 days piglets. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm EMG activity corresponding to reflex-related events involved in clearance (restorative mechanisms such as cough and swallow exhibit lower complexity, suggesting that a synchronized homogeneous group of neurons in the central respiratory network are active during these events. Nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using the approximate entropy to asses the complexity of respiratory patterns. Results Diaphragm EMG, genioglossal activity EMG, as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume were recorded from 5 unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets. Approximate entropy values of the EMG during cough and swallow were found significantly (p p Conclusion Reduced complexity values of the respiratory neural network output corresponding to coughs and swallows suggest synchronous neural activity of a homogeneous group of neurons. The higher complexity values exhibited by eupneic respiratory activity are the result of a more random behaviour, which is the outcome of the integrated action of several groups of neurons involved in the respiratory neural network.

  6. High molecular weight forms of mammalian respiratory chain complex II.

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    Nikola Kovářová

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain is organised into supramolecular structures that can be preserved in mild detergent solubilisates and resolved by native electrophoretic systems. Supercomplexes of respiratory complexes I, III and IV as well as multimeric forms of ATP synthase are well established. However, the involvement of complex II, linking respiratory chain with tricarboxylic acid cycle, in mitochondrial supercomplexes is questionable. Here we show that digitonin-solubilised complex II quantitatively forms high molecular weight structures (CIIhmw that can be resolved by clear native electrophoresis. CIIhmw structures are enzymatically active and differ in electrophoretic mobility between tissues (500 - over 1000 kDa and cultured cells (400-670 kDa. While their formation is unaffected by isolated defects in other respiratory chain complexes, they are destabilised in mtDNA-depleted, rho0 cells. Molecular interactions responsible for the assembly of CIIhmw are rather weak with the complexes being more stable in tissues than in cultured cells. While electrophoretic studies and immunoprecipitation experiments of CIIhmw do not indicate specific interactions with the respiratory chain complexes I, III or IV or enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, they point out to a specific interaction between CII and ATP synthase.

  7. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I.

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    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Zhu, Jiapeng; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The 14 conserved 'core' subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 'supernumerary' subunits are unknown. Here we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we considerably advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases.

  8. Factors affecting the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens.

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    Gross, W B

    1990-01-01

    Factors playing a part in the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens were investigated in a series of experiments. The experimental infection was produced by exposing chickens to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and the B1 vaccine strain of Newcastle disease virus and later exposing them to aerosols containing the O1:K1 serotype of Escherichia coli. Chickens became susceptible (pericarditis or death) to E. coli 8 days after mixed respiratory disease challenge. One day after respiratory disease challenge, lesions consisted of edema and infiltration with lymphoid cells and heterophils. At the time of susceptibility to E. coli, the lesions were strongly lymphoid with many dense follicular areas and very few heterophils. The incidence of pericarditis and death was similar when the concentration of bacteria in the aerosol inoculum ranged between 10(9)/ml and 10(5)/ml. At the time of maximum susceptibility to aerosol challenge, chickens were less susceptible to intravenously administered E. coli than were the uninfected controls. Resistance of chickens that had been selectively bred for a high (HA) or low (LA) antibody response to sheep erythrocytes was compared. HA chickens were more resistant to respiratory agents and less resistant to E. coli than LA line chickens. When the lines were exposed to respiratory disease followed by exposure to aerosols containing E. coli, the HA line had the lowest incidence of pericarditis and death.

  9. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration.

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    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-06-16

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria.

  10. Indoor environmental and air quality characteristics, building-related health symptoms, and worker productivity in a federal government building complex.

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    Lukcso, David; Guidotti, Tee Lamont; Franklin, Donald E; Burt, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Building Health Sciences, Inc. (BHS), investigated environmental conditions by many modalities in 71 discreet areas of 12 buildings in a government building complex that had experienced persistent occupant complaints despite correction of deficiencies following a prior survey. An online health survey was completed by 7,637 building occupants (49% response rate), a subset of whom voluntarily wore personal sampling apparatus and underwent medical evaluation. Building environmental measures were within current standards and guidelines, with few outliers. Four environmental factors were consistently associated with group-level building-related health complaints: physical comfort/discomfort, odor, job stress, and glare. Several other factors were frequently commented on by participants, including cleanliness, renovation and construction activities, and noise. Low relative humidity was significantly associated with lower respiratory and "sick building syndrome"-type symptoms. No other environmental conditions (including formaldehyde, PM10 [particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter buildings without unusual hazards and with environmental and air quality indicators within the range of acceptable indoor air quality standards, there is an identifiable population of occupants with a high prevalence of asthma and allergic disease who disproportionately report discomfort and lost productivity due to symptoms and that in "normal" buildings these outcome indicators are more closely associated with host factors than with environmental conditions. We concluded from the experience of this study that building-related health complaints should be investigated at the work-area level and not at a building-wide level. An occupant-centric medical evaluation should guide environmental investigations, especially when screening results of building indoor environmental and air quality measurements show that the building and its work areas are within regulatory standards and industry

  11. Adult, isolated respiratory chain complex IV deficiency with minimal manifestations.

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    Finsterer, Josef; Kovacs, Gabor G; Rauschka, Helmut; Ahting, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency is one of the most frequent respiratory chain defects in mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and usually occurs together with severe pediatric or rarely adult multisystem disease. Here we report an adult with isolated complex IV deficiency with unusually mild clinical manifestations. A 50-year-old man had developed generalized muscle aches and occasional twitching and stiffness of the musculature since age 48 years. He had a previous history of diabetes, acute hearing loss, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, arterial hypertension, polyarthrosis, hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism. The family history was positive for diabetes (mother), CK elevation (brother), myalgias (brother), and proximal weakness of the upper limbs (mother). Work-up revealed hypoacusis, postural tremor and reduced tendon reflexes, recurrent mild hyper-CK-emia, neurogenic needle electromyography, and a muscle biopsy with mild non-specific changes. Biochemical investigations of the muscle homogenate revealed an isolated complex IV defect and reduced amounts of coenzyme Q (CoQ). He profited from CoQ supplementation, low-carbohydrate diet, and gluten-free diet. Isolated complex IV deficiency may present with only mild muscular, endocrine, or cardiac manifestations in adults. Coenzyme Q supplementation, low-carbohydrate diet, and gluten-free diet may have a beneficial effect at least on some of the manifestations.

  12. Changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in occupants of a large office building over a period of moisture damage remediation attempts.

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    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Sook Ja; White, Sandra K; Cox-Ganser, Jean M

    2018-01-01

    There is limited information on the natural history of building occupants' health in relation to attempts to remediate moisture damage. We examined changes in respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms in 1,175 office building occupants over seven years with multiple remediation attempts. During each of four surveys, we categorized participants using a severity score: 0 = asymptomatic; 1 = mild, symptomatic in the last 12 months, but not frequently in the last 4 weeks; 2 = severe, symptomatic at least once weekly in the last 4 weeks. Building-related symptoms were defined as improving away from the building. We used random intercept models adjusted for demographics, smoking, building tenure, and microbial exposures to estimate temporal changes in the odds of building-related symptoms or severity scores independent of the effect of microbial exposures. Trend analyses of combined mild/severe symptoms showed no changes in the odds of respiratory symptoms but significant improvement in non-respiratory symptoms over time. Separate analyses showed increases in the odds of severe respiratory symptoms (odds ratio/year = 1.15‒1.16, p-valuesrespiratory symptoms, we found no changes in the odds of severe symptoms but improvement in severity scores (-0.04‒-0.01/year, p-valuesrespiratory and severe non-respiratory symptoms associated with dampness/mold, remediation efforts might not be effective in improving occupants' health.

  13. Hydrophilic fungi and ergosterol associated with respiratory illness in a water-damaged building.

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    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M; Kreiss, Kathleen; White, Sandra K; Rao, Carol Y

    2008-01-01

    Damp building-related respiratory illnesses are an important public health issue. We compared three respiratory case groups defined by questionnaire responses [200 respiratory cases, 123 of the respiratory cases who met the epidemiologic asthma definition, and 49 of the epidemiologic asthma cases who had current physician-diagnosed asthma with post-occupancy onset] to a comparison group of 152 asymptomatic employees in an office building with a history of water damage. We analyzed dust samples collected from floors and chairs of 323 cases and comparisons for culturable fungi, ergosterol, endotoxin, and cat and dog allergens. We examined associations of total fungi, hydrophilic fungi (requiring water activity > or = 0.9), and ergosterol with the health outcomes using logistic regression models. In models adjusted for demographics, respiratory illnesses showed significant linear exposure-response relationships to total culturable fungi [interquartile range odds ratios (IQR-OR) = 1.37-1.72], hydrophilic fungi (IQR-OR = 1.45-2.19), and ergosterol (IQR-OR = 1.54-1.60) in floor and chair dusts. Of three outcomes analyzed, current asthma with postoccupancy physician diagnosis was most strongly associated with exposure to hydrophilic fungi in models adjusted for ergosterol, endotoxin, and demographics (IQR-OR = 2.09 for floor and 1.79 for chair dusts). Ergosterol levels in floor dust were significantly associated with epidemiologic asthma independent of culturable fungi (IQR-OR = 1.54-1.55). Our findings extend the 2004 conclusions of the Institute of Medicine [Human health effects associated with damp indoor environments. In: Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington DC:National Academies Press, 183-269] by showing that mold levels in dust were associated with new-onset asthma in this damp indoor environment. Hydrophilic fungi and ergosterol as measures of fungal biomass may have promise as markers of risk of building-related respiratory diseases in damp indoor

  14. Respiratory

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    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  15. Office work exposures [corrected] and respiratory and sick building syndrome symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Maritta S; Yang, Liyan; Ieromnimon, Antonia; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2007-03-01

    To assess the relation between exposure to carbonless copy paper (CCP), paper dust, and fumes from photocopiers and printers (FPP), and the occurrence of sick building syndrome (SBS)-related symptoms, chronic respiratory symptoms and respiratory infections. A population-based cross-sectional study with a random sample of 1016 adults, 21-63 years old, living in Pirkanmaa District in South Finland was conducted. This study focused on 342 office workers classified as professionals, clerks or administrative personnel according to their current occupation by the International Standard Classification of Occupations-88. They answered a questionnaire about personal information, health, smoking, occupation, and exposures in the work environment and at home. In logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, sex and a set of other confounders, all three exposures were related to a significantly increased risk of general symptoms (headache and fatigue). Exposure to paper dust and to FPP was associated with upper respiratory and skin symptoms, breathlessness, tonsillitis and middle ear infections. Exposure to CCP increased the risk of eye symptoms, chronic bronchitis and breathlessness. It was also associated with increased occurrence of sinus and middle ear infections and diarrhoea. A dose-response relations was observed between the number of exposures and occurrence of headache. The risk of tonsillitis and sinus infections also increased with increasing number of exposures. All chronic respiratory symptoms, apart from cough, were increased in the highest exposure category (including all three exposures). This study provides new evidence that exposure to paper dust and to FPP is related to the risk of SBS symptoms, breathlessness and upper respiratory infections. It strengthens the evidence that exposure to CCP increases the risk of eye symptoms, general symptoms, chronic respiratory symptoms and some respiratory infections. Reduction of these exposures could improve the

  16. Strategic directions of personnel potential forming of a building complex

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    Simonova Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of directions of strategic approach forming of labor potential management of a building complex is carried out in this paper. On the basis of this analysis the system of actions for strategy forming divided into consecutive stages is offered. The development of the personnel forecast is a strategic planning basis. One of personnel forecast variants is the correlation of needs estimates in personnel of a building complex with available allowances. On the basis of the personnel forecast strategic analysis it is possible to compose working programs for the stated goals of implementation. Operational assessment of personnel requirements of a building complex is proved to be combined with strategic objectives. Some assessment approaches to qualitative and quantitative need for specialists of a building complex are offered. The fact that high-quality labor power supply system of a building complex with should be based on industry development forecast and increase in construction products competitiveness is revealed in the article. Strategic management priority will allow to react immediately to the current situation changes, to introduce amendments both into tactical, and operational management.

  17. Affection of the Respiratory Muscles in Combined Complex I and IV Deficiency.

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    Finsterer, Josef; Rauschka, Helmut; Segal, Liane; Kovacs, Gabor G; Rolinski, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Combined complex I+IV deficiency has rarely been reported to manifest with the involvement of the respiratory muscles. A 45y male was admitted for hypercapnia due to muscular respiratory insufficiency. He required intubation and mechanical ventilation. He had a previous history of ophthalmoparesis since age 6y, ptosis since age 23y, and anterocollis since at least age 40y. Muscle biopsy from the right deltoid muscle at age 41y was indicative of mitochondrial myopathy. Biochemical investigations revealed a combined complex I+IV defect. Respiratory insufficiency was attributed to mitochondrial myopathy affecting not only the extra-ocular and the axial muscles but also the shoulder girdle and respiratory muscles. In addition to myopathy, he had mitochondrial neuropathy, abnormal EEG, and elevated CSF-protein. Possibly, this is why a single cycle of immunoglobulins was somehow beneficial. For muscular respiratory insufficiency he required tracheostomy and was scheduled for long-term intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Mitochondrial myopathy due to a combined complex I+IV defect with predominant affection of the extra-ocular muscles may progress to involvement of the limb-girdle, axial and respiratory muscles resulting in muscular respiratory insufficiency. In patients with mitochondrial myopathy, neuropathy and elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein, immunoglobulins may be beneficial even for respiratory functions.

  18. PreBötzinger complex and pacemaker neurons: hypothesized site and kernel for respiratory rhythm generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1998-01-01

    Identification of the sites and mechanisms underlying the generation of respiratory rhythm is of longstanding interest to physiologists and neurobiologists. Recently, with the development of novel experimental preparations, especially in vitro en bloc and slice preparations of rodent brainstem......, progress has been made In particular, a site in the ventrolateral medulla, the preBötzinger Complex, is hypothesized to contain neuronal circuits generating respiratory rhythm. Lesions or disruption of synaptic transmission within the preBötzinger Complex, either in vivo or in vitro, can abolish...... respiratory activity. Furthermore, the persistence of respiratory rhythm following interference with postsynaptic inhibition and the subsequent discovery of neurons with endogenous bursting properties within the preBötzinger Complex have led to the hypothesis that rhythmogenesis results from synchronized...

  19. Complexity measures of the central respiratory networks during wakefulness and sleep

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    Dragomir, Andrei; Akay, Yasemin; Curran, Aidan K.; Akay, Metin

    2008-06-01

    Since sleep is known to influence respiratory activity we studied whether the sleep state would affect the complexity value of the respiratory network output. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the complexity values of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) activity would be lower during REM compared to NREM. Furthermore, since REM is primarily generated by a homogeneous population of neurons in the medulla, the possibility that REM-related respiratory output would be less complex than that of the awake state was also considered. Additionally, in order to examine the influence of neuron vulnerabilities within the rostral ventral medulla (RVM) on the complexity of the respiratory network output, we inhibited respiratory neurons in the RVM by microdialysis of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. Diaphragm EMG, nuchal EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) were recorded from five unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets (3-10 days old). Complexity of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) signal during wakefulness, NREM and REM was evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn). ApEn values of the EMGdia during NREM and REM sleep were found significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower than those of awake EMGdia after muscimol inhibition. In the absence of muscimol, only the differences between REM and wakefulness ApEn values were found to be significantly different.

  20. An Agent Based Software Approach towards Building Complex Systems

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    Latika Kharb

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Agent-oriented techniques represent an exciting new means of analyzing, designing and building complex software systems. They have the potential to significantly improve current practice in software engineering and to extend the range of applications that can feasibly be tackled. Yet, to date, there have been few serious attempts to cast agent systems as a software engineering paradigm. This paper seeks to rectify this omission. Specifically, points to be argued include:firstly, the conceptual apparatus of agent-oriented systems is well-suited to building software solutions for complex systems and secondly, agent-oriented approaches represent a genuine advance over the current state of the art for engineering complex systems. Following on from this view, the major issues raised by adopting an agentoriented approach to software engineering are highlighted and discussed in this paper.

  1. The Ins and Outs of Breath Holding: Simple Demonstrations of Complex Respiratory Physiology

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    Skow, Rachel J.; Day, Trevor A.; Fuller, Jonathan E.; Bruce, Christina D.; Steinback, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of breath holding is complex, and voluntary breath-hold duration is affected by many factors, including practice, psychology, respiratory chemoreflexes, and lung stretch. In this activity, we outline a number of simple laboratory activities or classroom demonstrations that illustrate the complexity of the integrative physiology…

  2. LOCALIZATION OF PATHOLOGY ON COMPLEX ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SURFACES

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Sidiropoulos; K. N. Lakakis; V. K. Mouza

    2017-01-01

    The technology of 3D laser scanning is considered as one of the most common methods for heritage documentation. The point clouds that are being produced provide information of high detail, both geometric and thematic. There are various studies that examine techniques of the best exploitation of this information. In this study, an algorithm of pathology localization, such as cracks and fissures, on complex building surfaces is being tested. The algorithm makes use of the points’ position in th...

  3. An Investigation of the Pathology and Pathogens Associated with Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sif; Pors, S. E.; Jensen, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory infections are among the most important diseases of growing pigs. In order to elucidate the multifactorial aetiology of porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) in Denmark, lungs from 148 finishing pigs with cranioventral bronchopneumonia (case group) and 60 pigs without lung lesions......), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (both European and US type), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine respiratory coronavirus, porcine cytomegalovirus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. All cases had cranioventral lobular bronchopneumonia consistent with PRDC....... There was a broad range of microscopical lesions and the cases were characterized as acute (n=10), subacute (n=24) or chronic (n=114) bronchopneumonia. Five bacterial species, five viruses and two Mycoplasma spp. were detected in different combinations. PCV2, M. hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis and Pasteurella multocida...

  4. Team-building and change management in respiratory care: description of a process and outcomes.

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    Stoller, James K; Sasidhar, Madhu; Wheeler, David M; Chatburn, Robert L; Bivens, Roy T; Priganc, Dave; Orens, Douglas K

    2010-06-01

    Teamwork promotes enhanced outcomes in various business sectors but can be hampered when there are organizational "silos." This study describes an intervention that fostered teamwork among 4 separate respiratory therapy (RT) departments within a single hospital. An initial retreat of leaders of the 4 RT groups indicated a common goal of developing a scorecard by which RT outcomes could be followed and improved. Developing this scorecard involved a business review process that comprised 7 facilitated meetings, in which the 4 RT groups developed metrics and targets for RT outcomes in 4 categories: quality/innovation; service; productivity; and employee engagement. The process of developing the scorecard prompted improvements in the quality of RT care (eg, enhanced cross-staffing, low respiratory therapist turnover). A welcome impact of the business review process was enhanced collaboration and teamwork among the 4 RT groups, as manifested by sharing of educational resources, developing a cross-departmental float pool, and forming a process and group to standardize RT care across all groups. The results of this business review process show that teamwork among 4 separate RT departments improved and that enhanced outcomes were achieved. Based on this experience, we recommend consideration of this business review process as a team-building activity that can confer demonstrable clinical benefits.

  5. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

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    Wang, Juan; Engvall, Karin; Smedje, Greta; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old) from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%). 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis); 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29). And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78). Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008) and respiratory infections (pold. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06) and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24). Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16). Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82). In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections were related to a number of factors in the home environment. Certain building years (1961-1985), building dampness, window panel condensation and odor in the dwelling may be risk factors.

  6. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%. 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis; 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29. And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84 and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78. Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008 and respiratory infections (p<0.001. Rented apartments had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07-1.40, wheeze (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.02-1.41, day time breathlessness (OR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.04-1.66 and respiratory infections (OR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.01-1.26. Living in colder parts of the country was a risk factor for wheeze (p = 0.03 and night time breathlessness (p = 0.002. Building dampness was a risk factor for wheeze (OR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.08-1.86 and day time breathlessness (OR = 1.57, 95%CI 1.09-2.27. Building dampness was a risk factor for health among those below 66 years old. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06 and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16. Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82. In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections were

  7. Closed genomes of seven histophilus somni isolates from beef calves with bovine respiratory disease complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histophilus somni is a fastidious gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic Pasteurellacea that affects multiple organ systems and is one of the principle bacterial species contributing to bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in feed yard cattle. Here we present seven closed genomes isolated from...

  8. Calculation of genomic predicted transmitting abilities for bovine respiratory disease complex in Holsteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex is a disease that is very costly to the dairy industry. Genomic selection may be an effective tool to improve host resistance to the pathogens that cause this disease. Use of genomic predicted transmitting abilities (GPTA) for selection has had a dramatic effect on...

  9. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

    2003-09-01

    Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

  10. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M; Herrler, Georg

    2014-02-18

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this purpose, two culture systems for well-differentiated BAEC were used: the air-liquid interface (ALI) system, where filter-grown BAEC differentiate into a pseudostratified respiratory epithelium and precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) where BAEC are maintained in the original tissue organisation. Comparative infection studies demonstrated that entry and release of BPIV3 occurred specifically via the apical membrane with ciliated cells being the major target cells. By contrast, airway epithelial cells were largely resistant to infection by BHV-1. When the epithelial barrier was abolished by opening tight junctions or by injuring the cell monolayer, BHV-1 infected mainly basal cells. Respiratory epithelial cells were also refractory to infection by BRSV. However, this virus infected neither differentiated epithelial cells nor basal cells when the integrity of the epithelial barrier was destroyed. In contrast to cells of the airway epithelium, subepithelial cells were susceptible to infection by BRSV. Altogether, these results indicate that the three viruses of the same disease complex follow different strategies to interact with the airway epithelium. Possible entry mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Signal peptide etiquette during assembly of a complex respiratory enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Martyn J; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen capable of respiration with a number of terminal electron acceptors. Tetrathionate reductase is important for the infection process and is encoded by the ttrBCA operon where TtrA and TtrB are metallocofactor-containing proteins targeted to the periplasmic side of the membrane by two different Tat targeting peptides. In this work, the inter-relationship between these two signal peptides has been explored. Molecular genetics and biochemical approaches reveal that the processing of the TtrB Tat signal peptide is dependent on the successful assembly of its partner protein, TtrA. Inactivation of either the TtrA or the TtrB Tat targeting peptides individually was observed to have limited overall effects on assembly of the enzyme or on cellular tetrathionate reductase activity. However, inactivation of both signal peptides simultaneously was found to completely abolish physiological tetrathionate reductase activity. These data suggest both signals are normally active during assembly of the enzyme, and imply a code of conduct exists between the signal peptides where one can compensate for inactivity in the other. Since it appears likely that tetrathionate reductase presents itself for export as a multi-signal complex, these observations also have implications for the mechanism of the bacterial Tat translocase. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Respiratory chain complexes in dynamic mitochondria display a patchy distribution in life cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria, the main suppliers of cellular energy, are dynamic organelles that fuse and divide frequently. Constraining these processes impairs mitochondrial is closely linked to certain neurodegenerative diseases. It is proposed that functional mitochondrial dynamics allows the exchange of compounds thereby providing a rescue mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The question discussed in this paper is whether fusion and fission of mitochondria in different cell lines result in re-localization of respiratory chain (RC complexes and of the ATP synthase. This was addressed by fusing cells containing mitochondria with respiratory complexes labelled with different fluorescent proteins and resolving their time dependent re-localization in living cells. We found a complete reshuffling of RC complexes throughout the entire chondriome in single HeLa cells within 2-3 h by organelle fusion and fission. Polykaryons of fused cells completely re-mixed their RC complexes in 10-24 h in a progressive way. In contrast to the recently described homogeneous mixing of matrix-targeted proteins or outer membrane proteins, the distribution of RC complexes and ATP synthase in fused hybrid mitochondria, however, was not homogeneous but patterned. Thus, complete equilibration of respiratory chain complexes as integral inner mitochondrial membrane complexes is a slow process compared with matrix proteins probably limited by complete fusion. In co-expressing cells, complex II is more homogenously distributed than complex I and V, resp. Indeed, this result argues for higher mobility and less integration in supercomplexes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics favours the re-mixing of all RC complexes within the chondriome. This permanent mixing avoids a static situation with a fixed composition of RC complexes per mitochondrion.

  13. DOCUMENTATION OF HISTORICAL BUILDING VIA VIRTUAL TOUR: THE COMPLEX BUILDING OF BATHS IN STRASBOURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koehl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The virtual visits exist for several years and rest on open source or professional software packages allowing to realize complete animations. The historic buildings are often fragile, sometimes difficultly and only partially accessible. It is the complex case of the building of the municipal baths of Strasbourg, France, object of this study. It is thus interesting to use the technologies of the virtual visits to document a historic building. If we content ourselves only of panoramic images, the visitor cannot take completely advantage of the site, especially if he does not know it in advance. It is a question of proposing to the visitor a guided tour, constrained, allowing him to move on to all the recommended places. Then to supply him further information on the most significant parts and to propose him images of archive to make comparisons. Of course, if he wants to walk alone in and around the building, he will have the leisure of it, but at his own risk. To realize such a visit, the paper shows the various necessary stages of elaboration, in particular by beginning with the writing of a scenario of the visit. This project written in several hands allowed to combine the knowledge of diverse actors working in the field of the inventory and of the heritage valorisation.

  14. RIBOSOMAL COMPLEX IN PROPHYLAXIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are widespread in children regardless of age and region of living; they are characterized with big amount of infectious agents and absence of a trend to morbidity decrease. Drugs for nonspecific prophylaxis (immunostimulators and immunomodulatory agents are frequently used for prevention of ARI. There are plenty of immunomodulating agents; the wellstudied medication with systemic action with good efficacy and safety in pediatric practice is ribosomal-proteoglycan complex. The article presents the description of clinical experience of treatment with this complex in pediatric practice.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, prophylaxis, treatment, ribosomal complex.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(6:127-130

  15. Low-complexity Wireless Monitoring of Respiratory Movements Using Ultra-wideband Impulse Response Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2014-03-01

    In this paper; we present a comprehensive scheme for wireless monitoring of the respiratory movements in humans. Our scheme overcomes the challenges low signal-to-noise ratio, background clutter and high sampling rates. It is based on the estimation of the ultra-wideband channel impulse response. We suggest techniques for dealing with background clutter in situations when it might be time variant. We also present a novel methodology for reducing the required sampling rate of the system significantly while achieving the accuracy offered by the Nyquist rate. Performance results from simulations conducted with pre-recorded respiratory signals demonstrate the robustness of our scheme for tackling the above challenges and providing a low-complexity solution for the monitoring of respiratory movements.

  16. Consensus Building: the Democracy which Works Properly in Complex Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Susskind

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available “Quality of life and governance are more and more related. The Consensus Building method is the “other” democracy, the one which works in complex societies. This approach has old roots, but its current success born in the last years due to two phenomenon’s; the great crisis in traditional governance in particular in western societies from 70’s until nowadays, and the inadequate local answers to this problems. On one hand some governments try to solve it with more restrict places of power, that take decisions on their own, on the other hand or they try to solve it with naïve participation, open new moments of decision without specific methods, thinking that differences could be solve with “good will” and  voting. (From the introduction“Confronto Creativo; dal diritto alla parola al diritto di essere ascoltati” Lawrence Susskind- Marianella Sclavi 2011On September 2011 Lawrence Susskind came to Italy in order to presents his book “Confronto Creativo, dal diritto di parola al diritto di essere ascoltati”, wrote with Marianella Sclavi. This book has been published in more than 20 countries, from China, to Japan. The authors underline the idea that globalization is, in certain way, helping the born of a different governance, which makes democracy and new ways of participation been closer than in the past. This interview tries to answer some questions of participatory urban planning in Italy nowadays. As for example; can consensus building help to deal with complex cities nowadays? Who should promote consensus building approach: governments, citizens, private entrepreneurships? Which are the obstacles, and the methodologies to solve them? Once urban planners finish their work, who implement the projects? What are the new languages that urban planning should find in order to create local processes?

  17. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kohda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4 as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3 and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21 as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  18. Dry building mixture with complex dispersed mineral additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Mukhina, Irina; Teplov, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the complex dispersed mineral additive consisting of diopside and limestone was provided by the following factors. Diopside, due to the high hardness, reinforces formed hardened cement paste and prevents the spread of micro-cracks in it under the action of loads. Furthermore, diopside due to the greater elastic modulus than cement paste causes redistribution of stress between the additive particles and the cement. Limestone, since it has chemical affinity with the clinker minerals and products of their hydration hardening, effects on the hydration process and the formation of the contact area between the additive particles and the cement. The optimum quantity of complex dispersed mineral additive is 7%. At the same time the strength of the solution, made of dry building mixture "rough leveler for floor", increased by 22.1%, and the strength of the solution, made of dry mortar "masonry mixture" increased by 32.7%. With the mineral additive introduction the offset of the endoeffect temperatures to higher temperatures on derivatograms is fixed. If there is a mineral additive in the hardened cement paste, which may act as substrate for the tumors crystallization, the hardened cement paste structure strengthening while the complex thermal analysis is seen.

  19. INFLUENCE OF RIBOSOMAL COMPLEX ON THE STATE OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT STENOSING LARYNGOTRACHEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Orlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An influence of ribosomal-proteoglycan complex (Ribomunyl on respiratory system in treatment and rehabilitation of 40 children with recurrent stenosing laryngotracheitis developed on the basis of respiratory viral infections was studied. Inclusion of this drug into complex of treatment and rehabilitation resulted in normalization of lungs’ ventilation and threshold sensitivity of airways, decreasing of common IgE and nitric oxide in these patients. The effect means significant decrease of persistent infectious-allergic inflammation. Treatment with this drug resulted in prolongation of remission in increase of children’s quality of life. Key words: children, recurrent stenosing laryngotracheitis, hypersensitivity of airways, Rybomunyl, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:36-41

  20. Procedural design of exterior lighting for buildings with complex constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Schwarz, Michael

    2014-09-23

    We present a system for the lighting design of procedurally modeled buildings. The design is procedurally specified as part of the ordinary modeling workflow by defining goals for the illumination that should be attained and locations where luminaires may be installed to realize these goals. Additionally, constraints can be modeled that make the arrangement of the installed luminaires respect certain aesthetic and structural considerations. From this specification, the system automatically generates a lighting solution for any concrete model instance. The underlying, intricate joint optimization and constraint satisfaction problem is approached with a stochastic scheme that operates directly in the complex subspace where all constraints are observed. To navigate this subspace efficaciously, the actual lighting situation is taken into account. We demonstrate our system on multiple examples spanning a variety of architectural structures and lighting designs. Copyright held by the Owner/Author.

  1. Surfactant-anti-surfactant immune complexes in infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.; Merritt, T A; Lwebuga-Mukasa, J.; Hallman, M

    1986-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with human surfactant resulted in the formation of detectable circulating immune complexes. Preterm infants with severe RDS were divided into two groups: one group received human surfactant by intratracheal instillation and the other group did not. Both groups received ventilatory management involving intermittent mandatory ventilation. Plasma samples were drawn from these babies prior to treatment and at...

  2. Rényi entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of mechanomyographic recordings of diaphragm muscle as indexes of respiratory effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Abel; Fiz, Jose A; Jane, Raimon; Laciar, Eric; Galdiz, Juan B; Gea, Joaquim; Morera, Josep

    2008-01-01

    The study of the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals of respiratory muscles is a promising technique in order to evaluate the respiratory muscles effort. A new approach for quantifying the relationship between respiratory MMG signals and respiratory effort is presented by analyzing the spatio-temporal patterns in the MMG signal using two non-linear methods: Rényi entropy and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity analysis. Both methods are well suited to the analysis of non-stationary biomedical signals of short length. In this study, MMG signals of the diaphragm muscle acquired by means of a capacitive accelerometer applied on the costal wall were analyzed. The method was tested on an animal model (dogs), and the diaphragmatic MMG signal was recorded continuously while two non anesthetized mongrel dogs performed a spontaneous ventilation protocol with an incremental inspiratory load. The performance in discriminating high and low respiratory effort levels with these two methods was analyzed with the evaluation of the Pearson correlation coefficient between the MMG parameters and respiratory effort parameters extracted from the inspiratory pressure signal. The results obtained show an increase of the MMG signal Rényi entropy and LZ complexity values with the increase of the respiratory effort. Compared with other parameters analyzed in previous works, both Rényi entropy and LZ complexity indexes demonstrates better performance in all the signals analyzed. Our results suggest that these non-linear techniques are useful to detect and quantify changes in the respiratory effort by analyzing MMG respiratory signals.

  3. Determinants of functional coupling between astrocytes and respiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schnell

    Full Text Available Respiratory neuronal network activity is thought to require efficient functioning of astrocytes. Here, we analyzed neuron-astrocyte communication in the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC of rhythmic slice preparations from neonatal mice. In astrocytes that exhibited rhythmic potassium fluxes and glutamate transporter currents, we did not find a translation of respiratory neuronal activity into phase-locked astroglial calcium signals. In up to 20% of astrocytes, 2-photon calcium imaging revealed spontaneous calcium fluctuations, although with no correlation to neuronal activity. Calcium signals could be elicited in preBötC astrocytes by metabotropic glutamate receptor activation or after inhibition of glial glutamate uptake. In the latter case, astrocyte calcium elevation preceded a surge of respiratory neuron discharge activity followed by network failure. We conclude that astrocytes do not exhibit respiratory-rhythmic calcium fluctuations when they are able to prevent synaptic glutamate accumulation. Calcium signaling is, however, observed when glutamate transport processes in astrocytes are suppressed or neuronal discharge activity is excessive.

  4. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005. The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002. The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are supposed to function as boundary objects across different disciplines can lead to misinterpretation of requirements, project content and objectives. In this research, knowledge is seen as resulting from social interactions; knowledge resides in communities and it is generated through social relationships (Wenger 1998, Olsson et al. 2008. Knowledge is often tacit, intangible and context-dependent and it is articulated in the changing responsibilities, roles, attitudes and values that are present in the work environment (Bresnen et al., 2003. In a project environment, knowledge enables individuals to solve problems, take decisions, and apply these decisions to actions. In order to achieve a shared understanding and minimize the misunderstanding and misinterpretations among project actors, it is necessary to share knowledge (Fong 2003. Sharing knowledge is particularly crucial in large complex building projects (LCBPs in order to accelerate the building process, improve architectural quality and prevent mistakes or undesirable results. However, knowledge sharing is often hampered through professional or organizational boundaries or contractual concerns. When knowledge is seen as an organizational asset, there is little willingness among project organizations to share their knowledge. Individual people may recognize the need to promote knowledge sharing throughout the project, but typically there is no deliberate strategy agreed by all project partners to address

  5. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005. The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002. The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are supposed to function as boundary objects across different disciplines can lead to misinterpretation of requirements, project content and objectives. In this research, knowledge is seen as resulting from social interactions; knowledge resides in communities and it is generated through social relationships (Wenger 1998, Olsson et al. 2008. Knowledge is often tacit, intangible and context-dependent and it is articulated in the changing responsibilities, roles, attitudes and values that are present in the work environment (Bresnen et al., 2003. In a project environment, knowledge enables individuals to solve problems, take decisions, and apply these decisions to actions. In order to achieve a shared understanding and minimize the misunderstanding and misinterpretations among project actors, it is necessary to share knowledge (Fong 2003.Sharing knowledge is particularly crucial in large complex building projects (LCBPs in order to accelerate the building process, improve architectural quality and prevent mistakes or undesirable results. However, knowledge sharing is often hampered through professional or organizational boundaries or contractual concerns. When knowledge is seen as an organizational asset, there is little willingness among project organizations to share their knowledge. Individual people may recognize the need to promote knowledge sharing throughout the project, but typically there is no deliberate strategy agreed by all project partners to address

  6. Porcine respiratory disease complex: Interaction of vaccination and porcine circovirus type 2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Chanhee

    2016-06-01

    Porcine respiratory disease is a multifactorial and complex disease caused by a combination of infectious pathogens, environmental stressors, differences in production systems, and various management practices; hence the name porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is used. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are considered to be the most important pathogens that cause PRDC. Although interactions among the three major respiratory pathogens are well documented, it is also necessary to understand the interaction between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae are well known to potentiate PCV2-associated lesions; however, PRRSV and mycoplasmal vaccines can both enhance PCV2 viraemia regardless of the effects of the actual PRRSV or M. hyopneumoniae infection. On the other hand, M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of pneumonia induced by PRRSV, and vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone is also able to decrease PRRSV viraemia and PRRSV-induced lung lesions in dually infected pigs. This review focuses on (1) interactions between PCV2, PRRSV, and M. hyopneumoniae; and (2) interactions between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of respiratory frequency by peptidergic input to rhythmogenic neurons in the preBötzinger complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, P A; Rekling, J C; Bocchiaro, C M

    1999-01-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) and mu-opioid receptor (muOR) agonists affected respiratory rhythm when injected directly into the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), the hypothesized site for respiratory rhythmogenesis in mammals. These effects were mediated by actions on preBötC rhythmogenic neurons. ...

  8. Work-related health effects in swine building workers after respiratory protection use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Veillette, Marc; Mériaux, Anne; Duchaine, Caroline; Cormier, Yvon

    2012-09-01

    To compare inflammation and lung function in swine workers after periods with and without respiratory protection during work. Twenty-three workers were examined before and after two nonprotected work shifts. One shift was preceded by a period with diminished exposure by use of respirators. The other shift was preceded by an unprotected period of work. Endotoxin concentrations were similarly high (24,636 and 28,775 endotoxin units/m(3)). A 3.1% cross-shift decline in forced vital capacity occurred after the period with respiratory protection (P = 0.01). Blood leukocytes increased more (P = 0.01) and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein was reduced (P = 0.015) only after the period with respiratory protection. Plasma interleukin-6 increased (P Respiratory protection resulted in cross-shift inflammatory and respiratory reactions at return to unprotected work.

  9. Work-Related Health Effects in Swine Building Workers After Respiratory Protection Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Veillette, Marc; Mériaux, Anne

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To compare inflammation and lung function in swine workers after periods with and without respiratory protection during work. METHODS:Twenty-three workers were examined before and after two nonprotected work shifts. One shift was preceded by a period with diminished exposure by use...... of respirators. The other shift was preceded by an unprotected period of work. RESULTS:Endotoxin concentrations were similarly high (24,636 and 28,775 endotoxin units/m(3)). A 3.1% cross-shift decline in forced vital capacity occurred after the period with respiratory protection (P = 0.01). Blood leukocytes...... increased more (P = 0.01) and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein was reduced (P = 0.015) only after the period with respiratory protection. Plasma interleukin-6 increased (P Respiratory protection resulted in cross-shift inflammatory and respiratory...

  10. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J Gershwin

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  11. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Anderson, Mark L; McEligot, Heather A; Shao, Matt X; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F; Neibergs, Holly L; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  12. LOCALIZATION OF PATHOLOGY ON COMPLEX ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sidiropoulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The technology of 3D laser scanning is considered as one of the most common methods for heritage documentation. The point clouds that are being produced provide information of high detail, both geometric and thematic. There are various studies that examine techniques of the best exploitation of this information. In this study, an algorithm of pathology localization, such as cracks and fissures, on complex building surfaces is being tested. The algorithm makes use of the points’ position in the point cloud and tries to distinguish them in two groups-patterns; pathology and non-pathology. The extraction of the geometric information that is being used for recognizing the pattern of the points is being accomplished via Principal Component Analysis (PCA in user-specified neighborhoods in the whole point cloud. The implementation of PCA leads to the definition of the normal vector at each point of the cloud. Two tests that operate separately examine both local and global geometric criteria among the points and conclude which of them should be categorized as pathology. The proposed algorithm was tested on parts of the Gazi Evrenos Baths masonry, which are located at the city of Giannitsa at Northern Greece.

  13. Building dialogue on complex conservation issues in a conference setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jenny; Sparrow, Andrew; Wass, Rob; Moller, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Dialogue about complex science and society issues is important for contemporary conservation agendas. Conferences provide an appropriate space for such dialogue, but despite its recognized worth, best practices for facilitating active dialogue are still being explored. Face-to-face (FTF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) are two approaches to facilitating dialogue that have different strengths. We assessed the use of these approaches to create dialogue on cultural perspectives of conservation and biodiversity at a national ecology conference. In particular, we aimed to evaluate their potential to enhance dialogue through their integrated application. We used an interactive blog to generate CMC on participant-sourced issues and to prime subsequent discussion in an FTF conference workshop. The quantity and quality of both CMC and FTF discussion indicated that both approaches were effective in building dialogue. Prior to the conference the blog averaged 126 views per day, and 44 different authors contributed a total of 127 comments. Twenty-five participants subsequently participated in active FTF discussion during a 3-h workshop. Postconference surveys confirmed that CMC had developed participants' thinking and deepened FTF dialogue; 88% indicated specifically that CMC helped facilitate the FTF discussion. A further 83% of respondents concluded that preliminary blog discussion would be useful for facilitating dialogue at future conferences. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Assembly of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Thorsten; Dekovic, Doris Kreuzer; Burschel, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    Energy-converting NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, respiratory complex I, couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of four protons across the membrane. The Escherichia coli complex I is made up of 13 different subunits encoded by the so-called nuo-genes. The electron transfer is catalyzed by nine cofactors, a flavin mononucleotide and eight iron-sulfur (Fe/S)-clusters. The individual subunits and the cofactors have to be assembled together in a coordinated way to guarantee the biogenesis of the active holoenzyme. Only little is known about the assembly of the bacterial complex compared to the mitochondrial one. Due to the presence of so many Fe/S-clusters the assembly of complex I is intimately connected with the systems responsible for the biogenesis of these clusters. In addition, a few other proteins have been reported to be required for an effective assembly of the complex in other bacteria. The proposed role of known bacterial assembly factors is discussed and the information from other bacterial species is used in this review to draw an as complete as possible model of bacterial complex I assembly. In addition, the supramolecular organization of the complex in E. coli is briefly described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof. Conrad Mullineaux. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Mee; Lim, Mi Suk; Hong, Yun Ji; Kim, Taek Soo; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Eui Chong

    2013-11-01

    Many nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species have clinical significance, and the rapid and reliable identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and NTM species is important. We evaluated the simultaneous detection of MTBC and NTM in respiratory specimens. MTBC and NTM were simultaneously detected and identified by laboratory-developed (LDT) real-time PCR, multiplex real-time PCR/melting curve analysis, rpoB PCR restriction fragment length polymorphisms and the AdvanSure Mycobacteria GenoBlot assay (LG Life Sciences). Eighty-five respiratory specimens from 69 patients showed simultaneous detection of MTBC and NTM. A line probe assay showed 70.6% concordance with LDT. Ten patients (14.5%) had a history of tuberculosis, and eight patients (11.6%) had been previously diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Mixed cultures were present one time in 57 patients (82.6%) and repeatedly in 12 patients (17.4%). MTBC was more frequent in 44 patients (63.8%), and NTM was isolated in seven patients (10.1%). The commonly detected NTM species in the mixed cultures were Mycobacterium intracellulare (29.0%) and Mycobacterium abscessus (29.0%). Co-isolation caused a failure of antitubercular drug susceptibility testing in 2 patients (2.9%). Molecular methods allow MTBC and NTM species to be simultaneously identified in respiratory specimens. NTM isolated with MTBC has clinical significance in some patients and should not be ignored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pre-Bötzinger complex: Generation and modulation of respiratory rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ortiz, J; Muñoz-Ortiz, E; López-Meraz, M L; Beltran-Parrazal, L; Morgado-Valle, C

    2016-07-18

    In mammals, the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) is a bilateral and symmetrical neural network located in the brainstem which is essential for the generation and modulation of respiratory rhythm. There are few human studies about the preBötC and, its relationship with neurological diseases has not been described. However, the importance of the preBötC in neural control of breathing and its potential participation in neurological diseases in humans, has been suggested based on pharmacological manipulation and lesion of the preBötC in animal models, both in vivo and in vitro. In this review, we describe the effects of some drugs on the inspiratory activity in vitro in a transverse slice that contains the preBötC, as well as some in vivo experiments. Drugs were classified according to their effects on the main neurotransmitter systems and their importance as stimulators or inhibitors of preBötC activity and therefore for the generation of the respiratory rhythm. Clinical neurologists will find this information relevant to understanding how the central nervous system generates the respiratory rhythm and may also relate this information to the findings made in daily practice. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. On the complexity of smart buildings occupant behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Mohamed, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Smart buildings are run by Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), termed as Building Management Systems (BMS). Typical goals for the operation of BMS are increasing occupant comfort and decreasing buildings energy consumption. The central and critical figure, however, for achieving both goals are buildings......' occupants. In some BMS, occupants have a high level of interaction with the system, whereas in others this is limited to a large extent, barring occupants from even opening windows. Every interaction, however, is a form of feedback, which in some cases poses a risk, whereas in others, it is an opportunity...

  18. A systematic study of neutrophil degranulation and respiratory burst in vitro by defined immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Voice, J; Lachmann, P J

    1995-01-01

    Defined immune complexes (IC) were used to compare the effect of antibodies of different classes and subclasses on neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. IC were made from 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl (NIP) conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chimaeric mouse-human anti-NIP monoclonal antibodies including IgA2, IgE and all four IgG subclasses. The activation of neutrophils by IC depended on antibody class and subclass, on antigen epitope density, on antigen: antibody ratio and on the medium used. The ability to generate the respiratory burst showed a different pattern to the ability to give rise to degranulation. Compared with other IC, IgA2 IC provided the strongest stimulus for neutrophil activation. IgG1 IC, IgG2 IC and IgG4 IC activated neutrophils moderately or weakly IgG3 IC were unable to stimulate the respiratory burst, but could cause strong degranulation. IgE IC could hardly cause any neutrophil response. Neutrophil degranulation in response to IgG3 IC in serum-free medium or heat-inactivated serum was fast, and it quickly reached maximum. Degranulation caused by IgA IC was relatively slow, but gradually increased during incubation. The activity of IgG1 IC, IgG2 IC and IgG4 IC generated a respiratory burst increased with antibody excess and decreased with antigen excess. The activity of IgA2 IC, however, was not affected by change of antigen and antibody ratio. A specific role of serum, possibly due to complement, was found in enhancing degranulation, both temporally and quantitatively, by IgA2 IC. PMID:7664498

  19. [Automated RNA amplification for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouillon, V; Houriez, F; Buze, M; Lagrange, P; Herrmann, J-L

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) directly on clinical respiratory specimens is essential for a correct management of patients suspected of tuberculosis. For this purpose PCR-based kits are available to detect MTB in respiratory specimen but most of them need at least 4 hours to be completed. New methods, based on TRC method (TRC: Transcription Reverse transcription Concerted--TRCRapid M. Tuberculosis--Tosoh Bioscience, Tokyo, Japon) and dedicated monitor have been developed. A new kit (TRC Rapid M. tuberculosis and Real-time monitor TRCRapid-160, Tosoh Corporation, Japan) enabling one step amplification and real-time detection of MTB 16S rRNA by a combination of intercalative dye oxazole yellow-linked DNA probe and isothermal RNA amplification directly on respiratory specimens has been tested in our laboratory. 319 respiratory specimens were tested in this preliminary study and results were compared to smear and culture. Fourteen had a positive culture for MTB. Among theses samples, smear was positive in 11 cases (78.6%) and TRC process was positive in 8 cases (57.1%). Overall sensitivity of TRC compared to smear positive samples is 73%. Theses first results demonstrated that a rapid identification of MTB was possible (less than 2 processing hours for 14 specimens and about 1 hour for 1 specimen) in most cases of smear positive samples using ready to use reagents for real time detection of MTB rRNA in clinical samples. New pretreatment and extraction reagents kits to increase the stability of the sputum RNA and the extraction efficiency are now tested in our laboratory.

  20. Testing the role of preBötzinger Complex somatostatin neurons in respiratory and vocal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Rieger, Michael A; Ling, Guang-Yi; Park, Thomas J; Dougherty, Joseph D; Goodchild, Ann K; Gray, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Identifying neurons essential for the generation of breathing and related behaviors such as vocalisation is an important question for human health. The targeted loss of preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) glutamatergic neurons, including those that express high levels of somatostatin protein (SST neurons), eliminates normal breathing in adult rats. Whether preBötC SST neurons represent a functionally specialised population is unknown. We tested the effects on respiratory and vocal behaviors of eliminating SST neuron glutamate release by Cre-Lox-mediated genetic ablation of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGlut2). We found the targeted loss of VGlut2 in SST neurons had no effect on viability in vivo, or on respiratory period or responses to neurokinin 1 or μ-opioid receptor agonists in vitro. We then compared medullary SST peptide expression in mice with that of two species that share extreme respiratory environments but produce either high or low frequency vocalisations. In the Mexican free-tailed bat, SST peptide-expressing neurons extended beyond the preBötC to the caudal pole of the VII motor nucleus. In the naked mole-rat, however, SST-positive neurons were absent from the ventrolateral medulla. We then analysed isolation vocalisations from SST-Cre;VGlut2(F/F) mice and found a significant prolongation of the pauses between syllables during vocalisation but no change in vocalisation number. These data suggest that glutamate release from preBötC SST neurons is not essential for breathing but play a species- and behavior-dependent role in modulating respiratory networks. They further suggest that the neural network generating respiration is capable of extensive plasticity given sufficient time. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities.

  2. Innovative approaches to organization and management of material streams of building complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Arutyunyan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of theoretic and methodological approaches and scientific and practical recommendations concerning the management of the material flows of building complex. Methodology. Research includes analysis of existing scientific works concerning the problems of management of the construction development programs taking into account logistization on the enterprises of different branches related to the building complex. Experience generalization of administrative decision making in the process of production preparation, in particular the motion of material flows management of building resources and information flows (which accompany building resources, systematization of experience, logic analysis, design and system processing of information. Findings. Results give the building organization management an opportunity to estimate the material and technical support of the building objects according to the terms of building, technology of building processes, as well as to into account the minimization of expenses. Originality. Originality lies in the fact that the theoretical and methodological management foundations of the logistic system formation in the programs of building complex development are formulated on the basis of organization methodology development, planning and management from the point of view of the only system positions. Practical value. The contribution to the decision of the number of complex organizational and economic problems accompanied by the problems of building development is provided due to the increase of management efficiency of the material flows of building complex.

  3. Advancing the manufacture of complex geometry GFRC for today's building envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Henriksen

    2017-06-01

    With this research the current architectural knowledge base has been advanced in terms of complex geometry thin-walled GFRC for building envelopes. The identified solutions should allow building with complex geometries to be realised using thin-walled GFRC as the envelope cladding.

  4. TETRAPOLIS - an exercise in building the complexities of proximity space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristian Blidariu; Diana Giurea

    2017-01-01

    ... student’s intuitive ways for understanding these vicinities, their physical and symbolic proximities, through participatory tactics and certain poetic/architectural tools required in the phenomenological build-up of space...

  5. Predictive performance simulations for a sustainable lecture building complex

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available during operational hours. The following process was used to model the ventilation performance of this mixed-mode building: 1) An insolation analysis was undertaken to establish the effect of cumulative exposure of the Trombe wall surface to solar...

  6. Reduction of a linear complex model for respiratory system during Airflow Interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Ireneusz; Mroczka, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents methodology of a complex model reduction to its simpler version - an identifiable inverse model. Its main tool is a numerical procedure of sensitivity analysis (structural and parametric) applied to the forward linear equivalent designed for the conditions of interrupter experiment. Final result - the reduced analog for the interrupter technique is especially worth of notice as it fills a major gap in occlusional measurements, which typically use simple, one- or two-element physical representations. Proposed electrical reduced circuit, being structural combination of resistive, inertial and elastic properties, can be perceived as a candidate for reliable reconstruction and quantification (in the time and frequency domain) of dynamical behavior of the respiratory system in response to a quasi-step excitation by valve closure.

  7. The antioxidant function of Bcl-2 preserves cytoskeletal stability of cells with defective respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, A M; Ghelli, A; Iommarini, L; Mariani, E; Hoque, M; Zanna, C; Gasparre, G; Rugolo, M

    2008-09-01

    Human thyroid carcinoma XTC.UC1 cells harbor a homoplasmic frameshift mutation in the MT-ND1 subunit of respiratory complex I. When forced to use exclusively oxidative phosphorylation for energy production by inhibiting glycolysis, these cells triggered a caspase-independent cell death pathway, which was associated to a significant imbalance in glutathione homeostasis and a cleavage of the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein significantly increased the level of endogenous reduced glutathione, thus preventing its oxidation after the metabolic stress. Furthermore, Bcl-2 completely inhibited actin cleavage and increased cell adhesion, but was unable to improve cellular viability. Similar effects were obtained when XTC.UC1 cells were incubated with exogenous glutathione. We hence propose that Bcl-2 can safeguard cytoskeletal stability through an antioxidant function.

  8. Tafenoquine, an Antiplasmodial 8-Aminoquinoline, Targets Leishmania Respiratory Complex III and Induces Apoptosis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Luque-Ortega, Juan Román; Manzano, José Ignacio; Castanys, Santiago; Rivas, Luis; Gamarro, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Tafenoquine (TFQ), an 8-aminoquinoline analogue of primaquine, which is currently under clinical trial (phase IIb/III) for the treatment and prevention of malaria, may represent an alternative treatment for leishmaniasis. In this work, we have studied the mechanism of action of TFQ against Leishmania parasites. TFQ impaired the overall bioenergetic metabolism of Leishmania promastigotes, causing a rapid drop in intracellular ATP levels without affecting plasma membrane permeability. TFQ induced mitochondrial dysfunction through the inhibition of cytochrome c reductase (respiratory complex III) with a decrease in the oxygen consumption rate and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. This was accompanied by ROS production, elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation. We conclude that TFQ targets Leishmania mitochondria, leading to an apoptosis-like death process. PMID:20837758

  9. Species of mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory specimens from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Irena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide the first comprehensive report into the local pattern of mycobacterial isolation. We used the GenoType MTBC and CM/AS assays (Hain Lifescience to perform speciation of 1 096 mycobacterial cultures isolated from respiratory specimens, one culture per patient, in Serbia over a 12-month period. The only species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC identified in our study was M. tuberculosis, with an isolation rate of 88.8%. Ten different species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM were recognized, and the five most frequently isolated species were, in descending order, M. xenopi, M. peregrinum, M. gordonae, M. avium and M. chelonae. In total, NTM isolates accounted for 11.2% of all isolates of mycobacteria identified in pulmonary specimens. Our results suggest that routine differentiation among members of the MTBC is not necessary, while routine speciation of NTM is required. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175039

  10. Electrical coupling and excitatory synaptic transmission between rhythmogenic respiratory neurons in the preBötzinger complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Shao, X M; Feldman, J L

    2000-01-01

    Breathing pattern is postulated to be generated by brainstem neurons. However, determination of the underlying cellular mechanisms, and in particular the synaptic interactions between respiratory neurons, has been difficult. Here we used dual recordings from two distinct populations of brainstem...... respiratory neurons, hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons, and rhythmogenic (type-1) neurons in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the hypothesized site for respiratory rhythm generation, to determine whether electrical and chemical transmission is present. Using an in vitro brainstem slice preparation from newborn...... recordings also demonstrated unidirectional excitatory chemical transmission (EPSPs of approximately 3 mV) between type-1 neurons. These data indicate that respiratory motor output from the brainstem involves gap junction-mediated current transfer between motoneurons. Furthermore, bidirectional electrical...

  11. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    OpenAIRE

    Esra Bektas

    2013-01-01

    The construction industry is a project-based sector with a myriad of actors such as architects, construction companies, consultants, producers of building materials (Anumba et al., 2005). The interaction between the project partners is often quite limited, which leads to insufficient knowledge sharing during the project and knowledge being unavailable for reuse (Fruchter et al. 2002). The result can be a considerable amount of extra work, delays and cost overruns. Design outcomes that are sup...

  12. Oxidation-reduction and reactive oxygen species homeostasis in mutant plants with respiratory chain complex I dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczuk, Izabela M; Szal, Bożena; Rychter, Anna M

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in a mitochondrial or nuclear gene encoding respiratory chain complex I subunits lead to decreased or a total absence of complex I activity. Plant mutants with altered or lost complex I activity adapt their respiratory metabolism by inducing alternative pathways of the respiratory chain and changing energy metabolism. Apparently, complex I is a crucial component of the oxidation-reduction (redox) regulatory system in photosynthetic cells, and alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC) cannot fully compensate for its impairment. In most cases, dysfunction of complex I is associated with lowered or unchanged hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) concentrations, but increased superoxide (O(2)(-)) levels. Higher production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria in the mosaic (MSC16) cucumber mutant may be related to retrograde signalling. Different effects of complex I dysfunction on H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) levels in described mutants might result from diverse regulation of processes involved in H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) production. Often, dysfunction of complex I did not lead to oxidative stress, but increased the capacity of the antioxidative system and enhanced stress tolerance. The new cellular homeostasis in mutants with dysfunction of complex I allows growth and development, reflecting the plasticity of plant metabolism. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Clinical evaluation of the Abbott RealTime MTB Assay for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex from respiratory and non-respiratory samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinić, Vladimira; Feuz, Kinga; Turan, Selda; Berini, Andrea; Frei, Reno; Pfeifer, Karin; Goldenberger, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Rapid and reliable diagnosis is crucial for correct management of tuberculosis. The Abbott RealTime MTB Assay represents a novel qualitative real-time PCR assay for direct detection of M. tuberculosis-complex (MTB) DNA from respiratory samples. The test targets two highly conserved sequences, the multi-copy insertion element IS6110 and the protein antigen B (PAB) gene of MTB, allowing even the detection of IS6610-deficient strains. We evaluated this commercial diagnostic test by analyzing 200 respiratory and, for the first time, 87 non-respiratory clinical specimens from our tertiary care institution and compared its results to our IS6110-based in-house real-time PCR for MTB as well as MTB culture. Overall sensitivity for Abbott RealTime MTB was 100% (19/19) in smear positive and 87.5% (7/8) in smear negative specimens, while the specificity of the assay was 100% (260/260). For both non-respiratory smear positive and smear negative specimens Abbott RealTime MTB tests showed 100% (8/8) sensitivity and 100% (8/8) specificity. Cycle threshold (Ct) value analysis of 16 MTB positive samples showed a slightly higher Ct value of the Abbott RealTime MTB test compared to our in-house MTB assay (mean delta Ct = 2.55). In conclusion, the performance of the new Abbott RealTime MTB Assay was highly similar to culture and in-house MTB PCR. We document successful analysis of 87 non-respiratory samples with the highly automated Abbott RealTime MTB test with no inhibition observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Kristen; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD+ recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. PMID:26134164

  15. A method for evaluating the problem complex of choosing the ventilation system for a new building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2007-01-01

    The application of a ventilation system in a new building is a multidimensional complex problem that involves quantifiable and non-quantifiable data like energy consump¬tion, indoor environment, building integration and architectural expression. This paper presents a structured method for evaluat...

  16. How we are building a complex Angular 2 application at Inspire

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, at first we will talk about some basic and advanced Angular 2 concepts, then we will share our experiences with Angular 2 that we had so far while building a complex library and web applications at Inspire.

  17. A comparative analysis of Indoor WiFi Positioning at a large building complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren; Stisen, Allan

    2016-01-01

    are in daily use. The positioning methods covered utilizes received signal strength from existing WiFi infrastructure to ease deployment and maintenance. We identify meaningful key metrics which describe different aspects of the methods’ performance. Using these metrics, we furthermore report on experiences...... with implementing and using indoor positioning solutions in a highly diverse environment, in which building types and materials, as well as building use differ across the complex. Correspondingly, the evaluation data we use is gathered at different complex parts, days, and daytimes, and both at static locations...... as well as traveling within the building complex. Our results illustrate and quantify the challenges and breakdowns in transferring performance results from a small controlled setting, such as a small office environment, to a large dynamic building complex....

  18. Superhalogens as Building Blocks of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Superhalogens are species whose electron affinity (EA) or vertical detachment energy (VDE) exceed to those of halogen. These species typically consist of a central electropositive atom with electronegative ligands. The EA or VDE of species can be further increased by using superhalogen as ligands, which are termed as hyperhalogen. Having established BH4- as a superhalogen, we have studied BH4-x(BH4)x- (x = 1 to 4) hyperhalogen anions and their Li-complexes, LiBH4-x(BH4)x using density functional theory. The VDE of these anions is larger than that of BH4-, which increases with the increase in the number of peripheral BH4 moieties (x). The hydrogen storage capacity of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes is higher but binding energy is smaller than that of LiBH4, a typical complex hydride. The linear correlation between dehydrogenation energy of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes and VDE of BH4-x(BH4)x- anions is established. These complexes are found to be thermodynamically stable against dissociation into LiBH4 and borane. This stud...

  19. Respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to NDUFA12 mutations as a new cause of Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Rodenburg, Richard J; van den Brand, Mariël

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated a girl with Leigh syndrome born to first-cousin parents of Pakistani descent with an isolated respiratory chain complex I deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts. Her early development was delayed, and from age 2 years she started losing motor abilities. Cerebral MRI showed b...

  20. Closed genomes and phenotypes of seven Histophilus somni isolates from beef calves with bovine respiratory disease complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Histophilus somni is a fastidious gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic Pasteurellacea that affects multiple organ systems and is one of three principle bacterial species contributing to bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in North American feed yard cattle. BRDC outbreaks accoun...

  1. Evaluating the metagenome of two sampling locations in the nasal cavity of cattle with bovine respiratory disease complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multi-factor disease, and disease incidence may be associated with an animal’s commensal microbiota (metagenome). Evaluation of the animal’s resident microbiota in the nasal cavity may help us to understand the impact of the metagenome on incidence of ...

  2. Deciphering upper respiratory tract microbiota complexity in healthy calves and calves that develop respiratory disease using shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Natália C; Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre G; Ganda, Erika K; Oikonomou, Georgios; Gregory, Lilian; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2017-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a multifactorial disorder responsible for severe economic losses in dairy and feedlot herds. Advances in next-generation sequencing mean that microbial communities in clinical samples, including non-culturable bacteria, can be characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the microbiota of the upper respiratory tract of healthy calves and calves with BRD using whole-genome sequencing (shotgun metagenomics). We performed deep nasopharyngeal swabs on 16 Holstein heifer calves (10 healthy and 6 diagnosed with BRD during the study) at 14 and 28 d of life in 1 dairy herd near Ithaca, New York. Total DNA was extracted, and whole-genome sequencing was performed using the MiSeq Illumina platform (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Samples included 5 predominant phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Tenericutes. At the genus level, we observed differences between groups for Pseudomonas spp. At the species level, Mannheimia haemolytica was the most abundant bacterium detected. We detected significant differences between groups of calves in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Pasteurella multocida was among the 20 most abundant species, and Moraxella catarrhalis, commonly associated with pneumonia in humans, was detected in all groups. Analysis of resistance to antibiotics and compounds profiling revealed differences in cobalt-zinc-cadmium resistance. Further research to elucidate the role of Moraxella catarrhalis in BRD is warranted. Genes that were resistant to cobalt-zinc-cadmium, observed mostly in calves with BRD, might be associated with difficulties in antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Build-Up of Diversity in Complex Ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Tacchella, Andrea; Gabrielli, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Diversity is a fundamental feature of ecosystems, even when the concept of ecosystem is extended to sociology or economics. Diversity can be intended as the count of different items, animals, or, more generally, interactions. There are two classes of stylized facts that emerge when diversity is taken into account. The first are Diversity explosions: evolutionary radiations in biology, or the process of escaping 'Poverty Traps' in economics are two well known examples. The second is nestedness: entities with a very diverse set of interactions are the only ones that interact with more specialized ones. In a single sentence: specialists interact with generalists. Nestedness is observed in a variety of bipartite networks of interactions: Biogeographic, macroeconomic and mutualistic to name a few. This indicates that entities diversify following a pattern. Since they appear in such very different systems, these two stylized facts point out that the build up of diversity is driven by a fundamental probabilistic mec...

  4. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  5. From in silico to in spectro kinetics of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransac, Stéphane; Heiske, Margit; Mazat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    An enzyme's activity is the consequence of its structure. The stochastic approach we developed to study the functioning of the respiratory complexes is based upon their 3D structure and their physical and chemical properties. Consequently it should predict their kinetic properties. In this paper we compare the predictions of our stochastic model derived for the complex I with a number of experiments performed with a large range of complex I substrates and products. A good fit was found between the experiments and the prediction of our stochastic approach. We show that, due to the spatial separation of the two half redox reactions (NADH/NAD and Q/QH(2)), the kinetics cannot necessarily obey a simple mechanism (ordered or ping-pong for instance). A plateau in the kinetics is observed at high substrates concentrations, well evidenced in the double reciprocal plots, which is explained by the limiting rate of quinone reduction as compared with the oxidation of NADH at the other end of complex I. Moreover, we show that the set of the seven redox reactions in between the two half redox reactions (NADH/NAD and Q/QH(2)) acts as an electron buffer. An inhibition of complex I activity by quinone is observed at high concentration of this molecule, which cannot be explained by a simple stochastic model based on the known structure. We hypothesize that the distance between the catalytic site close to N2 (iron/sulfur redox center that transfers electrons to quinone) and the membrane forces the quinone/quinol to take several positions in between these sites. We represent these possible positions by an extra site necessarily occupied by the quinone/quinol molecules on their way to the redox site. With this hypothesis, we are able to fit the kinetic experiments over a large range of substrates and products concentrations. The slow rate constants derived for the transition between the two sites could be an indication of a conformational change of the enzyme during the quinone

  6. Triheterometallic Lanthanide Complexes Prepared from Kinetically Inert Lanthanide Building Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Tropiano, Manuel; Kenwright, Alan M.

    2017-01-01

    Three molecular structures, each containing three different lanthanide(III) centres, have been prepared by coupling three kinetically inert lanthanide(III) complexes in an Ugi reaction. These 2 kDa molecules were purified by dialysis and characterised by NMR and luminescence techniques. The photo...... and lanthanide(III) centres in these molecules inhibits the efficient sensitisation of europium. We conclude that the intramolecular collisions required for efficient Dexter energy transfer from the sensitiser to the lanthanide(III) centre can be prevented by steric congestion....

  7. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  8. THE PRINCIPLES OF POWER-RISE BUILDINGS COMPLEXES FORMATION USING WIND ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEVGAMONNIY G. U.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. The methodology of designing energy-efficient tower building should be based on systematic analysis of the building as a unified energy system. The prominent architect Norman Foster (Sir Norman Foster writes: "Architects cannot solve all the world's environmental problems, but we can design buildings that require only a fraction of current energy consumption, in addition, through proper urban planning we can affect traffic flows. The location and functionality of buildings, its structural flexibility and technological resources, orientation, shape and structure, heating and ventilation characteristics used in the construction materials - all these parameters affect the amount of energy required for the construction, operation and maintenance of the building, and as for transportation, moving to it and from it" [1]. Purpose. The purpose of the study is scientific justification principles of architectural formation decisions of the power-rise energy efficient complexes and developing methods of architectural design of PRBC using wind energy. To develop the science-based principles forming the architectural buildings with the use of alternative energy and determine the specific features of the architectural design of buildings. Conclusion. The principles of architectural forming in the use of wind power and identify possible trends for the development of buildings with integrated wind installations. Polyfunctional wind power plants are in special properties of certain material and structural elements of the building structure, improve aerodynamic performance of the outer shell and therefore wind energy devices. Thus, the power efficiency of energy active building depends on its space solutions.

  9. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during recovery from severe hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Metin; Sekine, Noriko

    2004-03-01

    Progressive hypoxemia in anesthetized, peripherally chemodenervated piglets results in initial depression of the phrenic neurogram (PN) culminating in phrenic silence and, eventually, gasping. These changes reverse after the 30 min reoxygenation (recovery) period. To determine if changes in the PN patterns correspond to changes in temporal patterning, we have used the approximate entropy (ApEn) method to examine the effects of maturation on the complexity of breathing patterns in chemodenervated, vagotomized and decerebrated piglets during severe hypoxia and reoxygenation. The phrenic neurogram in piglets was recorded during eupnea (normal breathing), severe hypoxia (gasping) and recovery from severe hypoxia in 31 piglets (2 35 days). Nonlinear dynamical analysis of the phrenic neurogram was performed using the ApEn method. The mean ApEn values for a recording of five consecutive breaths during eupnea, a few phrenic neurogram signals during gasping, the beginning of the recovery period, and five consecutive breaths at every 5 min interval for the 30 min recovery period were calculated. Our data suggest that gasping resulted in reduced duration of the phrenic neurogram, and the gasp-like patterns exist at the beginning of the recovery. But, the durations of phrenic neurograms during recovery were increased after 10 min postreoxygenation, but were restored 30 min post recovery. The ApEn (complexity) values of the phrenic neurogram during eupnea were higher than those of gasping and the early (the onset of) recovery from severe hypoxia (p statistically different than 5 min post recovery regardless of the maturation stages. These results suggest that hypoxia results in a reversible reconfiguration of the central respiratory pattern generator.

  10. Respiratory Disorders Associated with Occupational Inhalational Exposure to Bioaerosols among Wastewater Treatment Workers of Petrochemical Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahangiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Workers in wastewater treatment plants are exposed to a wide range of chemicals as well as biological contaminants. Objective: To ascertain whether exposure to bio-aerosols under the normal working conditions in wastewater treatment plants is associated with any significant changes in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and lung function capacities. Methods: 198 employees of wastewater treatment plants and 99 unexposed persons were studied. American thoracic society (ATS standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was used to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms. Pulmonary function tests were conducted for each participant. Results: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms among exposed persons was significantly higher than that of unexposed people. Mean values of most pulmonary function test parameters were significantly lower in the exposed compared to the comparison group persons. Conclusion: Increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms and decrements in pulmonary function test parameters may be attributed to exposure to bio-aerosols released from wastewater treatment plants.

  11. Building Better Ecological Machines: Complexity Theory and Alternative Economic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jess Bier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer models of the economy are regularly used to predict economic phenomena and set financial policy. However, the conventional macroeconomic models are currently being reimagined after they failed to foresee the current economic crisis, the outlines of which began to be understood only in 2007-2008. In this article we analyze the most prominent of this reimagining: Agent-Based models (ABMs. ABMs are an influential alternative to standard economic models, and they are one focus of complexity theory, a discipline that is a more open successor to the conventional chaos and fractal modeling of the 1990s. The modelers who create ABMs claim that their models depict markets as ecologies, and that they are more responsive than conventional models that depict markets as machines. We challenge this presentation, arguing instead that recent modeling efforts amount to the creation of models as ecological machines. Our paper aims to contribute to an understanding of the organizing metaphors of macroeconomic models, which we argue is relevant conceptually and politically, e.g., when models are used for regulatory purposes.

  12. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  13. Complete Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Induces an Up-Regulation of Respiratory Fluxes That Is Abolished by Traces of Functional Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Kristina; Obata, Toshihiro; Feher, Kristen; Bock, Ralph; Fernie, Alisdair R; Meyer, Etienne H

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular NAD(+) recycling and accounts for approximately 40% of mitochondrial ATP production. To understand how complex I function impacts respiration and plant development, we isolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines that lack complex I activity due to the absence of the catalytic subunit NDUFV1 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein1) and compared these plants with ndufs4 (for NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase Fe-S protein4) mutants possessing trace amounts of complex I. Unlike ndufs4 plants, ndufv1 lines were largely unable to establish seedlings in the absence of externally supplied sucrose. Measurements of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis revealed that compared with ndufv1, the complex I amounts retained by ndufs4 did not increase mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation capacities. No major differences were seen in the mitochondrial proteomes, cellular metabolomes, or transcriptomes between ndufv1 and ndufs4. The analysis of fluxes through the respiratory pathway revealed that in ndufv1, fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were dramatically increased compared with ndufs4, which showed near wild-type-like fluxes. This indicates that the strong growth defects seen for plants lacking complex I originate from a switch in the metabolic mode of mitochondria and an up-regulation of respiratory fluxes. Partial reversion of these phenotypes when traces of active complex I are present suggests that complex I is essential for plant development and likely acts as a negative regulator of respiratory fluxes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Analysis Thermal Comfort Condition in Complex Residential Building, Case Study: Chiangmai, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juangjandee, Warangkana

    2017-10-01

    Due to the increasing need for complex residential buildings, it appears that people migrate into the high-density urban areas because the infrastructural facilities can be easily found in the modern metropolitan areas. Such rapid growth of urbanization creates congested residential buildings obstructing solar radiation and wind flow, whereas most urban residents spend 80-90% of their time indoor. Furthermore, the buildings were mostly built with average materials and construction detail. This causes high humidity condition for tenants that could promote mould growth. This study aims to analyse thermal comfort condition in complex residential building, Thailand for finding the passive solution to improve indoor air quality and respond to local conditions. The research methodology will be in two folds: 1) surveying on case study 2) analysis for finding the passive solution of reducing humidity indoor air The result of the survey indicated that the building need to find passive solution for solving humidity problem, that can be divided into two ways which raising ventilation and indoor temperature including increasing wind-flow ventilation and adjusting thermal temperature, for example; improving building design and stack driven ventilation. For raising indoor temperature or increasing mean radiant temperature, daylight can be passive solution for complex residential design for reducing humidity and enhance illumination indoor space simultaneous.

  15. Using Modularity to Reduce Complexity of Industrialized Building Systems for Mass Customization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela D. Viana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that industrialized building systems can positively impact construction projects in terms of efficiency, duration, safety, and quality. Although the use of industrialized building systems can potentially simplify the production process on-site, the complexity of the overall delivery system tends to be high, especially in engineered-to-order (ETO environments, due to factors such as uncertainty related to goals and methods, conflicts between different trades on-site, and interdependence between supply chain members. This paper explores the concept of modularity, which has proven to be useful in different industries as a way of dealing with complex systems. The aim of this paper is to illustrate how modularity can reduce the complexity of ETO industrialized building systems, in companies that adopt a mass customization strategy. This investigation is based on two descriptive case studies on the development of modular structural steel systems for buildings that have adopted innovative beam-to-column connections. The main contribution of this research is demonstrating the need to adopt an integrated product and process-oriented conceptualization of modularity in industrialized building systems. Moreover, the comparison between the two case studies pointed out that the management of tolerances plays a key role in achieving high productivity and short lead times in structural steel building systems. This investigation also illustrates how the adoption of a limited set of modular components can be used to decouple design decisions, and standardize different types of processes.

  16. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    by visualizing coworkers’ task progress, automatic notifications based on context awareness, and record filing of task statuses and completions. This paper presents methods to sense and detect highly mobile workers’ tasks phases in large building complexes. Large building complexes restrict the technologies...... requirements on the accuracy of the indoor positioning, and thus come with low deployment and maintenance effort in real-world settings. We evaluated the proposed methods in a large hospital complex, where the highly mobile workers were recruited among the non-clinical workforce. The evaluation is based...... on manually labelled real-world data collected over 4 days of regular work life of the mobile workforce. The collected data yields 83 tasks in total involving 8 different orderlies from a major university hospital with a building area of 160, 000 m2. The results show that the proposed methods can distinguish...

  17. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Wiktor S; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A; Rekling, Jens C

    2016-02-01

    Study of acute brain stem slice preparations in vitro has advanced our understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. In the current study, we have developed an organotypic slice culture preparation containing the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the core inspiratory rhythm generator of the ventrolateral brain stem. We measured bilateral synchronous network oscillations, using calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes, in both ventrolateral (presumably the preBötC) and dorsomedial regions of slice cultures at 7-43 days in vitro. These calcium oscillations appear to be driven by periodic bursts of inspiratory neuronal activity, because whole cell recordings from ventrolateral neurons in culture revealed inspiratory-like drive potentials, and no oscillatory activity was detected from glial fibrillary associated protein-expressing astrocytes in cultures. Acute slices showed a burst frequency of 10.9 ± 4.2 bursts/min, which was not different from that of brain stem slice cultures (13.7 ± 10.6 bursts/min). However, slice cocultures that include two cerebellar explants placed along the dorsolateral border of the brainstem displayed up to 193% faster burst frequency (22.4 ± 8.3 bursts/min) and higher signal amplitude (340%) compared with acute slices. We conclude that preBötC-containing slice cultures retain inspiratory-like rhythmic function and therefore may facilitate lines of experimentation that involve extended incubation (e.g., genetic transfection or chronic drug exposure) while simultaneously being amenable to imaging and electrophysiology at cellular, synaptic, and network levels. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Wiktor S; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Acute brainstem slice preparations in vitro have advanced understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. Here, we developed an organotypic slice culture preparation...

  19. Mycoplasma hyorhinis is a potential pathogen of porcine respiratory disease complex that aggravates pneumonia caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Oh, Yu-Ri; Hwang, Min-A; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Sang-Won

    2016-09-01

    The porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) caused by numerous bacterial and viral agents has a great impact on pig industry worldwide. Although Mycoplasma hyorhinis (Mhr) has been frequently isolated from lung lesions from pigs with PRDC, the pathological importance of Mhr may have been underestimated. In this study, 383 serum samples obtained from seven herds with a history of PRDC were tested for specific antibodies to Mhr, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp), and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Seropositive rates of PRRSV were significantly correlated with those of Mhr (correlation coefficient, 0.862; P-value, 0.013), but not with those of Mhp (correlation coefficient, -0.555; P-value, 0.196). In vivo experiments demonstrated that pigs co-infected with Mhr and PRRSV induced more severe lung lesions than pigs infected with Mhr or PRRSV alone. These findings suggest that Mhr is closely associated with pneumonia caused by PRRSV and provide important information on Mhr pathogenesis within PRDC. Therefore, effective PRDC control strategies should also consider the potential impact of Mhr in the pathogenesis of PRDC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Overview of the ITER Tokamak complex building and integration of plant systems toward construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: jean-jacques.cordier@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bak, Joo-Shik [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Baudry, Alain [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Benchikhoune, Magali [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Carafa, Leontin; Chiocchio, Stefano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Darbour, Romaric [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Elbez, Joelle; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Jeannoutot, Thomas; Kotamaki, Miikka; Kuehn, Ingo; Lee, Andreas; Levesy, Bruno; Orlandi, Sergio [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Packer, Rachel [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Patisson, Laurent; Reich, Jens; Rigoni, Giuliano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Tokamak complex consists of Tokamak, diagnostic and tritium buildings. The Tokamak machine is located in the bioshield pit of the Tokamak building. Plant systems are implemented in the three buildings and are strongly interfacing with the Tokamak. The reference baseline (3D) configuration is a set of over 1000 models that today defines in an exhaustive way the overall layout of Tokamak and plant systems, needed for fixing the interfaces and to complete the construction design of the buildings. During the last two years, one of the main ITER challenges was to improve the maturity of the plant systems layout in order to confirm their integration in the building final design and freeze the interface definitions in-between the systems and to the buildings. The propagation of safety requirements in the design of the nuclear building like confinement, fire zoning and radiation shielding is of first priority. A major effort was placed by ITER Organization together with the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect Engineer as a joint team to fix the interfaces and the loading conditions to buildings. The most demanding systems in terms of interface definition are water cooling, cryogenic, detritiation, vacuum, cable trays and building services. All penetrations through the walls for piping, cables and other equipment have been defined, as well as all temporary openings needed for the installation phase. Project change requests (PCR) impacting the Tokamak complex buildings have been implemented in a tight allocated time schedule. The most demanding change was to implement a new design of the Tokamak basic machine supporting system. The 18 supporting columns of the cryostat (2001 baseline) were replaced at the end of 2012 by a concrete crown and radial concrete ribs linked to the basemat and to the bioshield surrounding the Tokamak. The change was implemented successfully in the building construction design to allow basemat construction phase being performed

  1. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  2. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs

  3. [Evaluation of Xpert® MTB/RIF technique for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detection in extra-respiratory specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Balcells, M Elvira; Castillo, Claudia; Miranda, Carolina; Geoffroy, Enrique; Román, Juan C; Wozniak, Aniela

    2017-08-01

    Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) represents the 26.2% of total TB cases in Chile. Culture is the gold standard method, but the process is extremely slow. Xpert®MTB/RIF technique detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBc) through real time PCR in less than 3 h. However, it has been validated only for respiratory specimens. We aimed to determine the performance of Xpert®MTB/RIF test in detecting MTBc in extra-respiratory specimens compared with a combined gold standard consisting in a positive (liquid and solid) mycobacterial culture and/or a positive validated molecular method (q-RPC, Cobas®TaqMan®-MTB). Fifty extra-respiratory specimens were analyzed, from which 25 were positive and 25 negative for MTBc based on the combined gold standard. The 25 positive specimens had a positive result by Xpert®MTB/RIF; from the 25 negative specimens, 24 had a negative result and one had a positive result. We obtained an overall concordance of 98% between Xpert®MTB/RIF and the combined gold standard. Xpert®MTB/RIF test was able to detect 12 smear-negative specimens and 3 culture-negative specimens, all of them corresponding to extra-pulmonary TB cases. Xpert®MTB/RIF showed similar sensitivity to q-RPC in detecting MTBc in extra-respiratory specimens. This procedure allowed a substantial reduction in the time of diagnosis.

  4. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  5. Respiratory Complex I in Bos taurus and Paracoccus denitrificans Pumps Four Protons across the Membrane for Every NADH Oxidized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew J Y; Blaza, James N; Varghese, Febin; Hirst, Judy

    2017-03-24

    Respiratory complex I couples electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane to support the proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. The proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I (i.e. the number of protons pumped for each two electrons transferred) underpins all mechanistic proposals. However, it remains controversial and has not been determined for any of the bacterial enzymes that are exploited as model systems for the mammalian enzyme. Here, we describe a simple method for determining the proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I in inverted membrane vesicles under steady-state ADP-phosphorylating conditions. Our method exploits the rate of ATP synthesis, driven by oxidation of NADH or succinate with different sections of the respiratory chain engaged in catalysis as a proxy for the rate of proton translocation and determines the stoichiometry of complex I by reference to the known stoichiometries of complexes III and IV. Using vesicles prepared from mammalian mitochondria (from Bos taurus) and from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, we show that four protons are pumped for every two electrons transferred in both cases. By confirming the four-proton stoichiometry for mammalian complex I and, for the first time, demonstrating the same value for a bacterial complex, we establish the utility of P. denitrificans complex I as a model system for the mammalian enzyme. P. denitrificans is the first system described in which mutagenesis in any complex I core subunit may be combined with quantitative proton-pumping measurements for mechanistic studies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Para-Functionalized NCN-Pincer Palladium and Platinum Complexes as Building Blocks in Organometallic Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, Martijn Quico

    2002-01-01

    A rapidly evolving field in chemistry is the application of organometallic and coordination complexes as building blocks or active components for the construction of new materials exhibiting specific catalytic, redox, optical or sensor activities. A central theme in the construction of these

  7. Community Learning Campus: It Takes a Simple Message to Build a Complex Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Education Canada asked Tom Thompson, president of Olds College and a prime mover behind the Community Learning Campus (CLC): What were the lessons learned from this unusually ambitious education project? Thompson mentions six lessons he learned from this complex project which include: (1) Dream big, build small, act now; (2) Keep a low profile at…

  8. Bilberry xyloglucan - novel building blocks containing ß-xylose within a complex structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.; Jong, de L.E.; Kabel, M.A.; Verhoef, R.P.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Bilberries are known to have one of the most complex xyloglucan structures described in the plant kingdom until now. To characterise this structure, xyloglucans were enzymatically degraded and the oligosaccharides obtained were analysed. More than 20 different building blocks were found to make up

  9. ROLE OF AZITHROMYCIN IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Sereda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the role of azithromycin (sumamed in treatment of respiratory diseases in children. It is noted that azithromycin is an efficient antibacterial drug for treatment of extramural and uncomplicated pneumonia and is the drug of choice for atypical mycoplasmal and chlamidia trachomatis pneumonia, as well as for relapses of chronic bronchopulmonary diseases in children. High sensitivity to azithromycin of main pneumotropic and atypical agents, convenience of application, presence of children's pharmaceutical forms, reduction of administration to 1 time per day in case of short treatment schedules, high efficiency and absence of serious adverse events make it possible to recommend this antibiotic as an available means for treatment of respiratory diseases in infants and senior children not only as in patients but as out patients as well.Key words: children, azithromycin, treatment, respiratory diseases.

  10. Evidence that metformin exerts its anti-diabetic effects through inhibition of complex 1 of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, M R; Doran, E; Halestrap, A P

    2000-01-01

    Although metformin is widely used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes, its mode of action remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that its primary site of action is through a direct inhibition of complex 1 of the respiratory chain. Metformin(50 microM) inhibited mitochondrial oxidation of glutamate+malate in hepatoma cells by 13 and 30% after 24 and 60 h exposure respectively, but succinate oxidation was unaffected. Metformin also caused time-dependent inhibition of complex 1 in isolated mitochondria, whereas in sub-mitochondrial particles inhibition was immediate but required very high metformin concentrations (K(0.5),79 mM). These data are compatible with the slow membrane-potential-driven accumulation of the positively charged drug within the mitochondrial matrix leading to inhibition of complex 1. Metformin inhibition of gluconeogenesis from L-lactate in isolated rat hepatocytes was also time- and concentration-dependent, and accompanied by changes in metabolite levels similar to those induced by other inhibitors of gluconeogenesis acting on complex 1. Freeze-clamped livers from metformin-treated rats exhibited similar changes in metabolite concentrations. We conclude that the drug's pharmacological effects are mediated, at least in part, through a time-dependent, self-limiting inhibition of the respiratory chain that restrains hepatic gluconeogenesis while increasing glucose utilization in peripheral tissues. Lactic acidosis, an occasional side effect, canal so be explained in this way. PMID:10839993

  11. Clinical Significance of Isolation of Mycobacterium avium Complex From Respiratory Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Shen

    2010-07-01

    Conclusion: Despite the increased frequency of recovering MAC from respiratory specimens, most cases did not meet the criteria of American Thoracic Society for clinically significant nontuberculous pulmonary disease. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of drugs against these MAC isolates might help to guide treatment, but further studies should be done.

  12. Report: Vapor Intrusion Health Risks at Bannister Federal Complex Not a Concern for Buildings 50 and 52, Unknown for Other Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0048, January 5, 2011. Testing at Bannister Federal Complex in February 2010 revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the soil vapor beneath the foundations of buildings 50 and 52.

  13. DINUCLEAR COMPLEXES AS BUILDING BLOCKS FOR TETRA-NUCLEAR MACROCYCLIC COMPLEXES WITH DITHIOLATE MACROCYCLIC LIGAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lozan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel tri-, tetra- and pentanuclear complexes composed of dinuclear LM units (M=Co, Ni, Zn; L=24-membered macrocyclic hexaaza-dithiophenolate ligand and ferrocenecarboxylate ([CpFeC5H4CO2]ˉ, 1,1’-ferrocenedicarboxy-late ([Fe(C5H4-CO22]2ˉ, acetylene-dicarboxylate, terephthalate, isophthalate, and naphthalene diimide dicarboxylate groups is reported. The complexes, have been synthesized and characterised by UV/Vis-, IR-, NMR-spectroscopy, Cyclovoltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. Each dicarboxylate dianion acts as a quadridentate bridging ligand linking two bioctahedral LM2 units via µ1,3-bridging carboxylate functions to generate discrete dications with a central LM2(O2C-R-CO2M2L core. The magnetic properties of these compounds reveal the presence of weak ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the NiII ions of the dinuclear subunits and negligible coupling across the dicarboxylate bridges.

  14. Innovative development of the building complex on the basis of environmental and energy-efficient technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kireeva Ekaterina E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to determine the priorities of innovative development of the building complex on the basis of the analysis of the environmental and energy-efficient technologies that were applied. Analysis of energy efficiency and environmental technologies in the construction industry showed that residential housing consumes 23% of the total primary energy supply in Russia. The construction sector is responsible for 30% of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Russia annually spends approximately 170 million tons of fuel equivalents for heating, ventilation and air conditioning of residential housing. Comparing Russia with the countries of similar climatic conditions it should be noted that energy consumption value in Russia is significantly higher (the excess ranges from 24 to 47% depending upon the building. Having analyzed the housing the authors offer the ways of building complex innovative development that mean the following: reindustrialization of material and technical resources of construction companies and the introduction of managerial innovations; the development and application of new high-tech building structures, products and materials that are to ensure the economic and environmental efficiency of buildings’ construction and operation.

  15. Machine-Building for Fuel and Energy Complex: Perspective Forms of Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, S. M.; Goosen, E. V.; Pakhomova, E. A.; Rozhkova, O. V.; Mesyats, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the existing forms of cooperation between the authorities, business and science in the fuel and energy complex and the machine-building industry at the regional level. The possibilities of applying the concept of the “triple helix” and its multi-helix modifications for the implementation of the import substitution program for high- tech products have been considered.

  16. Trends in the structures development of the regional machine-building complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ershova I.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of market reforms of the Russian machine-building complex several distinct periods can be revealed. In this article the authors define periods of mass disintegration and spontaneous integration (since the beginning of the reforms until the financial crisis of 1996, post-crisis stabilization, directional specialization (2000-2008 and evolutionary development (since 2010. The economic consequences of the enterprises mergers and divisions are shown on the example of machine-building enterprises of the Middle Urals. The aim of this study is to substantiate the methodical approach to the selection of the optimal organizational structure for the machine-building business. The necessity of taking into account the extent of the personnel diversification and the production volume has been revealed for the optimum organizational structure determination in the machine-building associations. The authors have analyzed sales profitability of the 2745 machine-building enterprises, depending on the production scale and industry sector. The factors affecting the development of cooperative ties and outsourcing have been defined. The authors have made a conclusion that it is necessary to form technological chains as a new kind of business associations.

  17. THE FORMATION OF THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE ENTERPRISES OF MACHINE-BUILDING COMPLEX OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zbyrannyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to analyse the existing approaches to determine the value of the production of innovative products and innovation in enterprises of machine-building complex of Ukraine in order to improve their level of competitiveness. Methodology. Statistical analysis and generalization of scientific approaches to the formation of the competitiveness of machine-building enterprises. Results of the of the analyzed approaches allowed to identify the cause of the imperfection of innovation policy in engineering. According to the research, the number of machine-building enterprises engaged in innovation activity, constantly shrinks; the share of innovative products in the total is only 3.5-4%, and the volume of imports of high-tech products exceeding the size of own production; the level of knowledge-intensive industrial production is only 0.3%. All this slows down the process of creating competitive products and as a result, the failure to provide highly own products to other industries, take a niche world of mechanical engineering. Practical implications. Ensure accelerated economic growth of the country as the defining condition for implementation of the European integration aspirations of Ukraine in the short term requires the intensification of innovative activity of the machine-building enterprises. The current state of innovation activity of enterprises in Ukraine is characterized by a number of negative factors: the internal environment of the majority of machine-building enterprises does not correspond to the market conditions of managing: high energy productions, the growth of the degree of wear and tear of fixed assets and reduce investment to update them, the lack of introduction of advanced production and resource-saving technologies, reducing innovation activity due to lack of financial resources significantly affect the level of the competitive machine-building enterprises. Value/ originality systematic approaches to determining the

  18. Optic atrophy 1 mediates coenzyme Q-responsive regulation of respiratory complex IV activity in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in brain mitochondria is significantly lower in aged mice than in young mice, and the reduced OCR is rescued by administration of water-solubilized CoQ10 to aged mice via drinking water. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. Here, we show that the activity of respiratory complex IV (CIV) in brain mitochondria declined in aged mice than in young mice, with no significant change in individual respiratory complex levels and their supercomplex assembly. Reduced CIV activity in the aged mice coincided with reduced binding of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) to CIV. Both reduced activity and OPA1 binding of CIV were rescued by water-solubilized CoQ10 administration to aged mice via drinking water. OCR and the activity and OPA1 binding of CIV in isolated brain mitochondria from aged mice were restored by incubation with CoQ10, but not in the presence of 15-deoxy-prostaglandin J2, an inhibitor of a GTPase effector domain-containing GTPase such as OPA1 and DRP1. By contrast, the CoQ10-responsive restoration of OCR in the isolated mitochondria was not inhibited by Mdivi-1, a selective inhibitor of DRP1. Thus, we propose a novel function of OPA1 in regulating the CIV activity in brain mitochondria in response to CoQ10. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advancing the manufacture of complex geometry GFRC for today's building envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Henriksen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin-walled glass fibre reinforced concrete (GFRC panels are being used as the primary cladding material on many landmark buildings especially in the last decade. GFRC is an ideal material for building envelopes because it is durable, it can resist fire and the environmental impact is low compared to other materials, because the base materials used in the production of GFRC are widely available throughout the world. Thin-walled GFRC was initially developed as a cladding material in the 1970s and 1980s where the majority of the available research lies. The introduction of 3D CAD software has enabled the design of buildings with complex shapes that, in the past, would have been rationalised to meet budget and time constraints. However, when GFRC has been proposed for buildings with a complex free-form geometry it has been replaced with alternative materials such as glass reinforced plastic (GFRP due to the high cost and time required to fabricate suitable GFRC panels using conventional manufacturing methods. The literature showed that empirical performance characterization of GFRC had not been researched in detail regarding the limits of functionality or any systematic approach to understanding their use in complex geometry building envelopes.As a first step the key architectural demands, the main barriers and limitations in the manufacture of complex geometry thin-walled GFRC were identified by interviewing and visiting manufacturers, designers and key buildings. This identified the key barrier to be the process of producing the mould for casting the complex geometry GFRC panels. Solutions to resolve them were tested over several stages for each of the main production methods most suited for the manufacture of thin-walled GFRC, namely; the automated premixed method, the premixed method and the sprayed method. The results from the laboratory testing over all the stages, and the prototype structure manufactured with the identified solution from

  20. The mitochondrial DNA mutation ND6*14,484C associated with leber hereditary optic neuropathy, leads to deficiency of complex I of the respiratory chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, R. J.; van Galen, M. J.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.; van den Bogert, C.

    1995-01-01

    The electron transfer activity of Complex I of the respiratory chain and Complex I-linked ATP synthesis were investigated in leukocytes of four males affected by Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and a mutation in the ND6 gene at nucleotide position 14,484 of mtDNA. The electron transfer activity in

  1. TRENDS AND ISSUES IN OF DEVELOPMENT OF REGION MACHINE BUILDING COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виталий Николаевич Маковеев

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transition of the Russian economy to an innovation type of development, selected by leaders of the country as a priority one, creates the need of solving number of problems. A key one is the need for large-scale renovation of the economy’s production basis, which can not be implemented without a modern machine building sector.Purpose. To analyze development of machine building complex in theVologda region against the all-Russian background, to identify common trends and challenges of the sector’s development.Methodology. Methods of system and structural analysis, comparison, differences and similarities analysis, deduction and induction were used. Official statistics, as well as the works of prominent scientists in this field, served as an information basis for the study.Results. The author conducted an analysis of basic production assets, growth rates, the financial situation, investments, levels of profitability, staffing and salary levels of employees of machine building sector of the Vologda Region and Russia. The main trends and problems of the sector development were identified. Measures that are able to change the situation were proposed.Practical implications. The research materials could be useful for regional authorities in forming industrial and innovation policy, as well as for all those interested in problems of machine building development.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-24

  2. Building-block architecture of botulinum toxin complex: Conformational changes provide insights into the hemagglutination ability of the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Suzuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum produces the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT. Previously, we provided evidence for the “building-block” model of botulinum toxin complex (TC. In this model, a single BoNT is associated with a single nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA, yielding M-TC; three HA-70 molecules are attached and form M-TC/HA-70, and one to three “arms” of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer (two HA-33 and one HA-17 further bind to M-TC/HA-70 via HA-17 and HA-70 binding, yielding one-, two-, and three-arm L-TC. Of all TCs, only the three-arm L-TC caused hemagglutination. In this study, we determined the solution structures for the botulinum TCs using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. The mature three-arm L-TC exhibited the shape of a “bird spreading its wings”, in contrast to the model having three “arms”, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. SAXS images indicated that one of the three arms of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer bound to both HA-70 and BoNT. Taken together, these findings regarding the conformational changes in the building-block architecture of TC may explain why only three-arm L-TC exhibited hemagglutination.

  3. A complex homeopathic preparation for the symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory infections associated with the common cold: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Volker; Klein, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The use of complementary medicines is large and growing in both the United States and Europe. To compare the effects of a complex homeopathic preparation (Engystol; Heel GmbH, Baden-Baden, Germany) with those of conventional therapies with antihistamines, antitussives, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on upper respiratory symptoms of the common cold in a setting closely related to everyday clinical practice. Nonrandomized, observational study over a treatment period of maximally two weeks. Eighty-five general and homeopathic practices in Germany. Three hundred ninety-seven patients with upper respiratory symptoms of the common cold. Engystol-based therapy or common over-the-counter treatments for the common cold. Patients receiving this homeopathic treatment were allowed other short-term medications, but long-term use of analgesics, antibiotics, and antiinflammatory agents was not permitted. Patients were allowed nonpharmacological therapies such as vitamins, thermotherapies, and others. The effects of treatment were evaluated on the variables fatigue, sensation of illness, chill/tremor, aching joints, overall severity of illness, sum of all clinical variables, temperature, and time to symptomatic improvement. Both treatment regimens provided significant symptomatic relief, and this homeopathic treatment was noninferior in a noninferiority analysis. Significantly more patients (P common cold in patients and practitioners choosing an integrative approach to medical care.

  4. Safety, bioavailability and mechanism of action of nitric oxide to control Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in calves entering a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; Vimalanathan, S; Prema, D; Church, J S; Reudink, M W; Nation, N; Miller, C C

    2014-04-01

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDc), a multi-factorial disease, negatively impacts the cattle industry. Nitric oxide (NO), a naturally occurring molecule, may have utility controlling incidence of BRDc. Safety, bioavailability, toxicology and tolerance/stress of administering NO to cattle is evaluated herein. Thirteen, crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled commercial weaned beef calves were treated multiple times intranasally over a 4 week period with either a nitric oxide releasing solution (treatment) or saline (control). Exhaled NO, methemoglobin percent (MetHg) and serum nitrites demonstrated biological availability as a result of treatment. Cortisol levels, tissue nitrites, behavior and gross and macroscopic pathology of organs were all normal. Moreover, preliminary in vitro studies using Mannheimia haemolytica, Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis, Bovine Parainfluenza-3 and Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, suggest a potential explanation for the previously demonstrated efficacy for BRDc. These data confirm the bioavailability, safety and lack of residual of NO treatment to cattle, along with the bactericidal and virucidal effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infection of differentiated airway epithelial cells from caprine lungs by viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Keil, Günther M; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Ganter, Martin; Herrler, Georg

    2014-05-14

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) are important pathogens associated with the bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Non-bovine ruminants such as goats may also be infected and serve as a virus reservoir to be considered in the development of control strategies. To evaluate the susceptibility of caprine airway epithelial cells to infection by viruses of BRDC, we established a culture system for differentiated caprine epithelial cells. For this purpose, we generated precision-cut lung slices (PCLS), in which cells are retained in their original structural configuration and remain viable for more than a week. The three bovine viruses were found to preferentially infect different cell types. Ciliated epithelial cells were the major target cells of BPIV3, whereas BHV-1 preferred basal cells. Cells infected by BRSV were detected in submucosal cell layers. This spectrum of susceptible cells is the same as that reported recently for infected bovine PCLS. While infection of caprine cells by BRSV and BPIV3 was as efficient as that reported for bovine cells, infection of caprine cells by BHV-1 required a tenfold higher dose of infectious virus as compared to infection of bovine airway cells. These results support the notion that non-bovine ruminants may serve as a reservoir for viruses of BRDC and introduce a culture system to analyze virus infection of differentiated airway epithelial cells from the caprine lung. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of the Hydrophilic Domain of Respiratory Complex I from Thermus thermophilus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonid A. Sazanov; Philip Hinchliffe

    2006-01-01

    ...) of complex I from Thermus thermophilus has been solved at 3.3 angstrom resolution. This subcomplex consists of eight subunits and contains all the redox centers of the enzyme, including nine iron-sulfur clusters...

  7. 76 FR 28789 - Draft Alert Entitled “Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease From Dampness in Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Respiratory Disease From Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings'' AGENCY... Occupational Respiratory Disease from Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and other Nonindustrial Buildings... is to provide workers and employers with information necessary for prevention of respiratory disease...

  8. Biocompatibility and Stability of Polysaccharide Polyelectrolyte Complexes Aimed at Respiratory Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rodrigues

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS and chondroitin sulfate (CHS are natural polymers with demonstrated applicability in drug delivery, while nanoparticles are one of the most explored carriers for transmucosal delivery of biopharmaceuticals. In this work we have prepared CS/CHS nanoparticles and associated for the first time the therapeutic protein insulin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA was also used to enable comparison of behaviors regarding differences in molecular weight (5.7 kDa versus 67 kDa. Nanoparticles of approximately 200 nm and positive zeta potential around +20 mV were obtained. These parameters remained stable for up to 1 month at 4 °C. Proteins were associated with efficiencies of more than 50%. The release of FITC-BSA in PBS pH 7.4 was more sustained (50% in 24 h than that of insulin (85% in 24 h. The biocompatibility of nanoparticles was tested in Calu-3 and A549 cells by means of three different assays. The metabolic assay MTT, the determination of lactate dehydrogenase release, and the quantification of the inflammatory response generated by cell exposure to nanoparticles have indicated an absence of overt toxicity. Overall, the results suggest good indications on the application of CS/CHS nanoparticles in respiratory transmucosal protein delivery, but the set of assays should be widened to clarify obtained results.

  9. RNA 3'-end mismatch excision by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein nsp10/nsp14 exoribonuclease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Imbert, Isabelle; Subissi, Lorenzo; Gluais, Laure; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-06-12

    The replication/transcription complex of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus is composed of at least 16 nonstructural proteins (nsp1-16) encoded by the ORF-1a/1b. This complex includes replication enzymes commonly found in positive-strand RNA viruses, but also a set of RNA-processing activities unique to some nidoviruses. The nsp14 protein carries both exoribonuclease (ExoN) and (guanine-N7)-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) activities. The nsp14 ExoN activity ensures a yet-uncharacterized function in the virus life cycle and must be regulated to avoid nonspecific RNA degradation. In this work, we show that the association of nsp10 with nsp14 stimulates >35-fold the ExoN activity of the latter while playing no effect on N7-MTase activity. Nsp10 mutants unable to interact with nsp14 are not proficient for ExoN activation. The nsp10/nsp14 complex hydrolyzes double-stranded RNA in a 3' to 5' direction as well as a single mismatched nucleotide at the 3'-end mimicking an erroneous replication product. In contrast, di-, tri-, and longer unpaired ribonucleotide stretches, as well as 3'-modified RNAs, resist nsp10/nsp14-mediated excision. In addition to the activation of nsp16-mediated 2'-O-MTase activity, nsp10 also activates nsp14 in an RNA processing function potentially connected to a replicative mismatch repair mechanism.

  10. Axiomatic design in large systems complex products, buildings and manufacturing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Nam

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a synthesis of recent developments in Axiomatic Design theory and its application in large complex systems. Introductory chapters provide concise tutorial materials for graduate students and new practitioners, presenting the fundamentals of Axiomatic Design and relating its key concepts to those of model-based systems engineering. A mathematical exposition of design axioms is also provided. The main body of the book, which represents a concentrated treatment of several applications, is divided into three parts covering work on: complex products; buildings; and manufacturing systems. The book shows how design work in these areas can benefit from the scientific and systematic underpinning provided by Axiomatic Design, and in so doing effectively combines the state of the art in design research with practice. All contributions were written by an international group of leading proponents of Axiomatic Design. The book concludes with a call to action motivating further research into the engineeri...

  11. Investigation into transmission of complex sound signals in the human respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Nuzhdenko, A. V.; Tagiltsev, A. A.; Kostiv, A. E.

    2010-07-01

    Lumen probing of human lungs with complex acoustic signals in the frequency band from 100 to 1000 Hz made it possible for the first time to explicitly confirm the concurrent existence of two mechanisms differing in propagation velocity behind the transmission of acoustic vibrations from the oral cavity to the thoracic cage surface. The numerical values of propagation time lags allowed one of these mechanisms to be associated with combined aerial-structural transmission and the other, with purely structural transmission.

  12. A recurring mutation in the respiratory complex 1 protein NDUFB11 is responsible for a novel form of X-linked sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Crispin, Andrew W; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Campagna, Dean R; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Sousa, Cristovao M; Kafina, Martin D; Schmidt, Paul J; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Porter, John; May, Alison; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Heeney, Matthew M; Kimmelman, Alec; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Paw, Barry H; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fleming, Mark D

    2016-10-13

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited blood disorders characterized by pathological mitochondrial iron deposition in erythroid precursors. Each known cause has been attributed to a mutation in a protein associated with heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, mitochondrial translation, or a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Here, we describe a recurring mutation, c.276_278del, p.F93del, in NDUFB11, a mitochondrial respiratory complex I-associated protein encoded on the X chromosome, in 5 males with a variably syndromic, normocytic CSA. The p.F93del mutation results in respiratory insufficiency and loss of complex I stability and activity in patient-derived fibroblasts. Targeted introduction of this allele into K562 erythroleukemia cells results in a proliferation defect with minimal effect on erythroid differentiation potential, suggesting the mechanism of anemia in this disorder. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH)

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  14. Swine Influenza Virus and Association with the Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex in Pig Farms in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Cibulski, S P; Andrade, C P; Teixeira, T F; Varela, A P M; Scheffer, C M; Franco, A C; de Almeida, L L; Roehe, P M

    2016-05-01

    Despite the putative endemic status of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) infections, data on the occurrence of swine influenza outbreaks are scarce in Brazil. The aim of this study was to detect and subtype swIAVs from six outbreaks of porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) in southern Brazil. Nasal swabs were collected from 66 piglets with signs of respiratory disease in six herds. Lung tissue samples were collected from six necropsied animals. Virus detection was performed by PCR screening and confirmed by virus isolation and hemagglutination (HA). Influenza A subtyping was performed by a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) to detect the A(H1N1)pdm09; other swIAV subtypes were determined by multiplex RT-PCR. In lung tissues, the major bacterial and viral pathogens associated with PRDC (Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and PCV2) were investigated. In some affected pigs, clinico-pathological evaluations were conducted. Influenza A was detected by screening PCR in 46 of 66 swab samples and from five of six lungs. Virus was recovered from pigs of all six herds. Subtype A(H1N1)pdm09 was detected in four of six herds and H1N2 in the other two herds. In lung tissues, further agents involved in PRDC were detected in all cases; Pasteurella multocida was identified in five of six samples and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in three of six. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (1/6), Haemophilus parasuis (1/6) and PCV2 (1/6) were also detected. These findings indicate that subtypes A(H1N1)pdm09 and H1N2 were present in pigs in southern Brazil and were associated with PRDC outbreaks. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, D; Zock, J-P; Plana, E; Heinrich, J; Tischer, C; Jacobsen Bertelsen, R; Sunyer, J; Künzli, N; Villani, S; Olivieri, M; Verlato, G; Soon, A; Schlünssen, V; Gunnbjörnsdottir, M I; Jarvis, D

    2017-09-01

    We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (Pbuilding age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Advances in Multi-Sensor Scanning and Visualization of Complex Plants: the Utmost Case of a Reactor Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullo, J.-F.; Thibault, G.; Boucheny, C.

    2015-02-01

    In a context of increased maintenance operations and workers generational renewal, a nuclear owner and operator like Electricité de France (EDF) is interested in the scaling up of tools and methods of "as-built virtual reality" for larger buildings and wider audiences. However, acquisition and sharing of as-built data on a large scale (large and complex multi-floored buildings) challenge current scientific and technical capacities. In this paper, we first present a state of the art of scanning tools and methods for industrial plants with very complex architecture. Then, we introduce the inner characteristics of the multi-sensor scanning and visualization of the interior of the most complex building of a power plant: a nuclear reactor building. We introduce several developments that made possible a first complete survey of such a large building, from acquisition, processing and fusion of multiple data sources (3D laser scans, total-station survey, RGB panoramic, 2D floor plans, 3D CAD as-built models). In addition, we present the concepts of a smart application developed for the painless exploration of the whole dataset. The goal of this application is to help professionals, unfamiliar with the manipulation of such datasets, to take into account spatial constraints induced by the building complexity while preparing maintenance operations. Finally, we discuss the main feedbacks of this large experiment, the remaining issues for the generalization of such large scale surveys and the future technical and scientific challenges in the field of industrial "virtual reality".

  17. How the strengths of Lisp-family languages facilitate building complex and flexible bioinformatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomtchouk, Bohdan B; Weitz, Edmund; Karp, Peter D; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2016-12-31

    We present a rationale for expanding the presence of the Lisp family of programming languages in bioinformatics and computational biology research. Put simply, Lisp-family languages enable programmers to more quickly write programs that run faster than in other languages. Languages such as Common Lisp, Scheme and Clojure facilitate the creation of powerful and flexible software that is required for complex and rapidly evolving domains like biology. We will point out several important key features that distinguish languages of the Lisp family from other programming languages, and we will explain how these features can aid researchers in becoming more productive and creating better code. We will also show how these features make these languages ideal tools for artificial intelligence and machine learning applications. We will specifically stress the advantages of domain-specific languages (DSLs): languages that are specialized to a particular area, and thus not only facilitate easier research problem formulation, but also aid in the establishment of standards and best programming practices as applied to the specific research field at hand. DSLs are particularly easy to build in Common Lisp, the most comprehensive Lisp dialect, which is commonly referred to as the 'programmable programming language'. We are convinced that Lisp grants programmers unprecedented power to build increasingly sophisticated artificial intelligence systems that may ultimately transform machine learning and artificial intelligence research in bioinformatics and computational biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Cation modules as building blocks forming supramolecular assemblies with planar receptor-anion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Honsho, Yoshihito; Seki, Shu; Maeda, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-30

    Ion-based materials were fabricated through ion pairing of planar receptor-anion complexes and cation modules as negatively and positively charged building blocks, respectively. Anion receptors that could not form soft materials by themselves provided mesophases upon anion binding and subsequent ion pairing with aliphatic cation modules. The mesogenic behaviors were affected by structural modification of both the cation module and the anion receptor. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements suggested the formation of columnar mesophases with contributions from charge-by-charge and charge-segregated arrangements. Flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements further revealed a higher charge-carrier mobility in the assembly with a large contribution from the charge-segregated arrangement than in the charge-by-charge-based assembly.

  19. Building flexibility and managing complexity in community mental health: lessons learned in a large urban centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Saab, Dima; Francombe Pridham, Kate; Aery, Anjana; Nakhost, Arash

    2018-01-24

    Across many jurisdictions, adults with complex mental health and social needs face challenges accessing appropriate supports due to system fragmentation and strict eligibility criteria of existing services. To support this underserviced population, Toronto's local health authority launched two novel community mental health models in 2014, inspired by Flexible Assertive Community Team principles. This study explores service user and provider perspectives on the acceptability of these services, and lessons learned during early implementation. We purposively sampled 49 stakeholders (staff, physicians, service users, health systems stakeholders) and conducted 17 semi-structured qualitative interviews and 5 focus groups between October 23, 2014 and March 2, 2015, exploring stakeholder perspectives on the newly launched team based models, as well as activities and strategies employed to support early implementation. Interviews and focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings revealed wide-ranging endorsement for the two team-based models' success in engaging the target population of adults with complex service needs. Implementation strengths included the broad recognition of existing service gaps, the use of interdisciplinary teams and experienced service providers, broad partnerships and collaboration among various service sectors, training and team building activities. Emerging challenges included lack of complementary support services such as suitable housing, organizational contexts reluctant to embrace change and risk associated with complexity, as well as limited service provider and organizational capacity to deliver evidence-based interventions. Findings identified implementation drivers at the practitioner, program, and system levels, specific to the implementation of community mental health interventions for adults with complex health and social needs. These can inform future efforts to address the health

  20. The clinical course of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Correia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of nine related species, are opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, associated with a poor prognosis and patient-to-patient transmissibility. The pulmonary deterioration in Bcc-colonised/ infected patients has a heterogeneous pattern leading, sometimes, to a fulminant development – the cepacia syndrome.To evaluate the relationship between colonisation/ infection by the different Bcc species and the clinical course, the authors carried out a retrospective study of 31 CF patients with Bcc bacteria isolations followed at Hospital de Santa Maria from January 1995 to March 2006. Patients were categorised into two groups: Group I, with intermittent isolations and Group II with chronic isolations. The prevalence of Bcc species was as follows: B. cepacia 57%, B. cenocepacia 43%, B. multivorans 7%, B. stabilis 13%. Three of the patients died of cepacia syndrome. The species B. cepacia and B. stabilis, usually less frequent in CF populations of Europe and America, were isolated in a considerable percentage of the patients examined. No correlation could be established between the species and the clinical outcome.Deteriorated but not stable patients from group II, whose lung function and pulmonary exacerbationcaused hospitalisation could be retrospectively analysed, exhibited significant differences in the number of hospitalisations and pulmonary function (FEV1 in the year prior to and the years following Bcc isolation.Based on the available data, it is not currently possible to outline preventive measures through the molecular characterisation of Bcc isolates, reinforcing the notion that the recommended control measures must be followed. Resumo: O complexo Burkholderia cepacia (Bcc é um grupo constituído por nove espécies de bactérias patogénicas oportunistas na fibrose quística (FQ, associadas a prognóstico mais reservado e a infecção cruzada entre

  1. [Risk factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome following surgeries for pediatric critical and complex congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shu-Rong; Zhang, Ying-Rui; Yu, Rong-Guo

    2016-12-20

    To explore the risk factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children receiving surgeries for critical and complex congenital heart disease (CCHD). According to the 2011's Berlin definition of ARDS, the clinical data were collected from 75 children without ARDS (group I) and 80 children with ARDS (group II) following surgeries for CCHD performed in the Department of Cardiac Surgery of our hospital from January, 2009 to May, 2014. Univariate analyses and logistic regression were used to analyze the risk factors contributing to the occurrence of ARDS following the surgeries. In the 80 patients who developed ARDS postoperatively in group II, 27 had mild ARDS, 25 had moderate ARDS, and 28 had severe ARDS; death occurred in 17 (21%) cases. Univariate analyses showed that 23 parameters were significantly different between groups I and II (Pfactors for postoperative ARDS. The risk factors of ARDS identified in these children can predict the occurrence of ARDS following the surgeries and timely interventions can improve the success rate in treatment of postoperative ARDS in children with CCHD.

  2. Prophylactic nitric oxide treatment reduces incidence of bovine respiratory disease complex in beef cattle arriving at a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; Church, J S; Cook, N J; Schaefer, A L; Miller, C

    2013-10-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked with the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring molecule with antimicrobial attributes. This study tests whether NO can prevent the symptoms associated with BRDc. Eighty-five, crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled commercial weaned beef calves were monitored and scored for temperature, white blood count, clinical score, hematology, cortisol levels and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. NO treatment or placebo were given once on arrival to the stockyard. After one week 87.5% of sick animals were from the control while 12.5% from treatment groups and after two weeks 72% and 28% respectively. Treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. These data show that NO treatment on arrival to the feedlot significantly decreased the incidence of BRDc in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Building University Capacity to Visualize Solutions to Complex Problems in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderson, D.; Veazey, P.; Raymond, V. L.; Kowalski, K.; Prakash, A.; Signor, B.

    2016-12-01

    Rapidly changing environments are creating complex problems across the globe, which are particular magnified in the Arctic. These worldwide challenges can best be addressed through diverse and interdisciplinary research teams. It is incumbent on such teams to promote co-production of knowledge and data-driven decision-making by identifying effective methods to communicate their findings and to engage with the public. Decision Theater North (DTN) is a new semi-immersive visualization system that provides a space for teams to collaborate and develop solutions to complex problems, relying on diverse sets of skills and knowledge. It provides a venue to synthesize the talents of scientists, who gather information (data); modelers, who create models of complex systems; artists, who develop visualizations; communicators, who connect and bridge populations; and policymakers, who can use the visualizations to develop sustainable solutions to pressing problems. The mission of Decision Theater North is to provide a cutting-edge visual environment to facilitate dialogue and decision-making by stakeholders including government, industry, communities and academia. We achieve this mission by adopting a multi-faceted approach reflected in the theater's design, technology, networking capabilities, user support, community relationship building, and strategic partnerships. DTN is a joint project of Alaska's National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (NSF EPSCoR) and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), who have brought the facility up to full operational status and are now expanding its development space to support larger team science efforts. Based in Fairbanks, Alaska, DTN is uniquely poised to address changes taking place in the Arctic and subarctic, and is connected with a larger network of decision theaters that include the Arizona State University Decision Theater Network and the McCain Institute in Washington, DC.

  4. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  5. buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the formation of the blasting seismic wave transmission is a complex mechanical process. Blasting seismic wave in different geological structure formation of the interface, diffraction, reflection, projection as the incident Angle is different, all kinds of waveform transformation, formation of different types, different amplitude, frequency and phase of various wave superimposition of random composite wave. Blasting seismic wave propagation distance (horizontal distance and height difference, and the performance of the explosive, explosive charge, charge structure, priming method, congestion state what international airport, the plane and direction, topography and geological conditions will affect the blasting vibration effect. In engineering by empirical formula to estimate main parameters of blasting seismic wave and the structure of the empirical formula is the result of the use of theoretical analysis, by blasting of similar rate to determine the parameters in the formula is made up of many engineering measured data from statistical analysis, or directly by the measured parameters of the blasting seismic wave is given. In this paper, through various points were set in the prison line large speed is the most value, using the mathematical statistics regression analysis method, attenuation coefficient is obtained, and then back to the formula of single ring allows maximum dose safety distance calculated.

  6. Quantum Computational Studies of Electron Transfer in Respiratory Complex III and its Application for Designing New Mitocan Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad Ahmed

    Electron transfer occurs in many biological systems which are imperative to sustain life; oxidative phosphorylation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and photophosphorylation in photosynthetic and plant cells are well-balanced and complementary processes. Investigating electron transfer in those natural systems provides detailed knowledge of the atomistic events that lead eventually to production of ATP, or harvesting light energy. Ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex (also known as bc 1 complex, or respiratory complex III) is a middle player in the electron transport proton pumping orchestra, located in the inner-mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in prokaryotes, which converts the free energy of redox reactions to electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane, following the fundamental chemiosmotic principle discovered by Peter Mitchell 1. In humans, the malfunctioned bc1 complex plays a major role in many neurodegenerative diseases, stress-induced aging, and cancer development, because it produces most of the reactive oxygen species, which are also involved in cellular signaling 2. The mitochondrial bc1 complex has an intertwined dimeric structure comprised of 11 subunits in each monomer, but only three of them have catalytic function, and those are the only domains found in bacterial bc1 complex. The core subunits include: Rieske domain, which incorporates iron-sulfur cluster [2Fe-2S]; trans-membrane cytochrome b domain, incorporating low-potential heme group (heme b L) and high-potential heme group (heme b H); and cytochrome c1 domain, containing heme c1 group and two separate binding sites, Qo (or QP) site where the hydrophobic electron carrier ubihydroquinol QH2 is oxidized, and Qi (or QN) site where ubiquinone molecule Q is reduced 3. Electrons and protons in the bc1 complex flow according to the proton-motive Q-cycle proposed by Mitchell, which includes a unique electron flow bifurcation at the Qo site. At this site, one

  7. Complexity, information loss, and model building: from neuro- to cognitive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecchi, F. Tito

    2007-06-01

    A scientific problem described within a given code is mapped by a corresponding computational problem, We call complexity (algorithmic) the bit length of the shortest instruction which solves the problem. Deterministic chaos in general affects a dynamical systems making the corresponding problem experimentally and computationally heavy, since one must reset the initial conditions at a rate higher than that of information loss (Kolmogorov entropy). One can control chaos by adding to the system new degrees of freedom (information swapping: information lost by chaos is replaced by that arising from the new degrees of freedom). This implies a change of code, or a new augmented model. Within a single code, changing hypotheses is equivalent to fixing different sets of control parameters, each with a different a-priori probability, to be then confirmed and transformed to an a-posteriori probability via Bayes theorem. Sequential application of Bayes rule is nothing else than the Darwinian strategy in evolutionary biology. The sequence is a steepest ascent algorithm, which stops once maximum probability has been reached. At this point the hypothesis exploration stops. By changing code (and hence the set of relevant variables) one can start again to formulate new classes of hypotheses . We call semantic complexity the number of accessible scientific codes, or models, that describe a situation. It is however a fuzzy concept, in so far as this number changes due to interaction of the operator with the system under investigation. These considerations are illustrated with reference to a cognitive task, starting from synchronization of neuron arrays in a perceptual area and tracing the putative path toward a model building.

  8. The Complexity of Antibody Responses Elicited against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoproteins in Hospitalized Children Younger than 2 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsina Trento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the antibody responses to human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV glycoproteins in very young children has been a matter of controversy. Both, immaturity of the immune system at very early age and suppression of the host immune response by high level of maternal antibodies have been claimed to limit the host antibody response to virus infection and to jeopardize the use of hRSV vaccines under development in that age group. Hence, the antibody responses to the two major hRSV glycoproteins (F and G were evaluated in children younger than 2 years, hospitalized with laboratory confirmed hRSV bronchiolitis. A strong negative correlation was found between the titre of circulating ELISA antibodies directed against either prefusion or postfusion F in the acute phase, but not age, and their fold change at convalescence. These changes correlated also with the level of circulating neutralizing antibodies in sera. As reported in adults, most neutralizing antibodies in a subset of tested sera could not be depleted with postfusion F, suggesting that they were mostly directed against prefusion-specific epitopes. In contrast, a weak negative association was found for group-specific anti-G antibodies in the acute phase and their fold change at convalescence only after correcting for the antigenic group of the infecting virus. In addition, large discrepancies were observed in some individuals between the antibody responses specific for F and G glycoproteins. These results illustrate the complexity of the anti-hRSV antibody responses in children experiencing a primary severe infection and the influence of preexisting maternal antibodies on the host response, factors that should influence hRSV serological studies as well as vaccine development.

  9. Efficiency of application of complex nanomodifying additives based on zeolites in building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PАNINА Tatyana Ivanovna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the possibility of using integrated multifunctional additives based on carbon nanotubes and zeolites (natural and synthetic in construction materials. The nanotubes were produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. The streamlined modification of the zeolite structure was performed by impregnating initial materials with a nanotubes-supported catalyst. The present experimental research focused on studying the effect of the synthesized nanomodifying additive on the physicomechanical properties of a composite construction material. Based on the obtained data, it was assumed that when entering the concrete structure, zeolite acts not only as mineral additive but also as nanotubes carrier under the chosen nanomodification conditions for the construction material, thereby allowing for uniform distribution of carbon nanoparticles in the composite matrix; on the other hand, the adsorption properties of zeolite can be reinforced by the presence of carbon in the structure. Structures of nanomodifying zeolites and obtained building composite were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Electron micrographs of the objects makes it possible to explain the processes of formation of the concrete structure, nanomodified complex multifunctional additive based on synthetic and natural zeolites and carbon nanomaterial.

  10. Aerodynamic calculations of the Sienna towers buildings complex with respect to human vibrations comfort of their users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Piotr; Flaga, Łukasz; Flaga, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents aerodynamic calculations of the Sienna Towers high buildings complex in Warsaw using authors mathematical model of the considered issue. Human vibrations comfort criteria were checked according to ISO/6897. Dynamic coefficients used in the calculations were obtained from wind tunnel tests.

  11. Distinct respiratory responses of soils to complex organic substrate are governed predominantly by soil architecture and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, F C; Todman, L C; Corstanje, R; Deeks, L K; Harris, J A; Pawlett, M; Whitmore, A P; Ritz, K

    2016-12-01

    Factors governing the turnover of organic matter (OM) added to soils, including substrate quality, climate, environment and biology, are well known, but their relative importance has been difficult to ascertain due to the interconnected nature of the soil system. This has made their inclusion in mechanistic models of OM turnover or nutrient cycling difficult despite the potential power of these models to unravel complex interactions. Using high temporal-resolution respirometery (6 min measurement intervals), we monitored the respiratory response of 67 soils sampled from across England and Wales over a 5 day period following the addition of a complex organic substrate (green barley powder). Four respiratory response archetypes were observed, characterised by different rates of respiration as well as different time-dependent patterns. We also found that it was possible to predict, with 95% accuracy, which type of respiratory behaviour a soil would exhibit based on certain physical and chemical soil properties combined with the size and phenotypic structure of the microbial community. Bulk density, microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity and microbial community phenotype were identified as the four most important factors in predicting the soils' respiratory responses using a Bayesian belief network. These results show that the size and constitution of the microbial community are as important as physico-chemical properties of a soil in governing the respiratory response to OM addition. Such a combination suggests that the 'architecture' of the soil, i.e. the integration of the spatial organisation of the environment and the interactions between the communities living and functioning within the pore networks, is fundamentally important in regulating such processes.

  12. Teaching about Complex Systems Is No Simple Matter: Building Effective Professional Development for Computer-Supported Complex Systems Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan A.; Anderson, Emma; Koehler-Yom, Jessica; Evans, Chad; Park, Miyoung; Sheldon, Josh; Schoenfeld, Ilana; Wendel, Daniel; Scheintaub, Hal; Klopfer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The recent next generation science standards in the United States have emphasized learning about complex systems as a core feature of science learning. Over the past 15 years, a number of educational tools and theories have been investigated to help students learn about complex systems; but surprisingly, little research has been devoted to…

  13. Advancing the manufacture of complex geometry GFRC for today's building envelopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriksen, T.N.

    2017-01-01

    Thin-walled glass fibre reinforced concrete (GFRC) panels are being used as the primary cladding material on many landmark buildings especially in the last decade. GFRC is an ideal material for building envelopes because it is durable, it can resist fire and the environmental impact is low compared

  14. [Coordinating complex nursing care: building a guidance tool for cancer patients, to direct them towards the coordination nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Raphael; Allenet, Benoit; Guillem, Pascale

    2017-04-19

    Introduction : following the 2009-2013 Cancer Plan, the experimental oncology nursing coordination (IDEC) showed a positive impact on the fluidity of care pathways. The 2014-2019 cancer plan guides their mission to complex cases. The objective of this study is to build a tool to facilitate the recruitment of patients likely to experience a complex path. Method : two phases have formed this research. The first one collected the elements of the dimensions that can predict the complexity of the care path, by focus group. The second consisted of reduction and selection of priority items and to estimate their importance by the Delphi method. Results : from the 12 selected items, two are recognized as a significant risk scoring, seven probably correlated with a complex pathway and three unrelated to the complexity of the pathways. Discussion : later this instrument would be validated by a test sample to evaluate its psychometric properties, metrological and feasibility.

  15. From Laser Scanning to Finite Element Analysis of Complex Buildings by Using a Semi-Automatic Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Giovanni; D’Altri, Antonio Maria; Bitelli, Gabriele; Selvaggi, Ilenia; Lambertini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new semi-automatic procedure to transform three-dimensional point clouds of complex objects to three-dimensional finite element models is presented and validated. The procedure conceives of the point cloud as a stacking of point sections. The complexity of the clouds is arbitrary, since the procedure is designed for terrestrial laser scanner surveys applied to buildings with irregular geometry, such as historical buildings. The procedure aims at solving the problems connected to the generation of finite element models of these complex structures by constructing a fine discretized geometry with a reduced amount of time and ready to be used with structural analysis. If the starting clouds represent the inner and outer surfaces of the structure, the resulting finite element model will accurately capture the whole three-dimensional structure, producing a complex solid made by voxel elements. A comparison analysis with a CAD-based model is carried out on a historical building damaged by a seismic event. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is effective and obtains comparable models in a shorter time, with an increased level of automation. PMID:26225978

  16. Accuracy Assessment of a Complex Building 3d Model Reconstructed from Images Acquired with a Low-Cost Uas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniga, E.; Chirilă, C.; Stătescu, F.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) are a wide used technique for acquisition in order to create buildings 3D models, providing the acquisition of a high number of images at very high resolution or video sequences, in a very short time. Since low-cost UASs are preferred, the accuracy of a building 3D model created using this platforms must be evaluated. To achieve results, the dean's office building from the Faculty of "Hydrotechnical Engineering, Geodesy and Environmental Engineering" of Iasi, Romania, has been chosen, which is a complex shape building with the roof formed of two hyperbolic paraboloids. Seven points were placed on the ground around the building, three of them being used as GCPs, while the remaining four as Check points (CPs) for accuracy assessment. Additionally, the coordinates of 10 natural CPs representing the building characteristic points were measured with a Leica TCR 405 total station. The building 3D model was created as a point cloud which was automatically generated based on digital images acquired with the low-cost UASs, using the image matching algorithm and different software like 3DF Zephyr, Visual SfM, PhotoModeler Scanner and Drone2Map for ArcGIS. Except for the PhotoModeler Scanner software, the interior and exterior orientation parameters were determined simultaneously by solving a self-calibrating bundle adjustment. Based on the UAS point clouds, automatically generated by using the above mentioned software and GNSS data respectively, the parameters of the east side hyperbolic paraboloid were calculated using the least squares method and a statistical blunder detection. Then, in order to assess the accuracy of the building 3D model, several comparisons were made for the facades and the roof with reference data, considered with minimum errors: TLS mesh for the facades and GNSS mesh for the roof. Finally, the front facade of the building was created in 3D based on its characteristic points using the PhotoModeler Scanner

  17. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  18. Evaluation of Low-Cost Terrestrial Photogrammetry for 3d Reconstruction of Complex Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, S.; Xiao, W.; Grayson, B.

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry is an accessible method of 3D digital modelling, and can be done with low-cost consumer grade equipment. Globally there are many undocumented buildings, particularly in the developing world, that could benefit from 3D modelling for documentation, redesign or restoration. Areas with buildings at risk of destruction by natural disaster or war could especially benefit. This study considers a range of variables that affect the quality of photogrammetric results. Different point clouds of the same building are produced with different variables, and they are systematically tested to see how the output was affected. This is done by geometrically comparing them to a laser scanned point cloud of the same building. It finally considers how best results can be achieved for different applications, how to mitigate negative effects, and the limits of this technique.

  19. EVALUATION OF LOW-COST TERRESTRIAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF COMPLEX BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Altman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial photogrammetry is an accessible method of 3D digital modelling, and can be done with low-cost consumer grade equipment. Globally there are many undocumented buildings, particularly in the developing world, that could benefit from 3D modelling for documentation, redesign or restoration. Areas with buildings at risk of destruction by natural disaster or war could especially benefit. This study considers a range of variables that affect the quality of photogrammetric results. Different point clouds of the same building are produced with different variables, and they are systematically tested to see how the output was affected. This is done by geometrically comparing them to a laser scanned point cloud of the same building. It finally considers how best results can be achieved for different applications, how to mitigate negative effects, and the limits of this technique.

  20. Validation of a Simplified Building Cooling Load Model Using a Complex Computer Simulation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Morgan Eugene

    2001-01-01

    Building energy simulation has become a useful tool for predicting cooling, heating and electrical loads for facilities. Simulation models have been validated throughout the years by comparing simulation results to actual measured values. The simulations have become more accurate as approaches were changed to be more comprehensive in their ability to model building features. These simulation models tend to require considerable experience in determining input parameters and large amounts of...

  1. Analysis of Numerical Models for Dispersion of Chemical/Biological Agents in Complex Building Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    variation in ventilation rates over time and the distribution of ventilation air within a building, and to estimate the impact of envelope air...bio) contaminants. This CH2M HILL research: (1) analyzed existing filtration technologies for building heating, ventilating , and air-conditioning...009XGG, “ERASP (Environmental Response and Secu- rity Protection)/HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning).” The technical monitor was Dr

  2. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  3. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  4. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  5. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  6. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-17

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

  7. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; M& #233; gel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-18

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analyzed.

  8. Dive into the Deep End: Anchor Texts Build Understanding of Complex Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Diane P.; Litzau, Katrina M.; Murray, Vicki L.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, instructional coaches Katrina Litzau and Vicki Murray designed professional learning to support teachers and principals in developing a deeper understanding of the cognitive processes of leadership. Steeped in the Common Core State Standards and building on quality literacy instruction, they designed the professional learning based on…

  9. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413982653; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  10. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Development of a sustainable building complex. Heat and cold storage realize a considerable saving in building project in Zoetermeer, Netherlands; Ontwikkeling duurzaam complex. Wko zorgt voor flinke besparing bij Zoetermeers project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erik, A.

    2013-01-15

    The housing corporation Vidomes finds it important to create a good living environment in a sustainable way. This is reflected in the project Schoutenhoek in Zoetermeer, Netherlands. Here, at the site of a former building complex for seniors, over a hundred houses and a health centre were realized [Dutch] Voor een goed woon- en leefklimaat in de toekomst is het belangrijk vandaag de dag duurzaam te handelen, zo vindt woningcorporatie Vidomes. Dit principe is terug te zien bij het project Schoutenhoek in Zoetermeer. Hier worden, op de plaats van een voormalig seniorencomplex, op duurzame wijze ruim honderd woningen en een gezondheidscentrum gerealiseerd.

  12. PCPP-Adjuvanted Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) sF Subunit Vaccine: Self-Assembled Supramolecular Complexes Enable Enhanced Immunogenicity and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayatte, Corinne; Marin, Alexander; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; Schneider-Ohrum, Kirsten; Snell Bennett, Angie; Marshall, Jason D; Andrianov, Alexander K

    2017-07-03

    PCPP, a well-defined polyphosphazene macromolecule, has been studied as an immunoadjuvant for a soluble form of the postfusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV sF), which is an attractive vaccine candidate for inducing RSV-specific immunity in mice and humans. We demonstrate that RSV sF-PCPP formulations induce high neutralization titers to RSV comparable to alum formulations even at a low PCPP dose and protect animals against viral challenge both in the lung and in the upper respiratory tract. PCPP formulations were also characterized by Th1-biased responses, compared to Th2-biased responses that are more typical for RSV sF alone or RSV sF-alum formulations, suggesting an inherent immunostimulating activity of the polyphosphazene adjuvant. We defined these immunologically active RSV sF-PCPP formulations as self-assembled water-soluble protein-polymer complexes with distinct physicochemical parameters. The secondary structure and antigenicity of the protein in the complex were fully preserved during the spontaneous aqueous self-assembly process. These findings further advance the concept of polyphosphazene immunoadjuvants as unique dual-functionality adjuvants integrating delivery and immunostimulating modalities in one water-soluble molecule.

  13. The Improvement of Organizational and Functional Approaches of Implementation of Complex Energy Renovation of Odessa Historic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posternak Irina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Different systems act as one of the most promising forms of integration in the urban planning structure. In the process of formation of plans for social and economic development of major cities more often, there is a situation, when the improvement of resources efficiency needs not just a concentration of effort, but also some new and innovative forms of building production organization. It is proposed to establish in Odessa the "Corporate Scientific and Technical Complex of urban planning energy renovation" as an innovative organizational structure which practically uses the accumulated scientific and technical potential for the reconstruction of historic buildings in Odessa in 1820–920 using energy efficiency standards. It is necessary to organize courses in the form of accelerated training for workers of the occupation "master of finishing construction work" specialty "plasterer" for "KNTK GERek" effective functioning.

  14. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Municipal Building complex, Abbeville, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Information on the solar energy system installed at the new municipal building for the City of Abbeville, SC is presented, including a description of solar energy system and buildings, lessons learned, and recommendations. The solar space heating system is a direct air heating system. The flat roof collector panel was sized to provide 75% of the heating requirement based on an average day in January. The collectors used are job-built with two layers of filon corrugated fiberglass FRP panels cross lapped make up the cover. The storage consists of a pit filled with washed 3/4 in - 1 1/2 in diameter crushed granite stone. The air handler includes the air handling mechanism, motorized dampers, air circulating blower, sensors, control relays and mode control unit. Solar heating of water is provided only those times when the hot air in the collector is exhausted to the outside.

  15. Complex analysis of energy efficiency of public buildings: case study of VGTU

    OpenAIRE

    Rynkun G.; Valancius K.; Motuziene V.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to make analysis of energy efficiency of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU) buildings. The survey was performed within the frame of the Intelligent Energy – Europe (IEE) project “Use Efficiency” – Universities and Students for Energy Efficiency.The methodology of the detailed auditing proves that energy audits must be performed with the maximum use of measurements. When having main parameters measured, it is much exact and easier to form energy balance ...

  16. Complex evaluation of the loft-style of retrivation as a type of building conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkov, V.; Kazaryan, R.; Kuzina, O.; Maloyan, G.; Efimenko, A.

    2017-10-01

    Construction reorganization is part of a basic reorganization cycle in which four phases (phases, states, technological redistribution) are consistently implemented: device, disorganization, reorganization and co-organization. The field of our research lies in the phase of reconstruction. One of the varieties of building reconstruction is retrieval (from English retrieve - to restore, find) - bringing the reorganized object into a working state by attaching to the old functional building system of the new system. Retraining provides the ability to replace elements of the new system locally or in general (implementing the principle of “assembly-disassembly”) and provides for the elimination of the moral deterioration of the building and the normal operation of the facility. In the construction and transport industry there is a sufficiently large number of multiparameter tasks that require a systematic approach and the definition of a single integrated indicator of the effectiveness of the operation. These tasks can be solved using a variety of approaches. One of such approaches, as the method of integral evaluation based on stellar infographic models, is considered.

  17. FLT-3 ITD Positive Acute Basophilic Leukemia with Rare Complex Karyotype Presenting with Acute Respiratory Failure: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antohe Ion

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute basophilic leukemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, as categorized by the 2008 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms. Acute basophilic leukemia diagnosis requires thorough morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, molecular, and cytogenetic studies and exclusion of other hematological neoplasms associating basophilia. The disease course is defined by histamine driven, occasionally life-threatening respiratory, cardiovascular, cutaneous or digestive complications, as well as primary refractoriness to standard therapy. Clinical presentation: We herein report a case of a 63-year-old asthmatic female patient diagnosed with acute basophilic leukemia, associated with previously unpublished cytogenetic features and FLT-3 ITD mutation, pulmonary leukostasis and spontaneous pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, which worsened immediately following chemotherapy initiation. Respiratory complications were successfully managed, but recrudesced upon emergence of refractory disease and were ultimately fatal. We highlight the likelihood of pulmonary complications induced by basophil degranulation and tumor lysis in hypercellular acute basophilic leukemia and the potential benefit of histamine receptor blockade in this setting.

  18. Management of development of economic potential of the machine-building complex of region

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova, O.; Starikov, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the article it was offered the author's definition specifying concept "economic potential" from the point of view of principles of marketing and strategic management, and there was concretized multi-component structure of economic potential of an industrial complex. The concept "strategic monitoring" is filled by the new meaning, and it was offered the author's model of management by strategic development of economic potential of an industrial complex on the basis of use of the approach of...

  19. Government Campuses, Feature class of building footprints of the Rock County Complex. Includes 911 Comm Center, Health Care Center, and Rock Haven., Published in 2005, Rock County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Government Campuses dataset current as of 2005. Feature class of building footprints of the Rock County Complex. Includes 911 Comm Center, Health Care Center, and...

  20. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of commercially available vaccines against bovine herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza type 3 virus for mitigation of bovine respiratory disease complex in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; Larson, Robert L; White, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and analyze data from controlled studies on the effectiveness of vaccinating cattle with commercially available viral antigen vaccines for mitigation of the effects of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Systematic review and meta-analysis. 31 studies comprising 88 trials. Studies that reported the effectiveness of commercially available bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI3) vaccines for protection of cattle against BRDC or its components were included in the analysis. Studies or trials were categorized as natural exposure or experimental challenge and were further divided by the viral antigen evaluated and vaccine type (modified-live virus [MLV] or inactivated vaccine). Meta-analysis was performed; summary Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios were determined, and Forest plots were generated. In natural exposure trials, beef calves vaccinated with various antigen combinations had a significantly lower BRDC morbidity risk than did nonvaccinated control calves. In trials evaluating BHV-1 and MLV BVDV vaccines in experimental challenge models, vaccinated calves had a lower BRDC morbidity risk than did control calves; however, in experimental challenge trials evaluating MLV BRSV and PI3 vaccines, no significant difference in morbidity or mortality risk was found between vaccinated and control calves. Estimating clinical efficacy from results of experimental challenge studies requires caution because these models differ substantially from those involving natural exposure. The literature provides data but does not provide sufficiently strong evidence to guide definitive recommendations for determining which virus components are necessary to include in a vaccination program for prevention or mitigation of BRDC in cattle.

  1. Quantifying Natural Organic Matter with Calorimetry - assessing system complexity to build a central view C stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, G. C.; Bower, J.; Henneberry, Y.; Horwath, W. R.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the status and stability of natural organic matter (NOM) is central to understanding the flux, attenuation and function of C in the biosphere. A diversity of stabilizing factors (climate, mineralogy, chemical recalcitrance) have required a range of analytical approaches and methods that are site or discipline specific making unified assessments difficult. Aggregated, these efforts support our working models of NOM as a dynamic body but, overall, lack analytical simplicity and reproducibility. In particular, the robustness and resolution to assess NOM across systems of increasing complexity is lacking. Calorimetry has been central to chemistry and material science characterizing a broad range of organic and inorganic materials and their mixtures illustrating composition, purity and stability. Differential scanning calorimetry - thermogravimetry (DSC-TG) provides the flexibility and resolution to quantify the complexity found within NOM with precise quantification of material mass loss (TG) and energetic (DSC) under controlled atmospheric and heating conditions. DSC-TG is data rich providing a range of qualitative and quantitative metrics: peak shape, exothermic energy yield, mass loss, and determination of enthalpy, to characterize NOM stability from low (dissolved organic carbon - DOC) through high (compost and soils) molecular weights (MW) at increasing levels of organo-metallic complexity. Our research investigates the influence of biochemical recalcitrance and its alteration by oxides employing three natural systems of varying complexity as experimental models: aquatic - DOC and DOC with metal flocculants (low MW - low complexity), compost - processed with and without metal oxides (mixed MW - increasing complexity) and forest soils - under varying management and litter inputs (mixed MW - most complexity). Samples were analyzed by DSC-TG (zero-air - 20 C/min - ambient to > 800C) and assessed for three temperature/exothermic reaction regions (200

  2. Towards a Net Zero Building Cluster Energy Systems Analysis for a Brigade Combat Team Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    building enve- lope, ventilation, advanced “low exergy ” heating and cooling systems, central energy plants with co- This material is declared a work of the...from the mains increases from centralized to decentralized by 21% or 4.3 GWh/yr. The fact that heat is a local commodity with a lower exergy factor...and electricity is a non-local commod- ity with an exergy factor of 1 that cannot be stored easily like heat, indicates that this is a good path to

  3. Next generation healthcare buildings in South Africa: complexities and opportunities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info De Jager_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 39483 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name De Jager_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Proceedings of the CIB World... Building Congress 2016 Volume V Advancing products and services Edited by Nebil Achour Tampereen teknillinen yliopisto. Rakennustekniikan laitos. Rakennustuotanto ja -talous. Raportti 18 Tampere University of Technology. Department of Civil Engineering...

  4. Mycoplasma detection by triplex real-time PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from bovine respiratory disease complex cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Jan B W J; de Bree, Freddy M; van der Wal, Fimme J; Kooi, Engbert A; Koene, Miriam G J; Bossers, Alex; Smid, Bregtje; Antonis, Adriaan F; Wisselink, Henk J

    2017-04-08

    In this study we evaluated the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR for the detection in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of Mycoplasma (M.) dispar, M. bovis and M. bovirhinis, all three associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Primers and probes of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR are based on the V3/V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of the three Mycoplasma species. The analytical sensitivity of the RespoCheck triplex real-time PCR was, as determined by spiking experiments of the Mycoplasma strains in Phosphate Buffered Saline, 300 colony forming units (cfu)/mL for M. dispar, and 30 cfu/mL for M. bovis or M. bovirhinis. The analytical sensitivity of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCRwas, as determined on purified DNA, 10 fg DNA per assay for M. dispar and 100 fg fo rM. bovis and M. bovirhinis. The analytical specificity of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR was, as determined by testing Mycoplasmas strains (n = 17) and other bacterial strains (n = 107), 100, 98.2 and 99.1% for M. bovis, M. dispar and M. bovirhinis respectively. The RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR was compared with the PCR/DGGE analysis for M. bovis, M. dispar and M. bovirhinis respectively by testing 44 BALF samples from calves. In conclusion, the RespoCheck PCR assay can be a valuable tool for timely and accurate detection of three Mycoplasma species associated with in bovine respiratory disease.

  5. How to build functional thylakoid membranes: from plastid transcription to protein complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyska, Dagmar; Meierhoff, Karin; Westhoff, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Chloroplasts are the endosymbiotic descendants of cyanobacterium-like prokaryotes. Present genomes of plant and green algae chloroplasts (plastomes) contain ~100 genes mainly encoding for their transcription-/translation-machinery, subunits of the thylakoid membrane complexes (photosystems II and I, cytochrome b (6) f, ATP synthase), and the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Nevertheless, proteomic studies have identified several thousand proteins in chloroplasts indicating that the majority of the plastid proteome is not encoded by the plastome. Indeed, plastid and host cell genomes have been massively rearranged in the course of their co-evolution, mainly through gene loss, horizontal gene transfer from the cyanobacterium/chloroplast to the nucleus of the host cell, and the emergence of new nuclear genes. Besides structural components of thylakoid membrane complexes and other (enzymatic) complexes, the nucleus provides essential factors that are involved in a variety of processes inside the chloroplast, like gene expression (transcription, RNA-maturation and translation), complex assembly, and protein import. Here, we provide an overview on regulatory factors that have been described and characterized in the past years, putting emphasis on mechanisms regulating the expression and assembly of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane complexes.

  6. Mechanisms Leading to Rhythm Cessation in the Respiratory PreBötzinger Complex Due to Piecewise Cumulative Neuronal Deletions1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hanbing; Hayes, John A.; Vann, Nikolas C.; Drew LaMar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mammalian breathing rhythm putatively originates from Dbx1-derived interneurons in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) of the ventral medulla. Cumulative deletion of ∼15% of Dbx1 preBötC neurons in an in vitro breathing model stops rhythmic bursts of respiratory-related motor output. Here we assemble in silico models of preBötC networks using random graphs for structure, and ordinary differential equations for dynamics, to examine the mechanisms responsible for the loss of spontaneous respiratory rhythm and motor output measured experimentally in vitro. Model networks subjected to cellular ablations similarly discontinue functionality. However, our analyses indicate that model preBötC networks remain topologically intact even after rhythm cessation, suggesting that dynamics coupled with structural properties of the underlying network are responsible for rhythm cessation. Simulations show that cumulative cellular ablations diminish the number of neurons that can be recruited to spike per unit time. When the recruitment rate drops below 1 neuron/ms the network stops spontaneous rhythmic activity. Neurons that play pre-eminent roles in rhythmogenesis include those that commence spiking during the quiescent phase between respiratory bursts and those with a high number of incoming synapses, which both play key roles in recruitment, i.e., recurrent excitation leading to network bursts. Selectively ablating neurons with many incoming synapses impairs recurrent excitation and stops spontaneous rhythmic activity and motor output with lower ablation tallies compared with random deletions. This study provides a theoretical framework for the operating mechanism of mammalian central pattern generator networks and their susceptibility to loss-of-function in the case of disease or neurodegeneration. PMID:26465010

  7. Perturbations of Respiratory Rhythm and Pattern by Disrupting Synaptic Inhibition within Pre-Bötzinger and Bötzinger Complexes123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Mosher, Bryan; Tariq, Mohammad F.; Zhang, Ruli; Molkov, Yaroslav I.

    2016-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes are the brainstem compartments containing interneurons considered to be critically involved in generating respiratory rhythm and motor pattern in mammals. Current models postulate that both generation of the rhythm and coordination of the inspiratory-expiratory pattern involve inhibitory synaptic interactions within and between these regions. Both regions contain glycinergic and GABAergic neurons, and rhythmically active neurons in these regions receive appropriately coordinated phasic inhibition necessary for generation of the normal three-phase respiratory pattern. However, recent experiments attempting to disrupt glycinergic and GABAergic postsynaptic inhibition in the pre-BötC and BötC in adult rats in vivo have questioned the critical role of synaptic inhibition in these regions, as well as the importance of the BötC, which contradicts previous physiological and pharmacological studies. To further evaluate the roles of synaptic inhibition and the BötC, we bilaterally microinjected the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine and glycinergic receptor antagonist strychnine into the pre-BötC or BötC in anesthetized adult rats in vivo and in perfused in situ brainstem–spinal cord preparations from juvenile rats. Muscimol was microinjected to suppress neuronal activity in the pre-BötC or BötC. In both preparations, disrupting inhibition within pre-BötC or BötC caused major site-specific perturbations of the rhythm and disrupted the three-phase motor pattern, in some experiments terminating rhythmic motor output. Suppressing BötC activity also potently disturbed the rhythm and motor pattern. We conclude that inhibitory circuit interactions within and between the pre-BötC and BötC critically regulate rhythmogenesis and are required for normal respiratory motor pattern generation. PMID:27200412

  8. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and rpo B gene in respiratory and non-respiratory clinical specimens at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somily, Ali M; Barry, Mazin A; Habib, Hanan A; Alotaibi, Fawzia E; Al-Zamil, Fahad A; Khan, Mohammed A; Sarwar, Mohammed S; Bakhash, Nawab D; Alrabiaah, Abdulkarim A; Shakoor, Zahid A; Senok, Abiola C

    2016-12-01

    To assess the performance of Xpert MTB/RIF, an automated molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and resistance to rifampin (RIF), against smear microscopy and culture method for diagnosis of MTB infection. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 103 respiratory and 137 non-respiratory patient specimens suspected of tuberculosis at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia performed between April 2014 and March 2015. Each sample underwent smear microscopy, mycobacterial culture, and GeneXpert MTB/RIF test. Results: Fifteen out of 103 respiratory samples were smear and culture positive, whereas 9 out of 137 non-respiratory samples were smear positive. Out of 9 smear positive specimens, 8 were also culture positive. All 15 culture positive respiratory samples were detected by Xpert MTB/RIF (sensitivity  and positive predictive value [PPV]=100%). Similarly, all 8 culture positive non-respiratory specimens were identified by Xpert MTB/RIF (sensitivity 100%; PPV 88.8%). The Xpert MTB/RIF detected only one false positive result in 88 smear negative respiratory specimens (specificity 98.9%; negative predictive value [NPV]= 100%). All 125 smear negative non-respiratory specimens tested negative by culture and Xpert MTB/RIF (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV= 100%). Conclusion: The performance of Xpert MTB/RIF was comparable to the gold standard culture method for identification of MTB in both respiratory and non-respiratory clinical specimens.

  9. Building a pseudo-atomic model of the anaphase-promoting complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Kiran; Zhang, Ziguo; Chang, Leifu; Yang, Jing; Fonseca, Paula C. A. da; Barford, David, E-mail: david.barford@icr.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Research, Chester Beatty Laboratories, 237 Fulham Road, London SW3 6JB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    This article describes an example of molecular replacement in which atomic models are used to interpret electron-density maps determined using single-particle electron-microscopy data. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates progression through specific stages of the cell cycle by coordinating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Depending on the species, the active form of the APC/C consists of 14–15 different proteins that assemble into a 20-subunit complex with a mass of approximately 1.3 MDa. A hybrid approach of single-particle electron microscopy and protein crystallography of individual APC/C subunits has been applied to generate pseudo-atomic models of various functional states of the complex. Three approaches for assigning regions of the EM-derived APC/C density map to specific APC/C subunits are described. This information was used to dock atomic models of APC/C subunits, determined either by protein crystallography or homology modelling, to specific regions of the APC/C EM map, allowing the generation of a pseudo-atomic model corresponding to 80% of the entire complex.

  10. Building a pseudo-atomic model of the anaphase-promoting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Kiran; Zhang, Ziguo; Chang, Leifu; Yang, Jing; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Barford, David

    2013-11-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates progression through specific stages of the cell cycle by coordinating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Depending on the species, the active form of the APC/C consists of 14-15 different proteins that assemble into a 20-subunit complex with a mass of approximately 1.3 MDa. A hybrid approach of single-particle electron microscopy and protein crystallography of individual APC/C subunits has been applied to generate pseudo-atomic models of various functional states of the complex. Three approaches for assigning regions of the EM-derived APC/C density map to specific APC/C subunits are described. This information was used to dock atomic models of APC/C subunits, determined either by protein crystallography or homology modelling, to specific regions of the APC/C EM map, allowing the generation of a pseudo-atomic model corresponding to 80% of the entire complex.

  11. Benzoquinolateplatinum(II) complexes as building blocks in the synthesis of Pt-Ag extended structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forniés, Juan; Ibáñez, Susana; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa; Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2012-03-28

    The reaction between (NBu(4))[Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(2)] (1, bzq = 7,8-benzoquinolate) and AgClO(4) in a 1 : 1 molar ratio, in acetone, gives the polymer [{Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(2)}Ag](n) (2). The reaction of 2 with equimolecular amounts of PPh(3) and SC(4)H(8) (tht) produces the bimetallic complexes [{Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(2)}AgL] (L = PPh(3) (3), tht (4)). For L = py, decomposition takes place and [Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))py] (5) is obtained. All these complexes have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. The most interesting features of complexes 2-4 is the presence of Pt-Ag bonds, with Pt-Ag distances of ca. 2.75 Å. Besides, the silver centres establish short η(1) bonding interactions with the C(ipso) of the bzq ligands, with distances Ag-C of ca. 2.45 Å. Complex 2 is a one-dimensional infinite chain in which the fragments "Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(2)(-)" and Ag(+) alternate. On the other hand, complexes 1 and 3-5 show intermolecular pairing through π···π interactions between the aromatic rings of the bzq ligand, having interplanar separations of ca. 3.5 Å. Complex 2 dissolves in donor solvents (acetone, THF) as discrete bimetallic solvated fragments [{Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(2)}AgS(n)] (S = solvent), similar to complexes 3 and 4. The persistence of the Pt-Ag bond in 2-4, supported by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, causes a significant blue-shift in the lowest-lying absorption in relation to 1. This fact is attributed (TD-DFT) to a remarkable modification of the orbitals contributing to the HOMO, which changes the character of the transition from (1)LC/(1)MLCT in 1 to admixture (1)L'LCT/(1)MLCT in the bimetallic complexes. The low energy feature (490-530 nm) of 2 in solid state is attributed to CT from the Pt fragments to the Ag centers. Complexes 2-4 are only emissive in rigid media (solid and glasses). In the solid state, the metallic chain 2 exhibits a bright orange emission (560 nm, 298 K; 590 nm, 77 K), assigned to an excited state involving charge transfer from the platinum

  12. Contributions of the pre-Bötzinger complex and the Kölliker-fuse nuclei to respiratory rhythm and pattern generation in awake and sleeping goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Hubert; Bonis, Josh; Krause, Katie; Wenninger, Julie; Neumueller, Suzanne; Hodges, Matthew; Pan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in three groups of awake and sleeping goats whether there are differences in ventilatory responses after injections of Ibotenic acid (IA, glutamate receptor agonist and neurotoxin) into the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), lateral parabrachial (LPBN), medial (MPBN) parabrachial, or Kölliker-Fuse nuclei (KFN). In one group, within minutes after bilateral injection of 10μl IA (50mM) into the preBötC, there was a 10-fold increase in breathing frequency, but 1.5h later, the goats succumbed to terminal apnea. These data are consistent with findings in reduced preparations that the preBötC is critical to sustaining normal breathing. In a second group, increasing volumes (0.5-10μl) of IA injected at weekly intervals into the preBötC elicited a near-dose-dependent tachypnea and irregular breathing that lasted at least 5h. There were apneas restricted to wakefulness, but none were terminal. Postmortem histology revealed that the preBötC was 90% destroyed, but there was a 25-40% above normal number of neurons in the presumed parafacial respiratory group that may have contributed to maintenance of arterial blood gas homeostasis. In a third group, bilateral injections (1 and 10μl) of IA into the LPBN, MPBN, or KFN did not significantly increase breathing in any group, and there were no terminal apneas. However, 3-5h after the injections into the KFN, breathing frequency was decreased and the three-phase eupneic breathing pattern was eliminated. Between 10 and 15h after the injections, the eupneic breathing pattern was not consistently restored to normal, breathing frequency remained attenuated, and there were apneas during wakefulness. Our findings during wakefulness and NREM sleep warrant concluding that (a) the preBötC is a primary site of respiratory rhythm generation; (b) the preBötC and the KFN are determinants of respiratory pattern generation; (c) after IA-induced lesions, there is time-dependent plasticity within the respiratory control

  13. Design Process Control for Improved Surface Finish of Metal Additive Manufactured Parts of Complex Build Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikdam Jamal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal additive manufacturing (AM is increasingly used to create complex 3D components at near net shape. However, the surface finish (SF of the metal AM part is uneven, with surface roughness being variable over the facets of the design. Standard post-processing methods such as grinding and linishing often meet with major challenges in finishing parts of complex shape. This paper reports on research that demonstrated that mass finishing (MF processes are able to deliver high-quality surface finishes (Ra and Sa on AM-generated parts of a relatively complex geometry (both internal features and external facets under select conditions. Four processes were studied in this work: stream finishing, high-energy (HE centrifuge, drag finishing and disc finishing. Optimisation of the drag finishing process was then studied using a structured design of experiments (DOE. The effects of a range of finishing parameters were evaluated and optimal parameters and conditions were determined. The study established that the proposed method can be successfully applied in drag finishing to optimise the surface roughness in an industrial application and that it is an economical way of obtaining the maximum amount of information in a short period of time with a small number of tests. The study has also provided an important step in helping understand the requirements of MF to deliver AM-generated parts to a target quality finish and cycle time.

  14. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  15. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in respiratory complex-I in never-smoker lung cancer patients contribute to lung cancer progression and associated with EGFR gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Santanu; Soudry, Ethan; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Shao, Chunbo; Yee, John; Lam, Stephan; Lam, Wan; Zhang, Wei; Gazdar, Adi F; Fisher, Paul B; Sidransky, David

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were reported in different cancers. However, the nature and role of mtDNA mutation in never-smoker lung cancer patients including patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and KRAS gene mutation are unknown. In the present study, we sequenced entire mitochondrial genome (16.5 kb) in matched normal and tumors obtained from 30 never-smoker and 30 current-smoker lung cancer patients, and determined the mtDNA content. All the patients' samples were sequenced for KRAS (exon 2) and EGFR (exon 19 and 21) gene mutation. The impact of forced overexpression of a respiratory complex-I gene mutation was evaluated in a lung cancer cell line. We observed significantly higher (P = 0.006) mtDNA mutation in the never-smokers compared to the current-smoker lung cancer patients. MtDNA mutation was significantly higher (P = 0.026) in the never-smoker Asian compared to the current-smoker Caucasian patients' population. MtDNA mutation was significantly (P = 0.007) associated with EGFR gene mutation in the never-smoker patients. We also observed a significant increase (P = 0.037) in mtDNA content among the never-smoker lung cancer patients. The majority of the coding mtDNA mutations targeted respiratory complex-I and forced overexpression of one of these mutations resulted in increased in vitro proliferation, invasion, and superoxide production in lung cancer cells. We observed a higher prevalence and new relationship between mtDNA alterations among never-smoker lung cancer patients and EGFR gene mutation. Moreover, a representative mutation produced strong growth effects after forced overexpression in lung cancer cells. Signature mtDNA mutations provide a basis to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for never-smoker lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Relative significance of heat transfer processes to quantify tradeoffs between complexity and accuracy of energy simulations with a building energy use patterns classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarinejad, Mohammad

    This dissertation develops rapid and accurate building energy simulations based on a building classification that identifies and focuses modeling efforts on most significant heat transfer processes. The building classification identifies energy use patterns and their contributing parameters for a portfolio of buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is "Building classification can provide minimal required inputs for rapid and accurate energy simulations for a large number of buildings". The critical literature review indicated there is lack of studies to (1) Consider synoptic point of view rather than the case study approach, (2) Analyze influence of different granularities of energy use, (3) Identify key variables based on the heat transfer processes, and (4) Automate the procedure to quantify model complexity with accuracy. Therefore, three dissertation objectives are designed to test out the dissertation hypothesis: (1) Develop different classes of buildings based on their energy use patterns, (2) Develop different building energy simulation approaches for the identified classes of buildings to quantify tradeoffs between model accuracy and complexity, (3) Demonstrate building simulation approaches for case studies. Penn State's and Harvard's campus buildings as well as high performance LEED NC office buildings are test beds for this study to develop different classes of buildings. The campus buildings include detailed chilled water, electricity, and steam data, enabling to classify buildings into externally-load, internally-load, or mixed-load dominated. The energy use of the internally-load buildings is primarily a function of the internal loads and their schedules. Externally-load dominated buildings tend to have an energy use pattern that is a function of building construction materials and outdoor weather conditions. However, most of the commercial medium-sized office buildings have a mixed-load pattern, meaning the HVAC system and operation schedule dictate

  17. Palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex formulation enhances activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases and respiratory complexes I-IV in the heart of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K; Krishnan, C V

    2009-08-01

    Age-related decline in the capacity to withstand stress, such as ischemia and reperfusion, results in congestive heart failure. Though the mechanisms underlying cardiac decay are not clear, age dependent somatic damages to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), loss of mitochondrial function, and a resultant increase in oxidative stress in heart muscle cells may be responsible for the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The effect of a safe nutritional supplement, POLY-MVA, containing the active ingredient palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex, was evaluated on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV in heart mitochondria of aged male albino rats of Wistar strain. Administration of 0.05 ml/kg of POLY-MVA (which is equivalent to 0.38 mg complexed alpha-lipoic acid/kg, p.o), once daily for 30 days, was significantly (pKrebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. The unique electronic and redox properties of palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex appear to be a key to this physiological effectiveness. The results strongly suggest that this formulation might be effective to protect the aging associated risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  19. Respiratory complex I dysfunction due to mitochondrial DNA mutations shifts the voltage threshold for opening of the permeability transition pore toward resting levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Angelin, Alessia; Ghelli, Anna; Mariani, Elisa; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Rugolo, Michela

    2009-01-23

    We have studied mitochondrial bioenergetics in HL180 cells (a cybrid line harboring the T14484C/ND6 and G14279A/ND6 mtDNA mutations of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, leading to an approximately 50% decrease of ATP synthesis) and XTC.UC1 cells (derived from a thyroid oncocytoma bearing a disruptive frameshift mutation in MT-ND1, which impairs complex I assembly). The addition of rotenone to HL180 cells and of antimycin A to XTC.UC1 cells caused fast mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was prevented by treatment with cyclosporin A, intracellular Ca2+ chelators, and antioxidant. Both cell lines also displayed an anomalous response to oligomycin, with rapid onset of depolarization that was prevented by cyclosporin A and by overexpression of Bcl-2. These findings indicate that depolarization by respiratory chain inhibitors and oligomycin was due to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). A shift of the threshold voltage for PTP opening close to the resting potential may therefore be the underlying cause facilitating cell death in diseases affecting complex I activity. This study provides a unifying reading frame for previous observations on mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic defects, and Ca2+ deregulation in mitochondrial diseases. Therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing the PTP voltage threshold may be instrumental in ameliorating the course of complex I-dependent mitochondrial diseases.

  20. Numerical study of near-field pollutant dispersion around a building complex emitted from a rooftop stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateb, Mohamed

    The topic of environmental pollution is of special significance in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) especially in urban areas as it is one of the significant sources of poor indoor air quality due to contamination of fresh-air intakes. In city centres where external air pollution levels are relatively high, it is usually assumed that natural ventilation may not be able to provide adequate indoor air quality. Therefore mechanical ventilation and air-conditioning systems are thus being solicited to "clean" the incoming air (Kukadia and Palmer, 1998). There is evidence that such systems do not always provide clean fresh-air to the occupants of the building since several contaminants from nearby outside sources exist (e.g. vehicle exhaust, rooftop stack exhaust, wind-blown dust). Control of the pollutant sources and understanding the dispersion mechanisms, therefore, shall be considered as the first alternative to evaluate better these harmful phenomena. This thesis focuses on dispersion and transportation of pollutant emissions from a building rooftop stack situated in the wake of a neighbouring tower using numerical simulation approach. The main objective of this work is to contribute to the "best-practice" of numerical modelling for dispersion studies. For that, wind tunnel tests as well as full-scale experiments are numerically reproduced to shed light on the uncertainties related to the complex dispersion phenomenon when using CFD simulations. In the first study of this thesis, the behaviour of the flow and pollutant concentration fields around the two-building configuration are investigated by means of various k - epsilon turbulence models (i.e. standard, re-normalization group (RNG) and realizable k - epsilon models). The results show that the realizable k - epsilon model yields the best agreement with wind tunnel experimental data for lower stack height and smaller momentum ratio, while the RNG k - epsilon model performs best for taller stacks. Despite an

  1. A method for evaluating the problem complex of choosing the ventilation system for a new building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2007-01-01

    for evaluating the performance of a ventilation system in the design proces by treating quantifiable and non-quantifiable datasets together. The method is based on general morphological analysis and applies cross-consistency assessment for reducing the problem complex, thus treating the multi......-dimensionality, the uncertainty and the subjectivity that arises in the design proces on a sound methodological and scientific basis. Through a distance analysis of the shared parameter values the solution scenarios may be plotted relative to each other, hence providing the designer with an illustrated ‘space of solutions...

  2. Restoration and conversion to re-use of historic buildings incorporating increased energy efficiency: A case study - the Haybarn complex, Hilandar Monastery, Mount Athos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Šekularac Jelena A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper approach to restoration of historic buildings is crucial for monumental heritage protection. The objective of the paper is to define a methodology for historic buildings restoration in order to increase energy efficiency and re-usability in accordance with modern standards. The main method used in the paper is the observation of historic buildings during their restoration and exploitation, analysis and evaluation of achieved results regarding energy efficiency and energy saving, through the examples of the buildings belonging to Hilandar Monastery, Mount Athos, in Greece. Mount Athos was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List for its cultural and natural values. This case study discusses the abandoned and dilapidated historic buildings of the Haybarn Complex (Stable, Mulekeepers’ House and Haybarn, the achieved results regarding the restoration of these buildings, their energy efficiency and turning into the premises for occasional stays. The research results are recommendations for increasing energy efficiency while performing the restoration of historic buildings, so that these buildings could be re-used in a new way. The most significant contribution of the paper is the practical test of energy refurbishment of these historic buildings conducted using the principles and methods of energy efficiency, in compliance with conservation requirements and authenticity of historic buildings.

  3. Mechanisms of nuclear pore complex assembly - two different ways of building one molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Ellenberg, Jan

    2017-11-08

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates all macromolecular transport across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes that have an open mitosis, NPCs assemble at two points in the cell cycle: during nuclear assembly in late mitosis and during nuclear growth in interphase. How the NPC, the largest nonpolymeric protein complex in eukaryotic cells, self-assembles inside cells remained unclear. Recent studies have started to uncover the assembly process, and evidence has been accumulating that postmitotic and interphase NPC assembly use fundamentally different mechanisms; the duration, structural intermediates, and regulation by molecular players are different and different types of membrane deformation are involved. In this Review, we summarize the current understanding of these two modes of NPC assembly and discuss the structural and regulatory steps that might drive the assembly processes. We furthermore integrate understanding of NPC assembly with the mechanisms for rapid nuclear growth in embryos and, finally, speculate on the evolutionary origin of the NPC implied by the presence of two distinct assembly mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Application of Computer Technologies in Building Design by Example of Original Objects of Increased Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilieva, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the solution of problems in AutoCAD offered at the All-Russian student Olympiads at the section of “Computer graphics” that are not typical for the students of construction specialties. The students are provided with the opportunity to study the algorithm for solving original tasks of high complexity. The article shows how the unknown parameter underlying the construction can be determined using a parametric drawing with geometric constraints and dimensional dependencies. To optimize the mark-up operation, the use of the command for projecting the points and lines of different types onto bodies and surfaces in different directions is shown. For the construction of a spring with a different pitch of turns, the paper describes the creation of a block from a part of the helix and its scaling when inserted into a model with unequal coefficients along the axes. The advantage of the NURBS surface and the application of the “body-surface-surface-NURBS-body” conversion are reflected to enhance the capabilities of both solid and surface modeling. The article’s material introduces construction students into the method of constructing complex models in AutoCAD that are not similar to typical training assignments.

  5. The Fluka Linebuilder and Element Database: Tools for Building Complex Models of Accelerators Beam Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V

    2012-01-01

    Extended FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines can be extremely complex: heavy to manipulate, poorly versatile and prone to mismatched positioning. We developed a framework capable of creating the FLUKA model of an arbitrary portion of a given accelerator, starting from the optics configuration and a few other information provided by the user. The framework includes a builder (LineBuilder), an element database and a series of configuration and analysis scripts. The LineBuilder is a Python program aimed at dynamically assembling complex FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines: positions, magnetic fields and scorings are automatically set up, and geometry details such as apertures of collimators, tilting and misalignment of elements, beam pipes and tunnel geometries can be entered at user’s will. The element database (FEDB) is a collection of detailed FLUKA geometry models of machine elements. This framework has been widely used for recent LHC and SPS beam-machine interaction studies at CERN, and led to a dra...

  6. Designing To Learn about Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo, Cindy E.; Holton, Douglas L.; Kolodner, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the presence of complex structural, behavioral, and functional relations to understanding. Reports on a design experiment in which 6th grade children learned about the human respiratory system by designing artificial lungs and building partial working models. Makes suggestions for successful learning from design activities. (Contains 44…

  7. Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C

    2013-01-01

    The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Block-induced Complex Structures Building the Flare-productive Solar Active Region 12673

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Xiaoshuai [Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Song, Qiao, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-11-10

    Solar active region (AR) 12673 produced 4 X-class, 27 M-class, and numerous lower-class flares during its passage across the visible solar disk in 2017 September. Our study is to answer the questions why this AR was so flare-productive and how the X9.3 flare, the largest one of the past decade, took place. We find that there was a sunspot in the initial several days, and then two bipolar regions emerged nearby it successively. Due to the standing of the pre-existing sunspot, the movement of the bipoles was blocked, while the pre-existing sunspot maintained its quasi-circular shaped umbra only with the disappearance of a part of penumbra. Thus, the bipolar patches were significantly distorted, and the opposite polarities formed two semi-circular shaped structures. After that, two sequences of new bipolar regions emerged within the narrow semi-circular zone, and the bipolar patches separated along the curved channel. The new bipoles sheared and interacted with the previous ones, forming a complex topological system, during which numerous flares occurred. At the highly sheared region, a great deal of free energy was accumulated. On September 6, one negative patch near the polarity inversion line began to rapidly rotate and shear with the surrounding positive fields, and consequently the X9.3 flare erupted. Our results reveal that the block-induced complex structures built the flare-productive AR and the X9.3 flare was triggered by an erupting filament due to the kink instability. To better illustrate this process, a block-induced eruption model is proposed for the first time.

  9. Block-induced Complex Structures Building the Flare-productive Solar Active Region 12673

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Song, Qiao

    2017-11-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12673 produced 4 X-class, 27 M-class, and numerous lower-class flares during its passage across the visible solar disk in 2017 September. Our study is to answer the questions why this AR was so flare-productive and how the X9.3 flare, the largest one of the past decade, took place. We find that there was a sunspot in the initial several days, and then two bipolar regions emerged nearby it successively. Due to the standing of the pre-existing sunspot, the movement of the bipoles was blocked, while the pre-existing sunspot maintained its quasi-circular shaped umbra only with the disappearance of a part of penumbra. Thus, the bipolar patches were significantly distorted, and the opposite polarities formed two semi-circular shaped structures. After that, two sequences of new bipolar regions emerged within the narrow semi-circular zone, and the bipolar patches separated along the curved channel. The new bipoles sheared and interacted with the previous ones, forming a complex topological system, during which numerous flares occurred. At the highly sheared region, a great deal of free energy was accumulated. On September 6, one negative patch near the polarity inversion line began to rapidly rotate and shear with the surrounding positive fields, and consequently the X9.3 flare erupted. Our results reveal that the block-induced complex structures built the flare-productive AR and the X9.3 flare was triggered by an erupting filament due to the kink instability. To better illustrate this process, a block-induced eruption model is proposed for the first time.

  10. Suppression of tumor growth in vivo by the mitocan alpha-tocopheryl succinate requires respiratory complex II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dong, L.F.; Freeman, R.; Liu, J.; Zobalová, Renata; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Stantic, M.; Rohlena, Jakub; Vališ, Karel; Rodriguez-Enriquez, S.; Butcher, B.; Goodwin, J.; Brunk, U.T.; Witting, P. K.; Moreno-Sanchez, R.; Scheffler, I.E.; Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2009), s. 1593-1600 ISSN 1078-0432 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/0811; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500520702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : SDHC-mutants * mitocans * mitochondrial complex II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.747, year: 2009

  11. To Issue of Mathematical Management Methods Applied for Investment-Building Complex under Conditions of Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, V.; Nikolaeva, O.

    2017-11-01

    In the article the authors consider a cognitive management method of the investment-building complex in the crisis conditions. The factors influencing the choice of an investment strategy are studied, the basic lines of the activity in the field of crisis-management from a position of mathematical modelling are defined. The general approach to decision-making on investment in real assets on the basis of the discrete systems based on the optimum control theory is offered. With the use of a discrete maximum principle the task in view of the decision is found. The numerical algorithm to define the optimum control is formulated by investments. Analytical decisions for the case of constant profitability of the basic means are obtained.

  12. Building Blocks of the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex in Chlamydomonas Flagella*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianfeng; Tritschler, Douglas; Song, Kangkang; Barber, Cynthia F.; Cobb, Jennifer S.; Porter, Mary E.; Nicastro, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    The directional flow generated by motile cilia and flagella is critical for many processes, including human development and organ function. Normal beating requires the control and coordination of thousands of dynein motors, and the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) has been identified as an important regulatory node for orchestrating dynein activity. The nexin link appears to be critical for the transformation of dynein-driven, linear microtubule sliding to flagellar bending, yet the molecular composition and mechanism of the N-DRC remain largely unknown. Here, we used proteomics with special attention to protein phosphorylation to analyze the composition of the N-DRC and to determine which subunits may be important for signal transduction. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of WT and mutant flagellar axonemes from Chlamydomonas identified 12 N-DRC-associated proteins, including all seven previously observed N-DRC components. Sequence and PCR analyses identified the mutation responsible for the phenotype of the sup-pf-4 strain, and biochemical comparison with a radial spoke mutant revealed two components that may link the N-DRC and the radial spokes. Phosphoproteomics revealed eight proteins with phosphorylated isoforms for which the isoform patterns changed with the genotype as well as two components that may play pivotal roles in N-DRC function through their phosphorylation status. These data were assembled into a model of the N-DRC that explains aspects of its regulatory function. PMID:21700706

  13. Using McStas for modelling complex optics, using simple building bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willendrup, Peter K., E-mail: pkwi@risoe.dtu.d [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Materials Research Division, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 (Denmark); Udby, Linda [University of Copenhagen, Nanoscience and Escience Centers, Niels Bohr Institute, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 (Denmark); Knudsen, Erik [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Materials Research Division, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 (Denmark); Farhi, Emmanuel [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), 6 rue J. Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lefmann, Kim [University of Copenhagen, Nanoscience and Escience Centers, Niels Bohr Institute, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 (Denmark); ESS, University of Lund, St. Algatan 4 (Sweden)

    2011-04-01

    The McStas neutron ray-tracing simulation package is a versatile tool for producing accurate neutron simulations, extensively used for design and optimization of instruments, virtual experiments, data analysis and user training. In McStas, component organization and simulation flow is intrinsically linear: the neutron interacts with the beamline components in a sequential order, one by one. Historically, a beamline component with several parts had to be implemented with a complete, internal description of all these parts, e.g. a guide component including all four mirror plates and required logic to allow scattering between the mirrors. For quite a while, users have requested the ability to allow 'components inside components' or meta-components, allowing to combine functionality of several simple components to achieve more complex behaviour, i.e. four single mirror plates together defining a guide. We will here show that it is now possible to define meta-components in McStas, and present a set of detailed, validated examples including a guide with an embedded, wedged, polarizing mirror system of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin type.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial cells induces

  15. Identification of a previously undetected metabolic defect in the Complex II Caenorhabditis elegans mev-1 mutant strain using respiratory control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Sheng; Ng, Li Fang; Ng, Li Theng; Moore, Philip K; Halliwell, Barry; Gruber, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Hypometabolism may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ageing and ageing-related diseases. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers the opportunity to study "living mitochondria" in a small (~1 mm) animal replete with a highly stereotypical, yet complex, anatomy and physiology. Basal oxygen consumption rate is often employed as a proxy for energy metabolism in this context. This parameter is traditionally measured using single-chamber Clark electrodes without the addition of metabolic modulators. Recently, multi-well oxygen electrodes, facilitating addition of metabolic modulators and hence study of respiratory control during different mitochondrial respiration states, have been developed. However, only limited official protocols exist for C. elegans, and key limitations of these techniques are therefore unclear. Following modification and testing of some of the existing protocols, we used these methods to explore mitochondrial bioenergetics in live nematodes of an electron transfer chain Complex II mutant strain, mev-1, and identified a previously undetected metabolic defect. We find that mev-1 mutants cannot respond adequately to increased energy demands, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation is more severely impaired in these animals than has previously been appreciated.

  16. Modeling of longitudinal polytomous outcome from complex survey data - application to investigate an association between mental distress and non-malignant respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahwa Punam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The data from longitudinal complex surveys based on multi-stage sampling designs contain cross-sectional dependencies among units due to clustered nature of the data and within-subject dependencies due to repeated measurements. Special statistical methods are required to analyze longitudinal complex survey data. Methods Statistics Canada's longitudinal National Population Health Survey (NPHS dataset from the first five cycles (1994/1995 to 2002/2003 was used to investigate the effects of demographic, social, life-style, and health-related factors on the longitudinal changes of mental distress scores among the NPHS participants who self-reported physician diagnosed respiratory diseases, specifically asthma and chronic bronchitis. The NPHS longitudinal sample includes 17,276 persons of all ages. In this report, participants 15 years and older (n = 14,713 were considered for statistical analysis. Mental distress, an ordinal outcome variable (categories: no/low, moderate, and high was examined. Ordered logistic regression models based on the weighted generalized estimating equations approach were fitted to investigate the association between respiratory diseases and mental distress adjusting for other covariates of interest. Variance estimates of regression coefficients were computed by using bootstrap methods. The final model was used to predict the probabilities of prevalence of no/low, moderate or high mental distress scores. Results Accounting for design effects does not vary the significance of the coefficients of the model. Participants suffering with chronic bronchitis were significantly at a higher risk (ORadj = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.12-1.66 of reporting high levels of mental distress compared to those who did not self-report chronic bronchitis. There was no significant association between asthma and mental distress. There was a significant interaction between sex and self-perceived general health status indicating a dose

  17. Renal oncocytoma characterized by the defective complex I of the respiratory chain boosts the synthesis of the ROS scavenger glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürschner, Gerrit; Zhang, Qingzhou; Clima, Rosanna; Xiao, Yi; Busch, Jonas Felix; Kilic, Ergin; Jung, Klaus; Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Attimonelli, Marcella; Babu, Mohan; Meierhofer, David

    2017-12-01

    Renal oncocytomas are rare benign tumors of the kidney and characterized by a deficient complex I (CI) enzyme activity of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. Yet, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and alterations of metabolic pathways in this tumor. We compared renal oncocytomas with adjacent matched normal kidney tissues on a global scale by multi-omics approaches, including whole exome sequencing (WES), proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic pathway simulation. The abundance of proteins localized to mitochondria increased more than 2-fold, the only exception was a strong decrease in the abundance for CI subunits that revealed several pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations by WES. We also observed renal oncocytomas to dysregulate main metabolic pathways, shunting away from gluconeogenesis and lipid metabolism. Nevertheless, the abundance of energy carrier molecules such as NAD + , NADH, NADP, ATP, and ADP were significantly higher in renal oncocytomas. Finally, a substantial 5000-fold increase of the reactive oxygen species scavenger glutathione can be regarded as a new hallmark of renal oncocytoma. Our findings demonstrate that renal oncocytomas undergo a metabolic switch to eliminate ATP consuming processes to ensure a sufficient energy supply for the tumor.

  18. Towards a continuum of computational building simulation tools to support the design and evaluation of complex built environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a Computational Building Simulation (CBS) tool, termed KRONOS that is being used to work on advanced architectural research questions such as user behaviour in buildings. The intention is to provide better...

  19. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. (Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. (St. Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)); Dennett, X. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)); Lethlean, K. (Prince Henry Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Comparative mitogenomics indicates respiratory competence in parasitic Viscum despite loss of complex I and extreme sequence divergence, and reveals horizontal gene transfer and remarkable variation in genome size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skippington, Elizabeth; Barkman, Todd J; Rice, Danny W; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-21

    Aerobically respiring eukaryotes usually contain four respiratory-chain complexes (complexes I-IV) and an ATP synthase (complex V). In several lineages of aerobic microbial eukaryotes, complex I has been lost, with an alternative, nuclear-encoded NADH dehydrogenase shown in certain cases to bypass complex I and oxidize NADH without proton translocation. The first loss of complex I in any multicellular eukaryote was recently reported in two studies; one sequenced the complete mitogenome of the hemiparasitic aerial mistletoe, Viscum scurruloideum, and the other sequenced the V. album mitogenome. The V. scurruloideum study reported no significant additional loss of mitochondrial genes or genetic function, but the V. album study postulated that mitochondrial genes encoding all ribosomal RNAs and proteins of all respiratory complexes are either absent or pseudogenes, thus raising questions as to whether the mitogenome and oxidative respiration are functional in this plant. To determine whether these opposing conclusions about the two Viscum mitogenomes reflect a greater degree of reductive/degenerative evolution in V. album or instead result from interpretative and analytical differences, we reannotated and reanalyzed the V. album mitogenome and compared it with the V. scurruloideum mitogenome. We find that the two genomes share a complete complement of mitochondrial rRNA genes and a typical complement of genes encoding respiratory complexes II-V. Most Viscum mitochondrial protein genes exhibit very high levels of divergence yet are evolving under purifying, albeit relaxed selection. We discover two cases of horizontal gene transfer in V. album and show that the two Viscum mitogenomes differ by 8.6-fold in size (66 kb in V. scurruloideum; 565 kb in V. album). Viscum mitogenomes are extraordinary compared to other plant mitogenomes in terms of their wide size range, high rates of synonymous substitutions, degree of relaxed selection, and unprecedented loss of

  1. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  2. Learning from simple ebooks, online cases or classroom teaching when acquiring complex knowledge. A randomized controlled trial in respiratory physiology and pulmonology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne Skjødt Worm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: E-learning is developing fast because of the rapid increased use of smartphones, tablets and portable computers. We might not think of it as e-learning, but today many new e-books are in fact very complex electronic teaching platforms. It is generally accepted that e-learning is as effective as classroom teaching methods, but little is known about its value in relaying contents of different levels of complexity to students. We set out to investigate e-learning effects on simple recall and complex problem-solving compared to classroom teaching. METHODS: 63 nurses specializing in anesthesiology were evenly randomized into three groups. They were given internet-based knowledge tests before and after attending a teaching module about respiratory physiology and pulmonology. The three groups was either an e-learning group with eBook teaching material, an e-learning group with case-based teaching or a group with face-to-face case-based classroom teaching. After the module the students were required to answer a post-test. Time spent and the number of logged into the system was also measured. RESULTS: For simple recall, all methods were equally effective. For problem-solving, the eCase group achieved a comparable knowledge level to classroom teaching, while textbook learning was inferior to both (p<0.01. The textbook group also spent the least amount of time on acquiring knowledge (33 minutes, p<0.001, while the eCase group spent significantly more time on the subject (53 minutes, p<0.001 and logged into the system significantly more (2.8 vs 1.6, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: E-learning based cases are an effective tool for teaching complex knowledge and problem-solving ability, but future studies using higher-level e-learning are encouraged.Simple recall skills, however, do not require any particular learning method.

  3. DOCUMENTING A COMPLEX MODERN HERITAGE BUILDING USING MULTI IMAGE CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND 3D LASER SCANNED POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Vianna Baptista

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers’ intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  4. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lungs Work Oxygen Therapy Pneumonia Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary Rehabilitation Ventilator/Ventilator Support Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Respiratory Acidosis (MedlinePlus) Respiratory Failure (MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 ...

  6. Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Birkner, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory protection is used as a method of protecting individuals from inhaling harmful airborne contaminants and in some cases to supply them with breathable air in oxygen-deficient environments. This article focuses on the use and types of personal respiratory protection (respirators) worn by individuals at workplaces where airborne hazardous contaminants may exist. Respirators are increasingly also being used in nonindustrial settings such as health care facilities, as concerns regarding infectious epidemics and terrorist threats grow. Pulmonologists and other clinicians should understand fundamental issues regarding respiratory protection against airborne contaminants and the use of respirators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Sick building syndrome or fungal allergy? When houses cause illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H P

    2003-08-21

    In modern societies, the sick building syndrome (SBS) is a very common building-related complex of unspecific symptoms affecting groups of persons. Most frequently, complains include irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract that are believed to be related to negative ambient factors at the workplace. The etiology is multifactorial. In persons showing typical anxiety about the environment, SBS may also be considered a variant of a somatoform disorder. SBS must be clearly differentiated from building-related illness. Diagnostic measures and therapeutic implications are discussed.

  8. Respiratory Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated with workers, and other areas (more often, rural areas) will be in need of respiratory therapists’ ... workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. ...

  9. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency and the elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarzan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory failure is a complex entity of varied etiology and physio-pathological mechanisms. It is mainly characterised by the respiratory system's difficulty in ensuring correct aeration at rest, resulting initially in insufficient oxygenation of arterial blood. Treatment is adapted to each etiology and aims to compensate for respiratory failure and to ensure the oxygenation of the organism.

  10. Building a measurement framework of burden of treatment in complex patients with chronic conditions: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1 Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira,2,3 Jason S Egginton,1 Jennifer L Ridgeway,1 Laura Odell,4 Carl R May,5 Victor M Montori1,61Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2College of Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Medication Therapy Management Program, Fairview Pharmacy Services LLC, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 4Pharmacy Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 5Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 6Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Burden of treatment refers to the workload of health care as well as its impact on patient functioning and well-being. We set out to build a conceptual framework of issues descriptive of burden of treatment from the perspective of the complex patient, as a first step in the development of a new patient-reported measure.Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with patients seeking medication therapy management services at a large, academic medical center. All patients had a complex regimen of self-care (including polypharmacy, and were coping with one or more chronic health conditions. We used framework analysis to identify and code themes and subthemes. A conceptual framework of burden of treatment was outlined from emergent themes and subthemes.Results: Thirty-two patients (20 female, 12 male, age 26–85 years were interviewed. Three broad themes of burden of treatment emerged including: the work patients must do to care for their health; problem-focused strategies and tools to facilitate the work of self-care; and factors that exacerbate the burden felt. The latter theme encompasses six subthemes including challenges with taking medication, emotional problems with others, role and activity limitations, financial challenges, confusion about medical information, and health care delivery obstacles

  11. Low-power wearable respiratory sound sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oletic, Dinko; Arsenali, Bruno; Bilas, Vedran

    2014-04-09

    Building upon the findings from the field of automated recognition of respiratory sound patterns, we propose a wearable wireless sensor implementing on-board respiratory sound acquisition and classification, to enable continuous monitoring of symptoms, such as asthmatic wheezing. Low-power consumption of such a sensor is required in order to achieve long autonomy. Considering that the power consumption of its radio is kept minimal if transmitting only upon (rare) occurrences of wheezing, we focus on optimizing the power consumption of the digital signal processor (DSP). Based on a comprehensive review of asthmatic wheeze detection algorithms, we analyze the computational complexity of common features drawn from short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and decision tree classification. Four algorithms were implemented on a low-power TMS320C5505 DSP. Their classification accuracies were evaluated on a dataset of prerecorded respiratory sounds in two operating scenarios of different detection fidelities. The execution times of all algorithms were measured. The best classification accuracy of over 92%, while occupying only 2.6% of the DSP's processing time, is obtained for the algorithm featuring the time-frequency tracking of shapes of crests originating from wheezing, with spectral features modeled using energy.

  12. Low-Power Wearable Respiratory Sound Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinko Oletic

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Building upon the findings from the field of automated recognition of respiratory sound patterns, we propose a wearable wireless sensor implementing on-board respiratory sound acquisition and classification, to enable continuous monitoring of symptoms, such as asthmatic wheezing. Low-power consumption of such a sensor is required in order to achieve long autonomy. Considering that the power consumption of its radio is kept minimal if transmitting only upon (rare occurrences of wheezing, we focus on optimizing the power consumption of the digital signal processor (DSP. Based on a comprehensive review of asthmatic wheeze detection algorithms, we analyze the computational complexity of common features drawn from short-time Fourier transform (STFT and decision tree classification. Four algorithms were implemented on a low-power TMS320C5505 DSP. Their classification accuracies were evaluated on a dataset of prerecorded respiratory sounds in two operating scenarios of different detection fidelities. The execution times of all algorithms were measured. The best classification accuracy of over 92%, while occupying only 2.6% of the DSP’s processing time, is obtained for the algorithm featuring the time-frequency tracking of shapes of crests originating from wheezing, with spectral features modeled using energy.

  13. Building Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    ‘The procurement of construction work is complex, and a successful outcome frequently elusive’. With this opening phrase of the book, the authors take on the challenging job of explaining the complexity of building procurement. Even though building procurement systems are, and will remain, complex...... despite this excellent book, the knowledge, expertise, well-articulated argument and collection of recent research efforts that are provided by the three authors will help to make project success less elusive. The book constitutes a thorough and comprehensive investigation of building procurement, which...... evolves from a simple establishment of a contractual relationship to a central and strategic part of construction. The authors relate to cultural, ethical and social and behavioural sciences as the fundamental basis for analysis and understanding of the complexity and dynamics of the procurement system...

  14. Respiratory Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin R. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Mechanics by Theodore Wilson is a slim paperback volume (64 pages) describing three aspects of the way the lungs work: 1) pressure?volume relationships with regard to the lungs, 2) chest wall and muscles with regard to how the respiratory pump works, and 3) gas flow and transport. Relevant details about the author are missing, which I think is a loss. He is Emeritus Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics and this background and his expertise was a perfect fit for the inv...

  15. A simple building-block route to (phosphanyl-carbene)palladium complexes via intermolecular addition of functionalised phosphanes to isocyanides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberhard, M.R.; van Vliet, B.; Durán Páchon, L.; Rothenberg, G.; Eastham, G.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Elsevier, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a straightforward protocol for making (phosphanyl-carbene)PdII complexes. These complexes have bidentate ligands containing an acyclic diamino- or aminooxy-carbene and a phosphane. The synthesis gives good yields (typically 70-90 %) for a variety of complexes (22 compounds). Moreover, it

  16. Simple building-block route to (Phosphanyl-carbene)palladium complexes via intermolecular addition of functionalised phosphanes to isocyanides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberhard, M.R.; van Vliet, Bart; Durán Páchon, L.; Rothenberg, G.; Eastham, G.; Kooijman, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091208610; Spek, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156517566; Elsevier, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a straightforward protocol for making (phosphanyl- carbene)PdII complexes. These complexes have bidentate ligands containing an acyclic diamino- or aminooxycarbene and a phosphane. The synthesis gives good yields (typically 70–90%) for a variety of complexes (22 compounds). Moreover, it

  17. Efficiency evaluation criteria of communication paths structure in a complex of buildings of maternity and child-care institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholshchevnikov Valery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The communication paths form the network of areas that connect the public spaces of the building among themselves and with external (in relation to the building sources and accumulators of crowd flows. The spaces can have different purposes of use. The function of the communication paths is always the same – ensuring the safe movement of crowd flows. That’s why communication paths are one of the security systems of buildings, constructions and associated areas under various application conditions. The areas of communication path can be different types: horizontal, stairs down, stairs up, ramps, openings. Its effective size is determined in accordance with values of crowd flow movements. They can vary depending on numerous factors, but represent the result of invariant patterns of connection between parameters of flows which have different composition. The article considers the calculated values which determine the criteria of optimality of the size of communication paths of buildings using the buildings of maternity and child-care institutions in their multifunctional use as an example.

  18. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  19. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  20. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  1. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  2. Wine-growing establishment. A building complex serving an industrial model for a century (1870 – 1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Manzini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The wine industry in the province of Mendoza, Argentina as modern industrial was developed from the late nineteenth century. The decline starting in the 1970s, and triggered the second modernization wine since the 1980s. The functional requirements of the first modernization wine required both housing construction and production, giving rise to so-called wine-growing establishment. The wineries of these establishment, are the buildings used to make wine. The rest of the constructions are used as support for such activity. The functional units required in establishments, have varied over time, were adapted according to the different production needs of the moment. The wine-growing establishment that were built in this period can be found now adapted to the new requirements in production and operation, as well as in a complete abandonment. The group of buildings with various implements that are integrated testimonies, traces of other realities and knowledge that occurred in them before. Therefore, the aim to the present work is to perform a historical analysis of the evolution from architectural materiality 1870-1970; focused on understanding its growth and the distribution and location of the buildings, that they are closely integrated into the contextual framework belonging

  3. Learning Vue.js 2 learn how to build amazing and complex reactive web applications easily with Vue.js

    CERN Document Server

    Filipova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    About This Book Learn how to propagate DOM changes across the website without writing extensive jQuery callbacks code. Learn how to achieve reactivity and easily compose views with Vue.js and understand what it does behind the scenes. Explore the core features of Vue.js with small examples, learn how to build dynamic content into preexisting web applications, and build Vue.js applications from scratch. Who This Book Is For This book is perfect for novice web developer seeking to learn new technologies or frameworks and also for webdev gurus eager to enrich their experience. Whatever your level of expertise, this book is a great introduction to the wonderful world of reactive web apps. What You Will Learn Build a fully functioning reactive web application in Vue.js from scratch. The importance of the MVVM architecture and how Vue.js compares with other frameworks such as Angular.js and React.js. How to bring reactivity to an existing static application using Vue.js. How to use p...

  4. Risk Management in Complex Construction Projects that Apply Renewable Energy Sources: A Case Study of the Realization Phase of the Energis Educational and Research Intelligent Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechowicz, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, one of the characteristic features of construction industry is an increased complexity of a growing number of projects. Almost each construction project is unique, has its project-specific purpose, its own project structural complexity, owner’s expectations, ground conditions unique to a certain location, and its own dynamics. Failure costs and costs resulting from unforeseen problems in complex construction projects are very high. Project complexity drivers pose many vulnerabilities to a successful completion of a number of projects. This paper discusses the process of effective risk management in complex construction projects in which renewable energy sources were used, on the example of the realization phase of the ENERGIS teaching-laboratory building, from the point of view of DORBUD S.A., its general contractor. This paper suggests a new approach to risk management for complex construction projects in which renewable energy sources were applied. The risk management process was divided into six stages: gathering information, identification of the top, critical project risks resulting from the project complexity, construction of the fault tree for each top, critical risks, logical analysis of the fault tree, quantitative risk assessment applying fuzzy logic and development of risk response strategy. A new methodology for the qualitative and quantitative risk assessment for top, critical risks in complex construction projects was developed. Risk assessment was carried out applying Fuzzy Fault Tree analysis on the example of one top critical risk. Application of the Fuzzy sets theory to the proposed model allowed to decrease uncertainty and eliminate problems with gaining the crisp values of the basic events probability, common during expert risk assessment with the objective to give the exact risk score of each unwanted event probability.

  5. Assembly of Metal−Organic Frameworks from Large Organic and Inorganic Secondary Building Units: New Examples and Simplifying Principles for Complex Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaheon; Chen, Banglin; Reineke, Theresa M.; Li, Hailian; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Moler, David B.; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2001-01-01

    The secondary building unit (SBU) has been identified as a useful tool in the analysis of complex metal−organic frameworks (MOFs). We illustrate its applicability to rationalizing MOF crystal structures by analysis of nine new MOFs which have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Tetrahedral SBUs in Zn(ADC)_2·(HTEA)_2 (MOF-31), Cd(ATC)·[Cd(H2O)_6](H2O)_5 (MOF-32), and Zn_2(ATB)(H_2O)·(H_2O)_3(DMF)_3 (MOF-33) are linked into diamond networks, while those of Ni_2(ATC)(H_2O)_4·...

  6. Age modulates Fe3O4 nanoparticles liver toxicity: dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and coupling in middle-aged as compared to young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratli, Yosra; Charles, Anne-Laure; Wolff, Valérie; Ben Tahar, Lotfi; Smiri, Leila; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Sakly, Mohsen; Auger, Cyril; Vogel, Thomas; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Tebourbi, Olfa; Geny, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and mitochondrial coupling in young (3 months) and middle-aged (18 months) rat liver, organ largely involved in body iron detoxification. Isolated liver mitochondria were extracted using differential centrifugations. Maximal oxidative capacities (V(max), complexes I, III, and IV activities), V(succ) (complexes II, III, and IV activities), and V tmpd, (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V(max)/V0) were determined in controls conditions and after exposure to 250, 300, and 350 μ g/ml Fe3O4 in young and middle-aged rats. In young liver mitochondria, exposure to IONPs did not alter mitochondrial function. In contrast, IONPs dose-dependently impaired all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in middle-aged rat liver: V(max) (from 30 ± 1.6 to 17.9 ± 1.5; P V(succ) (from 33.9 ± 1.7 to 24.3 ± 1.0; P V(tmpd) (from 43.0 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 2.2 µmol O2/min/g protein; P < 0.001) using Fe3O4 350 µg/ml. Mitochondrial coupling also decreased. Interestingly, 350 μ g/ml Fe3O4 in the form of Fe(3+) solution did not impair liver mitochondrial function in middle-aged rats. Thus, IONPs showed a specific toxicity in middle-aged rats suggesting caution when using it in old age.

  7. Age Modulates Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Liver Toxicity: Dose-Dependent Decrease in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complexes Activities and Coupling in Middle-Aged as Compared to Young Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra Baratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and mitochondrial coupling in young (3 months and middle-aged (18 months rat liver, organ largely involved in body iron detoxification. Isolated liver mitochondria were extracted using differential centrifugations. Maximal oxidative capacities (Vmax, complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, and Vtmpd, (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 were determined in controls conditions and after exposure to 250, 300, and 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in young and middle-aged rats. In young liver mitochondria, exposure to IONPs did not alter mitochondrial function. In contrast, IONPs dose-dependently impaired all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in middle-aged rat liver: Vmax (from 30 ± 1.6 to 17.9 ± 1.5; P<0.001, Vsucc (from 33.9 ± 1.7 to 24.3 ± 1.0; P<0.01, Vtmpd (from 43.0 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 2.2 µmol O2/min/g protein; P<0.001 using Fe3O4 350 µg/ml. Mitochondrial coupling also decreased. Interestingly, 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in the form of Fe3+ solution did not impair liver mitochondrial function in middle-aged rats. Thus, IONPs showed a specific toxicity in middle-aged rats suggesting caution when using it in old age.

  8. Competence Building Strategy in the Textile Complex: A Study of the Impact of Cultural and Identitarian Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo de Jesus Carvalho Lima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the profile of the remaining textile industry workforce as a strategic factor for the building of competencies in the companies of the sector. It investigates the impact of the cultural and identitarian traits developed by the workforce within century-old organizations on productive dynamics. The discussion is justified in a precarious working context seeking competitive differentials. The theoretical framework is supported by a reflexive axis that gives first priority to the combination of complementary topics. This article is based on exploratory and qualitative research developed through a multiple case methodology (Yin, 2005 covering textile factions and cotton mills from the micro-regions of Curvelo and Diamantina, Minas Gerais State. The body of the work included fifty-one operating and directive-level respondents and the data were collected through interviews between October 2009 and March 2010. The NVIVO software and Content Analysis were used for data processing based on categories and frequency counting (Bardin, 1979. The results indicate that from a structural viewpoint, the retention of a qualified workforce, both technically and skillfully, was an alternative to the shaping of the workforce and the stabilization of the productive process. Concerning the relational and formative dimensions, the study concluded that learning developed fundamentally by means of experienced tutors. Competence building resulted from some deliberate strategy consisting of social and historical aspects within the work environment.

  9. SU-E-J-261: Statistical Analysis and Chaotic Dynamics of Respiratory Signal of Patients in BodyFix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, D; Huq, M; Bednarz, G; Lalonde, R; Yang, Y; Heron, D [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory signal of patients in BodyFix undergoing 4DCT scan with and without immobilization cover. Methods: 20 pairs of respiratory tracks recorded with RPM system during 4DCT scan were analyzed. Descriptive statistic was applied to selected parameters of exhale-inhale decomposition. Standardized signals were used with the delay method to build orbits in embedded space. Nonlinear behavior was tested with surrogate data. Sample entropy SE, Lempel-Ziv complexity LZC and the largest Lyapunov exponents LLE were compared. Results: Statistical tests show difference between scans for inspiration time and its variability, which is bigger for scans without cover. The same is for variability of the end of exhalation and inhalation. Other parameters fail to show the difference. For both scans respiratory signals show determinism and nonlinear stationarity. Statistical test on surrogate data reveals their nonlinearity. LLEs show signals chaotic nature and its correlation with breathing period and its embedding delay time. SE, LZC and LLE measure respiratory signal complexity. Nonlinear characteristics do not differ between scans. Conclusion: Contrary to expectation cover applied to patients in BodyFix appears to have limited effect on signal parameters. Analysis based on trajectories of delay vectors shows respiratory system nonlinear character and its sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Reproducibility of respiratory signal can be evaluated with measures of signal complexity and its predictability window. Longer respiratory period is conducive for signal reproducibility as shown by these gauges. Statistical independence of the exhale and inhale times is also supported by the magnitude of LLE. The nonlinear parameters seem more appropriate to gauge respiratory signal complexity since its deterministic chaotic nature. It contrasts with measures based on harmonic analysis that are blind for nonlinear features. Dynamics of breathing, so crucial for

  10. The respiratory pump: past and present understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlieger, H

    2003-11-01

    The history of our understanding of the respiratory system has been long and progressive, probably starting with Galenus who did experimental spinal cord sections, and progressed through the poorly known work of Leonardo da Vinci on the structure-function relation of chest wall components. Despite numerous experiments in the past, the respiratory control system remains complex and poorly integrated because of the diversity of the afferent pathways and of the interacting respiratory centres.

  11. Efficacy of complex herbal compound of Echinacea angustifolia (Imoviral® Junior) in recurrent upper respiratory tract infections during pediatric age: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, A M; Forti, S; Tassone, G; Torretta, S; Pignataro, L

    2011-06-01

    Among pediatric population the recurrent upper respiratory tract infections are very common. Several phytotherapies are been proposed as support therapies and, in particular, the efficacy of Echinacea angustifolia is controversial. This paper presents an evaluation of a new herbal compound in the treatment of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections in a pediatric cohort. An immunostimulant herbal compound of Echinacea angustifolia, Arabinogalactan, Acerola (Vitamin C), Beta- Glucan e Zinc (Imoviral® Junior) was given to 37 children affected by recurrent pharyngotonsillitis or otitis media. The mean number of inflammatory episodes (i.e. tonsillitis or otitis media) during 6 months before treatment was 3±2.19, during the 6 months following treatment initiation it was 1±0.93 (P=0.04). After the complete treatment, 77% of children reported an improvement of chronic inflammatory in frequency of acute episodes. The total score of a questionnaire about life quality is improved (P=0.04). Finally, none collateral effects was occurred. The herbal compound of echinacea, beta-glucan, vitamin c, arabinoglactan and zinc (Imoviral® Junior) can improve the quality of life in pediatric patients affected by recurrent pharyngotonsillitis and otitis media without contralateral effects.

  12. Provenance of granites used to build the Santa Maria de Valdeiglesias Monastery, Pelayos de la Presa (Madrid, Spain), and conservation state of the monumental complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, R.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Vazquez-Calvo, C.; Perez-Monserrat, E. M.; Varas-Muriel, M. J.; Lopez-Arce, P.

    2012-04-01

    The construction of the Cistercian Monastery began at 1180, in an initial Late Romanesque style in which the Church was erected; later on, in 1258, the church underwent a severe fire, only the apse stood standing. The church was reconstructed at the end of the 13th century in Mudejar style. Gothic style was used later on, in the 16th century, for the reconstruction of the funerary chapel, and Renaissance style for the Plateresque door in between the church and the sacristy. At the end of the 16th century, the main door to access the church was built in Baroque style. In 1836, the Ecclesiastical Confiscations resulted on transfer the Monastery into particular owners. This fact favoured its abandon and ruin state until 1979, when architect Mariano Garcia Benito purchased the property and started the conservation and consolidation of the complex, beginning with the Bell Tower. Natural stone materials used in the Monastery are igneous (granite) and metamorphic rocks (gneiss and schist), and artificial stone materials are bricks and mortars, both joint and rendering ones. Granite is the most abundant material used in the complex, with a structural/reinforcing role in elements such as lintels, jambs, buttresses, or bottom areas of the walls with greater sizes and better dimensioned. Some pillars are granite built, from the large ashlars of the sacristy, to the rubble-work of the Mozarab chapel. Two types of monzogranite can be differentiated in relation to distinct constructive stages: the coarse texture monzogranite is used in the first building stages, while the fine texture monzogranite was employed mainly from 17th century on. Petrophysical characteristics of these granites are different but show a good quality to be used in construction. Nevertheless, the abandon and partial ruin of the complex, the devastating fire events (the second one in 1743) leaded to the decay acceleration of the monumental complex, being nowadays the church in ruin, with no roofs and walls

  13. Building integrated approaches for the proteomics of complex, dynamic systems: NIH programs in technology and infrastructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeley, Douglas M; Breen, Joseph J; Old, Susan E

    2005-01-01

    Proteomics technology and methods remain inadequate. Technological constraints contribute to an artificially static view of complex biological systems and a barrier between quantitative and interaction studies. Several NIH programs combine proteomics technology development with research on challenging biological problems to drive progress. A new initiative of the NIH Roadmap focuses on characterization of dynamic systems. The success of these programs will be judged by their impact on relevant biological problems.

  14. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    Specific donor and acceptor pairs have been assembled in bovine serum albumin (BSA), at neutral pH and room temperature, and these dye-protein complexes indicated efficient donor to acceptor singlet-singlet energy transfer. For example, pyrene-1-butyric acid served as the donor and Coumarin 540A served as the acceptor. Both the donor and the acceptor bind to BSA with affinity constants in excess of 2x10(5) M(-1), as measured in absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectral titrations. Simultaneous binding of both the donor and the acceptor chromophores was supported by CD spectra and one chromophore did not displace the other from the protein host, even when limited concentrations of the host were used. For example, a 1:1:1 complex between the donor, acceptor and the host can be readily formed, and spectral data clearly show that the binding sites are mutually exclusive. The ternary complexes (two different ligands bound to the same protein molecule) provided opportunities to examine singlet-singlet energy transfer between the protein-bound chromophores. Donor emission was quenched by the addition of the acceptor, in the presence of limited amounts of BSA, while no energy transfer was observed in the absence of the protein host, under the same conditions. The excitation spectra of the donor-acceptor-host complexes clearly show the sensitization of acceptor emission by the donor. Protein denaturation, as induced by the addition of urea or increasing the temperature to 360 K, inhibited energy transfer, which indicate that protein structure plays an important role. Sensitization also proceeded at low temperature (77 K) and diffusion of the donor or the acceptor is not required for energy transfer. Stern-Volmer quenching plots show that the quenching constant is (3.1+/-0.2)x10(4) M(-1), at low acceptor concentrations (light harvesting, conversion and storage.

  15. C,N-2-[(Dimethylamino)methyl]phenylplatinum Complexes Functionalized with C60 as Macromolecular Building Blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Meijer, M.D.; Wolf, E. de; Lutz, M.H.; Spek, A.L.; Klink, G.P.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The application of platinum(II) complexes based on the N,N-dimethylbenzylamine ligand (abbreviated as H-C,N) in macromolecular synthesis was demonstrated. Two cationic C,N-platinum moieties were linked with a 4,4'-bipyridine bridge, giving [{C6H4(CH2NMe2)-2-Pt(PPh3)}2(4,4'-bpy)](BF4)2 (2), the

  16. Paediatric respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Everard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual “home”.

  17. Paediatric respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual "home". Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  18. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  19. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  20. [Ru(III)(valen)(CN)2](-): a New Building Block To Design 4d-4f Heterometallic Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Gabriela; Maxim, Catalin; Clérac, Rodolphe; Andruh, Marius

    2015-06-15

    New 4d-4f heterometallic complexes with a one-dimensional structure, (1)∞[{Ru(valen)(CN)2KRu(valen)(CN)2}{Ln(O2NO)2(CH3OH)3}]·2CH3OH (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy), have been assembled from the reaction of [K(H2O)2Ru(III)(valen)(CN)2]·H2O with lanthanide nitrates. The exchange interaction between Ru(III) and Gd(III) mediated by the cyanido ligand was determined for the first time and found to be weak and of antiferromagnetic nature.

  1. Building a Natural Language Interface for the ATNF Pulsar Database for Speeding up Execution of Complex Queries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rupert; Jenet, F.; Rangel, S.; Dartez, L.

    2010-01-01

    Until now, there has been no available natural language interfaces (NLI's) for querying a database of pulsars (rotating neutron stars emitting radiation at regular intervals). Currently, pulsar records are retrieved through an HTML form accessible via the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) website where one needs to be familiar with pulsar attributes used by the interface (e.g. BLC). Using a NLI relinquishes the need for learning form-specific formalism and allows execution of more powerful queries than those supported by the HTML form. Furthermore, on database access that requires comparison of attributes for all the pulsar records (e.g. what is the fastest pulsar?), using a NLI for retrieving answers to such complex questions is definitely much more efficient and less error-prone. This poster presents the first NLI ever created for the ATNF pulsar database (ATNF-Query) to facilitate database access using complex queries. ATNF-Query is built using a machine learning approach that induces a semantic parser from a question corpus; the innovative application is intended to provide pulsar researchers or laymen with an intelligent language understanding database system for friendly information access.

  2. Learning from simple ebooks, online cases or classroom teaching when acquiring complex knowledge. A randomized controlled trial in respiratory physiology and pulmonology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Bjarne Skjødt

    2013-01-01

    E-learning is developing fast because of the rapid increased use of smartphones, tablets and portable computers. We might not think of it as e-learning, but today many new e-books are in fact very complex electronic teaching platforms. It is generally accepted that e-learning is as effective as c...... as classroom teaching methods, but little is known about its value in relaying contents of different levels of complexity to students. We set out to investigate e-learning effects on simple recall and complex problem-solving compared to classroom teaching....

  3. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  4. Two-dimensional Al hydroxide interaction with cancerous cell membrane building units: Complexed free energy and orientation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-09-01

    The application of hierarchical nanoparticles based on metal hydroxides in biomedicine, including anticancer therapy and medical imaging, is a rapidly developing field. Low-dimensional aluminum oxyhydroxide nanomaterials (AlOOH-NM) are quite promising base to develop hybrid theranostic nano-agents with core-shell architecture, which is determined by AlOOH-NMs physicochemical properties such as: large specific surface area, pH-dependent charge, amphoteric behavior, high surface density of polar groups capable to form non-covalent bonds, low or null cytotoxicity and biocompatibility. Characterization of the system behavior within interface between NM and plasmatic membrane is crucial for the understanding of nano-agent—cell interaction. In the present work the complex in silico study including the free energy estimation and orientation analysis of phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids interacting with AlOOH nanosheet was conducted to understand the effect of such nanomaterial on cancerous cell plasmatic membrane.

  5. Towards building a more complex view of the lateral geniculate nucleus: Recent advances in understanding its role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati, Masoud; Khaligh-Razavi, Seyed-Mahdi; Lehky, Sidney R

    2017-09-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has often been treated in the past as a linear filter that adds little to retinal processing of visual inputs. Here we review anatomical, neurophysiological, brain imaging, and modeling studies that have in recent years built up a much more complex view of LGN. These include effects related to nonlinear dendritic processing, cortical feedback, synchrony and oscillations across LGN populations, as well as involvement of LGN in higher level cognitive processing. Although recent studies have provided valuable insights into early visual processing including the role of LGN, a unified model of LGN responses to real-world objects has not yet been developed. In the light of recent data, we suggest that the role of LGN deserves more careful consideration in developing models of high-level visual processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Series of Linear {FeIII2FeII} Complexes with Paramagnetic Building-Block-Modified Spin Crossover Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Xiang; Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Hai-Lang; Liu, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Jiao, Cheng-Qi; Liu, Tao

    2017-11-13

    Tuning of the spin crossover (SCO) behavior through paramagnetic building blocks with different steric hindrance effects is of great interest in terms of the synergy between SCO and magnetic interactions. Herein, the steric effect of specified Fe III building blocks is modified, from the large Tp* (hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)borate) analogue to a small Tp (hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate) derivative; the Fe II SCO unit and Fe III paramagnetic ions are incorporated into three well isolated trinuclear complexes featuring thermally induced and light-induced SCO properties. Reanalysis of the structures reveals that π-π stacking interactions play a key role in the thermal hysteresis and anomalous octahedral distortion parameter Σ around the Fe II ion. The Tp* ligand showing the largest steric hindrance induces elongated Fe II -N bond lengths and bending of the C≡N-Fe II angle in 1, as well as having a relatively large electron donor effect, which leads to the lowest thermal transition temperature among the three compounds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Crystal engineered acid–base complexes with 2D and 3D hydrogen bonding systems using p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the building block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PU SU ZHAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HOBA was selected as the building block for self-assembly with five bases, i.e., diethylamine, tert-butylamine, cyclohexylamine, imidazole and piperazine, and generation of the corresponding acid–base complexes 1–5. Crystal structure analyses suggest that proton-transfer from the carboxyl hydrogen to the nitrogen atom of the bases can be observed in 1–4, while only in 5 does a solvent water molecule co-exist with p--HOBA and piperazine. With the presence of O–H···O hydrogen bonds in 1–4, the deprotonated p-hydroxybenzoate anions (p-HOBAA– are simply connected each other in a head-to-tail motif to form one-dimensional (1D arrays, which are further extended to distinct two-dimensional (2D (for 1 and 4 and three-dimensional (3D (for 2 and 3 networks via N–H···O interactions. While in 5, neutral acid and base are combined pair-wise by O–H···N and N–H···O bonds to form a 1D tape and then the 1D tapes are sequentially combined by water molecules to create a 3D network. Some interlayer or intralayer C–H···O, C–H···p and p×××p interactions help to stabilize the supramolecular buildings. Melting point determination analyses indicate that the five acid–base complexes are not the ordinary superposition of the reactants and they are more stable than the original reactants.

  8. The roles of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and type 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) in the regulation of the immune complex-elicited respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Antonsen, S; Matthiesen, S H

    1997-01-01

    The binding of immune complexes (IC) to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the consequent respiratory burst (RB) were investigated in whole blood cell preparations suspended in 75% human serum, using flow cytometry. Blockade of the complement receptor (CR)1 receptor sites for C3b on whole blood...... and inhibited the IC binding to PMN in a whole blood cell preparation, with or without mAb 3D9, by approximately 40% from 15-40 min while reducing their RB over 40 min to approximately one third. Blockade of CR1 on either erythrocytes (E) or leukocytes, before mixing the populations, revealed...... that the potentiation of the RB by mAb 3D9 was associated with abrogation of E-CR1 function, whereas blockade of leukocyte-CR1 had a diminishing effect. Exposure to IC at high concentrations induced release of both specific and azurophilic granule contents from PMN. The latter was CR3 dependent in that blockade...

  9. Hiding the Complexity: Building a Distributed ATLAS Tier-2 with a Single Resource Interface using ARC Middleware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, S.; Stewart, G.; Kenyon, M.; Skipsey, S.; Washbrook, A.; Bhimji, W.; Filipčič, A.

    2011-12-01

    Since their inception, Grids for high energy physics have found management of data to be the most challenging aspect of operations. This problem has generally been tackled by the experiment's data management framework controlling in fine detail the distribution of data around the grid and the careful brokering of jobs to sites with co-located data. This approach, however, presents experiments with a difficult and complex system to manage as well as introducing a rigidity into the framework which is very far from the original conception of the grid. In this paper we describe how the ScotGrid distributed Tier-2, which has sites in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Durham, was presented to ATLAS as a single, unified resource using the ARC middleware stack. In this model the ScotGrid 'data store' is hosted at Glasgow and presented as a single ATLAS storage resource. As jobs are taken from the ATLAS PanDA framework, they are dispatched to the computing cluster with the fastest response time. An ARC compute element at each site then asynchronously stages the data from the data store into a local cache hosted at each site. The job is then launched in the batch system and accesses data locally. We discuss the merits of this system compared to other operational models and consider, from the point of view of the resource providers (sites), and from the resource consumers (experiments); and consider issues involved in transitions to this model.

  10. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  11. Study by similarity of wind influence on mass transfers in complex buildings; Etude par similitude de l'influence du vent sur les transferts de masse dans les batiments complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Nicolas

    2011-12-05

    Residential and industrial buildings equipped with a ventilation system are complex facilities, where various heat and mass transfers could occur according to the operating conditions. In order to study these mass transfers, a methodology has been developed so as to carry out reduced-scale experiments for the study of isothermal flows, in steady or transient state. This methodology has been numerically and experimentally validated on simple configurations, and then applied to two standard configurations, representing nuclear facilities. The wind influence on mass transfers inside these configurations, in normal, damaged (stopping ventilation) or accidental (internal overpressure) situations, has been studied in the Jules Verne climatic wind tunnel of the CSTB. The wind effects, coupled or not with an internal overpressure, can lead to a partial or a total loss of the pollutant's containment inside buildings. Moreover, the wind turbulence can bring about instantaneous reversal leakage flow-rates, which cannot be identified in steady state. In addition, the study of transient phenomena has highlighted the low influence of the branch inertia on transient flows, for typical values of real facilities. Finally, tracer tests have been carried out in order to study the pollutant dispersion inside a standard configuration subjected to wind, mechanical ventilation and internal overpressure effects. The reliability of the zonal code SYLVIA, used notably to support safety assessment in nuclear buildings, has been analyzed from these experimental results. The modelling of the physical phenomena experimentally observed has been validated, in steady and transient states. However, limitations have been identified for the study of pollutant dispersion, due to hypothesis used in SYLVIA code, as in all zonal codes (homogenous concentration inside rooms, instantaneous propagation inside branches and rooms). (author)

  12. Building the capacity to solve complex health challenges in sub-Saharan Africa: CARTA's multidisciplinary PhD training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonn, Sharon; Egesah, Omar; Cole, Donald; Griffiths, Frances; Manderson, Lenore; Kabiru, Caroline; Ezeh, Alex; Thorogood, Margaret; Izugbara, Chimaraoke

    2016-12-27

    To develop a curriculum (Joint Advanced Seminars [JASs]) that produced PhD fellows who understood that health is an outcome of multiple determinants within complex environments and that approaches from a range of disciplines is required to address health and development within the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA). We sought to attract PhD fellows, supervisors and teaching faculty from a range of disciplines into the program. Multidisciplinary teams developed the JAS curriculum. CARTA PhD fellowships were open to academics in consortium member institutions, irrespective of primary discipline, interested in doing a PhD in public and population health. Supervisors and JAS faculty were recruited from CARTA institutions. We use routine JAS evaluation data (closed and open-ended questions) collected from PhD fellows at every JAS, a survey of one CARTA cohort, and an external evaluation of CARTA to assess the impact of the JAS curriculum on learning. We describe our pedagogic approach, arguing its centrality to an appreciation of multiple disciplines, and illustrate how it promotes working in multidisciplinary ways. CARTA has attracted PhD fellows, supervisors and JAS teaching faculty from across a range of disciplines. Evaluations indicate PhD fellows have a greater appreciation of how disciplines other than their own are important to understanding health and its determinants and an appreciation and capacity to employ mixed methods research. In the short term, we have been effective in promoting an understanding of multidisciplinarity, resulting in fellows using methods from beyond their discipline of origin. This curriculum has international application.

  13. The "Haunt" project: an attempt to build a "haunted" room by manipulating complex electromagnetic fields and infrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Christopher C; Haque, Usman; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie; Davis, Rob

    2009-05-01

    Recent research has suggested that a number of environmental factors may be associated with a tendency for susceptible individuals to report mildly anomalous sensations typically associated with "haunted" locations, including a sense of presence, feeling dizzy, inexplicable smells, and so on. Factors that may be associated with such sensations include fluctuations in the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the presence of infrasound. A review of such work is presented, followed by the results of the "Haunt" project in which an attempt was made to construct an artificial "haunted" room by systematically varying such environmental factors. Participants (N=79) were required to spend 50 min in a specially constructed chamber, within which they were exposed to infrasound, complex EMFs, both or neither. They were informed in advance that during this period they might experience anomalous sensations and asked to record on a floor plan their location at the time of occurrence of any such sensations, along with a note of the time of occurrence and a brief description of the sensation. Upon completing the session in the experimental chamber, they were asked to complete three questionnaires. The first was an EXIT scale asking respondents to indicate whether or not they had experienced particular anomalous sensations. The second was the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale, a widely used measure of belief in and experience of the paranormal. The third was Persinger's Personal Philosophy Inventory, although only the items that constitute the Temporal Lobe Signs (TLS) Inventory sub-scale were scored. These items deal with psychological experiences typically associated with temporal lobe epilepsy but normally distributed throughout the general population. Although many participants reported anomalous sensations of various kinds, the number reported was unrelated to experimental condition but was related to TLS scores. The most parsimonious explanation for our findings is in terms of

  14. Respiratory chain complex I, a main regulatory target of the cAMP/PKA pathway is defective in different human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papa, S.; De Rasmo, D.; Technikova-Dobrova, Z.

    2012-01-01

    to genetic and sporadic pathological factors. Complex I dysfunction has, indeed, been found, to be associated with several human diseases. Knowledge of the pathogenetic mechanisms of these diseases can help to develop new therapeutic strategies. (C) 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies...

  15. Respiratory diseases and muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2012-02-01

    Many respiratory diseases lead to impaired function of skeletal muscles, influencing quality of life and patient survival. Dysfunction of both respiratory and limb muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been studied in depth, and seems to be caused by the complex interaction of general (inflammation, impaired gas exchange, malnutrition, comorbidity, drugs) and local factors (changes in respiratory mechanics and muscle activity, and molecular events). Some of these factors are also present in cystic fibrosis and asthma. In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, repeated exposure to hypoxia and the absence of reparative rest are believed to be the main causes of muscle dysfunction. Deconditioning appears to be crucial for the functional impairment observed in scoliosis. Finally, cachexia seems to be the main mechanism of muscle dysfunction in advanced lung cancer. A multidimensional therapeutic approach is recommended, including pulmonary rehabilitation, an adequate level of physical activity, ventilatory support and nutritional interventions.

  16. Evaluation of the Abbott RealTime MTB and RealTime MTB INH/RIF Assays for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Resistance Markers in Respiratory and Extrapulmonary Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Thiel, Sabine; Molodtsov, Nikolay; Antonenka, Uladzimir; Hoffmann, Harald

    2016-12-01

    The Abbott RealTime MTB (RT MTB) assay is a new automated nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in clinical specimens. In combination with the RealTime MTB INH/RIF (RT MTB INH/RIF) resistance assay, which can be applied to RT MTB-positive specimens as an add-on assay, the tests also indicate the genetic markers of resistance to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of RT MTB using different types of respiratory and extrapulmonary specimens and to compare performance characteristics directly with those of the FluoroType MTB assay. The resistance results obtained by RT MTB INH/RIF were compared to those from the GenoType MTBDRplus and from phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. A total of 715 clinical specimens were analyzed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivity of RT MTB was 92.1%; the sensitivity rates for smear-positive and smear-negative samples were 100% and 76.2%, respectively. The sensitivities of smear-negative specimens were almost identical for respiratory (76.3%) and extrapulmonary (76%) specimens. Specificity rates were 100% and 95.8% for culture-negative specimens and those that grew nontuberculous mycobacteria, respectively. RT MTB INH/RIF was applied to 233 RT MTB-positive samples and identified resistance markers in 7.7% of samples. Agreement with phenotypic and genotypic drug susceptibility testing was 99.5%. In conclusion, RT MTB and RT MTB INH/RIF allow for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in different types of specimens and reliably indicate resistance markers. The strengths of this system are the comparably high sensitivity with paucibacillary specimens, its ability to detect INH and RIF resistance, and its high-throughput capacities. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Model Demonstrating Respiratory Mechanics for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivien; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that involves construction of a model by high school students to demonstrate respiratory mechanics. Engages students in interactive learning and stimulates interest for future science study. Challenges students and teachers to build, manipulate, and discuss their experience during the investigation of respiratory mechanics.…

  18. Mold exposure and respiratory health in damp indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M

    2011-01-01

    Almost all modern buildings experience at least minor, and sometimes serious, water damage during their life span. Excess moisture in buildings becomes a critical factor for mold (fungal) proliferation in nutrient-rich environments. As a result, building occupants may be exposed to increased levels of microbial agents such as fungal spores, cell fragments, cell wall components, or toxins. Such exposures may result in various diseases and symptoms, both respiratory and non-respiratory. Respiratory health complaints are common in damp buildings and have been more thoroughly studied than non-respiratory complaints. Respiratory diseases and symptoms which may be produced by exposure to indoor fungi include asthma development, exacerbation of asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cough, wheeze, dyspnea (shortness of breath), nasal and throat symptoms, and respiratory infections. In addition to these illnesses, rhinosinusitis and sarcoidosis in water-damaged building occupants are also drawing more scientific attention. In this article, we explore the evidence for adverse effects of fungal exposure on respiratory health in damp indoor environments and potential disease mechanisms related to the exposure.

  19. The respiratory microbiome and respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, Stefan A.; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances over the past ten years lower respiratory tract infections still comprise around a fifth of all deaths worldwide in children under five years of age with the majority in low- and middle-income countries. Known risk factors for severe respiratory infections and poor chronic

  20. Learning Drupal 8 create complex websites quickly and easily using the building blocks of Drupal 8, the most powerful version of Drupal yet

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Nick

    2016-01-01

    About This Book : Build complete, complex websites with no prior knowledge of web development entirely using the intuitive Drupal user interface ; Follow a practical case study chapter-by-chapter to construct a complete website as you progress ; Ensure your sites are modern, responsive and mobile-friendly through utilizing the full features available in Drupal 8. Who This Book Is For : If you want to learn to use Drupal 8 for the first time, or you are transitioning over from a previous version of Drupal, this is the book for you. No knowledge of PHP, MySQL, or HTML is assumed or required. What You Will Learn : Set up a local “stack” development environment and install your first Drupal 8 site ; Find out what is available in Drupal 8 core Define content types and taxonomies―and find out when you should do so ; Use the powerful Views module ; Get hands-on with image and media handling ; Extend Drupal using custom community modules ; Develop the look and feel of your website using Drupal themes ; M...

  1. Three-dimensional techniques for capturing and building virtual models of complex objects for use in scientific and industrial applications, data archiving, and the entertainment industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Arthur; Chapman, Ralph E.; Wilcox, Brian

    2003-05-01

    The past 10 years have seen remarkable improvements in the capture of 3-dimesional data. Both scanning speeds and accuracy have increased by a magnitude. Software and increasingly more powerful computers allow larger data bases and faster post processing. CT, laser and optical scanners are finding increased use in the medical, manufacturing, scientific and entertainment industries. CT (Computerized Tomography) is generally used to capture internal as well as external surfaces. Medical (hospital) scanners are the most common and can be of service in industrial applications. But true industrial scanners service a much wider range of sizes and materials. Laser and optical scanners are line-of-sight, and are available in portable and permanent CMM mounting arrangements. Scanners are available to capture a wide range of objects; from entire buildings to fingernail sized parts. Solid objects requiring multiple scans, must register each scan to another for part completion. The collected data is exported as a "point cloud." The data can be used to digitally inspect complex parts, surface them for tooling and reverse engineering, or export surfaces to animation software.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA variants of respiratory complex I that uniquely characterize haplogroup T2 are associated with increased risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a chronic neurodegenerative and neovascular retinal disease, is the leading cause of blindness in elderly people of western European origin. While structural and functional alterations in mitochondria (mt and their metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative and vascular diseases, the relationship of inherited variants in the mitochondrial genome and mt haplogroup subtypes with advanced AMD has not been reported in large prospective cohorts. METHODOLOGY/PRINICIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the relationship of inherited mtDNA variants with advanced AMD in 1168 people using a three-stage design on samples from 12-year and 10-year prospective studies on the natural history of age-related eye disease. In Stage I we resequenced the entire genome in 99 elderly AMD-free controls and 215 people with advanced AMD from the 12-year study. A consistent association with AMD in 14 of 17 SNPs characterizing the mtDNA T haplogroup emerged. Further analysis revealed these associations were driven entirely by the T2 haplogroup, and characterized by two variants in Complex I genes (A11812G of MT-ND4 and A14233G of MT-ND6. We genotyped T haplogroups in an independent sample of 490 cases and 61 controls from the same study (Stage II and in 56 cases and 246 controls from the 10-year study (Stage III. People in the T2 haplogroup were approximately 2.5 times more likely to have advanced AMD than their peers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.54, 95%CI 1.36-4.80, PComplex I are reasonable targets for novel functional analyses and therapeutic research in AMD.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  5. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  6. PT-1 selectively activates AMPK-γ1 complexes in mouse skeletal muscle, but activates all three γ subunit complexes in cultured human cells by inhibiting the respiratory chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Ross, Fiona A; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) occurs as heterotrimeric complexes in which a catalytic subunit (α1/α2) is bound to one of two b subunits (β1/β2) and one of three γ subunits (γ1/γ2/γ3). The ability to selectively activate specific isoforms would be a useful research tool, and a promising...

  7. Respiratory Protection in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Grisso, Robert D. (Robert Dwight), 1956-

    2014-01-01

    Farm workers can encounter a variety of respiratory problems ranging from temporary discomfort caused by allergic reactions to fatal asphyxiation. However, the risk of contracting serious lung diseases or death can be significantly decreased by using respiratory protection. This publication lists farm work that requires respiratory protection and equipment that will help prevention of future problems.

  8. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  9. How Is Respiratory Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  11. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  12. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Building information modelling (BIM)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a Building Information Model (BIM) also known as a Building Product Model (BPM) is nothing new. A short article on BIM will never cover the entire filed, because it is a particularly complex filed that is recently beginning to receive...

  14. [The respiratory therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, O; Bubulj, C; Esche, B; Geiseler, J; Bonnet, R; Mäder, I

    2008-11-01

    Because of the expected significant growth in the elderly population and respiratory diseases, the topic of "delegation of physician's duties" is of increasing importance to the German health-care system. In 2004 the German Respiratory Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V. (DGP)) established the new profession: respiratory therapist. A curriculum was defined which offers training for certified nurses and physiotherapists. Respiratory therapists evaluate, treat, document and care for patients with pulmonary disorders. Under appropriate supervision a licensed respiratory therapist performs some of the work previously done by physicians at the same quality of care. The first respiratory therapists have finished their professional training in Germany. Most of these respiratory therapists are now employed in hospital-based positions requiring their specific skills. Generally, the increased medical responsibility and the increased degree of decision-making possibilities associated with the new profession contribute to a better job satisfaction. However, this is not yet true for all the newly employed respiratory therapists. Only few of the new graduate respiratory therapists were awarded higher salaries. It is a strongly recommendation to the heads of medical departments and the human resources managers of hospitals that they should recognise the increased qualifications of nurses and physiotherapists who become respiratory therapists by appropriate remuneration.

  15. Respiratory physiology at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, C; Naylor, J

    2011-03-01

    The changes in respiratory physiology that occur with increasing altitude are driven by the fall in the partial pressure of oxygen that occurs with decreasing barometric pressure. At altitude, respiratory system changes occur which impact on each step of the oxygen cascade that occurs within the body. These changes are pivotal to the process of acclimatisation to altitude. The study of human respiratory physiology at altitude has the potential to produce research that will be translational to disease states characterised by hypoxaemia.

  16. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  17. Managing respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Sarah; Restrick, Louise; Stern, Myra

    2017-02-01

    The diverse and evolving role of a psychologist within a respiratory multidisciplinary team (MDT) is described, providing a working model for service provision. The rationale for appointing a psychologist within a respiratory MDT is presented first, citing relevant policy and research and outlining the wider psychosocial impact of respiratory disease. This is followed by an insight into the psychologist's role by highlighting important areas, including key therapy themes and the challenge of patient engagement. The way in which the psychologist supports the collective aims and aspirations of respiratory colleagues to provide a more holistic package of care is illustrated throughout.

  18. Determination of NRHP Eligibility for Buildings 28414, 32100, 33800, 36300, and 36302 at Fort Gordon, Georgia: Includes a Criteria Consideration G Evaluation of the 1988 Barracks Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/ client /default. Cover Photo: Photo of the west side of Building 33800, mid-1980s (DPW, Fort Gordon). ERDC...contract to Southeastern Architects and Engineers of Augusta, Georgia, to adapt an existing 1959 plan for an enlisted women’s barracks and mess for 204...women (Figure 11). Southeastern Architects modified the original by omitting the basement and shrinking the size of the building to only house 180

  19. ACETHYLCYSTEIN IN INFANTILE RESPIRATORY PATHOLOGY TREATMENT CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Davidova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucolytics are widely used in pediatric respiratory pathology treatment. This review contains information about main groups of mucolytics. Special attention is given to acetylcystein. It also includes substantiation report of mucolytics in complex treatment of acute and chronic bronchopulmonary disorders in children.Key words: acetylcystein, mucocillary clearence, acute respiratory viral infection, bronchoobstructive syndrome, respiratory function. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 62–66

  20. Motivational interviewing in respiratory therapy: What do clinicians need to make it part of routine care? A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Shannon

    Full Text Available Motivational interviewing (MI is a method for building motivation for behaviour change that has potential for use in respiratory contexts. There is a paucity of published research exploring the feasibility of this intervention from the clinicians' perspective. This study aimed to explore respiratory clinicians' views of MI: Is it perceived as useful? Could it be integrated into practice? What training would be required to make it part of routine care? Nine respiratory clinicians attended a one-day MI workshop and a semi-structured face-to-face interview two weeks later. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed with thematic analysis. Four main themes are presented-1 MI's suitability for use in respiratory contexts: participants saw potential in using MI to motivate their patients to engage with prescribed respiratory interventions, such as increased physical activity. Those who experimented with new skills post-workshop were encouraged by patient responsiveness and outcomes. 2 MI's relationship with routine clinical practice: some believed they already used elements of MI, but most participants felt MI was fundamentally 'different' to their normal style of working. 3 Implementation issues: additional time would need to be made available to enable an appropriate depth of conversation. 4 Training issues: Participants sensed the complexity of MI could make it difficult to learn and that it would take them time to become competent. On-going supervision was perceived as necessary. One key challenge identified was how to suppress behaviours that are antithetical to MI. These findings lend support to the feasibility of using MI in respiratory contexts such as pulmonary rehabilitation programmes, but highlight implementation and training issues that would need to be overcome. The insights have informed the development of another study, testing the effect of a tailored training package on MI skill, specifically for

  1. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  2. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which requires the most regu- lar and precise evaluation of physiological function for complete assessment of the patient. The very nature of respiratory physiology requires the availability of a range of technological devices. Physiological measurements that may be.

  3. Respiratory challenge MRI: Practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Moreton, Fiona C.; Dani, Krishna A.; Goutcher, Colin; O'Hare, Kevin; Muir, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory challenge MRI is the modification of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and/or carbon dioxide (PaCO2) concentration to induce a change in cerebral function or metabolism which is then measured by MRI. Alterations in arterial gas concentrations can lead to profound changes in cerebral haemodynamics which can be studied using a variety of MRI sequences. Whilst such experiments may provide a wealth of information, conducting them can be complex and challenging. In this paper we review the ration...

  4. Molecular mechanisms of superoxide production by the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drose, S.; Brandt, U.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial ROS production associated with a dysfunction of respiratory chain complexes has been implicated in a number of degenerative diseases and biological aging. Recent findings suggest

  5. Facilities Management Service Delivery in Public and Private High Rise Residential Buildings in Nigeria: A case study of Eko Court Complex and Niger Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrele O. O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed and compared the delivery of Facilities Management (FM services in public and private high rise residential buildings in Lagos, Nigeria. While some facilities or services may not be available in some public estates, the efficiency of the available ones is inadequate in comparison with the adequacy and efficiency of services provided in private estates. The objectives set for the study include identification of services that are provided in the case studies, service delivery method, and an assessment of the residents’ satisfaction of the services. This study adopted questionnaire survey for collection of data. 127 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of the case studies and 93 were returned. Three of which were discarded for incompleteness, thus 90 were analysed. The study found that most but not all of the facilities services expected in high rise buildings are available in the case studies and the services are outsourced under a standard Service Level Agreement. The service delivery in private high rise residential building is better than the public residential high rise buildings as revealed by the study. The study recommends improved standardization of services, customized services and meeting customer’s expectation for improved service delivery.

  6. Non-inferiority of nitric oxide releasing intranasal spray compared to sub-therapeutic antibiotics to reduce incidence of undifferentiated fever and bovine respiratory disease complex in low to moderate risk beef cattle arriving at a commercial feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; McMullin, B; Nation, N; Church, J S; Dorin, C; Miller, C

    2017-03-01

    Undifferentiated fever, or bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked to the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Common practice during processing at feedlots is administration of antibiotic metaphylaxis to reduce the incidence of BRDc. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring nano-molecule with a wide range of physiological attributes. This study evaluated the metaphylactic use of intranasal NO releasing spray (NORS) to control BRDc incidence in calves at low-moderate risk of developing BRDc, arriving at a commercial feedlot as compared to conventional antibiotic metaphylaxis. One thousand and eighty crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled, commercial, weaned beef calves were screened, enrolled, randomized and treated upon arrival. Animals appearing sick were pulled (from their pen) by blinded pen keepers then assessed for BRDc symptoms; blood samples were taken for haptoglobin quantification and the animals were rescued with an antibiotic. After 35 days both groups showed no significant difference in BRDc incidence (5.2% of animals from NORS group and 3.2% from antibiotic group). Average daily weight gain of animals at day 150 for the NORS cohort was 1.17kg compared to 1.18kg for the antibiotic group (p>0.05). There was no significant difference in mortality in the first 35 days (p=0.7552), however, general mortality over 150 days trended higher in the antibiotic cohort. NORS treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. This large randomized controlled study in low-moderate BRDc incidence risk calves demonstrates that NORS treatment, as compared to conventional metaphylactic antibiotics, is non-inferior based on BRDc incidence and other metrics like weight and mortality. These data justify further studies in higher BRDc incidence risk populations to evaluate NORS as

  7. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  8. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  9. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health and safety conditions of building maintenance sites in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISHIOMA

    Euros and other moisture-related respiratory diseases cost between 12 and 23 ... Additional information relating to the function of building, the the part building from which sample was taken, and age of buildings were also collected. The samples were sealed in sterile containers before transportation to laboratory. Structured ...

  11. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  12. Building envelope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the way building envelopes can contribute to developing green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also proposes a number of approaches that can be used to help design green building envelopes...

  13. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) ... diseases that affect the lungs, heart, or immune system , RSV infections can lead to other more serious ...

  15. Respiratory disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth; Hardy, Erica; Powrie, Raumond

    2015-07-01

    Many physiological and anatomical changes of pregnancy affect the respiratory system. These changes often affect the presentation and management of the various respiratory illnesses in pregnancy. This article focuses on several important respiratory issues in pregnancy. The management of asthma, one of the most common chronic illnesses in pregnancy, remains largely unchanged compared to the nonpregnant state. Infectious respiratory illness, including pneumonia and tuberculosis, are similarly managed in pregnancy with antibiotics, although special attention may be needed for antibiotic choices with more pregnancy safety data. When mechanical ventilation is necessary, consideration should be given to the maternal hemodynamics of pregnancy and fetal oxygenation. Maintaining maternal oxygen saturation above 95% is recommended to sustain optimal fetal oxygenation. Cigarette smoking has known risks in pregnancy, and current practice guidelines recommend offering cognitive and pharmacologic interventions to pregnant women to assist in smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that secretes mucus. The mucus traps smaller particles like pollen or smoke. Hairlike structures called cilia line the mucous membrane ...

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Robert A; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  19. Measurement of the Respiratory Quotient of Peat

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Jake

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory quotient (RQ) is the ratio of CO2 produced to O2 consumed by an organism. Complete respiration of glucose will give an RQ of 1 as described by the formula CnH2nOn+nO2→nCO2+nH2O. The respiration of molecules with lower oxygen content, such as lipids, give RQ values of less than one, whereas in cases of anaerobic metabolism, an increase in biomass or the respiration of substances such as humic, oxalic and citric acids the respiratory quotient can be greater than one. In complex syst...

  20. Alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Federica; Alesii, Annalisa; Dall'armi, Valentina; Rubino, Salvatore; Ferri, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are no studies that have investigated the role of alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation. We aimed to observe the prevalence of alexithymia in patients attending respiratory rehabilitation and to verify the presence of a difference between alexithymics and non-alexithymics responsiveness to the respiratory rehabilitation standard protocol. A prospective cohort study evaluating the influence of alexithymia on functional recovery of in-patients afferent to the Respiratory Rehabilitation Unit of IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana. Sixty patients were consecutively enrolled into the study and evaluated for alexithymia, anxiety and depression. Functional recovery was assessed with the six-minute walking test (6MWT). Prior and post-completion of this test dyspnoea, oxygen saturation and cardiac frequency were recorded. Alexithymia was not found to be significantly affecting the functional recovery of participants in respiratory rehabilitation. The distance walked at the 6MWT (6MWD) increased in both alexithymics and non-alexithymics (p(alexithymics) = 0.014; p(non-alexithymics) respiratory rehabilitation.

  1. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  2. A series of Cadmium(II) complexes with 2-substituted terephthalate building block and N-Donor co-ligands: Structural diversity and fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yixia; Zhou, Shanhong; Wang, Zhixiang; Zhang, Meili; Wang, Jijiang; Cao, Jia

    2017-11-01

    Four new Cd(II) complexes have been prepared based on 1,2,4-trimellitic acid (H3tma) and monosodium 2-sulfoterephthalate (2-NaH2stp), formulated as [Cd2(Htma)2 (dpp)2(H2O)] (1), [Cd3 (tma)2 (2,4-bipy)4(H2O)2] (2), [Cd (2-Hstp) (2,2'-bipy)2]·2H2O (3) and [Cd (2-Hstp) (2,4-bipy) (H2O)2] (4) (dpp = dipyrido [3,2-a:2‧,3'-c] phenazine, 2,4-bipy = 2,4-bipyridine, 2,2'-bipy = 2,2'- bipyridine) by hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction structural analyses show all these complexes crystallized in triclinic crystal system of Pī space group, but their structures are diverse. Complex 1 exhibits an infinite one-dimensional chain featuring the left- and right-handed stranded chains interweaved each other. For 2, the two-dimensional network is constructed by one-dimensional ladder-like chain linked by Cd2 ions. In complex 3, the cadmium ion is surrounded with one 2-Hstp2- anion and two 2,2'-bipy molecules. Complex 4 is also a discrete structure based on a metallic dimer unit. In all these complexes, the N-donor co-ligands take the important roles in the assembly of three-dimensional supramolecular structures. The fluorescence properties of complexes 1-4 could be assigned to the π - π* transition of organic ligands.

  3. The Respiratory Chain of Alkaliphilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Ann Krulwich

    2008-01-29

    Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow at extremely high pH are confronted by particular bioenergetic problems in carrying out oxidative phosphorylation. This project focused on the properties and adaptations of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain as a whole, the redox poises of its components and several individual complexes of the respiratory chain of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 have been characterized as part of this project and, importantly, this project has helped support the development of genetic tools that make B. pseudofirmus OF4 the most genetically tractable and, hence, most bioenergetically characterized extreme alkaliphile. Evidence has been obtained for a pivotal role of the cca3-type terminal oxidase in oxidative phosphorylation, especially at high pH and motifs that may be relevant to that special role have been identified.

  4. Respiratory care informatics and the practice of respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Constance C

    2008-04-01

    Recently I reported the results of a study that was conducted to determine how respiratory care information is managed and processed in respiratory care departments. Data obtained from the respiratory care departments surveyed indicated that their information systems (paper-based or automated) do not manage and process respiratory care information effectively or efficiently. Since the goal of an information system is to improve delivery of services, any useful information system must mirror business processes (or professional activities) to achieve that goal. Consequently, I suggested that, in addition to inadequate database management systems, the shortcomings of the information systems surveyed may have stemmed from a failure to accurately define and describe the data, information, and knowledge unique to the respiratory care profession. Accurate description and definition of respiratory care data, information, and knowledge, however, require a formal language and taxonomy for the respiratory care profession. This article explores the concept of respiratory care informatics and its relevance to the practice of respiratory care.

  5. Morphology, structure, composition and build-up processes of the active channel-mouth lobe complex of the Congo deep-sea fan with inputs from remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) multibeam and video surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennielou, Bernard; Droz, Laurence; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jacq, Céline; Bonnel, Cédric; Picot, Marie; Le Saout, Morgane; Saout, Yohan; Bez, Martine; Savoye, Bruno; Olu, Karine; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The detailed structure and composition of turbiditic channel-mouth lobes is still largely unknown because they commonly lie at abyssal water depths, are very thin and are therefore beyond the resolution of hull-mound acoustic tools. The morphology, structure and composition of the Congo turbiditic channel-mouth lobe complex (90×40 km; 2525 km2) were investigated with hull-mounted swath bathymetry, air gun seismics, 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler, sediment piston cores and also with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and video acquired with a Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV). The lobe complex lies 760 km off the Congo River mouth in the Angola abyssal plain between 4740 and 5030 m deep. It is active and is fed by turbidity currents that deposit several centimetres of sediment per century. The lobe complex is subdivided into five lobes that have prograded. The lobes are dominantly muddy. Sand represents ca. 13% of the deposits and is restricted to the feeding channel and distributaries. The overall lobe body is composed of thin muddy to silty turbidites. The whole lobe complex is characterized by in situ mass wasting (slumps, debrites). The 1-m-resolution bathymetry shows pervasive slidings and block avalanches on the edges of the feeding channel and the channel mouth indicating that sliding occurs early and continuously in the lobe build-up. Mass wasting is interpreted as a consequence of very-high accumulation rates, over-steepening and erosion along the channels and is therefore an intrinsic process of lobe building. The bifurcation of feeding channels is probably triggered when the gradient in the distributaries at the top of a lobe becomes flat and when turbidity currents find their way on the higher gradient on the lobe side. It may also be triggered by mass wasting on the lobe side. When a new lobe develops, the abandoned lobes continue to collect significant turbiditic deposits from the feeding channel spillover, so that the whole lobe complex remains active. A

  6. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  7. The evolutionary history of the Arabidopsis lyrata complex: a hybrid in the amphi-Beringian area closes a large distribution gap and builds up a genetic barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Marcus A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of higher plants are, on the majority, polyploid, and hybridisation is more frequent in plants than in animals. Both polyploidisation and hybridisation contribute to increased variability within species, and may transfer adaptations between species in a changing environment. Studying these aspects of evolution within a diversified species complex could help to clarify overall spatial and temporal patterns of plant speciation. The Arabidopsis lyrata complex, which is closely related to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is a perennial, outcrossing, herbaceous species complex with a circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere as well as a disjunct Central European distribution in relictual habitats. This species complex comprises three species and four subspecies, mainly diploids but also several tetraploids, including one natural hybrid. The complex is ecologically, but not fully geographically, separated from members of the closely related species complex of Arabidopsis halleri, and the evolutionary histories of both species compexes have largely been influenced by Pleistocene climate oscillations. Results Using DNA sequence data from the nuclear encoded cytosolic phosphoglucoisomerase and Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 and 2 of the ribosomal DNA, as well as the trnL/F region from the chloroplast genome, we unravelled the phylogeography of the various taxonomic units of the A. lyrata complex. We demonstrate the existence of two major gene pools in Central Europe and Northern America. These two major gene pools are constructed from different taxonomic units. We also confirmed that A. kamchatica is the allotetraploid hybrid between A. lyrata and A. halleri, occupying the amphi-Beringian area in Eastern Asia and Northern America. This species closes the large distribution gap of the various other A. lyrata segregates. Furthermore, we revealed a threefold independent allopolyploid origin of this hybrid

  8. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  9. Building the rationale and structure for a complex physical therapy intervention within the context of a clinical trial: a multimodal individualized treatment for patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Egerton, Thorlene; Pua, Yong-Hao; Abbott, J Haxby; Sims, Kevin; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2011-10-01

    Evaluating the efficacy of complex interventions such as multimodal, impairment-based physical therapy treatments in randomized controlled trials is essential to inform practice and compare relative benefits of available treatment options. Studies of physical therapy interventions using highly standardized intervention protocols, although methodologically rigorous, do not necessarily reflect "real-world" clinical practice, and in many cases results have been disappointing. Development of a complex intervention that includes multiple treatment modalities and individualized treatment technique selection requires a systematic approach to designing all aspects of the intervention based on theory, evidence, and practical constraints. This perspective article outlines the development of the rationale and structure of a multimodal physical therapy program for painful hip osteoarthritis to be assessed in a clinical trial. The resulting intervention protocol comprises a semi-structured program of exercises and manual therapy, advice, physical activity, and optional prescription of a gait aid that is standardized, yet can be individualized according to physical assessment and radiographic findings. The program is evidence based and reflects contemporary physical therapist practice, while also being reproducible and reportable. This perspective article aims to encourage physical therapy researchers involved in evaluation of complex interventions to better document their own intervention development, as well as the outcomes, thus generating a body of knowledge about the development processes and protocols that is generalizable to the real-world complexity of providing physical therapy to individual patients.

  10. Chemoreception and neuroplasticity in respiratory circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William H; Abdala, Ana P; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A; Zoccal, Daniel B; Molkov, Yaroslav I

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory central pattern generator must respond to chemosensory cues to maintain oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) homeostasis in the blood and tissues. To do this, sensorial cells located in the periphery and central nervous system monitor the arterial partial pressure of O 2 and CO 2 and initiate respiratory and autonomic reflex adjustments in conditions of hypoxia and hypercapnia. In conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), repeated peripheral chemoreceptor input mediated by the nucleus of the solitary tract induces plastic changes in respiratory circuits that alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs and result in chemoreflex sensitization, active expiration, and arterial hypertension. Herein, we explored the hypothesis that the CIH-induced neuroplasticity primarily consists of increased excitability of pre-inspiratory/inspiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex. To evaluate this hypothesis and elucidate neural mechanisms for the emergence of active expiration and sympathetic overactivity in CIH-treated animals, we extended a previously developed computational model of the brainstem respiratory-sympathetic network to reproduce experimental data on peripheral and central chemoreflexes post-CIH. The model incorporated neuronal connections between the 2nd-order NTS neurons and peripheral chemoreceptors afferents, the respiratory pattern generator, and sympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in order to capture key features of sympathetic and respiratory responses to peripheral chemoreflex stimulation. Our model identifies the potential neuronal groups recruited during peripheral chemoreflex stimulation that may be required for the development of inspiratory, expiratory and sympathetic reflex responses. Moreover, our model predicts that pre-inspiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex experience plasticity of channel expression due to excessive excitation during peripheral chemoreflex. Simulations

  11. Building Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Koukkari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Although social, economic, and cultural indicators are of substantial importance to the concept of sustainable building, this concept is usually related to environmental characteristics. Any building level assessment method is complex and involves contradictory aspects. Moreover, emphasizing qualitative criteria only increases confusion. R&D and standardization are thus concentrated to transparency and usability of the environmental methods. Other directions of research aim at performance-based design and methods to take regional and cultural aspects into account. In this paper, the perspectives of the sustainability assessment of a whole building are presented, based on a state of the art, feasibility study on performance analysis and the development of an extended life-cycle assessment for buildings. Using various tools, and based on the case studies of building sustainability assessment, environmental indicators were often shown to be of lesser importance than the other, soft ones. The first steps in the development of a building sustainability assessment method for Portuguese residential buildings will be presented and discussed in the end.

  12. Building Software with Gradle

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Studer, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will give an overview of the key concepts and main features of Gradle, the innovative build system that has become the de-facto standard in the enterprise. We will cover task declaration and task graph execution, incremental builds, multi-project builds, dependency management, applying plugins, extracting reusable build logic, bootstrapping a build, and using the Gradle daemon. By the end of this talk, you will have a good understanding of what makes Gradle so powerful yet easy to use. You will also understand why companies like Pivotal, LinkedIn, Google, and other giants with complex builds count on Gradle. About the speakers Etienne is leading the Tooling Team at Gradleware. He has been working as a developer, architect, project manager, and CTO over the past 15 years. He has spent most of his time building software products from the ground up and successfully shipping them to happy customers. He had ...

  13. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  14. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  15. Building sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mass Media

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available proactive,” Van Wyk says. “Demand for greener buildings is slowly beginning to increase among tenants. If asset managers do not take action, the value of assets will depreciate rapidly, and this will make the building obsolete within five years...

  16. Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method for building genetic networks for complex diseases and traits using whole genome genotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput genotype (HTG) data has been used primarily in genome-wide association (GWA) studies; however, GWA results explain only a limited part of the complete genetic variation of traits. In systems genetics, network approaches have been shown to be able to identify pathways and their underlying causal genes to unravel the biological and genetic background of complex diseases and traits, e.g., the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) method based on microarray gene expression data. The main objective of this study was to develop a scale-free weighted genetic interaction network method using whole genome HTG data in order to detect biologically relevant pathways and potential genetic biomarkers for complex diseases and traits. We developed the Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) network method that uses HTG data to detect genome-wide interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and its relationship with complex traits. Data dimensionality reduction was achieved by selecting SNPs based on its: 1) degree of genome-wide significance and 2) degree of genetic variation in a population. Network construction was based on pairwise Pearson's correlation between SNP genotypes or the epistatic interaction effect between SNP pairs. To identify modules the Topological Overlap Measure (TOM) was calculated, reflecting the degree of overlap in shared neighbours between SNP pairs. Modules, clusters of highly interconnected SNPs, were defined using a tree-cutting algorithm on the SNP dendrogram created from the dissimilarity TOM (1-TOM). Modules were selected for functional annotation based on their association with the trait of interest, defined by the Genome-wide Module Association Test (GMAT). We successfully tested the established WISH network method using simulated and real SNP interaction data and GWA study results for carcass weight in a pig resource population; this resulted in detecting modules and key functional and biological pathways

  17. Building a foundation for structure-based cellulosome design for cellulosic ethanol: Insight into cohesin-dockerin complexation from computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiancong; Crowley, Michael F; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-05-01

    The organization and assembly of the cellulosome, an extracellular multienzyme complex produced by anaerobic bacteria, is mediated by the high-affinity interaction of cohesin domains from scaffolding proteins with dockerins of cellulosomal enzymes. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations on both the wild type (WT) and D39N mutant of the C. thermocellum Type I cohesin-dockerin complex in aqueous solution. The D39N mutation has been experimentally demonstrated to disrupt cohesin-dockerin binding. The present MD simulations indicate that the substitution triggers significant protein flexibility and causes a major change of the hydrogen-bonding network in the recognition strips-the conserved loop regions previously proposed to be involved in binding-through electrostatic and salt-bridge interactions between beta-strands 3 and 5 of the cohesin and alpha-helix 3 of the dockerin. The mutation-induced subtle disturbance in the local hydrogen-bond network is accompanied by conformational rearrangements of the protein side chains and bound water molecules. Additional free energy perturbation calculations of the D39N mutation provide differences in the cohesin-dockerin binding energy, thus offering a direct, quantitative comparison with experiments. The underlying molecular mechanism of cohesin-dockerin complexation is further investigated through the free energy profile, that is, potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of WT cohesin-dockerin complex. The PMF shows a high-free energy barrier against the dissociation and reveals a stepwise pattern involving both the central beta-sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the beta-barrel structure.

  18. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J.; Kimpen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  19. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J; Kimpen, J

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  20. [Nutrition and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, M; Burgos, R

    2000-01-01

    Unlike other pathologies, not much attention has been paid to the relationship between nutrition and respiratory disease. This is probably because some of these diseases, such as cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are closely associated with smoking while others that could be more directly linked with nutrition such as cystic fibrosis and emphysema are not directly caused by nutrition disorders. Not all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are undernourished. When malnutrition is present in these patients it is because of multiple reasons and is associated with an increase in both mortality and morbidity. In patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, malnutrition is often secondary to a heightened catabolic state leading to the severe fundamental illness. We also know that nutritional treatment may not only correct malnutrition but also help in improving the respiratory function. This nutritional therapy is not normally easy to comply with. It must be accompanied by other non-pharmacological therapies such as rehabilitation. Renourishment may also entail risks for patients with respiratory diseases so it is very important to know as closely as possible their nutritional requirements and to focus on specific actions.

  1. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  2. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network of monitoring centres - mainly in the Witwatersrand and Vereeniging area with one centre in Middelburg - that ...

  3. Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Despreaux, Thomas; Perros, Frédéric; Lau, Edmund; Andujar, Pascal; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Descatha, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  5. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  6. Academic Institutions and One Health: Building Capacity for Transdisciplinary Research Approaches to Address Complex Health Issues at the Animal–Human–Ecosystem Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Scott, Lisa K.; Buntain, Bonnie; Hatfield, Jennifer M.; Meisser, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To improve health at the human, animal, and ecosystem interface, defined as One Health, training of researchers must transcend individual disciplines to develop a new process of collaboration. The transdisciplinary research approach integrates frameworks and methodologies beyond academic disciplines and includes involvement of and input from policy makers and members of the community. The authors argue that there should be a significant shift in academic institutions’ research capacity to achieve the added value of a transdisciplinary approach for addressing One Health problems. This Perspective is a call to action for academic institutions to provide the foundations for this salient shift. The authors begin by describing the transdisciplinary approach, propose methods for building transdisciplinary research capacity, and highlight three value propositions that support the case. Examples are provided to illustrate how the transdisciplinary approach to research adds value through improved sustainability of impact, increased cost-effectiveness, and enhanced abilities to mitigate potentially harmful unintended consequences. The authors conclude with three key recommendations for academic institutions: (1) a focus on creating enabling environments for One Health and transdisciplinary research, (2) the development of novel funding structures for transdisciplinary research, and (3) training of “transmitters” using real-world-oriented educational programs that break down research silos through collaboration across disciplines. PMID:25650827

  7. Academic Institutions and One Health: Building Capacity for Transdisciplinary Research Approaches to Address Complex Health Issues at the Animal-Human-Ecosystem Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Scott, Lisa K; Buntain, Bonnie; Hatfield, Jennifer M; Meisser, Andrea; Thomas, Christopher James

    2015-07-01

    To improve health at the human, animal, and ecosystem interface, defined as One Health, training of researchers must transcend individual disciplines to develop a new process of collaboration. The transdisciplinary research approach integrates frameworks and methodologies beyond academic disciplines and includes involvement of and input from policy makers and members of the community. The authors argue that there should be a significant shift in academic institutions' research capacity to achieve the added value of a transdisciplinary approach for addressing One Health problems. This Perspective is a call to action for academic institutions to provide the foundations for this salient shift. The authors begin by describing the transdisciplinary approach, propose methods for building transdisciplinary research capacity, and highlight three value propositions that support the case. Examples are provided to illustrate how the transdisciplinary approach to research adds value through improved sustainability of impact, increased cost-effectiveness, and enhanced abilities to mitigate potentially harmful unintended consequences. The authors conclude with three key recommendations for academic institutions: (1) a focus on creating enabling environments for One Health and transdisciplinary research, (2) the development of novel funding structures for transdisciplinary research, and (3) training of "transmitters" using real-world-oriented educational programs that break down research silos through collaboration across disciplines.

  8. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  9. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Updated ...

  10. Acute respiratory infections at children

    OpenAIRE

    Delyagin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The common signs of virus respiratory diseases, role of pathological inclination to infections, value of immunodeficiency are presented at lecture. Features of most often meeting respiratory virus infections are given.

  11. The Airborne Transmission of Infection Between Flats in High-rise Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, N.P.; Niu, J. L.; Perino, M.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne transmission of infectious respiratory diseases in indoor environments has drawn our attention for decades, and this issue is revitalized with the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). One of the concerns is that there may be multiple transmission routes across households....... High-speed winds can restrain the convective transfer of heat and mass between flats, functioning like an air curtain. Despite the complexities of the air flow involved, it is clear that this transmission route should be taken into account in infection control....... of magnitude, but the risk of infection calculated by the Wells-Riley equation is only around one order of magnitude lower. It is found that, with single-side open-window conditions, wind blowing perpendicularly to the building may either reinforce or suppress the upward transport, depending on the wind speed......Airborne transmission of infectious respiratory diseases in indoor environments has drawn our attention for decades, and this issue is revitalized with the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). One of the concerns is that there may be multiple transmission routes across households...

  12. Epidemiology of coronavirus respiratory infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D; Flowers, D; Clarke, J R; Valman, H B; MacNaughton, M R

    1983-01-01

    Human coronaviruses were found by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in upper respiratory tract secretions taken during 30% of 108 acute respiratory infections experienced by 30 children under age 6 years with recurrent respiratory infections (index group), and during 29% of 51 acute infections experienced by their siblings. Lower respiratory tract infection--predominantly wheezy bronchitis--occurred in 30% of the index children's coronavirus positive infections but in none of their siblings' ...

  13. Building Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — Explore real estate information about buildings in the Town of Cary.This file is created by the Town of Cary GIS Group. It contains data from both the Wake, Chatham...

  14. Ecology Beyond Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Terri

    2011-01-01

    As the designers of the WWf building in Zeist, The Netherslands a CO2-neutral, self-sufficient office complex, RAU has set the bar for sustainable research and design. Guesteditor Terri Peters visited the firm's studio in Amsterdam to talk to principal Thomas Rau. As Peters relates, Rau prefers t...... to put on the dwindling supply of raw materials rather than the immidiate problems of energy consumption for which there are solutions within reach. With the emphasis on a more far-reaching approach, he places buildings in a wider context of ecological thinking and systems....

  15. Megacomplex organization of the oxidative phosphorylation system by structural analysis of respiratory supercomplexes from potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultema, Jelle B.; Braun, Hans-Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouřil, Roman

    The individual protein complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS complexes 1 to V) specifically interact and form defined supramolecular structures, the so-called "respiratory supercomplexes". Some supercomplexes appear to associate into larger structures, or megacomplexes, such as a

  16. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  17. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. [Respiratory Rehabilitation to Reduce Respiratory Complications after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2017-07-01

    The number of cardiovascular surgical operations has been increasing, accompanied by an increase in the number of patients with an aging patient and various comorbidities. For this reason, the risk of respiratory complications after cardiovascular surgery is high, and ingenuity to alleviate this is necessary. We evaluated preoperative respiratory function and examined whether there is a difference in the onset of postoperative respiratory complications with or without respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative. As a result, the incidence of respiratory complications was significantly reduced in the group subjected to preoperative respiratory rehabilitation. Also, the intensive care unit stay was significantly shortened. From this, it is important to perform respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative time. And as a breathing exercise method, active cycle breathing technique is safe and highly effective.

  19. Excellence in Promoting Participation: Striving for the 10 Cs-Client-Centered Care, Consideration of Complexity, Collaboration, Coaching, Capacity Building, Contextualization, Creativity, Community, Curricular Changes, and Curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa A

    2017-07-01

    Participation of children with physical disabilities is critical to optimizing their life roles and lived experiences. This perspective explores the complex and multidimensional construct of participation and presents recommendations for practice, education, and research to transform pediatric physical therapy service delivery. Two models are reviewed of participation-based service delivery grounded in client-centered care and the principles of coaching to engage clients in their rehabilitation. The roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist and the importance of team collaboration are emphasized. Considerations are presented for ecological measurements and interventions to support client participation goals for children of all ages in home and community settings. Practitioners, educators, and researchers are encouraged to be advocates and change agents to ensure that services support meaningful participation for children in real-life contexts.

  20. The Diphosphorus Complex [Cp2Mo2(CO)4(η2‐P2)] as a Building Block for the Synthesis of Mixed‐Hybrid Coordination Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mehdi Elsayed; Attenberger, Bianca; Fleischmann, Martin; Schreiner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The three‐component reaction of the tetrahedral diphosphorus complex [Cp2Mo2(CO)4(η2‐P2)] (1), with Ag[BF4] (2) in the presence of 2,2′‐bipyrimidine (3) leads to the formation of the two novel two‐dimensional networks 4 and 5. Compound 4 is a new two‐dimensional organometallic‐organic hybrid polymer, while derivative 5 represents a unique two‐dimensional organometallic‐inorganic‐organic hybrid polymer. These results show the possibility of synthesizing a new class of coordination polymers, which could not be obtained from two‐component reactions with organic molecules in addition of metal ions. PMID:27867315

  1. New and emerging pathogens in canine infectious respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestnall, S L; Mitchell, J A; Walker, C A; Erles, K; Brownlie, J

    2014-03-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease is a common, worldwide disease syndrome of multifactorial etiology. This review presents a summary of 6 viruses (canine respiratory coronavirus, canine pneumovirus, canine influenza virus, pantropic canine coronavirus, canine bocavirus, and canine hepacivirus) and 2 bacteria (Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Mycoplasma cynos) that have been associated with respiratory disease in dogs. For some pathogens a causal role is clear, whereas for others, ongoing research aims to uncover their pathogenesis and contribution to this complex syndrome. Etiology, clinical disease, pathogenesis, and epidemiology are described for each pathogen, with an emphasis on recent discoveries or novel findings.

  2. Computerized adventitious respiratory sounds as outcome measures for respiratory therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alda; Oliveira, Ana; Jácome, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    There is a need to develop simple, noninvasive, and sensitive outcome measures for respiratory therapy. Adventitious respiratory sounds (ie, crackles and wheezes) can be objectively characterized with computerized respiratory sound analysis (CORSA) and have been shown to contribute for diagnosis purposes; however, their potential for use as outcome measures is unknown. Thus, this systematic review synthesizes the evidence on the use of computerized adventitious respiratory sounds as outcome measures. The Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases were searched. Reviewers independently selected studies according to the eligibility criteria. Effect sizes and 95% CIs were computed. Twelve studies with different designs (observational, n = 3; quasi-experimental n = 7; and randomized controlled trial, n = 2) were included. Eight studies were conducted with adults, and 4 studies with children. Most studies explored only one type of adventitious respiratory sound. For wheezes, the occupation rate seemed to be the most promising parameter to be used as an outcome measure, with high/medium effect sizes (0.62-1.82). For crackles, the largest deflection width showed high effect sizes (1.31 and 1.04); however, this was explored in only one study. Crackle number and 2-cycle duration presented conflicting information, with high/poor effect sizes depending on the study. Specific variables of each adventitious respiratory sound detected and characterized by CORSA showed high effect sizes and, thus, the potential to be used as outcome measures. Further research with robust study designs and larger samples (both of children and adult populations), and following CORSA guidelines is needed to build evidence-based knowledge on this topic.

  3. Advanced Role of Neutrophils in Common Respiratory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jinping Liu; Zhiqiang Pang,; Guoqiang Wang; Xuewa Guan; Keyong Fang; Ziyan Wang; Fang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory diseases, always being a threat towards the health of people all over the world, are most tightly associated with immune system. Neutrophils serve as an important component of immune defense barrier linking innate and adaptive immunity. They participate in the clearance of exogenous pathogens and endogenous cell debris and play an essential role in the pathogenesis of many respiratory diseases. However, the pathological mechanism of neutrophils remains complex and obscure. The tra...

  4. PHYTOTHERAPY IN SEASONAL PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES AMONG SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Garashchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the research findings of the application efficiency of the complex plant based preparation Sinupret (Bionorica AG, Germany for prevention of the acute respiratory diseases among sickly children. The authors showed that the application of the plant based preparation decreased the sick rate caused by the acute respiratory diseases and influenza, alleviated the run of the acute respiratory diseases, had some really good tolerance and might be recommended for the wide use, for the prevention of the acute respiratory diseases in organized children groups.Key words: acute respiratory diseases, prevention, phytotherapy, children, homeopathic remedies, vaccines.

  5. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  6. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  7. Disclosing respiratory coinfections: a Broad-Range Panel Assay for Avian Respiratory Pathogens on a Nanofluidic PCR Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croville, Guillaume; Foret, Charlotte; Heuillard, Pauline; Senet, Alexis; Delpont, Mattias; Mouahid, Mohammed; Ducatez, Mariette F; Kichou, Faouzi; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-19

    Respiratory syndromes (RS) are among the most significant pathological conditions in food animals and are caused by complex coactions of pathogens and environmental factors. In poultry, low pathogenic avian Influenza A viruses, metapneumoviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Mycoplasma spp. Escherichia coli and/or Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT) in turkeys, are considered as key co-infectious agents of respiratory syndromes. Aspergillus sp., Pasteurella multocida, Avibacterium paragallinarum or Chlamydia psittaci may also be involved in respiratory outbreaks. An innovative quantitative PCR method, based on a nanofluidic technology, has the ability to screen up to 96 samples with 96 pathogen-specific PCR primers, at the same time, in one run of real-time quantitative PCR (RTqPCR). This platform was used for the screening of avian respiratory pathogens: 15 respiratory agents, including viruses, bacteria and fungi potentially associated with respiratory infections of poultry were targeted. Primers were designed and validated for SYBR green RTqPCR and subsequently validated on the Biomark high throughput PCR nanofluidic platform (Fluidigm©). As a clinical assessment, tracheal swabs were sampled on turkeys showing respiratory syndromes and submitted to this panel assay. Beside systematic detection of E. coli, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae were frequently detected, with distinctive co-infection patterns between French and Moroccan flocks. This proof-of-concept study illustrates the potential of such panel assay for unveiling respiratory co-infections profiles in poultry.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, M J; Lemen, R J

    1997-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is associated with the clinical signs and symptoms of small airway obstruction. A major public health problem throughout the world, this condition is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Management is primarily preventive, through strict hand washing, avoidance of exposure during the respiratory illness season and intravenously administered prophylactic anti-RSV Immune globulin, especially in selected small infants with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. Supportive measures, including fluid hydration, good nutrition, aerosolized bronchodilators and steroids, may be helpful. Ribavirin may be useful in severely ill children or those with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. A significant number of patients have recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis and wheezing, and may develop asthma later in life. Avoidance of exposure to tobacco smoke, cold air and air pollutants is also beneficial to long-term recovery from RSV bronchiolitis. A number of vaccines to prevent this infection are currently being studied.

  9. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  10. Respiratory risks in broiler production workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M do CB de Alencar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many situations that involve health risks to the Brazilian rural worker, and animal production is just one of them. Inhalation of organic dust, which has many microorganisms, leads in general to respiratory allergic reactions in some individuals, "asthma-like syndrome", and mucous membrane inflammation syndrome, that is a complex of nasal, eye, and throat complaints. Furthermore, workers might have farmer's hypersensitivity pneumonia, that is a respiratory health risk along the years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential pulmonary health risks in poultry production workers in the region of Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Interviews using a pre-elaborated questionnaire with 40 questions were made with 37 broiler production workers, which were submitted to a pulmonary function test. Results of restrictive function with lower FEV1 (the maximum respiratory potential, the forced expiratory volume in the first second of exhalation and FVC (forced vital capacity represented 24.32% of the total of workers, and severe obstruction represented 2.70%. Other symptoms were found in 67.57% of the workers as well. The results showed that those who work more than 4 years and within more than one poultry house, exceeding 5 hours per day of work, presented higher pulmonary health risks. It is concluded that the activities within broiler houses may induce allergic respiratory reaction in workers. The use of IPE (individual protection equipment besides special attention to the air quality inside the housing may be advised in a preventive way.

  11. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  12. Building on the EGIPPS performance assessment: the multipolar framework as a heuristic to tackle the complexity of performance of public service oriented health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Hoerée, Tom; da Silveira, Valéria Campos; Van Belle, Sara; Prashanth, Nuggehalli S; Kegels, Guy

    2014-04-17

    Performance of health care systems is a key concern of policy makers and health service managers all over the world. It is also a major challenge, given its multidimensional nature that easily leads to conceptual and methodological confusion. This is reflected by a scarcity of models that comprehensively analyse health system performance. In health, one of the most comprehensive performance frameworks was developed by the team of Leggat and Sicotte. Their framework integrates 4 key organisational functions (goal attainment, production, adaptation to the environment, and values and culture) and the tensions between these functions.We modified this framework to better fit the assessment of the performance of health organisations in the public service domain and propose an analytical strategy that takes it into the social complexity of health organisations. The resulting multipolar performance framework (MPF) is a meta-framework that facilitates the analysis of the relations and interactions between the multiple actors that influence the performance of health organisations. Using the MPF in a dynamic reiterative mode not only helps managers to identify the bottlenecks that hamper performance, but also the unintended effects and feedback loops that emerge. Similarly, it helps policymakers and programme managers at central level to better anticipate the potential results and side effects of and required conditions for health policies and programmes and to steer their implementation accordingly.

  13. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4

  14. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  15. Capacity Building in Land Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Ahene, Rexford

    2003-01-01

    development in this area. Furthermore, capacity building should ensure that the focus is on building sound institutions and governance rather than just high-level IT-infrastructures.    This overall approach to capacity building in land management is used for implementing a new land policy reform in Malawi......There is a significant need for capacity building in the interdisciplinary area of land management especially in developing countries and countries in transition, to deal with the complex issues of building efficient land information systems and sustainable institutional infrastructures. Capacity...... building in land management is not only a question of establishing a sufficient technological level or sufficient economic resources. It is mainly a question of understanding the interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral nature of land administration systems, and understanding the need for human resource...

  16. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  17. Structural building screening and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawandy, Alex; Nakazawa, Shoji; Hendry, Andy; Ridwan, Firdaus, Rahmatul

    2017-10-01

    An earthquake is a disaster that can be harmful to the community, such as financial loss and also dead injuries. Pekanbaru is a city that located in the middle of Sumatera Island. Even though the city of Pekanbaru is a city that rarely occurs earthquake, but Pekanbaru has ever felt the impact of the big earthquake that occurred in West Sumatera on September 2009. As we know, Indonesia located between Eurasia plate, Pacific plate, and Indo-Australian plate. Particularly the Sumatera Island, It has the Semangko fault or the great Sumatra fault along the island from north to south due to the shift of Eurasia and Indo-Australian Plates. An earthquake is not killing people but the building around the people that could be killing them. The failure of the building can be early prevented by doing an evaluation. In this research, the methods of evaluation have used a guideline for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-154 and Applied Technology Council (ATC) 40. FEMA P-154 is a rapid visual screening of buildings for potential seismic hazards and ATC-40 is seismic evaluation and retrofit of Concrete Buildings. ATC-40 is a more complex evaluation rather than FEMA P-154. The samples to be evaluated are taken in the surroundings of Universitas Riau facility in Pekanbaru. There are four buildings as case study such as the rent student building, the building of mathematics and natural science faculty, the building teacher training and education faculty and the buildings in the faculty of Social political sciences. Vulnerability for every building facing an earthquake is different, this is depending on structural and non-structural components of the building. Among all of the samples, only the building of mathematics and the natural science faculty is in critical condition according to the FEMA P-154 evaluation. Furthermore, the results of evaluation using ATC-40 for the teacher training building are in damage control conditions, despite the other three buildings are

  18. [Moisture and mold damages of buildings in relation to health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Juha; Lampi, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Moisture damages of buildings increase respiratory symptoms and the risk of development of new cases of asthma. Scientific evidence of possible other health effects of moisture damages is scanty but they cause plenty of concern. The management of indoor air problems is further hampered by the lack of health-based limit values. Patients having symptoms from indoor air present a challenge to the doctor, because our ability to apply scientific data to an individual building or patient is very limited Although the factors increasing asthma and respiratory symptoms in buildings with moisture damage are not known in detail, every attempt should be made to prevent and correct the moisture damages.

  19. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...

  20. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  1. Reassessment of the evidence for postcranial skeletal pneumaticity in Triassic archosaurs, and the early evolution of the avian respiratory system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, Richard J; Barrett, Paul M; Gower, David J

    2012-01-01

    Uniquely among extant vertebrates, birds possess complex respiratory systems characterised by the combination of small, rigid lungs, extensive pulmonary air sacs that possess diverticula that invade (pneumatise...

  2. Quartz as votive and building material within the megalithic funerary complex of Palacio III (Almadén de la Plata, Seville: contextual and mineralogical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forteza González, Matilde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines an assemblage of quartz objects, such as crystals (rock crystal and prase and pebbles, that were found in two spatially and chronologically different contexts of the Palacio III megalithic complex (Almadén de la Plata, Seville, Spain excavated by the universities of Seville and Southampton between 2001 and 2002. Firstly, these objects are described macroscopically from a mineralogical and crystallographic point of view. When possible, samples are studied by X-ray diffraction and SEM in order to determine their mineralogical and chemical composition. Secondly, other similar instances, in which quartz and rock crystal objects have been found among the grave goods of funerary contexts of southern Iberian, are described. Finally, we propose a series of interpretations for these objects, both from a functional as well as a symbolical perspective, assessing the significance of their presence in spatially discrete and chrono-culturally distant contexts.

    Este trabajo examina un conjunto de objetos de cuarzo, tales como monocristales (variedades cristal de roca y prasio y cantos rodados, encontrados en dos contextos arqueológicos espacial y cronológicamente distintos del complejo megalítico de Palacio III (Almadén de la Plata, Sevilla, excavado por las universidades de Sevilla y Southampton entre 2001 y 2002. Estos objetos se describen, en primer lugar, desde un punto de vista macroscópico atendiendo a sus características mineralógicas y cristalográficas. Se han utilizado técnicas difractométricas y de microscopía electrónica de barrido sobre las muestras inalteradas para determinar su composición mineralógica y química. A continuación se listan y describen casos de ítems semejantes registrados en contextos funerarios de la Prehistoria Reciente del Sur de la Península Ibérica. Finalmente se valoran distintas interpretaciones para los mismos, desde un punto de vista tanto funcional como simbólico, discuti

  3. Innovation in Building Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Thomas & Betts Corporation's Flat Conductor Cables, or FCC, were developed of necessity as aircraft and spacecraft became increasingly complex. In order to reduce size and weight of components, the use of thin flat wire instead of relatively thick and protrusive round cable, provided a dramatic reduction of the space occupied by the many miles of power distribution lines in an aerospace vehicle. Commercially, FCC offers cost savings in simplified building construction, reduced installation time and ease of alteration.

  4. Dampness in buildings and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Blomquist, G.; Gyntelberg, F.

    2001-01-01

    Several epidemiological investigations concerning indoor environments have indicated that "dampness" in buildings is associated to health effects such as respiratory symptoms, asthma and allergy The aim of the present interdisciplinary review is to evaluate this association as shown in the epidem......Several epidemiological investigations concerning indoor environments have indicated that "dampness" in buildings is associated to health effects such as respiratory symptoms, asthma and allergy The aim of the present interdisciplinary review is to evaluate this association as shown...... in the epidemiological literature. A literature search identified 590 peer-reviewed articles of which 61 have been the foundation for this review. The review shows that "dampness" in buildings appears to increase the risk for health effects in the airways, such as cough, wheeze and asthma. Relative risks...... are in the range of OR 1.4-2.2. There also seems to be an association between "dampness" and other symptoms Such as tiredness, headache and airways infections. It is concluded that the evidence for a causal association between "dampness" and health effects is strong. However, the mechanisms are unknown. Several...

  5. Structure Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, J.E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    I argue that structure building (e.g. Chomsky’s Merge) is not part of the narrow language faculty (FLN, contra Hauser, Chomsky & Fitch 2002). FLN is not empty, though: it consists of a lexico-grammatical component that defines grammatical objects, (non- recursive) combinatory rules/principles,

  6. Existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    their homes. These policy measures include building regulations, energy tax and different types of incentives and information dissemination. The conclusion calls for new and innovative policy measures to cope with the realities of renovations of owner-occupied houses and how energy efficiency improvement...

  7. Building Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Marjane

    1994-01-01

    Describes how an initial $1,500 grant helped build a desperately needed health clinic on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Provides the history of the clinic, from its beginning as a small grant to its ultimate development into a $400,000 solar-heated health clinic with a staff of 9 people, including a full-time physician. (MAB)

  8. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsney, K M; Forsyth, D

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory dysfunction has been associated with Parkinson's disease since it was first described in 1817. The respiratory symptoms observed in Parkinson's disease patients vary greatly. Most patients remain asymptomatic, whereas others present with acute shortness of breath and even stridor. In August 2016, an electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results were screened and studies reporting on respiratory dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease were included. Respiratory dysfunction is due to a combination of factors including restrictive changes, upper airway obstruction, abnormal ventilatory drive and response to medications. Much debate surrounds the mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, its prevalence and the effect of levodopa on respiration. It is clear from this review that larger studies, comparing patients of similar disease duration and severity using the same pulmonary function parameters, are required to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

  9. Respiratory muscle strenght and functional capacity in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pesce de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibromyalgia (FM is a complex syndrome with skeletal muscle impairment. However, respiratory muscles responses are unknown. Purpose: we aimed to study strength resistance in both respiratory and skeletal muscles in FM and healthy controls. Methods: fifteen women with FM - FG group - (50 ± 11 years and 10 healthy controls - CG - (48 ± 11 years underwent clinical evaluation, skeletal muscle strength and resistance tests, respiratory tests, six-minute walk test and step test. Results: both groups were similar in demographic and anthropometric variables. Respiratory muscle strength was significantly lower in FG (46 ± 6 cm HO compared to CG (80 ± 8 cm HO; p < 0.05. Similarly, 22 skeletal muscle (71 ± 8 vs 167 ± 24 repetitions, p < 0.05 and respiratory muscle strength (29 ± 4 vs 56 ± 6 repetitions, p < 0.05 were lower in FG compared to CG. Moreover, CG showed greater distance on 6 - minute walk test (551 ± 36 vs 460 ± 86 m; p < 0.05 and higher number of steps (102 ± 9 vs 76 ± 13 steps; p < 0.05. Only FG showed significantly correlation between skeletal muscle and respiratory muscle strength (r = 0.64; p < 0.001. Conclusion: FM syndrome showed an impairment in both respiratory muscle strength and resistance, which could impair exercise tolerance in these patients.

  10. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  11. High-Rise Building: Function, Construction, Visual Image

    OpenAIRE

    Ozola, S

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays building achievements are characterized by engineering-technically complex buildings. Construction of tower buildings was already familiar during the antiquity and also in the territory of Latvia, where towers on the Baltic tribes’ hillforts guarded fortified wooden construction complexes. German knights started to build freestanding stone tower-castles in the conquered lands which were gradually included in the fortress building. The medieval city was surrounded by a defensive wall ...

  12. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  14. Respiratory symptoms of megaesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Megaesophagus as the end result of achalasia is the consequence of disordered peristalsis and the slow decompensation of the esophageal muscular layer. The main symptoms of achalasia are dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss, but respiratory symptoms, such as coughing, particularly when patients lie in a horizontal position, may also be common due to microaspiration. A 70-year old woman suffered from a nocturnal cough and shortness of breath with stridor. She reported difficulty in swallowing food over the past ten years, but had adapted by eating a semi-liquid diet. Chest X-ray showed right hemithorax patchy opacities projecting from the posterior mediastinum. Chest computed tomography scan showed a marked dilatation of the esophagus with abundant food residues. Endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of megaesophagus due to esophageal achalasia, excluding other causes of obstruction, such as secondary esophagitis, polyps, leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. In the elderly population, swallowing difficulties due to esophageal achalasia are often underestimated and less troublesome than the respiratory symptoms that are caused by microaspiration. The diagnosis of esophageal achalasia, although uncommon, should be considered in patients with nocturnal chronic coughs and shortness of breath with stridor when concomitant swallowing difficulties are present.

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  16. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Building economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D.O.(red.)

    Publikationen er på engelsk. Den omfatter alle indlæg på det fjerde internationale symposium om byggeøkonomi, der blev arrangeret af SBI for det internationale byggeforskningsråd CIB. De fem bind omhandler: Methods of Economic Evaluation, Design Optimization, Ressource Utilization, The Building...... Market og Economics and Technological Forecasting in Construction. Et indledende bind bringer statusrapporter for de fem forskningsområder, og det sidste bind sammenfatter debatten på symposiet....

  18. [Hardware and software for EMG recording and analysis of respiratory muscles of human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnushkin, S D; Chakhman, V N; Segizbaeva, M O; Pogodin, M A; Aleksandrov, V G

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new hardware and software system that allows to not only record the EMG of different groups of the respiratory muscles, but also hold its amplitude-frequency analysis, which allows to determine the change in the contribution to the work of breathing of a respiratory muscles and detect early signs of fatigue of the respiratory muscles. Presented complex can be used for functional diagnostics of breath in patients and healthy people and sportsmen.

  19. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conven...

  20. 10 CFR 850.28 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Respiratory protection. 850.28 Section 850.28 Energy... Respiratory protection. (a) The responsible employer must establish a respiratory protection program that complies with the respiratory protection program requirements of 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection...

  1. Respiratory system mechanics in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H; Katz, Jeffrey A

    2003-09-01

    Respiratory mechanics research is important to the advancement of ARDS management. Twenty-eight years ago, research on the effects of PEEP and VT indicated that the lungs of ARDS patients did not behave in a manner consistent with homogenously distributed lung injury. Both Suter and colleagues] and Katz and colleagues reported that oxygenation continued to improve as PEEP increased (suggesting lung recruitment), even though static Crs decreased and dead-space ventilation increased (suggesting concurrent lung overdistension). This research strongly suggested that without VT reduction, the favorable effects of PEEP on lung recruitment are offset by lung overdistension at end-inspiration. The implications of these studies were not fully appreciated at that time, in part because the concept of ventilator-associated lung injury was in its nascent state. Ten years later. Gattinoni and colleagues compared measurements of static pressure-volume curves with FRC and CT scans of the chest in ARDS. They found that although PEEP recruits collapsed (primarily dorsal) lung segments, it simultaneously causes overdistension of non-dependent, inflated lung regions. Furthermore, the specific compliance of the aerated, residually healthy lung tissue is essentially normal. The main implication of these findings is that traditional mechanical ventilation practice was injecting excessive volumes of gas into functionally small lungs. Therefore, the emblematic low static Crs measured in ARDS reflects not only surface tension phenomena and recruitment of collapsed airspaces but also overdistension of the remaining healthy lung. The studies reviewed in this article support the concept that lung injury in ARDS is heterogeneously distributed, with resulting disparate mechanical stresses, and indicate the additional complexity from alterations in chest wall mechanics. Most of these studies, however, were published before lung-protective ventilation. Therefore, further studies are needed to

  2. Building in a Market Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Sten; Levring, Peter

    This book offers a "state of the art" introduction to the "Danish way" of building. It presents a source of information and inspiration to the complex transitional process of rearranging the construction sectors in Central and Eastern European countries. The text gives a historical presentation o...... and functions of the main actors in the building process. During these passages and in a final section important future developments are highlighted, and characteristic research and development projects are presented....

  3. Respiratory effort from the photoplethysmogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    The potential for a simple, non-invasive measure of respiratory effort based on the pulse oximeter signal - the photoplethysmogram or 'pleth' - was investigated in a pilot study. Several parameters were developed based on a variety of manifestations of respiratory effort in the signal, including modulation changes in amplitude, baseline, frequency and pulse transit times, as well as distinct baseline signal shifts. Thirteen candidate parameters were investigated using data from healthy volunteers. Each volunteer underwent a series of controlled respiratory effort maneuvers at various set flow resistances and respiratory rates. Six oximeter probes were tested at various body sites. In all, over three thousand pleth-based effort-airway pressure (EP) curves were generated across the various airway constrictions, respiratory efforts, respiratory rates, subjects, probe sites, and the candidate parameters considered. Regression analysis was performed to determine the existence of positive monotonic relationships between the respiratory effort parameters and resulting airway pressures. Six of the candidate parameters investigated exhibited a distinct positive relationship (p<0.001 across all probes tested) with increasing upper airway pressure repeatable across the range of respiratory rates and flow constrictions studied. These were: the three fundamental modulations in amplitude (AM-Effort), baseline (BM-Effort) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA-Effort); two pulse transit time modulations - one using a pulse oximeter probe and an ECG (P2E-Effort) and the other using two pulse oximeter probes placed at different peripheral body sites (P2-Effort); and baseline shifts in heart rate, (BL-HR-Effort). In conclusion, a clear monotonic relationship was found between several pleth-based parameters and imposed respiratory loadings at the mouth across a range of respiratory rates and flow constrictions. The results suggest that the pleth may provide a measure of changing upper

  4. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  5. Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anita Lewis

    2012-07-01

    This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

  6. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Lungs & Respiratory System KidsHealth / For Kids / Your Lungs & Respiratory System What's ... your body, and your lungs especially hate it. Cigarette smoke damages the cilia in the trachea so they ...

  7. Sustainable building versus ecological building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available and Grosskopf posit that in the future three basic contemporary approaches will be synthesised into an integrated process and that ecological design will become a part of a new design process. The three contemporary processes are: vernacular design..., the technological approach, and the biomimetic approach. Vernacular architecture is the embodiment of cultural wisdom, memory, tradition and intimate knowledge of place into the design and operation of buildings. Vernacular architecture speaks directly...

  8. Occupational allergy: respiratory hazards in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewska, Marta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2014-04-01

    Allergens are one group of respiratory hazards in the workplace of healthcare workers (HCWs). The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent advances in occupational allergy as well as potential hazardous agents in HCWs. The review covers new developments on the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of occupational allergy in HCWs. This article also provides updated information on the prevalence of work-related respiratory symptoms, as well as on respiratory hazards among healthcare providers. It is established that HCWs are at risk of asthma symptoms. The growing use of cleaning products is one of the causes of occupational airway disease in that group. Among healthcare professionals, the prevalence of asthma varies depending on worksite. Recent findings indicate a need for education among HCWs concerning occupational risks. A lack of knowledge of product components as well as about exposure to cleaning/disinfecting agents has been demonstrated. Further studies are necessary to determine the relative role of individual agents versus complex workplace exposures in the development of work-related asthma in HCWs.

  9. Learn about Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus ( ... file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RSV Symptoms, Causes & ...

  10. Summary The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate,. QRS axis and QRS complex duration of the ECG was investigated in 41 pregnant compared to 39 non pregnant age and height matched Nigerian subjects. Results obtained show that pregnancy had no significant effect (p>0.05) on heart rate, respiratory ...

  11. PROGRAM RATIONALE OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION IN CHILDREN WITH FREQUENT RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Deryusheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of complex clinical and laboratory examination of 146 children aged 2—3 years attending kindergarten were presented. The leading predictors of frequent respiratory disease: disturbance of microbiocenosis oropharyngeal mucosa, immunoglobulins decrease, respiratory allergic pathology were established and scientifically substantiated. The results obtained prove the main directions of therapeutic and preventive measures.

  12. [The sick building syndrome (SBS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezratty, Véronique

    2003-10-11

    AN INCREASINGLY COMMON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROBLEM: Complaints related to indoor environment represent one of the most frequent problems that environmental health practitioners are confronted with. Hence the incidence of the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) has been increasing since the Seventies. DIFFERING DEFINITIONS AND CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS: The WHO defines SBS as an excess of complaints and symptoms occurring in certain occupants of non-industrial buildings. The syndrome can only be evoked after elimination in the person concerned of a disease related to the building, the aetiological agent of which is identifiable. The symptoms described during SBS (headaches, concentration problems, asthenia, irritation of the skin or nasal mucosa, of the eyes and upper respiratory tract.) are non specific and frequently observed in the general population. AN UNKNOWN CASE, BUT NUMEROUS AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS SUSPECTED: There is no unanimously accepted definition nor physio-pathological theory to explain the occurrence of SBS in a particular building. Many favouring factors, including the type and rate of ventilation, volatile organic compounds, particles and humidity have been suspected. TECHNICAL, SOCIAL, AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT IS REQUIRED: Although the symptoms are benign, they can be uncomfortable or even handicapping and prevent the functioning of workplaces. The SBS, the social and economical costs of which are high, requires multidisciplinary management.

  13. Bovine coronavirus antibody titers at weaning negatively correlate with incidence of bovine respiratory disease in the feed yard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multifactorial disease caused by complex interactions among viral and bacterial pathogens, stressful management practices and host genetic variability. Although vaccines and antibiotic treatments are readily available to prevent and treat infection caus...

  14. Interaction between telencephalic signals and respiratory dynamics in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Jorge M; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Goller, Franz

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which telencephalic areas affect motor activities are largely unknown. They could either take over motor control from downstream motor circuits or interact with the intrinsic dynamics of these circuits. Both models have been proposed for telencephalic control of respiration during learned vocal behavior in birds. The interactive model postulates that simple signals from the telencephalic song control areas are sufficient to drive the nonlinear respiratory network into producing complex temporal sequences. We tested this basic assumption by electrically stimulating telencephalic song control areas and analyzing the resulting respiratory patterns in zebra finches and in canaries. We found strong evidence for interaction between the rhythm of stimulation and the intrinsic respiratory rhythm, including naturally emerging subharmonic behavior and integration of lateralized telencephalic input. The evidence for clear interaction in our experimental paradigm suggests that telencephalic vocal control also uses a similar mechanism. Furthermore, species differences in the response of the respiratory system to stimulation show parallels to differences in the respiratory patterns of song, suggesting that the interactive production of respiratory rhythms is manifested in species-specific specialization of the involved circuitry.

  15. Recent Experiences in the Respiratory Unit of the Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and endotracheal intubation, cardiac arrhythmias, oxygen toxicity, fat embolism and tetanus. S. AII'. Med. l., 45,801 (1971). The staff of the Respiratory Unit of the Johannesburg. General Hospital are consuited by members of other disciplines in the Johannesburg Hospital complex for advice on and management of cases of ...

  16. RELAPSING RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN: DIFFERENTIAL APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Migacheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is one of the most important areas in the complex of health improvement of frequently ill children. The aim of this study was to establish the causes of the generally accepted rehabilitation measures failure and to assess the efficacy of the differential approach to the management of children with relapsing respiratory infections, suitability and efficacy of immunotropic drugs involvement into the complex rehabilitation program. The observation group consisted of 90 so called frequently ill children at the age of 3–14 years old. They were performed a complex clinical and laboratory examination, determining the causes of relapsing infectious syndrome. The children from the control group received etiotropic treatment depending on revealed etiological factor. The children from the main group received a 60-day long course of immunomodulator Pidotimod. The following issues were assessed: the frequency of acute respiratory infections during 6-month observation, the duration of the infections, the frequency of the complications and the necessity of antibacterial treatment. The positive dynamics of the infectious syndrome course in children from both groups was established. However, patients received complex therapy with immunomodulator had significantly lower rate of acute respiratory infections andcomplications, and they also had a significantly lower necessity in antibacterial drugs use.Key words: children, relapsing respiratory infections, treatment, immunotherapy.

  17. Respiratory Symptoms and Lung Function Patterns in Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of harmful effects. Wood smoke and cooking oil fumes is a complex mixture of substances.[1] Both contains toxic products as well as carcinogens such as aldehydes, alkanoic, polycyclic aromatic ... Respiratory functions workers exposed to cooking oil Nigeria ..... not accounted for by smoking cigarette and previous history.

  18. Immune systems in animals involve complex combi- nations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Formerly University of Wales at Bangor, School of Biological Sciences, Brambell Building, Bangor, Gwynedd, North Wales LL57 ... protein; 98% of that protein is the respiratory pigment ... constriction of the muscles surrounding the wound.

  19. Activation of respiratory muscles during respiratory muscle training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Pietsch, Fabian; Walker, David Johannes; Röcker, Kai; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    It is unknown which respiratory muscles are mainly activated by respiratory muscle training. This study evaluated Inspiratory Pressure Threshold Loading (IPTL), Inspiratory Flow Resistive Loading (IFRL) and Voluntary Isocapnic Hyperpnea (VIH) with regard to electromyographic (EMG) activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM), parasternal muscles (PARA) and the diaphragm (DIA) in randomized order. Surface EMG were analyzed at the end of each training session and normalized using the peak EMG recorded during maximum inspiratory maneuvers (Sniff nasal pressure: SnPna, maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure: PImax). 41 healthy participants were included. Maximal activation was achieved for SCM by SnPna; the PImax activated predominantly PARA and DIA. Activations of SCM and PARA were higher in IPTL and VIH than for IFRL (pVIH (pVIH differ in activation of inspiratory respiratory muscles. Whereas all methods mainly stimulate accessory respiratory muscles, diaphragm activation was predominant in IPTL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Building Sandcastles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø; Korsgaard, Steffen; Shumar, Wes

    In this paper we focus on a hitherto somewhat overlooked aspect of entrepreneurship education, namely the influence of materiality and spatial context on the process of teaching and learning. In the paper we present an empirical examination oriented towards the material and spatial dimensions...... of entrepreneurship education. Our theoretical and methodological approach builds on Actor-Network Theory. The empirical settings of our study consist of two entrepreneurship courses which differ in terms of temporal extension and physical setting. Data is collected using observation and interview techniques. Our...... findings demonstrate the agency of material artefacts and how they enable teachers to act at a distance, by standing in as a scaffold that maintains the learning space as it interacts with the students. This acting at a distance however is highly uncertain and uncontrollable. Also we see how important...

  1. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Mary [Brentwood, CA; Slezak, Thomas [Livermore, CA; Birch, James M [Albany, CA

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  2. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutlić, Z; Rudez, I; Biocina, B; Husedzinović, I

    1997-01-01

    In this article the authors present a case of successful treatment of a 54-year old male patient with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and triple-vessel coronary artery disease who underwent surgical myocardial revascularization and was reoperated on the same day because of excessive bleeding. The patient was given cca 5000 mL of whole blood and cca 3000 mL of blood derivatives. The first postoperative chest X-ray showed radiological signs of ARDS. The therapy was based upon authors' experience and was consisted of controlled mechanical ventilation (respiratory volume 12-15 mL/kg, 10-14 cycles/min, I/E ratio 1:2, FIO2 0.6, PEEP 2-5 cm H2O), daily bronchoscopies with bronchoaspiration, aggressive diuresis, negative fluid balance, specific antibiotic therapy, and last but not least, of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) 0.5-20 micrograms/kg/min combined with dopamine inotropic support (2-5 micrograms/kg/h). Simple but careful clinical observation still remains a milestone for all therapeutic measures taken in ARDS patients.

  3. [The sick building syndrome as a part of 'ASIA' (autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz-Segal, Ramit; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The entity 'sick building syndrome' is poorly defined and comprises of a set of symptoms resulting from environmental exposure to a work or a living environment. The symptoms are mainly "allergic"-like and include nasal, eye, and mucous membrane irritation, dry skin as well as respiratory symptoms and general symptoms such as fatigue, lethargy, headaches and fever. The Autoimmune [Auto-inflammatory] Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA) is a wider term which describes the role of various environmental factors in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diseases. Factors entailing an immune adjuvant activity such as infectious agents, silicone, aluminium salts and others were found in association with defined and non-defined immune mediated diseases. The sick building syndrome and ASIA share a similar complex of signs and symptoms and probably the same immunological mechanisms which further support a common denominator.

  4. Hybrid organic-inorganic CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite building blocks: Revealing ultra-strong hydrogen bonding and mulliken inner complexes and their implications in materials design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Arpita; Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Yamashita, Koichi

    2017-12-15

    Methylammonium lead iodide (CH3 NH3 PbI3 ) perovskite compound has produced a remarkable breakthrough in the photovoltaic history of solar cell technology because of its outstanding device-based performance as a light-harvesting semiconductor. Whereas the experimental and theoretical studies of this system in the solid state have been numerously reported in the last 4 years, its fundamental cluster physics is yet to be exploited. To this end, this study has performed theoretical investigations using DFT-M06-2X/ADZP to examine the principal geometrical, electronic, topological, and orbital properties of the CH3 NH3 PbI3 molecular building block. The intermolecular hydrogen bonded interactions examined for the most important conformers of the system are found to be unusually strong, with binding energies lying between -93.53 and -125.11 kcal mol-1 (beyond the covalent limit, -40 kcal mol-1 ), enabling us to classify the underlying interactions as ultra-strong type since their characteristic properties are unidentical with those have already been proposed as very strong, strong, moderate, weak, and van der Waals. Based on this, together with the unusually high charge transfers, strong hyperconjugative interactions, sophisticated topologies of the charge density, and short intermolecular distances of separation, we have characterized the conformers of CH3 NH3 PbI3 as Mulliken inner complexes. The consequences of these, as well as of the ultra-strong interactions, in designing novel functional nanomaterials are outlined. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Integrating Responsive Building Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Matthias; Amato, Alex; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    There is a global need for a more sustainable building development. About 50% of energy is used in buildings indicating that buildings provide a considerable potential for operational energy savings. Studies were conducted with the following objectives: to perform a state-of-the-art review...... of responsive building elements, of integrated building concepts and of environmental performance assessment methods to improve and optimize responsive building elements to develop and optimize new building concepts with integration of responsive building elements, HVAC-systems as well as natural and renewable...... energy strategies to develop guidelines and procedures for estimation of environmental performance of responsive building elements and integrated building concepts This paper introduces the ideas of this collaborative work and discusses its usefulness for Hong Kong and China. Special focus was put...

  6. Approaches to systems biology. Four methods to study single-cell gene expression, cell motility, antibody reactivity, and respiratory metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, Peter

    To understand how complex systems, such as cells, function, comprehensive Measurements of their constituent parts must be made. This can be achieved by combining methods that are each optimized to measure specific parts of the system. Four such methods,each covering a different area, are presented...... from such measurements allows models of the system to be developed and tested. For each of the methods, such analysis and modelling approaches have beenapplied and are presented: Differentially regulated genes are identified and classified according to function; cell-specfic motility models...... are developed that can distinguish between different surfaces; a method for selecting repertoires of antigens thatseparate mice based on their response to treatment is developed; and the observed concentrations of free and bound NADH is used to build and test a basic model of respiratory metabolism...

  7. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    monary function tests of varying complex- ity, measurement of arterial blood gases and pH, exercise testing, various forms of bronchial provocation testing, and the evaluation of sleep. These measurements have been possible for a number of years and require a considerable knowledge of, and investment in, technology.

  8. MUCOLYTIC TREATMENT OF PROLONGED DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Soroka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of morbidity of respiratory system diseases (RSD in children, living in Saint Petersburg, is described in this article; also the role of prolonged types of RSD is indicated. Main etiologic factors of prolonged RSD are presented, and short clinical characteristics of prolonged RSD are given. Main methods of treatment of negative course of bronchopulmonary diseases are indicated. The data of 35=year clinical experience of use of n-acetylcysteine (fluimucil in children is presented. It was marked, that n-acetylcysteine has significant complex mucolytic effect in children with RSD.Key words: children, diseases of respiratory system, prolonged types, n-acetylcysteine, treatment.

  9. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future.

  10. 33 CFR 142.39 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory protection. 142.39... Respiratory protection. (a) Personnel in an atmosphere specified under ANSI Z88.2, requiring the use of respiratory protection equipment shall wear the type of respiratory protection equipment specified in ANSI Z88...

  11. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  12. Sustainable facilities management through building information modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonari, Giulia; Jones, Keith G.

    2014-01-01

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is an approach to improving the efficiency of the building process and potentially providing the key data set needed by facilities managers to operate buildings in a more sustainable manner. Whilst the design/construction phase of BIM is well advanced, the facilities management phase is not. Although attempts to develop similar facilities management models have been tried before, they have failed because of the complexity of data analysis and the inadequac...

  13. Comprehensive Building Systems: Threat or Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Research, 1966

    1966-01-01

    Comprehensive building systems are the result of industry's search for markets, clients' desire for shorter hours and lower costs, and the growing complexity of building technology which requires the architect to depend on industry for research and development. Certain questions are raised by this trend. Will industry dominate architecture? Can…

  14. OF THE ARCHITECTURAL - SPATIAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilin Vladimir Vladimirovich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of comfort of the architectural - spatial environment of buildings is closely connected to a level of knowledge of the person. The author's model opens complexity of interrelations of the person and the architectural - spatial environment.

  15. The role of leptin in the respiratory system: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Since its cloning in 1994, leptin has emerged in the literature as a pleiotropic hormone whose actions extend from immune system homeostasis to reproduction and angiogenesis. Recent investigations have identified the lung as a leptin responsive and producing organ, while extensive research has been published concerning the role of leptin in the respiratory system. Animal studies have provided evidence indicating that leptin is a stimulant of ventilation, whereas researchers have proposed an important role for leptin in lung maturation and development. Studies further suggest a significant impact of leptin on specific respiratory diseases, including obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome, asthma, COPD and lung cancer. However, as new investigations are under way, the picture is becoming more complex. The scope of this review is to decode the existing data concerning the actions of leptin in the lung and provide a detailed description of leptin's involvement in the most common disorders of the respiratory system. PMID:21040518

  16. The role of leptin in the respiratory system: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since its cloning in 1994, leptin has emerged in the literature as a pleiotropic hormone whose actions extend from immune system homeostasis to reproduction and angiogenesis. Recent investigations have identified the lung as a leptin responsive and producing organ, while extensive research has been published concerning the role of leptin in the respiratory system. Animal studies have provided evidence indicating that leptin is a stimulant of ventilation, whereas researchers have proposed an important role for leptin in lung maturation and development. Studies further suggest a significant impact of leptin on specific respiratory diseases, including obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome, asthma, COPD and lung cancer. However, as new investigations are under way, the picture is becoming more complex. The scope of this review is to decode the existing data concerning the actions of leptin in the lung and provide a detailed description of leptin's involvement in the most common disorders of the respiratory system.

  17. The role of leptin in the respiratory system: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malli, Foteini; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Daniil, Zoe

    2010-10-31

    Since its cloning in 1994, leptin has emerged in the literature as a pleiotropic hormone whose actions extend from immune system homeostasis to reproduction and angiogenesis. Recent investigations have identified the lung as a leptin responsive and producing organ, while extensive research has been published concerning the role of leptin in the respiratory system. Animal studies have provided evidence indicating that leptin is a stimulant of ventilation, whereas researchers have proposed an important role for leptin in lung maturation and development. Studies further suggest a significant impact of leptin on specific respiratory diseases, including obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome, asthma, COPD and lung cancer. However, as new investigations are under way, the picture is becoming more complex. The scope of this review is to decode the existing data concerning the actions of leptin in the lung and provide a detailed description of leptin's involvement in the most common disorders of the respiratory system.

  18. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  19. Computerized management of respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, L; Jeffs, M; Turner, K

    1993-01-01

    Respiratory care as an organized discipline is only about 45 years old, and the management of this dynamic allied health profession has usually been characterized by a demand-for-service mentality. As pressure continues to control costs, those departments that maximize quality patient care cost-effectively with thoroughly documented outcomes are in a better position to compete for future resources. The practice of respiratory care is changing as is the practice of medical care in general. Accountability for resource consumption and the quality of the product delivered are essential elements in the delivery of respiratory modalities. We have developed and implemented a comprehensive patient-data-based approach to the management of respiratory care. The essential elements of this approach are (1) relative-value-unit procedure base; (2) individual, shift, and department productivity that is attached to the annual performance review process; (3) management reporting on a 24-hour basis, with biweekly review at the management level; (4) development and implementation of a comprehensive patient-data-documentation system that permits automatic patient billing and 100% data review for quality-assurance documentation; (5) the development of a medical alerting system that alerts the Medical Director and Respiratory Care staff to potentially harmful events that, if untreated, may result in increased morbidity or mortality; and (6) the development of concurrent and retrospective tools for patient-outcomes research. These functions are supported by an active Medical Informatics Department that is nationally recognized in medical computing and logic application.

  20. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  1. The global burden of respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas; Schraufnagel, Dean

    2014-03-01

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies has released a report entitled Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. The report identifies five conditions that primarily contribute to the global burden of respiratory disease (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and lung cancer), and offers an action plan to prevent and treat those diseases. It describes the staggering magnitude of the global burden of lung disease: hundreds of millions of people suffer and four million people die prematurely from respiratory diseases each year. The situation is not hopeless, because most major respiratory illnesses are avoidable. Much of the disease burden can be mitigated by reducing exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution, restraining tobacco use, and relieving urban overcrowding. Implementation of the strategies described in the Forum of International Respiratory Societies respiratory diseases report would have a profound effect on respiratory health, reduce economic costs, and enhance health equality in the world.

  2. Net-zero building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available of interventions where innovative technologies could realise substantial building performance improvements. A central challenge to construction and building performance is located in the practice of constructing a building on the project site using a combination...

  3. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  4. Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Thea B; Rimstad, Espen; Stokstad, Maria

    2014-01-14

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the major pathogens involved in the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. The seroprevalence to BRSV in Norwegian cattle herds is high, but its role in epidemics of respiratory disease is unclear. The aims of the study were to investigate the etiological role of BRSV and other respiratory viruses in epidemics of BRD and to perform phylogenetic analysis of Norwegian BRSV strains. BRSV infection was detected either serologically and/or virologically in 18 (86%) of 21 outbreaks and in most cases as a single viral agent. When serology indicated that bovine coronavirus and/or bovine parainfluenza virus 3 were present, the number of BRSV positive animals in the herd was always higher, supporting the view of BRSV as the main pathogen. Sequencing of the G gene of BRSV positive samples showed that the current circulating Norwegian BRSVs belong to genetic subgroup II, along with other North European isolates. One isolate from an outbreak in Norway in 1976 was also investigated. This strain formed a separate branch in subgroup II, clearly different from the current Scandinavian sequences. The currently circulating BRSV could be divided into two different strains that were present in the same geographical area at the same time. The sequence variations between the two strains were in an antigenic important part of the G protein. The results demonstrated that BRSV is the most important etiological agent of epidemics of BRD in Norway and that it often acts as the only viral agent. The phylogenetic analysis of the Norwegian strains of BRSV and several previously published isolates supported the theory of geographical and temporal clustering of BRSV.

  5. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  7. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Atorvastatin affects negatively respiratory function of isolated endothelial mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniarek, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the direct effects of two popular blood cholesterol-lowering drugs used to treat cardiovascular diseases, atorvastatin and pravastatin, on respiratory function, membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species formation in mitochondria isolated from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 cell line). Hydrophilic pravastatin did not significantly affect endothelial mitochondria function. In contrast, hydrophobic calcium-containing atorvastatin induced a loss of outer mitochondrial membrane integrity, an increase in hydrogen peroxide formation, and reductions in maximal (phosphorylating or uncoupled) respiratory rate, membrane potential and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. The atorvastatin-induced changes indicate an impairment of mitochondrial function at the level of ATP synthesis and at the level of the respiratory chain, likely at complex I and complex III. The atorvastatin action on endothelial mitochondria was highly dependent on calcium ions and led to a disturbance in mitochondrial calcium homeostasis. Uptake of calcium ions included in atorvastatin molecule induced mitochondrial uncoupling that enhanced the inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by atorvastatin. Our results indicate that hydrophobic calcium-containing atorvastatin, widely used as anti-atherosclerotic agent, has a direct negative action on isolated endothelial mitochondria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Defining inhibitory neurone function in respiratory circuits: opportunities with optogenetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana Paula; Paton, Julian F R; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-15

    Pharmacological and mathematical modelling studies support the view that synaptic inhibition in mammalian brainstem respiratory circuits is essential for generating normal and stable breathing movements. GABAergic and glycinergic neurones are known components of these circuits but their precise functional roles have not been established, especially within key microcircuits of the respiratory pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes involved in phasic control of respiratory pump and airway muscles. Here, we review briefly current concepts of relevant complexities of inhibitory synapses and the importance of synaptic inhibition in the operation of these microcircuits. We highlight results and limitations of classical pharmacological studies that have suggested critical functions of synaptic inhibition. We then explore the potential opportunities for optogenetic strategies that represent a promising new approach for interrogating function of inhibitory circuits, including a hypothetical wish list for optogenetic approaches to allow expedient application of this technology. We conclude that recent technical advances in optogenetics should provide a means to understand the role of functionally select and regionally confined subsets of inhibitory neurones in key respiratory circuits such as those in the pre-BötC and BötC. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Danish building typologies and building stock analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    enough to meet the government’s plan to make Danish buildings free from use of fossil fuels by 2035. This will probably require around 50 % energy savings in the Danish building stock as a whole. However, the project has proven that dedicated engagement of locals can speed up market penetration...... energy savings in residential buildings. The intension with this analysis was to investigate the possible energy reduction in Denmark if the same approach had been taken for the entire Danish building stock. The report concludes that the ZeroHome initiative clearly results in energy savings, but far from...... for energy savings in the existing Building stock....

  11. Danish building typologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    The objective of TABULA is to develop a harmonised building typology for European countries. Each national building typology will consist of a set of residential model buildings with characteristic energy-related properties (element areas of the thermal building envelope, U-values, supply system...... efficiencies). The model buildings will each represent a specific construction period of the country in question and a specific building size. Furthermore the number of buildings, flats and the overall floor areas will be given, which are represented by the different building types of the national typologies....

  12. Acute Respiratory Insufficiency After Adenotonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur Şen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenotonsillectomy is one of the frequently performed surgical procedures in children and the most common complications of this procedure are bleeding and respiratory insufficiency. Here, we present a 20-month-old boy who was born prematurely. He underwent adenotonsillectomy and bilateral grommet insertion due to recurrent tonsilitis, snoring, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The patient required a prolonged intensive care unit stay due to postoperative respiratory insufficiency. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the potential complications of adenotonsillectomy. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013;51:193-6

  13. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  14. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  15. Introduction of respiratory pattern generators into models of respiratory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, Guy; Evangelisti, Carlo J; Cherniack, Neil S

    2005-10-12

    We have adapted two models previously proposed as respiratory pattern generators (RPGs) into a neurochemical feed back control model of ventilation. The RPG models, non-dimensional as originally presented, consisted of oscillating circuits of either two or five interconnected neurons [Matsugu, M., Duffin, J., Poon, C.-S., 1998. Entrainment, instability, quasi-periodicity, and chaos in a compound neural oscillator. J. Comput. Neurosci. 5, 35-51; Botros, S.M., Bruce, E.N., 1990. Neural network implementation of a three-phase model of respiratory rhythm generation. Biol. Cybern. 63, 143-153]. The neurochemical model into which they were integrated [Longobardo, G., Evangelisti, C.J., Cherniack, N.S., 2002. Effects of neural drives on breathing in the awake state in humans. Respir. Physiol. 129, 317-333] included the effects of cerebral blood flow variation with CO2, vagal stretch receptors input and a multicompartment model of carbon dioxide stores. The methodology is described whereby these neuronal oscillator networks were quantified, a necessary step for their inclusion as RPGs in broader models of the overall control of respiration. Subsequent simulations of the ventilation response to carbon dioxide with either respiratory pattern generator model exhibited only a limited range in which tidal volume and frequency increased with increasing respiratory drive. With both models, frequency peaked and then declined, as did ventilation when P CO2 was greater than normal. The range of the models was extended if the respiratory pattern generators were considered to be composed of multiple neuronal oscillators or a single oscillator in which there was increasing phasic input that was gated or pacemaker driven.

  16. Bacterial pathogens of the bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dee; Chengappa, M M; Kuszak, Jennifer; McVey, D Scott

    2010-07-01

    Pneumonia caused by the bacterial pathogens discussed in this article is the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality of the BRDC. Most of these infectious bacteria are not capable of inducing significant disease without the presence of other predisposing environmental factors, physiologic stressors, or concurrent infections. Mannheimia haemolytica is the most common and serious of these bacterial agents and is therefore also the most highly characterized. There are other important bacterial pathogens of BRD, such as Pasteurella multocida, Histophulus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis. Mixed infections with these organisms do occur. These pathogens have unique and common virulence factors but the resulting pneumonic lesions may be similar. Although the amount and quality of research associated with BRD has increased, vaccination and therapeutic practices are not fully successful. A greater understanding of the virulence mechanisms of the infecting bacteria and pathogenesis of pneumonia, as well as the characteristics of the organisms that allow tissue persistence, may lead to improved management, therapeutics, and vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  18. Climate change and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Daniel A; Kellerman, Roy A

    2014-10-01

    To discuss the nature of climate change and both its immediate and long-term effects on human respiratory health. This review is based on information from a presentation of the American College of Chest Physicians course on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in Toronto, Canada, June 2013. It is supplemented by a PubMed search for climate change, global warming, respiratory tract diseases, and respiratory health. It is also supplemented by a search of Web sites including the Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, World Meteorological Association, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change, and the World Health Organization. Health effects of climate change include an increase in the prevalence of certain respiratory diseases, exacerbations of chronic lung disease, premature mortality, allergic responses, and declines in lung function. Climate change, mediated by greenhouse gases, causes adverse health effects to the most vulnerable patient populations-the elderly, children, and those in distressed socioeconomic strata.

  19. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-02-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation of egg activation modulate the activity of the oxidase. Inhibitors were used to test the relevance of this oxidase to the respiratory burst of fertilization. Procaine, two phenothiazines, and N-ethylmaleimide (but not iodoacetamide) inhibited H2O2 production by the oxidase fraction and oxygen consumption by activated eggs. The ATP requirement suggested that protein kinase activity might regulate the respiratory burst of fertilization; consonant with this hypothesis, H-7 and staurosporine were inhibitory. The respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization is an NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase that appears to be regulated by a protein kinase; although it bears a remarkable resemblance to the neutrophil oxidase, unlike the latter it does not form O2- as its initial product.

  20. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  1. Vitamin D and respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; de Cassia Bergamaschi, Cristiane

    2015-04-15

    Vitamin D or 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2 D) has a well-established role in calcium homeostasis. In recent years, the discovery of vitamin D-metabolizing enzymes and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the lungs and various cells of the immune system has led to numerous studies conducted to evaluate its role in respiratory functions and, in particular, upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). A PubMed literature search was done using vitamin D and respiratory infections as key words. Only clinical studies were considered. This study aimed to review recent clinical and epidemiological studies conducted in adults and children, and to evaluate the functional role of vitamin D in respiratory infections. The evaluated studies show an important immunomodulatory role of vitamin D, which reduces the incidence and risk of URTIs, both in children and in adults. Combating URTIs can be done prophylactically, associating the use of vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae with strengthening the immune system through supplementation with vitamin D. These actions can significantly contribute to reducing the number of URTIs, the use of antibiotics, and consequently, the rates of antimicrobial resistance.

  2. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas

  3. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features ... SARS virus · SARS – Koch´Postulates proved. SARS – virus jumps species · How infectious is SARS virus · SARS – Global Distribution- 10th July 2003.

  4. CURRENT STATUS OF PROBLEM: CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with children suffered from recurrent respiraatory infections. The authors attempted to summarize the literature data on the research findings of inosine pranobex application (Isoa prinosine, Teva, Israel in complex therapy against virulent and inflammatory diseases. Within recent years, many experts emphaasize the persistence of viruses and other pathogenic microorganaisms in the human body, which leads to changes in reactivity and emergence of the chronic diseases. These disorders are especially urgent for sickly children, suffering from respiratory infections, what well justifies the application of bacteriogenic immunomodulaa tors, interferon synthesis inductors, expediency for incorporating immunomodulators with antiviral action into complex therapy along with special vaccination against flu, pneumococcus and etc.Key words: sickly children, acute respiratory infections, immunomodulators, inosine pranobex.

  5. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  6. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Braces Eating Disorders Mitral Valve Prolapse Arrhythmias Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum Print A A A ...

  7. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased

  8. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders in the Old Order Amish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Goldstein, Amy; Walsh Vockley, Catherine; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Biery, Amy; Irani, Afifa; Ibarra, Jordan; Morton, D Holmes; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Vockley, Jerry

    2016-08-01

    The Old Order Amish populations in the US are one of the Plain People groups and are descendants of the Swiss Anabaptist immigrants who came to North America in the early eighteenth century. They live in numerous small endogamous demes that have resulted in reduced genetic diversity along with a high prevalence of specific genetic disorders, many of them autosomal recessive. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies arising from mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations have not previously been reported in the Plain populations. Here we present four different Amish families with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders. Mutations in two mitochondrial encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were identified in two patients. In the first case, MELAS syndrome caused by a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation (m.3243A>G) was identified in an extended Amish pedigree following a presentation of metabolic strokes in the proband. Characterization of the extended family of the proband by a high resolution melting assay identified the same mutation in many previously undiagnosed family members with a wide range of clinical symptoms. A MELAS/Leigh syndrome phenotype caused by a mtDNA mutation [m.13513G>A; p.Asp393Asn] in the ND5 gene encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I was identified in a patient in a second family. Mutations in two nuclear encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were also identified in two patients. One patient presented with Leigh syndrome and had a homozygous deletion in the NDUFAF2 gene, while the second patient had a homozygous mutation in the POLG gene, [c.1399G>A; p.Ala467Thr]. Our findings identify mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency as a cause of disease in the Old Order Amish that must be considered in the context of otherwise unexplained systemic disease, especially if neuromuscular symptoms are present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Topical respiratory strategies in neurocritical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, M B; Kruglyakov, N M; Semenov, M S; Zabelin, M V; Udalov, Yu D; Samoylov, A S; Popugaev, K A

    2017-01-01

    Management of the respiratory tract and maintenance of adequate gas exchange are the basic goals of critical care. Injury to the nervous system is often accompanied by development of respiratory disorders. On the other hand, changes in the gas composition of arterial blood can cause brain damage. In addition, approaches to the patient with respiratory failure, which are used in general critical care and neurocritical care, may differ. The presented literature review is devoted to modern respiratory strategies used in neurocritical care.

  10. Global Building Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    High ambitions are set for the building physics performance of buildings today. No single technology can achieve fulfilment of these ambitions alone. Integrated, multi-facetted solutions and optimization are necessary. A holistic, or “global”, technological perspective is needed, which includes all...... aspects of the building as defined in building engineering. We live in an international society and building solutions are developed across country borders. Building physics is a global theme. The International Association of Building Physics has global appeal. The keynote lecture and this brief paper...

  11. Global building physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    High ambitions are set for the building physics performance of buildings today. No single technology can achieve fulfilment of these ambitions alone. Integrated, multi-facetted solutions and optimization are necessary. A holistic, or ‘global’, technological perspective is needed, which includes all...... aspects of the building as defined in building engineering. We live in an international society and building solutions are developed across country borders. Building physics is a global theme. The International Association of Building Physics has global appeal. This brief article reports the keynote...

  12. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Spinal Cord Injury Respiratory Care

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosz, Renata; Littlepage, Meagan M.; Creasey, Graham; McKenna, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    The management of chronic respiratory insufficiency and/or long-term inability to breathe independently has traditionally been via positive-pressure ventilation through a mechanical ventilator. Although life-sustaining, it is associated with limitations of function, lack of independence, decreased quality of life, sleep disturbance, and increased risk for infections. In addition, its mechanical and electronic complexity requires full understanding of the possible malfunctions by patients and ...

  13. Structural basis of respiratory syncytial virus neutralization by motavizumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Kim, Albert; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH)

    2010-04-13

    Motavizumab is {approx}tenfold more potent than its predecessor, palivizumab (Synagis), the FDA-approved monoclonal antibody used to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The structure of motavizumab in complex with a 24-residue peptide corresponding to its epitope on the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein reveals the structural basis for this greater potency. Modeling suggests that motavizumab recognizes a different quaternary configuration of the F glycoprotein than that observed in a homologous structure.

  14. STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARU Trichothecene Mycotoxins and Damp Building-Related Illness: New Insights into a Public Health Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damp building-related illnesses (DBRI) include a myriad of respiratory, immunologic, and neurologic symptoms that are sometimes etiologically linked to aberrant indoor growth of the toxic black mold, Stachybotrys chartarum. Although supportive evidence for such linkages is limite...

  15. ICT Enhanced Buildings Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes and gives example on how Information and Communication, ICT, can and will enhance and support the building functional systems defined from client and end-user needs and requirements. The building systems may be derived from functional requirements on buildings such as usability...... and security on highest level with sub-systems definitions on lever levels. Building functional sub-systems may be defined for user comfort, indoor-climate, evacuation, space configuration, aesthetics, O&M etc. These building systems are supported by Information and Communication Technology, ICT, and building...... component systems that are accessed and integrated in the real world of building use in different contexts. The ICT systems may be physically or virtually embedded in the building. Already in 1982 AT&T established the 'intelligent buildings', IB, concept due to marketing reasons and the Informart building...

  16. KAJIAN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN PADA SAVILL BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavi Elok Hapsari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980 the development of Indonesian architecture design start to leads into sustainable architectural design which as it was expected to became a solution regarding the environmental problems. The implementation of sustainable design in buildings can be applied from the buildings typologi, renewable resources on materials untill the reduction of the negative impact againts the buildings surrounding environment. As the main object for this study was 2006 The Woods Awardee, Savill Building. A literature study was conducted related to sustainable concept design and the implementation in Savill Buildings. Savill Building is a transparance walls buildings with steel and wooden as main materials on it complex curve gridshell structures. Located in a countoured site Savill Building show it assertive appearance. Due to the good landscape processing and design the Savill Building stood out and yet still shown continuity and harmony with the surrounding environment. The buildings not only has a eco-friendly public facility function, but also has the capability on attracting visitors. In the end this study is expected able expand the knowledges on sustainable design and become a design references in Indonesia architectural design.

  17. Modernising ATLAS Software Build Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ritsch, Elmar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the last year ATLAS has radically updated its software development infrastructure hugely reducing the complexity of building releases and greatly improving build speed, flexibility and code testing. The first step in this transition was the adoption of CMake as the software build system over the older CMT. This required the development of an automated translation from the old system to the new, followed by extensive testing and improvements. This resulted in a far more standard build process that was married to the method of building ATLAS software as a series of $12$ separate projects from Subversion. We then proceeded with a migration of the code base from Subversion to Git. As the Subversion repository had been structured to manage each package more or less independently there was no simple mapping that could be used to manage the migration into Git. Instead a specialist set of scripts that captured the software changes across official software releases was developed. With some clean up of the repositor...

  18. Modernising ATLAS Software Build Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Gaycken, Goetz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the last year ATLAS has radically updated its software development infrastructure hugely reducing the complexity of building releases and greatly improving build speed, flexibility and code testing. The first step in this transition was the adoption of CMake as the software build system over the older CMT. This required the development of an automated translation from the old system to the new, followed by extensive testing and improvements. This resulted in a far more standard build process that was married to the method of building ATLAS software as a series of 12 separate projects from SVN. We then proceeded with a migration of its code base from SVN to git. As the SVN repository had been structured to manage each package more or less independently there was no simple mapping that could be used to manage the migration into git. Instead a specialist set of scripts that captured the software changes across official software releases was developed. With some clean up of the repository and the policy of onl...

  19. Assessing sustainability of building materials in developing countries: the sustainable building materials index (SBMI)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring sustainability of building materials is complex. Despite this a wide range of different methodologies and systems have been developed. Most of these focus on environmental issues and are based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), or similar...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.154 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory protection. 1915.154 Section 1915.154 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... (PPE) § 1915.154 Respiratory protection. Respiratory protection for shipyard employment is covered by...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1405 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respiratory protection. 154.1405 Section 154.1405... Equipment § 154.1405 Respiratory protection. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have: (a) Respiratory protection equipment for each person on board that protects the...

  2. 46 CFR 197.550 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respiratory protection. 197.550 Section 197.550 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.550 Respiratory protection. (a) General. When the use of respirators in... section that is appropriate for the exposure. Table 197.550(b)—Respiratory Protection for Benzene Airborne...

  3. 33 CFR 127.1209 - Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory protection. 127.1209... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Equipment § 127.1209 Respiratory protection. Each waterfront facility handling LHG must provide equipment for respiratory protection for each employee of the...

  4. Equation Discovery for Model Identification in Respiratory Mechanics of the Mechanically Ventilated Human Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzert, Steven; Guttmann, Josef; Steinmann, Daniel; Kramer, Stefan

    Lung protective ventilation strategies reduce the risk of ventilator associated lung injury. To develop such strategies, knowledge about mechanical properties of the mechanically ventilated human lung is essential. This study was designed to develop an equation discovery system to identify mathematical models of the respiratory system in time-series data obtained from mechanically ventilated patients. Two techniques were combined: (i) the usage of declarative bias to reduce search space complexity and inherently providing the processing of background knowledge. (ii) A newly developed heuristic for traversing the hypothesis space with a greedy, randomized strategy analogical to the GSAT algorithm. In 96.8% of all runs the applied equation discovery system was capable to detect the well-established equation of motion model of the respiratory system in the provided data. We see the potential of this semi-automatic approach to detect more complex mathematical descriptions of the respiratory system from respiratory data.

  5. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  6. Mathematical justification of the acoustic method for measuring the impedance of the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring a complex frequency-dependent acoustic impedance of the respiratory tract based on two-microphone method was developed. The measuring device consists of a waveguide connected through a mouthpiece to the patient's mouth. A sound field with a frequency range from 5 to 100 Hz is created in the waveguide. The impedance of the respiratory tract is determined at free respiration of the patient in the set frequency range; the duration of examination does not exceed 15 s. The criteria for the recognition of respiratory tract pathologies are proposed.

  7. A review of concepts regarding the origin of respiratory muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Bożena; Piotrkiewicz, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the classification of respiratory muscle fatigue from the perspective of its origin is presented. The fatigue is classified as central or peripheral, and the latter further subdivided into high- and low-frequency fatigue. However, muscle fatigue is a complex process and all three types of fatigue probably occur simultaneously in the overloaded respiratory muscles. The relative importance of each type depends on the duration of respiratory loading and other physiological variables. However, central and high-frequency fatigue resolve rapidly once muscle overload is removed, whereas low-frequency fatigue persists over long time.

  8. PIDOTIMOD IN TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECURRENT OBSTRUCTIVE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    E.E. Lokshina; O. V. Kravchenko; O. V. Zaytseva

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory infections are frequent in children; consequently evaluation of prophylactic effectiveness of immunomodulators is needed. Objective: to evaluate of clinical, immunological efficacy and safety of pidotimod in complex treatment of children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and obstructive syndrome. Methods: patients 3–10 years old hospitalized with ARI and obstructive syndrome participated the study. Children from first group (n = 30) were treated with pidotimod 400 mg 2 times...

  9. TLR-4 and CD14 Polymorphisms in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Associated Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Puthothu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common viral respiratory pathogen during infancy world wide. It induces innate and adaptive immune response in host cells. The toll like receptor 4 (TLR4/CD14 complex is particularly important for the initiation of an innate immune response to RSV. Thus we were interested whether an association exists between severe RSV associated diseases and polymorphisms within TLR4 and CD14.

  10. The respiratory physiotherapy causes pain in newborns? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zanelat, Camila Ferreira; Rocha, Flávia Rodrigues; Lopes, Gabriela Menezes; Ferreira, Juliana Rodrigues; Gabriel, Letícia Silva; Oliveira, Trícia Guerra e

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Neonatal respiratory physicaltherapy plays an important role in prevention and treatment of respiratory pathologies. In preterm neonates, immaturity of respiratory system can let development of various respiratory diseases. Meanwhile, it is discussed if respiratory physiotherapy can cause pain. Objective: Investigate presence of pain in neonates undergone to respiratory physiotherapy by a systematic review. Methods: Scientific search in electronic databases: Medli...

  11. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus and bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, R J

    1995-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is a common world-wide disease of infants and children resulting in respiratory failure and occasionally death. The major underlying pathophysiology is airway inflammation of peripheral airways and airway hyperresponsiveness to bronchoprovocation. Management is primarily prevention through strict hand washing and avoidance of exposures during respiratory seasons, especially in small infants who have underlying heart or lung disease. Careful supportive therapy, including fluid hydration, good nutrition, and aerosolized bronchodilators, steroids or ribavirin may be helpful. Long term follow-up for these children is important because a significant number will have recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis and wheezing, and many will develop clinical asthma. There's some evidence that long term abnormalities of airway function, perhaps secondary to airway fibrosis, may result from bronchiolitis infections. Avoidance of exposure to passive smoking, cold air and air pollutants is also beneficial to long term recovery from RSV bronchiolitis.

  13. Vitamin D and respiratory disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Hushmand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The active form of vitamin D is synthesized in some body organs following sun exposure and dietary intake. Vitamin D exhibits its major and critical effects not only through regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism but also by influencing on respiratory and immune system. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D below the optimum limit lead to vitamin D insufficiency or maybe deficiency. These inappropriate concentrations of vitamin D lead to different types of pulmonary diseases such as viral and bacterial respiratory infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. In this review we described the association between vitamin D deficiency and severe therapy resistant asthma. We also reviewed the underlying molecular mechanism of vitamin D deficiency in children with severe- therapy resistant asthma. Based on current information, future clinical trial are needed to study the role of vitamin D supplementation on different groups of patients with severe asthma including infants, children of school age, and ethnic minorities.

  14. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  16. Air pollution and childhood respiratory allergies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer D; Akinbami, Lara J; Woodruff, Tracey J

    2009-01-01

    Childhood respiratory allergies, which contribute to missed school days and other activity limitations, have increased in recent years, possibly due to environmental factors. In this study we examined whether air pollutants are associated with childhood respiratory allergies in the United States. For the approximately 70,000 children from the 1999-2005 National Health Interview Survey eligible for this study, we assigned between 40,000 and 60,000 ambient pollution monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, depending on the pollutant. We used monitors within 20 miles of the child's residential block group. We used logistic regression models, fit with methods for complex surveys, to examine the associations between the reporting of respiratory allergy or hay fever and annual average exposure to particulate matter pollutants, and definition of exposures by differing exposure radii. No associations between the other pollutants and the reporting respiratory allergy/hay fever were apparent. These results provide evidence of adverse health for children living in areas with chronic exposure to higher levels of O3 and PM2.5 compared with children with lower exposures.

  17. Electrical Neuromodulation of the Respiratory System After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmann, Jan T; Grahn, Peter J; Calvert, Jonathan S; Drubach, Dina I; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex and devastating condition characterized by disruption of descending, ascending, and intrinsic spinal circuitry resulting in chronic neurologic deficits. In addition to limb and trunk sensorimotor deficits, SCI can impair autonomic neurocircuitry such as the motor networks that support respiration and cough. High cervical SCI can cause complete respiratory paralysis, and even lower cervical or thoracic lesions commonly result in partial respiratory impairment. Although electrophrenic respiration can restore ventilator-independent breathing in select candidates, only a small subset of affected individuals can benefit from this technology at this moment. Over the past decades, spinal cord stimulation has shown promise for augmentation and recovery of neurologic function including motor control, cough, and breathing. The present review discusses the challenges and potentials of spinal cord stimulation for restoring respiratory function by overcoming some of the limitations of conventional respiratory functional electrical stimulation systems. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); M.D. Hulshoff; P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B J; Wielopolski, P A; Hulshoff, M D; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and

  20. Smoking and respiratory irregularity in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldirola, Daniela; Bellodi, Laura; Cammino, Stefania; Perna, Giampaolo

    2004-09-15

    The biological mechanisms underlying the link between smoking and panic attacks are unknown. Smoking might increase the risk of panic by impairing respiratory system function. We evaluated the effect of smoking on respiratory irregularity in patients with panic disorder (PD) and healthy comparison subjects and the role of the respiratory disorders in this effect. We applied the Approximate Entropy index (ApEn), a nonlinear measure of irregularity, to study breath-by-breath baseline respiratory patterns in our sample. Both smoker and nonsmoker patients had more irregular respiratory patterns than healthy subjects. Smoker patients showed higher ApEn indices of baseline respiratory rate and tidal volume than nonsmoker patients (R = 5.4, df = 2,55, p smoking in healthy subjects did not influence the regularity of respiratory patterns. Respiratory disorders did not account for the influence of smoking on respiratory irregularity. Smokers had more severe panic attacks than nonsmokers. Smoking may impair vulnerable respiratory function and act as disruptive factor on intrinsic baseline respiratory instability in patients with PD, possibly influencing the onset or maintenance of the disorder.