WorldWideScience

Sample records for buffers

  1. Buffering the buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie M. Reid; Sue Hilton

    1998-01-01

    Riparian buffer strips are a widely accepted tool for helping to sustain aquatic ecosystems and to protect downstream resources and values in forested areas, but controversy persists over how wide a buffer strip is necessary. The physical integrity of stream channels is expected to be sustained if the characteristics and rates of tree fall along buffered reaches are...

  2. Kinetic buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  4. A parallel buffer tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitchinava, Nodar; Zeh, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We present the parallel buffer tree, a parallel external memory (PEM) data structure for batched search problems. This data structure is a non-trivial extension of Arge's sequential buffer tree to a private-cache multiprocessor environment and reduces the number of I/O operations by the number...... of available processor cores compared to its sequential counterpart, thereby taking full advantage of multicore parallelism. The parallel buffer tree is a search tree data structure that supports the batched parallel processing of a sequence of N insertions, deletions, membership queries, and range queries...

  5. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  6. Creep in buffer clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Adey, R. [Computational Mechanics BEASY, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters.

  7. Workshop on moisture buffer capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003......Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003...

  8. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions. Copyright © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. The Lazy Z-Buffer

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new perspective on a fundamental algorithm of three-dimensional computer graphics, namely z-buffering. An implementation of the z-buffer method in a lazy functional language behaves in a quite different manner to the traditional imperative counterpart. The main result of this paper is to show that the lazy z-buffer is a scan-line method. The effective difference between scan-line methods and z-buffers is one of order of evaluation. A hybrid algorithm with properties com...

  10. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate M. Bailey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma, LL/2 (murine lung and HCT116 (human colon tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast and PC3M (human prostate tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells. Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit.

  11. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kate M; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Cornnell, Heather H; Ribeiro, Maria C; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma), LL/2 (murine lung) and HCT116 (human colon) tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast) and PC3M (human prostate) tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells) and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells). Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using fractional order method to generalize strengthening generating operator buffer operator and weakening buffer operator

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, L.; Liu, S.; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Traditional integer order buffer operator is extended to fractional order buffer operator, the corresponding relationship between the weakening buffer operator and the strengthening buffer operator is revealed. Fractional order buffer operator not only can generalize the weakening buffer operator and the strengthening buffer operator, but also realize tiny adjustment of buffer effect. The effectiveness of GM(1,1) with the fractional order buffer operator is validated by six cases.

  13. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryn, John N [Naperville, IL; Daniels, Edward J [Orland Park, IL; Krumdick, Greg K [Crete, IL

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  14. Buffers and vegetative filter strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Helmers; Thomas M. Isenhart; Michael G. Dosskey; Seth M. Dabney

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of buffers and vegetative filter strips relative to water quality. In particular, we primarily discuss the herbaceous components of the following NRCS Conservation Practice Standards.

  15. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  16. Buffer gas acquisition and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.

    2001-02-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture of CO2. Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO2 freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (N2), and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193 K and 10 kPa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph. The end result was data necessary to design a system that could separate CO2, N2, and Ar. .

  17. Buffer Gas Acquisition and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.; Callahan, Richard A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture Of CO2 Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO, freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (ND, and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193K and 10 kpa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph that used a thermoconductivity (TCD) detector with helium (He) as the carrier gas. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective, In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar.

  18. Thermophysical tests of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of buffer materials were measured for putting in order thermodynamic constants to be used in the near-field thermal analysis. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the water content and temperature to deduce the specific heat. The thermal conductivity and specific heat varied significantly as the water content changed. Obtained values of the specific heat agreed well the expected values calculated based on the constituents of the buffer material. Temperature dependence of the thermodynamic constants was found small below 90degC. From the findings, the thermal conductivity and specific heat of the buffer material were formulated as functions of the water content. Thermodynamic study of powdery bentonite was carried out as well with a purpose of use for filling apertures in the artificial barrier. (H. Baba)

  19. Buffer$--An Economic Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Bentrup

    2007-01-01

    Buffer$ is an economic spreadsheet tool for analyzing the cost-benefits of conservation buffers by resource professionals. Conservation buffers are linear strips of vegetation managed for multiple landowner and societal objectives. The Microsoft Excel based spreadsheet can calculate potential income derived from a buffer, including income from cost-share/incentive...

  20. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  1. Role of Buffers in Protein Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbacnik, Teddy J; Holcomb, Ryan E; Katayama, Derrick S; Murphy, Brian M; Payne, Robert W; Coccaro, Richard C; Evans, Gabriel J; Matsuura, James E; Henry, Charles S; Manning, Mark Cornell

    2017-03-01

    Buffers comprise an integral component of protein formulations. Not only do they function to regulate shifts in pH, they also can stabilize proteins by a variety of mechanisms. The ability of buffers to stabilize therapeutic proteins whether in liquid formulations, frozen solutions, or the solid state is highlighted in this review. Addition of buffers can result in increased conformational stability of proteins, whether by ligand binding or by an excluded solute mechanism. In addition, they can alter the colloidal stability of proteins and modulate interfacial damage. Buffers can also lead to destabilization of proteins, and the stability of buffers themselves is presented. Furthermore, the potential safety and toxicity issues of buffers are discussed, with a special emphasis on the influence of buffers on the perceived pain upon injection. Finally, the interaction of buffers with other excipients is examined. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Buffer Zone Requirements for Soil Fumigant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated pesticide product labels require fumigant users to establish a buffer zone around treated fields to reduce risks to bystanders. Useful information includes tarp testing guidance and a buffer zone calculator.

  3. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  4. Comparative analysis of CRT Buffer, GC saliva check buffer tests and laboratory titration to evaluate saliva buffering capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldupa, Ilze; Brinkmane, Anda; Mihailova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of two commercial strip tests and laboratory titration to detect saliva buffer capacity. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Sixty-four patients were examined. Stimulated saliva was collected and buffer capacity was determined with two different chair-side strip tests in addition to immediate transportation to the laboratory to check the buffering ability by titrating with 0.005 M HCl and measuring pH by digital pH/Ion meter, used as a gold standart. The correlation were analyzed using the Spearman Rank Correlation Test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient and Pearson's Correlation test, p buffer capacity was found in 23.4% of cases, medium in 62.5%, and low in 14.1%. The Spearman Rank Correlation coefficient between the titration method and CRT Buffer test was 0.685 and the GC Saliva Check Buffer was 0.837. The Kappa coefficient for the CRT Buffer test was 0.508, while the coefficient for the GC Saliva Check Buffer was 0.752. The Pearson Correlation for the GC Saliva Check was 0.675. The difference is found in the buffer capacity at initial pH and at pH value 3. CONCLUSIONS. Both colorimetric tests correlate with the acid titration method in laboratory and are usable for saliva buffer capacity detection in dental offices. Buffer capacity detected in laboratory at different pH values can provide more information regarding caries risk.

  5. Improving Water Quality With Conservation Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, R.; Dabney, S.; Schultz, R.

    2003-12-01

    Conservation buffer technologies are new approaches that need wider application. In-field buffer practices work best when used in combination with other buffer types and other conservation practices. Vegetative barriers may be used in combination with edge-of-field buffers to protect and improve their function and longevity by dispersing runoff and encouraging sediment deposition upslope of the buffer. It's important to understand how buffers can be managed to help reduce nutrient transport potential for high loading of nutrients from manure land application sites, A restored riparian wetland buffer retained or removed at least 59 percent of the nitrogen and 66 percent of the phosphorus that entered from an adjacent manure land application site. The Bear Creek National Restoration Demonstration Watershed project in Iowa has been the site of riparian forest buffers and filter strips creation; constructed wetlands to capture tile flow; stream-bank bioengineering; in-stream structures; and controlling livestock grazing. We need field studies that test various widths of buffers of different plant community compositions for their efficacy in trapping surface runoff, reducing nonpoint source pollutants in subsurface waters, and enhancing the aquatic ecosystem. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of different riparian grazing strategies on channel morphology, water quality, and the fate of livestock-associated pathogens and antibiotics. Integrating riparian buffers and other conservation buffers into these models is a key objective in future model development.

  6. Buffer capacity of humic acid: thermodynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertusatti, Jonas; Prado, Alexandre G S

    2007-10-15

    Commercial humic acid was dialyzed and characterized by infrared, UV/vis spectroscopy, (13)C NMR spectrometry, thermogravimetry, and elemental analysis. The dialyzed humic acid was titrated with HNO(3) and NaOH in order to obtain the buffer capacity value (beta). The humic acid presented buffer behavior by base and acid addition, and moreover, an excellent buffer capacity by addition of NaOH. Humic acid showed buffer action between pH 5.5 and 8.0, and a maximum buffer capacity at pH 6.0. The same study was followed calorimetrically to determinate the enthalpy of interaction between H(+)/OH(-) and buffer, which resulted in a maximum enthalpy of -38.49 kJ mol(-1) at pH 6.0. This value suggests that the buffer activity is based on chemisorption of proton and hydroxyl.

  7. A THEORETICAL DISCUSSION OF THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF BUFFER STOCKS AND BUFFER FUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Phil

    1988-01-01

    It has been established that the absence of risk markets justifies market intervention in principle. The form of intervention that has been discussed most widely in the literature is the buffer stock. This paper points out that other forms of intervention, specifically buffer funds, are likely to perform better. The analysis shows that buffer funds are likely to outperform buffer stocks because they address market failure more directly. A sub-theme developed in this paper is that since buffer...

  8. Enhancement of thermal performance in KRS buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Won; Lee, Jong Youl; Kim, Geon Young; Lee, Yang; Koo, J. E

    2007-03-15

    The Korean Reference disposal System consists of the engineered barrier and natural barrier. The main components of the engineered barrier are the canister and buffer. KAERI has developed the buffer for the repository. So far Korean domestic Ca-bentonite was selected as buffer material and the properties of it were characterized. In this report the design requirements of the buffer are fixed based on the characteristics of Korean Ca-bentonite, and the conceptual design of the buffer for KRS is carried out by determining the thickness and shape of the buffer. The thickness of 0.5 m buffer is determined from the mass transfer equation, which gives the less radionuclide release rates from the borehole to the rock. The shape of the buffer is disk and ring. The dry density is 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. The thickness of the buffer above the canister is 2.5 m and the that of the buffer below the canister is 0.5 m. The disposal system should meet the requirement that the maximum temperature at the interface between the buffer and the canister keeps below 100 .deg.. A 3-dimensional finite element program is used for the thermal analysis around the buffer. The results shows that the current conceptual design of the buffer meets the requirement. Another major role of the buffer is to protect the canister and the spent fuels from the exterior impact. The rock movement around the buffer is introduced to assess the buffer performance. Two cases of rock movement are assessed, and the results show that the buffer mitigates sufficiently the impact from the 10 cm movement of rock. Finally, the resaturation time is estimated through mathematical modeling. ABAQUS program is used for the analysis, and the resaturation time is estimated to be around 10 to 30 years. The enhancement of thermal performance of the disposal system is directly related to the economics of the HLW disposal. The way to enhance the thermal performance is suggested from the results of experiment and design. The thermal

  9. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  10. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  11. Systemic Risk, Bank's Capital Buffer, and Leverage

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Buddi

    2017-01-01

    This paper measures individual bank's impact on banking systemic risk and examines the effect of individual bank's capital buffer and leverage to bank's systemic risk impact in Indonesia during 2010-2014. Using Merton's distance-to-default to measure systemic risk, the study shows a significant negative relationship between bank's capital buffer and systemic risk. High capital buffer tends to lowering bank's impact on systemic risk. Bank's leverage level also influences its contribution to sy...

  12. Signature-based store checking buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  13. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  14. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent...

  15. THE BUFFER CAPACITY OF AIRWAY EPITHELIAL SECRETIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusik eKim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 µl volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO3- is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO3- secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO3- secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions.

  16. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO(-) 3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO(-) 3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO(-) 3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions.

  17. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  18. Optimization of protein buffer cocktails using Thermofluor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Linda; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Geerlof, Arie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Weiss, Manfred S

    2013-02-01

    The stability and homogeneity of a protein sample is strongly influenced by the composition of the buffer that the protein is in. A quick and easy approach to identify a buffer composition which increases the stability and possibly the conformational homogeneity of a protein sample is the fluorescence-based thermal-shift assay (Thermofluor). Here, a novel 96-condition screen for Thermofluor experiments is presented which consists of buffer and additive parts. The buffer screen comprises 23 different buffers and the additive screen includes small-molecule additives such as salts and nucleotide analogues. The utilization of small-molecule components which increase the thermal stability of a protein sample frequently results in a protein preparation of higher quality and quantity and ultimately also increases the chances of the protein crystallizing.

  19. Buffer sizing for multi-hop networks

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem

    2014-01-28

    A cumulative buffer may be defined for an interference domain in a wireless mesh network and distributed among nodes in the network to maintain or improve capacity utilization of network resources in the interference domain without increasing packet queuing delay times. When an interference domain having communications links sharing resources in a network is identified, a cumulative buffer size is calculated. The cumulative buffer may be distributed among buffers in each node of the interference domain according to a simple division or according to a cost function taking into account a distance of the communications link from the source and destination. The network may be monitored and the cumulative buffer size recalculated and redistributed when the network conditions change.

  20. COMBINATIONS OF BUFFER-STOCKS AND BUFFER-FUNDS FOR WOOL PRICE STABILISATION IN AUSTRALIA

    OpenAIRE

    Moir, Brian; Piggott, Roley R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a preliminary analysis is presented of a combined buffer-fund and buffer-stock as an alternative to a pure buffer-fund or a pure buffer stock for stabilising wool prices. The alternatives analysed are designed so that each provides the same prices to producers as did the Reserve Price Scheme over the period of analysis. Least-cost combinations of policy instruments are derived. The results show that there is considerable potential for cost savings to be made by combining buffer-...

  1. Temperature buffer test. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report is the final report and a summary of all work performed within the TBT project. The design and the installation of the different components are summarized: the depositions hole, the heating system, the bentonite blocks with emphasis on the initial density and water content in these, the filling of slots with sand or pellets, the retaining construction with the plug, lid and nine anchor cables, the artificial saturation system, and finally the instrumentation. An overview of the operational conditions is presented: the power output from heaters, which was 1,500 W (and also 1,600 W) from each heater during the first {approx}1,700 days, and then changed to 1,000 and 2,000 W, for the upper and lower heater respectively, during the last {approx}600 days. From the start, the bentonite was hydrated with a groundwater from a nearby bore-hole, but this groundwater was replaced with de-ionized water from day {approx}1,500, due to the high flow resistance of the injections points in the filter, which implied that a high filter pressure couldn't be sustained. The sand shield around the upper heater was hydrated from day {approx}1,500 to day {approx}1

  2. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  3. African American college women's suicide buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Michelle S; Range, Lillian M

    2003-01-01

    African American women have lower suicide rates than other women and men in the United States They may possess suicide buffers including social support, religiosity, negative attitudes regarding suicide acceptability, and African American culture. To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious problem-solving style. The identification of these factors may help in the assessment, prevention, and intervention of suicide for African American women and other women and men.

  4. Buffer protection in the installation phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimelius, Hans (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Pusch, Roland (Geodevelopment International AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The research and development of the design and construction of the SKB's repository for final disposal of spent reactor fuel is conducted along several paths ('lines'). Issues concerning the bedrock are dealt with in the 'rock line' and those related to buffer and backfill in deposition holes and tunnels are considered in the 'buffer line' and 'backfill line', respectively. These lines also deal with sub-activities that are coupled to several other lines. One of them includes development of techniques for protecting buffer blocks from moisture and water in the installation phase. Techniques and methods for placement and removal of the 'buffer protection sheet' are dealt with in the 'buffer line'. The removal is, however, considered as being part of the backfilling sequence. Since the performance of the sheet is of fundamental importance to the placement and function of the buffer it deserves particular attention. Thus, the removal of the rubber sheet that serves to protect the buffer blocks in the installation phase may be difficult and can cause significant problems that may require retrieval of already placed canister, buffer and backfill. These matters are in focus in the present report. Arrangements for protecting already placed buffer blocks from moist air and water have been tested in earlier large-scale experiments, i.e. the Prototype Repository project at Aespoe but the experience from them has called for more effective protection of the clay blocks as described in the present report. Focus is on the construction of foundation components at the bottom of the deposition holes required for establishing a tight seal between rock and buffer blocks, and on the protection sheet and arrangements for limiting water pressure on it. Special attention is paid to the drainage of the space between rock and protection sheet that is necessary for avoiding failure of the sheet and to systems for achieving

  5. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Anders, Bojesen; Skydsgaard, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Xx showed that pain perception was similar between formulations containing phenol and benzyl alcohol, whereas m-cresol was associated with more painful injections than benzyl alcohol. Furthermore, patients reported more pain following injection of a citrate-buffered solution than after a histidine...... administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate...... been observed following subcutaneous administration of phenol (7.5 mg/ml), m-cresol (3-4 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (9 mg/ml). No general toxicity reactions were observed after subcutaneous administration of these agents. Clinical evaluation of the preservatives and buffers used in Norditropin Simple...

  6. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane Vindt, Steffen; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-01-01

    to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact...... of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous...... potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system....

  7. Calculating Buffer Zones: A Guide for Applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffer zones provide distance between the application block (i.e., edge of the treated field) and bystanders, in order to control pesticide exposure risk from soil fumigants. Distance requirements may be reduced by credits such as tarps.

  8. Moisture Buffer Value of Building Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut; Time, Berit

    2007-01-01

    When building materials are in contact with indoor air they have some effect to moderate the variations of indoor humidity in occupied buildings. But so far there has been a lack of a standardized quantity to characterize the moisture buffering capability of materials. It has been the objective...... of a recent Nordic project to define such a quantity, and to declare it in the form of a NORDTEST method. The Moisture Buffer Value is the figure that has been developed in the project as a way to appraise the moisture buffer effect of materials, and the value is described in the paper. Also explained...... is a test protocol which expresses how materials should be tested for determination of their Moisture Buffer Value. Finally, the paper presents some of the results of a Round Robin Test on various typical building materials that has been carried out in the project....

  9. Moisture buffer capacity of different insulation materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2004-01-01

    lead to more durable constructions. In this paper, a large range of very different thermal insulation materials have been tested in specially constructed laboratory facilities to determine their moisture buffer capacity. Both isothermal and nonisothermal experimental set-ups have been used...... are discussed, and different ways are presented how to determine the moisture buffer capacity of the materials using partly standard material parameters and partly parameters determined from the actual measurements. The results so far show that the determination of moisture buffer capacity is very sensitive...... to the used analysis method and therefore great care has to be taken when comparing results of different experiments. This paper discusses this issue and will come with a recommendation of a simple and consistent way to present the moisture buffer capacity of the materials in contact with the indoor air...

  10. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  11. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  12. Buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions: from protein buffer capacity prediction to bioprocess applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrenburg, Sven; Karow, Anne R; Garidel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Protein therapeutics, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), have significant buffering capacity, particularly at concentrations>50 mg/mL. This report addresses pH-related issues critical to adoption of self-buffered monoclonal antibody formulations. We evaluated solution conditions with protein concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 mg/mL. Samples were both buffer-free and conventionally buffered with citrate. Samples were non-isotonic or adjusted for isotonicity with NaCl or trehalose. Studies included accelerated temperature stability tests, shaking stability studies, and pH changes in infusion media as protein concentrate is added. We present averaged buffering slopes of capacity that can be applied to any mAb and present a general method for calculating buffering capacity of buffer-free, highly concentrated antibody liquid formulations. In temperature stability tests, neither buffer-free nor conventionally buffered solution conditions showed significant pH changes. Conventionally buffered solutions showed significantly higher opalescence than buffer-free ones. In general, buffer-free solution conditions showed less aggregation than conventionally buffered solutions. Shaking stability tests showed no differences between buffer-free and conventionally buffered solutions. "In-use" preparation experiments showed that pH in infusion bag medium can rapidly approximate that of self-buffered protein concentrate as concentrate is added. In summary, the buffer capacity of proteins can be predicted and buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  14. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  15. The use of 0.01M phosphate buffered saline as detection buffer for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at evaluating the use of 0.01M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as detection buffer for Alere Determine® HIV rapid test. This study was carried out at Bugando School of Medicine in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 300 whole blood specimens; 150 HIV positive specimens from patients attending Care and ...

  16. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips (VBS) for reducing herbicide transport in runoff may be affected by season, plant species composition, and buffer width. A plot-scale study was conducted from 2007-2012 on an eroded claypan soil with the objectives of: 1) assessing the effects of season ...

  17. Labview virtual instruments for calcium buffer calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Frederick B; Pollack, Gerald H

    2003-01-01

    Labview VIs based upon the calculator programs of Fabiato and Fabiato (J. Physiol. Paris 75 (1979) 463) are presented. The VIs comprise the necessary computations for the accurate preparation of multiple-metal buffers, for the back-calculation of buffer composition given known free metal concentrations and stability constants used, for the determination of free concentrations from a given buffer composition, and for the determination of apparent stability constants from absolute constants. As implemented, the VIs can concurrently account for up to three divalent metals, two monovalent metals and four ligands thereof, and the modular design of the VIs facilitates further extension of their capacity. As Labview VIs are inherently graphical, these VIs may serve as useful templates for those wishing to adapt this software to other platforms.

  18. Nonlinear spelling in graphemic buffer deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Teresa; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case of nonlinear spelling and its implications for theories of the graphemic buffer. C.T.J., an individual with an acquired deficit of the graphemic buffer, often wrote the letters of his responses in a nonlinear temporal order when writing to dictation. The spatial ordering of the letters was maintained: Letters in the later positions of the words were written towards the right side of the response, even when written before letters in earlier positions. This unusual phenomenon has been briefly reported in three prior cases but this study provides the most detailed analysis of the phenomenon to date. We specifically contend that the decoupling of the temporal and spatial aspects of spelling is difficult to reconcile with competitive queuing accounts of the graphemic buffer.

  19. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: An annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    This bibliography and associated literature synthesis (Melcher and Skagen, 2005) was developed for the Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV). The PLJV sought compilation and annotation of the literature on grass buffers for protecting playas from runoff containing sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and other contaminants. In addition, PLJV sought information regarding the extent to which buffers may attenuate the precipitation runoff needed to fill playas, and avian use of buffers. We emphasize grass buffers, but we also provide information on other buffer types.

  20. Defining Steamside Management Zones or Riparian Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Williams; Donald J. Lipscomb; Christopher J. Post

    2004-01-01

    Forestry Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been highly successful in protecting water quality throughout the Southeast. Numerous studies have found them to be effective in protecting water quality. Despite being mostly voluntary, compliance is generally about 90 percent across the region. Streamside Management Zones (SMZs) or riparian buffers are specified for...

  1. Zelfzorg als buffer voor burn-out

    OpenAIRE

    Damman, Caroline; Dewaele, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Burn-out komt vaak voor bij hulpverleners. Door hun eigenheid durven ze niet snel hulp vragen. In geen enkele missietekst van een organisatie staat dat de organisatie zelfzorg bij hulpverleners als kerntaak opneemt. Zelfzorg is de beste buffer tegen burn-out.

  2. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindt, Steffen T.; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-02-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system.

  3. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  4. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  5. MOISTURE-BUFFERING CHARACTERISTICS OF BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Cheol Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The humidity level of indoor air is an important factor influencing the air quality and energy consumption of buildings, as well as the durability of building components. Indoor humidity levels depend on several factors, such as moisture sources, air flow, and the adsorption/desorption properties of materials. The moisture-buffering characteristics of building materials that are in contact with indoor air may help moderate the variations of indoor humidity, especially in the summer and winter. In this study, the moisture adsorption/desorption properties of building materials were investigated experimentally and numerically. These properties can be used to characterize the ability of building materials to exchange moisture with the indoor environment. This study indicates that a building material surface resistivity was the main factor creating variations of moisture buffering.

  6. Surface Water Protection by Productive Buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christen, Benjamin

    Vegetated riparian buffer zones are a widely recommended best management practice in agriculture for protecting surface and coastal waters from diffuse nutrient pollution. On the background of the EU funded research project NitroEurope (NEU; www.NitroEurope.eu), this study concentrates on the mit......Vegetated riparian buffer zones are a widely recommended best management practice in agriculture for protecting surface and coastal waters from diffuse nutrient pollution. On the background of the EU funded research project NitroEurope (NEU; www.NitroEurope.eu), this study concentrates...... viability and visualize the resulting landscape changes. For the Danish NEU landscape, a detailed plan of implementation options is presented, taking into account catchment morphology and hydrology, land use and drainage, access conditions, land ownership structure and land owner profiles. Different...

  7. MONITORING OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECT THROUGH BUFFER MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Arti Bhan*1 & Prof. Ashish P. Waghmare2

    2017-01-01

    Critical Chain Project Management is an effective method over Critical Path Method (CPM) for scheduling and monitoring the progress of a project. CPM leads to ineffective scheduling due to overestimation of duration and increases the overall project duration. The task estimates in CPM are based on guess work whereas CCPM reduces the duration of task to 50% to that of its original duration as uses the remaining 50% duration as buffer to protect the activity against delays. Also the availabilit...

  8. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  9. Microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, M.; Itavaara, M.

    2012-07-01

    The proposed disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes involves storing the wastes underground in copper-iron containers embedded in buffer material of compacted bentonite. Hydrogen sulphide production by sulphate-reducing prokaryotes is a potential mechanism that could cause corrosion of waste containers in repository conditions. The prevailing conditions in compacted bentonite buffer will be harsh. The swelling pressure is 7-8 MPa, the amount of free water is low and the average pore and pore throat diameters are small. This literature study aims to assess the potential of microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature on the environmental limits of microbial life in extreme conditions and the occurrence of sulphatereducing prokaryotes in extreme environments is reviewed briefly and the results of published studies characterizing microbes and microbial processes in repository conditions or in relevant subsurface environments are presented. The presence of bacteria, including SRBs, has been confirmed in deep groundwater and bentonite-based materials. Sulphate reducers have been detected in various high-pressure environments, and sulphate-reduction based on hydrogen as an energy source is considered a major microbial process in deep subsurface environments. In bentonite, microbial activity is strongly suppressed, mainly due to the low amount of free water and small pores, which limit the transport of microbes and nutrients. Spore-forming bacteria have been shown to survive in compacted bentonite as dormant spores, and they are able to resume a metabolically active state after decompaction. Thus, microbial sulphide production may increase in repository conditions if the dry density of the bentonite buffer is locally reduced. (orig.)

  10. Methyl Bromide Commodity Fumigation Buffer Zone Lookup Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Product labels for methyl bromide used in commodity and structural fumigation include requirements for buffer zones around treated areas. The information on this page will allow you to find the appropriate buffer zone for your planned application.

  11. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  12. Towards Optimal Buffer Size in Wi-Fi Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Showail, Ahmad J.

    2016-01-19

    Buffer sizing is an important network configuration parameter that impacts the quality of data traffic. Falling memory cost and the fallacy that ‘more is better’ lead to over provisioning network devices with large buffers. Over-buffering or the so called ‘bufferbloat’ phenomenon creates excessive end-to-end delay in today’s networks. On the other hand, under-buffering results in frequent packet loss and subsequent under-utilization of network resources. The buffer sizing problem has been studied extensively for wired networks. However, there is little work addressing the unique challenges of wireless environment. In this dissertation, we discuss buffer sizing challenges in wireless networks, classify the state-of-the-art solutions, and propose two novel buffer sizing schemes. The first scheme targets buffer sizing in wireless multi-hop networks where the radio spectral resource is shared among a set of con- tending nodes. Hence, it sizes the buffer collectively and distributes it over a set of interfering devices. The second buffer sizing scheme is designed to cope up with recent Wi-Fi enhancements. It adapts the buffer size based on measured link characteristics and network load. Also, it enforces limits on the buffer size to maximize frame aggregation benefits. Both mechanisms are evaluated using simulation as well as testbed implementation over half-duplex and full-duplex wireless networks. Experimental evaluation shows that our proposal reduces latency by an order of magnitude.

  13. Runtime buffer management to improve the performance in irregular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wormhole switching is that the buffer depth can be set as small as possible. Each port has an input channel as well as an output channel. Buffers are present at all input channels to store the data temporarily at the time of congestion. There is no need of buffers at the output channel since it is enabled by a hand shaking ...

  14. Managing Multiuser Database Buffers Using Data Mining Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, L.; Lu, H.J.

    In this paper, we propose a data-mining-based approach to public buffer management for a multiuser database system, where database buffers are organized into two areas – public and private. While the private buffer areas contain pages to be updated by particular users, the public

  15. Heed the head: buffer benefits along headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Deanna (Dede) Olson

    2015-01-01

    Since the Northwest Forest Plan implemented riparian buffers along non-fish bearing streams in 1994, there have been questions about how wide those buffers need to be to protect aquatic and riparian resources from upland forest management activities. The Density Management and Riparian Buffer Study of western Oregon, also initiated in 1994, examines the effects of...

  16. Effective Allocation of Database Buffers by Mining Users' Access Histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, L.; Li, Q; Leung, H.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of database buffer management has extensively been studied for nearly three decades. In this paper, we explore the use of newly emerging data mining technology to tackle the traditional buffer management issue. In particular, we address the buffer size setting problem for distributed

  17. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  18. Concentrated flow paths in riparian buffer zones of southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Pankau; J.E. Schoonover; K.W.J. Willard; P.J. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Riparian buffers in agricultural landscapes should be designed to trap pollutants in overland flow by slowing, filtering, and infiltrating surface runoff entering the buffer via sheet flow. However, observational evidence suggests that concentrated flow is prevalent from agricultural fields. Over time sediment can accumulate in riparian buffers forming berms that...

  19. The buffer capacity and buffer systems of human whole saliva measured without loss of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardow, A; Moe, D; Nyvad, B; Nauntofte, B

    2000-01-01

    The buffer capacity of unstimulated (UWS) and stimulated (SWS) whole-mouth saliva involves three major buffer systems. The aim was to determine the buffer capacity of UWS and SWS at specific pH in the interval from pH 7.5 down to pH 3.0. The contribution of each of the buffer systems was also determined under conditions resembling those in the mouth. UWS and SWS were collected from 20 healthy volunteers; the saliva was collected under paraffin oil in order to avoid loss of CO2. The buffer capacity of UWS and SWS in samples with and without bicarbonate (HCO3-) and CO2 were measured at various pH by acid titration in a closed system at 36 C. The mean concentrations of the buffer systems in UWS (mean flow rate 0.55 ml/min) were 4.4 mmol/l HCO3-, 4.5 mmol/l phosphate (of which 1.3 mmol/l was present in the form of HPO4(2-)), 1876 microg/ml protein; the saliva pH was 6.8 and the P(CO2) 29.3 mmHg. The corresponding mean concentrations in SWS (mean flow rate 1.66 ml/min) were 9.7 mmol/l HCO3-, 3.8 mmol/l phosphate (of which 1.9 mmol/l was present in the form of HPO4(2-)), 1955 microg/ml protein; pH 7.2 and P(CO2) 25.7 mmHg, The highest buffer capacity of UWS and SWS was 6.0 and 8.5 mmol H+ /(1 saliva*pH unit) at pH 6.25, respectively. At saliva pH in the range from pH 7 down to pH 5, the following had significant impact on buffer capacity: the HCO3- concentration (p buffer capacity (p < 0.01).

  20. k(+)-buffer: An Efficient, Memory-Friendly and Dynamic k-buffer Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilakis, Andreas-Alexandros; Papaioannou, Georgios; Fudos, Ioannis

    2015-06-01

    Depth-sorted fragment determination is fundamental for a host of image-based techniques which simulates complex rendering effects. It is also a challenging task in terms of time and space required when rasterizing scenes with high depth complexity. When low graphics memory requirements are of utmost importance, k-buffer can objectively be considered as the most preferred framework which advantageously ensures the correct depth order on a subset of all generated fragments. Although various alternatives have been introduced to partially or completely alleviate the noticeable quality artifacts produced by the initial k-buffer algorithm in the expense of memory increase or performance downgrade, appropriate tools to automatically and dynamically compute the most suitable value of k are still missing. To this end, we introduce k(+)-buffer, a fast framework that accurately simulates the behavior of k-buffer in a single rendering pass. Two memory-bounded data structures: (i) the max-array and (ii) the max-heap are developed on the GPU to concurrently maintain the k-foremost fragments per pixel by exploring pixel synchronization and fragment culling. Memory-friendly strategies are further introduced to dynamically (a) lessen the wasteful memory allocation of individual pixels with low depth complexity frequencies, (b) minimize the allocated size of k-buffer according to different application goals and hardware limitations via a straightforward depth histogram analysis and (c) manage local GPU cache with a fixed-memory depth-sorting mechanism. Finally, an extensive experimental evaluation is provided demonstrating the advantages of our work over all prior k-buffer variants in terms of memory usage, performance cost and image quality.

  1. MISKONSEPSI SISWA PADA MATERI LARUTAN BUFFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widy Ika Parastuti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Buffer solution is one high school chemistry material found misconceptions on student understanding. Misconceptions identification method by giving some quetion with same type. Misconceptions identified from recurring student answers incorrectly. The study population was the students of class XI IPA at SMAN 1 Malang academic year 2015/2016 with a research subject in class XI MIA 7 number of 32 students. The results obtained by analysis of four kinds of misconceptions. The cause of the misconception is (1 a weak prior knowledge; (2 problems of symbols and mathematical formulas; (3 difficulty understanding the context of the material; (4 problems in generalize. Larutan buffer merupakan salah satu materi kimia SMA yang ditemukan miskonsepsi pada pemahaman siswa. Metode identifikasi miskonsepsi dengan memberikan beberapa soal yang setipe. Miskonsepsi teridentifikasi dari jawaban salah yang berulang siswa. Populasi penelitian ini adalah siswa kelas XI IPA SMA Negeri 1 Malang Tahun ajaran 2015/2016 dengan subjek penelitian kelas XI MIA 7 sejumlah 32 siswa. Hasil analisis diperoleh  empat macam miskonsepsi. Penyebab miskonsepsi adalah (1 pengetahuan awal yang lemah; (2 permasalahan simbol dan rumus matematika; (3 kesulitan memahami konteks materi; (4 permasalahan dalam menggeneralisasikan masalah.

  2. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  3. Buffered Versus Non-Buffered Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Mandibular Nerve Block: Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phero, James A; Nelson, Blake; Davis, Bobby; Dunlop, Natalie; Phillips, Ceib; Reside, Glenn; Tikunov, Andrew P; White, Raymond P

    2017-04-01

    Outcomes for peak blood levels were assessed for buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine compared with non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. In this institutional review board-approved prospective, randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial, the clinical impact of buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (Anutra Medical, Research Triangle Park, Cary, NC) was compared with the non-buffered drug. Venous blood samples for lidocaine were obtained 30 minutes after a mandibular nerve block with 80 mg of the buffered or unbuffered drug. Two weeks later, the same subjects were tested with the alternate drug combinations. Subjects also reported on pain on injection with a 10-point Likert-type scale and time to lower lip numbness. The explanatory variable was the drug formulation. Outcome variables were subjects' peak blood lidocaine levels, subjective responses to pain on injection, and time to lower lip numbness. Serum lidocaine levels were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses were performed using Proc TTEST (SAS 9.3; SAS Institute, Cary, NC), with the crossover option for a 2-period crossover design, to analyze the normally distributed outcome for pain. For non-normally distributed outcomes of blood lidocaine levels and time to lower lip numbness, an assessment of treatment difference was performed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Proc NPAR1WAY (SAS 9.3). Statistical significance was set at a P value less than .05 for all outcomes. Forty-eight percent of subjects were women, half were Caucasian, 22% were African American, and 13% were Asian. Median age was 21 years (interquartile range [IQR], 20-22 yr), and median body weight was 147 lb (IQR, 130-170 lb). Median blood levels (44 blood samples) at 30 minutes were 1.19 μg/L per kilogram of body weight. Mean blood level differences of lidocaine for each patient were significantly lower after nerve block with the buffered drug compared with the

  4. Buffer Sizing in 802.11 Wireless Mesh Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Jamshaid, Kamran

    2011-10-01

    We analyze the problem of buffer sizing for TCP flows in 802.11-based Wireless Mesh Networks. Our objective is to maintain high network utilization while providing low queueing delays. The problem is complicated by the time-varying capacity of the wireless channel as well as the random access mechanism of 802.11 MAC protocol. While arbitrarily large buffers can maintain high network utilization, this results in large queueing delays. Such delays may affect TCP stability characteristics, and also increase queueing delays for other flows (including real-time flows) sharing the buffer. In this paper we propose sizing link buffers collectively for a set of nodes within mutual interference range called the \\'collision domain\\'. We aim to provide a buffer just large enough to saturate the available capacity of the bottleneck collision domain that limits the carrying capacity of the network. This neighborhood buffer is distributed over multiple nodes that constitute the network bottleneck; a transmission by any of these nodes fully utilizes the available spectral resource for the duration of the transmission. We show that sizing routing buffers collectively for this bottleneck allows us to have small buffers (as low as 2 - 3 packets) at individual nodes without any significant loss in network utilization. We propose heuristics to determine these buffer sizes in WMNs. Our results show that we can reduce the end-to-end delays by 6× to 10× at the cost of losing roughly 5% of the network capacity achievable with large buffers.

  5. Moisture buffering capacity of highly absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerolini, S.; D' Orazio, M.; Stazi, A. [Department of Architecture, Construction and Structures (DACS), Faculty of Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60100 Ancona (Italy); Di Perna, C. [Department of Energetics, Faculty of Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60100 Ancona (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    This research investigates the possibility to use highly absorbing materials to dampen indoor RH% variations. The practical MBV of sodium polyacrylate, cellulose-based material, perlite and gypsum is evaluated for a daily cyclic exposure that alternates high (75%) and low (33%) RH% levels for 8 h and 16 h, respectively. The adjustment velocity to RH% variations and the presence of hysteretic phenomena are also presented. The cellulose-based material proves to be the most suitable for moisture buffering applications. Starting from this material's properties, the effect of thickness, vapour resistance factor ({mu}) and mass surface exchange coefficient (Z{sub v}) on sorption capacity is evaluated by the use of a numerical model. (author)

  6. Huge capacity optical packet switching and buffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinada, Satoshi; Furukawa, Hideaki; Wada, Naoya

    2011-12-12

    We demonstrate 2.56 Tbit/s/port dual-polarization DWDM/DQPSK variable-length optical packet (20 Gbit/s × 64 wavelengths × 2 polarizations) switching and buffering by using a 2×2 optical packet switch (OPS) system. The optical data plane of the OPS system was constructed of multi-connected electro-optical switches and fiber delay lines. The accumulated polarization dependent loss of each optical path in the data plane was less than 5 dB. This low-polarization-dependence OPS system enabled us to handle DWDM/DQPSK optical packets (1.28 Tbit/s/port) with time-varying polarization after transmission through 100 km fiber in the field. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Surface Treatments of Nb by Buffered Electropolishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Andy T. [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Manus, Robert L. [JLAb; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Williams, J. S. [JLAB; Eozénou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Jin, S. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Lin, L. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Lu, X.Y. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Mammosser, John D. [JLAB; Wang, E. [BNL

    2009-11-01

    Buffered electropolishing (BEP) is a Nb surface treatment technique developed at Jefferson Lab1. Experimental results obtained from flat Nb samples show2-4 that BEP can produce a surface finish much smoother than that produced by the conventional electropolishing (EP), while Nb removal rate can be as high as 4.67 μm/min. This new technique has been applied to the treatments of Nb SRF single cell cavity employing a vertical polishing system5 constructed at JLab as well as a horizontal polishing system at CEA Saclay. Preliminary results show that the accelerating gradient can reach 32 MV/m for a large grain cavity and 26.7 MV/m for a regular grain cavity. In this presentation, the latest progresses from the international collaboration between Peking University, CEA Saclay, and JLab on BEP will be summarized.

  8. Developing suitable buffers to capture transport cycling behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas; Schipperijn, Jasper; Christiansen, Lars Breum

    2014-01-01

    The association between neighborhood built environment and cycling has received considerable attention in health literature over the last two decades, but different neighborhood definitions have been used and it is unclear which one is most appropriate. Administrative or fixed residential spatial...... units (e.g., home-buffer-based neighborhoods) are not necessarily representative for environmental exposure. An increased understanding of appropriate neighborhoods is needed. GPS cycling tracks from 78 participants for 7 days form the basis for the development and testing of different neighborhood...... buffers for transport cycling. The percentage of GPS points per square meter was used as indicator of the effectiveness of a series of different buffer types, including home-based network buffers, shortest route to city center buffers, and city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers. The results show...

  9. A study on manufacturing and construction method of buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Sugita, Yutaka [Tokai Works, Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Waste Isolation Research Division, Barrier Performance Group, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Amemiya, Kiyoshi [Hazama Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    As an engineered barrier system in the geological disposal of high-level waste, multibarrier system is considered. Multibarrier system consists of the vitrified waste, the overpack and the buffer. Bentonite is one of the potential material as the buffer because of its low water permeability, self-sealing properties, radionuclides adsorption and retardation properties, thermal conductivity, chemical buffering properties, overpack supporting properties, stress buffering properties, etc. In order to evaluate the functions of buffer, a lot of experiments has been conducted. The evaluations of these functions are based on the assumption that the buffer is emplaced or constructed in the disposal tunnel (or disposal pit) properly. Therefore, it is necessary to study on the manufacturing / construction method of buffer. As the manufacturing / construction technology of the buffer, the block installation method and in-situ compaction method, etc, are being investigated. The block installation method is to emplace the buffer blocks manufactured in advance at the ground facility, and construction processes of the block installation method at the underground will be simplified compared with the in-situ compaction method. On the other hand, the in-situ compaction method is to introduce the buffer material with specified water content into the disposal tunnel and to make the buffer with high density at the site using a compaction machine. In regard to the in-situ compaction method, it is necessary to investigate the optimum finished thickness of one layer because it is impossible to construct the buffer at one time. This report describes the results of compaction property test and the summary of the past investigation results in connection with the manufacturing / construction method. Then this report shows the construction method that will be feasible in the actual disposal site. (J.P.N.)

  10. BUFFER SIZING FOR THE CRITICAL CHAIN PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Geekie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Methods for sizing project and feeding buffers for critical chain project management are investigated. Experiments indicate that – in the absence of bias, and for certain classes of bias – buffer consumption is independent of the mean duration of a chain. Generally the popular method – a buffer size equal to 50% of the longest path leading to it – gives rise to excessively large buffers. Buffers sized according to the square root of the sum of squares perform well in the absence of bias, but with bias present the performance is unacceptably poor. A new approach to buffer sizing is proposed.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Metodes vir groottebepaling van projek- en saamvloeibuffers vir kritieke-ketting projekbestuur word ondersoek. Eksperimente dui daarop dat – in die afwesigheid van onewewigtigheid, en vir sekere tipes onewewigtigheid – bufferverbruik onafhanklik is van die gemiddelde lengte van ’n ketting. Oor die algemeen veroorsaak die metode van buffergrootte – gelyk aan 50% van die langste pad wat tot die buffer lei – onnodige groot buffers. Buffers bepaal met die metode van die vierkantswortel van die som van kwadrate, vaar goed in die afwesigheid van onewewigtigheid, maar vaar onaanvaarbaar swak wanneer onewewigtigheid teenwoordig is. ’n Nuwe metode vir die bepaling van buffergrootte word voorgestel.

  11. Effect of Buffer Bow Structure in Ship-Ship Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yasuhira; Endo, Hisayoshi; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2008-01-01

    tankers, the introduction of buffer bulbous bows has been proposed. Relatively soft buffer bows absorb part of the kinetic energy of the striking ship before penetrating the inner hull of the struck vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to verify the effectiveness of a prototype buffer bulbous bow......) and the forward velocity of the struck ship on the collapse mode of the bow of the striking vessel are investigated. Collapse modes, contact forces and energy absorption capabilities of the buffer bows are compared with those of conventional bows....

  12. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  13. Temperature buffer test. Installation of buffer, heaters and instruments in the deposition hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Barcena, Ignacio; Garcia-Sineriz, Jose Luis [Aitemin, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    During 2003 the Temperature Buffer Test was installed in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Temperature, water pressure, relative humidity, total pressure and displacements etc. are measured in numerous points in the test. Most of the cables from the transducers are led in the deposition hole through slots in the rock surface of the deposition hole in watertight tubes to the data collection system in a container placed in the tunnel close to the deposition hole. This report describes the work with the installations of the buffer, heaters, and instruments and yields a description of the final location of all instruments. The report also contains a description of the materials that were installed and the densities yielded after placement.

  14. The buffer/container experiment: results, synthesis, issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J. [Univ. of Manitoba, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Chandler, N.A.; Dixon, D.A.; Roach, P.J.; To, T.; Wan, A.W.L

    1997-12-01

    A large in-ground experiment has examined how heat affects the performance of the dense sand bentonite 'buffer' that has been proposed for use in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The experiment was performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at its Underground Research Laboratory, Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba between 1991 and 1994. The experiment placed a full-size heater representing a container of nuclear fuel waste in a 1.24-m diameter borehole filled with buffer below the floor of a room excavated at 240-m depth in granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. The buffer and surrounding rock were extensively instrumented for temperatures, total pressures, water pressures, suctions, and rock displacements. Power was provided to the heater for almost 900 days. The experiment showed that good rock conditions can be pre-selected, a borehole can be drilled, and buffer can be placed at controlled densities and water contents. The instrumentation generally worked well, and an extensive data base was successfully organized. Drying was observed in buffer close to the heater. This caused some desiccation cracking. However the cracks only extended approximately one third of the distance to the buffer-rock interface and did not form an advective pathway. Following sampling at the time of decommissioning, cracked samples of buffer were transported to the laboratory and given access to water. The hydraulic conductivities and swelling pressures of these resaturated samples were very similar to those of uncracked buffer. A good balance was achieved between the mass of water flowing into the experiment from the surrounding rock and the increased mass of water in the buffer. A good understanding was developed of the relationships between suctions, water contents, and total pressures in buffer near the buffer-rock interface. Comparisons between measurements and predictions of measured parameters show that a good understanding has been developed of the processes

  15. Buffers Affect the Bending Rigidity of Model Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvrais, H.; Duelund, L.; Ipsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    vesicles, of a more complex behavior, where the buffering molecules may considerably affect the bending rigidity of phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Furthermore, a synergistic effect on the bending modulus is observed in the presence of both salt and buffer molecules, which serves as a warning...

  16. Effects of riparian buffers on hydrology of northern seasonal ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall K. Kolka; Brian J. Palik; Daniel P. Tersteeg; James C. Bell

    2011-01-01

    Although seasonal ponds are common in northern, glaciated, forested landscapes, forest management guidelines are generally lacking for these systems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of riparian buffer type on seasonal pond hydrology following harvest of the adjacent upland forest. A replicated block design consisting of four buffer treatments...

  17. Reduction of buffering requirements: Another advantage of cooperative transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Yet another advent of cooperative transmission is exposed in this letter. It is shown that cooperation lends itself to the reduction of buffer sizes of wireless sensor nodes. It is less likely to find the channel busy when cooperative transmission is employed in the network. Otherwise, in the lack of cooperation, the probability of build up of packet queues in transmission buffers increases.

  18. Arise, amphibians: stream buffers affect more than fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally. Duncan

    2003-01-01

    Buffers along streams cover a tremendous proportion of the land base in the forested systems of the western Pacific Northwest. These buffers were designated primarily to conserve and restore habitat for salmon and trout, but conservation of habitat for a number of other organisms also has been implicit in their design. Recent research evaluated the importance of...

  19. Molecular Buffers Permit Sensitivity Tuning and Inversion of Riboswitch Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Genee, Hans Jasper; Jensen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    transcription factor, while interacting DNA-binding domains mediate the transduction of signal and form an interacting molecular buffer. The molecular buffer system enables modular signal inversion through integration with repressor modules. Further, tuning of input sensitivity was achieved through perturbation...

  20. The Effect of Double Buffer Management in Packet Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of file downloads between the HTTP server and clients are also varied to follow the behavior of data. The buf(er ... to accommodate. Keywords: buffer, traffic analysis, packet, HTTP, server, clients, byte, double buffer. ... Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANETs), each node serves as a host as well as a router and uses consequently ...

  1. Challenges of Buffer Zone Management in Cross River National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecological buffer zones are very crucial in minimizing the impact of land use practices close to protected areas, though there is no consensus surrounding their objectives, ... These developments might be adduced to the low level of awareness of Park laws and buffer zone management policies by these communities.

  2. Bus Implementation Using New Low Power PFSCL Tristate Buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes new positive feedback source coupled logic (PFSCL tristate buffers suited to bus applications. The proposed buffers use switch to attain high impedance state and modify the load or the current source section. An interesting consequence of this is overall reduction in the power consumption. The proposed tristate buffers consume half the power compared to the available switch based counterpart. The issues with available PFSCL tristate buffers based bus implementation are identified and benefits of employing the proposed tristate buffer topologies are put forward. SPICE simulation results using TSMC 180 nm CMOS technology parameters are included to support the theoretical formulations. The performance of proposed tristate buffer topologies is examined on the basis of propagation delay, output enable time, and power consumption. It is found that one of the proposed tristate buffer topology outperforms the others in terms of all the performance parameters. An examination of behavior of available and the proposed PFSCL tristate buffer topologies under parameter variations and mismatch shows a maximum variation of 14%.

  3. Placement of riparian forest buffers to improve water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Tomer; Michael G. Dosskey; Michael R. Burkart; David E. James; Matthew J. Helmers; Dean E. Eisenhauer

    2005-01-01

    Riparian forest buffers can improve stream water quality, provided they intercept and remove contaminants from surface runoff and/or shallow groundwater. Soils, topography, hydrology, and surficial geology detemine the capability of forest buffers to intercept and treat these flows. This paper describes landscape analysis techniques for identifying and mapping...

  4. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  5. A multipurpose switched reluctance motor with a series commutation buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Vasil'ev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a power-supply circuit for a multipurpose switched reluctance motor with a series commutation buffer is presented. It is shown that a series buffer improves output characteristics of multipurpose switched reluctance motors under supply from a single-phase circuit and also lifts necessity of switching capacitors according to the motor power supply modes.

  6. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  7. Sampling phase lock loop (PLL) with low power clock buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Bahai, A.; Bohsali, M.; Djabbari, A.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram; Socci, G.

    2012-01-01

    A sampling phase locked loop (PLL) circuit includes a pull-up/down buffer configured to convert an oscillator reference clock into a square wave sampling control signal input to a sampling phase detector. The buffer circuit is configured to reduce power by controlling the switching of the pull-up

  8. Sampling phase lock loop (PLL) with low power clock buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Bahai, A.; Bohsali, M.; Djabbari, A.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram; Socci, G.

    2013-01-01

    A sampling phase locked loop (PLL) circuit includes a pull-up/down buffer configured to convert an oscillator reference clock into a square wave sampling control signal input to a sampling phase detector. The buffer circuit is configured to reduce power by controlling the switching of the pull-up

  9. Evaluation on elution feature of bentonite buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Kanno, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1997-09-01

    In order to evaluate long term physical stability of artificial barrier in land disposal of high level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to know quantitatively elution behavior of buffering materials from disposal road (or cavity) to circumferential rock crack. When elution of the buffer material occurs on large scale, amount of bentonite in the disposal road (or cavity) reduces and reduction of various functions expected to the buffer materials is presumed. According to specification examples of road transverse arrangement and disposal vertical arrangement systems, evaluation on elution amount of the buffer materials at disposal environment was conducted. Opening width of rock crack in the disposal environment was supposed to be 0.5 mm. As a result, obtained mass elution ratios of the buffer materials due to extrusion phenomenon were 0.04 to 0.2% after 10,000 year and 2 to 12% after 1,000,000 years. (G.K.)

  10. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly......, the buffer performance is investigated first for the untreated material, then after adding rendering on the surfaces, and finally with latex paint. Similarly for the walls of plasterboard construction, the buffer effects are investigated first for the insulation (cellulose or mineral wool), then after adding...

  11. Model-driven engineering of supramolecular buffering by multivalency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffen, Tim F E; Teunissen, Abraham J P; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2017-12-05

    A supramolecular system in which the concentration of a molecule is buffered over several orders of magnitude is presented. Molecular buffering is achieved as a result of competition in a ring-chain equilibrium of multivalent ureidopyrimidinone monomers and a monovalent naphthyridine molecule which acts as an end-capper. While we previously only considered divalent ureidopyrimidinone monomers we now present a model-driven engineering approach to improve molecular buffering using multivalent ring-chain systems. Our theoretical models reveal an odd-even effect where even-valent molecules show superior buffering capabilities. Furthermore, we predict that supramolecular buffering can be significantly improved using a tetravalent instead of a divalent molecule, since the tetravalent molecule can form two intramolecular rings with different "stabilities" due to statistical effects. Our model predictions are validated against experimental 1H NMR data, demonstrating that model-driven engineering has considerable potential in supramolecular chemistry. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  12. Thin film photovoltaic devices with a minimally conductive buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Teresa M.; Burst, James

    2016-11-15

    A thin film photovoltaic device (100) with a tunable, minimally conductive buffer (128) layer is provided. The photovoltaic device (100) may include a back contact (150), a transparent front contact stack (120), and an absorber (140) positioned between the front contact stack (120) and the back contact (150). The front contact stack (120) may include a low resistivity transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer (124) and a buffer layer (128) that is proximate to the absorber layer (140). The photovoltaic device (100) may also include a window layer (130) between the buffer layer (128) and the absorber (140). In some cases, the buffer layer (128) is minimally conductive, with its resistivity being tunable, and the buffer layer (128) may be formed as an alloy from a host oxide and a high-permittivity oxide. The high-permittivity oxide may further be chosen to have a bandgap greater than the host oxide.

  13. Replenishing data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Cernohous, Bob R [Rochester, MN; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Kumar, Sameer [White Plains, NY; Parker, Jeffrey J [Rochester, MN

    2011-10-11

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for replenishing data descriptors in a Direct Memory Access (`DMA`) injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer that include: determining, by a messaging module on an origin compute node, whether a number of data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds a predetermined threshold, each data descriptor specifying an application message for transmission to a target compute node; queuing, by the messaging module, a plurality of new data descriptors in a pending descriptor queue if the number of the data descriptors in the DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds the predetermined threshold; establishing, by the messaging module, interrupt criteria that specify when to replenish the injection FIFO buffer with the plurality of new data descriptors in the pending descriptor queue; and injecting, by the messaging module, the plurality of new data descriptors into the injection FIFO buffer in dependence upon the interrupt criteria.

  14. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  15. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel [UPC, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code{sub B}right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code{sub B}right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  16. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  17. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior.

  18. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Montanaro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2. All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates.

  19. Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhimji, Wahid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, Debbie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Romanus, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Paul, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ovsyannikov, Andrey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Friesen, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bryson, Matt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Correa, Joaquin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lockwood, Glenn K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsulaia, Vakho [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Byna, Suren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Farrell, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gursoy, Doga [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Daley, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beckner, Vince [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Van Straalen, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tull, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weber, Gunther H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wright, Nicholas J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prabhat, none [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    NVRAM-based Burst Buffers are an important part of the emerging HPC storage landscape. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently installed one of the first Burst Buffer systems as part of its new Cori supercomputer, collaborating with Cray on the development of the DataWarp software. NERSC has a diverse user base comprised of over 6500 users in 700 different projects spanning a wide variety of scientific computing applications. The use-cases of the Burst Buffer at NERSC are therefore also considerable and diverse. We describe here performance measurements and lessons learned from the Burst Buffer Early User Program at NERSC, which selected a number of research projects to gain early access to the Burst Buffer and exercise its capability to enable new scientific advancements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a Burst Buffer has been stressed at scale by diverse, real user workloads and therefore these lessons will be of considerable benefit to shaping the developing use of Burst Buffers at HPC centers.

  20. Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coiner, Josh (Gilliam Soil and Water Conservation District, Condon, OR)

    2004-06-01

    Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

  1. Lean buffering in serial production lines with Bernoulli machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Hu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lean buffering is the smallest buffer capacity necessary to ensure the desired production rate of a manufacturing system. In this paper, analytical methods for selecting lean buffering in serial production lines are developed under the assumption that the machines obey the Bernoulli reliability model. Both closed-form expressions and recursive approaches are investigated. The cases of identical and nonidentical machines are analyzed. Results obtained can be useful for production line designers and production managers to maintain the required production rate with the smallest possible inventories.

  2. Job Shop Scheduling Focusing on Role of Buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Rei; Kusumi, Tetsuya; Yoo, Jae-Kyu; Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    A scheduling problem is formulated in order to consistently manage each manufacturing resource, including machine tools, assembly robots, AGV, storehouses, material shelves, and so on. The manufacturing resources are classified into three types: producer, location, and mover. This paper focuses especially on the role of the buffer, and the differences among these types are analyzed. A unified scheduling formulation is derived from the analytical results based on the resource’s roles. Scheduling procedures based on dispatching rules are also proposed in order to numerically evaluate job shop-type production having finite buffer capacity. The influences of the capacity of bottle-necked production devices and the buffer on productivity are discussed.

  3. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; DeCarlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    1998-05-22

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized from pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  4. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  5. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S. (San Jose, CA); De Carlo, Francesco (Darien, IL); Song, Joshua J. (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  6. On Buffer-Aided Multiple-Access Relay Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Rongkuan; Popovski, Petar; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This letter treats uplink scenario where M user equipments (UEs) send to a base station (BS), possibly via a common relay station (RS) that is equipped with a buffer. This is a multiple-access relay channel aided by a buffer. We devise a protocol in which the transmission mode is selected...... adaptively, using the buffer at the RS in order to maximize the average system throughput. We consider the general case in which the RS and the BS can have limits on the maximal number of transmitters that can be received over the multiple access channel. In each slot, there are three type possible actions...

  7. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  8. Transient response of a thermal buffer: A study for ISABELLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, W. J.

    The design and transient response of a buffer for use during cooldown of ISABELLE is discussed. Introduction of an insensitive thermal mass of the inlet of a sextant ahead of the first semiconducting magnets is considered.

  9. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  11. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  14. Effects of Different Buffers on the Construction of Aptamer Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Quan; Dai, Zhao; Wu, Wenjing; Zhu, Haijia; Ji, Luyu

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the effect of different buffers, PBS and TBE, on the construction of an aptamer sensor (apt sensor) for ATP was investigated. The apt sensor was based on fluorescence energy resonance transfer (FRET), when the energy donor was 5'-carboxyfluorescein (5'-FAM) and the energy receptor was Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), respectively. Both the donor and acceptor were conjugated with complementary and single stranded DNA (ssDNA). The fluorescent changes of the sensors were measured to investigate the influence of different buffers during the whole preparation and detection process. The results indicated that when the AuNPs and ssDNA (Au-DNA1) were conjugated in PBS buffer, the corresponding apt sensors would obtain a better detection ability of ATP than in TBE buffer.

  15. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  16. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  18. Buffers for biomass production in temperate European agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christen, Benjamin; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    Buffer strips on agricultural land have been shown to protect surface water quality by reducing erosion and diffuse pollution. They can also play a key role in nature conservation and flood risk mitigation as well as in the design of bioenergy landscapes resilient to changes in climate, environme......Buffer strips on agricultural land have been shown to protect surface water quality by reducing erosion and diffuse pollution. They can also play a key role in nature conservation and flood risk mitigation as well as in the design of bioenergy landscapes resilient to changes in climate...... or pasture land. Root architecture of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants differs between species and is important for the extent of hydrological changes after establishment. Riparian buffers retain 30-99% of nitrate N and 20-100% of phosphorous from runoff and shallow groundwater. Buffers are also highly...

  19. Analysis of Buffer Arrangements in Low and High Dimensional Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alzeidi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual channels have been introduced to enhance the performance of wormhole-switched networks. They are formed by arranging the buffer space dedicated to a given physical channel into multiple parallel buffers that share the physical bandwidth on a demand driven time-multiplexed manner. The question to be answered is: given a fixed amount of finite buffer what is the optimal way to arrange it into virtual channels. There have been few studies attempting to address this issue, however, these studies have so far resorted to simulation experiments and focused on deterministic routing algorithms. In this paper we use analytical performance models to investigate the optimal arrangement of the available buffer space into multiple virtual channels when adaptive routing is used in wormhole-switched k-ary ncubes.

  20. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Des Moines, IA - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  6. EnviroAtlas - New Haven, CT - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  8. The influence of tooth brushing time over saliva buffering capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Mulyanti; Hetty Anggrawati

    2014-01-01

    Saliva gives a considerable influence against the growth of dental caries as a natural defense against caries. the things very important about saliva are its flow rate and buffering capacity. the decrease in saliva flow rate might cause food retention that furthermore would turn into dental plaques, meanwhile it’s buffering capacity will play a considerable role in maintaining the saliva’s pH and remineralization process of the teeth. One of the mechanisms which are considered to be effective...

  9. irradiation on the optical and electrical properties of buffer solution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pure and aluminum doped (0.001 wt %Al) CdS thin films were deposited on microscope glass slides using buffer solution growth technique based on CdSO4 as the cadmium source, thiourea as the sulphur source, and (NH4)2 SO4 as a buffer. The effects of gamma radiation on the optical and electrical properties of the ...

  10. The buffer/container experiment design and construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, N.A.; Wan, A.W.L.; Roach, P.J

    1998-03-01

    The Buffer/Container Experiment was a full-scale in situ experiment, installed at a depth of 240 m in granitic rock at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The experiment was designed to examine the performance of a compacted sand-bentonite buffer material under the influences of elevated temperature and in situ moisture conditions. Buffer material was compacted in situ into a 5-m-deep, 1.24-m-diameter borehole drilled into the floor of an excavation. A 2.3-m long heater, representative of a nuclear fuel waste container, was placed within the buffer, and instrumentation was installed to monitor changes in buffer moisture conditions, temperature and stress. The experiment was sealed at the top of the borehole and restrained against vertical displacement. Instrumentation in the rock monitored pore pressures, temperatures and rock displacement. The heater was operated at a constant power of 1200 W, which provided a heater skin temperature of approximately 85 degrees C. Experiment construction and installation required two years, followed by two and a half years of heater operation and two years of monitoring the rock conditions during cooling. The construction phase of the experiment included the design, construction and testing of a segmental heater and controller, geological and hydrogeological characterization of the rock, excavation of the experiment room, drilling of the emplacement borehole using high pressure water, mixing and in situ compaction of buffer material, installation of instrumentation in the rock, buffer and on the heater, and the construction of concrete curb and steel vertical restraint system at the top of emplacement borehole. Upon completion of the experiment, decommissioning sampling equipment was designed and constructed and sampling methods were developed which allowed approximately 2000 samples of buffer material to be taken over a 12-day period. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of experiment

  11. Deflating link buffers in a wireless mesh network

    KAUST Repository

    Jamshaid, Kamran

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the problem of buffer sizing for backlogged TCP flows in 802.11-based wireless mesh networks. Our objective is to maintain high network utilization while providing low queueing delays. Unlike wired networks where a single link buffer feeds a bottleneck link, the radio spectral resource in a mesh network is shared among a set of contending mesh routers. We account for this by formulating the buffer size problem as sizing a collective buffer distributed over a set of interfering nodes. In this paper we propose mechanisms for sizing and distributing this collective buffer among the mesh nodes constituting the network bottleneck. Our mechanism factors in the network topology and wireless link rates, improving on pre-set buffer allocations that cannot optimally work across the range of configurations achievable with 802.11 radios. We evaluate our mechanisms using simulations as well as experiments on a testbed. Our results show that we can reduce the RTT of a flow by 6× or more, at the cost of less than 10% drop in end-to-end flow throughput.

  12. Receiver buffer requirement for video streaming over TCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyun; Ammar, Mostafa H.

    2006-01-01

    TCP is one of the most widely used transport protocols for video streaming. However, the rate variability of TCP makes it difficult to provide good video quality. To accommodate the variability, video streaming applications require receiver-side buffering. In current practice, however, there are no systematic guidelines for the provisioning of the receiver buffer, and smooth playout is insured through over-provisioning. In this work, we are interested in memory-constrained applications where it is important to determine the right size of receiver buffer in order to insure a prescribed video quality. To that end, we characterize video streaming over TCP in a systematic and quantitative manner. We first model a video streaming system analytically and derive an expression of receiver buffer requirement based on the model. Our analysis shows that the receiver buffer requirement is determined by the network characteristics and desired video quality. Experimental results validate our model and demonstrate that the receiver buffer requirement achieves desired video quality.

  13. Design, production and initial state of the buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Lennart; Gunnarsson, David; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jonsson, Esther

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the buffer for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the buffer shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the buffer and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. It also describes the production of the buffer, from excavation and delivery of buffer material to installation in the deposition hole. Finally, the initial state of the buffer and its conformity to the reference design and design premises is presented

  14. Diazinon and permethrin mitigation across a grass-wetland buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M T; Kröger, R; Locke, M A; Lizotte, R E; Testa, S; Cooper, C M

    2014-11-01

    Vegetated buffers of different designs are often used as edge-of-field treatment practices to remove pesticides that may be entrained in agricultural runoff. However, buffer system efficacy in pesticide runoff mitigation varies widely due to a multitude of factors including, but not limited to, pesticide chemistry, vegetation composition, and hydrology. Two experimental systems, a control (no vegetation) and a grass-wetland buffer system, were evaluated for their ability to retain diazinon and permethrin associated with a simulated storm runoff. The two systems were equally inefficient at retaining diazinon (mean 9.6 % retention for control and buffer). Grass-wetland buffers retained 83 % and 85 % of cis- and trans-permethrin masses, respectively, while the control only retained 39 % and 44 % of cis- and trans-permethrin masses, respectively. Half-distances (the distance required to decrease pesticide concentration by one-half) for both permethrin isomers were 26 %-30 % shorter in grass buffers (22-23 m) than in the control (32 m). The current study demonstrates treatment efficacy was a function of pesticide properties with the more strongly sorbing permethrin retained to a greater degree. The study also demonstrates challenges in remediating multiple pesticides with a single management practice. By using suites of management practices, especially those employing vegetation, better mitigation of pesticide impacts may be accomplished.

  15. Assessing multiregion avian benefits from strategically targeted agricultural buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kristine O; Burger, L Wes; Riffell, Sam; Smith, Mark D

    2014-08-01

    Mounting evidence of wildlife population gains from targeted conservation practices has prompted the need to develop and evaluate practices that are integrated into production agriculture systems and targeted toward specific habitat objectives. However, effectiveness of targeted conservation actions across broader landscapes is poorly understood. We evaluated multiregion, multispecies avian densities on row-crop fields with native grass field margins (i.e., buffers) as part of the first U.S. agricultural conservation practice designed to support habitat and population recovery objectives of a national wildlife conservation initiative. We coordinated breeding season point transect surveys for 6 grassland bird species on 1151 row-crop fields with and without native grass buffers (9-37 m) in 14 U.S. states (10 ecoregions) from 2006 to 2011. In most regions, breeding season densities of 5 of 6 targeted bird species were greater in the 500-m surrounding survey points centered on fields with native grass buffers than in landscapes without buffers. Relative effect sizes were greatest for Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), Dickcissel (Spiza americana), and Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Eastern Tallgrass Prairie regions. Other species (e.g., Eastern Meadowlark [Sturnella magna], Grasshopper Sparrow [Ammodramus savannarum]) exhibited inconsistent relative effect sizes. Bird densities on fields with and without buffers were greatest in the Central Mixed-grass Prairie region. Our results suggest that strategic use of conservation buffers in regions with the greatest potential for relative density increases in target species will elicit greater range-wide population response than diffuse, uninformed, and broadly distributed implementation of buffers. We recommend integrating multiple conservation practices in broader agricultural landscapes to maximize conservation effectiveness for a larger suite of species. © 2014 Society for

  16. Flow and transport through a damaged buffer - exploration of the impact of a cemented and an eroded buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    The compacted bentonite buffer that surrounds the canister with spent fuel is designed not to allow water to flow through it in any appreciable quantities. Should the buffer be severely damaged water could flow to the canister and bring with it corrosive agent such as sulphide. This could speed up the rate of copper corrosion. Should the canister have a damage or be corroded so that the spent fuel inside the canister comes in contact with the water radionuclides could dissolve in the water and be carried away. Two modes of canister damage and their consequences for solute transport are explored in this report. In one case the buffer can potentially be eroded by the water seeping in the fractures in the surrounding rock and attain a high hydraulic conductivity allowing water to flow through it, at least locally. In another case it is conjectured that the buffer is cemented and becomes brittle. Then a crack could conceivably form in the cemented buffer allowing water to flow through it directly to the canister surface. Both cases are hypothetical although in the erosion case the erosion rate could possibly be quantified. The cases studied are to be seen as exploratory calculations for 'what if' cases. Some worst case assumptions have been used to explore bounding scenarios. Thus for the erosion case it is assumed that the hydraulic conductivity is so high that the buffer exerts negligible resistance to water flow. This implies that all the water that can flow through the fractures intersecting the deposition hole can reach the canister. Similarly for the cemented buffer case it is assumed that the crack in the buffer directly connects the rock fracture to the canister surface. For these circumstances it is found that the flowrate that can enter the deposition hole will be approximately two times as large as the water flow that would pass a projected area equal to that of the deposition hole. Thus if the flux in the rock some distance from the deposition

  17. Measurement of radon concentration in super-Kamiokande's buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Tasaka, S.; Takeuchi, Y.; Wendell, R. A.; Matsubara, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2017-09-01

    To precisely measure radon concentrations in purified air supplied to the Super-Kamiokande detector as a buffer gas, we have developed a highly sensitive radon detector with an intrinsic background as low as 0.33 ± 0.07 mBq /m3 . In this article, we discuss the construction and calibration of this detector as well as results of its application to the measurement and monitoring of the buffer gas layer above Super-Kamiokande. In March 2013, the chilled activated charcoal system used to remove radon in the input buffer gas was upgraded. After this improvement, a dramatic reduction in the radon concentration of the supply gas down to 0.08 ± 0.07 mBq /m3 . Additionally, the Rn concentration of the in-situ buffer gas has been measured 28.8 ± 1.7 mBq /m3 using the new radon detector. Based on these measurements we have determined that the dominant source of Rn in the buffer gas arises from contamination from the Super-Kamiokande tank itself.

  18. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers.

  19. A readout buffer prototype for ATLAS high-level triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, D; Huet, M; Le Dû, P; Mandjavidze, I D; Mur, M

    2001-01-01

    Readout buffers are critical components in the dataflow chain of the ATLAS trigger/data-acquisition system. At up to 75 kHz, after each Level-1 trigger accept signal, these devices receive and store digitized data from groups of front-end electronic channels. Several readout buffers are grouped to form a readout buffer complex that acts as a data server for the high-level trigger selection algorithms and for the final data-collection system. This paper describes a functional prototype of a readout buffer based on a custom-made PCI mezzanine card that is designed to accept input data at up to 160 MB /s, to store up to 8 MB of data, and to distribute data chunks at the desired request rate. We describe the hardware of the card that is based on an Intel 1960 processor and complex programmable logic devices. We present the integration of several of these cards in a readout buffer complex. We measure various performance figures and discuss to which extent these can fulfil ATLAS needs. (5 refs).

  20. [Buffer capacity of aquifer media polluted by landfill leachate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhao, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Ying-Ying

    2009-02-15

    A column filled with fine sand was constructed to investigate pH buffering capacity and redox buffering capacity of aquifer media. Experimental results indicated that calcium carbonate played a significant role in pH buffering; with the aggravating of landfill leachate pollution, the pH buffering capacity of calcium carbonate was increased; it increased from background value, which was 1.62 x pH(-1) mmol/kg, to 41.3 x pH(-1) mmol/kg. With the aggravating of landfill leachate pollution, the oxidation capacity (OXC) of aquifer media was decreased, and the reduction capacity (RDC) was increased. In unpolluted aquifer media, Fe3+ was the main component of OXC, and accounted for about 70.5% of OXC; TOC was the main component of RDC, and accounted for about 98.7% of RDC. Species of the minerals was related to the degree of pollution; large fraction of amorphous Fe3+ and part of crystalline Fe3+ were reduced near the pollution source, and the reduced product was mainly precipitated as FeCO3 and FeS. Deposit of produced Fe2+ led to ion-exchangeable Fe2+ content increased from 0.5% of uncontaminated aquifer media to 3%. Therefore, Fe3+ may act as a very significant redox buffer in aquifer.

  1. Can Parenting Microprotections Buffer Against Adolescents' Experiences of Racial Discrimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Aryn M; James, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    Previous research highlights the importance and pervasiveness of racial discrimination for minority youth in the United States. Adolescents may experience either personal or group race-based discrimination. While past research found both forms of discrimination are harmful to well-being it is unknown whether parental microprotections, which may buffer against the negative effects of discrimination, protect against both forms of discrimination. Informed by ecological frameworks the present study examined whether parent microprotections (parental warmth/acceptance, cultural socialization, preparation for bias) buffered the effects of personal and group discrimination on adolescents' depressive symptoms. Participants were African American early adolescents (N = 129; 58% female) and their parents (90% mothers). Adolescents attended a Midwestern, Title 1, urban, public middle school and completed surveys in their homerooms and parents completed paper-pencil surveys at home, online or surveys via telephone. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to test whether adolescents' personal and group discrimination at school were related to their reports of depressive symptoms and evaluate whether parent microprotections buffered these associations. Results showed that parental microprotections moderated the effects of personal discrimination on depressive symptoms but did not buffer the effects of group discrimination. These results highlight the importance of distinguishing between personal and group discrimination. Further, additional protective factors need to be identified and tested to better understand parental actions that potentially buffer the negative effects of discrimination.

  2. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  3. On the risk of liquefaction of buffer and backfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2000-10-01

    The necessary prerequisites for liquefaction of buffers and backfills in a KBS-3 repository exist but the stress conditions and intended densities practically eliminate the risk of liquefaction for single earthquakes with magnitudes up to M=8 and normal duration. For buffers rich in expandable minerals it would be possible to reduce the density at water saturation to 1,700 - 1,800 kg/m{sup 3} or even less without any significant risk of liquefaction, while the density at saturation of backfills with 10 - 15% expandable clay should not be reduced to less than about 1,900 kg/m{sup 3}. Since the proposed densities of both buffers and backfills will significantly exceed these minimum values it is concluded that there is no risk of liquefaction of the engineered soil barriers in a KBS-3 repository even for very significant earthquakes.

  4. A Modular, Scalable, Extensible, and Transparent Optical Packet Buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Benjamin A.; Shacham, Assaf; Bergman, Keren

    2007-04-01

    We introduce a novel optical packet switching buffer architecture that is composed of multiple building-block modules, allowing for a large degree of scalability. The buffer supports independent and simultaneous read and write processes without packet rejection or misordering and can be considered a fully functional packet buffer. It can easily be programmed to support two prioritization schemes: first-in first-out (FIFO) and last-in first-out (LIFO). Because the system leverages semiconductor optical amplifiers as switching elements, wideband packets can be routed transparently. The operation of the system is discussed with illustrative packet sequences, which are then verified on an actual implementation composed of conventional fiber-optic componentry.

  5. The effect of buffered calcium diffusion on neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Dawson, Silvina; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.

    2002-08-01

    Calcium plays a major role in inter-neuron communication. It has recently been observed that the scaling relationship between extracellular calcium concentration and postsynaptic response is different depending on the channel through which calcium enters the presynaptic neuron. Experiments suggest that the two types of calcium channels probed in this regard are at different mean distances from the neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. In this work we investigate whether the effect of calcium buffers along the path from the channel to the vesicle sensor can be responsible for the differences observed. Our results show that buffers cannot account for this change. This study also allows us to probe the limitations of the rapid buffering approximation in the presence of strong and localized sources.

  6. NORDTEST Project on Moisture Buffer Value of Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2005-01-01

    possibly be used as a passive means of establishing indoor climatic conditions, which are comfortable for human occupancy. But so far there has been a lack of a standardized figure to characterize the moisture buffering ability of materials. It has been the objective of a Nordic project, which is currently...... being completed, to develop a definition, and to declare it in the form of a NORDTEST method. Apart from the definition of the term Moisture Buffer Value, the project also declares a test protocol which expresses how materials should be tested. Finally as a part of the project, some Round Robin Tests...... have been carried out on various typical building materials. The paper gives an account on the definition of the Moisture Buffer Value, it outlines the content of the test protocol, and it gives some examples of results from the Round Robin Tests....

  7. Capacity gains of buffer-aided moving relays

    KAUST Repository

    Zafar, Ammar

    2017-03-14

    This work investigates the gain due to reduction in path loss by deploying buffer-aided moving relaying. In particular, the increase in gain due to moving relays is studied for dual-hop broadcast channels and the bidirectional relay channel. It is shown that the exploited gains in these channels due to buffer-aided relaying can be enhanced by utilizing the fact that a moving relay can communicate with the terminal closest to it and store the data in the buffer and then forward the data to the intended destination when it comes in close proximity with the destination. Numerical results show that for both the considered channels the achievable rates are increased as compared to the case of stationary relays. Numerical results also show that more significant increase in performance is seen when the relay moves to-and-fro between the source and the relay.

  8. Moisture buffer value: A comprehensive analysis of essential parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2006-01-01

    .The dynamic nature of the buffering phenomena makes it difficult to use the standard hygrothermal material properties directly for this purpose. In this paper some experimental results on aerated cellular concrete are used for pointing out the methodological and experimental use of dynamic tests...... for determination of the moisture buffer value of building materials. Special focus is given to the significance of e.g. the equilibrium state, the step size in the RH and whether one is studying absorption or desorption steps. In addition, the paper summarizes shortly the experience until now of studying...... the moisture buffer phenomenon. In the experiments the material samples were exposed to a sudden change in the RH of the ambient air which were either consecutive absorption and desorption steps or periodically varying cyclic steps....

  9. Moisture Buffer Performance of a Fully Furnished Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennberg, Kaisa; Hedegaard, Lone Grønbæk; Rode, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    The moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate the relative humidity of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. Since moisture plays a significant role in the development of many processes that affect the quality...... of the indoor air, such as growth of house dust mites, emissions from materials and mould growth it is anticipated that the moisture buffer effect can help to ensure healthier indoor environments. The building materials as well as furniture and other furnishing materials exposed to the indoor air...... will contribute to the moisture buffer capacity of the room. There is few studies made on the impact of furnishing materials in comparison with traditional building materials this paper will present such a study conducted in a full scale climate test cell. A series of experiments have been carried out...

  10. Buffered 1% Lidocaine With Epinephrine Is as Effective as Non-Buffered 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Mandibular Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Victor T; Fisher, Anson G; Rivera, Eric M; Saha, Pooja T; Turner, Blake; Reside, Glenn; Phillips, Ceib; White, Raymond P

    2017-07-01

    To assess outcomes for pulpal anesthesia and pain on injection for buffered 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (EPI) versus non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI. In a randomized cross-over trial approved by the institutional review board, buffered 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI was compared with non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI. After mandibular nerve block with buffered lidocaine 40 mg or non-buffered lidocaine 80 mg, patients reported responses at the mandibular first molar and canine after cold and electrical pulp testing (EPT). Patients also reported pain on injection with a 10-point Likert-type scale. Teeth were tested before nerve block and at 30-minute intervals until a positive response returned. Two weeks later, patients were tested with the alternate drug combinations. The same outcomes were assessed. Predictor variables were alternate drug formulations. Outcome variables were patients' responses to cold and EPT stimulation of the mandibular first molar and canine and pain on injection. An assessment of treatment difference was performed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Proc NPAR1WAY (SAS 9.3, SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Significance was set at a P value less than .05. Fifty-seven percent of patients were women and 43% were men. Seventy percent were Caucasian, 17% were African American, and 13% had another ethnicity. Median age was 25 years (interquartile range [IQR], 21-26 yr) and median body weight was 140 lbs (IQR, 120-155 lbs). After the cold test and EPT, the time to sensation return for the molar or canine was not statistically different between the 2 drug formulations. Patients reported significantly lower pain scores with the buffered versus non-buffered drug (P lidocaine with EPI can produce similar clinical outcomes for duration of pulpal anesthesia as non-buffered 2% lidocaine with EPI and lower pain on injections, which are a potential benefit to patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and

  11. Eco-buffers: A high density agroforestry design using native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Schroeder

    2012-01-01

    This study showed that Eco-Buffers are characterized by rapid establishment and superior survival when compared to single species buffers. Height of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. var. subintegerrima (Vahl.) Fern.) after eight growing seasons averaged 415 cm when growing in an Eco-Buffer compared to 333cm in the single species buffer. Site capture in the Eco-...

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF QUAZISTEADY MODE OF BEARING AIR BUFFER FILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Today the only way to eliminate contact with the product during the manufacturing process is to provide a support surface under its support surface air buffer layer formed due to the expiration of the working environment through holes perforated gas distribution grids forms. There proposed the method of contactless formation of products consisting of composite materials by the means of air buffer in the article. The results of theoretical and experimental investigations of hydro-gas-dynamic processes occurring when casting of organic- mineral composite material onto the bearing air buffer expressed in the form of mathematical description realizing original hypotheses reflected in the choice of transformation algorithm and limiting conditions are presented. On the base of obtained mathematical model the algorithm of calculation of optimum parameters of transporting systems with discretely powered gas buffer is developed. The method of deduction of a semi-finished product on the gas buffer, which allows to level the pressure field under the bearing surface of the deduction object due to the usage of devices of pseudo fluidized granular material in pneumatic chambers is offered. The application of this method allows to eliminate the possibility of contact between the composite material and the working surface of the equipment and also to reduce the cost of production of pneumatic devices, to improve operational characteristics of this equipment. Submitted depending allowed to develop the methodology and implementation of engineering calculation device for non-contact casting composite materials on air buffer, semi-industrial and industrial variants were created and put into production.

  13. Exposure to buffer solution alters tendon hydration and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Babak N; Meadows, Kyle D; Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M

    2017-08-16

    A buffer solution is often used to maintain tissue hydration during mechanical testing. The most commonly used buffer solution is a physiological concentration of phosphate buffered saline (PBS); however, PBS increases the tissue's water content and decreases its tensile stiffness. In addition, solutes from the buffer can diffuse into the tissue and interact with its structure and mechanics. These bathing solution effects can confound the outcome and interpretation of mechanical tests. Potential bathing solution artifacts, including solute diffusion, and their effect on mechanical properties, are not well understood. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of long-term exposure of rat tail tendon fascicles to several concentrations (0.9-25%) of NaCl, sucrose, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and SPEG (NaCl+PEG) solutions on water content, solute diffusion, and mechanical properties. We found that with an increase in solute concentration the apparent water content decreased for all solution types. Solutes diffused into the tissue for NaCl and sucrose, however, no solute diffusion was observed for PEG or SPEG. The mechanical properties changed for both NaCl solutions, in particular after long-term (8h) incubation the modulus and equilibrium stress decreased compared to short-term (15min) for 25% NaCl, and the cross sectional area increased for 0.9% NaCl. However, the mechanical properties were unchanged for both PEG and SPEG except for minor alterations in stress relaxation parameters. This study shows that NaCl and sucrose buffer solutions are not suitable for long-term mechanical tests. We therefore propose using PEG or SPEG as alternative buffer solutions that after long-term incubation can maintain tissue hydration without solute diffusion and produce a consistent mechanical response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Insufficient buffer capacity in up chamber leads to vertical streaking of two-dimensional electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Ke-hua JIN

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of buffer capacity in up chamber on vertical streaking(VSTK) of two-dimensional electrophoresis.Methods The same buffer volume was kept in up chamber,VSTK was compared by running two SDS gels or single one in 1× Laemmli buffer(buffer),or two ones in 1.5×,2× and 3× buffer in up chamber respectively.Results VSTK appeared severely when two gels were run in 1× buffer,while disappeared when one did.When two gels were run in 1.5×buffer,VSTK only existed in the region o...

  15. Impact of Burst Buffer Architectures on Application Portability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oral, H. Sarp [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Center for Computational Science; Atchley, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Center for Computational Science; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Center for Computational Science

    2016-09-30

    The Oak Ridge and Argonne Leadership Computing Facilities are both receiving new systems under the Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) program. Because they are both part of the INCITE program, applications need to be portable between these two facilities. However, the Summit and Aurora systems will be vastly different architectures, including their I/O subsystems. While both systems will have POSIX-compliant parallel file systems, their Burst Buffer technologies will be different. This difference may pose challenges to application portability between facilities. Application developers need to pay attention to specific burst buffer implementations to maximize code portability.

  16. Sample solublization buffers for two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Walter; Görg, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    Before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), proteins of the sample must be denatured, reduced, disaggregated, and solubilized. Sample solubilization is usually carried out in a buffer containing chaotropes (typically 9.5 M urea, or 5-8 M urea and 2 M thiourea), 2-4% nonionic and/or zwitterionic detergent(s), reducing agent(s), carrier ampholytes and, depending on the type of sample, protease inhibitors. In this chapter, the major constituents of sample solubilization/lysis buffers will be briefly reviewed, some general sample preparation guidelines will be given, and the most common protein solubilization cocktails will be described.

  17. SDRAM-based packet buffer model for high speed switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the how the performance of SDRAM based packet buffering systems for high performance switches can be simulated using OPNET. In order to include the access pattern dependent performance of SDRAM modules in simulations, a custom SDRAM model is implemented in OPNET Modeller...... based on the specifications of a real-life DDR3-SDRAM chip. Based on this model the performance of different schemes for optimizing the performance of such a packet buffer can be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to find efficient schemes for memory mapping of the packet queues and I/O traffic...

  18. Buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Marie; Laitat, Kim; Moulin, Laure; Catarino, Ana I; Grosjean, Philippe; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The increase in atmospheric CO2 due to anthropogenic activity results in an acidification of the surface waters of the oceans. The impact of these chemical changes depends on the considered organisms. In particular, it depends on the ability of the organism to control the pH of its inner fluids. Among echinoderms, this ability seems to differ significantly according to species or taxa. In the present paper, we investigated the buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid in different echinoderm taxa as well as factors modifying this capacity. Euechinoidea (sea urchins except Cidaroidea) present a very high buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid (from 0.8 to 1.8mmolkg(-1) SW above that of seawater), while Cidaroidea (other sea urchins), starfish and holothurians have a significantly lower one (from -0.1 to 0.4mmolkg(-1) SW compared to seawater). We hypothesize that this is linked to the more efficient gas exchange structures present in the three last taxa, whereas Euechinoidea evolved specific buffer systems to compensate lower gas exchange abilities. The constituents of the buffer capacity and the factors influencing it were investigated in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the starfish Asterias rubens. Buffer capacity is primarily due to the bicarbonate buffer system of seawater (representing about 63% for sea urchins and 92% for starfish). It is also partly due to coelomocytes present in the coelomic fluid (around 8% for both) and, in P. lividus only, a compound of an apparent size larger than 3kDa is involved (about 15%). Feeding increased the buffer capacity in P. lividus (to a difference with seawater of about 2.3mmolkg(-1) SW compared to unfed ones who showed a difference of about 0.5mmolkg(-1) SW) but not in A. rubens (difference with seawater of about 0.2 for both conditions). In P. lividus, decreased seawater pH induced an increase of the buffer capacity of individuals maintained at pH7.7 to about twice that of the control individuals and, for those at pH7

  19. Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance of Halobacterium halobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, N; Lorén, J G

    1996-09-01

    Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance were measured in Halobacterium halobium suspensions in the light and in the dark over a wide range of external pH. The values of both variables for this archaeobacterium were significantly higher than those found for eubacteria in other reports. It appears from our results that the special chemical composition of the cell envelope and the movement of ions, mainly protons, may influence the magnitude of the buffering power and the H+ membrane conductance of these cells.

  20. Biomechanical Response and Behavior of Users under Emergency Buffer Crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Miralbes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the biomechanical effects on elevator users and the injuries sustained should an elevator crash happen. The analysis will focus on buffer impact, signaling that the earlier mentioned buffer is usually located at the bottom of the pit. In order to carry out this analysis, a numerical technique based on finite element method will be used, while elevator users will be simulated by means of automotive dummies. Two crash factors will be studied, namely, location of dummy and fall velocity. The analysis criteria will be damages sustained by the dummy, based on biomechanical index such as HIC, CSI, forces, and accelerations.

  1. The Buffer and Backfill Handbook. Part 2: Materials and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Improved technology and prospection yielding more pure and homogeneous raw materials for preparing buffers and backfills will ultimately outdate the clays and ballast materials described in the present part of the Handbook. It describes experimentally investigated materials of potential use in repositories but other, more suitable materials will replace them in the future. The Handbook will hence have to be reviewed regularly, making room for superior materials in future, upgraded Handbook versions. Buffer is the term for dense clay used for embedment of canisters with highly radioactive waste, while backfill is soil used for filling tunnels and shafts in repositories. Examples of soil materials of potential use as buffers and backfills in repositories of KBS-3 type are described in this part of the Handbook. They are: smectitic clay materials intended for preparation of buffers (canister-embedding clay) and used as clay component in artificially prepared tunnel and shaft backfills consisting of mixtures of clay and ballast. Ballast materials intended for backfilling of tunnels and shafts and used as components of artificially prepared backfills. Smectitic natural clay soils intended for use as buffers and backfills. Very fine-grained smectite clay used as grout for sealing rock fractures. In this part of the Handbook for Buffers and Backfills, description of various candidate materials will be made with respect to their mineral composition and physical properties, with respect to the groundwater chemistry that can be expected in a deep repository in Swedish bedrock. Chapter 3 deals with smectitic clay materials intended for embedment of heat-producing canisters with highly radioactive waste. Focus is on the nature of the buffer constituents, i. e. the smectite content, the non-expanding clay minerals colloidal and the accessory non-clay minerals as well as amorphous matter and organic substances. The dominant part of the chapter describes the occurrence and origin

  2. Separated Control and Data Stacks to Mitigate Buffer Overflow Exploits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kugler

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that protection mechanisms like StackGuard, ASLR and NX are widespread, the development on new defense strategies against stack-based buffer overflows has not yet come to an end. In this article, we present a novel compiler-level protection called SCADS: Separated Control and Data Stacks that protects return addresses and saved frame pointers on a separate stack, called the control stack. In common computer programs, a single user mode stack is used to store control information next to data buffers. By separating control information from the data stack, we can protect sensitive pointers of a program’s control flow from being overwritten by buffer overflows. To substantiate the practicability of our approach, we provide SCADS as an open source patch for the LLVM compiler infrastructure. Focusing on Linux and FreeBSD running on the AMD64 architecture, we show compatibility, security and performance results. As we make control flow information simply unreachable for buffer overflows, many exploits are stopped at an early stage of progression with only negligible performance overhead.

  3. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Pritchard, Michael [Auburn University; Wang, Bin [Auburn University; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  4. Resource allocation in a multiple-priority buffered link

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuraniewski, P.W.; Mandjes, M.; Berg, J.L. van den; Malhotra, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider a multiple-priority buffered link, with a focus on resource allocation issues; our study was motivated by such issues in Carrier Ethernet, but the applicability of the results is by no means limited to this technology. In our model, the resource is shared by two priority

  5. A single basis for developmental buffering of Drosophila wing shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper J Breuker

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of developmental buffering processes has been debated extensively, based on both theoretical reasoning and empirical studies. In particular, controversy has focused on the question of whether distinct processes are responsible for canalization, the buffering against environmental or genetic variation, and for developmental stability, the buffering against random variation intrinsic in developmental processes. Here, we address this question for the size and shape of Drosophila melanogaster wings in an experimental design with extensively replicated and fully controlled genotypes. The amounts of variation among individuals and of fluctuating asymmetry differ markedly among genotypes, demonstrating a clear genetic basis for size and shape variability. For wing shape, there is a high correlation between the amounts of variation among individuals and fluctuating asymmetry, which indicates a correspondence between the two types of buffering. Likewise, the multivariate patterns of shape variation among individuals and of fluctuating asymmetry show a close association. For wing size, however, the amounts of individual variation and fluctuating asymmetry are not correlated. There was a significant link between the amounts of variation between wing size and shape, more so for fluctuating asymmetry than for variation among individuals. Overall, these experiments indicate a considerable degree of shared control of individual variation and fluctuating asymmetry, although it appears to differ between traits.

  6. The Effect of Double Buffer Management in Packet Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing the buffer effectively leads to increase in data transmission which in turn paves the way for network efficiency. Even fraction of a second plays vital role in network performance involving read and writes operations. The network traffic analysis could be used for various data and protocol performance including the ...

  7. The function of buffer layer in resistive switching device.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, B.; Prokop, V.; Střižík, L.; Zima, Vítězslav; Kutálek, P.; Vlček, Milan; Wágner, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2017), s. 291-295 ISSN 1584-8663 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : resistive switching * chalcogenide glasses * buffer layer Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.732, year: 2016 http://www.chalcogen.ro/291_ZhangB.pdf

  8. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received little...

  9. Learning the optimal buffer-stock consumption rule of Carroll

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yıldızoğlu, M.; Sénégas, M.A.; Salle, I.; Zumpe, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article questions the rather pessimistic conclusions of Allen and Carroll [Macroeconomic Dynamics 5 (2001), 255-271] about the ability of consumers to learn the optimal buffer-stock-based consumption rule. To this end, we develop an agent-based model in which alternative learning schemes can be

  10. Development of preventative streamside landslide buffers on managed timberlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason S. Woodward; Matthew R. House; David W. Lamphear

    2017-01-01

    Shallow streamside landslides are a principle source of sediment on managed timberlands in northern California. Using an adaptive management process, LiDAR, and a detailed field-based landslide inventory, Green Diamond Resource Company (GDRCo) has redefined the interim preventative landslide tree-retention buffers it applies to steep streamside slopes along...

  11. A Brownian model for multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wanyang

    2002-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the heavy traffic behavior of a type of multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers. The network consists of d single server stations and is populated by K classes of customers. Each station has a finite capacity waiting buffer and operates under first-in first-out (FIFO) service discipline. The network is assumed to have a feedforward routing structure under a blocking scheme. A server stops working when the downstream buffer is full. The focus of this paper is on the Brownian model formulation. More specifically, the approximating Brownian model for the networks is proposed via the method of showing a pseudo-heavy-traffic limit theorem which states that the limit process is a reflecting Brownian motion (RBM) if the properly normalized d-dimensional workload process converges in distribution to a continuous process. Numerical algorithm with finite element method has been designed to effectively compute the solution of the Brownian model (W. Dai, Ph.D. thesis (1996); X. Shen et al. The finite element method for computing the stationary distribution of an SRBM in a hypercube with applications to finite buffer queueing networks, under revision for Queueing Systems).

  12. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  13. Seasonal hydrologic buffer on continents: Patterns, drivers and ecological benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppel, Sylvain; Fan, Ying; Jobbágy, Esteban G.

    2017-04-01

    Continental precipitation returns to the atmosphere and the ocean with a delay that is critical in regulating seasonal water supply to ecosystems and societies. We quantify the magnitude and spatial patterns of this seasonal hydrologic buffer, its climatic and terrain drivers, and its apparent benefits to ecosystems using observed precipitation, climate reanalysis evaporation, GRACE seasonal water storage change, and MODIS vegetation index for a 1°× 1° global grid. We found that (1) seasonal hydrologic buffering is widespread and averages 241 mm.yr-1 on land (a quarter of continental precipitation); it supports evaporation 3-to-9 months of the year over all regions except the per-humid tropics and energy limited high latitudes, (2) the seasonal climatic water imbalance, with surplus in some months and deficit in others, drives hydrologic buffering in lower latitudes, while it is controlled by snow/ice storage in high latitudes, (3) the main terrain effect at our scale of analysis is grid-to-grid water transfer via large rivers providing lateral subsidy to lowland basins, and (4) buffering is manifested in global patterns of plant water use, as shown by high evaporation levels in water deficit conditions, particularly under tropical monsoonal climate. Our results highlight the paramount role of seasonal land water storage and redistribution in supporting ecosystem productivity, and provide a reference to understanding likely impacts of global change on the water cycle and ecosystem dynamics in the future.

  14. Buffered Simulation Games for Büchi Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Hutagalung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulation relations are an important tool in automata theory because they provide efficiently computable approximations to language inclusion. In recent years, extensions of ordinary simulations have been studied, for instance multi-pebble and multi-letter simulations which yield better approximations and are still polynomial-time computable. In this paper we study the limitations of approximating language inclusion in this way: we introduce a natural extension of multi-letter simulations called buffered simulations. They are based on a simulation game in which the two players share a FIFO buffer of unbounded size. We consider two variants of these buffered games called continuous and look-ahead simulation which differ in how elements can be removed from the FIFO buffer. We show that look-ahead simulation, the simpler one, is already PSPACE-hard, i.e. computationally as hard as language inclusion itself. Continuous simulation is even EXPTIME-hard. We also provide matching upper bounds for solving these games with infinite state spaces.

  15. Moisture buffering phenomenon and its impact on building energy consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mingjie; Qin, Menghao; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    buffering on building energy consumption in different climate conditions is assessed by using numerical simulations. The results show that the potential energy saving rate could be up to 25–30% when using proper hygroscopic materials in the test building in temperate climates and semi-arid climates. Finally...

  16. Buffer Capacity Computation for Throughput-Constrained Modal Task Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, stream-processing applications include complex control structures to better adapt to changing conditions in their environment. This adaptivity often results in task execution rates that are dependent on the processed stream. Current approaches to compute buffer capacities that are

  17. Does menstrual cycle effect buffer capacity of stimulated saliva?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Sema; Cağirankaya, Leyla Berna

    2007-09-01

    The present study was performed to analyze buffer capacity (BC) and flow rate of stimulated saliva during menstrual cycle. Two salivary samples were taken from 17 subjects during the menstrual cycle. BC was determined according to electrometric method. Both variables showed no hormone dependency. The results suggest that the salivary protection against acid attacks is constant in healthy nonpregnant women.

  18. Redox buffer capacity of the cell: theoretical and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinovich, Grigory G; Martinovich, Irina V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Sauer, Heinrich

    2010-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in a variety of biological phenomena, such as mutation, carcinogenesis, inflammation, aging, development, and signal transduction. Intracellular generation of ROS might lead to the activation of redox signaling or oxidative stress. Nonetheless, it is difficult to estimate whether ROS-induced intracellular events are beneficial or deleterious to the cell. The quantitative basis of changes in the intracellular redox state of cells is not well-defined, thus leading to the dilemma that redox changes induced by oxidants in distinct cell types cannot be predicted. To overcome this limitation this study undertakes to analyze on a theoretical as well as on an experimental basis the intracellular redox state changes occurring inside cells upon addition of oxidants or reductants. 2,7-Dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H(2)DCF) was used to characterize the redox buffer capacity in erythrocytes. It was shown that the redox buffer capacity of erythrocytes in the relation to peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is 2.1 times lower than the redox buffer capacity of erythrocytes in the relation to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The feasibility of redox buffer capacity assessment as an innovative tool for investigation and description of redox signaling events in cells is discussed.

  19. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  20. Intracuff buffered lidocaine versus saline or air – A comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Injecting buffered lidocaine into the endotracheal tube cuff, produces smooth extubation even in patients with hyperactive airways as the cough receptors in the tracheal mucosa gets blocked by the increased diffusion of uncharged base form of the drug across the hydrophobic polyvinyl chloride wall of the cuff.

  1. Optimizing the HLT Buffer Strategy with Monte Carlo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2266763

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to optimize the strategy of utilizing the disk buffer for the High Level Trigger (HLT) of the LHCb experiment with the help of Monte-Carlo simulations. A method is developed, which simulates the Event Filter Farm (EFF) -- a computing cluster for the High Level Trigger -- as a compound of nodes with different performance properties. In this way, the behavior of the computing farm can be analyzed at a deeper level than before. It is demonstrated that the current operating strategy might be improved when data taking is reaching a mid-year scheduled stop or the year-end technical stop. The processing time of the buffered data can be lowered by distributing the detector data according to the processing power of the nodes instead of the relative disk size as long as the occupancy level of the buffer is low enough. Moreover, this ensures that data taken and stored on the buffer at the same time is processed by different nodes nearly simultaneously, which reduces load on the infrastructure.

  2. Multiple function benefit - cost comparison of conservation buffer placement strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z. Qiu; M.G. Dosskey

    2012-01-01

    Conservation buffers are considered to be effective practices for repairing impaired streams and restoring multiple ecosystem functions in degraded agricultural watersheds. Six different planning strategies for targeting their placement within watersheds were compared in terms of cost-effectiveness for environmental improvement in the 144 km² Neshanic River...

  3. Evaluation of buffering potency of oyster ( Crassostrea gasar ) shells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) shells on acidic borehole water for fish farming. Eighteen (18), 100-litre shaded plastic tanks (3/4- filled, pH 4.0) of three replicates per treatment of 270 g buffer agent were used. There were four trials of six treatments (T) namely control (C) ...

  4. VLSI implementation of a fairness ATM buffer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.V.; Dittmann, Lars; Madsen, Jens Kargaard

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a VLSI implementation of a resource allocation scheme, based on the concept of weighted fair queueing. The design can be used in asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks to ensure fairness and robustness. Weighted fair queueing is a scheduling and buffer management scheme...

  5. Buffer zones for biodiversity of plants and arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Nimgaard, Rasmus Bak

    behov for at finde en mulig optimal buffer-bredde. Dette spørgsmål blev et af de prioriterede i et udbud fra Miljøministeriet, og nærværende projekt blev accepteret og startede i 2008 med belysning af buffer-bredder på 4, 6, 12 og 24 m. Projektet har involveret medarbejdere fra Københavns Universitet...... form af øget forekomst, artsdiversitet og diversitetmålt som indeks-værdi. På markfladen var den diversitetsmæssige hovedgevinst for planter og dyr nået allerede ved 6 m buffer, men der var øget diversitet på til 12 m med tendens til yderligere stigning up til 24 m. Diversiteten af insekter og i nogen...... for biodiversiteten og kan ses som en bredde, der giver en relativ mætning mht. biodiversitet. Dette resultat er så klart at videre diskussion af buffer bredder nok har begrænset betydning.   For landbrugere og politiske beslutningstagere burde 6 m bufferzoner langs hegn til at modvirke de negative biodiversitets...

  6. Assessment of buffer zones in a world heritage site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers

    2005-01-01

    developing historical areas as buffer zones. Finally, I will point to the Principles for the Conservation of Heritage Sites in China, as exceptional carefully composed guidelines. The purpose of the first approach is to establish an assessment of the existing building culture in a given site, while...

  7. Spirituality and optimism as buffer of sense of coherence among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the buffering influence of spirituality and optimism on sense of coherence among imminent retirees in Lagos State, Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive survey utilizing an expost-facto research design. Six hundred and five imminent retirees constituted the participants for the study. Through the use ...

  8. Buffering Implications for the Design Space of Streaming MEMS Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Abelmann, Leon; Preas, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Emerging nanotechnology-based systems encounter new non-functional requirements. This work addresses MEMS storage, an emerging technology that promises ultrahigh density and energy-efficient storage devices. We study the buffering requirement of MEMS storage in streaming applications. We show that

  9. Fragmentation impairs the microclimate buffering effect of tropical forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Ewers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropical forest species are among the most sensitive to changing climatic conditions, and the forest they inhabit helps to buffer their microclimate from the variable climatic conditions outside the forest. However, habitat fragmentation and edge effects exposes vegetation to outside microclimatic conditions, thereby reducing the ability of the forest to buffer climatic variation. In this paper, we ask what proportion of forest in a fragmented ecosystem is impacted by altered microclimate conditions driven by edge effects, and extrapolate these results to the whole Atlantic Forest biome, one of the most disturbed biodiversity hotspots. To address these questions, we collected above and below ground temperature for a full year using temperature sensors placed in forest fragments of different sizes, and at different distances from the forest edge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the Atlantic forests of Brazil, we found that the buffering effect of forests reduced maximum outside temperatures by one third or more at ground level within a forest, with the buffering effect being stronger below-ground than one metre above-ground. The temperature buffering effect of forests was, however, reduced near forest edges with the edge effect extending up to 20 m inside the forest. The heavily fragmented nature of the Brazilian Atlantic forest means that 12% of the remaining biome experiences altered microclimate conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results add further information about the extent of edge effects in the Atlantic Forest, and we suggest that maintaining a low perimeter-to-area ratio may be a judicious method for minimizing the amount of forest area that experiences altered microclimatic conditions in this ecosystem.

  10. Tumor microenvironment: hypoxia and buffer capacity for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenghu; Gao, Shangxian; Qu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lining

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the study of tumor biology and anti-tumor immunotherapy. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor progression still remain obscure. As we know, tumor microenvironment that can directly influence tumor development and prognosis has attracted much attention of large number of immunologists. Accumulated evidence has suggested that tumor microenvironment is in a hypoxic condition, under which immune cells may exhibit distinct functions compared to those under normal oxygen tension. The article we propose here will offer a novel point of view for understanding tumor microenvironment in order to instruct clinical immunotherapy. Just like the pH buffer system in human body, interactions of immune cells in tumor microenvironment may also constitute a buffer system, the balance of which is of great importance during immunotherapy for tumors. However, many protocols for tumor immunotherapy in clinic at present have not taken it into account, so the therapeutic outcome is often disappointing. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Corynebacterium parvum, a well known immune stimulator, on malignant melanoma. Cell ingredients in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and their anti-tumor effect have been altered when dosage of Corynebacterium parvum is changed. So, to obtain better therapeutic purposes, what we should do first is to detect an index to evaluate immune buffer capacity for the patient during tumor immunotherapy, then to choose appropriate drug doses to augment buffer capacity for their immune buffer system. Taken together, the hypothesis proposed here may help understand the pathogenesis of tumor progression and design more effective strategy for clinical immunotherapy for tumors.

  11. [Influences of matter variations on pollution buffer capacity of landfill leachate polluted subsurface environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Rui; Hong, Mei; Zhang, Wei-hong; Zhu, Zhi-guo

    2009-12-01

    Columns filled with fine sand were constructed to investigate influences of subsurface environment and main constituent variations caused by landfill leachate pollution on pH buffer capacity and redox buffer capacity of sediments. Experimental results indicated that the subsurface environment had significant impacts on pH and redox buffer capacity. The pH buffer capacity increased 12.4%, 10.8%, 19.8% and 11.1% in MGZ/SRZ, IRZ, NRZ and ORZ compared with background value, respectively. pH buffer and redox buffer were interaction and inter-promotion, which influenced natural attenuation processes of pollutants in subsurface directly. Content of iron oxides, organic substrate, SOC2(2-) and NH4+ -N in sediments had different impacts on pH buffer and redox buffer capacity, and the overall pollution buffer capacity of system was comprehensive results of constituents.

  12. Do calcium buffers always slow down the propagation of calcium waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Calcium buffers are large proteins that act as binding sites for free cytosolic calcium. Since a large fraction of cytosolic calcium is bound to calcium buffers, calcium waves are widely observed under the condition that free cytosolic calcium is heavily buffered. In addition, all physiological buffered excitable systems contain multiple buffers with different affinities. It is thus important to understand the properties of waves in excitable systems with the inclusion of buffers. There is an ongoing controversy about whether or not the addition of calcium buffers into the system always slows down the propagation of calcium waves. To solve this controversy, we incorporate the buffering effect into the generic excitable system, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, to get the buffered FitzHugh-Nagumo model, and then to study the effect of the added buffer with large diffusivity on traveling waves of such a model in one spatial dimension. We can find a critical dissociation constant (K = K(a)) characterized by system excitability parameter a such that calcium buffers can be classified into two types: weak buffers (K ∈ (K(a), ∞)) and strong buffers (K ∈ (0, K(a))). We analytically show that the addition of weak buffers or strong buffers but with its total concentration b(0)(1) below some critical total concentration b(0,c)(1) into the system can generate a traveling wave of the resulting system which propagates faster than that of the origin system, provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large. Further, the magnitude of the wave speed of traveling waves of the resulting system is proportional to √D1 as D1 --> ∞. In contrast, the addition of strong buffers with the total concentration b(0)(1) > b(0,c)(1) into the system may not be able to support the formation of a biologically acceptable wave provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large.

  13. Perioperative administration of buffered versus non-buffered crystalloid intravenous fluid to improve outcomes following adult surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampoe, Sohail; Odor, Peter M; Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott; Cro, Suzie; Gan, Tong J; Grocott, Michael Pw; James, Michael Fm; Mythen, Michael G; O'Malley, Catherine Mn; Roche, Anthony M; Rowan, Kathy; Burdett, Edward

    2017-09-21

    Perioperative fluid strategies influence clinical outcomes following major surgery. Many intravenous fluid preparations are based on simple solutions, such as normal saline, that feature an electrolyte composition that differs from that of physiological plasma. Buffered fluids have a theoretical advantage of containing a substrate that acts to maintain the body's acid-base status - typically a bicarbonate or a bicarbonate precursor such as maleate, gluconate, lactate, or acetate. Buffered fluids also provide additional electrolytes, including potassium, magnesium, and calcium, more closely matching the electrolyte balance of plasma. The putative benefits of buffered fluids have been compared with those of non-buffered fluids in the context of clinical studies conducted during the perioperative period. This review was published in 2012, and was updated in 2017. To review effects of perioperative intravenous administration of buffered versus non-buffered fluids for plasma volume expansion or maintenance, or both, on clinical outcomes in adults undergoing all types of surgery. We electronically searched the Clinicaltrials.gov major trials registry, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 6) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2016), Embase (1980 to June 2016), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to June 2016). We handsearched conference abstracts and, when possible, contacted leaders in the field. We reran the search in May 2017. We added one potential new study of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting classification' and will incorporate this trial into formal review findings when we prepare the review update. Only randomized controlled trials that compared buffered versus non-buffered intravenous fluids for surgical patients were eligible for inclusion. We excluded other forms of comparison such as crystalloids versus colloids and colloids versus different colloids. Two review

  14. Effects of Buffer Gas Composition on Autoignition of Dimethyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Shi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies are conducted on the thermal, chemical and dilution effects of buffer gas composition on autoignition of dimethyl ether (DME. The buffer gases considered are nitrogen (N2, a mixture of N2 and argon (Ar at a mole ratio of 50%/50% and a mixture of Ar and carbon dioxide (CO2 at a mole ratio of 61.2%/38.8%. Experiments are performed using a rapid compression machine (RCM at compressed pressure of 10 bar, equivalence ratio (φ of 1, and compressed temperature from 670 K to 795 K. The N2 dilution ratio considered ranges from 36.31% to 55.04%. The experimental results show that buffer gas composition has little impact on the first-stage ignition delay. However, significant differences in the total ignition delay as a function of buffer gas composition are observed in the negative temperature coefficient (NTC region. Compared to N2, N2/Ar (50%/50% mixture decreases the total ignition delay by 31%. The chemical effects of buffer gas composition on the first-stage and total ignition delays are negligible. With increasing N2 dilution ratio, the first-stage ignition delay slightly increases, while a significant increase in the total ignition delay is observed. Moreover, the NTC behavior of total ignition delay is noted to become more pronounced at high N2 dilution ratio. The heat release during the first-stage ignition decreases as N2 dilution ratio increases. Results of numerical simulations with the Zhao DME mechanism over a wider range of temperature show good agreement with that of experiments. Further numerical simulations are conducted using pure N2, Ar and CO2 as buffer gases. Results indicate that the thermal effects are the dominant factor in low temperature and NTC regions. The chemical effects become pronounced in the NTC region, and the chemical effect of CO2 exceeds the thermal effect at the compressed temperature higher than 880 K.

  15. Bryophyte responses to microclimatic edge effects across riparian buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Katherine J; Mallik, Azim U

    2006-08-01

    Although riparian buffers are an important aspect of forest management in the boreal forest of Canada, little is known about the habitat conditions within buffers, due in part to complex edge effects in response to both the upland clearcut and the stream. We investigated microclimatic conditions and bryophyte growth and vitality in seven locations between the stream edge and 60 m into the upland undisturbed conifer forests and at the clearcut sites with riparian buffer 30 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that the growth and vitality of a pleurocarpous moss, Hylocomium splendens, and an acrocarpous moss, Polytrichum commune, would be directly related to the microclimatic gradients detected. We further hypothesized that sensitivity of the bryophytes to environmental factors will vary depending on their life form type, i.e., pleurocarpous moss will respond differently than the acrocarpous moss. Both bryophyte species were transplanted in pots and placed at 10-m intervals along 60-m transects perpendicular to the stream across the buffer and undisturbed sites. Bryophyte growth, cover, and vitality, as well as microclimatic parameters and plant cover, were measured over the summer in 2003. The riparian buffers were simultaneously affected by microclimatic gradients extending from both the clearcut edge and the riparian-upland ecotonal edge. Both bryophyte species responded to changes in the microclimatic conditions. However, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was the most important factor influencing the growth of H. splendens, whereas for P. commune growth soil moisture was most important. Our study confirms earlier findings that interior forest bryophytes such as H. splendens can be used as indicators to monitor edge effects and biodiversity recovery following forest harvesting. We demonstrate that growth and vitality of these bryophytes reflect the prevailing near-ground microclimatic conditions at the forest edges. Abundance estimates of such

  16. Assessment and preliminary design of an energy buffer for regenerative braking in electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, R.; Mathur, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Energy buffer systems, capable of storing the vehicle energy during braking and reusing this stored energy during acceleration, were examined. Some of these buffer systems when incorporated in an electric vehicle would result in an improvement in the performance and range under stop and go driving conditions. Buffer systems considered included flywheels, hydropneumatic, pneumatic, spring, and regenerative braking. Buffer ranking and rating criteria were established. Buffer systems were rated based on predicted range improvements, consumer acceptance, driveability, safety, reliability and durability, and initial and life cycle costs. A hydropneumatic buffer system was selected.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of interior moisture buffering by enclosures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Roels, Staf

    2009-01-01

    The significance of interior humidity in attaining sustainable, durable, healthy and comfortable buildings is increasingly recognised. Given their significant interaction, interior humidity appraisals need a qualitative and/or quantitative assessment of interior moisture buffering. While...... the effective moisture penetration depth and effective capacitance models allow quantified assessment, their reliance on the ‘moisture penetration depth’ necessitates comprehensive material properties and hampers their application to multi-dimensional interior objects. On the other hand, while various recently...... suggested protocols for the simple and fast measurement of the moisture buffer potential of interior elements allow qualitative assessment, none of these are currently dependable for a wide range of moisture production regimes. In response to these flaws, this paper introduces the production...

  18. Analysis of Hybrid Buffering and Retransmission in OBS Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, D Veera; Sabrigiriraj, M

    2015-01-01

    Burst contention is a major problem in the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks. Due to inadequate contention resolution techniques, the burst loss is prominent in OBS. In order to resolve contention fiber delay lines, wavelength converters, deflection routing, burst segmentation, and retransmission are used. Each one has its own limitations. In this paper, a new hybrid scheme is proposed which combines buffering and retransmission, which increases the mean number of bursts processed in the system. In this hybrid method, retransmission with controllable arrival and uncontrollable arrival is analyzed. Normally all the bursts reach the first hop and few of them go for second hop to reach destination. After all the bursts reach the destination the server may go for maintenance activity or wait for the arrival of next burst. We model it as a batch arrival single server retrial queue with buffer. Numerical results are analyzed to show the mean number of bursts processed in the system with uncontrollable arrival and controllable arrivals.

  19. Moisture buffering and its consequence in whole building hygrothermal modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Grau, Karl

    2008-01-01

    of building products to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. Of interest therefore is to establish a unit to appraise this quality of building products and to investigate the importance of moisture buffering when it is considered in whole building hygrothermal simulation. This paper will illustrate...... both. A new test method specifies a protocol for determination of what has recently been termed the Moisture Buffer Value (MBV) of building products. The paper presents the definition of MBV and introduces a test protocol which has been proposed for its experimental determination. The MBV is primarily...... possible benefits on energy consumption if humidity-controlled ventilation is employed, as well some benefit on the indoor acceptability with the hygrothermal quality of indoor air. However, both benefits seem to be somewhat limited in the model room used for analysis....

  20. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    We summarize current knowledge about grass buffers for protecting small, isolated wetlands in agricultural contexts, including information relevant to protecting playas from runoff containing sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and other contaminants, and information on how buffers may affect densities and productivity of grassland birds. Land-uses surrounding the approximately 60,000 playas within the Playa Lakes Region (PLR), including intensive agriculture, feedlots, and oil extraction, can contribute to severe degradation of playas. Farming and grazing can lead to significant sedimentation in nearby playas, eliminating their ability to hold water, support the region’s biodiversity, or adequately recharge aquifers. Contaminants further degrade habitats and threaten the water quality of underlying aquifers, including the Ogallala Aquifer.

  1. Effects of water inflow on the buffer - an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaberg, Andreas (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    Water inflow and its effect on the buffer during installation until the backfill is completed is a major concern for the repository concept. In this study, a full-scale model with a reduced height of a deposition hole has been designed. The behaviour, after installation, of the buffer with bentonite rings and pellets at different water inflow rates has been studied. This report describes these tests and the results and conclusions that have emerged. The result shows that piping occurs in all of the tests and that the bentonite pellets has no ability to seal the water pathways as long as there is a continuous inflow of water. The wetting pattern seems predictable at the studied inflow rates. The water flows upwards at 0.01 l/min and downwards at 0.1 l/min. Large heaving of the uppermost ring occurred compared to the lowermost due to the absence of overburden pressure

  2. Electrokinetic determination of the buffer capacity of Andisols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Mario V; Hernández-Luis, Felipe; Benjumea, Dora; Grandoso, Domingo; Lemus, Mercedes; Arbelo, Carmen D

    2007-05-25

    Among methods which involve the flow of electric current, the electro-remediation techniques have shown useful both for the removal of polluting species, and for obtaining a series of parameters in relatively laboratory simple experiments which can be used to characterize soils. This technique was applied in the present study to obtain experimental results with two soils from Tenerife. The capacity of the method as methodology for the measurement of the buffering capacity of these soils during electrokinetic experiments was analyzed. The results obtained on electrokinetic determination of buffer capacity correlated quite well with behaviour observed in the pH curves. The technique was promising for soil description primarily because important information could be obtained in shorter time periods than those required when using routine laboratory methods of soil analysis.

  3. Desire to work as a death anxiety buffer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakobi, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Four studies were conducted to examine the death anxiety buffering function of work as a terror management mechanism, and the possible moderating role of culture. In Study 1, making mortality salient led to higher reports of participants' desire to work. In Study 2, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work after mortality salience reduced the accessibility of death-related thoughts. In Study 3, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work reduced the effects of mortality salience on out-group derogation. In Study 4, priming thoughts about obstacles to the actualization of desire to work led to greater accessibility of death-related thoughts. Although two different cultures with contrasting work values were examined, the results were consistent, indicating that the desire to work serves as a death anxiety buffer mechanism in both cultures.

  4. Use of bicarbonate buffer systems for dissolution characterization of enteric-coated proton pump inhibitor tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroko; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of buffer systems (bicarbonate or phosphate at different concentrations) on the in vitro dissolution profiles of commercially available enteric-coated tablets. In vitro dissolution tests were conducted using an USP apparatus II on 12 enteric-coated omeprazole and rabeprazole tablets, including innovator and generic formulations in phosphate buffers, bicarbonate buffers and a media modified Hanks (mHanks) buffer. Both omeprazole and rabeprazole tablets showed similar dissolution profiles among products in the compendial phosphate buffer system. However, there were large differences between products in dissolution lag time in mHanks buffer and bicarbonate buffers. All formulations showed longer dissolution lag times at lower concentrations of bicarbonate or phosphate buffers. The dissolution rank order of each formulation differed between mHanks buffer and bicarbonate buffers. A rabeprazole formulation coated with a methacrylic acid copolymer showed the shortest lag time in the high concentration bicarbonate buffer, suggesting varied responses depending on the coating layer and buffer components. Use of multiple dissolution media during in vitro testing, including high concentration bicarbonate buffer, would contribute to the efficient design of enteric-coated drug formulations. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

  5. HFB : A FASTBUS multi event double port buffer memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerrito, L.; Lebbolo, H.

    1986-02-01

    The authors describe here the FB double port buffer memory developed at the LPNHE of the University Paris VI. Its purposes are to make available same features useful in the High Energy environment, to reduce, for a given amount of memory, the dead time data collection in a large size (in term of read-out channels) High Energy experiment and to get a buffer of memory as cheap and reliable as possible. The FB protocol, on the crate and cable side, is exploited using the coupler on 4 PAL's developed by G.Fremont and E.Sanchis. The DATA-Space is divided in 4 independent smaller blocks in a way such that a block can be accessed from a port while a different block is accessed from the other port. The two ports are: A, the FB crate port and B, the FB cable port. The buffer works as a rotary FIFO, looping over the 4 blocks of memory, but allowing for any random access. A mechanism is implemented on the board in order to be able to link different modules placed everywhere. If there are m modules, the looping will be around m 4 memory blocks. A multi event function is implemented on the board. HFB is quiped of two NTA for the DATA-Space on the port ''A'', and a flag to choose between them, to allow for a FB spying of DATA during the DAS dead time. HFB is a buffer of memory which can be used at each stage of a DAS: Frontend, Intermediate (MEB) or final, being completely FB standard. The HFB was designed for the LEP data acquisition system.

  6. Pulsed extraction of ionization from helium buffer gas

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, D. J.; Bollen, G.; Facina, M.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-01-01

    The migration of intense ionization created in helium buffer gas under the influence of applied electric fields is considered. First the chemical evolution of the ionization created by fast heavy-ion beams is described. Straight forward estimates of the lifetimes for charge exchange indicate a clear suppression of charge exchange during ion migration in low pressure helium. Then self-consistent calculations of the migration of the ions in the electric field of a gas-filled cell at the Nationa...

  7. Tropical forests are thermally buffered despite intensive selective logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Rebecca A; Hill, Jane K; Benedick, Suzan; Edwards, David P

    2017-10-20

    Tropical rainforests are subject to extensive degradation by commercial selective logging. Despite pervasive changes to forest structure, selectively logged forests represent vital refugia for global biodiversity. The ability of these forests to buffer temperature-sensitive species from climate warming will be an important determinant of their future conservation value, although this topic remains largely unexplored. Thermal buffering potential is broadly determined by: (i) the difference between the "macroclimate" (climate at a local scale, m to ha) and the "microclimate" (climate at a fine-scale, mm to m, that is distinct from the macroclimate); (ii) thermal stability of microclimates (e.g. variation in daily temperatures); and (iii) the availability of microclimates to organisms. We compared these metrics in undisturbed primary forest and intensively logged forest on Borneo, using thermal images to capture cool microclimates on the surface of the forest floor, and information from dataloggers placed inside deadwood, tree holes and leaf litter. Although major differences in forest structure remained 9-12 years after repeated selective logging, we found that logging activity had very little effect on thermal buffering, in terms of macroclimate and microclimate temperatures, and the overall availability of microclimates. For 1°C warming in the macroclimate, temperature inside deadwood, tree holes and leaf litter warmed slightly more in primary forest than in logged forest, but the effect amounted to logged forests are similar to primary forests in their potential for thermal buffering, and subsequent ability to retain temperature-sensitive species under climate change. Selectively logged forests can play a crucial role in the long-term maintenance of global biodiversity. ©2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Are Capital Buffers Countercyclical ? An Evidence From Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romila Qamar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available New risk based capital requirement have pro-cyclical effect and causes negative externalities in the economy. During recession, on one side, quality of loan portfolio deteriorates and probability of default increases resulting into increased level of provisions and write off’s and reduced capital level. This causes an increase in capital requirements which becomes more expensive. Weaker banks fail to access new capital and ultimately reduce the credit supply. On the other side, banks are required to maintain the minimum capital which results into credit supply contraction and hits the bank’s profitability leading to a situation called Credit Crunch. This situation may prolong recession. During the crisis, developing countries are more affected than developed countries and this debate is entirely new in Pakistan. This research empirically investigates the pro-cyclical effect of new capital regulation under Basel II using panel data of 47 Pakistani Banks from 2001-2012. Particularly this paper examines the capital management mechanisms using capital buffers, using Generalized Method of Moments (GMM one step and two step estimation techniques on dynamic panel data model. The results gives evidence that capital buffer are counter-cyclical except in case of specialized banks because of difference in operations. The findings also suggest that adjustment costs, cost of raising capital and bankruptcy costs are major determines of holding capital buffer. Analysis confirms too big to fail hypothesis. Form the results, it is concluded that capital buffer are counter-cyclical, consistent with the hypothesis. The findings suggest the banks to adopt Basel III Accord.

  9. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates social buffering of the stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam S; Wang, Zuoxin

    2014-08-15

    While stressful life events can enhance the risk of mental disorders, positive social interactions can propagate good mental health and normal behavioral routines. Still, the neural systems that promote these benefits are undetermined. Oxytocin is a hormone involved in social behavior and stress; thus, we focus on the impact that social buffering has on the stress response and the governing effects of oxytocin. Female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) were exposed to 1 hour immobilization stress and then recovered alone or with their male partner to characterize the effect of social contact on the behavioral, physiological, and neuroendocrine stress response. In addition, we treated immobilized female voles recovering alone with oxytocin or vehicle and female voles recovering with their male partner with a selective oxytocin receptor antagonist or vehicle. Group sizes varied from 6 to 8 voles (N = 98 total). We found that 1 hour immobilization increased anxiety-like behaviors and circulating levels of corticosterone, a stress hormone, in female prairie voles recovering alone but not the female prairie voles recovering with their male partner. This social buffering by the male partner on biobehavioral responses to stress was accompanied by increased oxytocin release in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Intra-paraventricular nucleus oxytocin injections reduced behavioral and corticosterone responses to immobilization, whereas injections of an oxytocin receptor antagonist blocked the effects of the social buffering. Together, our data demonstrate that paraventricular nucleus oxytocin mediates the social buffering effects on the stress response and thus may be a target for treatment of stress-related disorders. Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry on behalf of Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  10. The buffer value of groundwater when well yield is limited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T.; Brozović, N.; Speir, C.

    2017-04-01

    A large proportion of the total value of groundwater in conjunctive use systems is associated with the ability to smooth out shortfalls in surface water supply during droughts. Previous research has argued that aquifer depletion in these regions will impact farmers negatively by reducing the available stock of groundwater to buffer production in future periods, and also by increasing the costs of groundwater extraction. However, existing studies have not considered how depletion may impact the productivity of groundwater stocks in conjunctive use systems through reductions in well yields. In this work, we develop a hydro-economic modeling framework to quantify the effects of changes in well yields on the buffer value of groundwater, and apply this model to an illustrative case study of tomato production in California's Central Valley. Our findings demonstrate that farmers with low well yields are forced to forgo significant production and profits because instantaneous groundwater supply is insufficient to buffer surface water shortfalls in drought years. Negative economic impacts of low well yields are an increasing function of surface water variability, and are also greatest for farmers operating less efficient irrigation systems. These results indicate that impacts of well yield reductions on the productivity of groundwater are an important economic impact of aquifer depletion, and that failure to consider this feedback may lead to significant errors in estimates of the value of groundwater management in conjunctive use systems.

  11. Does education buffer the impact of disability on psychological distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandemakers, Jornt J; Monden, Christiaan W S

    2010-07-01

    This paper investigates whether education buffers the impact of physical disability on psychological distress. It further investigates what makes education helpful, by examining whether cognitive ability and occupational class can explain the buffering effect of education. Two waves of the 1958 British National Child Development Study are used to test the hypothesis that the onset of a physical disability in early adulthood (age 23 to 33) has a smaller effect on psychological distress among higher educated people. In total 423 respondents (4.6%) experienced the onset of a physical disability between the ages of 23 and 33. We find that a higher educational level cushions the psychology impact of disability. Cognitive ability and occupational class protect against the effect of a disability too. The education buffer arises in part because individuals with a higher level of education have more cognitive abilities, but the better social position of those with higher levels of education appears to be of greater importance. Implications of these findings for the social gradient in health are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Professional commitment: Does it buffer or intensify job demands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether professional commitment can be seen as a moderator in the relationship between job demands and emotional exhaustion among Norwegian nurses. Inspired by the job demands-resources model, this study explores whether having a strong commitment to the nursing profession can be seen as a resource that buffers the effect of job demands on emotional exhaustion or, conversely, intensifies the impact of job demands. A survey that comprised Norwegian nurses who had graduated three years previously (N = 388) was conducted. Multiple regression was performed to test the hypothesis. The results provide support to a buffering effect; thus, individuals with a higher degree of professional commitment conveyed a weaker association between job demands and emotional exhaustion compared with nurses with a lower degree of commitment. Developing a better understanding of the potential buffering effect of professional commitment is of great interest. The present study is the first to utilize professional commitment as a resource within the job demands-resources framework. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Buffer management in wireless full-duplex systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bouacida, Nader

    2015-10-19

    Wireless full-duplex radios can simultaneously transmit and receive using the same frequency. In theory, this can double the throughput. In fact, there is only little work addressing aspects other than throughput gains in full-duplex systems. Over-buffering in today\\'s networks or the so-called “bufferbloat” phenomenon creates excessive end-to-end delays resulting in network performance degradation. Our analysis shows that full-duplex systems may suffer from high latency caused by bloated buffers. In this paper, we address the problem of buffer management in full-duplex networks by using Wireless Queue Management (WQM), which is an active queue management technique for wireless networks. Our solution is based on Relay Full-Duplex MAC (RFD-MAC), an asynchronous media access control protocol designed for relay full-duplexing. We compare the performance of WQM in full-duplex environment to Drop Tail mechanism over various scenarios. Our solution reduces the end-to-end delay by two orders of magnitude while achieving similar throughput in most of the cases.

  14. Electroejaculation and semen buffer evaluation in the microbat Carollia perspicillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, Nicolas Jean; Helfenstein, Fabrice; Buff, Samuel; Richner, Heinz

    2015-03-15

    Scientific interests and conservation needs currently stress the necessity to better understanding bat reproductive biology. In this study, we present the first, safe, inexpensive, and reliable method to obtain sperm from a microbat species (Carollia perspicillata) by electroejaculation. This method revealed to be highly efficient (100% success rate). We obtained ejaculates composed of two characteristically different fractions. We compared three buffers and recommend using an Earle's balanced salt solution as a semen extender. Earle's balanced salt solution provided significant repeatable measure of swimming ability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.74, P < 0.01) and proportion of motile sperms (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.08, P = 0.01) and allowed sperm to maintain optimal swimming capacity over time. None of the buffers could dissolve all the coagulated sperm. Although the trypsin buffer freed a larger fraction of spermatozoa in the ejaculate, it impaired swimming ability without improving motility, viability, and stamina. We thus argue that the sperm population analyzed with Earle's balanced salt solution is a representative of the ejaculate. Finally, we found that the mean sperm velocity of C perspicillata (78.8 μm/s) is lower than that predicted by regressing sperm velocity on relative testes mass, a proxy of sperm competition. The question as to whether C perspicillata is an outsider for sperm velocity, or whether bats evolved yet another unique mechanism to cope with sperm competition deserves more investigations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Methyl Bromide Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation: Treatment Longer than 8 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains buffer zone tables required by certain methyl bromide commodity fumigant product labels that refer to Buffer Zone Lookup Tables located at epa.gov/pesticide-registration/mbcommoditybuffer on the label.

  16. Methyl Bromide Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation: Treatment 8 Hours or Less

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains buffer zone tables required by certain methyl bromide commodity fumigant product labels that refer to Buffer Zone Lookup Tables located at epa.gov/pesticide-registration/mbcommoditybuffer on the label.

  17. The influence of tooth brushing time over saliva buffering capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyanti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Saliva gives a considerable influence against the growth of dental caries as a natural defense against caries. the things very important about saliva are its flow rate and buffering capacity. the decrease in saliva flow rate might cause food retention that furthermore would turn into dental plaques, meanwhile it’s buffering capacity will play a considerable role in maintaining the saliva’s pH and remineralization process of the teeth. One of the mechanisms which are considered to be effective in preventing dental caries is teeth brushing which could change the pH of 5,6 to a normal level. And the right time of teeth brushing will provide an optimal result.The study aims to reveal the influence of teeth brushing time against saliva buffering capacity. The study is an analytic study using a quasi-experimental design. The samples of the study are 20 (twenty students of dentistry in Health Ministry of Bandung which was purposively selected the sample is divided into 3 groups. The first group is treated by brushing their teeth right after eating bread, the second and third group is treated 15 and 30 minutes after eating bread. The hypothesis uses Kruskal Wallis hypothesis continued by Mann Whitney test, strikethrough. The study reveals that the group brushed their teeth right after eating bread shows low category of saliva buffering is that 55% meanwhile those who brushed their teeth 15 and 30 minutes after eating bread exhibits the result as much as 65% and 25 % Thus the last group is included to those who have a medium risk of suffering from dental carries. The statistics of Kruskal Wallis test within the confidence level of 95% shows that there is an influence of teeth brushing time over the saliva buffering capacity with p<0,001. Mann Whitney test shows that the time of teeth brushing within 15 minutes after eating is better than the group who brush their teeth 30 minutes after eating.

  18. Automatic buffer capacity model building for advanced interpretation of titration curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Steene, M; Van Vooren, L; Ottoy, J P; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2002-02-15

    An automatic buffer capacity model building algorithm was developed. The objective of this algorithm is to characterize multiple buffer systems from experimental titration curves. Starting from a simple mathematical model that incorporates the available prior knowledge on the buffer system, the model is sequentially extended by incorporating additional monoprotic buffer equations. To select the most appropriate model from the resulting set of automatically built models, a model structure selection technique was constructed from existing methods.

  19. Potential adoption of agroforestry riparian buffers based on landowner and streamside characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.E. Trozzo; J.F. Munsell; J.L. Chamberlain; W.M. Aust

    2014-01-01

    Riparian forest buffers provide numerous environmental benefits, yet obstacles to landowner adoption are many. One barrier is the perception that riparian forest buffers are used for conservation at the expense of production. We present a study that focused on why landowners are more or less inclined to adopt native fruit and nut tree agroforestry riparian buffers that...

  20. Watershed scale impacts of buffers and upland conservation practices on agrochemical delivery to streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.G. Franti; D.E. Eisenhauer; M.C. McCullough; L.M. Stahr; Mike G. Dosskey; D.D. Snow; R.F. Spalding; A.L. Boldt

    2004-01-01

    Conservation buffers are designed to reduce sediment and agrichemical runoff to surface water. Much is known about plot and field scale effectiveness of buffers; but little is known about their - watershed scale impact. Our objective was to estimate the watershed scale impact of grass buffers by comparing sediment and agrichemical losses from two adjacent 141 - 165...

  1. Applying critical chain buffer management theory in location-based management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büchmann-Slorup, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    or unconsciously, given a certain time buffer with which to cope with unpredicted events, and that these buffers become a large part of the project lead time. However, CCT suggests that these buffers entail inherent waste within schedules and fail to protect both critical activities and projects. CCT assumes...

  2. Classification of Orthophotos to Identify Vegetative Buffer Strips to Update Existing Land Use Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetative buffer strips (VBS) including grass buffer, forested buffer (FBS), among others, are important best management practices implemented in agricultural areas to control the movement of potential agricultural contaminants into water bodies. The importance of VBS has led the Natural Resource C...

  3. Flood risk reduction and flow buffering as ecosystem services - Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordwijk, Van Meine; Tanika, Lisa; Lusiana, Betha

    2017-01-01

    Watersheds buffer the temporal pattern of river flow relative to the temporal pattern of rainfall. This "ecosystem service" is inherent to geology and climate, but buffering also responds to human use and misuse of the landscape. Buffering can be part of management feedback loops if salient,

  4. Efficient Computation of Buffer Capacities for Cyclo-Static Dataflow Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Bekooij, Marco J.G.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    A key step in the design of cyclo-static real-time systems is the determination of buffer capacities. In our multi-processor system, we apply back-pressure, which means that tasks wait for space in output buffers. Consequently buffer capacities affect the throughput. This requires the derivation of

  5. Photodynamic optical sensor for buffer capacity and pH based on hydrogel-incorporated spiropyran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, G; Pawlak, M; Bakker, E; Klimant, I

    2015-03-11

    We introduce here a dynamic optode for buffer capacity sensing based on photochromic spiropyran (Sp). It represents the first reversible optical sensor for buffer capacity. Sensing was possible using a non-equilibrium readout mode, a novelty for photoswitchable optical ion sensors. In addition to the buffer capacity, the final point of each measurement sequence provides the pH of the solution.

  6. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pKa of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. There is no capacity limited buffer in the Murdock (1962) free recall data

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Theories of short term memory often include a limited capacity “buffer”. Such a buffer contains items which do not decay at all but are overwritten by new data. I show that one of the experiments that fueled the buffer concept, the free recall experiments by Murdock (J Exp Psychol 64(5):482–488, 1962), does not contain such a buffer.

  8. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Buffer sizing to reduce interference and increase throughput of real-time stream processing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtin, Philip Sebastian; Geuns, S.J.; Hausmans, J.P.H.M.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Existing temporal analysis and buffer sizing techniques for real-time stream processing applications ignore that FIFO buffers bound interference between tasks on the same processor. By considering this effect it can be shown that a reduction of buffer capacities can result in a higher throughput.

  10. Efficient Computation of Buffer Capacities for Cyclo-Static Dataflow Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2006-01-01

    A key step in the design of cyclo-static real-time systems is the determination of buffer capacities. In our multi-processor system, we apply back-pressure, which means that tasks wait for space in output buffers. Consequently buffer capacities affect the throughput. This requires the derivation of

  11. Buffer selection for HP treatment of biomaterials and its consequences for enzyme inactivation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Matser, A.M.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biochemical systems are best studied under buffered conditions and it is, therefore, necessary to have good knowledge on the pressure-induced changes in buffer pH. For experiments conducted at a set temperature, it is possible to use a relatively stable pressure buffer. However, when experiments

  12. Dynamic model and performance analysis of landing buffer for bionic locust mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The landing buffer is an important problem in the research on bionic locust jumping robots, and the different modes of landing and buffering can affect the dynamic performance of the buffering process significantly. Based on an experimental observation, the different modes of landing and buffering are determined, which include the different numbers of landing legs and different motion modes of legs in the buffering process. Then a bionic locust mechanism is established, and the springs are used to replace the leg muscles to achieve a buffering effect. To reveal the dynamic performance in the buffering process of the bionic locust mechanism, a dynamic model is established with different modes of landing and buffering. In particular, to analyze the buffering process conveniently, an equivalent vibration dynamic model of the bionic locust mechanism is proposed. Given the support forces of the ground to the leg links, which can be obtained from the dynamic model, the spring forces of the legs and the impact resistance of each leg are the important parameters affecting buffering performance, and evaluation principles for buffering performance are proposed according to the aforementioned parameters. Based on the dynamic model and these evaluation principles, the buffering performances are analyzed and compared in different modes of landing and buffering on a horizontal plane and an inclined plane. The results show that the mechanism with the ends of the legs sliding can obtain a better dynamic performance. This study offers primary theories for buffering dynamics and an evaluation of landing buffer performance, and it establishes a theoretical basis for studies and engineering applications.

  13. Costs of Producing Biomass from Riparian Buffer Strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhollow, A.

    2000-09-01

    Nutrient runoff from poultry litter applied to agricultural fields in the Delmarva Peninsula contributes to high nutrient loadings in Chesapeake Bay. One potential means of ameliorating this problem is the use of riparian buffer strips. Riparian buffer strips intercept overland flows of water, sediments, nutrients, and pollutants; and ground water flows of nutrients and pollutants. Costs are estimated for three biomass systems grown on buffer strips: willow planted at a density of 15,300 trees/ha (6200 trees/acre); poplar planted at a density of 1345 trees/ha (545 trees/acre); and switchgrass. These costs are estimated for five different scenarios: (1) total economic costs, where everything is costed [cash costs, noncash costs (e.g., depreciation), land rent, labor]; (2) costs with Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) payments (which pays 50% of establishment costs and an annual land rent); (3) costs with enhanced CRP payments (which pays 95% of establishment costs and an annual payment of approximately 170% of land rent for trees and 150% of land rent for grasses); (4) costs when buffer strips are required, but harvest of biomass is not required [costs borne by biomass are for yield enhancing activities (e.g., fertilization), harvest, and transport]; and (5) costs when buffer strips are required. and harvest of biomass is required to remove nutrients (costs borne by biomass are for yield enhancing activities and transport). CRP regulations would have to change to allow harvest. Delivered costs of willow, poplar, and switchgrass [including transportation costs of $0.38/GJ ($0.40/million Btu) for switchgrass and $0.57/GJ ($0.60/million Btu) for willow and poplar] at 11.2 dry Mg/ha-year (5 dry tons/acre-year) for the five cost scenarios listed above are [$/GJ ($million BIN)]: (1) 3.30-5.45 (3.45-5.75); (2) 2.30-3.80 (2.45-4.00); (3) 1.70-2.45 (1.80-2.60); (4) l-85-3.80 (1.95-4.05); and (5) 0.80-1.50 (0.85-1.60). At yields of 15.7 to 17.9 GJ/ha-year (7 to 8 dry tons

  14. THE SYSTEMIC RISK BUFFER – A CHALLENGING INSTRUMENT FOR ASSESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BADEA IRINA - RALUCA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of the global financial crisis have changed the orientation of the regulators from the micro towards the macroeconomic level, which encompasses the financial system as a whole, with its components as individual financial institutions. Needless to say that there is an inherent risk to which every participant to the market is exposed, the systemic risk. Therefore, this paper aims at presenting systemic risk in a clear manner, paying attention to and highlighting several approaches regarding systemic risk in literature and practice. Moreover, the mechanism of systemic risk transmission points out the channels through which systemic risk spreads and affects the real economy. There is also presented a new component of the macroprudential regulation, i.e. the systemic risk buffer (SRB, which is an important instrument to fight against systemic risk along with the other buffers stipulated in the Basel III standards. Hence, the subject dealt in this paper represents a realistic outlook upon the situation of the financial system at the moment, in its struggle to forecast a potential systemic threat and the instruments needed to counteract it in order to diminish its negative effects. In the last part of the paper there is presented evidence from a few countries that started to implement the SRB and G-SII or O-SII buffers or are phased for implementation to the extent of 2019. Tracking the vulnerabilities of the system as a whole, of each of its components and the tranmission channels of systemic risk should be the first step to make before taking any measures against a monetary or financial phenomenon.

  15. Solace in solidarity: Disability friendship networks buffer well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Arielle M; Molton, Ivan R; Smith, Amanda E; Jensen, Mark P; Cohen, Geoffrey L

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether having friends who share one's disability experiences is associated with higher well-being, and whether these friendships buffer well-being from disability-related stressors. Research Method/Design: In 2 cross-sectional studies, adults with long-term physical disabilities identified close friends who shared their diagnosis. We assessed well-being as a function of the number of friends that participants identified in each group. Study 1 included 71 adults with legal blindness living in the United States, while Study 2 included 1,453 adults in the United States with either muscular dystrophy (MD), multiple sclerosis (MS), post-polio syndrome (PPS), or spinal cord injury (SCI). In Study 1, having more friends sharing a blindness diagnosis was associated with higher life satisfaction, even controlling for the number of friends who were not blind. In Study 2, Participants with more friends sharing their diagnosis reported higher quality of life and satisfaction with social role participation. Participants with more friends sharing their diagnosis also showed and attenuated associations between the severity of their functional impairment and their quality of life and social role satisfaction, suggesting that their friendships buffered the impact of their functional impairment on well-being. Participants reporting more friends with any physical disability showed similar benefits. Friends with disabilities can offer uniquely important informational and emotional support resources that buffer the impact of a functional impairment on well-being. Psychosocial interventions should help people with long-term disabilities build their peer support networks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. All MOD buffer/YBCO approach to coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parans Paranthaman, M. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 4500 South, Room S-244, MS-6100, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States)]. E-mail: paranthamanm@ornl.gov; Sathyamurthy, S. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 4500 South, Room S-244, MS-6100, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Heatherly, L. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States); Martin, P.M. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States); Goyal, A. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States); Kodenkandath, T. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA 01581 (United States); Li, X. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA 01581 (United States); Thieme, C.L.H. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA 01581 (United States); Rupich, M.W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA 01581 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    RABiTS based metal-organic deposition (MOD) buffer/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) approach has been considered as one of the potential, low-cost approaches to fabricate high performance second generation coated conductors. The most commonly used RABiTS architectures consisting of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-W (5 at.%) substrate with a seed layer of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a barrier layer of YSZ, and a CeO{sub 2} cap. In this three layer architecture, all the buffers are deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques. Using these PVD deposited templates, 0.8-{mu}m thick MOD-YBCO films with an I {sub c} (critical current) of 250 A/cm have been achieved routinely in short lengths. We have developed a low-cost, non-vacuum, MOD process to grow epitaxial buffer layers on textured Ni-5W substrates. The main challenge in this effort is to match the performance of MOD templates to that of PVD templates. We have recently shown that the properties of MOD-La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZO) layers can be improved by inserting a thin Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} seed layer. Using MOD-CeO{sub 2} cap layers, we have demonstrated the growth of high performance MOD-YBCO films with an I {sub c} of 200 A/cm-width on MOD-La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni-5W substrates. This approach could potentially decrease the overall cost of the coated conductor fabrication.

  17. All MOD Buffer/YBCO Approach to Coated Conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Heatherly Jr, Lee [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Kodenkandath, Thomas [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Li, Xiaoping [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Thieme, C. L. H. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA

    2006-01-01

    RABiTS based metal-organic deposition (MOD) buffer/YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) approach has been considered as one of the potential, low-cost approaches to fabricate high performance second generation coated conductors. The most commonly used RABiTS architectures consisting of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-W (5 at.%) substrate with a seed layer of Y2O3, a barrier layer of YSZ, and a CeO2 cap. In this three layer architecture, all the buffers are deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques. Using these PVD deposited templates, 0.8-{mu}m thick MOD-YBCO films with an Ic (critical current) of 250 A/cm have been achieved routinely in short lengths. We have developed a low-cost, non-vacuum, MOD process to grow epitaxial buffer layers on textured Ni-5W substrates. The main challenge in this effort is to match the performance of MOD templates to that of PVD templates. We have recently shown that the properties of MOD-La2Zr2O7 (LZO) layers can be improved by inserting a thin Y2O3 seed layer. Using MOD-CeO2 cap layers, we have demonstrated the growth of high performance MOD-YBCO films with an Ic of 200 A/cm-width on MOD-La2Zr2O7/Y2O3/Ni-5W substrates. This approach could potentially decrease the overall cost of the coated conductor fabrication.

  18. Fluorescence properties of doxorubicin in PBS buffer and PVA films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunil; Chandra, Anjali; Kaur, Amanjot; Sabnis, Nirupama; Lacko, Andras; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2017-05-01

    We studied steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of an anticancer drug Doxorubicin in a saline buffer and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) film. Absorption of Doxorubicin, located at blue-green spectral region, allows a convenient excitation with visible light emitting diodes or laser diodes. Emission of Doxorubicin with maximum near 600nm can be easily detected with photomultipliers and CCD cameras. Both, absorption and fluorescence spectra in polymeric matrix show more pronounced vibronic structures than in solution. Also, the steady-state anisotropy in the polymer film is significantly higher than in the saline solution. In PVA film the fluorescence anisotropy is about 0.30 whereas in the saline buffer only 0.07. Quantum efficiencies of Doxorubicin were compared to a known standard Rhodamine 101 which has fluorescence emission in a similar spectral region. The quantum yield of Doxorubicin in PVA film is more than 10% and about twice higher than in the saline solution. Similarly, the lifetime of doxorubicin in PVA film is about 2ns whereas in the saline solution only about 1ns. The fluorescence anisotropy decays show that Doxorubicin molecules are freely rotating in the saline buffer with a correlation time of about 290ps, and are almost completely immobilized in the PVA film. The spectroscopic investigations presented in this manuscript are important, as they provide answers to changes in molecular properties of Doxorubicin depending changes in the local environment, which is useful when synthesizing nanoparticles for Doxorubicin entrapment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in hybrid poplar buffers, herbaceous buffers and natural woodlots in the riparian zone on agricultural land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Julien; Truax, Benoit; Gagnon, Daniel; Lambert, France

    2015-05-01

    In many temperate agricultural areas, riparian forests have been converted to cultivated land, and only narrow strips of herbaceous vegetation now buffer many farm streams. The afforestation of these riparian zones has the potential to increase carbon (C) storage in agricultural landscapes by creating a new biomass sink for atmospheric CO2. Occurring at the same time, the storage of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in plant biomass, is an important water quality function that may greatly vary with types of riparian vegetation. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare C, N and P storage in aboveground, belowground and detrital biomass for three types of riparian vegetation cover (9-year-old hybrid poplar buffers, herbaceous buffers and natural woodlots) across four agricultural sites and (2) to determine potential vegetation cover effects on soil nutrient supply rate in the riparian zone. Site level comparisons suggest that 9-year-old poplar buffers have stored 9-31 times more biomass C, 4-10 times more biomass N, and 3-7 times more biomass P than adjacent non managed herbaceous buffers, with the largest differences observed on the more fertile sites. The conversion of these herbaceous buffers to poplar buffers could respectively increase C, N and P storage in biomass by 3.2-11.9 t/ha/yr, 32-124 kg/ha/yr and 3.2-15.6 kg/ha/yr, over 9 years. Soil NO3 and P supply rates during the summer were respectively 57% and 66% lower in poplar buffers than in adjacent herbaceous buffers, potentially reflecting differences in nutrient storage and cycling between the two buffer types. Biomass C ranged 49-160 t/ha in woodlots, 33-110 t/ha in poplar buffers and 3-4 t/ha in herbaceous buffers. Similar biomass C stocks were found in the most productive poplar buffer and three of the four woodlots studied. Given their large and varied biomass C stocks, conservation of older riparian woodlots is equally important for C balance management in farmland. In addition, the

  20. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Jesse H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Surendranath, Yogesh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Alivisatos, Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  1. Buffer-Aided Relaying with Adaptive Link Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatanov, Nikola; Schober, Robert; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple network consisting of a source, a half-duplex decode-and-forward relay, and a destination. We propose a new relaying protocol employing adaptive link selection, i.e., in any given time slot, based on the channel state information of the source-relay and the relay......-constrained and delay-unconstrained transmission. For the delay-unconstrained case, we characterize the optimal link selection policy, derive the corresponding throughput, and develop an optimal power allocation scheme. For the delay-constrained case, we propose to starve the buffer of the relay by choosing...

  2. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  3. Leakage effects in n-GaAs MESFET with n-GaAs buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. C.; Bahrami, M.

    1983-01-01

    Whereas improvement of the interface between the active layer and the buffer layer has been demonstrated, the leakage effects can be important if the buffer layer resistivity is not sufficiently high and/or the buffer layer thickness is not sufficiently small. It was found that two buffer leakage currents exist from the channel under the gate to the source and from drain to the channel in addition to the buffer leakage resistance between drain and source. It is shown that for a 1 micron gate-length n-GaAs MESFET, if the buffer layer resistivity is 12 OHM-CM and the buffer layer thickness h is 2 microns, the performance of the device degrades drastically. It is suggested that h should be below 2 microns.

  4. Heuristics for the Buffer Allocation Problem with Collision Probability Using Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eishi Chiba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard manufacturing system for Flat Panel Displays (FPDs consists of a number of pieces of equipment in series. Each piece of equipment usually has a number of buffers to prevent collision between glass substrates. However, in reality, very few of these buffers seem to be used. This means that redundant buffers exist. In order to reduce cost and space necessary for manufacturing, the number of buffers should be minimized with consideration of possible collisions. In this paper, we focus on an in-line system in which each piece of equipment can have any number of buffers. In this in-line system, we present a computer simulation method for the computation of the probability of a collision occurring. Based on this method, we try to find a buffer allocation that achieves the smallest total number of buffers under an arbitrarily specified collision probability. We also implement our proposed method and present some computational results.

  5. Automatic buffer capacity model building for the purpose of water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vooren, L; Van de Steene, M; Ottoy, J P; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, buffer capacity profiles are used in the framework of automatic monitoring of water quality. The aim of the proposed methodology is to automatically and stepwise build buffer capacity models for each particular titrated sample, and to quantify the individual buffer systems that constitute the total buffer capacity. An automatic and robust model building algorithm has been developed and applied to many titration curves of effluent and river water samples. It is illustrated that the application of automatically built buffer capacity models mostly results in similar or better estimations of ammonium and ortho-phosphate in the samples compared to a priori fixed buffer capacity models. The automatic modelling approach is also advantageous for alarm generating purposes on e.g. river waters, because unexpected buffers are easily detected.

  6. Acid-base buffering in organ preservation solutions as a function of temperature: new parameters for comparing buffer capacity and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baicu, Simona C; Taylor, Michael J

    2002-08-01

    Control of acidity and preventing intracellular acidosis are recognized as critical properties of an effective organ preservation solution. Buffer capacity and efficiency are therefore important for comparing the relative merits of preservation fluids for optimum hypothermic storage, but these parameters are not available for the variety of organ preservation solutions of interest in transplantation today. Moreover, buffer capacity is dependent upon both concentration and pH such that buffer capacity is not easily predicted for a complex solution containing multiple buffer species. Using standard electrometric methods to measure acid dissociation constants, this study was undertaken to determine the maximum and relative buffer capacities of a variety of new and commonly used hypothermic preservation solutions as a function of temperature. The reference data provided by these measurements show that comparative buffer capacity and efficiency vary widely between the commonly used solutions. Moreover, the fluids containing zwitterionic sulfonic acid buffers such as Hepes possess superior buffering for alpha-stat pH regulation in the region of physiological importance.

  7. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, C.E. Reece, R.A. Rimmer,L. Lin, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  9. Determination of Buffer-Zones using Agricultural Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Eren Atay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of agricultural yield is a challenging and essential task for every farmer. In most countries worldwide, above 70% of the population practice and depend upon agriculture for their lives and livehoods. In attempts to increase agricultural productivity, farmers often apply pesticides excessively. This practice has led to problems with spray drift, along with many others, a process by which liquid sprays are transported and cause harm to adjacent crops and other non-target areas. Although investigation has also been directed toward pesticide drift caused by agents such as wind, boom height, and driving speed, this effort has thus been insufficient. Therefore, our research focuses on modelling to account for these factors to create buffer zones around crops to spray drift during pesticide application. We employed a GIS model to capture spray area points. Spray drift distances calculated with values representing the aforementioned agents are appended to these geographic points of the farm to establish a buffer zone area.

  10. Analysis of Hybrid Buffering and Retransmission in OBS Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Veera Vanitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst contention is a major problem in the Optical Burst Switching (OBS networks. Due to inadequate contention resolution techniques, the burst loss is prominent in OBS. In order to resolve contention fiber delay lines, wavelength converters, deflection routing, burst segmentation, and retransmission are used. Each one has its own limitations. In this paper, a new hybrid scheme is proposed which combines buffering and retransmission, which increases the mean number of bursts processed in the system. In this hybrid method, retransmission with controllable arrival and uncontrollable arrival is analyzed. Normally all the bursts reach the first hop and few of them go for second hop to reach destination. After all the bursts reach the destination the server may go for maintenance activity or wait for the arrival of next burst. We model it as a batch arrival single server retrial queue with buffer. Numerical results are analyzed to show the mean number of bursts processed in the system with uncontrollable arrival and controllable arrivals.

  11. [Antigen retrieval by microwave oven with buffer of citric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, E M; Sundblad, A

    1994-01-01

    Microwave oven (mwo) is used to stimulate tissue fixation and to retrieve antigens damaged by fixation. Heavy metal salt solutions, water, and citric acid buffer (cab) have been suggested for this purpose. A serie of tumors treated with cab and phosphate-buffered saline (pbs) with mwo were studied immunohistochemically with 24 antibodies. Controls were treated in the same way, except for microwaving. The antibodies were directed against antigens of the following tumors: breast and prostate carcinoma, carcinoid, lymphoma and melanoma. The results showed that cab enhanced the immunoreactivity of the following antigens: estrogen receptors (AMAC), progesterone receptors (Novocastra), HMB45, vimentin, leukocyte common antigen, PCNA, p53, MIB-1 (Ki-67) and prostatic specific antigen. The antigens that did not improve their immunoreactivity, when compared with the control series were: factor VIII, keratin, Leu 22, L26, neuron-specific enolase, CEA, chromogranin, HBME-1, smooth muscle actin and EMA. Microwaving equally improved protein S100 and desmin either with cab or pbs. The only antigen that improved with pbs was actin. The results with B72.3 and NKI/C3 were poor and not reliable. In conclusion microwaving with cab enhances the immunoreactivity of the antibodies mentioned above leading to an increase in sensibility without loosing specificity.

  12. Synthetic tunable amplifying buffer circuit in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilgiriwala, Kayzad Soli; Jiménez, José; Rivera, Phillip Michael; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2015-05-15

    While predictable design of a genetic circuit's output is a major goal of synthetic biology, it remains a significant challenge because DNA binding sites in the cell affect the concentration of available transcription factors (TF). To mitigate this problem, we propose to use a TF that results from the (reversible) phosphorylation of protein substrate as a circuit's output. We demonstrate that by comparatively increasing the amounts of substrate and phosphatase, the TF concentration becomes robust to the presence of DNA binding sites and can be kept at a desired value. The circuit's input/output gain can, in turn, be tuned by changing the relative amounts of the substrate and phosphatase, realizing an amplifying buffer circuit with tunable gain. In our experiments in E. coli, we employ phospho-NRI as the output TF, phosphorylated by the NRII kinase, and dephosphorylated by the NRII phosphatase. Amplifying buffer circuits such as ours could be used to insulate a circuit's output from the context, bringing synthetic biology one step closer to modular design.

  13. Buffer layer enhanced stability of sodium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xusheng; Yang, Zhanhai; Wang, Chao; Chen, Dong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xinxiang; Chen, Jitao; Xue, Mianqi

    2017-11-01

    Se-Se buffer layers are introduced into tin sequences as SnSe2 single crystal to enhance the cycling stability for long-term sodium-ion storage by blazing a trail of self-defence strategy to structural pulverization especially at high current density. Specifically, under half-cell test, the SnSe2 electrodes could yield a high discharge capacity of 345 mAh g-1 after 300 cycles at 1 A g-1 and a high discharge capacity of 300 mAh g-1 after 2100 cycles at 5 A g-1 with stable coulombic efficiency and no capacity fading. Even with the ultrafast sodium-ion storage at 10 A g-1, the cycling stability still makes a positive response and a high discharge capacity of 221 mAh g-1 is demonstrated after 2700 cycles without capacity fading. The full-cell test for the SnSe2 electrodes also demonstrates the superior cycling stability. The flexible and tough Se-Se buffer layers are favourable to accommodate the sodium-ion intercalation process, and the autogenous Na2Se layers could confine the structural pulverization of further sodiated tin sequences by the slip along the Na2Se-NaxSn interfaces.

  14. Quantum dot-induced viral capsid assembling in dissociation buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ding; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Feng; Men, Dong; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zong-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encapsulating inorganic nanoparticles are a novel type of nanostructure with applications in biomedicine and biosensors. However, the encapsulation and assembly mechanisms of these hybridized virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) are still unknown. In this article, it was found that quantum dots (QDs) can induce simian virus 40 (SV40) capsid assembly in dissociation buffer, where viral capsids should be disassembled. The analysis of the transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction experimental results showed that the SV40 major capsid protein 1 (VP1) can be assembled into ≈25 nm capsids in the dissociation buffer when QDs are present and that the QDs are encapsulated in the SV40 capsids. Moreover, it was determined that there is a strong affinity between QDs and the SV40 VP1 proteins (KD = 2.19E-10 M), which should play an important role in QD encapsulation in the SV40 viral capsids. This study provides a new understanding of the assembly mechanism of SV40 virus-based nanoparticles with QDs, which may help in the design and construction of other similar virus-based nanoparticles. PMID:23776332

  15. Buffer Capacity, Ecosystem Feedbacks, and Seawater Chemistry under Global Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Toonen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA results in reduced seawater pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag, but also reduced seawater buffer capacity. As buffer capacity decreases, diel variation in seawater chemistry increases. However, a variety of ecosystem feedbacks can modulate changes in both average seawater chemistry and diel seawater chemistry variation. Here we model these effects for a coastal, reef flat ecosystem. We show that an increase in offshore pCO2 and temperature (to 900 µatm and + 3 °C can increase diel pH variation by as much as a factor of 2.5 and can increase diel pCO2 variation by a factor of 4.6, depending on ecosystem feedbacks and seawater residence time. Importantly, these effects are different between day and night. With increasing seawater residence time and increasing feedback intensity, daytime seawater chemistry becomes more similar to present-day conditions while nighttime seawater chemistry becomes less similar to present-day conditions. Recent studies suggest that carbonate chemistry variation itself, independent of the average chemistry conditions, can have important effects on marine organisms and ecosystem processes. Better constraining ecosystem feedbacks under global change will improve projections of coastal water chemistry, but this study shows the importance of considering changes in both average carbonate chemistry and diel chemistry variation for organisms and ecosystems.

  16. Parental care buffers against inbreeding depression in burying beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilakouta, Natalie; Jamieson, Seonaidh; Moorad, Jacob A; Smiseth, Per T

    2015-06-30

    When relatives mate, their inbred offspring often suffer a reduction in fitness-related traits known as "inbreeding depression." There is mounting evidence that inbreeding depression can be exacerbated by environmental stresses such as starvation, predation, parasitism, and competition. Parental care may play an important role as a buffer against inbreeding depression in the offspring by alleviating these environmental stresses. Here, we examine the effect of parental care on the fitness costs of inbreeding in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, an insect with facultative parental care. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with the following factors: (i) the presence or absence of a caring female parent during larval development and (ii) inbred or outbred offspring. We examined the joint influence of maternal care and inbreeding status on fitness-related offspring traits to test the hypothesis that maternal care improves the performance of inbred offspring more than that of outbred offspring. Indeed, the female's presence led to a higher increase in larval survival in inbred than in outbred broods. Receiving care at the larval stage also increased the lifespan of inbred but not outbred adults, suggesting that the beneficial buffering effects of maternal care can persist long after the offspring have become independent. Our results show that parental care has the potential to moderate the severity of inbreeding depression, which in turn may favor inbreeding tolerance and influence the evolution of mating systems and other inbreeding-avoidance mechanisms.

  17. Environmental Modeling, The Natural Filter Buffer Targeting layers identify riparian forest and grass buffer opportunities by county. Land use and hydrology characteristics were used to identify potential riparian buffer locations., Published in 2014, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Environmental Modeling dataset current as of 2014. The Natural Filter Buffer Targeting layers identify riparian forest and grass buffer opportunities by county. Land...

  18. Environmental Modeling, The Buffer Priority layers for Phosphorus / Sediment) Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer opportunities by subwatershed. Land use, hydrology, soil, and landscape characteristics were analyzed to rank buffer opportunities with high P/sed removal., Published in 2014, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Environmental Modeling dataset current as of 2014. The Buffer Priority layers for Phosphorus / Sediment) Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer opportunities...

  19. High-intensity exercise decreases muscle buffer capacity via a decrease in protein buffering in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David; Edge, Johann; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Thomas, Claire; Schneiker, Knut

    2009-09-01

    We have previously reported an acute decrease in muscle buffer capacity (betam(in vitro)) following high-intensity exercise. The aim of this study was to identify which muscle buffers are affected by acute exercise and the effects of exercise type and a training intervention on these changes. Whole muscle and non-protein betam(in vitro) were measured in male endurance athletes (VO(2max) = 59.8 +/- 5.8 mL kg(-1) min(-1)), and before and after training in male, team-sport athletes (VO(2max) = 55.6 +/- 5.5 mL kg(-1) min(-1)). Biopsies were obtained at rest and immediately after either time-to-fatigue at 120% VO(2max) (endurance athletes) or repeated sprints (team-sport athletes). High-intensity exercise was associated with a significant decrease in betam(in vitro) in endurance-trained males (146 +/- 9 to 138 +/- 7 mmol H(+) x kg d.w.(-1) x pH(-1)), and in male team-sport athletes both before (139 +/- 9 to 131 +/- 7 mmol H(+) x kg d.w.(-1) x pH(-1)) and after training (152 +/- 11 to 142 +/- 9 mmol H(+) x kg d.w.(-1) x pH(-1)). There were no acute changes in non-protein buffering capacity. There was a significant increase in betam(in vitro) following training, but this did not alter the post-exercise decrease in betam(in vitro). In conclusion, high-intensity exercise decreased betam(in vitro) independent of exercise type or an interval-training intervention; this was largely explained by a decrease in protein buffering. These findings have important implications when examining training-induced changes in betam(in vitro). Resting and post-exercise muscle samples cannot be used interchangeably to determine betam(in vitro), and researchers must ensure that post-training measurements of betam(in vitro) are not influenced by an acute decrease caused by the final training bout.

  20. Role of histidine-related compounds to intracellular buffering in fish skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, H; Dobson, G P; Hoeger, U; Parkhouse, W S

    1985-10-01

    Histidine-related compounds (HRC) were analyzed in fish skeletal muscle as a means of identifying their precise role in intracellular buffering. Fish muscle was used because it contains two functionally and spatially distinct fiber types, red and white. Two fish species, rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and the Pacific blue marlin (Makaira nigricans), were studied because these species demonstrate widely different activity patterns. Marlin red and white muscle buffer capacity was two times higher than trout with white muscle, buffering being two times greater than red in both species. Buffer capacity was highest in the 6.5-7.5 pH range for all tissues, which corresponded to their high anserine levels. The titrated HRC buffering was greater than the observed HRC buffering, which suggested that not all HRC were available to absorb protons. The HRC contribution to total cellular buffering varied from a high of 62% for marlin white to a low of 7% for trout red. The other principal buffers were found to be phosphate and protein with taurine contributing within red muscle in the 7.0-8.0 pH range. HRC were found to be dominant in skeletal muscle buffering by principally accounting for the buffering capacity differences found between the species and fiber types.

  1. Sustainable power generation in microbial fuel cells using bicarbonate buffer and proton transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanzhen; Hu, Hongqiang; Liu, Hong

    2007-12-01

    Phosphate buffer solution has been commonly used in MFC studiesto maintain a suitable pH for electricity-generating bacteria and/or to increase the solution conductivity. However, addition of a high concentration of phosphate buffer in MFCs could be expensive, especially for wastewater treatment. In this study, the performances of MFCs with cloth electrode assemblies (CEA) were evaluated using bicarbonate buffer solutions. A maximum power density of 1550 W/m3 (2770 mW/ m2) was obtained at a current density of 0.99 mA/cm2 using a pH 9 bicarbonate buffer solution. Such a power density was 38.6% higher than that using a pH 7 phosphate buffer at the same concentration of 0.2 M. Based on the quantitative comparison of free proton transfer rates, diffusion rates of pH buffer species, and the current generated, a facilitated proton transfer mechanism was proposed for MFCs in the presence of the pH buffers. The excellent performance of MFCs using bicarbonate as pH buffer and proton carrier indicates that bicarbonate buffer could be served as a low-cost and effective pH buffer for practical applications, especially for wastewater treatment.

  2. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  3. Glacier melt buffers river runoff in the Pamir Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Eric; Gloaguen, Richard; Andermann, Christoff; Knoche, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Newly developed approaches based on satellite altimetry and gravity measurements provide promising results on glacier dynamics in the Pamir-Himalaya but cannot resolve short-term natural variability at regional and finer scale. We contribute to the ongoing debate by upscaling a hydrological model that we calibrated for the central Pamir. The model resolves the spatiotemporal variability in runoff over the entire catchment domain with high efficiency. We provide relevant information about individual components of the hydrological cycle and quantify short-term hydrological variability. For validation, we compare the modeled total water storages (TWS) with GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) data with a very good agreement where GRACE uncertainties are low. The approach exemplifies the potential of GRACE for validating even regional scale hydrological applications in remote and hard to access mountain regions. We use modeled time series of individual hydrological components to characterize the effect of climate variability on the hydrological cycle. We demonstrate that glaciers play a twofold role by providing roughly 35% of the annual runoff of the Panj River basin and by effectively buffering runoff both during very wet and very dry years. The modeled glacier mass balance (GMB) of -0.52 m w.e. yr-1 (2002-2013) for the entire catchment suggests significant reduction of most Pamiri glaciers by the end of this century. The loss of glaciers and their buffer functionality in wet and dry years could not only result in reduced water availability and increase the regional instability, but also increase flood and drought hazards.Plain Language SummaryGlaciers store large amounts of water in the form of ice. They grow and shrink dominantly in response to climatic conditions. In Central Asia, where rivers originate in the high mountains, glaciers are an important source for sustainable water availability. Thus, understanding the link between climate, hydrology, and

  4. Buffer Sizing in Wireless Networks: Challenges, Solutions, and Opportunities

    KAUST Repository

    Showail, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Buffer sizing is an important network configuration parameter that impacts the Quality of Service (QoS) characteristics of data traffic. With falling memory costs and the fallacy that \\'more is better\\', network devices are being overprovisioned with large bu ers. This may increase queueing delays experienced by a packet and subsequently impact stability of core protocols such as TCP. The problem has been studied extensively for wired networks. However, there is little work addressing the unique challenges of wireless environment such as time-varying channel capacity, variable packet inter-service time, and packet aggregation, among others. In this paper we discuss these challenges, classify the current state-of-the-art solutions, discuss their limitations, and provide directions for future research in the area.

  5. Neighborhood cohesion as a buffer against hostile maternal parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S; Sessa, Frances M; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Steinberg, Laurence; Avenevoli, Shelli

    2004-03-01

    This study explored the moderating effects of children's neighborhoods on the link between hostile parenting and externalizing behavior. Participants were 1st- or 2nd-grade children in an urban northeastern community. Children were administered the Parenting and Neighborhood scales of the Child Puppet Interview, and mothers completed questionnaires on neighborhood quality and parenting practices. Census tract measures of neighborhood quality and teachers' reports of children's externalizing behavior also were obtained. Results indicated that children's and mothers' perceptions of neighborhood involvement-cohesion buffered the link between hostile parenting and externalizing problems. Children's externalizing behavior was unrelated to census tract variables. Findings highlight the protective effect of neighborhood social cohesion and the utility of including young children's perspectives in research on neighborhoods and families.

  6. How much will evolution buffer changes in climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Current climate change is altering the phenology, or seasonal timing of reproduction and other life-history events, of many species. There is now evidence that at least some of these changes in phenology represent genetically- based evolution. Evolution may thus potentially serve as a buffer, allowing species to adapt to changes in climatic conditions. However, there are many constraints to evolution, including lack of genetic variation, antagonistic trait correlations, and physiological and developmental constraints. Furthermore, if changes in climate are extremely rapid and severe, many species may experience extinction rather than rapid evolution. I present recent empirical evidence for evolution following changes in climate, examine constraints to evolution, and ask if evolution can keep pace with rapid climate change. The empirical work focuses on the species Brassica rapa, which I show evolved earlier flowering time following several years of drought in Southern California.

  7. Stability of resazurin in buffers and mammalian cell culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva; Nicolaisen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    The utility of a ferricyanide/ferrocyanide system used in the AlamarBlue(TM) (Serotec, Oxford, UK) vital. dye to inhibit the reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media is questioned. Resazurin was found to be relatively stable when dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The use...... of HEPES resulted in a huge immediate dye reduction, which was significantly enhanced by exposure to diffuse light from fluorescent tubes in the laboratory 8 h per day. The reduction of resazurin by various cell culture media was time and temperature dependent, and it was significantly enhanced......'s nutrient mixture F-10 and F-12. Fetal calf serum (5-20%) slightly decreased resazurin reduction during the first 2 days of incubation. The reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media do not appear to be problematic under normal culture conditions, and it is primarily dependent upon the presence...

  8. Structural transitions in polycytidylic acid: proton buffer capacity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarudnaya, Margarita I; Samijlenko, Svitlana P; Potyahaylo, Andriy L; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2002-01-01

    The pH-dependences of proton buffer capacity of poly(C) were computed on the basis of the literature data. In these curves there were observed four peaks: two narrow and two wide ones. The first narrow peak reflects the process of cooperative formation of double helices, which is induced by protonation of the N3 atom of nucleotide bases. The first wide peak is assigned to noncooperative process of poly(C) double helices protonation at the N3 nitrogen atom. It is proposed that the second wide peak corresponds to noncooperative protonation of the neutral cytosine bases at the oxygen atom. This reaction causes cooperative dissociation of the poly(C) double helices. The second narrow peak reflects the dissociation process.

  9. Highly efficient treatment of aerobic vaginitis with simple acidic buffered gels: The importance of pH and buffers on the microenvironment of vaginas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Qiu, Haiying; Jin, Yiguang

    2017-06-15

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) leads to uterus deep infection or preterm birth. Antibacterial agents are not optimal therapeutics of AV. Here, we report a series of temperature-sensitive in situ forming acidic buffered gels for topical treatment of AV, involving lactate, acetate, and citrate gels at pH 3.5, 5.0, and 6.5. AV rat models were prepared following vaginal infection with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro/in vivo studies of the buffered gels were performed compared with ofloxacin gels and blank gels. All the buffered gels showed the lower in vitro antibacterial activities than ofloxacin gels but the better in vivo anti-S. aureus effects and similar anti-E. coli effects. The buffered gels improved Lactobacillus growth in the vaginas. Both the healthy rat vaginal pH and the pH of rat vaginas treated with the buffered gels were about 6.5 though the AV rat models or ones treated with ofloxacin gels still remained at the high pH more than 7.0. After treatments with the buffered gels, the vaginal smears changed to a clean state nearly without aerobic bacteria, the vaginal tissues were refreshed, and the immunoreactions were downregulated. The acidic buffered gels bring rapid decrease of local vaginal pH, high antibacterial activities, improvement of probiotics, and alleviation of inflammation. They are simple, highly efficient, and safe anti-AV formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and optimization of buffer gas positron traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, Srđan; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2017-02-01

    Buffer gas positron traps have been used for over two decades as the prime source of slow positrons enabling a wide range of experiments. While their performance has been well understood through empirical studies, no theoretical attempt has been made to quantitatively describe their operation. In this paper we apply standard models as developed for physics of low temperature collision dominated plasmas, or physics of swarms to model basic performance and principles of operation of gas filled positron traps. The Monte Carlo model is equipped with the best available set of cross sections that were mostly derived experimentally by using the same type of traps that are being studied. Our model represents in realistic geometry and fields the development of the positron ensemble from the initial beam provided by the solid neon moderator through voltage drops between the stages of the trap and through different pressures of the buffer gas. The first two stages employ excitation of N2 with acceleration of the order of 10 eV so that the trap operates under conditions when excitation of the nitrogen reduces the energy of the initial beam to trap the positrons without giving them a chance to become annihilated following positronium formation. The energy distribution function develops from the assumed distribution leaving the moderator, it is accelerated by the voltage drops and forms beams at several distinct energies. In final stages the low energy loss collisions (vibrational excitation of CF4 and rotational excitation of N2) control the approach of the distribution function to a Maxwellian at room temperature but multiple non-Maxwellian groups persist throughout most of the thermalization. Optimization of the efficiency of the trap may be achieved by changing the pressure and voltage drops and also by selecting to operate in a two stage mode. The model allows quantitative comparisons and test of optimization as well as development of other properties.

  11. Ocean acidification buffering effects of seagrass in Tampa Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kimberly K.; Moyer, Ryan P.; Moore, Christopher; Tomasko, David A.; Smiley, Nathan A.; Torres-Garcia, Legna; Powell, Christina E.; Chappel, Amanda R.; Bociu, Ioana; Smiley, Nathan; Torres-Garcia, Legna M.; Powell, Christina E.; Chappel, Amanda R.; Bociu, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified ocean acidification as a critical threat to marine and estuarine species in ocean and coastal ecosystems around the world. However, seagrasses are projected to benefit from elevated atmospheric pCO2, are capable of increasing seawater pH and carbonate mineral saturation states through photosynthesis, and may help buffer against the chemical impacts of ocean acidification. Additionally, dissolution of carbonate sediments may also provide a mechanism for buffering seawater pH. Long-term water quality monitoring data from the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County indicates that seawater pH has risen since the 1980‘s as seagrass beds have continued to recover since that time. We examined the role of seagrass beds in maintaining and elevating pH and carbonate mineral saturation state in northern and southern Tampa Bay where the percent of carbonate sediments is low (40%), respectively. Basic water quality and carbonate system parameters (including pH, total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, partial pressure of CO2, and carbonate mineral saturation state) were measured over diurnal time periods along transects (50-100 m) including dense and sparse Thalassia testudinum. seagrass beds, deep edge seagrass, and adjacent bare sand bottom. Seagrass density and productivity, sediment composition and hydrodynamic parameters were also measured, concurrently. Results indicate that seagrass beds locally elevate pH by up to 0.5 pH unit and double carbonate mineral saturation states relative to bare sand habitats. Thus, seagrass beds in Tampa Bay may provide refuge for marine organisms from the impacts of ocean acidification.

  12. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks. PMID:27761104

  13. Carbonate buffering and metabolic controls on carbon dioxide in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward G.; Butman, David; McDonald, Cory P.; Stackpoole, Sarah M.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple processes support the significant efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from rivers and streams. Attribution of CO2 oversaturation will lead to better quantification of the freshwater carbon cycle and provide insights into the net cycling of nutrients and pollutants. CO2 production is closely related to O2 consumption because of the metabolic linkage of these gases. However, this relationship can be weakened due to dissolved inorganic carbon inputs from groundwater, carbonate buffering, calcification, and anaerobic metabolism. CO2 and O2 concentrations and other water quality parameters were analyzed in two data sets: a synoptic field study and nationwide water quality monitoring data. CO2 and O2 concentrations were strongly negatively correlated in both data sets (ρ = -0.67 and ρ = -0.63, respectively), although the correlations were weaker in high-alkalinity environments. In nearly all samples, the molar oversaturation of CO2 was a larger magnitude than molar O2 undersaturation. We used a dynamically coupled O2CO2 model to show that lags in CO2 air-water equilibration are a likely cause of this phenomenon. Lags in CO2 equilibration also impart landscape-scale differences in the behavior of CO2 between high- and low-alkalinity watersheds. Although the concept of carbonate buffering and how it creates lags in CO2 equilibration with the atmosphere is well understood, it has not been sufficiently integrated into our understanding of CO2 dynamics in freshwaters. We argue that the consideration of carbonate equilibria and its effects on CO2 dynamics are primary steps in understanding the sources and magnitude of CO2 oversaturation in rivers and streams.

  14. Carbonate buffering and metabolic controls on carbon dioxide in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward; Butman, David; McDonald, Cory P.; Stackpoole, Sarah M.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Striegl, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Multiple processes support the significant efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from rivers and streams. Attribution of CO2 oversaturation will lead to better quantification of the freshwater carbon cycle and provide insights into the net cycling of nutrients and pollutants. CO2 production is closely related to O2consumption because of the metabolic linkage of these gases. However, this relationship can be weakened due to dissolved inorganic carbon inputs from groundwater, carbonate buffering, calcification, and anaerobic metabolism. CO2and O2 concentrations and other water quality parameters were analyzed in two data sets: a synoptic field study and nationwide water quality monitoring data. CO2 and O2 concentrations were strongly negatively correlated in both data sets (ρ = −0.67 and ρ = −0.63, respectively), although the correlations were weaker in high-alkalinity environments. In nearly all samples, the molar oversaturation of CO2 was a larger magnitude than molar O2 undersaturation. We used a dynamically coupled O2CO2 model to show that lags in CO2 air-water equilibration are a likely cause of this phenomenon. Lags in CO2 equilibration also impart landscape-scale differences in the behavior of CO2 between high- and low-alkalinity watersheds. Although the concept of carbonate buffering and how it creates lags in CO2 equilibration with the atmosphere is well understood, it has not been sufficiently integrated into our understanding of CO2 dynamics in freshwaters. We argue that the consideration of carbonate equilibria and its effects on CO2 dynamics are primary steps in understanding the sources and magnitude of CO2 oversaturation in rivers and streams.

  15. Towards a unified process model for graphemic buffer disorder and deep dysgraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasspool, David W; Shallice, Tim; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-05-01

    Models based on the competitive queuing (CQ) approach can explain many of the effects on dysgraphic patients' spelling attributed to disruption of the "graphemic output buffer". Situating such a model in the wider spelling system, however, raises the question of what happens when input to the buffer (e.g., from a semantic system) is degraded while the buffer remains intact. We present a preliminary exploration of predictions following from the CQ approach. We show that the CQ account of the graphemic buffer predicts and explains the finding that deep dysgraphic patients generally show features of graphemic buffer disorder, as disrupted input from a damaged semantic system has an inevitable effect upon the functioning of the buffer. The approach also explains the most salient differences between the two syndromes, which are seen as consequences of the difference between an intact sequence generation system operating on degraded input versus a damaged sequencing system operating on intact input.

  16. Analysis of a production system with a feedback buffer and a general dispatching time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ho Woo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze a production system with a finite feedback buffer and dispatching time. Parts enter a “main buffer” before they are processed. Processed parts leave the system with probability 1 − p or are fed back to a “feedback buffer” with probability p . As soon as the feedback buffer becomes full, the parts in the feedback buffer are dispatched, all at once, to the main buffer by the server for reprocessing. The dispatching time follows a general distribution. Thus the server is engaged either in one of the following states: idle, processing, dispatching. We derive various performance measures such as the mean number of parts in each buffer, the mean system sojourn time and the dispatching rate. We also discuss the effects of the dispatching time on the performance measures. We finally derive the procedure to obtain the optimal buffer size that minimizes the overall operating cost.

  17. High effective cytosolic H+ buffering in mouse cortical astrocytes attributable to fast bicarbonate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2015-09-01

    Cytosolic H(+) buffering plays a major role for shaping intracellular H(+) shifts and hence for the availability of H(+) for biochemical reactions and acid/base-coupled transport processes. H(+) buffering is one of the prime means to protect the cell from large acid/base shifts. We have used the H(+) indicator dye BCECF and confocal microscopy to monitor the cytosolic H(+) concentration, [H(+)]i, in cultured cortical astrocytes of wild-type mice and of mice deficient in sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 (NBCe1-KO) or in carbonic anhydrase isoform II (CAII-KO). The steady-state buffer strength was calculated from the amplitude of [H(+)]i transients as evoked by CO2/HCO3(-) and by butyric acid in the presence and absence of CO2/HCO3(-). We tested the hypotheses if, in addition to instantaneous physicochemical H(+) buffering, rapid acid/base transport across the cell membrane contributes to the total, "effective" cytosolic H(+) buffering. In the presence of 5% CO2/26 mM HCO3(-), H(+) buffer strength in astrocytes was increased 4-6 fold, as compared with that in non-bicarbonate, HEPES-buffered solution, which was largely attributable to fast HCO3 (-) transport into the cells via NBCe1, supported by CAII activity. Our results show that within the time frame of determining physiological H(+) buffering in cells, fast transport and equilibration of CO2/H(+)/HCO3(-) can make a major contribution to the total "effective" H(+) buffer strength. Thus, "effective" cellular H(+) buffering is, to a large extent, attributable to membrane transport of base equivalents rather than a purely passive physicochemical process, and can be much larger than reported so far. Not only physicochemical H(+) buffering, but also rapid import of HCO3(-) via the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1, supported by carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), was identified to enhance cytosolic H(+) buffer strength substantially. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Relationships between soil physicochemical, microbiological properties, and nutrient release in buffer soils compared to field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc I; Richards, Samia

    2012-01-01

    The retention of nutrients in narrow, vegetated riparian buffer strips (VBS) is uncertain and underlying processes are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that buffer soils are poor at retaining dissolved nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), necessitating management actions if P retention is not to be compromised. We sampled 19 buffer strips and adjacent arable field soils. Differences in nutrient retention between buffer and field soils were determined using a combined assay for release of dissolved P, N, and C forms and particulate P. We then explored these differences in relation to changes in soil bulk density (BD), moisture, organic matter by loss on ignition (OM), and altered microbial diversity using molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [TRFLP]). Buffer soils had significantly greater soil OM (89% of sites), moisture content (95%), and water-soluble nutrient concentrations for dissolved organic C (80%), dissolved organic N (80%), dissolved organic P (55%), and soluble reactive P (70%). Buffer soils had consistently smaller bulk densities than field soils. Soil fine particle release was generally greater for field than buffer soils. Significantly smaller soil bulk density in buffer soils than in adjacent fields indicated increased porosity and infiltration in buffers. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities showed altered diversity between the buffer and field soils, with significant relationships with soil BD, moisture, OM, and increased solubility of buffer nutrients. Current soil conditions in VBS appear to be leading to potentially enhanced nutrient leaching via increasing solubility of C, N, and P. Manipulating soil microbial conditions (by management of soil moisture, vegetation type, and cover) may provide options for increasing the buffer storage for key nutrients such as P without increasing leaching to adjacent streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and

  19. Overcoming TCP Degradation in the Presence of Multiple Intermittent Link Failures Utilizing Intermediate Buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    however to expect link proxy routers to provide infinite buffer capacity . Accordingly, the centralized memory manager built into the model requires...utilized within strategically placed backbone routers under military jurisdiction. 5.3.4 Custodial TCP Flow Control Link proxy buffer capacity enables...Moderate and heavy channel losses however would require considerable buffer capacity , 5−8 especially if multiple high capacity TCP flows

  20. THE BUFFER ROLE OF GROUNDWATER WHEN SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES ARE UNCERTAIN: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Tsur, Yacov

    1988-01-01

    When used in conjunction with surface water for irrigation, groundwater serves two roles: to increase water supply; and to mitigate fluctuations in the supply of water. The later is the buffer role. This paper identifies and evaluates the economic benefit associated with the buffer role of ground water. Implications for the development of groundwater resources are investigated. An estimate is given of the buffer benefit to wheat growers of the fossil water aquifer underlying the Israeli Negev...

  1. IMPACT OF BUFFER SIZE ON PQRS AND D-PQRS SCHEDULING ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Narayanan Prasanth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the internet applications required high speed internet connectivity. Crosspoint Buffered Switches are widely used switching architectures and designing a scheduling algorithm is a major challenge. PQRS and D-PQRS are the two most successful schedulers used in Crosspoint Buffered Switches under unicast traffic. In this paper, we analysed the performance of PQRS and DPQRS algorithms by varying the crosspoint buffer size. Simulation result shows the delay performance of the switch increases if the size of the buffer increases.

  2. Managing soil nitrate with cover crops and buffer strips in Sicilian vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Guaitoli, F.; Santoro, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2013-04-01

    When soil nitrate levels are inadequate, plants suffer nitrogen deficiency but when the levels are excessive, nitrates (NO3-N) can pollute surface and subsurface waters. Strategies to reduce the nitrate pollution are necessary to reach a sustainable use of resources such as soil, water and plant. Buffer strips and cover crops can contribute to the management of soil nitrates, but little is known of their effectiveness in semiarid vineyards plantations. The experimental site, a 10 m wide and 80 m long area at the bottom of a vineyard was selected in Sicily. The soil between vine rows and upslope of the buffer strip (seeded with Lolium perenne) and non-buffer strips (control) was managed conventionally and with one of two cover crops (Triticum durum and Vicia sativa cover crop). Soil nitrate was measured monthly and nitrate movement was monitored by application of a 15N tracer to a narrow strip between the bottom of vineyard and the buffer and non-buffer strips. L. perenne biomass yield in the buffer strips and its isotopic nitrogen content were monitored. V. sativa cover crop management contribute with an excess of nitrogen, and the soil management determined the nitrogen content at the buffer areas. A 6 m buffer strip reduce the nitrate by 42% with and by 46% with a 9 m buffer strip.

  3. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  4. Dynamic approach to predict pH profiles of biologically relevant buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ganesh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, dynamic approach has been applied to determine the steady state concentrations of multiple ionic species present in complex buffers at equilibrium. Here, we have used the dynamic approach to explicitly model the pH profiles of biologically relevant phosphate buffer and universal buffer (a mixture of three tri-protic acids such as citric acid, boric acid and phosphoric acid. The results from dynamic approach are identical to that of the conventional algebraic approach, but with an added advantage that the dynamic approach, allow for the modelling of complex buffer systems relatively easy compared to that of algebraic method.

  5. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah, Anas M; Turner, Michael R; Mager, Donald E; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-03-01

    The subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after s.c. administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyperosmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as the animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and O-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) on the plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after s.c. administration. An increase was observed in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, compared with isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to the improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph nodes in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatics, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05% in isotonic buffer to 13% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. The data suggest that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option for improving s.c. bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. High-throughput and multiplexed regeneration buffer scouting for affinity-based interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuijen, Karin P M; Schasfoort, Richard B; Wijffels, Rene H; Eppink, Michel H M

    2014-06-01

    Affinity-based analyses on biosensors depend partly on regeneration between measurements. Regeneration is performed with a buffer that efficiently breaks all interactions between ligand and analyte while maintaining the active binding site of the ligand. We demonstrated a regeneration buffer scouting using the combination of a continuous flow microspotter with a surface plasmon resonance imaging platform to simultaneously test 48 different regeneration buffers on a single biosensor. Optimal regeneration conditions are found within hours and consume little amounts of buffers, analyte, and ligand. This workflow can be applied to any ligand that is coupled through amine, thiol, or streptavidin immobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Calculation of the equilibrium pH in a multiple-buffered aqueous solution based on partitioning of proton buffering: a new predictive formula

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Minhtri K.; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution containing multiple buffers, the final H+ concentration ([H+]) at equilibrium is determined by the partitioning of added H+ among the various buffer components. In the analysis of acid-base chemistry, the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and the Stewart strong ion formulation can only describe (rather than predict) the equilibrium pH following a proton load since these formulas calculate the equilibrium pH only when the reactant concentrations...

  8. Bone: an acute buffer of plasma sodium during exhaustive exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew-Butler, T; Stuempfle, K J; Hoffman, M D

    2013-09-01

    Both hyponatremia and osteopenia separately have been well documented in endurance athletes. Although bone has been shown to act as a "sodium reservoir" to buffer severe plasma sodium derangements in animals, recent data have suggested a similar function in humans. We aimed to explore if acute changes in bone mineral content were associated with changes in plasma sodium concentration in runners participating in a 161 km mountain footrace. Eighteen runners were recruited. Runners were tested immediately pre- and post-race for the following main outcome measures: bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA); plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]p), plasma arginine vasopressin ([AVP]p), serum aldosterone concentration ([aldosterone]s), and total sodium intake. Six subjects finished the race in a mean time of 27.0±2.3 h. All subjects started and finished the race with [Na+]p within the normal range (137.7±2.3 and 136.7±1.6 mEq/l, pre- and post-race, respectively). Positive correlations were noted between change (Δ; post-race minus pre-race) in total BMC (grams) and [Na+]p (mEq/l) (r=0.99; pbone density may be inter-related during endurance exercise and should be considered in future investigations of athletic osteopenia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  10. Population connectivity buffers genetic diversity loss in a seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Oscar; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Olalde, Iñigo; Illera, Juan Carlos; Rando, Juan Carlos; González-Solís, Jacob; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-05-20

    Ancient DNA has revolutionized conservation genetic studies as it allows monitoring of the genetic variability of species through time and predicting the impact of ecosystems' threats on future population dynamics and viability. Meanwhile, the consequences of anthropogenic activities and climate change to island faunas, particularly seabirds, remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined temporal changes in the genetic diversity of a threatened seabird, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris borealis). We analysed the mitochondrial DNA control region of ancient bone samples from the late-Holocene retrieved from the Canary archipelago (NE Atlantic) together with modern DNA sequences representative of the entire breeding range of the species. Our results show high levels of ancient genetic diversity in the Canaries comparable to that of the extant population. The temporal haplotype network further revealed rare but recurrent long-distance dispersal between ocean basins. The Bayesian demographic analyses reveal both regional and local population size expansion events, and this is in spite of the demographic decline experienced by the species over the last millennia. Our findings suggest that population connectivity of the species has acted as a buffer of genetic losses and illustrate the use of ancient DNA to uncover such cryptic genetic events.

  11. Resource Allocation in Heterogeneous Buffered Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Awoyemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resources available for operation in cognitive radio networks (CRN are generally limited, making it imperative for efficient resource allocation (RA models to be designed for them. However, in most RA designs, a significant limiting factor to the RA’s productivity has hitherto been mostly ignored, the fact that different users or user categories do have different delay tolerance profiles. To address this, in this paper, an appropriate RA model for heterogeneous CRN with delay considerations is developed and analysed. In the model, the demands of users are first categorised and then, based on the distances of users from the controlling secondary user base station and with the assumption that the users are mobile, the user demands are placed in different queues having different service capacities and the resulting network is analysed using queueing theory. Furthermore, to achieve optimality in the RA process, an important concept is introduced whereby some demands from one queue are moved to another queue where they have a better chance of enhanced service, thereby giving rise to the possibility of an improvement in the overall performance of the network. The performance results obtained from the analysis, particularly the blocking probability and network throughput, show that the queueing model incorporated into the RA process can help in achieving optimality for the heterogeneous CRN with buffered data.

  12. Work addiction and presenteeism: The buffering role of managerial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Greta; Vignoli, Michela; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Guglielmi, Dina

    2017-08-08

    The current study examined the mediating effect of presenteeism and moderating effect of managerial support in the relation between workaholism and work-family conflict. A sample of 1065 white-collar employees from an Italian company filled in an online survey and hypotheses were tested using a bootstrapping procedure. Results showed that presenteeism mediated the association between workaholism and work-family conflict. Moreover, the mediating effect of presenteeism was moderated by managerial support: for employees reporting lower levels of support workaholism was stronger related to presenteeism than for those experiencing higher support. Presenteeism, in turn, was related to greater levels of work-family conflict. The present study sheds light into the protective role played by managerial support in preventing workaholic employees from forcing themselves to attend work also when feeling sick. Accordingly, early intervention aimed at buffering the negative association between workaholism and work-family conflict should focus on training managers to develop supportive leadership skills. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  13. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  14. Social media as a shield: Facebook buffers acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Holly M; Tiemensma, Jitske

    2018-03-01

    Facebook remains the most widely used social media platform. Research suggests that Facebook may both enhance and undermine psychosocial constructs related to well-being, and that it may impair physiological stress recovery. However, little is known about its influence on stress reactivity. Using novel experimental methods, this study examined how Facebook influences reactivity to an acute social stressor. Facebook users (n=104, 53 males, mean age 19.50, SD=1.73) were randomly assigned to use their own Facebook account or sit quietly with the option of reading electronic magazines before experiencing an acute social stressor. All participants showed significant changes in subjective and physiological stress markers in response to the stressor. However, participants who used Facebook experienced lower levels of psychosocial stress, physiological stress, and rated the stressor as less threatening (p'sFacebook use may buffer stress-in particular psychosocial stress-if used before experiencing an acute social stressor. This study is among the first to incorporate both objective and subjective measures in investigating the complex relationship between Facebook use and well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Are temperate mature forests buffered from invasive lianas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    Mature and old-growth forests are often thought to be buffered against invasive species due to low levels of light and infrequent disturbance. Lianas (woody vines) and other climbing plants are also known to exhibit lower densities in older forests. As part of a larger survey of the lianas of the southern Lake Michigan region in mature and old-growth forests, the level of infestation by invasive lianas was evaluated. The only invasive liana detected in these surveys was Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae). Although this species had only attached to trees and reached the canopy in a few instances, it was present in 30% of transects surveyed, mostly as a component of the ground layer. Transects with C. orbiculatus had higher levels of soil potassium and higher liana richness than transects without. In contrast, transects with the native C. scandens had higher pH, sand content, and soil magnesium and lower organic matter compared to transects where it was absent. Celastrus orbiculatus appears to be a generalist liana since it often occurs with native lianas. Celastrus orbiculatus poses a substantial threat to mature forests as it will persist in the understory until a canopy gap or other disturbance provides the light and supports necessary for it to ascend to the canopy and damage tree species. As a result, these forests should be monitored by land managers so that C. orbiculatus eradication can occur while invasions are at low densities and restricted to the ground layer.

  16. Applying Dataflow Analysis to Dimension Buffers for Guaranteed Performance in Networks on Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansson, A.; Hansson, Andreas; Wiggers, M.H.; Moonen, Arno; Goossens, Kees; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Bekooij, Marco

    A Network on Chip (NoC) with end-to-end flow control is modelled by a cyclo-static dataflow graph. Using the proposed model together with state-of-the-art dataflow analysis algorithms, we size the buffers in the network interfaces. We show, for a range of NoC designs, that buffer sizes are

  17. Further study on the effect of buffer zone size on regional climate modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhong [PLA University of Science and Technology, Research Center for Applied Geophysics, Institute of Meteorology, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing (China); Wang, Xiaodan; Lu, Wei; Hu, Yijia [PLA University of Science and Technology, Research Center for Applied Geophysics, Institute of Meteorology, Nanjing (China)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the effect of buffer zone size on the performance of a regional climate model (RCM) was investigated. In contrast to carrying out simulations where the buffer zone expands inward, numerical experiments were performed with the buffer zone expanded outward, which ensured an objective comparison on the effect of buffer zone sizes. Case simulations on the abnormal 1998 East Asian summer monsoon demonstrated that an RCM's performance depended on the outward expansion of the buffer zone. Moreover, a broader buffer zone is able to improve large-scale circulation simulation in the upper troposphere; however, a narrower buffer zone shows better performance in the middle and lower troposphere. Numerical experiments show that the performance of RCMs in simulating the seasonal evolution of rainbands over eastern China is not completely consistent with that of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH). A possible reason why the configuration with the buffer zone expanding inward can improve the extension/withdrawal of the summer monsoon and the associated precipitation evolution over eastern China is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Delineation of preventative landslide buffers along steep streamside slopes in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason S. Woodward; David W. Lamphear; Matthew R. House

    2012-01-01

    Green Diamond Resource Co (GDRCo) applies tree retention buffers to steep slopes along fish bearing (Class I) and non-fish bearing (Class II) streams that are in addition to the standard riparian management zones associated with timber harvest plans. These Steep Streamside Slope (SSS) buffers were designed to reduce the amount of sediment delivering to watercourses as...

  19. Heuristics for the Buffer Allocation Problem with Collision Probability Using Computer Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiba, Eishi

    2015-01-01

    .... In this in-line system, we present a computer simulation method for the computation of the probability of a collision occurring. Based on this method, we try to find a buffer allocation that achieves the smallest total number of buffers under an arbitrarily specified collision probability. We also implement our proposed method and present some computational results.

  20. Geochemical modelling of hydrogen gas migration in an unsaturated bentonite buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Thomas, H.R.; Al Masum, S.; Vardon, P.J.; Nicholson, D.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the transport and fate of hydrogen gas through compacted bentonite buffer. Various geochemical reactions that may occur in the multiphase and multicomponent system of the unsaturated bentonite buffer are considered. A reactive gas transport model, developed

  1. Evaluating social-ecological aspects of buffer zones at the borders of Etosha National Park, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelani M. Mannetti; Ulrich Zeller; Karen J. Esler

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the premise that the implementation of a buffer zone around a national park provides opportunities for local communities to become active in the management of such areas. The study focuses on the Etosha National Park in Namibia, where the implementation of a buffer zone has been proposed, since the park fence is a potential barrier for...

  2. Simplified and quantitative saliva buffer capacity test using a hand-held pH meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Moritsuka, Michiyo; Foxton, Richard M; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate and compare saliva buffer capacity using a hand-held pH meter and a commercial buffer strip in patients at risk of caries. To obtain stimulated saliva, 109 patients were given a paraffin wax to chew for 5 minutes. After reading the pH value of 0.5 ml of tested saliva using a portable hand-held pH meter (B-212), 10 microl of 0.1N HCl was titrated into the obtained saliva up to a total titration of 160 microl, and then the pH value read each time. The commercial buffer strip (CRT) was also evaluated. The correlation in ranking results (high, medium, low) between the B-212 pH meter and CRT buffer were statistically analyzed by the Bartlett's test (P buffer capacity were 50%, 17% and 33% respectively for the B-212 pH meter, and 56%, 17% and 27% respectively for the CRT. For the CRT buffer, 23 out of 109 cases showed inconclusive color change under the colorimetric test. There was significant correlation between ranking buffer capacity measured by the B-212 pH meter and the CRT buffer (P < 0.001).

  3. Buffer Capacity Computation for Throughput Constrained Streaming Applications with Data-Dependent Inter-Task Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco J.G.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    Streaming applications are often implemented as task graphs, in which data is communicated from task to task over buffers. Currently, techniques exist to compute buffer capacities that guarantee satisfaction of the throughput constraint if the amount of data produced and consumed by the tasks is

  4. Methods to prioritize placement of riparian buffers for improved water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Tomer; Michael G. Dosskey; Michael R. Burkart; David E. James; Matthew J. Helmers; Dean E. Eisenhauer

    2008-01-01

    Agroforestry buffers in riparian zones can improve stream water quality, provided they intercept and remove contaminants from surface runoff and/or shallow groundwater. Soils, topography, surficial geology, and hydrology determine the capability of forest buffers to intercept and treat these flows. This paper describes two landscape analysis techniques for identifying...

  5. Setting priorities for research on pollution reduction functions of agricultural buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Dosskey

    2002-01-01

    The success of buffer installation initiatives and programs to reduce nonpoint source pollution of streams on agricultural lands will depend the ability of local planners to locate and design buffers for specific circumstances with substantial and predictable results. Current predictive capabilities are inadequate, and major sources of uncertainty remain. An...

  6. ROBUST: The ROle of BUffering capacities in STabilising coastal lagoon ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, R.; Stal, L.J.; Lomstein, B.A.; Herbert, R.A.; van Gemerden, H.; Viaroli, P.; Cecherelli, V.U.; Rodriguez-Valera, F.; Bartoli, M.; Giordani, G.; Azzoni, R.; Schaub, B.; Welsh, D.T.; Donnelly, A.; Cifuentes, A.; Anton, J.; Finster, K.; Nielsen, L.P.; Pedersen, A.G.U.; Neubauer, A.T.; Colangelo, M.A.; Heijs, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    "Buffer capacities" has been defined in ecology as a holistic concept (e.g., Integration of Ecosystem Theories: A Pattern, second ed. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1997, 388pp), but we show that it can also be worked out in mechanistic studies. Our mechanistic approach highlights that "buffering capacities"

  7. ROBUST : The ROle of BUffering capacities in STabilising coastal lagoon ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R; Stal, LJ; Lomstein, BA; Herbert, RA; van Gemerden, H; Viaroli, P; Cecherelli, VU; Rodriguez-Valera, F; Bartoli, M; Giordani, G; Azzoni, R; Schaub, B; Welsh, DT; Donnelly, A; Cifuentes, A; Anton, J; Finster, K; Nielsen, LB; Pedersen, AGU; Neubauer, AT; Colangelo, MA; Heijs, SK

    2001-01-01

    "Buffer capacities" has been defined in ecology as a holistic concept (e.g., Integration of Ecosystem Theories: A Pattern, second ed. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1997, 388pp), but we show that it can also be worked out in mechanistic studies. Our mechanistic approach highlights that "buffering capacities"

  8. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  9. Effects of riparian buffer width on wood loading in headwater streams after repeated forest thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia I. Burton; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2016-01-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones are used in conjunction with upland forest management, in part, to provide for the recruitment for large wood to streams. Small headwater streams account for the majority of stream networks in many forested regions. Yet, our understanding of how riparian buffer width influences wood dynamics in headwater streams is relatively less...

  10. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples. © Crown copyright 2015.

  11. Evaluation of sonication treatment and buffer composition on rumen bacteria protein extraction and carboxymethylcellulase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prauchner, Carlos A; Kozloski, Gilberto V; Farenzena, Roberta

    2013-05-01

    The methodological procedures for studying the fibrolytic activity of rumen bacteria are not clearly established. In this study the efficiency of sonication treatment and buffer composition (i.e. buffer varying in tonicity or pH) on the level of protein extraction from the residue of forage samples incubated in the rumen of a grazing steer and the effect of buffer composition or CaCl₂ concentration on the carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activity of the released protein were evaluated. The amount of protein released from the residue of incubation was higher (P buffer pH (P buffer. Both linear and quadratic effects (P buffer pH on CMCase activity were significant, with CMCase activity being maximal at pH 5.4-6.1. CMCase activity was higher (P buffer solution that includes a calcium source. When pH is not a treatment factor, the buffer pH should be between 5.5 and 6. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Efficacy of buffer zones in disconnecting roads and streams in the coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. III Grace; E. Davis

    2010-01-01

    Established forest BMPs rely heavily on the forest floor to disconnect upslope activities from stream systems. Optimizing the buffer length required to negate the storm runoff contribution of upslope activities has been a point of interest for soil scientist, hydrologist, and conservation professionals for the last century. Minimum buffer lengths have been recommended...

  13. The Maintenance of Cross-Domain Associations in the Episodic Buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerock, Naomi; Vergauwe, Evie; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The episodic buffer has been described as a structure of working memory capable of maintaining multimodal information in an integrated format. Although the role of the episodic buffer in binding features into objects has received considerable attention, several of its characteristics have remained rather underexplored. This is the case for its…

  14. Effects of grazing management and buffer strips on metal runoff from pastures fertilized with poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal runoff from fields fertilized with poultry litter may pose a threat to aquatic systems. Buffer strips have been added to fields to reduce nutrients and solids runoff. However, scant information exists on the effects of buffer strips combined with grazing management strategies on metal runoff f...

  15. Experiences gained from implementing mandatory buffer strips in Denmark: how can we enhance their ecosystem services?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronvang, Brian; Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Baatrup-Pedersen, Annette

    The Danish Parliament adopted in June 2012 a Buffer Strip Act that required 10 m mandatory buffer strips (BSs) to be established along all watercourses and lakes with a surface area greater than 100 m2 from 1st September 2012. The main reasons for deploying BSs was to reduce nitrate-N leaching an...

  16. A Novel Buffer Management Architecture for Epidemic Routing in Delay Tolerant Networks (DTNs)

    KAUST Repository

    Elwhishi, Ahmed

    2010-11-17

    Delay tolerant networks (DTNs) are wireless networks in which an end-to-end path for a given node pair can never exist for an extended period. It has been reported as a viable approach in launching multiple message replicas in order to increase message delivery ratio and reduce message delivery delay. This advantage, nonetheless, is at the expense of taking more buffer space at each node. The combination of custody and replication entails high buffer and bandwidth overhead. This paper investigates a new buffer management architecture for epidemic routing in DTNs, which helps each node to make a decision on which message should be forwarded or dropped. The proposed buffer management architecture is characterized by a suite of novel functional modules, including Summary Vector Exchange Module (SVEM), Networks State Estimation Module (NSEM), and Utility Calculation Module (UCM). Extensive simulation results show that the proposed buffer management architecture can achieve superb performance against its counterparts in terms of delivery ratio and delivery delay.

  17. Salivary buffer capacity, pH, and stimulated flow rate of crack cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyceichoski, Iverson Ernani Cogo; Costa, Carlos Henrique; de Araújo, Cristiano Miranda; Brancher, João Armando; Resende, Luciane Grochocki; Vieira, Iran; de Lima, Antonio Adilson Soares

    2013-08-01

    Crack cocaine is the freebase form of cocaine that can be smoked. The use of this drug has been considered a public health problem in many countries. The aim of this study was to assess the stimulated salivary flow rate (SSFR), pH, and the buffer capacity of saliva in crack cocaine users. Stimulated whole saliva was collected from 54 selected crack cocaine users and 40 non-users. All samples were analyzed for SSFR, pH, and buffer capacity. SSFR was analyzed by gravimetric method. The buffer capacity and pH were determined using a digital pH meter. The crack cocaine users demonstrated higher buffer capacity than the control group (P > 0.05). Salivary pH was lower in crack cocaine users (P 0.05). Crack cocaine users might exhibit a significant decrease in salivary pH, but not in salivary flow rate or buffer capacity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of Sikora instead of SMP buffer to estimate the potential acidity of brazilian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Santanna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the efficiency of the Shoemaker, McLean, Pratt (SMP buffer method in estimating soil acidity, the presence of p-nitrophenol and potassium chromate in the solution, both hazardous substances, has caused increasing environmental concerns. The purpose of this study was to test Sikora method (Sikora, 2006 as an alternative to the adapted SMP buffer method, generally used to estimate potential acidity of Southern Brazilian soils. For the test, 21 soils in the South and Cerrado regions of Brazil were sampled. (1 The potential acidity values of these soils range from 35.95 to 4.02 cmol c kg-1 of soil, reflecting a wide acidity variation. The Sikora buffer does not mimic the adapted SMP buffer used in Southern Brazil, since the former has a low ability to distinguish soils with different acidity from each other, probably due to the higher buffer capacity than of the adapted SMP solution.

  19. Propagation of misfit dislocations from buffer/Si interface into Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna [El Sobrante, CA; Maltez, Rogerio Luis [Porto Alegre, BR; Morkoc, Hadis [Richmond, VA; Xie, Jinqiao [Raleigh, VA

    2011-08-30

    Misfit dislocations are redirected from the buffer/Si interface and propagated to the Si substrate due to the formation of bubbles in the substrate. The buffer layer growth process is generally a thermal process that also accomplishes annealing of the Si substrate so that bubbles of the implanted ion species are formed in the Si at an appropriate distance from the buffer/Si interface so that the bubbles will not migrate to the Si surface during annealing, but are close enough to the interface so that a strain field around the bubbles will be sensed by dislocations at the buffer/Si interface and dislocations are attracted by the strain field caused by the bubbles and move into the Si substrate instead of into the buffer epi-layer. Fabrication of improved integrated devices based on GaN and Si, such as continuous wave (CW) lasers and light emitting diodes, at reduced cost is thereby enabled.

  20. Toward an In Vivo Dissolution Methodology: A Comparison of Phosphate and Bicarbonate Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jennifer J.; McNamara, Daniel P.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the difference between the pharmaceutical phosphate buffers and the gastrointestinal bicarbonates in dissolution of ketoprofen and indomethacin, to illustrate the dependence of buffer differential on biopharmaceutical properties of BCS II weak acids, and to recommend phosphate buffers equivalent to bicarbonates. Methods The intrinsic dissolution rates of, ketoprofen and indomethacin, were experimentally measured using rotating disk method at 37°C in USP SIF/FaSSIF and various concentrations of bicarbonates. Theoretical models including an improved reaction plane model and a film model were applied to estimate the surrogate phosphate buffers equivalent to the bicarbonates. Results Experimental results show that the intrinsic dissolution rates of ketoprofen and indomethacin, in USP and FaSSIF phosphate buffers are 1.5–3.0 times of that in the 15 mM bicarbonates. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the buffer differential is largely dependent on the drug pKa and secondly on solubility, and weakly dependent on the drug diffusivity. Further, in accordance with the drug pKa, solubility and diffusivity, simple phosphate surrogate was proposed to match an average bicarbonate value (15 mM) of the upper gastrointestinal region. Specifically, phosphate buffers of 13–15 mM and 3–4 mM were recommended for ketoprofen and indomethacin, respectively. For both ketoprofen and indomethacin, the intrinsic dissolution using the phosphate surrogate buffers closely approximated the 15 mM bicarbonate buffer. Conclusions This work demonstrates the substantial difference between pharmaceutical phosphates and physiological bicarbonates in determining the drug intrinsic dissolution rates of BCS II weak acids, such as ketoprofen and indomethacin. Surrogate phosphates were recommended in order to closely reflect the in vivo dissolution of ketoprofen and indomethacin in gastrointestinal bicarbonates, which has significant implications for defining buffer systems for

  1. Effect of moderately acidic pH on heat resistance of Clostridium sporogenes spores in phosphate buffer and in buffered pea puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, M S; Leonard, S J; Barrett, E L

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH in the range 5.0 to 7.0 on the thermal destruction of spores of Clostridium sporogenes putrefactive anaerobe 3679 was examined by three methods: a capillary tube method in which spores were suspended in phosphate buffers, a thermoresistometer method in which spores were suspended in buffered pea puree adjusted to the same set of pH values, and a thermal death time can method in which spores were again suspended in buffered pea puree. The results indicated that increasing acidity is, in general, accompanied by decreasing heat resistance, although the pH effect was more pronounced at the higher than at the lower processing temperatures. Certain pH values appear to be critical, as they produced, in all three sets of experiments, effects which would not be predicted by the overall relationship between acidity and spore heat resistance. Differences between heat resistance in phosphate buffer as compared with that in pea puree adjusted to the same pH were also noted. D-values in buffer were found to be lower than those in pea puree, except at the highest temperatures coupled with the lowest pH values. The differences between buffer D-value and pea puree D-value were found to increase with increasing pH and with decreasing temperature. On the other hand, at all pH values examined, z-values determined in buffer were somewhat higher than those determined in pea puree adjusted to the same pH. PMID:7396485

  2. Gray wolves as climate change buffers in Yellowstone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Wilmers

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  3. Glacier melt buffering sustains river flow in the Pamir Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Eric; Andermann, Christoff; Gloaguen, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Central Asia's water resources and agricultural practices depend on snow and glacier melts in the high mountains. The Amu Darya, the main river draining the Pamir Mountains, exemplifies the resulting seasonality in stream flow. In winter, comparably low amounts of groundwater discharge feed the streams, while the bulk of precipitation is provided and stored as snow. Successive melting of snow cover and glaciers during summer releases these stored waters to the swelling rivers. Despite a strong variability in precipitation and temperatures over the entire Pamir Mountain region, river flow shows severely less variability. We investigate what processes lead to this apparent discrepancy by using a simple but robust hydrological model that we thoroughly validate with remote sensing snow cover observations, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, highlighting changes in total water storage, and hydrograph comparison. We find that glaciers play a paramount role by buffering extreme meteorological conditions to sustain stream flow. In a simplified scheme, low precipitation amounts in winter result in small snow stocks, compensated for by more intensive glacier melt, and vice versa. By carrying out analyses over the extensive catchment area of the Amu Darya in the high mountain domain, we highlight regional differences in the effectiveness of this mechanism. Regional influences of wind systems and associated moisture transport as well as glaciated area emerge as main factors. Modeled negative glacier mass balances between -0.38 and -0.93 m/year agree with other studies based on geodetic methods and indicate a future reduction in stream flow sustainability. This not only exacerbates the conflict potential between riparian countries downstream, but also means that extreme weather events are more likely to cause floods and droughts.

  4. Gray wolves as climate change buffers in Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmers, Christopher C; Getz, Wayne M

    2005-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus) together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  5. Gray Wolves as Climate Change Buffers in Yellowstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmers Christopher C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  6. Highly smooth Nb surfaces fabricated by buffered electropolishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy T. Wu; John Mammossor; H. Phillips; Jean Delayen; Charles Reece; Amy Wilkerson; David Smith; Robert Ike

    2005-05-01

    It is demonstrated that highly smooth Nb surfaces can be obtained through Buffered ElectroPolishing (BEP) employing an electrolyte consisting of lactic, sulfuric, and hydrofluoric acids. Parameters that control the polishing process are optimized to achieve the smoothest surface finish with the help of surface observations using a scanning electron microscope and a Metallographic Optical Microscope (MOM). The polishing rate of BEP is determined to be 0.646 {micro}m/min that is much higher than 0.381 {micro}m/min achieved by the conventional ElectroPolishing (EP) process widely used in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) community. A high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer is used to view morphology of the treated Nb surfaces. Statistical data, such as, rms, total indicator runout, and arithmetic mean deviation of the Nb surfaces are extracted from the profilometer images. It is found that Nb surfaces treated by BEP are an order of magnitude smoother than those treated by the optimized EP process. The chemical composition of the Nb surfaces after BEP is analyzed by static and dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) systems. Cracking patterns of the Nb surfaces under different primary ion sources of Ga{sup +}, Au{sup +}, and Ar{sup +} are reported. The depth profile of the surface niobium oxides is studied through continuously monitoring niobium and its relevant oxides' peaks as a function of time. Dynamic SIMS results imply that the surface oxide structure of Nb may be more complicated than what usually believed and can be inhomogeneous. Preliminary results of BEP on Nb SRF single cell cavities and half-cells are reported. It is shown that smooth and bright surfaces can be obtained in 30 minutes when the electric field inside a SRF cavity is uniform during a BEP process. This study reveals that BEP is a highly promising technique for surface treatment on Nb SRF cavities to be used in particle accelerators.

  7. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  8. New pH-buffering system for media utilized during gamete and embryo manipulations for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Jason E; Pool, Thomas B

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance of stable pH is important for optimizing gamete and embryo culture. One method to stabilize pH entails using zwitterionic buffers in IVF handling media used outside the laboratory incubator. Current handling media utilize single buffers, such as MOPS or HEPES. However, the use of a single buffer limits the ability to adjust the range of buffering capacity. Furthermore, changes in temperature alter buffering of these compounds. Therefore, traditional IVF handling media utilizing a single buffer may not provide ideal pH buffering. This study reports that combining multiple buffers, such as HEPES, MOPS and DIPSO, into a single medium in various ratios gives the ability to shift the effective buffering range to cover a specific pH. Additionally, by combining various buffers, it is possible to expand pH buffering over a range of temperatures, while simultaneously reducing the absolute concentration of individual buffers, thereby reducing or alleviating toxicity concerns. This report verifies that DIPSO, MOPS and HEPES, and their combinations, support embryo development. Therefore, utilization of bi- and tri-buffered media, containing a mixture of HEPES, MOPS or DIPSO, offers advantages compared with media containing HEPES or MOPS alone, and may be used for procedures such as oocyte retrieval, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo transfer and cryopreservation.

  9. Preliminary Study on the Damping Effect of a Lateral Damping Buffer under a Debris Flow Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the impact of debris flows on structures and exploring the feasibility of applying energy dissipation devices or shock isolators to reduce the damage caused by debris flows can make great contribution to the design of disaster prevention structures. In this paper, we propose a new type of device, a lateral damping buffer, to reduce the vulnerability of building structures to debris flows. This lateral damping buffer has two mechanisms of damage mitigation: when debris flows impact on a building, it acts as a buffer, and when the structure vibrates due to the impact, it acts as a shock absorber, which can reduce the maximum acceleration response and subsequent vibration respectively. To study the effectiveness of such a lateral damping buffer, an impact test is conducted, which mainly involves a lateral damping buffer attached to a two-degree-of-freedom structure under a simulated debris flow load. To enable the numerical study, the equation of motion of the structure along with the lateral damping buffer is derived. A subsequent parametric study is performed to optimize the lateral damping buffer. Finally, a practical design procedure is also provided.

  10. Buffer architecture for biaxially textured structures and method of fabricating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, David P.; Park, Chan; Goyal, Amit

    2004-04-06

    The invention relates to an article with an improved buffer layer architecture comprising a substrate having a metal surface, and an epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The epitaxial buffer layer comprises at least one of the group consisting of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, and compounds having at least one of Ca and a rare earth element stabilizing cubic phases of ZrO.sub.2 and/or HfO.sub.2. The article can also include a superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. The article can also include an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article comprises providing a substrate with a metal surface, depositing on the metal surface an epitaxial buffer layer comprising at least one material selected from the group consisting of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, and compounds having at least one of Ca and a rare earth element stabilizing cubic phases of at least one of ZrO.sub.2 and HfO.sub.2. The epitaxial layer depositing step occurs in a vacuum with a background pressure of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-5 Torr. The method can further comprise depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  11. [Relationship between cariogenic microbe, salivary buffer capacity and early childhood caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiong; Bai, Jie; Qin, Man

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between Mutans streptococcus (MS), Lactobacilli (LB), pH value and buffer capacity of saliva and early childhood caries (ECC). A total of 178 children aged from 42 to 54 months were recruited from 14 urban kindergartens in Beijing. The ECC group contained 87 children with more than 5 decayed teeth, and the control group was composed of 91 caries-free children. Unstimulated (UWS, 2 ml) and stimulated (SWS, 2 ml) whole saliva were collected in each subject. The pH value and buffer capacity of saliva were measured using an electro-acidimeter (+/- 0.01pH). MS and LB were isolated from 96.6% and 79.3% of children with ECC, which were significantly higher than those (63.7%, 27.5%) of caries-free children (P buffer capacity of SWS were significantly higher than that of UWS (P buffer capacity of both UWS and SWS in ECC children were significantly higher than caries-free children (P buffer capacity of saliva in caries-free children. Significant correlation (r = 0.249, P buffer capacity of stimulated saliva in ECC children. MS and LB were important pathogens for ECC. Lower initial pH value and buffer capacity of saliva may be an important factor of ECC.

  12. Determination of intracellular buffer values after metabolic inhibition by fluoride and nitrilotriacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, H O

    1990-08-01

    Non-bicarbonate buffer values have been analysed in homogenates of squid mantle muscle and toad gastrocnemius muscle using the PCO2 equilibration technique. Homogenate metabolism was inhibited by the addition of potassium fluoride and nitrilotriacetic acid. After an initial change in the concentration of organic phosphates a new metabolic equilibrium was achieved which was insensitive to pH changes during PCO2 variations. Inaccurate measurements of homogenate buffer values could, thereby, be prevented. The accumulation of inorganic phosphate during the initial metabolic shift caused an increase in homogenate buffer values. Levels of unbound inorganic phosphate, which are effective in buffering, were estimated by enzymatic analysis in homogenate ultrafiltrates. Based on the evaluation of apparent dissociation constants pK', and buffer values for fluoride and inorganic phosphate, the non-bicarbonate, non-phosphatei (i: inorganic) buffer value of the tissue was calculated. The level of free inorganic phosphate in the resting tissue was considered for an estimate of the intracellular non-bicarbonate buffer value under control conditions.

  13. Buffer salt effects in off-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marák, Jozef; Stanová, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the impact of buffer salts/matrix effects on the signal in direct injection MS with an electrospray interface (DI-ESI-MS) following pITP fractionation of the sample was studied. A range of buffers frequently used in CE analyses (pH 3-10) was prepared containing 10, 50, and 90% v/v of ACN, respectively. The sets of calibration solutions of cetirizine (an antihistaminic drug with an amphiprotic character) within a 0.05-2.0 mg/L concentration range were prepared in different buffers. The greatest enhancements in the MS signal (in terms of change in the slope of the calibration line) were obtained for the beta-alanine buffer (pH 3.5) in positive ionization and for the borate buffer (pH 9.2) in negative ionization, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of buserelin (a peptidic drug). The slope of the calibration line for solutions containing the beta-alanine buffer with 50% of ACN was 4 times higher than for water or urine, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the buffer salt/matrix effects in an offline combination of pITP and DI-ESI-MS can also play a positive role, as they can enhance the signal in MS. A similar influence of the above effects can also be presumed in the CE techniques combined on-line with ESI-MS.

  14. TRIS buffer in simulated body fluid distorts the assessment of glass-ceramic scaffold bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohanová, Dana; Boccaccini, Aldo Roberto; Yunos, Darmawati Mohamad; Horkavcová, Diana; Březovská, Iva; Helebrant, Aleš

    2011-06-01

    The paper deals with the characterisation of the bioactive phenomena of glass-ceramic scaffold derived from Bioglass® (containing 77 wt.% of crystalline phases Na(2)O·2CaO·3SiO(2) and CaO·SiO(2) and 23 wt.% of residual glass phase) using simulated body fluid (SBF) buffered with tris-(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (TRIS). A significant effect of the TRIS buffer on glass-ceramic scaffold dissolution in SBF was detected. To better understand the influence of the buffer, the glass-ceramic scaffold was exposed to a series of in vitro tests using different media as follows: (i) a fresh liquid flow of SBF containing tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane; (ii) SBF solution without TRIS buffer; (iii) TRIS buffer alone; and (iv) demineralised water. The in vitro tests were provided under static and dynamic arrangements. SBF buffered with TRIS dissolved both the crystalline and residual glass phases of the scaffold and a crystalline form of hydroxyapatite (HAp) developed on the scaffold surface. In contrast, when TRIS buffer was not present in the solutions only the residual glassy phase dissolved and an amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca-P) phase formed on the scaffold surface. It was confirmed that the TRIS buffer primarily dissolved the crystalline phase of the glass-ceramic, doubled the dissolving rate of the scaffold and moreover supported the formation of crystalline HAp. This significant effect of the buffer TRIS on bioactive glass-ceramic scaffold degradation in SBF has not been demonstrated previously and should be considered when analysing the results of SBF immersion bioactivity tests of such systems. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Riparian forest buffers mitigate the effects of deforestation on fish assemblages in tropical headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, Christopher M; Kennedy, Brian P

    2009-03-01

    Riparian forest buffers may play a critical role in moderating the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream ecosystems, but very few studies have examined the ecological effects of riparian buffers in the tropics. To test the hypothesis that riparian forest buffers can reduce the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream biota, we sampled fish assemblages in lowland headwater streams in southeastern Costa Rica representing three different treatments: (1) forested reference stream reaches, (2) stream reaches adjacent to pasture with a riparian forest buffer averaging at least 15 m in width on each bank, and (3) stream reaches adjacent to pasture without a riparian forest buffer. Land cover upstream from the study reaches was dominated by forest at all of the sites, allowing us to isolate the reach-scale effects of the three study treatments. Fish density was significantly higher in pasture reaches than in forest and forest buffer reaches, mostly due to an increase in herbivore-detritivores, but fish biomass did not differ among reach types. Fish species richness was also higher in pasture reaches than in forested reference reaches, while forest buffer reaches were intermediate. Overall, the taxonomic and trophic structure of fish assemblages in forest and forest buffer reaches was very similar, while assemblages in pasture reaches were quite distinct. These patterns were persistent across three sampling periods during our 15-month study. Differences in stream ecosystem conditions between pasture reaches and forested sites, including higher stream temperatures, reduced fruit and seed inputs, and a trend toward increased periphyton abundance, appeared to favor fish species normally found in larger streams and facilitate a native invasion process. Forest buffer reaches, in contrast, had stream temperatures and allochthonous inputs more similar to forested streams. Our results illustrate the importance of riparian areas to stream ecosystem integrity in the tropics

  16. Reconnecting tile drainage to riparian buffer hydrology for enhanced nitrate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, D B; Isenhart, T M

    2014-03-01

    Riparian buffers are a proven practice for removing NO from overland flow and shallow groundwater. However, in landscapes with artificial subsurface (tile) drainage, most of the subsurface flow leaving fields is passed through the buffers in drainage pipes, leaving little opportunity for NO removal. We investigated the feasibility of re-routing a fraction of field tile drainage as subsurface flow through a riparian buffer for increasing NO removal. We intercepted an existing field tile outlet draining a 10.1-ha area of a row-cropped field in central Iowa and re-routed a fraction of the discharge as subsurface flow along 335 m of an existing riparian buffer. Tile drainage from the field was infiltrated through a perforated pipe installed 75 cm below the surface by maintaining a constant head in the pipe at a control box installed in-line with the existing field outlet. During 2 yr, >18,000 m (55%) of the total flow from the tile outlet was redirected as infiltration within the riparian buffer. The redirected water seeped through the 60-m-wide buffer, raising the water table approximately 35 cm. The redirected tile flow contained 228 kg of NO. On the basis of the strong decrease in NO concentrations within the shallow groundwater across the buffer, we hypothesize that the NO did not enter the stream but was removed within the buffer by plant uptake, microbial immobilization, or denitrification. Redirecting tile drainage as subsurface flow through a riparian buffer increased its NO removal benefit and is a promising management practice to improve surface water quality within tile-drained landscapes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Sustained housing-type social buffering following social housing in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Ishida, Aya; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-05-01

    In social animals, recovery from the adverse effects of distressing stimuli is promoted by subsequent cohousing with a conspecific animal(s). This phenomenon has been termed housing-type social buffering. We previously found that social housing induced housing-type social buffering in fear-conditioned male rats. This buffering took the form of attenuated conditioned hyperthermia in response to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). Here, we assessed whether this social buffering is sustained even if the subject is housed alone after a period of social housing. When fear-conditioned subjects were housed alone during a 48-h period between conditioning and re-exposure to the auditory CS, they exhibited conditioned hyperthermia in response to the CS. However, conditioned hyperthermia was not observed when the 12-h period of social housing began 24 and 36h after conditioning during the 48-h period. This was not the case when the 12-h period of social housing began 0 and 12h after the conditioning. These results suggest that housing-type social buffering is sustained for 12h after the 12-h period of social housing. We next considered whether increasing the duration of social housing would extend the period of social buffering. We observed social buffering of conditioned hyperthermia 24 and 48, but not 96h after a 24-h period of social housing. These results suggest that social buffering was extended when the duration of social housing was increased. Taken together, our findings indicate that housing-type social buffering is sustained after a period of social housing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methyl Bromide Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation: Active Aeration, Horizontal Stacks, 8 Hours or Less

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains buffer zone tables required by certain methyl bromide commodity fumigant product labels that refer to Buffer Zone Lookup Tables located at epa.gov/pesticide-registration/mbcommoditybuffer on the label.

  19. Methyl Bromide Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation: Active Aeration, No Stack, 8 Hours or Less

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains buffer zone tables required by certain methyl bromide commodity fumigant product labels that refer to Buffer Zone Lookup Tables located at epa.gov/pesticide-registration/mbcommoditybuffer on the label.

  20. Methyl Bromide Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation: Active Aeration, No Stack, More than 8 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains buffer zone tables required by certain methyl bromide commodity fumigant product labels that refer to Buffer Zone Lookup Tables located at epa.gov/pesticide-registration/mbcommoditybuffer on the label.

  1. The W-W02 Oxygen Fugacity Buffer at High Pressures and Temperatures: Implications for f02 Buffering and Metal-silicate Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Campbell, A. J.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) controls multivalent phase equilibria and partitioning of redox-sensitive elements, and it is important to understand this thermodynamic parameter in experimental and natural systems. The coexistence of a metal and its oxide at equilibrium constitutes an oxygen buffer which can be used to control or calculate fO2 in high pressure experiments. Application of 1-bar buffers to high pressure conditions can lead to inaccuracies in fO2 calculations because of unconstrained pressure dependencies. Extending fO2 buffers to pressures and temperatures corresponding to the Earth's deep interior requires precise determinations of the difference in volume (Delta) V) between the buffer phases. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction data were obtained using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and a multi anvil press (MAP) to measure unit cell volumes of W and WO2 at pressures and temperatures up to 70 GPa and 2300 K. These data were fitted to Birch-Murnaghan 3rd-order thermal equations of state using a thermal pressure approach; parameters for W are KT = 306 GPa, KT' = 4.06, and aKT = 0.00417 GPa K-1. Two structural phase transitions were observed for WO2 at 4 and 32 GPa with structures in P21/c, Pnma and C2/c space groups. Equations of state were fitted for these phases over their respective pressure ranges yielding the parameters KT = 190, 213, 300 GPa, KT' = 4.24, 5.17, 4 (fixed), and aKT = 0.00506, 0.00419, 0.00467 GPa K-1 for the P21/c, Pnma and C2/c phases, respectively. The W-WO2 buffer (WWO) was extended to high pressure by inverting the W and WO2 equations of state to obtain phase volumes at discrete pressures (1-bar to 100 GPa, 1 GPa increments) along isotherms (300 to 3000K, 100 K increments). The slope of the absolute fO2 of the WWO buffer is positive with increasing temperature up to approximately 70 GPa and is negative above this pressure. The slope is positive along isotherms from 1000 to 3000K with increasing pressure up to at least 100 GPa. The WWO buffer is at

  2. MgO buffer layers on rolled nickel or copper as superconductor substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan; Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederic A.

    2001-01-01

    Buffer layer architectures are epitaxially deposited on biaxially-textured rolled-Ni and/or Cu substrates for high current conductors, and more particularly buffer layer architectures such as MgO/Ag/Pt/Ni, MgO/Ag/Pd/Ni, MgO/Ag/Ni, MgO/Ag/Pd/Cu, MgO/Ag/Pt/Cu, and MgO/Ag/Cu. Techniques used to deposit these buffer layers include electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, rf magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), combustion CVD, and spray pyrolysis.

  3. Dynamic PDCP buffer management for TCP optimization in radio network controller (RNC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Shi, Yu; Ma, Jian

    2002-08-01

    Because of unbalanced inbound and outbound bit rate in PDCP buffer, the congestion may happen in 3G RNC. In this paper, one mechanism, called Dynamic buffer Management (DBM), is proposed to enhance the performance while TCP traffic is transmitted from the server in Internet to the mobile user. The simulation model aiming at the current PDCP buffer management is introduced first, the DBM mechanism is described in detail then. The performance comparison between the existing method and the DBM proves the efficiency of the DBM.

  4. Dynamic Floating Output Stage for Low Power Buffer Amplifier for LCD Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hari Shanker Srivastava; R.K Baghel

    2015-01-01

    This topic proposes low-power buffer means low quiescent current buffer amplifier. A dynamic floating current node is used at the output of two-stage amplifier to increase the charging and discharging of output capacitor as well as settling time of buffer. It is designed for 10 bit digital analog converter to support for LCD column driver it is implemented in 180 nm CMOS technology with the quiescent current of 5 µA for 30 pF capacitance, the settling time calculated as 4.5µs, the...

  5. Data on four criteria for targeting the placement of conservation buffers in agricultural landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyuan Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Four criteria are generally used to prioritize agricultural lands for placing conservation buffers. The criteria include soil erodibility, hydrological sensitivity, wildlife habitat, and impervious surface rate that capture conservation buffers’ benefits in reducing soil erosion, controlling runoff generation, enhancing wildlife habitat, and mitigating stormwater impacts, respectively. This article describes the data used to derive the values of those attributes and a scheme to classify the values in multi-criteria analysis of conservation buffer placement in “Choosing between alternative placement strategies for conservation buffers using borda count” [1].

  6. Buffer capacity and precipitation control of pH solubilized phenytoin formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Núñez, F A; Yalkowsky, S H

    1999-08-05

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a phenytoin (DPH) intravenous formulation that does not precipitate upon dilution. The effect of the buffer capacity at pH 12 of several DPH formulations on the extent and lag-time of DPH precipitation upon dilution with Sorensen's phosphate buffer (SPB) is evaluated. DPH precipitation was evaluated by means of static and dynamic in vitro dilution methods. It is shown that an increase in the formulation buffer capacity decreases substantially the extent of DPH precipitation and increases the lag-time for precipitation. In addition, a comparison between static and dynamic in vitro methods to measure precipitation is presented.

  7. The importance of moisture buffering for indoor climate and energy conditions of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Grau, Karl

    2007-01-01

    A new Nordic test method specifies a test protocol for determination of the so-called Moisture Buffer Value (MBV) of building materials. But how important is moisture buffering to determine the indoor humidity condition of buildings? The paper will present the new MBV-definition. Although...... buffering to save energy by reducing the requirement for ventilation in periods, and still maintain the same quality of the indoor climate? The paper will outline some possibilities for analytical/numerical calculations, and will answer some of the posed questions on the probable benefit of taking moisture...

  8. Urban scenic spot interest space research based on transportation junction buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhou; Li, Wang; Sida, Cao; Shijie, Li; Xu, Li; Chongchong, Xue

    2017-03-01

    According to city tourism features, this paper studies the urban scenic spot interest space based on transportation junction buffer. City tourism features and the transportation junction radiation impact on scenic spots are studied. Take Zhengzhou city as an example, urban scenic spots are sampled and classified. Research range and objects are confirmed. By setting up buffer model and interest field data model, tourists’ interests on scenic spots within buffers are studied quantitatively. Scenic spot interest space is studied and analyzed. Meanwhile, tourism decision support projects relying on scenic spot interest space are provided for tourists to refer to.

  9. The effect of respiration buffer composition on mitochondrial metabolism and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenman, Lucas C; Vander Ploeg, Matthew R; Miller, Mackinzie L; Zhang, Yizhu; Bazil, Jason N

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies on isolated mitochondria critically rely on the right choice of respiration buffer. Differences in buffer composition can lead to dramatically different respiration rates leading to difficulties in comparing prior studies. The ideal buffer facilities high ADP-stimulated respiratory rates and minimizes substrate transport effects so that the ability to distinguish between various treatments and conditions is maximal. In this study, we analyzed a variety of respiration buffers and substrate combinations to determine the optimal conditions to support mitochondrial function through ADP-stimulated respiration and uncoupled respiration using FCCP. The buffers consisted of a standard KCl based buffer (B1) and three modified buffers with chloride replaced by the K-lactobionate, sucrose, and the antioxidant taurine (B2) or K-gluconate (B3). The fourth buffer (B4) was identical to B2 except that K-lactobionate was replaced with K-gluconate. The substrate combinations consisted of metabolites that utilize different pathways of mitochondrial metabolism. To test mitochondrial function, we used isolated cardiac guinea pig mitochondria and measured oxygen consumption for three respiratory states using an Oroboros Oxygraph-2k. These states were the leak state (energized mitochondria in the absence of adenylates), ADP-stimulated state (energized mitochondria in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations), and uncoupled state (energized mitochondria in the presence of FCCP). On average across all substrate combinations, buffers B2, B3, and B4 had an increase of 16%, 26%, and 35% for the leak state, ADP-simulated state, and uncoupled state, respectively, relative to rates using B1. The common feature distinguishing these buffers from B1 is the notable lack of high chloride concentrations. Based on the respiratory rate metrics obtained with the substrate combinations, we conclude that the adenine nucleotide translocase, the dicarboxylate carrier, and the alpha

  10. Approach to the design of monitoring buffer for read-out ASICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, E. V.; Vinogradov, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the approach to designing built-in monitoring buffers for the purpose of checking the functionality of ASICs as parts of test printed boards. A figure of merit (FOM), based on that analysis is suggested. Features of the FOM, applied to particle physics experiments, are the speed, power consumption, load driving capability and occupied chip area. As an example, illustrating the choice of buffer according to the proposed FOM, there are presented the results of designing a buffer version as part of an ASIC for the CBM MUCH(http://www.fair-center.eu/for-users/experiments/cbm.html).

  11. 'Fair-wind gas cell' - a new concept of a buffer gas cell design

    CERN Document Server

    Varentsov, V L

    2003-01-01

    A new concept of the buffer gas cell design is presented for the first time. For fast and efficient transport of stopped ions through the gas cell and afterwards to guide them out of the cell, the use of an intensive compulsory buffer gas flow through the cell combined with an RF-funnel structure is suggested. The operation of this type of gas cell that we call the fair-wind gas cell has been investigated by means of detailed computer simulations. Results of calculations for big size gas cell at 1 bar He buffer gas pressure are presented and discussed.

  12. Herbal Supplement in a Buffer for Dry Eye Syndrome Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chang Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES is one of the most common types of ocular diseases. There is a major need to treat DES in a simple yet efficient way. Artificial tears (AT are the most commonly used agents for treating DES, but are not very effective. Herbal extractions of ferulic acid (FA, an anti-oxidant agent, and kaempferol (KM, an anti-inflammatory reagent, were added to buffer solution (BS to replace ATs for DES treatment. The cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects were examined in vitro by co-culture with human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs to obtain the optimal concentration of KM and FA for treating HCECs. Physical properties of BS, such as pH value, osmolality, and refractive index were also examined. Then, rabbits with DES were used for therapeutic evaluation. Tear production, corneal damage, and ocular irritation in rabbits’ eyes were examined. The non-toxic concentrations of KM and FA for HCEC cultivation over 3 days were 1 µM and 100 µM, respectively. Live/dead stain results also show non-toxicity of KM and FA for treating HCECs. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HCECs in inflammatory conditions treated with 100 µM FA and 1 µM KM (FA100/KM1 showed lower IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα expression when examined by real-time PCR. The BS with FA100/KM1 had neutral pH, and a similar osmolality and refractive index to human tears. Topical delivery of BS + FA100/KM1 showed no irritation to rabbit eyes. The corneal thickness in the BS + FA100/KM1 treated group was comparable to normal eyes. Results of DES rabbits treated with BS + FA100/KM1 showed less corneal epithelial damage and higher tear volume than the normal group. In conclusion, we showed that the combination of FA (100 µM and KM (1 µM towards treating inflamed HCECs had an anti-inflammatory effect, and it is effective in treating DES rabbits when BS is added in combination with these two herbal supplements and used as a topical eye drop.

  13. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, I. E.; Olsen, Y. S.; Ramajo, L.; Basso, L.; Steckbauer, A.; Moore, T. S.; Howard, J.; Duarte, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterized by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH ranges is in shallow (5-12 m) seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows from 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI). LAI was positively correlated to mean and max pHNBS and max ΩAr. Oxygen production positively influenced the range and maximum pHNBS and the range of ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy) influenced ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. ΩAr was positively correlated with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, demonstrating a direct link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. There was a direct relationship between ΩAr, influenced directly by meadow LAI, and CaCO3 content of the leaves. Therefore, calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, might benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. The meadow might be capable of providing refugia for calcifiers by increasing pH and ΩAr through metabolic activity. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide this refugia function in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, both strongly linked to LAI. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  14. Biological legacies buffer local species extinction after logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphi, Jörgen; Jönsson, Mari T; Gustafsson, Lena; Bugmann, H

    2014-02-01

    Clearcutting has been identified as a main threat to forest biodiversity. In the last few decades, alternatives to clearcutting have gained much interest. Living and dead trees are often retained after harvest to serve as structural legacies to mitigate negative effects of forestry. However, this practice is widely employed without information from systematic before-after control-impact studies to assess the processes involved in species responses after clearcutting with retention. We performed a large-scale survey of the occurrence of logging-sensitive and red-listed bryophytes and lichens before and after clearcutting with the retention approach. A methodology was adopted that, for the first time in studies on retention approaches, enabled monitoring of location-specific substrates. We used uncut stands as controls to assess the variables affecting the survival of species after a major disturbance. In total, 12 bryophyte species and 27 lichen species were analysed. All were classified as sensitive to logging, and most species are also currently red-listed. We found that living and dead trees retained after final harvest acted as refugia in which logging-sensitive species were able to survive for 3 to 7 years after logging. Depending on type of retention and organism group, between 35% and 92% of the species occurrences persisted on retained structures. Most species observed outside retention trees or patches disappeared. Larger pre-harvest population sizes of bryophytes on dead wood increased the survival probability of the species and hence buffered the negative effects of logging. Synthesis and applications. Careful spatial planning of retention structures is required to fully embrace the habitats of logging-sensitive species. Bryophytes and lichens persisted to a higher degree in retention patches compared to solitary trees or in the clearcut area. Retaining groups of trees in logged areas will help to sustain populations of species over the clearcut phase

  15. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Despite progress in cocaine immunotherapy, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of antibodies which bind to cocaine and its metabolites are not well understood. It is also not clear how the interactions between them differ in a complex matrix such as the serum present in the human body. In the present study, we have used microscale thermophoresis (MST, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR we have evaluated the affinity properties of a representative mouse monoclonal (mAb08 as well as those of polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mouse and human patient serum.MST analysis of fluorescently tagged mAb08 binding to cocaine reveals an approximately 15 fold decrease in its equilibrium dissociation constant in 20-50% human serum compared with that in saline buffer. A similar trend was also found using enriched polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mice and patient serum, for which we have used fluorescently tagged bovine serum albumin conjugated to succinyl norcocaine (BSA-SNC. This conjugate closely mimics both cocaine and the hapten used to raise these antibodies. The ITC data also revealed that cocaine has a moderate affinity of about 2 µM to 20% human serum and very little interaction with human serum albumin or nonspecific human IgG at that concentration range. In a SPR inhibition experiment, the binding of mAb08 to immobilized BSA-SNC was inhibited by cocaine and benzoylecgonine in a highly competitive manner, whereas the purified polyclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans and mice, revealed preferential selectivity to pharmacologically active cocaine but not to the inactive metabolite benzoylecgonine. We have also developed a simple binding model to simulate the challenges associated with cocaine immunotherapy using the variable quantitative and kinetic properties of the antibodies.High sensitivity calorimetric determination of antibody binding to cocaine and its metabolites provide

  16. Neighbourhood ethnic diversity buffers school readiness impact in ESL children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchala, Chassidy; Vu, Lan T H; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2010-01-01

    Contextual factors, as measured by neighbourhood characteristics, shape the experiences children have and affect their "school readiness", i.e., whether they are well or poorly prepared for the transition from home to kindergarten. This study assessed the independent effects of individual and neighbourhood factors on school readiness; specifically, it examined whether and to what degree neighbourhood factors modified children's language ability and thus their school readiness in a population of children in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The study included all children attending kindergarten in 2001, 2003 and 2005 in Saskatoon. School readiness and child characteristics were measured by the Early Development Instrument (EDI). The EDI measures child development at school commencement in five domains: physical health and well-being, social competence, emotional maturity, cognitive and language development, and communication skills and general knowledge. Data from the 2001 Census were used to characterize Saskatoon's neighbourhoods. Multilevel modeling examined the independent and buffering or exacerbating effects of individual and neighbourhood factors on the relation between English as a Second Language (ESL) status in children and EDI domain scores. ESL children had significantly lower scores on all EDI domains compared with non-ESL children. Certain factors (e.g., younger age, male, Aboriginal status, having special needs) were significantly related to lower readiness in terms of the emotional maturity, and communication skills and general knowledge domains. Importantly, children who lived in neighbourhoods that were highly transient (with a higher proportion of residents who had moved in the previous year) had lower EDI scores on both domains, and those in neighbourhoods with lower rates of employment had lower EDI scores on communication skills and general knowledge. Neighbourhood ethnic diversity mitigated the negative impact of ESL status on school readiness for both

  17. A Novel Tool to Facilitate the Learning of Buffering Mechanism by Undergraduate Students of the Biological Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Eduardo O.; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the application and evaluation of a novel didactic tool (buffer kit) is described to make it easy for students in the biological area to overcome their conceptual deficiencies that render the learning of the buffering mechanism difficult. The buffer kit was constructed with double-face EVA cards with a conjugated acid formula…

  18. Riparian buffer design guidelines for water quality and wildlife habitat functions on agricultural landscapes in the Intermountain West: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig W. Johnson; Susan Buffler

    2008-01-01

    This hypothetical case study illustrates how the riparian buffer planning protocol described in the RB handbook is used to plan a buffer for both water quality and wildlife conservation on a specific project site. The case study site includes riparian buffer characteristics typical of the study area-variable topography and soils, flood plain wetlands, seeps, springs,...

  19. Investigations into the stabilization of drugs by sugar glasses : III. The influence of various high-pH buffers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H C; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W; Frijlink, Henderik W

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of the high-pH buffers ammediol, borax, CHES, TRIS, and Tricine on the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrated fraction (Tg') of trehalose/buffer and inulin/buffer solutions at pH 6.0 and pH 9.8. Also, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of sugar

  20. Riparian buffer design guidelines for water quality and wildlife habitat functions on agricultural landscapes in the Intermountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig W. Johnson; Susan Buffler

    2008-01-01

    Intermountain West planners, designers, and resource managers are looking for science-based procedures for determining buffer widths and management techniques that will optimize the benefits riparian ecosystems provide. This study reviewed the riparian buffer literature, including protocols used to determine optimum buffer widths for water quality and wildlife habitat...

  1. Glycine buffered synthesis of layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides (green rusts)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Huang, Lizhi; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund

    2017-01-01

    H fluctuations during base addition and hence allows for fast GRSO4 precipitation, minimizing byproduct formation. The use of other pH buffers [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid and 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol] was also tested but failed. Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction......Layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) are efficient reducing agents against oxidizing contaminants such as chromate, nitrate, selenite, and nitroaromatic compounds and chlorinated solvents. In this study, we adopted a buffered precipitation approach where glycine (GLY) was used...... in the absence of GLY, synthesis failed under similar conditions. Gycine functions as both a pH buffer and a ligand; Fe(II)-GLY complexes serve as a source of base (Fe(II)-GLY+H2O→Fe(II)+H-GLY+OH(-)) during GR formation, supplying about 45% of the total base required for the synthesis. The GLY buffer decreases p...

  2. Side Effect of Good's Buffers on Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticle Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Wagner, Michal; Undall-Behrend Christiansen, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    we chose the Good's buffers 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) and 4-(N-morpholino)butanesulfonic acid (MOBS) as [AuCl4]- reducing agents. Resulting AuNP solutions were subjected to electrochemical investigations along with UV-vis and fluorescence......In search of fluorescent nanoclusters (NCs) for bioimaging, several methods of synthesis have been attempted. Particularly, formation of gold NCs (AuNCs) during synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Good's buffers was reported based on the optical properties of the reactions mixtures. Here...... spectroscopy. Distinct absorption features at ca. 290 and 360 nm and fluorescence emission in the 408-484 nm range are observed in filtered AuNP-free solutions. Electrochemical oxidation of these buffers generates similar optical properties, suggesting that the degradation products of the buffers contribute...

  3. Enhanced TCP Congestion Control with Higher Utilization in Under-Buffered Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dowon; Jang, Ju Wook

    TCP Reno is not fully utilized in under-buffered links. We propose a new TCP congestion control algorithm that can utilize the link almost up to 100% except the first congestion avoidance cycle. Our scheme estimates the minimum congestion window size for full link utilization in every congestion avoidance cycle and sends extra packets without touching TCP Reno congestion control. It has the same RTT fairness and the same saw-tooth wave as TCP Reno does. Our scheme does not affect competing TCP Reno flows since it uses only unused link capacity. We provide a simple mathematical modeling as well as ns-2 simulation results which show that the link utilization is improved by up to 19.88% for k=1/8 against TCP Reno when the buffer is k times the optimal buffer size. We claim that our scheme is useful for transmitting large amount of data in under-buffered links.

  4. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Agricultural Buffers by 12-Digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset estimates the average agricultural buffer width, the percentage of agricultural lands with flow paths that would intersect natural land...

  6. Describing the Access Network by means of Router Buffer Modelling: A New Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sequeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of the routers’ buffer may affect the quality of service (QoS of network services under certain conditions, since it may modify some traffic characteristics, as delay or jitter, and may also drop packets. As a consequence, the characterization of the buffer is interesting, especially when multimedia flows are transmitted and even more if they transport information with real-time requirements. This work presents a new methodology with the aim of determining the technical and functional characteristics of real buffers (i.e., behaviour, size, limits, and input and output rate of a network path. It permits the characterization of intermediate buffers of different devices in a network path across the Internet.

  7. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Baltimore, MD - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, tree cover is defined as Trees & Forest and...

  9. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees & Forest...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees and Forest,...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. Forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody Wetlands. There is a...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  14. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees and Forest,...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  4. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  7. Numerical Study on the Effect of Buffer Bow Structure in Ship-to-ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yasuhira; Endo, Hisayoshi; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2005-01-01

    A disastrous oil spill from a struck oil tanker has become one of the major problems in view of conservation of maritime environment. So far double hulls (D/H) have been introduced to reduce the consequences of collision and grounding events In order to further reduce the oil spill from struck oil...... tankers, the introduction of buffer bulbous bows has been proposed. Relatively soft buffer bows absorb part of the kinetic energy of the striking ship before penetrating the inner hull of the struck vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to verify the effectiveness of a prototype buffer bulbous bow......) and the forward velocity of the struck ship on the collapse mode of the bow of the striking vessel are investigated. Collapse modes, contact forces and energy absorption capabilities of the buffer bows are compared with those of conventional bows....

  8. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  10. Effect of cathode buffer layer on the stability of polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liying; Xu, Hao; Tian, Hui; Yin, Shougen [Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Devices (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Tianjin Key Lab for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin 300384 (China); Zhang, Fengling [Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Devices (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, Center of Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of cathode buffer layer on the stability of polymer solar cells with cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) as the cathode buffer layer was investigated. Compared with traditional devices using lithium fluoride (LiF) as buffer layer, the use of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} layer has enhanced not only open-circuit voltages and power conversion efficiencies of the polymer solar cells due to better contact with the cathode but also the device stability. From results of stability test, we concluded that the inserted Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} buffer layer is working as a better shielding and scavenging protector which prevents the intruding of oxygen and humidity into the active layer, thereby improving the lifetime of unpackaged devices. (author)

  11. EnviroAtlas - Sum of population near roads without tree buffer for the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is a summary of total population near major roads without any tree buffer within 12-digit Hydrologic Units (HUC_12), based on the National...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  14. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees & Forest...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, forest is defined as Trees and Forest and Woody...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  18. E-model MOS Estimate Improvement through Jitter Buffer Packet Loss Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Kovac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposed article analyses dependence of MOS as a voice call quality (QoS measure estimated through ITU-T E-model under real network conditions with jitter. In this paper, a method of jitter effect is proposed. Jitter as voice packet time uncertainty appears as increased packet loss caused by jitter memory buffer under- or overflow. Jitter buffer behaviour at receiver’s side is modelled as Pareto/D/1/K system with Pareto-distributed packet interarrival times and its performance is experimentally evaluated by using statistic tools. Jitter buffer stochastic model is then incorporated into E-model in an additive manner accounting for network jitter effects via excess packet loss complementing measured network packet loss. Proposed modification of E-model input parameter adds two degrees of freedom in modelling: network jitter and jitter buffer size.

  19. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  1. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, forest is defined as Trees & Forest. There is a...

  2. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Percent Stream Buffer Zone As Natural Land Cover for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the percentage of land area within a 30 meter buffer zone along the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) high resolution stream network,...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. Forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody Wetlands. There is a...

  8. Conservation of filtering in manufacturing systems with unreliable machines and finished goods buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshan Li

    2006-01-01

    nature of manufacturing systems, this law offers a tool for selecting the smallest, that is, lean, finished goods buffering, which is necessary and sufficient to ensure the desired level ofcustomer demand satisfaction.

  9. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, forest is defined as Trees and Forest and Woody...

  10. Final Report for File System Support for Burst Buffers on HPC Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mohror, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Distributed burst buffers are a promising storage architecture for handling I/O workloads for exascale computing. As they are being deployed on more supercomputers, a file system that efficiently manages these burst buffers for fast I/O operations carries great consequence. Over the past year, FSU team has undertaken several efforts to design, prototype and evaluate distributed file systems for burst buffers on HPC systems. These include MetaKV: a Key-Value Store for Metadata Management of Distributed Burst Buffers, a user-level file system with multiple backends, and a specialized file system for large datasets of deep neural networks. Our progress for these respective efforts are elaborated further in this report.

  11. The Selective Impairment of the Phonological Output Buffer: Evidence From a Chinese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Shu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a Chinese-speaking patient, SJ, who makes phonological errors across all tasks involving oral production. Detailed analyses of the errors across different tasks reveal that the patterns are very similar for reading, oral picture naming, and repetition tasks, which are also comparable to the error patterns of the phonological buffer deficit cases reported in the literature. The nature of the errors invites us to conclude that the patient's phonological output buffer is selectively impaired. Different from previously reported cases, SJ's deficits in oral production tasks are not accompanied by a similar impairment of writing performance. We argue that this dissociation is evidence that the phonological output buffer is not involved in writing Chinese words. Furthermore, the majority of SJ's errors occur at the onset of a syllable, indicating that the buffer has a structure that makes the onset more prone to impairment.

  12. Gastrointestinal symptoms in low-dose aspirin users: a comparison between plain and buffered aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers Focks, J.; Tielemans, M.M.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Eikendal, T.; Brouwer, M.A.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin is associated with gastrointestinal side effects such as gastric ulcers, gastric bleeding and dyspepsia. High-dose effervescent calcium carbasalate (ECC), a buffered formulation of aspirin, is associated with reduced gastric toxicity compared with plain aspirin in healthy

  13. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  14. Development of Buffer Layer Technologies for LWIR and VLWIR HgCdTe Integration on Si

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golding, Terry D

    2005-01-01

    This program proposed to develop manufacturable, cost-effective buffer layer technologies that would allow either hybrid or monolithic integration of LWIR and VLWIR HgCdTe infrared focal plane arrays...

  15. Spatial Characterization of Riparian Buffer Effects on Sediment Loads from Watershed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding all watershed systems and their interactions is a complex, but critical, undertaking when developing practices designed to reduce topsoil loss and chemical/nutrient transport from agricultural fields. The presence of riparian buffer vegetation in agricultural lands...

  16. Directions for Determining Buffer Zone Distances for Commodity and Structural Fumigation with Methyl Bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffer zones for commodity and food handling structural applications are distributed across numerous tables. This document provides directions for determining the factors to use to identify the correct table for a given application.

  17. Particulate capture efficiency of a vegetative environmental buffer surrounding an animal feeding operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter emitted from tunnel-ventilated animal feeding operations (AFOs) is known to transport malodorous compounds. As a mitigation strategy, vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs) are often installed surrounding AFOs to capture particulates and induce lofting and dispersion. Currently, ...

  18. Microstructure evolution of GaN buffer layer on MgAl 2O 4 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-F.; Han, P.-D.; Cheng, L.-S.; Zhang, Z.; Duan, S.-K.; Teng, X.-G.

    1998-10-01

    Microstructure of GaN buffer layer grown on (1 1 1)MgAl 2O 4 substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been observed that the early deposition of GaN buffer layer on the substrate at a relatively low temperature formed a continual island-sublayer (5 nm thick) with hexagonal crystallographic structure, and the subsequent GaN buffer deposition led to crystal columns which are composed of nano-crystal slices with mixed cubic and hexagonal phases. After high-temperature annealing, the crystallinity of nano-crystal slices and island-sublayer in the buffer layer have been improved. The formation of threading dislocations in the GaN film is attributed not only to the lattice mismatch of GaN/MgAl 2O 4 interface, but also to the stacking mismatches at the crystal column boundaries.

  19. Multilevel hybrid method for optimal buffer sizing and inspection stations positioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mhada, Fatima Zahra; Ouzineb, Mohamed; Pellerin, Robert; El Hallaoui, Issmail

    2016-01-01

    .... This paper adresses this issue by providing a fast algorithm for solving the buffer sizing and inspection positioning problem of large production lines by combining heuristic and exact algorithms...

  20. Safety of an alkalinizing buffer designed for inhaled medications in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Michael D; Walsh, Brian K; Dwyer, Scott T; Combs, Casey; Vehse, Nico; Paget-Brown, Alix; Pajewski, Thomas; Hunt, John F

    2013-01-01

    Airway acidification plays a role in disorders of the pulmonary tract. We hypothesized that the inhalation of alkalinized glycine buffer would measurably alkalinize the airways without compromising lung function or causing adverse events...

  1. Breeding Bird Community Continues to Colonize Riparian Buffers Ten Years after Harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Scott F; Giovanini, Jack; Jones, Jay E; Kroll, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems integrate aquatic and terrestrial communities and often contain unique assemblages of flora and fauna. Retention of forested buffers along riparian habitats is a commonly employed practice to reduce potential negative effects of land use on aquatic systems. However, very few studies have examined long-term population and community responses to buffers, leading to considerable uncertainty about effectiveness of this practice for achieving conservation and management outcomes. We examined short- (1-2 years) and long-term (~10 years) avian community responses (occupancy and abundance) to riparian buffer prescriptions to clearcut logging silvicultural practices in the Pacific Northwest USA. We used a Before-After-Control-Impact experimental approach and temporally replicated point counts analyzed within a Bayesian framework. Our experimental design consisted of forested control sites with no harvest, sites with relatively narrow (~13 m) forested buffers on each side of the stream, and sites with wider (~30 m) and more variable width unharvested buffer. Buffer treatments exhibited a 31-44% increase in mean species richness in the post-harvest years, a pattern most evident 10 years post-harvest. Post-harvest, species turnover was much higher on both treatments (63-74%) relative to the controls (29%). We did not find evidence of local extinction for any species but found strong evidence (no overlap in 95% credible intervals) for an increase in site occupancy on both Narrow (short-term: 7%; long-term 29%) and Wide buffers (short-term: 21%; long-term 93%) relative to controls after harvest. We did not find a treatment effect on total avian abundance. When assessing relationships between buffer width and site level abundance of four riparian specialists, we did not find strong evidence of reduced abundance in Narrow or Wide buffers. Silviculture regulations in this region dictate average buffer widths on small and large permanent streams that range from

  2. Breeding Bird Community Continues to Colonize Riparian Buffers Ten Years after Harvest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F Pearson

    Full Text Available Riparian ecosystems integrate aquatic and terrestrial communities and often contain unique assemblages of flora and fauna. Retention of forested buffers along riparian habitats is a commonly employed practice to reduce potential negative effects of land use on aquatic systems. However, very few studies have examined long-term population and community responses to buffers, leading to considerable uncertainty about effectiveness of this practice for achieving conservation and management outcomes. We examined short- (1-2 years and long-term (~10 years avian community responses (occupancy and abundance to riparian buffer prescriptions to clearcut logging silvicultural practices in the Pacific Northwest USA. We used a Before-After-Control-Impact experimental approach and temporally replicated point counts analyzed within a Bayesian framework. Our experimental design consisted of forested control sites with no harvest, sites with relatively narrow (~13 m forested buffers on each side of the stream, and sites with wider (~30 m and more variable width unharvested buffer. Buffer treatments exhibited a 31-44% increase in mean species richness in the post-harvest years, a pattern most evident 10 years post-harvest. Post-harvest, species turnover was much higher on both treatments (63-74% relative to the controls (29%. We did not find evidence of local extinction for any species but found strong evidence (no overlap in 95% credible intervals for an increase in site occupancy on both Narrow (short-term: 7%; long-term 29% and Wide buffers (short-term: 21%; long-term 93% relative to controls after harvest. We did not find a treatment effect on total avian abundance. When assessing relationships between buffer width and site level abundance of four riparian specialists, we did not find strong evidence of reduced abundance in Narrow or Wide buffers. Silviculture regulations in this region dictate average buffer widths on small and large permanent streams that

  3. Influence of HEPES buffer on the local pH and formation of surface layer during in vitro degradation tests of magnesium in DMEM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.Naddaf Dezfuli Zhigang Huan J.M.C.Mol M.A.Leeflang Jiang Chang Jie Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The human body is a buffered environment where p H is effectively maintained. HEPES is a biological buffer often used to mimic the buffering activity of the body in in vitro studies on the degradation behavior of magnesium...

  4. Low-temperature solution-processed metal oxide buffer layers fulfilling large area production requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubhan, T.; Litzov, I.; Li, Ning; Wang, H. Q.; Krantz, J.; Machui, F.; Steidl, M.; Oh, H.; Matt, G. J.; Brabec, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper is a review of our previous work on the field of low temperature, solution processed metal oxide buffer layers published in various journals. Our work focuses on zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as n-type and molybdenum oxide (MoO3) as p-type solution processed buffer layer. In addition to that, we investigate the surface modification of AZO using phosphonic acid-anchored aliphatic and fullerene self assembled monolayers (SAMs).

  5. Coming and going in Slovakia: international labour mobility in the Central European 'buffer zone'

    OpenAIRE

    Allan M Williams; Vladimír Baláz; Daniel Kollár

    2001-01-01

    The collision between economic systems after 1989 led to significant new forms of mobility. East Central Europe became a legally and institutional ly constructed 'buffer zone' between Western Europe and the CIS, Commonwealth of Independent States -- the former USSR. The opportunities for and costs of migration in the buffer zone were shaped by the 'double territorial shock' of the transition: reinterationalisation and the withdrawal of massive state intervention in support of regional converg...

  6. Social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Kaori; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    In social species, the phenomenon in which the presence of conspecific animals mitigates stress responses is called social buffering. We previously reported that social buffering in male rats ameliorated behavioral fear responses, as well as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, elicited by an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). However, after social buffering, it is not clear whether rats exhibit fear responses when they are re-exposed to the same CS in the absence of another rat. In the present study, we addressed this issue using an experimental model of extinction. High stress levels during extinction training impaired extinction, suggesting that extinction is enhanced when stress levels during extinction training are low. Therefore, we hypothesized that rats that had received social buffering during extinction training would not show fear responses to a CS, even in the absence of another rat, because social buffering had enhanced the extinction of conditioned fear responses. To test this, we subjected male fear-conditioned rats to extinction training either alone or with a non-conditioned male rat. The subjects were then individually re-exposed to the CS in a recall test. When the subjects individually underwent extinction training, no responses were suppressed in the recall test. Conversely, when the subjects received social buffering during extinction training, freezing and Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and lateral amygdala were suppressed. Additionally, the effects of social buffering were absent when the recall test was conducted in a different context from the extinction training. The present results suggest that social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distributed Modeling of soil erosion and deposition affected by buffer strips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    was surveyed during the runoff season. In addition, organic carbon and phosphorous contents as well as bulk density were determined in soils of eroding and depositional sites. General buffer zone properties were recorded. Here we present results from scenario analyses comparing measured sediment deposition...... and discharge to streams with predictions obtained with the distributed soil erosion and deposition model WaTEM and assess the potential of using such tool to assist with the planning of buffer zones in landscapes....

  8. Buffer Rod Design for Measurement of Specific Gravity in the Processing of Industrial Food Batters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.; Smith, Penny Probert

    2002-01-01

    A low cost perspex buffer rod design for the measurement of specific gravity during the processing of industrial food batters is reported. Operation was conducted in pulsed mode using a 2.25 MHz, 15 mm diameter transducer and the intensity and an analytic calibration curve relating buffer rod...... output to specific gravity is obtained. The probe design may have application to other similar mixtures or industrial sludges in which similar material properties are observed....

  9. Carbon Stock of Agroforestry Systems at Adjacent Buffer Zone of Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Wardah; Bau Toknok; Zulkhaidah

    2011-01-01

    The potential of agrofrestry to sequestrate carbon varies depending on the natural quality of sites and management practices. Agroforestry is a climate change mitigation activities. The aim of study was to estimate the carbon stock of agroforestry system at adjacent buffer zone of Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP). Research was carried out in two types of agroforestry stands (simple and complex) adjacent LLNP buffer zone in Palolo Sub District, Sigi District, Central Sulawesi. Estimation of bio...

  10. Effectiveness of vegetation buffers surrounding playa wetlands at contaminant and sediment amelioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukos, David A; Johnson, Lacrecia A; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2016-10-01

    Playa wetlands, the dominant hydrological feature of the semi-arid U.S. High Plains providing critical ecosystem services, are being lost and degraded due to anthropogenic alterations of the short-grass prairie landscape. The primary process contributing to the loss of playas is filling of the wetland through accumulation of soil eroded and transported by precipitation from surrounding cultivated watersheds. We evaluated effectiveness of vegetative buffers surrounding playas in removing metals, nutrients, and dissolved/suspended sediments from precipitation runoff. Storm water runoff was collected at 10-m intervals in three buffer types (native grass, fallow cropland, and Conservation Reserve Program). Buffer type differed in plant composition, but not in maximum percent removal of contaminants. Within the initial 60 m from a cultivated field, vegetation buffers of all types removed >50% of all measured contaminants, including 83% of total suspended solids (TSS) and 58% of total dissolved solids (TDS). Buffers removed an average of 70% of P and 78% of N to reduce nutrients entering the playa. Mean maximum percent removal for metals ranged from 56% of Na to 87% of Cr. Maximum removal was typically at 50 m of buffer width. Measures of TSS were correlated with all measures of metals and nutrients except for N, which was correlated with TDS. Any buffer type with >80% vegetation cover and 30-60 m in width would maximize contaminant removal from precipitation runoff while ensuring that playas would continue to function hydrologically to provide ecosystem services. Watershed management to minimize erosion and creations of vegetation buffers could be economical and effective conservation tools for playa wetlands. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  12. Riparian buffer zones as pesticide filters of no-till crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Terencio R; Bortolozo, F R; Hansel, F A; Rasera, K; Ferreira, M T

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have pointed to the potential benefits of riparian vegetation as buffer zones for agricultural and industrial pollutants harmful to aquatic ecosystems. However, other studies have called into question its use as an ecological filter, questioning the widths and conditions for which they are effective as a filter. In this work, we have investigated the buffering capacity of the riparian one to retain pesticides in the water-saturated zone, on 27 sites composed by riparian buffer zones with different vegetation structure (woody, shrubs, or grass vegetation) and width (12, 36, and 60 m). Five pesticides were analyzed. The effectiveness of the filtering was largely influenced by the width and vegetation type of the buffer zone. In general, decreasing pesticide removal followed in this order wood > shrubs > grass. The 60 m woody buffer zone was the most effective in the removal of all the pesticides. Only atrazine was detected in this case (0.3 μg L(-1)). Furthermore, a linear correlation (R (2) > 0.97) was observed in their removal for all compounds and buffer zones studied. Thus, preserving the woody vegetation in the riparian zone is important for watershed management and groundwater quality in the no-tillage system in temperate climate.

  13. Water quality in relation to vegetative buffers around sinkholes in karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A.; Vondracek, B.

    2006-01-01

    There are approximately 8,340 mapped sinkholes in karst terrain of southeast Minnesota. Most sinkholes are adjacent to row crops that likely contribute pollutants to surface waters and aquifers. Vegetated buffers can improve water quality by reducing sediment, fertilizers, pesticides, and other potential contaminants from runoff, and may benefit water quality when placed around sinkholes. We evaluated sediment, nitrogen, phosphorus, and runoff for buffers from 2.5 to 30 m (8.3 to 98 ft) wide with a spreadsheet model. We found buffers 30 m (98 ft) wide may reduce pollution by 80 percent, although buffers 15 m (49 ft) wide may be most cost effective. Buffers could contribute to goals of reducing sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loads in Minnesota waters. Buffers 15 m (49 ft) wide around all sinkholes would retire approximately 436 ha (1,077 ac) of land from production and cost approximately $260,000 yr-1 based on Conservation Reserve Program payments, while requiring <14 percent of the budget of the program for groundwater protection in southeast Minnesota.

  14. 'Trophic whales' as biotic buffers: weak interactions stabilize ecosystems against nutrient enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmüller, Florian; Eisenhauer, Nico; Brose, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Human activities may compromise biodiversity if external stressors such as nutrient enrichment endanger overall network stability by inducing unstable dynamics. However, some ecosystems maintain relatively high diversity levels despite experiencing continuing disturbances. This indicates that some intrinsic properties prevent unstable dynamics and resulting extinctions. Identifying these 'ecosystem buffers' is crucial for our understanding of the stability of ecosystems and an important tool for environmental and conservation biologists. In this vein, weak interactions have been suggested as stabilizing elements of complex systems, but their relevance has rarely been tested experimentally. Here, using network and allometric theory, we present a novel concept for a priori identification of species that buffer against externally induced instability of increased population oscillations via weak interactions. We tested our model in a microcosm experiment using a soil food-web motif. Our results show that large-bodied species feeding at the food web's base, so called 'trophic whales', can buffer ecosystems against unstable dynamics induced by nutrient enrichment. Similar to the functionality of chemical or mechanical buffers, they serve as 'biotic buffers' that take up stressor effects and thus protect fragile systems from instability. We discuss trophic whales as common functional building blocks across ecosystems. Considering increasing stressor effects under anthropogenic global change, conservation of these network-intrinsic biotic buffers may help maintain the stability and diversity of natural ecosystems. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  15. All-optical tunable buffering with coupled ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiki, Wataru; Honda, Yoshihiro; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Furusawa, Kentaro; Sekine, Norihiko; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2017-09-06

    All-optical tunable buffering was recently achieved on a chip by using dynamically tuned coupled mode induced transparency, which is an optical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency. However, the small Q s of about 105 used in those systems were limiting the maximum buffering time to a few hundred ps. Although employing an ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity can significantly improve the maximum buffering time, the dynamic tuning of the WGM has remained challenging because thermo-optic and pressure tunings, which are widely used for WGM microcavities, have a very slow response. Here we demonstrate all-optical tunable buffering utilizing coupled ultra-high Q WGM cavities and the Kerr effect. The Kerr effect can change the refractive index instantaneously, and this allowed us to tune the WGM cavity very quickly. In addition, from among the various WGM cavities we employed a silica toroid microcavity for our experiments because it has an ultra-high Q factor (>2 × 107) and a small mode volume, and can be fabricated on a chip. Use of the Kerr effect and the silica toroid microcavity enabled us to observe an on-chip all-optical tunable buffering operation and achieve a maximum buffering time of 20 ns.

  16. Comparative studies of social buffering: A consideration of approaches, terminology, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Hennessy, Michael B

    2017-12-06

    KIYOKAWA, Y. and HENNESSY, M.B. Comparative studies of social buffering: A consideration of approaches, terminology, and pitfalls…NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XXX-XXX, .- Over the past decades, there has been an increasing number of investigations of the impact of social variables on neural, endocrine, and immune outcomes. Among these are studies of "social buffering"-or the phenomenon by which affiliative social partners mitigate the response to stressors. Yet, as social buffering studies have become more commonplace, the variety of approaches taken, definitions employed, and divergent results obtained in different species can lead to confusion and miscommunication. The aim of the present paper, therefore, is to address terminology and approaches and to highlight potential pitfalls to the study of social buffering across nonhuman species. We review and categorize variables currently being employed in social buffering studies and provide an overview of responses measured, mediating sensory modalities and underlying mechanisms. It is our hope that the paper will be useful to those contemplating examination of social buffering in the context of their own research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermal buffering performance of composite phase change materials applied in low-temperature protective garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xueying; Liu, Rangtong; Cao, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is increasingly being applied in the manufacturing of functional thermo-regulated textiles and garments. This paper investigated the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCMs which are suitable for the application in functional low-temperature protective garments. First, according to the criteria selecting PCM for functional textiles/garments, three kinds of pure PCM were selected as samples, which were n-hexadecane, n-octadecane and n-eicosane. To get the adjustable phase change temperature range and higher phase change enthalpy, three kinds of composite PCM were prepared using the above pure PCM. To evaluate the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCM samples, the simulated low-temperature experiments were performed in the climate chamber, and the skin temperature variation curves in three different low temperature conditions were obtained. Finally composite PCM samples’ thermal buffering time, thermal buffering capacity and thermal buffering efficiency were calculated. Results show that the comprehensive thermal buffering performance of n-octadecane and n-eicosane composite PCM is the best.

  18. Morphology and wettability of ZnO nanostructures prepared by hydrothermal method on various buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-jia; Huang, Li-jing; Zhou, Ming; Ren, Nai-fei

    2013-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were prepared by hydrothermal method on glass substrates with various buffer layers: Ag, Al, aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The structure, morphology and wettability of the ZnO nanostructured surfaces were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle (WCA) analysis methods, respectively. All the nanostructures grown on glass with various buffer layers exhibited strong growth orientation along the (1 0 1) plane. The nature of the buffer layer was found to have remarkable effect on the morphology and wettability of the ZnO nanostructures. Whether the buffer layers were hydrophilic or low hydrophobic, all the ZnO nanostructures grown on the various buffer layers showed high hydrophobic property, and that grown on the AZO buffer layer even exhibited superhydrophobicity with a WCA of 151.1°. This work may provide a scientific basis for self-cleaning ZnO-based optoelectronic device applications.

  19. Asparagine deamidation dependence on buffer type, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Amanda L; Wong, Rita L; Zhang, Yonghua Taylor; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Wang, Y John

    2013-06-01

    The deamidation of asparagine into aspartate and isoaspartate moieties is a major pathway for the chemical degradation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). It can affect the shelf life of a therapeutic antibody that is not formulated or stored appropriately. A new approach to detect deamidation using ion exchange chromatography was developed that separates papain-digested mAbs into Fc and Fab fragments. From this, deamidation rates of each fragment can be calculated. To generate kinetic parameters useful in setting shelf life, buffers prepared at room temperature and then placed at the appropriate stability temperatures. Solution pH was not adjusted to the same at different temperatures. Deamidation rate at 40°C was faster in acidic buffers than in basic buffers. However, this trend is reversed at 5°C, attributed to the change in hydroxide ion concentration influenced by buffer and temperature. The apparent activation energy was higher for rates generated in an acidic buffer than in a basic buffer. The rate-pH profile for mAb1 can be deconvoluted to Fc and Fab. The Fc deamidation showed a V-shaped profile: deamidation of PENNY peptide is responsible for the rate at high-pH, whereas deamidation of a new site, Asn323, may be responsible for the rate at low-pH. The profile for Fab is a straight line without curvature. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ssDNA degradation along capillary electrophoresis process using a Tris buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ric, Audrey; Ong-Meang, Varravaddheay; Poinsot, Verena; Martins-Froment, Nathalie; Chauvet, Fabien; Boutonnet, Audrey; Ginot, Frédéric; Ecochard, Vincent; Paquereau, Laurent; Couderc, François

    2017-06-01

    Tris-Acetate buffer is currently used in the selection and the characterization of ssDNA by capillary electrophoresis (CE). By applying high voltage, the migration of ionic species into the capillary generates a current that induces water electrolysis. This phenomenon is followed by the modification of the pH and the production of Tris derivatives. By injecting ten times by capillary electrophoresis ssDNA (50 nM), the whole oligonucleotide was degraded. In this paper, we will show that the Tris buffer in the running vials is modified along the electrophoretic process by electrochemical reactions. We also observed that the composition of the metal ions changes in the running buffer vials. This phenomenon, never described in CE, is important for fluorescent ssDNA analysis using Tris buffer. The oligonucleotides are degraded by electrochemically synthesized species (present in the running Tris vials) until it disappears, even if the separation buffer in the capillary is clean. To address these issues, we propose to use a sodium phosphate buffer that we demonstrate to be electrochemically inactive. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effect of pH, buffer concentration and buffer composition on the absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaey, C.J. de; Schurgers, N.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat was investigated using buffer solutions of different pH (3.0–9.2), composition and concentration. The technique used, encloses luminal perfusion of an intestinal loop with collection of the blood draining the perfused loop, which

  2. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-06-01

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pK a values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pK a1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pK a1 3.73), β-alanine (pK a1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pK a1 2.95; pK a2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H 2 A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Method of depositing an electrically conductive oxide buffer layer on a textured substrate and articles formed therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, M. Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.

    2005-10-18

    An article with an improved buffer layer architecture includes a substrate having a textured metal surface, and an electrically conductive lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The article can also include an epitaxial superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. An epitaxial capping layer can be placed between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article includes providing a substrate with a metal surface and depositing on the metal surface a lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer. The method can further include depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial buffer layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  4. Method of depositing an electrically conductive oxide buffer layer on a textured substrate and articles formed therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, M. Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.

    2003-09-09

    An article with an improved buffer layer architecture includes a substrate having a textured metal surface, and an electrically conductive lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The article can also include an epitaxial superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. An epitaxial capping layer can be placed between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article includes providing a substrate with a metal surface and depositing on the metal surface a lanthanum metal oxide epitaxial buffer layer. The method can further include depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial buffer layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  5. Final Report: Rational Design of Wide Band Gap Buffer Layers for High-Efficiency Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to enable rational design of wide band gap buffer layer materials for CIGS thin-film PV by building understanding of the correlation of atomic-scale defects in the buffer layer and at the buffer/absorber interface with device electrical properties. Optimized wide band gap buffers are needed to reduce efficiency loss from parasitic absorption in the buffer. The approach uses first-principles materials simulations coupled with nanoscale analytical electron microscopy as well as device electrical characterization. Materials and devices are produced by an industrial partner in a manufacturing line to maximize relevance, with the goal of enabling R&D of new buffer layer compositions or deposition processes to push device efficiencies above 21%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is the reference material for analysis, as the prototypical high-performing buffer material.

  6. System and Method for Network Bandwidth, Buffers and Timing Management Using Hybrid Scheduling of Traffic with Different Priorities and Guarantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, Srivatsan (Inventor); Hall, Brendan (Inventor); Smithgall, William Todd (Inventor); Bonk, Ted (Inventor); DeLay, Benjamin F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods for network bandwidth, buffers and timing management using hybrid scheduling of traffic with different priorities and guarantees are provided. In certain embodiments, a method of managing network scheduling and configuration comprises, for each transmitting end station, reserving one exclusive buffer for each virtual link to be transmitted from the transmitting end station; for each receiving end station, reserving exclusive buffers for each virtual link to be received at the receiving end station; and for each switch, reserving a exclusive buffer for each virtual link to be received at an input port of the switch. The method further comprises determining if each respective transmitting end station, receiving end station, and switch has sufficient capability to support the reserved buffers; and reporting buffer infeasibility if each respective transmitting end station, receiving end station, and switch does not have sufficient capability to support the reserved buffers.

  7. The roles of buffer layer thickness on the properties of the ZnO epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Kun, E-mail: ktang@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Shimin [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gu, Shulin, E-mail: slgu@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhu, Shunming [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ye, Jiandong [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing University Institute of Optoelectronics at Yangzhou, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Xu, Zhonghua; Zheng, Youdou [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The growth mechanism has been revealed for the ZnO buffers with different thickness. • The surface morphology has been determined as the key factor to affect the epitaxial growth. • The relation between the hexagonal pits from buffers and epi-films has been established. • The hexagonal pits formed in the epi-films have been attributed to the V-shaped defects inheriting from the dislocations in the buffers. • The structural and electrical properties of the V-defects have been presented and analyzed. - Abstract: In this article, the authors have investigated the optimization of the buffer thickness for obtaining high-quality ZnO epi-films on sapphire substrates. The growth mechanism of the buffers with different thickness has been clearly revealed, including the initial nucleation and vertical growth, the subsequent lateral growth with small grain coalescence, and the final vertical growth along the existing larger grains. Overall, the quality of the buffer improves with increasing thickness except the deformed surface morphology. However, by a full-scale evaluation of the properties for the epi-layers, the quality of the epi-film is briefly determined by the surface morphology of the buffer, rather than the structural, optical, or electrical properties of it. The best quality epi-layer has been grown on the buffer with a smooth surface and well-coalescent grains. Meanwhile, due to the huge lattice mismatch between sapphire and ZnO, dislocations are inevitably formed during the growth of buffers. More importantly, as the film grows thicker, the dislocations may attracting other smaller dislocations and defects to reduce the total line energy and thus result in the formation of V-shape defects, which are connected with the bottom of the threading dislocations in the buffers. The V-defects appear as deep and large hexagonal pits from top view and they may act as electron traps which would affect the free carrier concentration of the epi-layers.

  8. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jessica S Veysey; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2015-01-01

    Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer) and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools). Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding populations of pool

  9. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Veysey Powell

    Full Text Available Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools. Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding

  10. Effect of Tris-acetate buffer on endotoxin removal from human-like collagen used biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huizhi; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Deng, Jianjun; Zhu, Chenghui; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-09-01

    Protein preparation, which has active ingredients designated for the use of biomaterials and therapeutical protein, is obtained by genetic engineering, but products of genetic engineering are often contaminated by endotoxins. Because endotoxin is a ubiquitous and potent proinflammatory agent, endotoxin removal or depletion from protein is essential for researching any biomaterials. In this study, we have used Tris-acetate (TA) buffer of neutral pH value to evaluate endotoxins absorbed on the Pierce high-capacity endotoxin removal resin. The effects of TA buffer on pH, ionic strength, incubation time as well as human-like collagen (HLC) concentration on eliminating endotoxins are investigated. In the present experiments, we design an optimal method for TA buffer to remove endotoxin from recombinant collagen and use a chromogenic tachypleus amebocyte lysate (TAL) test kit to measure the endotoxin level of HLC. The present results show that, the endotoxins of HLC is dropped to 8.3 EU/ml at 25 mM TA buffer (pH 7.8) with 150 mM NaCl when setting incubation time at 6 h, and HLC recovery is about 96%. Under this experimental condition, it is proved to exhibit high efficiencies of both endotoxin removal and collagen recovery. The structure of treated HLC was explored by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), demonstrating that the property and structure of HLC treated by TA buffer are maintained. Compared to the most widely used endotoxin removal method, Triton X-114 extraction, using TA buffer can obtain the non-toxic HLC without extra treatment for removing the toxic substances in Triton X-114. In addition, the present study aims at establishing a foundation for further work in laboratory animal science and providing a foundation for medical grade biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: The processes of endotoxins adsorbed from HLC. - Highlights: • TA buffer is a mild buffer system for endotoxins removal of HLC. • TA buffer may facilitate endotoxins adsorbed on the

  11. Mechanical interaction buffer/backfill. Finite element calculations of the upward swelling of the buffer against both dry and saturated backfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boergesson, Lennart (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Hernelind, Jan (5T-Engineering AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    The mechanical interaction between the buffer material in the deposition hole and the backfill material in the deposition tunnel is an important process in the safety assessment since the primary function of the backfill is to keep the buffer in place and not allow it to expand too much and thereby loose too much of its density and barrier properties. In order to study the upwards swelling of the buffer and the subsequent density reduction a number of finite element calculations have been performed. The calculations have been done with the FE-program Abaqus with 3D-models of a deposition hole and the deposition tunnel. In order to refine the modelling only the two extreme cases of completely un-wetted (dry) and completely water saturated (wet) backfill have been modelled. For the wet case the influence of different factors has been studied while only one calculation of the dry case has been done. The calculated upwards swelling of the buffer varied between 2 and 15 cm for the different wet cases while it was about 10 cm for the dry case. In the wet reference case the E-modulus of the block and pellets fillings was 50 MPa and 3.24 MPa respectively, the friction angle between the buffer and the rock and canister was 8.7 deg and there were no swelling pressure from the backfill. There is a strong influence of the friction angle on both the upwards swelling and the canister heave. The friction is important for preventing especially canister displacements. The unrealistic case of no friction yielded strong unacceptable influence on the buffer with an upwards swelling of 15 cm and a strong heave of 5 cm of the canister. The influence of the backfill stiffness is as expected strong. Both buffer swelling and canister heave are twice as large at the E-modulus E = 25 MPa than at the E-modulus E = 100 MPa. The influence of the stiffness of the pellets filling is not strong since there are no pellets on the floor in the model used. The influence of the swelling pressure of the

  12. Electrophoretic behavior of charge regulated zwitter ionic buffers in covalently and dynamically coated fused silica capillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of zwitterionic buffers is investigated in the absence of electroosmotic flow (EOF. Electro mobilization of capillary contents is noted when zwitterionic buffers are employed as the background electrolyte at a pH where the buffering moiety carries a net charge. The bulk flow of capillary contents was demonstrated via monitoring the migration of a neutral marker as well as a free and micellar negatively charged marker and SDS–protein complexes. This electrolyte-driven mobilization (EDM was investigated in detail using 4-(2-hydroxyethylpiprazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer over a wide pH range (pH 4.0–8.0. Results confirmed that at a pH where HEPES molecules carry a net negative charge, a bulk flow toward the anode is observed. This was attributed to the migration of HEPES ions toward the anode along with their hydration shells. The relatively large difference in size and solvation number between the ionic buffering moiety and its counter-migrating ions (Na+ or H+ resulted in such a net movement. Results indicated that at constant voltage, plotting the measured current versus buffer pH can be used for determination of the isoelectric point of the zwitterionic buffering moiety. Furthermore, this novel mobilization modality was demonstrated using five different HEPES analogs over pH range 5.0–8.0. More in depth investigations are required in order to explore the applicability of EDM in coated capillaries of different wall chemistries and dimensions.

  13. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  14. Do Riparian Buffers Protect Stream Invertebrate Communities in South American Atlantic Forest Agricultural Areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, L.; Marrochi, N.; Bonetto, C.; Liess, M.; Buss, D. F.; Vieira da Silva, C.; Chiu, M.-C.; Resh, V. H.

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the influence and relative importance of insecticides and other agricultural stressors in determining variability in invertebrate communities in small streams in intensive soy-production regions of Brazil and Paraguay. In Paraguay we sampled 17 sites on tributaries of the Pirapó River in the state of Itapúa and in Brazil we sampled 18 sites on tributaries of the San Francisco River in the state of Paraná. The riparian buffer zones generally contained native Atlantic forest remnants and/or introduced tree species at various stages of growth. In Brazil the stream buffer width was negatively correlated with sediment insecticide concentrations and buffer width was found to have moderate importance in mitigating effects on some sensitive taxa such as mayflies. However, in both regions insecticides had low relative importance in explaining variability in invertebrate communities, while various habitat parameters were more important. In Brazil, the percent coverage of soft depositional sediment in streams was the most important agriculture-related explanatory variable, and the overall stream-habitat score was the most important variable in Paraguay streams. Paraguay and Brazil both have laws requiring forested riparian buffers. The ample forested riparian buffer zones typical of streams in these regions are likely to have mitigated the effects of pesticides on stream invertebrate communities. This study provides evidence that riparian buffer regulations in the Atlantic Forest region are protecting stream ecosystems from pesticides and other agricultural stressors. Further studies are needed to determine the minimum buffer widths necessary to achieve optimal protection.

  15. Variable luminal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) buffer capacity in smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino-Acosta, Adán; Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín

    2009-09-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum contains the internal Ca(2+) store in smooth muscle cells and its lumen appears to be a continuum that lacks diffusion barriers. Accordingly, the free luminal Ca(2+) level is the same all throughout the SR; however, whether the Ca(2+) buffer capacity is the same in all the SR is unknown. We have estimated indirectly the luminal Ca(2+) buffer capacity of the SR by comparing the reduction in SR Ca(2+) levels with the corresponding increase in [Ca(2+)](i) during activation of either IP(3)Rs with carbachol or RyRs with caffeine, in smooth muscle cells from guinea pig urinary bladder. We have determined that carbachol-sensitive SR has a 2.4 times larger Ca(2+) buffer capacity than caffeine-sensitive SR. Rapid inhibition of SERCA pumps with thapsigargin revealed that this pump activity accounts for 80% and 60% of the Ca(2+) buffer capacities of carbachol- and caffeine-sensitive SR, respectively. Moreover, the Ca(2+) buffer capacity of carbachol-sensitive SR was similar to caffeine-sensitive SR when SERCA pumps were inhibited. Similar rates of Ca(2+) replenishments suggest similar levels of SERCA pump activities for either carbachol- or caffeine-sensitive SR. Paired pulses of caffeine, in conditions of low Ca(2+) influx, indicate the relevance of luminal SR Ca(2+) buffer capacity in the [Ca(2+)](i) response. To further study the importance of luminal SR Ca(2+) buffer capacity in the release process we used low levels of heparin to partially inhibit IP(3)Rs. This condition revealed carbachol-induced transient increase of luminal SR Ca(2+) levels provided that SERCA pumps were active. It thus appears that SERCA pump activity keeps the luminal SR Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the high-capacity, low-affinity conformation, particularly for IP(3)R-mediated Ca(2+) release.

  16. Tuning local calcium availability: cell-type-specific immobile calcium buffer capacity in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2013-09-04

    It has remained difficult to ascribe a specific functional role to immobile or fixed intracellular calcium buffers in central neurons because the amount of these buffers is unknown. Here, we explicitly isolated the fixed buffer fraction by prolonged whole-cell patch-clamp dialysis and quantified its buffering capacity in murine hippocampal slices using confocal calcium imaging and the "added-buffer" approach. In dentate granule cells, the calcium binding ratio (κ) after complete washout of calbindin D28k (Cb), κfixed, displayed a substantial value of ∼100. In contrast, in CA1 oriens lacunosum moleculare (OLM) interneurons, which do not contain any known calcium-binding protein(s), κfixed amounted to only ∼30. Based on these values, a theoretical analysis of dendritic spread of calcium after local entry showed that fixed buffers, in the absence of mobile species, decrease intracellular calcium mobility 100- and 30-fold in granule cells and OLM cells, respectively, and thereby strongly slow calcium signals. Although the large κfixed alone strongly delays the spread of calcium in granule cells, this value optimizes the benefits of additionally expressing the mobile calcium binding protein Cb. With such high κfixed, Cb effectively increases the propagation velocity to levels seen in OLM cells and, contrary to expectation, does not affect the peak calcium concentration close to the source but sharpens the spatial and temporal calcium gradients. The data suggest that the amount of fixed buffers determines the temporal availability of calcium for calcium-binding partners and plays a pivotal role in setting the repertoire of cellular calcium signaling regimens.

  17. Relative functional buffering capacity in 400-meter runners, long-distance runners and untrained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcker, K; Striegel, H; Freund, T; Dickhuth, H H

    1994-01-01

    Buffering is a factor which influences performance in short and middle-term endurance by compensating exercise acidosis. The aim of the study was to establish whether respiration parameters are a relative measure of buffering capacity and to study the influence of buffering on specific performance parameters. Three groups (each of ten subjects) with defined degrees of adaptation [untrained (UT), aerobic-trained (AeT) and elite 400-m runners (AnT) with a best time of 48.47 +/- 0.98 s] were examined in an incremental multi-stage test on the treadmill. Breath-by-breath gas analysis was performed using mass spectrometry and computer routines. Serum lactate concentrations were determined at each exercise level until subjective exhaustion. A value for the relative functional buffering capacity (relFB) was calculated using exercise metabolic parameters. Running speed at the lactate threshold was used as the starting point of buffering. The start of respiratory compensation of acidosis (RCP) was taken as the endpoint of buffering. RCP was determined at the point of decrease in end-tidal CO2 content (CO2-ET). RelFB was given in percent of buffering to running speed at RCP. Group AnT attained the same maximum performance data (maximum running speed, maximum rate of O2 consumption) as group AeT. However, these values were attained in group AnT with a significantly higher relFB (AnT: 31.0 +/- 3.2% vs. AeT: 15.7 +/- 3.9%, P < 0.0001), while a higher lactate threshold indicated a greater oxidative capacity in AeT (AeT: 3.07 +/- 0.26 m.s-1 vs. AnT: 2.68 +/- 0.22 m.s-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A comparison of buffered lidocaine versus ELA-Max before peripheral intravenous catheter insertions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet; Hurt, Sarah; Shootman, Mario; Kennedy, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion is a common, painful experience for many children in the pediatric emergency department. Although local anesthetics such as injected buffered lidocaine have been shown to be effective at reducing pain and anxiety associated with PIV insertion, they are not routinely used. ELA-Max, a topical local anesthetic, has the advantage of needle-free administration but has not been compared with buffered lidocaine for PIV insertion. To compare the reduction of pain and anxiety during PIV insertion provided by subcutaneous buffered 1% lidocaine or topical ELA-Max in children. A randomized trial in children 4 to 17 years old undergoing PIV insertion with 22-gauge catheters was conducted. Children received either buffered lidocaine or ELA-Max. Buffered lidocaine was administered by using 30-gauge needles to inject 0.1 to 0.2 mL subcutaneously just before PIV insertion. ELA-Max was applied to the skin and occluded with Tegaderm 30 minutes before PIV insertion. Self-reported Visual Analog Scale (VAS) questionnaires (rating on a scale of 1-10; 1 = no pain, anxiety) were completed by patients and their parents before PIV insertion to assess baseline perceptions about pain and anxiety associated with PIV insertion and immediately after PIV insertion to assess pain and anxiety associated with the experience. After PIV insertion, the nurse who inserted the PIV also completed a VAS questionnaire assessing technical difficulty and satisfaction with the local anesthesia. A blinded observer also completed a VAS questionnaire to assess pain and anxiety associated with the PIV insertion. Data were analyzed by using chi2 and t tests. Sixty-nine subjects were enrolled, and questionnaires were competed by all (mean age: 12.1 +/- 4.5 years; 61% female). There were no differences for buffered lidocaine and ELA-Max groups in age, gender, race, prior IV experience, or baseline pain and anxiety. There were no significant differences between buffered

  19. Enhanced transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection in a humid temperate agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Santana, V.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Isenhart, T.; Schilling, K.; Schultz, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Riparian buffers are designed as management practices to increase infiltration and reduce surface runoff and transport of sediment and nonpoint source pollutants from crop fields to adjacent streams. Achieving these ecosystem service goals depends, in part, on their ability to remove water from the soil via transpiration. In these systems, edges between crop fields and trees of the buffer systems can create advection processes, which could influence water use by trees. We conducted a field study in a riparian buffer system established in 1994 under a humid temperate climate, located in the Corn Belt region of the Midwestern U.S. (Iowa). The goals were to estimate stand level transpiration by the riparian buffer, quantify the controls on water use by the buffer system, and determine to what extent advective energy and tree position within the buffer system influence individual tree transpiration rates. We primarily focused on the water use response (determined with the Heat Ratio Method) of one of the dominant species (Acer saccharinum) and a subdominant (Juglans nigra). A few individuals of three additional species (Quercus bicolor, Betula nigra, Platanus occidentalis) were monitored over a shorter time period to assess the generality of responses. Meteorological stations were installed along a transect across the riparian buffer to determine the microclimate conditions. The differences found among individuals were attributed to differences in species sap velocities and sapwood depths, location relative to the forest edge and prevailing winds and canopy exposure and dominance. Sapflow rates for A. saccharinum trees growing at the SE edge (prevailing winds) were 39% greater than SE interior trees and 30% and 69% greater than NW interior and edge trees, respectively. No transpiration enhancement due to edge effect was detected in the subdominant J. nigra. The results were interpreted as indicative of advection effects from the surrounding crops. Further, significant

  20. Acid-base buffer effect of fulvic acid and barium fulvate from weathered coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao-feng Guo; Xi-feng Li [Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan (China). Mining Engineering Institute

    2009-12-15

    The acid-base buffer characteristics of fulvic acid (FA) and barium fulvate (BaFA) were analyzed. Each share of the sample or model agents (phthalic acid and salicylic acid) were separately mixed into a series of shares of dilute solutions of HCl or NaOH with a series of concentration. The original pH values of the solutions were arranged from 2 to 13. Final balanced pH of each share was measured. The pH changes show that FA and BaFA possess buffer ability, whereas the model agents do not. The tendency of balanced pH values was 5.4 for FA and 7.4 for BaFA, whereas the original pH was 4.0-8.5; balanced pH changed little. At room temperature, the maximum buffer capacities were as follows: 18.11 mmol hydroxyl per gram FA, 11.25 mmol hydroxyl per gram BaFA, 1.19 mmol proton per gram FA, and 1.45 mmol proton per gram BaFA. Mathematics analysis shows that logarithm of buffer capacities of FA and BaFA is linearly dependent on original pH. Compared with BaFA and model agents, it is concluded that FA buffer capacity against hydroxyl relies not only on its acidic groups, BaFA buffer capacity against hydroxyl does not rely on its acidic groups, and FA buffer capacity against proton is not related with its carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl group. The pH values of FA-water solutions with different concentrations from 1 to 10 grams per liter were measured. Their pH values were slightly affected by its concentration. Thus, FA possesses a much stronger buffer ability against water dilution than common buffer agent. All the pH values of FA water solutions were very nearly 5.4, just the same as the balanced pH tendency for adding FA. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Differential effect of buffering agents on the crystallization of gemcitabine hydrochloride in frozen solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mehulkumar; Munjal, Bhushan; Bansal, Arvind K

    2014-08-25

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differential effect of buffering agents on the crystallization of gemcitabine hydrochloride (GHCl) in frozen solutions. Four buffering agents, viz. citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA), succinic acid (SA) and tartaric acid (TA) were selected and their effect on GHCl crystallization was monitored using standard DSC and low temperature XRD. Onset of GHCl crystallization during heating run in DSC was measured to compare the differential effect of buffering agents. Glass transition temperature (Tg'), unfrozen water content in the freeze concentrate and crystallization propensity of the buffering agents was also determined for mechanistic understanding of the underlying effects. CA and MA inhibited while SA facilitated crystallization of GHCl even at 25 mM concentration. Increasing the concentration enhanced their effect. However, TA inhibited GHCl crystallization at concentrations crystallization could be explained by consideration of two opposing factors: (i) their own crystallization tendency and (ii) unfrozen water content in the freeze concentrate. In conclusion, it was established that API crystallization in frozen solution is affected by the type and concentration of the buffering agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Power Impact of Loop Buffer Schemes for Biomedical Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francky Catthoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Instruction memory organisations are pointed out as one of the major sources of energy consumption in embedded systems. As these systems are characterised by restrictive resources and a low-energy budget, any enhancement in this component allows not only to decrease the energy consumption but also to have a better distribution of the energy budget throughout the system. Loop buffering is an effective scheme to reduce energy consumption in instruction memory organisations. In this paper, the loop buffer concept is applied in real-life embedded applications that are widely used in biomedical Wireless Sensor Nodes, to show which scheme of loop buffer is more suitable for applications with certain behaviour. Post-layout simulations demonstrate that a trade-off exists between the complexity of the loop buffer architecture and the energy savings of utilising it. Therefore, the use of loop buffer architectures in order to optimise the instructionmemory organisation from the energy efficiency point of view should be evaluated carefully, taking into account two factors: (1 the percentage of the execution time of the application that is related to the execution of the loops, and (2 the distribution of the execution time percentage over each one of the loops that form the application.

  3. The effect of buffered lidocaine in local anesthesia: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk Jin; Cho, Young Jae; Gong, Hyun Sik; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyun Soo; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Open carpal tunnel decompression under local anesthesia is routinely done by many surgeons. However, patients complain of pain during the injection of local anesthesia. This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was to compare the pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores of local anesthesia using lidocaine with and without sodium bicarbonate in patients with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty-five patients underwent bilateral simultaneous carpal tunnel decompression. All had topical anesthetic cream applied on the palm and wrist before the lidocaine block. In a randomized manner, half of the hands were blocked with nonbuffered lidocaine and half were blocked with buffered lidocaine. Pain was evaluated on a VAS score. The mean pain VAS score in the hand with buffered lidocaine was 4.6 ± 1.5 and 6.5 ± 1.5 for the hand with nonbuffered lidocaine. After adjustment for individual threshold of the pain, the mean pain VAS score changed into 4.6 ± 1.3 with buffered lidocaine and 6.6 ± 1.7 without buffered lidocaine. In open carpal tunnel surgery, the use of buffered lidocaine for local anesthesia reduces the anesthetic pain effectively. Therapeutic I. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phonological-lexical activation: A lexical component or an output buffer? Evidence from aphasic errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Cristina; Galluzzi, Claudia; Olson, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Single word production requires that phoneme activation is maintained while articulatory conversion is taking place. Word serial recall, connected speech and non-word production (repetition and spelling) are all assumed to involve a phonological output buffer. A crucial question is whether the same memory resources are also involved in single word production. We investigate this question by assessing length and positional effects in the single word repetition and reading of six aphasic patients. We expect a damaged buffer to result in error rates per phoneme which increase with word length and in position effects. Although our patients had trouble with phoneme activation (they made mainly errors of phoneme selection), they did not show the effects expected from a buffer impairment. These results show that phoneme activation cannot be automatically equated with a buffer. We hypothesize that the phonemes of existing words are kept active though permanent links to the word node. Thus, the sustained activation needed for their articulation will come from the lexicon and will have different characteristics from the activation needed for the short-term retention of an unbound set of units. We conclude that there is no need and no evidence for a phonological buffer in single word production. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  5. Perpendicular magnetization of CoFeB on top of an amorphous buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongseok; Jung, K.Y. [Department of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sungjung [Department of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Electricity and Magnetism, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Youngjae; Hong, Jinki [Department of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.C.; You, C.Y.; Cho, J.H. [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.Y. [Department of Nano Physics, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Rhie, K., E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr [Department of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was observed in sputtered FeZr/CoFeB/MgO multilayers. A thin paramagnetic amorphous FeZr layer was used as a buffer layer and perpendicular anisotropy was obtained by annealing the samples without an external magnetic field. The critical CoFeB thickness for perpendicular anisotropy was 1.8 nm; the anisotropy changes from out-of-plane to in-plane as the CoFeB thickness increases beyond this point. Perpendicular anisotropy was also enhanced when a Ta layer was capped on top of the MgO layer. The amorphous buffer provided better perpendicular anisotropy than previously reported Ta buffer, and it may be applied to perpendicular magnetization MRAM devices where good uniformity of tunnel junctions is required. - Highlights: • Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of buffer/CoFeB/MgO was investigated. • The PMA was enhanced by using an amorphous buffer. • The PMA of the CoFeB layer was maintained up to 1.8 nm. • Ta capping layer further improved the PMA by 40%.

  6. Cathode buffer composed of fullerene-ethylenediamine adduct for an organic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Yoshinori; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Katsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We developed a fullerene-ethylenediamine adduct (C60P-DC) for a cathode buffer material in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, which enhance the open-circuit voltage (V oc). The evaporative spray deposition using ultra dilute solution (ESDUS) technique was employed to deposit the buffer layer onto the organic active layer to avoid damage during the deposition. By the insertion of a C60P-DC buffer layer, V oc and power conversion efficiency (PCE) were increased from 0.41 to 0.57 V and from 1.65 to 2.10%, respectively. The electron-only device with the C60P-DC buffer showed a much lower current level than that without the buffer, indicating that the V oc increase is caused not by vacuum level shift but by hole blocking. The curve fitting of current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics to the equivalent circuit with a single diode indicated that the decrease in reversed saturation current by hole blocking increased caused the V oc.

  7. Buffering action of acetate on hydrogen production by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Fei Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The buffering effect of acetate on hydrogen production during glucose fermentation by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 was investigated compared to phosphate, a widely used fermentative hydrogen production buffer. Specific concentrations of sodium acetate or phosphate were added to batch cultures, and the effects on hydrogen production were comparatively analyzed using a modified Gompertz model. Adding 50 mM acetate or phosphate suppressed the hydrogen production peak and slightly extended the lag phase. However, the overall hydrogen yields were 113.5 and 108.5 mmol/L, respectively, and the final pH was effectively controlled. Acetate buffered against hydrogen production more effectively than did phosphate, promoting cell growth and preventing decreased pH. At buffer concentrations 100–250 mM, the maximum hydrogen production was barely suppressed, and the lag phase extended past 7 h. Therefore, although acetate inhibits hydrogen production, using acetate as a buffer (like phosphate effectively prevented pH drops and increased substrate consumption, enhancing hydrogen production.

  8. A read-out buffer prototype for ATLAS high level triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, D; Huet, M; Le Dû, P; Mandjavidze, I D; Mur, M

    2000-01-01

    Read-Out Buffers are critical components in the dataflow chain of the ATLAS Trigger/DAQ system. At up to 75 kHz, after each Level-1 trigger accept signal, these devices receive and store digitized data from groups of front-end electronic channels. Several Read-Out Buffers are grouped to form a Read-Out Buffer Complex that acts as a data server for the High Level Triggers selection algorithms and for the final data collection system. This paper describes a functional prototype of a Read-Out Buffer based on a custom made PCI mezzanine card that is designed to accept input data at up to 160 MB/s, to store up to 8 MB of data and to distribute data chunks at the desired request rate. We describe the hardware of the card that is based on an Intel I960 processor and CPLDs. We present the integration of several of these cards in a Read-Out Buffer Complex. We measure various performance figures and we discuss to which extent these can fulfill ATLAS needs. 5 Refs.

  9. Dysgraphia in dementia: a systematic investigation of graphemic buffer features in a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice; Tree, Jeremy; Baron, Rachel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we report findings from a systematic investigation of spelling performance in three patients - PR, RH and AC - who despite their different medical diagnoses showed a very consistent pattern of dysgraphia, more typical of graphemic buffer disorder. Systematic investigation of the features characteristic of this disorder in Study 1 confirmed the presence of length effects in spelling, classic errors (i.e., letter substitution, omission, addition, transposition), a bow-shaped curve in the serial position of errors and consistency in substitution of consonants and vowels. However, in addition to this clear pattern of graphemic buffer impairment, evidence of regularity effects and phonologically plausible errors in spelling raised questions about the integrity of the lexical spelling route in each case. A second study was conducted, using a word and non-word immediate delay copy task, in an attempt to minimise the influence of orthographic representations on written output. Persistence of graphemic buffer errors would suggest an additional, independent source of damage. Two patients, PR and AC, took part and in both cases symptoms of graphemic buffer disorder persisted. Together, these findings suggest that damage to the graphemic buffer may be more common than currently suggested in the literature.

  10. Physiological bicarbonate buffers: stabilisation and use as dissolution media for modified release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Hala M; Merchant, Hamid A; Arafat, Basel T; Basit, Abdul W

    2009-12-01

    Bicarbonate media are reflective of the ionic composition and buffer capacity of small intestinal luminal fluids. Here we investigate methods to stabilise bicarbonate buffers which can be readily applied to USP-II dissolution apparatus. The in vitro drug release behaviour of three enteric coated mesalazine (mesalamine) products is investigated. Asacol 400 mg and Asacol 800 mg (Asacol HD) and the new generation, high dose (1200 mg) delayed and sustained release formulation, Mezavant (Lialda), are compared in pH 7.4 Krebs bicarbonate and phosphate buffers. Bicarbonate stabilisation was achieved by: continuous sparging of the medium with 5% CO(2)(g), application of a layer of liquid paraffin above the medium, or a specially designed in-house seal device that prevents CO(2)(g) loss. Each of the products displayed a delayed onset of drug release in physiological bicarbonate media compared to phosphate buffer. Moreover, Mezavant displayed a zero-order, sustained release profile in phosphate buffer; in bicarbonate media, however, this slow drug release was no longer apparent and a profile similar to that of Asacol 400 mg was observed. These similar release patterns of Asacol 400 mg and Mezavant displayed in bicarbonate media are in agreement with their pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Bicarbonate media provide a better prediction of the in vivo behaviour of the mesalazine preparations investigated.

  11. Tunneling Injection and Exciton Diffusion of White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Composed Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Wu, Jian-Ping; Huang, Tao-Liang; Chung, Bin-Fong

    2018-02-01

    Four configurations of buffer layers were inserted into the structure of a white organic light emitting diode, and their impacts on the hole tunneling-injection and exciton diffusion processes were investigated. The insertion of a single buffer layer of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) resulted in a balanced carrier concentration and excellent color stability with insignificant chromaticity coordinate variations of Δ x < 0.023 and Δ y < 0.023. A device with a 2,9-Dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) buffer layer was beneficial for hole tunneling to the emission layer, resulting in a 1.45-fold increase in current density. The tunneling of holes and the diffusion of excitons were confirmed by the preparation of a dual buffer layer of CBP:tris-(phenylpyridine)-iridine (Ir(ppy)3)/BCP. A maximum current efficiency of 12.61 cd/A with a luminance of 13,850 cd/m2 was obtained at 8 V when a device with a dual-buffer layer of CBP:6 wt.% Ir(ppy)3/BCP was prepared.

  12. Using Computer Simulation Method to Improve Throughput of Production Systems by Buffers and Workers Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłos Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the application of computer simulation methods to support decision making regarding intermediate buffer allocations in a series-parallel production line. The simulation model of the production system is based on a real example of a manufacturing company working in the automotive industry. Simulation experiments were conducted for different allocations of buffer capacities and different numbers of employees. The production system consists of three technological operations with intermediate buffers between each operation. The technological operations are carried out using machines and every machine can be operated by one worker. Multi-work in the production system is available (one operator operates several machines. On the basis of the simulation experiments, the relationship between system throughput, buffer allocation and the number of employees is analyzed. Increasing the buffer capacity results in an increase in the average product lifespan. Therefore, in the article a new index is proposed that includes the throughput of the manufacturing system and product life span. Simulation experiments were performed for different configurations of technological operations.

  13. Vaginal fluid pH and buffer capacity for predicting false preterm labor in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Taketoshi; Sado, Toshiyuki; Naruse, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To determine the relationship between preterm labor and delivery, and the pH and buffer capacity of vaginal secretions. Between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2012, two cohorts of patients at 22-36weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in a prospective cohort study at Nara Medical University Hospital, Japan. Patients experiencing preterm contractions and a control group of patients experiencing normal pregnancies were included. The pH and buffer capacity of vaginal secretions were measured and compared. Of the 237 patients enrolled, 48 (20.3%) were experiencing symptoms of preterm labor and 189 (79.7%) were included in the control group. The pH was higher (Pbuffer capacity was lower (P=0.0135) in the vaginal secretions of the patients experiencing preterm contractions compared with the control group. There was no difference in the pH and buffer capacity of the vaginal secretions of symptomatic patients who would experience preterm delivery and those who would not. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses demonstrated that vaginal-secretion pH and buffer capacity could differentiate between patients experiencing preterm contractions and those not, but could not differentiate between patients who would experience preterm delivery and those who would not. Vaginal-secretion pH and buffer capacity could be useful in diagnosing preterm labor; further studies are needed to determine potential practical diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anatomy of the Episodic Buffer: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study in Patients with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Berlingeri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2000 Baddeley proposed the existence of a new component of working memory, the episodic buffer, which should contribute to the on-line maintenance of integrated memory traces. The author assumed that this component should be critical for immediate recall of a short story that exceeds the capacity of the phonological store. Accordingly, patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD should suffer of a deficit of the episodic buffer when immediate recall of a short story is impossible. On the other hand, the episodic buffer should be somewhat preserved in such patients when some IR can occur (Baddeley and Wilson, 2002. We adopted this logic for a voxel-based morphometry study. We compared the distribution of grey-matter density of two such groups of AD patients with a group of age-matched controls. We found that both AD groups had a significant atrophy of the left mid-hippocampus; on the other hand, the anterior part of the hippocampus was significantly more atrophic in patients who were also impaired on the immediate prose recall task. Six out of ten patients with no immediate recall were spared at “central executive” tasks. Taken together our findings suggest that the left anterior hippocampus contributes to the episodic buffer of the revised working memory model. We also suggest that the episodic buffer is somewhat independent from the central executive component of working memory.

  15. DROP TAIL AND RED QUEUE MANAGEMENT WITH SMALL BUFFERS:STABILITY AND HOPF BIFURCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Patil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors that are important in the design of queue management schemes for routers in the Internet: for example, queuing delay, link utilization, packet loss, energy consumption and the impact of router buffer size. By considering a fluid model for the congestion avoidance phase of Additive Increase Multiplicative Decrease (AIMD TCP, in a small buffer regime, we argue that stability should also be a desirable feature for network performance. The queue management schemes we study are Drop Tail and Random Early Detection (RED. For Drop Tail, the analytical arguments are based on local stability and bifurcation theory. As the buffer size acts as a bifurcation parameter, variations in it can readily lead to the emergence of limit cycles. We then present NS2 simulations to study the effect of changing buffer size on queue dynamics, utilization, window size and packet loss for three different flow scenarios. The simulations corroborate the analysis which highlights that performance is coupled with the notion of stability. Our work suggests that, in a small buffer regime, a simple Drop Tail queue management serves to enhance stability and appears preferable to the much studied RED scheme.

  16. Optically pumped alkali laser and amplifier using helium-3 buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Raymond J.; Page, Ralph; Soules, Thomas; Stappaerts, Eddy; Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2010-09-28

    In one embodiment, a laser oscillator is provided comprising an optical cavity, the optical cavity including a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas, the buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Additionally, an optical excitation source is provided. Furthermore, the laser oscillator is capable of outputting radiation at a first frequency. In another embodiment, an apparatus is provided comprising a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  17. Influences of biochar addition on vegetable soil nitrogen balance and pH buffering capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Odindo, AO; Xue, L.; Yang, L.

    2016-08-01

    Leaching is a major path for chemical nitrogen fertilizer loss from in vegetable soil, which would destroy soil pH buffering capacity soil and result in acidification. It has been a common phenomenon in Tai Lake Region, China. However, few study focused on the change soil pH buffering capacity, especially the effect of soil amendment on pH buffering capacity. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to research the effects of biochar addition to a vegetable soil on nitrogen leaching and pH buffering capacity with pakchoi (B.chinensis L.) growth as the experimental crop. The results showed that biochar could significantly increase the pakchoi nitrogen utilization efficiency, decrease 48%-65% nitrogen loss from leaching under the urea continuous applied condition. Biochar also could effectively maintain the content of soil organic matter and base cations. Therefore, it rose up soil pH buffering capacity by 9.4%-36.8% and significantly slowed down acidification rate. It was suggested that 1%-2% addition ratio was recommended from this study when used as similar soil condition.

  18. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2' bipyridine)ruthenium(II) using common biological buffers as co-reactant, pH buffer and supporting electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Noah; Francis, Paul S; Barbante, Gregory J; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-11-07

    A series of aliphatic tertiary amines (HEPES, POPSO, EPPS and BIS-TRIS) commonly used to buffer the pH in biological experiments, were examined as alternative, non-toxic co-reactants for the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)). These were found to be very attractive as "multi-tasking" reagents, serving not only as co-reactants, but also fulfiling the roles of pH buffer and supporting electrolyte within an aqueous environment; thus significantly simplifying the overall ECL analysis. Sub-nanomolar detection limits were obtained for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) in the presence of BIS-TRIS, making this species an valuable option for co-reactant ECL-based bioanalytical applications.

  19. Microchannel electrokinetics of charged analytes in buffered solutions near floating electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Wolfcale, Trevor; Gregersen, Misha Marie

    to accurately predict such behavior in these flow regimes. Experimentally, using conventional fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the concentration gradient (as well as the associated electroosmosis, induced-charge electro-osmosis, and electrophoresis) of the charged analyte near the floating electrode......We present both experimental and numerical studies of nonlinear electrokinetic flow of buffered solutions seeded with dilute analytes in a straight microchannel (0.6 μm high, 250 μm wide, and 9000 μm long) with a 0.15 μm high 60 μm wide electrode situated at the bottom center of the channel...... as a function of analyte (1 to 10 μM fluorescein and bodipy) and buffer (1 to 10 mM borate and posphate) concentrations and an externally applied voltage drop (50 to 100 V) along the channel. We have implemented a nonlinear continuum kinetics model of the system involving the electric potential, the buffer flow...

  20. Effect of ZnO buffer layer on phase transition properties of vanadium dioxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiqun; Li, Lekang; Li, Chunbo

    2016-03-01

    VO2 thin films were prepared on ZnO buffer layers by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature using vanadium target and post annealing at 400 °C. The ZnO buffer layers with different thickness deposited on glass substrates by magnetron sputtering have a high visible and near infrared optical transmittance. The electrical resistivity and the phase transition properties of the VO2/ZnO composite thin films in terms of temperature were investigated. The results showed that the resistivity variation of VO2 thin film with ZnO buffer layer deposited for 35 min was 16 KΩ-cm. The VO2/ZnO composite thin films exhibit a reversible semiconductor-metal phase transition at 48 °C.