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Sample records for budgerigars melopsittacus undulatus

  1. Experimental toxoplasmosis in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

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    Dubey, J P; Hamir, A N

    2002-06-01

    The susceptibility of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) to graded doses of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts was studied. Sixteen budgerigars were divided into 4 groups (A-D) of 4 each. Birds in groups A-C were fed 100,000, 1,000, or 100 infective oocysts of the VEG strain of T. gondii, respectively. Budgerigars in group D were not fed oocysts and served as controls. All 4 birds in group A died (or were killed) because of acute severe enteritis 5 or 6 days after feeding oocysts (DAFO). Three of the 4 birds in group B were killed (or died) because of toxoplasmosis 9 or 14 DAFO. One budgerigar in group C and the 4 budgerigars in group D remained healthy and were killed 35 or 39 DAFO. Toxoplasma gondii was demonstrated in tissues of all budgerigars fed oocysts. The control budgerigars remained clinically normal and showed no evidence of T. gondii exposure. These results indicate that, compared to other passerines, budgerigars are relatively resistant to clinical toxoplasmosis.

  2. Edge detection in landing budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus.

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    Partha Bhagavatula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While considerable scientific effort has been devoted to studying how birds navigate over long distances, relatively little is known about how targets are detected, obstacles are avoided and smooth landings are orchestrated. Here we examine how visual features in the environment, such as contrasting edges, determine where a bird will land. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Landing in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus was investigated by training them to fly from a perch to a feeder, and video-filming their landings. The feeder was placed on a grey disc that produced a contrasting edge against a uniformly blue background. We found that the birds tended to land primarily at the edge of the disc and walk to the feeder, even though the feeder was in the middle of the disc. This suggests that the birds were using the visual contrast at the boundary of the disc to target their landings. When the grey level of the disc was varied systematically, whilst keeping the blue background constant, there was one intermediate grey level at which the budgerigar's preference for the disc boundary disappeared. The budgerigars then landed randomly all over the test surface. Even though this disc is (for humans clearly distinguishable from the blue background, it offers very little contrast against the background, in the red and green regions of the spectrum. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that budgerigars use visual edges to target and guide landings. Calculations of photoreceptor excitation reveal that edge detection in landing budgerigars is performed by a color-blind luminance channel that sums the signals from the red and green photoreceptors, or, alternatively, receives input from the red double-cones. This finding has close parallels to vision in honeybees and primates, where edge detection and motion perception are also largely color-blind.

  3. Personality types in Budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus.

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    Duggan, Michael R; Lee-Soety, Julia Y; Anderson, Matthew J

    2017-05-01

    The current study further characterized personality types in Budgerigars, an avian model that only recently demonstrated individual consistencies in behavior (Callicrate et al., 2011). Several methodological techniques, commonly used in previous examinations of other animal models, were employed. Specifically, Phase I assessed the relationship between Budgerigar personality types and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) activity, while Phase II sought to examine the persistence of individual behavioral tendencies across varying testing contexts. In comparison to other species, our findings failed to illustrate a clear relationship between Budgerigar personality types and concentrations of corticosterone. However, results provided significant evidence for the consistency of personalities across multiple contexts. In sum, our investigation further defined the expression of personality in the Budgerigar and substantiated the claim for individual tendencies in this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacokinetics after intravenous administration of flunixin meglumine in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus).

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    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Phalen, David N

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the disposition kinetics of flunixin meglumine when administered IV to budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus). Prospective cohort study. 8 adult Patagonian conures and 24 adult budgerigars. Injectable flunixin meglumine (50 mg/mL) was diluted to 10 and 1. 0 mg/mL and administered IV at a dose of 5.0 mg/kg (2.3 mg/lb) to Patagonian conures and budgerigars, respectively. In budgerigars, the elimination half-life was 0.72 hours and the mean residence time was 0.73 hours. In Patagonian conures, the elimination half-life was 0.91 hours and the mean residence time was 1.20 hours. The concentration of flunixin was below the assay's limit of quantification (0.5 μg/mL) at 3 and 6 hours in budgerigars and Patagonian conures, respectively. A single budgerigar developed adverse effects (lethargy and signs of depression) for approximately 15 minutes following drug administration. The half-life of flunixin in Patagonian conures and budgerigars was short following IV administration; however, results of this study suggested that IV administration of injectable flunixin meglumine at 5.0 mg/kg resulted in plasma concentrations that could potentially be anti-inflammatory and analgesic in budgerigars and Patagonian conures.

  5. Luminance-dependence of spatial vision in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii).

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    Lind, Olle; Sunesson, Tony; Mitkus, Mindaugas; Kelber, Almut

    2012-01-01

    Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii) are closely related birds with different activity patterns. Budgerigars are strictly diurnal while Bourke's parrots are active in dim twilight. Earlier studies show that the intensity threshold of colour vision is similar in both species while Bourke's parrots have larger eyes with a higher density of rods than budgerigars. In this study, we investigate whether this could be an adaptation for better spatial vision in dim light. We used two alternative forced-choice experiments to determine the spatial acuity of both species at light intensities ranging from 0.08 to 73 cd/m(2). We also determined the spatial contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for bright light in Bourke's parrots and compare it to existing data for budgerigars. The spatial acuity of Bourke's parrots was found to be similar to that of budgerigars at all light levels. Also the CSF of Bourke's parrots is similar to that of budgerigars with a sensitivity peak located between 2.1 and 2.6 cycles/degree. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that Bourke's parrots have superior spatial acuity in dim light compared to budgerigars and the adaptive value of the relatively rod-rich and large eyes of Bourke's parrots remains unclear.

  6. Sex differences in rhythmic preferences in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus: A comparative study with humans

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    Marisa Hoeschele

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of parrot species have recently gained attention as members of a small group of non-human animals that are capable of coordinating their movements in time with a rhythmic pulse. This capacity is highly developed in humans, who display unparalleled sensitivity to musical beats and appear to prefer rhythmically organized sounds in their music. Do parrots also exhibit a preference for rhythmic over arrhythmic sounds? Here we presented humans and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus – a small parrot species that have been shown to be able to align movements with a beat – with rhythmic and arrhythmic sound patterns in an acoustic place preference paradigm. Both species were allowed to explore an environment for 5 minutes. We quantified how much time they spent in proximity to rhythmic vs. arrhythmic stimuli. The results show that humans spent more time with rhythmic stimuli, and also preferred rhythmic stimuli when directly asked in a post-test survey. Budgerigars did not show any such overall preferences. However, further examination of the budgerigar results showed an effect of sex, such that male budgerigars spent more time with arrthymic stimuli, and female budgerigars spent more time with rhythmic stimuli. Our results support the idea that rhythmic information is interesting to budgerigars. We suggest that future investigations into the temporal characteristics of naturalistic social behaviors in budgerigars, such as courtship vocalizations and head-bobbing displays, may help explain the sex difference we observed.

  7. Temporal coherence for pure tones in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and humans (Homo sapiens).

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    Neilans, Erikson G; Dent, Micheal L

    2015-02-01

    Auditory scene analysis has been suggested as a universal process that exists across all animals. Relative to humans, however, little work has been devoted to how animals perceptually isolate different sound sources. Frequency separation of sounds is arguably the most common parameter studied in auditory streaming, but it is not the only factor contributing to how the auditory scene is perceived. Researchers have found that in humans, even at large frequency separations, synchronous tones are heard as a single auditory stream, whereas asynchronous tones with the same frequency separations are perceived as 2 distinct sounds. These findings demonstrate how both the timing and frequency separation of sounds are important for auditory scene analysis. It is unclear how animals, such as budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), perceive synchronous and asynchronous sounds. In this study, budgerigars and humans (Homo sapiens) were tested on their perception of synchronous, asynchronous, and partially overlapping pure tones using the same psychophysical procedures. Species differences were found between budgerigars and humans in how partially overlapping sounds were perceived, with budgerigars more likely to segregate overlapping sounds and humans more apt to fuse the 2 sounds together. The results also illustrated that temporal cues are particularly important for stream segregation of overlapping sounds. Lastly, budgerigars were found to segregate partially overlapping sounds in a manner predicted by computational models of streaming, whereas humans were not. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Eye surface temperature detects stress response in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

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    Ikkatai, Yuko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-08-05

    Previous studies have suggested that stressors not only increase body core temperature but also body surface temperature in many animals. However, it remains unclear whether surface temperature could be used as an alternative to directly measure body core temperature, particularly in birds. We investigated whether surface temperature is perceived as a stress response in budgerigars. Budgerigars have been used as popular animal models to investigate various neural mechanisms such as visual perception, vocal learning, and imitation. Developing a new technique to understand the basic physiological mechanism would help neuroscience researchers. First, we found that cloacal temperature correlated with eye surface temperature. Second, eye surface temperature increased after handling stress. Our findings suggest that eye surface temperature is closely related to cloacal temperature and that the stress response can be measured by eye surface temperature in budgerigars.

  9. Feeding behaviour and daily energy expenditure of domesticated budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) : Influence of type of housing and vertical position of the feeder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnegg, Antoine; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Keller, Petra; Visser, G. Henk; Steiger, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a common health problem in captive budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). The welfare of budgerigars would be increased in a housing system limiting obesity. The aim of this study was to measure the influence of 3 different housing types on feeding behaviour and energy balance. Fifty-four

  10. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production: a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers.

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    D'Alba, Liliana; Kieffer, Leah; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-04-15

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin 'spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems.

  11. Experience with speech sounds is not necessary for cue trading by budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

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    Flaherty, Mary; Dent, Micheal L; Sawusch, James R

    2017-01-01

    The influence of experience with human speech sounds on speech perception in budgerigars, vocal mimics whose speech exposure can be tightly controlled in a laboratory setting, was measured. Budgerigars were divided into groups that differed in auditory exposure and then tested on a cue-trading identification paradigm with synthetic speech. Phonetic cue trading is a perceptual phenomenon observed when changes on one cue dimension are offset by changes in another cue dimension while still maintaining the same phonetic percept. The current study examined whether budgerigars would trade the cues of voice onset time (VOT) and the first formant onset frequency when identifying syllable initial stop consonants and if this would be influenced by exposure to speech sounds. There were a total of four different exposure groups: No speech exposure (completely isolated), Passive speech exposure (regular exposure to human speech), and two Speech-trained groups. After the exposure period, all budgerigars were tested for phonetic cue trading using operant conditioning procedures. Birds were trained to peck keys in response to different synthetic speech sounds that began with "d" or "t" and varied in VOT and frequency of the first formant at voicing onset. Once training performance criteria were met, budgerigars were presented with the entire intermediate series, including ambiguous sounds. Responses on these trials were used to determine which speech cues were used, if a trading relation between VOT and the onset frequency of the first formant was present, and whether speech exposure had an influence on perception. Cue trading was found in all birds and these results were largely similar to those of a group of humans. Results indicated that prior speech experience was not a requirement for cue trading by budgerigars. The results are consistent with theories that explain phonetic cue trading in terms of a rich auditory encoding of the speech signal.

  12. Experience with speech sounds is not necessary for cue trading by budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus.

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    Mary Flaherty

    Full Text Available The influence of experience with human speech sounds on speech perception in budgerigars, vocal mimics whose speech exposure can be tightly controlled in a laboratory setting, was measured. Budgerigars were divided into groups that differed in auditory exposure and then tested on a cue-trading identification paradigm with synthetic speech. Phonetic cue trading is a perceptual phenomenon observed when changes on one cue dimension are offset by changes in another cue dimension while still maintaining the same phonetic percept. The current study examined whether budgerigars would trade the cues of voice onset time (VOT and the first formant onset frequency when identifying syllable initial stop consonants and if this would be influenced by exposure to speech sounds. There were a total of four different exposure groups: No speech exposure (completely isolated, Passive speech exposure (regular exposure to human speech, and two Speech-trained groups. After the exposure period, all budgerigars were tested for phonetic cue trading using operant conditioning procedures. Birds were trained to peck keys in response to different synthetic speech sounds that began with "d" or "t" and varied in VOT and frequency of the first formant at voicing onset. Once training performance criteria were met, budgerigars were presented with the entire intermediate series, including ambiguous sounds. Responses on these trials were used to determine which speech cues were used, if a trading relation between VOT and the onset frequency of the first formant was present, and whether speech exposure had an influence on perception. Cue trading was found in all birds and these results were largely similar to those of a group of humans. Results indicated that prior speech experience was not a requirement for cue trading by budgerigars. The results are consistent with theories that explain phonetic cue trading in terms of a rich auditory encoding of the speech signal.

  13. Observing real-time social interaction via telecommunication methods in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

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    Ikkatai, Yuko; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seki, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-01

    Humans communicate with one another not only face-to-face but also via modern telecommunication methods such as television and video conferencing. We readily detect the difference between people actively communicating with us and people merely acting via a broadcasting system. We developed an animal model of this novel communication method seen in humans to determine whether animals also make this distinction. We built a system for two animals to interact via audio-visual equipment in real-time, to compare behavioral differences between two conditions, an "interactive two-way condition" and a "non-interactive (one-way) condition." We measured birds' responses to stimuli which appeared in these two conditions. We used budgerigars, which are small, gregarious birds, and found that the frequency of vocal interaction with other individuals did not differ between the two conditions. However, body synchrony between the two birds was observed more often in the interactive condition, suggesting budgerigars recognized the difference between these interactive and non-interactive conditions on some level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) do not hear infrasound: the audiogram from 8 Hz to 10 kHz.

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    Heffner, Henry E; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-12-01

    The pure-tone thresholds of three budgerigars were determined from 8 Hz to 10 kHz. At a level of 60 dB sound pressure level (re 20 μN/m2), their hearing range extends 6.6 octaves from 77 Hz to 7.6 kHz, with a best sensitivity of 1.1 dB at 3 kHz. Unlike pigeons and chickens, budgerigars do not have better low-frequency hearing than humans. This difference implies anatomical, physiological, and ecological differences between birds that hear infrasound (so far, pigeons and chickens) and those that do not (budgerigars).

  15. Comparison of different methods of semen cryopreservation in Melopsittacus undulatus.

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    Dogliero, Andrea; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Rota, Ada; Pregel, Paola; Quaranta, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Melopsittacus undulatus is largely used as a potential model for assisted reproduction in other endangered parrot species. Semen was collected from nineteen healthy adult males, by massage technique, during the breeding season. After preliminary evaluations through CASA analysis, eight birds were selected as semen donors and five ejaculates of each bird were utilized to evaluate the effect of 10% ethylene glycol (EG) addition, in two times, during 40min of equilibration time at 4°C, and to compare two programmable freezing curves (a rapid and a slow temperature descent rate) and freezing on nitrogen vapors. Diluted semen (modified TALP, pH 8.4) was divided into two aliquots, the first for freezing individual samples, the second to be mixed in a semen pool from the eight birds. Potential inseminating doses of 10μl, containing 1×106 spermatozoa, were frozen. The effect of EG addition on semen motility and kinetic parameters was analyzed and the three freezing methods were compared. EG addition caused a significant decline of semen motility in individual samples, not in semen pools. The three freezing curves resulted in significant differences in thawed-semen parameters, with nitrogen vapors showing the worst results, while the higher total and progressive motility values were obtained with the 'fast' protocol. Thawed-semen pools motility and kinetic parameters appeared lower than those of the individual ejaculates. The differences found between single ejaculates and semen pools emphasize the importance of performing artificial insemination tests in order to assess the in vivo performance of single ejaculates in the parrot species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. TOPOGRAPHY AND VISCERAL MORPHOLOGY OF THE Melopsittacus undulatus, SHAW 1805 TOPOGRAFIA E MORFOLOGIA DAS VÍSCERAS DO PERIQUITO-AUSTRALIANO (Melopsittacus undulatus, SHAW 1805

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    Fabiana S. Matsumoto

    2009-12-01

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    The aim of this research was to study the topography and morphology of Australian parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus viscera. Ten Australian parakeet were used (5 males and 5 females. The animals were fixed in 10% formaldehyde solution, through perfusion in the musculature and visceral cavity. Macroscopically, the Australian parakeet viscera did not show expressive differences when compared to other domestic birds’ species. Microscopically, the main difference was the presence of mechanoreceptors (Corpuscles of Pacini in the tongue, found for the first time in this psittaciform  species.

    KEY WORDS: Melopsittacus undulatus, morphology, topography, viscera.

    Em virtude da escassez de dados referentes à morfologia e topografia das aves em geral, o presente estudo teve como objetivo descrever a topografia e morfologia das vísceras do periquito-australiano (Melopsittacus undulatus, para assim proporcionar um conhecimento mais amplo sobre características específicas dessa espécie. Para a descrição da morfologia e topografia das vísceras foram utilizados dez periquitos, sendo cinco machos e cinco fêmeas. Os animais foram fixados com solução de formaldeído 10%, através de perfusão na musculatura e cavidade visceral. Macroscopicamente, as vísceras do periquito não apresentaram muitas diferenças comparadas a outras espécies de aves domésticas. Microscopicamente, a principal diferença estava na presença de mecanorreceptores (corpúsculos de Pacini na língua, encontrados pela primeira vez nesta espécie de psitaciforme. 

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Melopsittacus undulatus, morfologia, topografia, vísceras.

  17. Spermagewinnung und –untersuchung sowie endoskopische Beurteilung des Geschlechts-apparates in Abhängigkeit von der Spermaproduktion bei Psittaziden am Beispiel des Wellensittichs (Melopsittacus undulatus)

    OpenAIRE

    Behncke, Helge

    2004-01-01

    Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, eine reproduzierbare Methode der Spermagewinnung bei Psittaciformes am Beispiel des Wellensittichs (Melopsittacus undulatus) zu entwickeln. Es sollten spermatologische Referenzwerte für diese Spezies erstellt werden, um eine erste Grundlage für deren Fruchtbarkeitsbeurteilung zu erhalten. Ferner sollten diese spermatologischen Parameter mit der endoskopischen Darstellung der Gonaden verglichen werden, um eine spezifische Beurteilungsmöglichkeit der Hodenaktivität ab...

  18. Budgerigar flight in a varying environment: flight at distinct speeds?

    OpenAIRE

    Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2016-01-01

    How do flying birds respond to changing environments? The behaviour of budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus, was filmed as they flew through a tapered tunnel. Unlike flying insects���which vary their speed progressively and continuously by holding constant the optic flow induced by the walls���the birds showed a tendency to fly at only two distinct, fixed speeds. They switched between a high speed in the wider section of the tunnel, and a low speed in the narrower section. The transition betw...

  19. Differences in number and distribution of striatal calbindin medium spiny neurons between a vocal-learner (Melopsittacus undulatus) and a non-vocal learner bird (Colinus virginianus).

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    Garcia-Calero, Elena; Bahamonde, Olga; Martinez, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Striatal projecting neurons, known as medium spiny neurons (MSNs), segregate into two compartments called matrix and striosome in the mammalian striatum. The matrix domain is characterized by the presence of calbindin immunopositive (CB+) MSNs, not observed in the striosome subdivision. The existence of a similar CB+ MSN population has recently been described in two striatal structures in male zebra finch (a vocal learner bird): the striatal capsule and the Area X, a nucleus implicated in song learning. Female zebra finches show a similar pattern of CB+ MSNs than males in the developing striatum but loose these cells in juveniles and adult stages. In the present work we analyzed the existence and allocation of CB+ MSNs in the striatal domain of the vocal learner bird budgerigar (representative of psittaciformes order) and the non-vocal learner bird quail (representative of galliformes order). We studied the co-localization of CB protein with FoxP1, a transcription factor expressed in vertebrate striatal MSNs. We observed CB+ MSNs in the medial striatal domain of adult male and female budgerigars, although this cell type was missing in the potentially homologous nucleus for Area X in budgerigar. In quail, we observed CB+ cells in the striatal domain at developmental and adult stages but they did not co-localize with the MSN marker FoxP1. We also described the existence of the CB+ striatal capsule in budgerigar and quail and compared these results with the CB+ striatal capsule observed in juvenile zebra finches. Together, these results point out important differences in CB+ MSN distribution between two representative species of vocal learner and non-vocal learner avian orders (respectively the budgerigar and the quail), but also between close vocal learner bird families.

  20. Differences in number and distribution of striatal calbindin medium spiny neurons between a vocal-learner (Melopsittacus undulatus and a non-vocal learner bird (Colinus virginianus

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    Elena eGarcia-Calero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projecting neurons, known as medium spiny neurons (MSNs, segregate into two compartments called matrix and striosome in the mammalian striatum. The matrix domain is characterized by the presence of calbindin immunopositive (CB+ MSNs, not observed in the striosome subdivision. The existence of a similar CB+ MSN population has recently been described in two striatal structures in male zebra finch (a vocal learner bird: the striatal capsule and the Area X, a nucleus implicated in song learning. Female zebra finches show a similar pattern of CB+ MSNs than males in the developing striatum but loose these cells in juveniles and adult stages. In the present work we analyzed the existence and allocation of CB+MSNs in the striatal domain of the vocal learner bird budgerigar (representative of psittaciformes order and the non-vocal learner bird quail (representative of galliformes order. We studied the co-localization of CB protein with FoxP1, a transcription factor expressed in vertebrate striatal MSNs. We observed CB+ MSNs in the medial striatal domain of adult male and female budgerigars, although this cell type was missing in the potentially homologous nucleus for Area X in budgerigar. In quail, we observed CB+ cells in the striatal domain at developmental and adult stages but they did not co-localize with the MSN marker FoxP1. We also described the existence of the CB+ striatal capsule in budgerigar and quail and compared these results with the CB+ striatal capsule observed in juvenile zebra finches. Together, these results point out important differences in CB+MSN distribution between two representative species of vocal learner and non-vocal learner avian orders (respectively the budgerigar and the quail, but also between close vocal learner bird families.

  1. Trichomonas gallinae in budgerigars and columbid birds in Perth, Western Australia.

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    McKeon, T; Dunsmore, J; Raidal, S R

    1997-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of infection with Trichomonas gallinae and other parasites of the alimentary tract in psittacine and columbid birds in Perth and to determine in vitro the effectiveness of drugs commonly recommended for treating trichomoniasis. Samples of crop contents were collected from aviary flocks of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and other psittacine and columbid birds in both private and commercial collections in Perth. Similar samples from wild Senegal doves (Streptopelia senegalensis) also were collected. Crop contents were examined and cultured for Trichomonas gallinae and in vitro studies were conducted on the susceptibility of isolates to several drugs used commonly. Other parasites also were detected by faecal examination and/or necropsy. T gallinae was recovered from birds in 1 of 13 private collections of budgerigars (2/289 birds in total). Direct wet-mount examination of crop fluid identified 36.4% of samples at four commercial bird dealers which were later determined by culture to contain T gallinae. The prevalence of T gallinae infection range from 0 to 11.4% in budgerigars. The prevalence of T gallinae infection of wild Senegal doves was 46% and from one flock of racing pigeons was 59%. The in vitro minimum lethal concentrations of metronidazole, dimetridazole and ronidazole ranged from 40 to 96, 30 to 80 and 40 to 92 micrograms/mL respectively for six isolates of T gallinae. Other alimentary parasites detected during the survey included Spironucleus sp (syn. Hexamita sp), coccidia, Ascaridia platycerci and Raillietina sp. Thirteen budgerigar flocks belonging to members of avicultural societies in Perth had a low prevalence of trichomoniasis and other parasitic infections. The dose rate currently recommended for ronidazole may not result in complete protozoacidal activity against T gallinae infection.

  2. Bare-part color in female budgerigars changes from brown to structural blue following testosterone treatment but is not strongly masculinized.

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    Stefanie E P Lahaye

    Full Text Available Whereas several studies have shown that experimentally increased levels of the androgenic steroid testosterone can affect female behavior, fewer studies have focused on the activational effects of exogenous testosterone on female morphology. With respect to colorful displays in birds, almost exclusively the effects of testosterone manipulation on female carotenoid-based colorations have been studied. Other color types such as structural colors (i.e. UV, blue and violet colors that result from differential light reflection in the nanostructures of the tissue remain largely unstudied. Here, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of exogenous testosterone on the expression of structural bare-part coloration in female budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus. In this parrot species, bare-part coloration is expressed in the cere, a structure over the beak which is brown in females and structural blue in males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females compared to controls (C-females and we performed weekly spectrophotometric measurements of the cere for five weeks after implantation and one measurement after ten weeks. We also estimated the extent to which testosterone masculinized female cere color by comparing the experimental females with untreated males. We found significant effects of testosterone on cere color from week four after implantation onwards. T-females expressed significantly bluer ceres than C-females with higher values for brightness and UV reflectance. T-female cere color, however, remained significantly less blue than in males, while values for brightness and UV reflectance were significantly higher in T-females than in males. Our quantitative results show that exogenous testosterone induces the expression of structural blue color in females but does not strongly masculinize female cere coloration. We provide several potential pathways for the action of testosterone on

  3. A pioneering study on cytotoxicity in Australian parakeets (Melopsittacus undulates) exposed to tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Joyce Moreira; Montalvão, Mateus Flores; da Silva, Anderson Rodrigo; de Lima Rodrigues, Aline Sueli; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2017-05-01

    Waste effluent from the tannery industry is a major source of environmental pollution. Considering that the bird intake of water contaminated with tannery effluent constitutes a potential genotoxic source, especially for birds inhabiting areas closest to tanning industries, the aim of this study is to assess the possible mutagenic effects that the intake may have on Melopsittacus undulatus (Australian parakeet). In order to do so, adult male and female M. undulatus were distributed in two experimental groups: control (drinking water) and TE (5%). After 60 days of exposure, the micronucleus test, as well as tests looking for other nuclear abnormalities in the peripheral blood of the birds were performed. The male and female birds exposed to the pollutant have presented the highest total number of nuclear abnormalities, as well as increased individual abnormalities such as nuclei with symmetrical constricted bi-lobed/bi-nucleated erythrocytes, indented nuclei and micro-lobed nuclei (top)/micro-nuclei (bottom). In addition, the exposure to TE has caused a nuclear variant increase rarely reported in the literature concerning poultry erythrocyte nuclei. The birds exposed to the pollutant have presented the highest frequency of displaced nuclei forming different rotation/displacement angles within the cells. Therefore, the current study confirmed the toxicological potential of TE and was pioneer in showing that male and female M. undulatus exposed to pollutant present the highest frequency of erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities, thus corroborating the initial hypothesis herein presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Megabacteriosis Occurrence in Budgerigars, Canaries and Lovebirds in Ribeirao Preto region - Sao Paulo State - Brazil Ocorrência de Megabacteriose em Periquitos Autralianos, Canários e Agapornis na Região de Ribeirão Preto- Estado de São Paulo - Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Werther

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the occurrence of an megabacterium-like organism at small birds from the Northeast area of São Paulo State - Brazil. The results presented herein were obtained from 64 necropsy along four years (1994-1997. Sixty four birds (4 budgerigars Melopsittacus undulatus, 12 lovebirds Agapornis spp and 48 canaries Serinus canaria were studied. At 56% of the examined birds showed at the proventricular mucus smear a presence of rod-shaped (similar to a toothpick organisms, Gram positive and acidophilic in Giemsa staining, called megabacteria. Different kind of culture media was testes to replicated these organism in vitro. Also the dimension (large and width of the fresh microorganism from the proventricular mucus and from the first culture was compared. The macroscopic alterations observed at the necropsies was also listed.Este trabalho tem como objetivo relatar a ocorrência de um agente etiológico, denominado na Europa, Australia e EUA como "megabactéria", observado em estômago de pequenas aves (canários belgas, agapornis e periquitos australianos, provenientes da região de Ribeirão Preto, Estado de São Paulo/SP. As necropsias de 64 aves silvestres (4 periquitos australianos, 12 agapornis e 48 canários, realizadas no perído de 1994 a 1997, foram analisadas, constatando-se em 56% dos casos a presença de estruturas filiformes, acidofílicas sob coloração Giemsa, gram positivas, existentes no muco do proventrículo, descritas na literatura como "megabactérias". Foram testados diversos tipos de meios de cultura para reprodução in vitro deste microrganismo. Foram ainda comparadas as dimensões (comprimento e largura dessa bactéria obtida apartir do esfregaço fresco de muco proventricular e da "megabactéria" proveniente de cultivo in vitro. Também foram listados os principais achados macroscópicos do animais portadores desta bactéria.

  5. Absorbance of retinal oil droplets of the budgerigar: sex, spatial and plumage morph-related variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Ben; Bowmaker, James K; Berg, Mathew L; Bennett, Andrew T D

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in photoreceptor physiology is known in several vertebrate taxa, but is currently unknown in birds, despite many avian traits varying intraspecifically, and avian visual ecology encompassing a wide range of environments and visual stimuli, which might influence spectral sensitivity. Avian retinal photoreceptors contain light absorbing carotenoid-rich oil droplets that affect vision. Carotenoids are also important plumage components. However, our understanding of the regulation of carotenoids in oil droplets remains rudimentary. Among birds, Melopsittacus undulatus has probably the best-studied colour vision, shows profound intraspecific variation in plumage colour, and increased plasma carotenoids during moult. We used microspectrophotometry to determine whether a relationship exists between oil droplet carotenoid concentration and plumage pigmentation, and tested for sex and spatial variation in droplet absorbance across the retina. Absorbance of one variety of P-type droplets was higher in males. No relationship was found between droplet absorbance and plumage colour. We found a spatial pattern of droplets absorbance across the retina that matched a pattern found in another parrot, and other avian species. Our work provides insights into the development and maintenance of retinal oil droplets and suggests a common mechanism and function for carotenoid deposition in the retina across bird species.

  6. The Skull Development of Parrots with Special Reference to the Emergence of a Morphologically Unique Cranio-Facial Hinge

    OpenAIRE

    Tokita, Masayoshi

    2003-01-01

    The order Psittaciformes (parrots) has unique morphological features in the head that are evolutionarily novel. To better understand the unique evolution of the head in parrots, the developmental pattern of the skull of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) was initially described on the basis of transparent skeletal specimens. Although the fundamental pattern of the skull development of birds is conserved in parrots, some differences were observed between parrots and other groups of birds...

  7. Failure of operant control of vocal learning in budgerigars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa Seki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Budgerigars were trained by operant conditioning to produce contact calls immediately after hearing a stimulus contact call. In Experiments 1 and 2, playback stimuli were chosen from two different contact call classes from the bird’s repertoire. Once this task was learned, the birds were then tested with other probe stimulus calls from its repertoire, which differed from the original calls drawn from the two classes. Birds failed to mimic the probe stimuli but instead produced one of the two call classes as in the training sessions, showing that birds learned that each stimulus call served as a discriminative stimulus but not as a vocal template for imitation. In Experiment 3, birds were then trained with stimulus calls falling along a 24-step acoustic gradient which varied between the two sounds representing the two contact call categories. As before, birds obtained a reward when the bird’s vocalization matched that of the stimulus above a criterion level. Since the first step and the last step in the gradient were the birds’ original contact calls, these two patterns were easily matched. Intermediate contact calls in the gradient were much harder for the birds to match. After extensive training, one bird learned to produce contact calls that had only a modest similarity to the intermediate contact calls along the gradient. In spite of remarkable vocal plasticity under natural conditions, operant conditioning methods with budgerigars, even after extensive training and rigorous control of vocal discriminative stimuli, failed to show vocal learning.

  8. Behavioral lateralization and optimal route choice in flying budgerigars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha S Bhagavatula

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Birds flying through a cluttered environment require the ability to choose routes that will take them through the environment safely and quickly. We have investigated some of the strategies by which they achieve this. We trained budgerigars to fly through a tunnel in which they encountered a barrier that offered two passages, positioned side by side, at the halfway point. When one of the passages was substantially wider than the other, the birds tended to fly through the wider passage to continue their transit to the end of the tunnel, regardless of whether this passage was on the right or the left. Evidently, the birds were selecting the safest and quickest route. However, when the two passages were of equal or nearly equal width, some individuals consistently preferred the left-hand passage, while others consistently preferred the passage on the right. Thus, the birds displayed idiosyncratic biases when choosing between alternative routes. Surprisingly--and unlike most of the instances in which behavioral lateralization has previously been discovered--the bias was found to vary from individual to individual, in its direction as well as its magnitude. This is very different from handedness in humans, where the majority of humans are right-handed, giving rise to a so-called 'population' bias. Our experimental results and mathematical model of this behavior suggest that individually varying lateralization, working in concert with a tendency to choose the wider aperture, can expedite the passage of a flock of birds through a cluttered environment.

  9. Behavioral Lateralization and Optimal Route Choice in Flying Budgerigars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Partha S.; Claudianos, Charles; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2014-01-01

    Birds flying through a cluttered environment require the ability to choose routes that will take them through the environment safely and quickly. We have investigated some of the strategies by which they achieve this. We trained budgerigars to fly through a tunnel in which they encountered a barrier that offered two passages, positioned side by side, at the halfway point. When one of the passages was substantially wider than the other, the birds tended to fly through the wider passage to continue their transit to the end of the tunnel, regardless of whether this passage was on the right or the left. Evidently, the birds were selecting the safest and quickest route. However, when the two passages were of equal or nearly equal width, some individuals consistently preferred the left-hand passage, while others consistently preferred the passage on the right. Thus, the birds displayed idiosyncratic biases when choosing between alternative routes. Surprisingly - and unlike most of the instances in which behavioral lateralization has previously been discovered - the bias was found to vary from individual to individual, in its direction as well as its magnitude. This is very different from handedness in humans, where the majority of humans are right-handed, giving rise to a so-called ‘population’ bias. Our experimental results and mathematical model of this behavior suggest that individually varying lateralization, working in concert with a tendency to choose the wider aperture, can expedite the passage of a flock of birds through a cluttered environment. PMID:24603285

  10. Habitat requirements of the long-tailed ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus) in the southern Altai

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řičánková, V.; Fric, Zdeněk; Chlachula, J.; Šťastná, P.; Faltýnková, A.; Zemek, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 270, - (2006), s. 1-8 ISSN 0952-8369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Spermophilus undulatus * Altai mountain s * habitat selection * predation risk * grazing Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.413, year: 2006

  11. Papovavirus Induced Feather Abnormalities and Skin Lesions in the Budgerigar: Clinical and Pathological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bernier, G; Morin, M.; Marsolais, G

    1984-01-01

    Feather abnormalities and skin lesions caused by a papovavirus infection in budgerigars are described. Diseased one to 15 day old birds displayed a lack of nestling down feathers and filoplumes on the head and neck. Survivors older than 15 days exhibited retarded growth and temporary absence of feathers variable from bird to bird. Several birds between 15 and 25 days of age had flight feathers with total absence or marked sparseness of the vanes. After 25 days, feathers began to grow, althoug...

  12. Detection thresholds for amplitude modulations of tones in budgerigar, rabbit, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Laurel H; Ketterer, Angela D; Abrams, Kristina S; Schwarz, Douglas M; Idrobo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is -essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can -sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal -models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation -frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, -especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency -modulations of wideband noise (O'Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37-43, 2011). Rats and -chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude -modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98-105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, -1177-1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low -modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65-71, 1981). A -one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM -detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation -frequencies (4-256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented.

  13. Abnormalities and diseases observed in commercial fish catches from Biscayne Bay, Florida. [Mugil cephalus, Micropogon undulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, R.H.; Kandrashoff, W.

    1988-10-01

    Many of the most productive fishing grounds in the United States are estuaries and bays which are located near population and industrial centers, and therefore subjected to pollution. Observations made on 17 fish species from commercial catches harvested in north Biscayne Bay, Florida, an urban area, showed high numbers of individuals suffering from abnormalities and diseases. Seven groups of disorders most frequently affected bottom feeders. Fin and integumental hemorrhages occurred in all individuals in 26 of 43 catches of Mugil cephalus (striped mullet), and in all individuals in 24 of 30 catches of Micropogon undulatus (Atlantic croaker). Disorders occurring consistently in a location exposed to pollutants, but uncommon in other areas of the species' range, point to environmental stress as a probable cause.

  14. Effects of Different Temperatures on the Development of Dermestes Frischii and Dermestes Undulatus (Coleoptera, Dermestidae): Comparison Between Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, Simonetta; Murgia, Giulia; Sacchi, Roberto; Ghitti, Michele; di Lucia, Valeria

    2017-06-20

    Dermestidae could be useful in forensic investigations to assess the PMI as adults and larvae colonize dried remains. We reared two species of Dermestidae (Dermestes frischii and Dermestes undulatus) to understand the effects of different temperatures on the length of their whole life cycle and on their immature stages. Both species were reared at 23°C ± 0.5, RH 75% and at 26°C ± 0.5, 75% RH. Our result shows that the temperature is the main factor that influences the development of those species; in fact, increasing temperature leads to a shorter development cycle (59.8 ± 0.5 and 38.1 ± 0.2 for D. frischii; 50.6 ± 0.6 and 36.2 ± 0.2 for D. undulatus). Furthermore, we found that the number of the molts before the pupa decreases from 5-7 to 5-6 for D. frischii and from 4-6 to 4-5 for D. undulatus, respectively, at 23°C and 26°C. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis E Virus in Four Species of Parrots in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Zhang, Nian-Zhang Zhang, Dong-Hui Zhou, Wei-Peng Tian, Ying-Tian Xu and Xing-Quan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, antibodies against avian Hepatitis E Virus (avian HEV were detected in 6.43% of examined serum samples (n=311 from budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus, lovebirds (Agapornis sp., cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus and Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria by indirect ELISA. Seroprevalence of avian HEV infection in different parrot species varied from 0 to 7.92%. Statistical analysis of the origins of parrots demonstrated that parrots from Weifang city had a higher avian HEV seropositivity (7.84% compared with parrots from Beijing city (5.06%. The seroprevalence in parrots of different age groups varied from 4 to 7.62%. The avian HEV seroprevalence in parrots examined in spring and summer was 7.19 and 5.81%, respectively. This is the first report of avian HEV seroprevalence in four species of parrots in China, which will provide base-line data for the control of HEV infection in parrots in China.

  16. Catarrhal proventriculitis associated with a filamentous organism in pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Park, J H; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1992-12-01

    Catarrhal proventriculitis due to infection by an unidentified organism was diagnosed in 79 of 534 pet birds examined histologically. It was more prevalent in domestic birds (70 cases) than in imported ones (9 cases). A high incidence of the disease was encountered in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and it was occasionally found in finches (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae), parakeets (Psittacula Krameri manillensis), Amazona parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva) and cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus). The agent was a large filamentous rod, and was stained positively with Gram, GMS and PAS methods. Histologically, it induced a mild to moderate exudative or proliferative inflammation in the proventriculus. All the cases had an erosion in the gizzard. Ultrastructurally, the organism had a eukaryotic nucleus and three cell-wall layers. Concurrent infections were very common, including adenoviruses (37 cases), giardiasis (31 cases), candidiasis (13 cases), papovaviruses (11 cases) and knemidocoptic mites (11 cases).

  17. Stress Responses to Heat Exposure in Three Species of Australian Desert Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shangzhe; Romero, L Michael; Htut, Zaw Win; McWhorter, Todd J

    Birds need to respond to weather changes quickly and appropriately for their own well-being and survival. The inability to respond appropriately to heat waves can be fatal to individual birds and can translate into large-scale mortality events. We investigated corticosterone (CORT) and heterophil∶lymphocyte (H∶L) ratio responses of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), and diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) to heat exposures. The birds were exposed to a temperature similar to what they experience during a typical summer day (35°C) and a higher temperature (45°C) similar to that experienced during a heat wave. There were no significant increases between the CORT concentrations before and after heat exposure in zebra finches and budgerigars at 35° and 45°C, but there was a significant increase in CORT concentrations in diamond doves after exposure to 45°C. The H∶L ratios increased significantly after heat exposure in budgerigars at 35° and 45°C and in diamond doves at 35°C. No significant correlation was found between the changes in CORT and H∶L ratios. The data suggest that there are species differences in birds' stress responses to heat exposure that may reflect their ability to detect and adapt to high temperatures. There appear to be differences between the two types of stress measurements, which may reflect differences in the timescales of these responses.

  18. Histopathological survey of protozoa, helminths and acarids of imported and local psittacine and passerine birds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1992-12-01

    A total of 534 psittacine and passerine birds consisting of 241 imported and 293 local birds were examined histologically. As a result, the following parasites were found: Giardia (86 cases), Knemido-coptes (26 cases), coccidia (10 cases), Ascaridia (6 cases), Cryptosporidium (5 cases), Sarcocystis (5 cases), tapeworm (4 cases), microfilaria (2 cases), Hexamita (1 case), and Spiroptera (1 case). High incidences of giardiasis and knemido-coptic infestation were detected in the local birds, but rarely in the imported birds. Giardial trophozoites were observed mainly in the duodenum of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). Knemidocoptic mites burrowed into the epidermis producing proliferative dermatitis in 25 budgerigars and 1 African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus erithacus). This ectoparasite often infested the skin around the cloaca. Coccidiosis was seen only in the small intestines of the finch (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae), African Grey Parrot, Rainbow lory (Trichoglossus haematodus), Indian Ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri manillensis) and peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis). Two parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva and Psittacus erithacus erithacus) and two budgerigars had intestinal cryptosporidiosis. Conjunctivitis associated with cryptosporidial infection was seen in a lovebird. Sarcocystis cysts containing crescent-shaped bradyzoites were found not only in the thigh and breast but also in the heart and cloacal muscles. Other organisms such as Ascaridia, tapeworm, microfilaria, Hexamita, and Spiroptera were clinically less significant. However, infections such as Giardia and Cryptosporidim might have zoonotic implications.

  19. Eye lesions in pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Park, J H; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1993-03-01

    Amongst eye lesions in birds that died in quarantine, cataracts were the most common disorders (37/241, 15.4%), being prevalent in the annular pads of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva) and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). The incidence in male birds was more than twice that in females. Deposition of crystals, mostly in the cornea, was the second most frequent lesion (21/293, 8.7%), mainly found in cockatiels, parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva), budgerigars and finches (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae). These corneal crystals were negative to PAS and Kossa's stains. Six parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) had calcium salts deposited in the inner plexiform layer of the retina and occasionally in the iris and ciliary body. Neither inflammation nor neo-vascularization was observed when cataracts, corneal crystalline deposition, and retinal and ciliary calcification were present. Intranuclear inclusion bodies typical for papovavirus infection were found in the eyelids of six budgerigars (2.5%). Similar inclusions were simultaneously found in the pars ciliaris retinae (4, 1.7%), inner plexiform of retina (1, 0.4%) and anterior epithelium of the cornea (1, 0.4%). Other lesions such as candidial endophthalmitis, conjunctival cryptosporidiosis, corneal dystrophy, keratitis, corneal perforation and iridocyclitis, were occasional findings.

  20. Biochemical characterization of a membrane androgen receptor in the ovary of the atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alyssa M; Thomas, Peter

    2004-07-01

    Membrane androgen receptors have been biochemically characterized in only a few vertebrate species to date. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to comprehensively investigate the binding characteristics of a putative membrane androgen receptor in the ovary of the teleost, Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). Specific androgen binding to an ovarian plasma membrane fraction was demonstrated using a radioreceptor assay protocol consisting of a short-term incubation with [(3)H]testosterone (T) and subsequent filtration of bound steroid from free steroid. Saturation and Scatchard analyses of T binding to an ovarian plasma membrane fraction indicated the presence of a single, high-affinity (K(d) = 15.32 +/- 2.68 nM [mean +/- SEM]), low-capacity (B(max) = 2.81 +/- 0.31 pmol/mg protein), androgen-binding site. Specific androgen binding to the receptor was readily displaceable, and the association and dissociation kinetics were rapid (half-time = 3.7 +/- 1.7 and 4.7 +/- 0.2 min, respectively). Competitive binding assays showed that 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, T, and 11-ketotestosterone had relative binding affinities (RBAs) of 193%, 100%, and 13%, respectively, whereas none of the C(18) or C(21) steroids tested bound with high affinity except for progesterone (RBA = 191%). This androgen-binding moiety with high affinity for progesterone is unlikely to mediate the physiological actions of progestins in croaker, because it has low binding affinity for fish progestin hormones. Androgen-binding sites were also detected in membrane fractions of the brain, liver, kidney, and drumming muscle, whereas little or no binding was detected in the trunk muscle, heart, gills, or intestine. Receptor levels increased 10-fold during ovarian recrudescence, reaching maximum levels in fully mature ovaries, which suggests a likely physiological role for this receptor during the reproductive cycle of female croaker. It is concluded that the androgen-binding moiety identified in

  1. Localized Brain Activation Related to the Strength of Auditory Learning in a Parrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masanori; Matsuda, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Hiro-Aki; Satoh, Ryohei; Watanabe, Aiko; Zandbergen, Matthijs A.; Manabe, Kazuchika; Kawashima, Takashi; Bolhuis, Johan J.

    2012-01-01

    Parrots and songbirds learn their vocalizations from a conspecific tutor, much like human infants acquire spoken language. Parrots can learn human words and it has been suggested that they can use them to communicate with humans. The caudomedial pallium in the parrot brain is homologous with that of songbirds, and analogous to the human auditory association cortex, involved in speech processing. Here we investigated neuronal activation, measured as expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene ZENK, in relation to auditory learning in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus), a parrot. Budgerigar males successfully learned to discriminate two Japanese words spoken by another male conspecific. Re-exposure to the two discriminanda led to increased neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium, but not in the hippocampus, compared to untrained birds that were exposed to the same words, or were not exposed to words. Neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium of the experimental birds was correlated significantly and positively with the percentage of correct responses in the discrimination task. These results suggest that in a parrot, the caudomedial pallium is involved in auditory learning. Thus, in parrots, songbirds and humans, analogous brain regions may contain the neural substrate for auditory learning and memory. PMID:22701714

  2. Prevalence and Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Infection in Pet Parrots in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Cryptosporidium spp., sometimes leading to severe diarrhea in humans and animals. In the present study, 311 parrots, belonging to four species, namely, Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), Lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria), and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), from Beijing and Weifang cities, were examined for Cryptosporidium spp. infection. Blood samples of each bird were examined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fecal samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection were 3.22% (10/311) and 0.64% (2/311) by ELISA and Sheather's sugar flotation technique, respectively. Seroprevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in different breeds varied from 0 to 15.39%. Sequencing analysis showed that both positive samples from fecal samples belonged to Cryptosporidium avian genotype V. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V in Budgerigars. The results of the present study provided foundation-data for prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis in pet birds in China.

  3. Localized brain activation related to the strength of auditory learning in a parrot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Eda-Fujiwara

    Full Text Available Parrots and songbirds learn their vocalizations from a conspecific tutor, much like human infants acquire spoken language. Parrots can learn human words and it has been suggested that they can use them to communicate with humans. The caudomedial pallium in the parrot brain is homologous with that of songbirds, and analogous to the human auditory association cortex, involved in speech processing. Here we investigated neuronal activation, measured as expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene ZENK, in relation to auditory learning in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus, a parrot. Budgerigar males successfully learned to discriminate two Japanese words spoken by another male conspecific. Re-exposure to the two discriminanda led to increased neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium, but not in the hippocampus, compared to untrained birds that were exposed to the same words, or were not exposed to words. Neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium of the experimental birds was correlated significantly and positively with the percentage of correct responses in the discrimination task. These results suggest that in a parrot, the caudomedial pallium is involved in auditory learning. Thus, in parrots, songbirds and humans, analogous brain regions may contain the neural substrate for auditory learning and memory.

  4. Prevalence and Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Infection in Pet Parrots in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Cryptosporidium spp., sometimes leading to severe diarrhea in humans and animals. In the present study, 311 parrots, belonging to four species, namely, Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus, Lovebirds (Agapornis sp., Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria, and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus, from Beijing and Weifang cities, were examined for Cryptosporidium spp. infection. Blood samples of each bird were examined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and fecal samples were examined by Sheather’s sugar flotation technique. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection were 3.22% (10/311 and 0.64% (2/311 by ELISA and Sheather’s sugar flotation technique, respectively. Seroprevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in different breeds varied from 0 to 15.39%. Sequencing analysis showed that both positive samples from fecal samples belonged to Cryptosporidium avian genotype V. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V in Budgerigars. The results of the present study provided foundation-data for prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis in pet birds in China.

  5. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Feces of Pet Birds Using 16S Marker Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Castillo-Carranza, Stephany A; Guard, Blake; Gomez-Vazquez, Jose P; Dowd, Scot E; Brigthsmith, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    Birds and other animals live and evolve in close contact with millions of microorganisms (microbiota). While the avian microbiota has been well characterized in domestic poultry, the microbiota of other bird species has been less investigated. The aim of this study was to describe the fecal bacterial communities of pet birds. Pooled fecal samples from 22 flocks representing over 150 individual birds of three different species (Melopsittacus undulatus or budgerigars, Nymphicus hollandicus or cockatiels, and Serinus canaria or domestic canaries) were used for analysis using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the MiSeq platform (Illumina). Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum (median 88.4 %; range 12.9-98.4 %) followed by other low-abundant phyla such as Proteobacteria (median 2.3 %; 0.1-85.3 %) and Actinobacteria (median 1.7 %; 0-18.3 %). Lactobacillaceae (mostly Lactobacillus spp.) was the most abundant family (median 78.1 %; 1.4-97.5 %), especially in budgerigars and canaries, and it deserves attention because of the ascribed beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria. Importantly, feces from birds contain intestinal, urinary, and reproductive-associated microbiota thus posing a serious problem to study one anatomical region at a time. Other groups of interest include the family Clostridiaceae that showed very low abundance (overall median bird species, meaning each species shed distinctive bacterial communities in feces. This descriptive analysis provides insight into the fecal microbiota of pet birds.

  6. Perdagangan burung-burung paruh bengkok di Bali

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    W Widodo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The survey was carried out to know some aspects of the bird trade in Bali on May 2002, especially to observe the diversity and abundance of species of Psittacidae Family along with their problems. The survey was done by direct observations and interview to the traders in the Sanglah and Satria Bird Markets, Denpasar-Bali. The total of 80 spescies of birds were traded in Bali and most of them i.e.: 75 species or 1577 individuals were found in the Satria bird market, but only 37 species or 393 individuals traded in the Sanglah bird market. Psittacidae family was found more abundantly, i.e.: 428 individiuals in 13 species of parrots. Those spesies of parrots were: Violet-necked Lory (Eos squamata, Blue-streaked Lory (E. reticulata, Red Lory (E. bornea, Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus, Chattering Lory (Lorius garrulus, Cockatail Australia (Nymphicus hollandicus, Moustached Parrakeet (Psittacula alexandri, Peach-faced Lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis, Fischer’s Lovebird (A. fischeri, Masked Lovebird (A. personata, Bali Hanging Parrot (Loriculus pusillus and Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus. The Rainbow Lorikeet was found more abundant than another species of parrots, but Bali or Javan Hanging Parrot was very rare. The most catching area of Psittacidae was about 45% from Moluccas Islands.

  7. Seroprevalence and genotype of Chlamydia in pet parrots in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N-Z; Zhang, X-X; Zhou, D-H; Huang, S-Y; Tian, W-P; Yang, Y-C; Zhao, Q; Zhu, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are one of the most popular pet birds in China, and can harbour Chlamydia which has significance for human and animal health. We investigated, by indirect haemagglutination assay, the seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection in four species of parrots, namely budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria) that were collected from Weifang and Beijing cities, North China and explored the association between potential risk factors and chlamydial seropositivity. We further determined the genotype of Chlamydia in 21 fresh faecal samples based on the ompA sequence by reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Of the 311 parrots examined, 35·37% (95% confidence interval 30·06-40·68) were seropositive, and species, gender, age, season and geographical location were identified as risk factors. Two PCR-positive samples represented Chlamydia psittaci genotype A. The occurrence of C. psittaci genotype A in the droppings of two pet parrots in China suggests potential environmental contamination with Chlamydiaceae and may raise a public health concern.

  8. Occurrence of Ornithonyssus sylviarum in pet birds from the district of Setúbal, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waap, Helga; Paulino, Diana; Cardoso, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Ornithonyssus sylviarum is a blood-feeding ectoparasite of birds and the most serious pest in poultry farms in North America. Although the mites are typically adapted to temperate climates, information on this mite in Europe is sparse, and Dermanyssus gallinae is considered to be the only mite impacting the poultry industry. The present study reports the occurrence of O. sylviarum in pet birds in Portugal. Mites were collected directly from birds and with traps placed in cages and nests at 20 different sampling places belonging to 6 municipalities in the district of Setúbal. In a total of 217 birds, O. sylviarum was identified in 47 out of 147 (32.0%) canaries (Serinus canaria), 14 out of 21 (14.3%) estrildid finches, 1 out of 24 (4.2%) budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and 1 out of 15 (6.7%) lovebirds (Agapornis spp.). Mites of the genus Dermanyssus were identified in 8 canaries (5.4%), 8 estrildid finches (38.1%) and 1 lovebird (6.7%). No mites were found in 6 cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), 2 African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus), 1 Bourke's parrot (Neophema bourkii) and 1 rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri). Considering the zoonotic potential and the risk of dissemination to poultry, the present findings underline the need for further monitoring of O. sylviarum in the wild and domestic avifauna in Portugal.

  9. The skull development of parrots with special reference to the emergence of a morphologically unique cranio-facial hinge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi

    2003-06-01

    The order Psittaciformes (parrots) has unique morphological features in the head that are evolutionarily novel. To better understand the unique evolution of the head in parrots, the developmental pattern of the skull of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) was initially described on the basis of transparent skeletal specimens. Although the fundamental pattern of the skull development of birds is conserved in parrots, some differences were observed between parrots and other groups of birds. In parrots, the vacuity in the interorbital septum did not emerge throughout ontogeny, in contrast to other lineages of birds, for example Galliformes and Coliiformes. This feature seems to be concerned with the attachment of the unique jaw muscle of parrots, M. ethmomandibularis, to the interorbital septum. In spite of a prokinetic skull, the cranio-facial hinge of parrots was brought about by secondary transformation of dermal bones unlike that of birds with a standard prokinetic skull (e.g. Corvus) in which the nasal-frontal suture directly becomes a hinge of bending. To further understand the evolution of "pseudoprokinesis" in parrots, the construction of a robust avian phylogeny is desired. The parrot-specific suborbital arch and cranio-facial hinge are not seen until birds leave the nest and can feed themselves. In conclusion, these structures are considered to be essential for eating hard and/or large meals.

  10. CHANGES IN AMBIENT TEMPERATURE TRIGGER YAWNING BUT NOT STRETCHING IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallup, Andrew C; Miller, Ralph R; Clark, Anne B

    2010-11-21

    Yawning appears to be involved in arousal, state change, and activity across vertebrates. Recent research suggests that yawning may support effective changes in mental state or vigilance through cerebral cooling. To further investigate the relationship between yawning, state change, and thermoregulation, 12 Sprague-Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) were exposed to a total of two hours of ambient temperature manipulation over a period of 48 hours. Using a repeated measures design, each rat experienced a range of increasing (22→32°C), decreasing (32→22°C), and constant temperatures (22°C; 32°C). Yawning and locomotor activity occurred most frequently during initial changes in temperature, irrespective of direction, compared to more extended periods of temperature manipulation. The rate of yawning also diminished during constant high temperatures (32°C) compared to low temperatures (22°C). Unlike yawning, however, stretching was unaffected by ambient temperature variation. These findings are compared to recent work on budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), and the ecological selective pressures for yawning in challenging thermal environments are discussed. The results support previous comparative research connecting yawning with arousal and state change, and contribute to refining the predictions of the thermoregulatory hypothesis across vertebrates.

  11. Increasing incidence of megabacteriosis in canaries (Serinus canarius domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Leroy, C; Sturbois, M; Delleur, V; Poulipoulis, A; Vindevogel, H

    2006-11-01

    A total of 312 post-mortem examinations of 178 canaries (Serinus canarius domesticus), 40 parakeets (Melopsittacus undulatus, Nymphicus hollandicus) and 94 parrots (Amazona aestiva, Psitaccus erithacus) were conducted at the Birds and Rabbits Service of the University of Liège, Belgium. After a detailed gross examination, tissue samples were collected for virological and/or bacteriological and/or parasitological examination to complete the diagnosis. In all cases, a microscopic examination of the proventricular mucus layer was undertaken for the detection of the anamorphic ascomycetous yeast Macrorhabdus ornithogaster, which causes the non-zoonotic but important disease in cage birds known as megabacteriosis. At the time of death, megabacteriosis was diagnosed respectively in 28% of canaries and 22.5% of budgerigars (P value for Fisher's exact test=0.5576), but was not diagnosed in parrots (P value for Fisher's exact test <0.0001). The incidence of megabacteriosis significantly increases along the years (P value for chi2 test <0.0001, Cramer's coefficient=0.3405). The most common gross lesions seen at necropsy of the 59 megabacteriosis cases was proventricular dilatation (86.1%). All the birds diagnosed as typical megabacteriosis cases were free of Salmonella spp. infections and of any parasitic infections. Four megabacteriosis cases (three canaries, one parakeet) were not included in statistical analysis as salmonellosis, pseudotuberculosis, coccidiosis and chlamydophilosis were diagnosed concomitantly in these birds. With the exception of megabacteriosis, the most frequent causes of death were protozoan (coccidiosis, lankesterellosis) infections (18.4%) and salmonellosis (17.1%) in canaries, and psittacosis (31.5%) and viral hepatitis (26.3%) in parakeets. In parrots, the most common causes of death were psittacosis (28.6%) and aspergillosis (28.5%).

  12. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes.

  13. Isolation of Salmonella spp. in captive Psittaciformes from zoos and a commercial establishment of Fortaleza, Brazil

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    E.S. Lopes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study showed a low prevalence of Salmonella spp. in captive psittacines from zoos and a commercial establishment of Fortaleza. None of the isolated serotypes (S. Lexington, S. Saintpaul and S. Newport have yet been reported in Amazona aestiva, Ara chloroptera or Melopsittacus undulatus. However, the fact that most birds presented negative for Salmonella spp. may not imply the absence of this pathogen in these birds, since the intermittent excretion is a well-known characteristic of this microorganism.

  14. First report of Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in pet parrots in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Tian, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Xu, Ying-Tian; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by the obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, has become a serious public health problem worldwide. T. gondii can infect almost all warm-blooded animals, including parrots. However, little is known of T. gondii infection in parrots in China. Antibodies against T. gondii in 311 parrots including 202 Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), 26 Lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), 22 Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), and 61 Alexandrine Parakeets (Psittacula eupatria) in the cities of Beijing and Weifang in north China were tested using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Twenty-six (8.36%) out of 311 serum samples were positive for T. gondii at the cutoff of 1:5. Among the four species, a higher seroprevalence of T. gondii was found in Cockatiels (13.64%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00-27.98), although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.61). Seropositivity rates against T. gondii in male parrots (10.43%, 95% CI 5.74-15.12) were not statistically different from that in female parrots (6.08%, 95% CI 2.23-9.93, p=0.17). The seropositivity of T. gondii in parrots from Weifang and Beijing was 11.11% (95% CI 6.13-16.09) and 5.70% (95% CI 2.08-9.31), respectively. The seroprevalence varied in parrots of different age groups, ranging from 5.71% (95% CI 1.27-10.15) to 13.00% (95% CI 6.41-19.69), however, the difference among age groups was not statistically significant (p=0.12). The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in parrots in summer (11.63%, 95% CI 6.84-16.42) was significantly higher than in spring (4.32%, 95% CI 0.94-7.70, p=0.02). The results of the present survey indicated that parrots in China are exposed to T. gondii. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. gondii seroprevalence in parrots in China.

  15. Macrorhabdus ornithogaster in ostrich, rhea, canary, zebra finch, free range chicken, turkey, guinea-fowl, columbina pigeon, toucan, chuckar partridge and experimental infection in chicken, japanese quail and mice Macrorhabdus ornithogaster em avestruzes, ema, canário, mandarim, galinha, peru, galinha da Angola, pombo doméstico, rolinha, tucano, perdiz de chuckar e infecção experimental em galinha, codorna e camundongo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R.S. Martins

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2000, Macrorhabdus ornithogaster "megabacteriosis" has been diagnosed in the avian diseases laboratory in a diversity of avian species and varied spectrum of disease. The disease in some species (chickens, turkeys, guinea fowls was clinically characterized by emaciation, prostration, loss of appetite, cachexia and death, with a typically chronic course. A more acute disease was observed in finches (canary-Serinus and zebra-Taeniopygia and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus. The large rod shaped organism, visible from 100 times magnification, with and without staining, could be detected in sick and also in reasonably normal individuals of some species, such as chickens, turkeys, quails and pigeons. In rheas (Rhea americana, ostriches (Struthio camelus, canaries, zebra-finches, guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris and budgerigars. The disease was severe, causing to up to 100% mortality. The infection could be detected in some species along with other infectious or disease problems, such as endoparasites (helminths, coccidia and ectoparasitism (order Mallophaga or/and order Acarina. The cultivation of M. ornithogaster was successfully achieved in solid and liquid media, originated from chickens (four isolates, guinea fowl (1 isolate, chuckar partridge (1 isolate and canary (1 isolate. A very interesting finding at microscopy was motility of M. ornithogaster, as detected both in cultures obtained on agar for pathogenic fungi and passaged into thioglycolate broth, as well as on samples observed in wet preparations from in vivo. Differences in colony aspects were noted among the isolates. Experimental infections were attempted in chicken and japanese quail, using a chicken isolate, allowing the detection of the organism in the proventriculus and liver in apparently normal birds. One chicken isolate was injected intraperitoneally in Balb/c mice and resulted in 100% mortality.Desde 2000, diversos casos de infecção e doença por Macrorhabdus

  16. MORPHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF Napoleon WRASSE, Cheilinus undulatus LARVAE

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    Jhon Harianto Hutapea

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the survival rate, napoleon wrasse larval rearing trial was conducted at Research Institute for Mariculture, Gondol-Bali in 2003. The trial aims at assessing initial feed for larvae, food habit, and morphological development from early larval stage to juvenile. The results showed that chicken egg yolk could be applied as initial feed and followed by rotifer, Artemia and mysid (Mesophodopsis sp.. Three swimming behavior of larvae were observed, drifting, free swimming and hiding on the substrate as larvae develop. Digestive system development, simple tube like, transition stage and coiled where digestive system could be distinguished between stomach, intestine and rectum.

  17. Maternal body burdens of methylmercury impair survival skills of offspring in Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María del Carmen; Murphy, Cheryl A; Rose, Kenneth A; McCarthy, Ian D; Fuiman, Lee A

    2006-12-30

    Methylmercury (MeHg), the organic form of mercury, bioaccumulates easily through the food chain. Fish in high trophic levels can accumulate substantial levels of MeHg and transfer it to their developing eggs. Here, the effects of maternally derived MeHg on the planktonic larval stage of Atlantic croaker were investigated. Adult Atlantic croaker were fed MeHg-contaminated food at three levels: 0, 0.05, and 0.1 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 1 month. Fish were then induced to spawn and MeHg levels in the eggs were measured (0.04-4.6 ng g(-1)). Behavioral performance of exposed and control larvae was measured at four developmental stages: end of yolk absorption (yolk), end of oil absorption (oil), and 4 and 11 days after oil absorption (oil+4 and oil+11). Behaviors analyzed included survival skills related to foraging and predator evasion: routine behavior (rate of travel, active swimming speed, net-to-gross displacement ratio, and activity) and startle response to a visual and a vibratory stimulus (responsiveness, reactive distance, response distance, response duration, average response speed, and maximum response speed). Maternally transferred MeHg induced concentration-dependent effects on survival skills. Statistical and simulation models applied to predict the ecological consequences of the behavioral effects suggested that maternal transfer of MeHg may substantially lower survival of planktonic stage larvae compared to unexposed larvae. These results also imply that larvae of top predatory fish species, such as blue marlin, may suffer mortality through maternal transfer of MeHg.

  18. STATUS PEMANFAATAN IKAN NAPOLEON (Cheilinus undulatus Rüppel, 1835 DI SULAWESI SELATAN

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    Dian Oktaviani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulawesi Selatan merupakan salah satu daerah pemasok ikan napoleon (Cheilinus undulates Rüppel, 1835; Labridae hidup bagi pasar nasional maupun internasional. Akan tetapi informasi mengenai status pemanfaatan ikan napoleon dengan segala implementasi peraturannya dalam skala lokal masih sedikit. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui status pemanfaatan ikan napoleon dengan pendekatan penilaian Non Detrimental Finding (NDF di Sulawesi Selatan. Penelitian didasarkan pada data dan informasi dari penampung serta instansi terkait sebagai bentuk pemanfaatan yang dihubungkan dengan keberlanjutan populasi spesies tersebut di alam. Metode yang digunakan berupa pengamatan langsung, wawancara, dan studi literatur yang berlokasi di Kabupaten Sinjai, Kabupaten Bone, dan Kota Makassar. Pengumpulan data dari wawancara dan pengamatan lapangan dilakukan pada Maret dan November 2014, sedangkan studi literatur dilakukan selama periode penelitian antara Januari – Desember 2014. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa penilaian NDF terhadap status pemanfaatan ikan napoleon di Sulawesi Selatan mengindikasikan adanya gangguan terhadap populasi ikan tersebut di alam (nilai: 3,81 ≈ 4. Opsi pengelolaan yang dapat dilakukan adalah melakukan moratorium selama lima tahun yang disertai implementasi peraturan yang lebih ketat dan meningkatkan penyuluhan tentang dampak negatif penangkapan ikan dengan menggunakan racun dan bom.   South Sulawesi is one of the regional sources of humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulates Rüppel, 1835; Labridae for national and international trades of life reef fishes. However, few information was available regarding the implementation of the rules for local utilization of humphead wrasse. The current study was conducted to fill a gap, especially in relation to the sustainability of the population and trade of the species. The research was aimed to identify the level of local utilization of humphead wrasse based on Non Detrimental Finding (NDF approach in South Sulawesi. The method applied in the research was a direct observation, an interview, and a desk study in Sinjai Regency, Bone Regency, and Makassar City. Data collection included field surveys and visits to some collectors and governmental institutions were undertaken in March and November 2014. Desk study was conducted as long as the research period done from January to December 2014. Following the inclusion of humphead wrasse in CITES Appendix II determination of Non Detrimental Finding (NDF was considered essential. It shows that harvest and subsequent trades in humphead wrasse population in South Sulawesi indicated a detrimental trend (score: 3,81 ≈ 4. The solutions found out are moratorium minimum five years inline with tight implementation of the rules and an education of broader negative effect of using of poission and bom in capturing the fish.

  19. Feather mites of the genera Dubininia and Cacatualges (Acari: Xolalgidae) associated with parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) of the Old World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Sergey V; Ehrnsberger, Rainer; Dabert, Jacek

    2017-05-31

    This paper gives a systematic revision of feather mites of the genera Dubininia Vassilev, 1958 and Cacatualges Dabert, Badek and Skoracki, 2007 (Xolalgidae: Ingrassiinae) associated with parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) of the Old World. Five new species are described: Cacatualges probosciger sp. n. from Probosciger aterrimus (Gmelin) (Cacatuidae) from New Guinea, Dubininia charmosynae sp. n. from Charmosyna pulchella Gray GR (Psittaculidae) from New Guinea, D. micropsittae sp. n. from Micropsitta pusio pusio (Scaltter) (Psittaculidae) from New Guinea, D. nestori sp. n. from Nestor notabilis Gould (Strigopidae) from New Zealand, and D. pezopori sp. n. from Pezoporus wallicus (Kerr) (Psittaculidae) from Tasmania, Australia. Four previously described species of Dubininia are redescribed based on material from type hosts: D. curta (Trouessart, 1885) from Platycercus elegans (Gmelin) (Psittaculidae), D. lorina (Trouessart, 1885) from Lorius domicella (Linnaeus) (Psittaculidae), D. melopsittaci Atyeo and Gaud, 1987 from Melopsittacus undulatus (Shaw) (Psittaculidae), and D. psittacina (Trouessart, 1885) from Strigops harboptilus Gray GR (Strigopidae) from New Zealand. A new diagnosis for the genus Dubininia is provided. A key to all presently known Dubininia species is provided for the first time.

  20. Hybrid error correction and de novo assembly of single-molecule sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Sergey; Schatz, Michael C; Walenz, Brian P; Martin, Jeffrey; Howard, Jason T; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Wang, Zhong; Rasko, David A; McCombie, W Richard; Jarvis, Erich D; Adam M Phillippy

    2012-07-01

    Single-molecule sequencing instruments can generate multikilobase sequences with the potential to greatly improve genome and transcriptome assembly. However, the error rates of single-molecule reads are high, which has limited their use thus far to resequencing bacteria. To address this limitation, we introduce a correction algorithm and assembly strategy that uses short, high-fidelity sequences to correct the error in single-molecule sequences. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on reads generated by a PacBio RS instrument from phage, prokaryotic and eukaryotic whole genomes, including the previously unsequenced genome of the parrot Melopsittacus undulatus, as well as for RNA-Seq reads of the corn (Zea mays) transcriptome. Our long-read correction achieves >99.9% base-call accuracy, leading to substantially better assemblies than current sequencing strategies: in the best example, the median contig size was quintupled relative to high-coverage, second-generation assemblies. Greater gains are predicted if read lengths continue to increase, including the prospect of single-contig bacterial chromosome assembly.

  1. Accumulation of triclosan from diet and its neuroendocrine effects in Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) under two temperature Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick-Hopper, Tiffany L; Koster, Lauren P; Diamond, Sandra L

    2015-12-01

    Rising water temperatures due to climate change may increase the uptake and effects of triclosan in aquatic organisms. Our objectives were to investigate the accumulation of dietary triclosan and its neuroendocrine effects in Atlantic croaker, an estuarine fish, under two temperatures and during depuration. A pilot study was used to select a dietary exposure of 50 mg/kg. For 10 days, fish were exposed to one of four diet/temperature treatments (n = 16/treatment): normal diet at 26 °C and 29 °C and triclosan-treated diet at 26 °C and 29 °C. Fish exposed to triclosan at 26 °C accumulated 2.6 mg/kg wet weight on average versus 5.6 mg/kg wet weight at 29 °C. Triclosan exposure significantly impacted reflexes, resulting in the loss of the dorsal fin reflex (DS) in 53% of fish, while temperature and triclosan-temperature interactions were not significant. Triclosan body burden did not significantly predict DS loss. There were no significant differences in thyroid hormone levels among groups. Triclosan-treated fish at 26 °C were fed untreated pellets for 5 additional weeks. Two fish lost the DS during the first depuration week, and no affected fish recovered the reflex. These results have important implications for fish and their predators, as the DS may be important for swimming performance and social patterning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0066 gb|AAT90237.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|...AAT90243.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|AAT90267.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus... undulatus] gb|AAT90269.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] AAT90237.1 1e-123 72% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0066 gb|AAT90233.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|...AAT90234.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|AAT90238.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus... undulatus] gb|AAT90239.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|AAT90241.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus... undulatus] gb|AAT90245.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus u...ndulatus] gb|AAT90247.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus undulatus] gb|AAT90248.1| melanocortin 1 receptor [Sceloporus

  4. Molecular characterization of Giardia psittaci by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Niichiro; Makino, Ikuko; Kojima, Atsushi

    2012-12-01

    Multilocus sequence analyses targeting small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA), elongation factor 1 alpha (ef1α), glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and beta giardin (β-giardin) were performed on Giardia psittaci isolates from three Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulates) and four Barred parakeets (Bolborhynchus lineola) kept in individual households or imported from overseas. Nucleotide differences and phylogenetic analyses at four loci indicate the distinction of G. psittaci from the other known Giardia species: Giardia muris, Giardia microti, Giardia ardeae, and Giardia duodenalis assemblages. Furthermore, G. psittaci was related more closely to G. duodenalis than to the other known Giardia species, except for G. microti. Conflicting signals regarded as "double peaks" were found at the same nucleotide positions of the ef1α in all isolates. However, the sequences of the other three loci, including gdh and β-giardin, which are known to be highly variable, from all isolates were also mutually identical at every locus. They showed no double peaks. These results suggest that double peaks found in the ef1α sequences are caused not by mixed infection with genetically different G. psittaci isolates but by allelic sequence heterogeneity (ASH), which is observed in diplomonad lineages including G. duodenalis. No sequence difference was found in any G. psittaci isolates at the gdh and β-giardin, suggesting that G. psittaci is indeed not more diverse genetically than other Giardia species. This report is the first to provide evidence related to the genetic characteristics of G. psittaci obtained using multilocus sequence analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Zoo Wild¬life and Pet Birds in Fujian, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfeng CHEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxoplasmosis, a worldwide zoonotic disease, is caused by Toxo­plasma gondii. The distribution of genetic diversity of T. gondii in wild animals is of great importance to understand the transmission of the parasite in the environ­ment. However, little is known about T. gondii prevalence in wild animals and birds in China.Methods: We conducted the genetic characterization of T. gondii isolated from Zoo Wild Animals and Pet Birds in Fujian Province, Southeastern China. Heart tissues were collected from 45 zoo animals and 140 pet birds. After identified using B1 gene, the genetic diversity of T. gondii isolates were typed at 11 genetic markers, including SAG1,5’ and3’-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, Apico, and CS3.Results: Seven of 45 zoo animals and 3 of 140 pet birds were positive by PCR amplifi­cation using T. gondii B1 gene specific primers. Of these positive isolates, 3 isolates from Black-capped (Cebus apella, Peacock (Peafowl and Budgerigar (Melopsitta­cus undulatus were successfully genotyped at 11 genetic loci, and grouped to three distinct genotypes: ToxoDB Genotype #9, #2 and #10, respectively.Conclusion: This is the first genotyping of T. gondii isolated from zoo wild animals and pet birds in Fujian, China. There is a potential risk for the transmission of this parasite through zoo wild animals and pet birds in this region.

  6. Comparative analysis of complete genome sequences of European subtype tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks, long-tailed ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus), and human blood in the Asian part of Russia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demina, T. V.; Tkachev, S. E.; Kozlova, I. V.; Doroshchenko, E. K.; Lisak, O. V.; Suntsova, O. V.; Verkhozina, M. M.; Dzhioev, Y. P.; Paramonov, A. I.; Tikunov, A. Y.; Tikunova, N. V.; Zlobin, V. I.; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 547-553 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : TBEV * complete genome * European subtype * Western Siberia * Eastern Siberia * nucleotide * Amino acid sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2016

  7. Ocorrência e tratamento de sarna knemidocóptica (Knemidokoptes sp. em aves de companhia atendidas na Faculdade de Veterinária da Universidade Federal Fluminense, RJ, Brasil Occurrence and treatment of knemidocoptic mange (Knemidokoptes sp. in pet birds company cared at the Veterinary Medicine College - Universidade Federal Fluminense, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio Freire Bruno

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A sarna knemidocóptica ocasionada pelo ácaro Knemidokoptes sp. pode ser considerada uma enfermidade de caráter relevante na rotina clínica aviária. Este trabalho tem como objetivo relatar a ocorrência da sarna knemidocóptica em aves de companhia atendidas no Setor de Animais Selvagens da Faculdade de Veterinária da Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF, ressaltando as principais espécies acometidas e a eficácia do tratamento clínico estabelecido. No período entre janeiro de 2000 e junho de 2006, 374 aves foram atendidas no Setor; 25 delas eram portadoras de ectoparasitos, das quais 68% (n=17 com diagnóstico de sarna knemidocóptica. As lesões associadas à presença do Knemidokoptes sp. ocorreram principalmente na região dos pés em 14 aves (82,4%, sendo os Passeriformes (Serinus canarius os mais acometidos com 14 casos (82,4%, seguidos de três casos (17,7% em Psitaciformes (Melopsittacus undulatus. Os sinais clínicos constituíram-se de lesões hiperqueratosas e deformidade de dígitos. A confirmação do diagnóstico foi realizada por meio, da identificação microscópica do ácaro a partir de raspado cutâneo da área infestada. Em 15 pacientes portadores da sarna knemidocóptica, entre Passeriformes e Psitaciformes, administrou-se pomada composta por sulfureto de potássio 3g 100g-1 e carbonato de potássio 3g 100g-1 associados uma vez ao dia, em dias alternados, por quatorze dias. Apenas dois pacientes (11,8% foram tratados com aplicação tópica de solução à base de benzoato de benzila 25%, na mesma freqüência e duração do tratamento anterior. Foi intercalado o uso de óleo mineral puro 100%, aplicado topicamente duas vezes ao dia, em ambos os tratamentos. Nos casos mais graves (três pacientes, associou-se ao tratamento 0,06ml de ivermectina 1% pour on em dose única. Os pacientes submetidos a esses tratamentos obtiveram em sua totalidade a cura clínica.Knemidocoptic mange caused by Knemidokoptes sp. can be

  8. Nasal allergy to avian antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); P.H. Dieges

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThis study describes the case of a patient who developed symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis on exposure to budgerigars and parrots. An IgE‐mediated allergy to budgerigar, parrot and pigeon antigens was demonstrated using both in‐vivo challenge tests (skin and nasal provocation tests) and

  9. Ecological release in White Sands lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-12-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems.

  10. Ecological release in White Sands lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-01-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

  11. Comparative genomic data of the Avian Phylogenomics Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Bo; Li, Cai

    2014-01-01

    , which include 38 newly sequenced avian genomes plus previously released or simultaneously released genomes of Chicken, Zebra finch, Turkey, Pigeon, Peregrine falcon, Duck, Budgerigar, Adelie penguin, Emperor penguin and the Medium Ground Finch. We hope that this resource will serve future efforts...

  12. The developmental origin of zygodactyl feet and its possible loss in the evolution of Passeriformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-Leon, Daniel; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Vargas, Alexander O.

    2014-01-01

    The zygodactyl orientation of toes (digits II and III pointing forwards, digits I and IV pointing backwards) evolved independently in different extant bird taxa. To understand the origin of this trait in modern birds, we investigated the development of the zygodactyl foot of the budgerigar (Psittaciformes). We compared its muscular development with that of the anisodactyl quail (Galliformes) and show that while the musculus abductor digiti IV (ABDIV) becomes strongly developed at HH36 in both species, the musculus extensor brevis digiti IV (EBDIV) degenerates and almost disappears only in the budgerigar. The asymmetric action of those muscles early in the development of the budgerigar foot causes retroversion of digit IV (dIV). Paralysed budgerigar embryos do not revert dIV and are anisodactyl. Both molecular phylogenetic analysis and palaeontological information suggest that the ancestor of passerines could have been zygodactyl. We followed the development of the zebra finch (Passeriformes) foot muscles and found that in this species, both the primordia of the ABDIV and of the EBDIV fail to develop. These data suggest that loss of asymmetric forces of muscular activity exerted on dIV, caused by the absence of the ABDIV, could have resulted in secondary anisodactyly in Passeriformes. PMID:24966313

  13. Minimal role of eastern fence lizards in Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in central New Jersey oak/pine woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L; Kerr, Kaetlyn T; Dyer, Megan C; Han, Seungeun; Burke, Russell L; Tsao, Jean I; Ginsberg, Howard S

    2014-10-01

    The eastern fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus , is widely distributed in eastern and central North America, ranging through areas with high levels of Lyme disease, as well as areas where Lyme disease is rare or absent. We studied the potential role of S. undulatus in transmission dynamics of Lyme spirochetes by sampling ticks from a variety of natural hosts at field sites in central New Jersey, and by testing the reservoir competence of S. undulatus for Borrelia burgdorferi in the laboratory. The infestation rate of ticks on fence lizards was extremely low (prevalence = 0.087, n = 23) compared to that on white-footed mice and other small mammals (prevalence = 0.53, n = 140). Of 159 nymphs that had fed as larvae on lizards that had previously been exposed to infected nymphs, none was infected with B. burgdorferi , compared with 79.9% of 209 nymphs that had fed as larvae on infected control mice. Simulations suggest that changes in the numbers of fence lizards in a natural habitat would have little effect on the infection rate of nymphal ticks with Lyme spirochetes. We conclude that in central New Jersey, S. undulatus plays a minimal role in the enzootic transmission cycle of Lyme spirochetes.

  14. Larose to Golden Meadow, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    intermediate marsh. The vegetation in thkmarsh type includes bull- tongue , cyperus, wiregrass, Pluchea, dwarf spikerush, saltgrass, deerpea, and saltmarsh...Snakes Serpentes 2 A-8 TABLE A-1.2. (CONT.) FISH Common Name Scientific Name Alligator gar Lepisosteus spatula Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus

  15. Terrestrial Biological Inventory Hartwell Drainage and Levee District Greene County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Riparian woods Bulrush Scirpus polyphyllus Bottomland forest Ginseng Panax quinquefolius Forest Aster Aster undulatus Forest, Old field Golden Seal...Hardwood Forests of Southern Illinois-- Regeneration and Succession. Ecology 44:29-41. Hus, H. 1908. An Ecological Cross Section of the Mississippi River

  16. Minimal role of eastern fence lizards in Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in central New Jersey oak/pine woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L.; Kerr, Kaetlyn T; Dyer, Megan C; Han, Seungeun; Burke, Russell L.; Tsao, Jean I.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, is widely distributed in eastern and central North America, ranging through areas with high levels of Lyme disease, as well as areas where Lyme disease is rare or absent. We studied the potential role of S. undulatus in transmission dynamics of Lyme spirochetes by sampling ticks from a variety of natural hosts at field sites in central New Jersey, and by testing the reservoir competence of S. undulatus for Borrelia burgdorferi in the laboratory. The infestation rate of ticks on fence lizards was extremely low (proportion infested = 0.087, n = 23) compared to that on white footed mice and other small mammals (proportion infested = 0.53, n = 140). Of 159 nymphs that had fed as larvae on lizards that had previously been exposed to infected nymphs, none was infected with B. burgdorferi, compared with 79.9% of 209 nymphs that had fed as larvae on infected control mice. Simulations suggest that changes in the numbers of fence lizards in a natural habitat would have little effect on the infection rate of nymphal ticks with Lyme spirochetes. We conclude that in central New Jersey S. undulatus plays a minimal role in the enzootic transmission cycle of Lyme spirochetes.

  17. Growth and activity of Sceloporus cowlesi (southwestern fence lizard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. Bateman; Alice Chung-MacCoubrey

    2012-01-01

    Lizards from the Sceloporus undulatus complex have been the subject of many studies on lizard ecology (Hager 2001; Rosenblum 2006; Rosenblum et al. 2007), behavior (Hein and Whitaker 1997; Robertson and Rosenblum 2009), and reproduction (Vinegar 1975; Robertson and Rosenblum 2010). However, genetic data (Leache and Reeder 2002) support reallocation of the subspecies of...

  18. Tissue culture of three species of Laurencia complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong; Wu, Xunjian; Yan, Binlun; He, Lihong

    2010-05-01

    To establish a micropropagation system of three Laurencia complex species ( Laurencia okamurai, Laurencia tristicha, and Chondrophycus undulatus) by tissue culture techniques, we studied the regeneration characteristics and optimal culture conditions of axenic algal fragments cultured on solid medium and in liquid medium. Regeneration structures were observed and counted regularly under a reverse microscope to investigate the regeneration process, polarity and optimal illumination, and temperature and salinity levels. The results show that in most cultures of the three species, we obtained bud regeneration on solidified medium with 0.5% agar and in liquid medium. Rhizoid-like regeneration was filamentous and developed from the lower cut surface of fragments in L. okamurai, but was discoid and developed from the apical back side of bud regeneration in L. tristicha and C. undulatus. Regeneration polarity was localized to the apical part of algal fronds in all three species, and on fragments cut from the basal part of algae buds could develop from both the upper and the lower cut surfaces. Buds could develop from both the medullary and the cortical portions in L. okamurai and C. undulatus, while in L. tristicha, buds only emerged from the cortex. The optimal culture conditions for L. okamurai were 4 500 lx, 20°C and 35 (salinity); for C. undulatus, 4 500 lx, 20°C and 30; and for L. tristicha, 4 500 lx, 25°C and 30.

  19. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  20. General Plan Environmental Assessment for Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    bat species are also known to be present at Andrews (AAFB 2009c). Reptiles present at Andrews include the Eastern garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis...black rat snake (Elaphe obsolete), fence lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), and Eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). Fish species in the Base Lake...1290 Auto Garage F 3285 AFOSI F 1353 OPG Storage F 3286 Gas Station F 1384 BOQ Navy #1 – Coral Sea F 3296 BE Storage Shed F 1385 BOQ Navy #1

  1. Genetically different clonal isolates of Trichomonas gallinae, obtained from the same bird, can vary in their drug susceptibility, an in vitro evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimre-Grabensteiner, Elvira; Arshad, Najma; Amin, Aziza; Hess, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a flagellated protozoon which parasitizes in the upper digestive tract of different birds, especially columbiformes (doves and pigeons) and falconiformes. The parasite is also a common inhabitant of the crop of psittacine birds and is frequently detected in budgerigars. The lesions associated with T. gallinae infection of the upper digestive tract range from mild inflammation of the mucosa to large caseous lesions that block the lumen of the oesophagus. Nitroimidazoles are considered to be the drugs of choice for the treatment of trichomonosis. However, only a few studies report the existence of resistant strains of T. gallinae to these drugs. Thus, in the present investigation cloned cultures of T. gallinae obtained from budgerigars and pigeons were analysed for the first time for their in vitro susceptibilities against four 5´-nitroimidazole derivates, including metronidazole, dimetridazole, ronidazole and ornidazole. Significantly different minimal lethal concentrations (MLCs) were observed for them against all four drugs. The lowest MLCs revealed the Trichomonas isolates obtained from two budgerigars, ranging from 2.0 ± 0.3 to 3.0 ± 0.7 μg/ml for metronidazole and dimetridazole, and from 2.0 ± 0.6 to 6.7 ± 1.7 μg/ml for ornidazole and ronidazole. Contrary to this, the highest MLCs were recorded for one Trichomonas isolate obtained from a pigeon, ranging from 83.3 ± 6.7 (for dimetridazole and ronidazole) to 103.3 ± 3.3 μg/ml (for metronidazole and ornidazole). The data obtained for the resistance testing were further compared with already available genetic data of the small subunit rRNA gene sequences and ITS-1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS-2 sequences, indicating a certain correlation between in vitro results and strain relationships. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lizard activity and abundance greater in burned habitat of a xeric montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Kevin L.; Moore, Clinton; Johnson, Kristine D.; Maerz, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Restoring the natural or historical state of ecosystems is a common objective among resource managers, but determining whether desired system responses to management actions are occurring is often protracted and challenging. For wildlife, the integration of mechanistic habitat modeling with population monitoring may provide expedited measures of management effectiveness and improve understanding of how management actions succeed or fail to recover populations. Southern Appalachia is a region of high biodiversity that has undergone dramatic change as a result of human activities such as historic logging, exotic invasions, and alteration of disturbance regimes—including reduction in application of fire. Contemporary efforts to restore fire-maintained ecosystems within southern Appalachian forests require tools to assess the effects of fire management practices on individual animal fitness and relate them to corresponding influences on species abundance. Using automated sensing equipment, we investigated the effects of burned forests on reptile habitat suitability within the western portion of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. Specifically, we used microclimate measurements to model northern fence lizard Sceloporus undulatus hyacinthinus diurnal activity budgets in unburned and variable burn age (3–27-y) forest stands. We estimated northern fence lizard occurrence and abundance along transects through burned and unburned forests. Burned forest stands had microclimates that resulted in longer modeled daily activity periods under most conditions during summer. S. undulatus abundance was 4.75 times greater on burned stands compared to paired unburned stands, although the relationship between burn age and abundance was not well determined. Results suggest the more open habitat structure of burned areas within these xeric pine–oak forests may benefit S. undulatus.

  3. Nutritional modulation of IGF-1 in relation to growth and body condition in Sceloporus lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christine A; Jetzt, Amanda E; Cohick, Wendie S; John-Alder, Henry B

    2015-05-15

    Nutrition and energy balance are important regulators of growth and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis. However, our understanding of these functions does not extend uniformly to all classes of vertebrates and is mainly limited to controlled laboratory conditions. Lizards can be useful models to improve our understanding of the nutritional regulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis because many species are relatively easy to observe and manipulate both in the laboratory and in the field. In the present study, the effects of variation in food intake on growth, body condition, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA levels were measured in (1) juveniles of Sceloporus jarrovii maintained on a full or 1/3 ration and (2) hatchlings of Sceloporus undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. These parameters plus plasma IGF-1 were measured in a third experiment using adults of S. undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. In all experiments, plasma corticosterone was measured as an anticipated indicator of nutritional stress. In S. jarrovii, growth and body condition were reduced but lizards remained in positive energy balance on 1/3 ration, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and plasma corticosterone were not affected in comparison to full ration. In S. undulatus, growth, body condition, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA, and plasma IGF-1 were all reduced by zero ration and restored by refeeding. Plasma corticosterone was increased in response to zero ration and restored by full ration in hatchlings but not adults of S. undulatus. These data indicate that lizards conform to the broader vertebrate model in which severe food deprivation and negative energy balance is required to attenuate systemic IGF-1 expression. However, when animals remain in positive energy balance, reduced food intake does not appear to affect systemic IGF-1. Consistent with other studies on lizards, the corticosterone response to reduced food intake is an unreliable indicator

  4. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Brauth, Steven E.; Durand, Sarah E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot “core” song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the “shell” song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities. PMID:26107173

  5. Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications: Progress report for period December 1, 1986-July 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, W.P.

    1987-08-01

    The vacuum gas-analysis system is running and we use doubly labeled water routinely in our research. We have the computer-controlled respirometer system running, and can routinely measure respiratory gases and body temperatures in small, living mammals. Our heat- and mass-balance model calculations of field metabolism and water loss agree exceptionally well with doubly labeled water measurements of the field metabolism and water loss for Sceloporus undulatus in the sandhill country of western Nebraska. We established theoretical links between our biophysical models of individual animals and population dynamics and community models in the literature. Our general, dry, porous-media model works for bird feathers as well as fur. Now heat and mass fluxes for any endotherm in any physical environment can be calculated with accuracy knowing only allometry, insulation properties, core or skin temperature and environmental conditions. We developed a general respiratory water-loss model using a coupled molar and heat balance. We developed a general counter-current heat exchange model with a peripheral heat generation and iterative skin temperature solution. We are testing our endotherm model on four species of temperate and tropical birds. We are completing parameter measurements for a test of the ectotherm model on an herbivorous lizard, like the test described above for the carnivorous lizard, Sceloporus undulatus. We have begun lab and field studies of the energetic costs of parasitism and climate on a small endotherm (using tapeworm infection of white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus). 8 figs.

  6. A revision of the families Licnodamaeidae and Licnobelbidae (Acari, Oribatei with a recharacterization of the genera Licnodamaeus and Licnobelba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson D. Paschoal

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The families Licnodamaeidae and Licnobelbi ee are recharacterized. Licnodamaeidae includes the sole genus Licnodamaeus Grandjean, with the species: undulatus (Paoli, pulcherrimus (Paoli and costula Grandjean, all from Europe; the gen b Licnocepheus Woolley is removed from the family Licnodamaeidae. Licnobelbidae includes also one single genus: Licnobelba Grandjean, with the species: alestensis Grandjean, caesarea (Berlese and montana Mihelcic, all from Europe. Licnodamaeus granulatus Balogh & Csiszár (Argentina, Licneremaeus latiflabellatus Paoli and Licneremaeus tuberculatus Paoli (both from taly are considered incertae sedis.As famílias Licnodamaeidae e Licnobelbidae são recaracterizadas. Licnodamaeidae inclui apenas o gênero Licnodamaeus Grandjean, com as espécies: undulatus (Paoli, pulcherrimus (Paoli e costula randjean, todas da Europa; o gênero Licnocepheus Woolley é removido de Licnodamaeidae. Licnobelbidae inclui também só um gênero, Licnobelba Grandjean, com as espécies: alestensis Grandjean, caesarea (Berlese e montana Mihelcic, todas da Europa. Licnodamaeus granulatus Balogh & Csiszár (Argentina, Licneremaeus latiflabellatus Paoli e Licneremaeus tuberculatus Paoli (ambas da Itália são consideradas incertae sedis.

  7. Estado de conservación de la fauna de Sauria y Amphisbaenidae (Reptilia: Squamata de Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carreira Vidal, Santiago

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Se evalúa el estado de conservación de la fauna de Sauria y Amphisbaenia del Uruguay, basado en el índice propuesto por Reca et al. (1994, y se aplican las categorías propuestas por Ávila et al. (2000. Se analizaron en total 17 especies, de las cuales se destacan como vulnerables (V Leposternon microcephalum, Anisolepis undulatus, Tropidurus torquatus y Stenocercus azureus, representando el 23,5% de los taxones investigados. La limitación principal detectada en la utilización del índice de Reca es que, dada la carencia de información básica sobre algunas especies, los resultados deben ser re-evaluados de forma constante ante la generación de nuevos conocimientos. Based on the index proposed by Reca et al. (1994, and the categories proposed by Ávila et al. (2000, the conservation status for Sauria and Amphisbaenia from Uruguay is evaluated. Seventeen species were analized, four of them stood out as vulnerable (V Leposternon microcephalum, Anisolepis undulatus, Tropidurus torquatus and Stenocercus azureus, representing the 23.5% of the taxa. The most important constraint detected using Reca's Index, is that due to the lack of basic information about some of the species, the results should be revisited any time new knowledge arises.

  8. Core and shell song systems unique to the parrot brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Harpøth, Solveig Walløe; Nedergaard, Signe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning...... systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences...... contains a song system within a song system. The parrot "core" song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the "shell" song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living...

  9. Discovery of a novel functional leptin protein (LEP) in zebra finches: evidence for the existence of an authentic avian leptin gene predominantly expressed in the brain and pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guian; Li, Juan; Wang, Hongning; Lan, Xinyu; Wang, Yajun

    2014-09-01

    Leptin (LEP) is reported to play important roles in controlling energy balance in vertebrates, including birds. However, it remains an open question whether an authentic "LEP gene" exists and functions in birds. Here, we identified and characterized a LEP gene (zebra finch LEP [zbLEP]) encoding a 172-amino acid precursor in zebra finches. Despite zbLEP showing limited amino acid sequence identity (26%-29%) to human and mouse LEPs, synteny analysis proved that zbLEP is orthologous to mammalian LEP. Using a pAH32 luciferase reporter system and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that the recombinant zbLEP protein could potently activate finch and chicken LEP receptors (zbLEPR; cLEPR) expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and enhance signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, further indicating that zbLEP is a functional ligand for avian LEPRs. Interestingly, quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that zbLEP mRNA is expressed nearly exclusively in the pituitary and various brain regions but undetectable in adipose tissue and liver, whereas zbLEPR mRNA is widely expressed in adult finch tissues examined with abundant expression noted in pituitary, implying that unlike mammalian LEP, finch LEP may not act as an adipocyte-derived signal to control energy balance. As in finches, a LEP highly homologous to zbLEP was also identified in budgerigar genome. Strikingly, finch and budgerigar LEPs show little homology with chicken LEP (cLEP) previously reported, suggesting that the so-called cLEP is incorrect. Collectively, our data provide convincing evidence for the existence of an authentic functional LEP in avian species and suggest an important role of brain- and pituitary-derived LEP played in vertebrates.

  10. [Behavior of pet animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmelin, I

    1990-06-01

    Severe mistakes in pet keeping are often the result of ignorance. Many animals suffer from the care of their owners. Industry provides food in the proper composition, but the importance of the cage's interior, its size and the number of animals of the same species kept in it is often neglected. The key to a better understanding of pets is the knowledge of the ecological environment of their species. Fish, amphibia and reptiles are capable of simple acts of learning, but their potential of adaptation to their environment is determined mainly genetically, which can be observed best during the phase of their youth. Most members of these animal groups are born with a perfect behaviour program. Thus aquaria and terraria should as far as possible correspond to the needs and requirements of the species in question to its ecological niche. An aquarium should be a model of the animals' biotope. The effect of the conditions under which a pet is kept on its wellbeing is discussed in detail for the budgerigar and the guinea pig. Experiments with budgerigars showing that too small cages and the missing company of animals of the same species lead to abnormal behaviour are described. Guinea pigs live in packs. The fact how important the group and its social organization is for the individual guinea pig is documented by experimentally verified data. Furthermore the effect of the guinea pig's ontogeny under experimental conditions on the structure of a pack is discussed. Already small changes in the size of the cage or in its interior encourage the guinea pig's exploration behaviour and its mobility.

  11. Reconstruction of gross avian genome structure, organization and evolution suggests that the chicken lineage most closely resembles the dinosaur avian ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Michael N; Farré, Marta; Lithgow, Pamela E; Fowler, Katie E; Skinner, Benjamin M; O'Connor, Rebecca; Fonseka, Gothami; Backström, Niclas; Matsuda, Yoichi; Nishida, Chizuko; Houde, Peter; Jarvis, Erich D; Ellegren, Hans; Burt, David W; Larkin, Denis M; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-12-11

    The availability of multiple avian genome sequence assemblies greatly improves our ability to define overall genome organization and reconstruct evolutionary changes. In birds, this has previously been impeded by a near intractable karyotype and relied almost exclusively on comparative molecular cytogenetics of only the largest chromosomes. Here, novel whole genome sequence information from 21 avian genome sequences (most newly assembled) made available on an interactive browser (Evolution Highway) was analyzed. Focusing on the six best-assembled genomes allowed us to assemble a putative karyotype of the dinosaur ancestor for each chromosome. Reconstructing evolutionary events that led to each species' genome organization, we determined that the fastest rate of change occurred in the zebra finch and budgerigar, consistent with rapid speciation events in the Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. Intra- and interchromosomal changes were explained most parsimoniously by a series of inversions and translocations respectively, with breakpoint reuse being commonplace. Analyzing chicken and zebra finch, we found little evidence to support the hypothesis of an association of evolutionary breakpoint regions with recombination hotspots but some evidence to support the hypothesis that microchromosomes largely represent conserved blocks of synteny in the majority of the 21 species analyzed. All but one species showed the expected number of microchromosomal rearrangements predicted by the haploid chromosome count. Ostrich, however, appeared to retain an overall karyotype structure of 2n=80 despite undergoing a large number (26) of hitherto un-described interchromosomal changes. Results suggest that mechanisms exist to preserve a static overall avian karyotype/genomic structure, including the microchromosomes, with widespread interchromosomal change occurring rarely (e.g., in ostrich and budgerigar lineages). Of the species analyzed, the chicken lineage appeared to have undergone

  12. New fossil Osmylopsychopidae (Neuroptera) from the Early/Middle Jurassic of Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramov, Alexander V; Makarkin, Vladimir N

    2015-12-21

    Four genera and four species of Osmylopsychopidae are described from the Jurassic of Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia: Oligophlebiopsis biramosa gen. et sp. nov. (Early Jurassic of Sogyuty); Osmylopsychoides anteromedialis gen. et sp. nov., Psychostoechotes undulatus gen. et sp. nov. and Osmylopsychostoechus sogulensis gen. et sp. nov. (all from the late Early to early Middle Jurassic of Sai-Sagul). By their poorly-developed outer gradate series of crossveins, these taxa (except O. anteromedialis gen. et sp. nov.) are more similar to Triassic genera than to the Middle/Late Jurassic Osmylopsychopidae (particularly from Daohugou, China). Two isolated hind wings from Sai-Sagul (i.e., Osmylopsychostoechus sp. and Osmylopsychopidae gen. et sp. indet.) are preliminarily assigned to this family.

  13. Effect of Temperature on Feeding Period of Larval Blacklegged Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on Eastern Fence Lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L; Lebrun, Roger A; Ginsberg, Howard S

    2014-11-01

    Ambient temperature can influence tick development time, and can potentially affect tick interactions with pathogens and with vertebrate hosts. We studied the effect of ambient temperature on duration of attachment of larval blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, to eastern fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus (Bosc & Daudin). Feeding periods of larvae that attached to lizards under preferred temperature conditions for the lizards (WARM treatment: temperatures averaged 36.6°C at the top of the cage and 25.8°C at the bottom, allowing behavioral thermoregulation) were shorter than for larvae on lizards held under cool conditions (COOL treatment temperatures averaged 28.4°C at top of cage and 24.9°C at the bottom). The lizards were infested with larvae four times at roughly monthly intervals. Larval numbers successfully engorging and dropping declined and feeding period was longer after the first infestation. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  14. Effect of temperature on feeding period of larval blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on eastern fence lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient temperature can influence tick development time, and can potentially affect tick interactions with pathogens and with vertebrate hosts. We studied the effect of ambient temperature on duration of attachment of larval blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, to eastern fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus (Bose & Daudin). Feeding periods of larvae that attached to lizards under preferred temperature conditions for the lizards (WARM treatment: temperatures averaged 36.6°C at the top of the cage and 25.8°C at the bottom, allowing behavioral thermoregulation) were shorter than for larvae on lizards held under cool conditions (COOL treatment temperatures averaged 28.4°C at top of cage and 24.9°C at the bottom). The lizards were infested with larvae four times at roughly monthly intervals. Larval numbers successfully engorging and dropping declined and feeding period was longer after the first infestation.

  15. Gergithoides Schumacher, 1915 in Vietnam, with two new species, and taxonomic notes on the genus (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Issidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Constant

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Gergithoides Schumacher, 1915 (Issinae, Hemisphaeriini, G. gnezdilovi sp. nov. from Bidoup-Nui Ba National Park in Central Vietnam and G. nui sp. nov. from Pia-Oac National Park in North Vietnam, are described. These are the only species of the genus formally recorded from Vietnam to date. Habitus, details and male genitalia are illustrated and a distribution map is provided. Four females representing three or four additional species, known from females only, are mentioned and illustrated. Taxonomic and biogeographical updates based on a thorough review of the literature are proposed and discussed for G. carinatifrons Schumacher, 1915, G. rugulosus (Melichar, 1906 and G. undulatus Wang & Che, 2003.

  16. Widespread endocrine disruption and reproductive impairment in an estuarine fish population exposed to seasonal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Rahman, Md Saydur; Khan, Izhar A; Kummer, James A

    2007-11-07

    The long-term effects on marine fish populations of the recent increase worldwide in the incidence of coastal hypoxia are unknown. Here we show that chronic environmental exposure of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) to hypoxia in a Florida estuary caused marked suppression of ovarian and testicular growth which was accompanied by endocrine disruption. Laboratory hypoxia studies showed that the endocrine disruption was associated with impairment of reproductive neuroendocrine function and decreases in hypothalamic serotonin (5-HT) content and the activity of the 5-HT biosynthetic enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase. Pharmacological restoration of hypothalamic 5-HT levels also restored neuroendocrine function, indicating that the stimulatory serotonergic neuroendocrine pathway is a major site of hypoxia-induced inhibition. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase activity to downregulate reproductive activity could have evolved as an adaptive mechanism to survive periodic hypoxia, but in view of the recent increased incidence of coastal hypoxia could become maladaptive and potentially affect fish population abundance and threaten valuable fishery resources.

  17. Involvement of larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) on human cadavers: a review of 81 forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Colard, Thomas; Vincent, Benoit; Pasquerault, Thierry; Hedouin, Valery

    2014-11-01

    From 1994 to 2013, French forensic entomology laboratories investigated 1,093 cases. Larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) were observed in 81 (7.5%) of these cases. To describe and analyze these 81 cases, eight parameters were used: city, location (indoor or outdoor), decay stage (fresh, decay, or dry), dermestid species and instar (adults and/or larvae), presence of living calliphorid larvae, presence of calliphorid pupae or adults, and presence of other necrophagous species. Eight Dermestidae species were observed: Dermestes frischii (42% of cases), Dermestes undulatus (35.8%), Dermestes peruvianus (12.3%), Dermestes lardarius (9.9%), Dermestes haemorrhoidalis (8.6%), Dermestes maculatus (7.4%), Dermestes bicolor (3.7%), and Dermestes ater (1.2%). Larder beetles primarily developed on human cadavers in outdoor locations in areas with a dry climate and were never reported in oceanic areas (which are characterized by frequent rainfall and high ambient humidity). The number of dermestid species on a single corpse never exceeded three. Typically, one species was found per corpse. Species differed between indoor and outdoor cases, with D. frischii and D. undulatus dominant in outdoor cases, while D. peruvianus dominant in indoor cases. Calliphoridae was found in 88% of the cases, while Hydrotaea and Piophilidae were observed 40% of the time. Regarding Coleoptera, Necrobia spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) was observed in 46% of the cases. Lastly, we observed a typical decomposition pattern, with preferential feeding areas on the face, hands, and feet (i.e., the extremities). Pupation chambers on or inside the bones were not observed.

  18. The evolutionary diversification of parrots supports a taxon pulse model with multiple trans-oceanic dispersal events and local radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Manuel; Seehausen, Ole; Güntert, Marcel; Hertwig, Stefan T

    2010-03-01

    Vicariance is thought to have played a major role in the evolution of modern parrots. However, as the relationships especially of the African taxa remained mostly unresolved, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about the roles of dispersal and vicariance. Our analyses using the broadest taxon sampling of old world parrots ever based on 3219bp of three nuclear genes revealed well-resolved and congruent phylogenetic hypotheses. Agapornis of Africa and Madagascar was found to be the sister group to Loriculus of Australasia and Indo-Malayasia and together they clustered with the Australasian Loriinae, Cyclopsittacini and Melopsittacus. Poicephalus and Psittacus from mainland Africa formed the sister group of the Neotropical Arini and Coracopsis from Madagascar and adjacent islands may be the closest relative of Psittrichas from New Guinea. These biogeographic relationships are best explained by independent colonization of the African continent via trans-oceanic dispersal from Australasia and Antarctica in the Paleogene following what may have been vicariance events in the late Cretaceous and/or early Paleogene. Our data support a taxon pulse model for the diversification of parrots whereby trans-oceanic dispersal played a more important role than previously thought and was the prerequisite for range expansion into new continents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mind the gap: upgrading genomes with Pacific Biosciences RS long-read sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C English

    Full Text Available Many genomes have been sequenced to high-quality draft status using Sanger capillary electrophoresis and/or newer short-read sequence data and whole genome assembly techniques. However, even the best draft genomes contain gaps and other imperfections due to limitations in the input data and the techniques used to build draft assemblies. Sequencing biases, repetitive genomic features, genomic polymorphism, and other complicating factors all come together to make some regions difficult or impossible to assemble. Traditionally, draft genomes were upgraded to "phase 3 finished" status using time-consuming and expensive Sanger-based manual finishing processes. For more facile assembly and automated finishing of draft genomes, we present here an automated approach to finishing using long-reads from the Pacific Biosciences RS (PacBio platform. Our algorithm and associated software tool, PBJelly, (publicly available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/pb-jelly/ automates the finishing process using long sequence reads in a reference-guided assembly process. PBJelly also provides "lift-over" co-ordinate tables to easily port existing annotations to the upgraded assembly. Using PBJelly and long PacBio reads, we upgraded the draft genome sequences of a simulated Drosophila melanogaster, the version 2 draft Drosophila pseudoobscura, an assembly of the Assemblathon 2.0 budgerigar dataset, and a preliminary assembly of the Sooty mangabey. With 24× mapped coverage of PacBio long-reads, we addressed 99% of gaps and were able to close 69% and improve 12% of all gaps in D. pseudoobscura. With 4× mapped coverage of PacBio long-reads we saw reads address 63% of gaps in our budgerigar assembly, of which 32% were closed and 63% improved. With 6.8× mapped coverage of mangabey PacBio long-reads we addressed 97% of gaps and closed 66% of addressed gaps and improved 19%. The accuracy of gap closure was validated by comparison to Sanger sequencing on gaps from the

  20. Evaluation effect of Lambdacy halothrin, Zizyphus extract and Cedrus oil in knemidocoptes in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R Hosseini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Knemidocoptic mange is occasionally noted in pet chickens. The etiologic agent of this disease is Knemidocoptes gallinae and K.mutans, a sarcoptiform mite. These mites live out their entire life cycle on their hosts. Typically, the crusty and scaly dermatitis associated with this mite is seen at the feet and legs, as may be seen in some pet canaries or budgerigars with the same problem. Facial lesions, however, are particularly uncommonly seen in chickens. A suggestive diagnosis can be established by physical examination findings of a "honeycombed" appearance to the crusts and scales on the feet and legs, or by skin scraping. Treatment is with ivermectin, which may be repeated in 2-week intervals for 2 to 3 total treatments. Not all birds exposed to a bird with this condition necessarily will develop problems, and group treatment is not necessarily always required Cedrus oil a herbal product was trid agains knemidocoptes gallinae and its efficacy was compared with of Zizyphus Extract and Rotenone-orthophenol. In this study 16 broiler with knemidocoptes gallinae infestion treated with cedrus oil and Zizyphus extract .Mite scrapings after topical application of cedrus oil caused complet recovery after 20 days in severe infestation with growth of feather on days 20 post treatment. Adverse reactions were observed the following of lambdacyhalothrin were used.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis by 16S rDNA gene sequence comparison of avian taxa of Bisgaard and characterization and description of two new taxa of Pasteurellaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H; Foster, G; Christensen, J P; Pennycott, T; Olsen, J E; Bisgaard, M

    2003-01-01

    Characterization and classification of members of Pasteurellaceae isolated from birds by extended phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA gene sequence comparison. A total of 95 avian isolates were subjected to extended phenotypic characterization. Thirteen bacterial strains selected from main phenotypic clusters and isolated from parrot, parakeet, budgerigar, partridge, pheasant, chicken, duck, hawk and gull were subsequently characterized by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Eight of the sequenced strains were classified with six taxa of Bisgaard of which two (34 and 40) have not been published before, and the properties of four others (14, 22, 26 and 32) changed upon the characterization of these new isolates. Of the remaining strains, one was identified as a phenotypic variant in maltose and dextrin of Pasteurella gallinarum another as a trehalose positive variant of taxon 3 of Bisgaard. The remaining three strains sequenced were not closely related to existing taxa of Pasteurellaceae. However, they were found to belong to the Avian cluster with 92-97% 16S rDNA gene sequence similarity. The study allowed the classification of bacteria isolated from birds by the integrated use of extended phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Only the application of 16S rDNA gene sequencing allows a correct identification of variant strains. The description of new taxa within the bacterial family Pasteurellaceae will subsequently allow additional isolates of these taxa to be identified and improve the diagnosis and epidemiological understanding of bacteria causing disease in birds.

  2. Molecular characterization of avian polyomavirus isolated from psittacine birds based on the whole genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Ohya, Kenji; Une, Yumi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto

    2009-07-02

    Seven avian polyomaviruses (APVs) were isolated from seven psittacine birds of four species. Their whole genome sequences were genetically analyzed. Comparing with the sequence of BFDV1 strain, nucleotide substitutions in the sequences of seven APV isolates were found at 63 loci and a high level of conservation of amino acid sequence in each viral protein (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP4, and t/T antigen) was predicted. An A-to-T nucleotide substitution was observed in non-control region of all seven APV sequences in comparison with BFDV1 strain. Two C-to-T nucleotide substitutions were also detected in non-coding regions of one isolate. A phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome sequences indicated that the sequences from the same species of bird were closely related. APV has been reported to have distinct tropism for cell cultures of various avian species. The present study indicated that a single amino acid substitution at position 221 in VP2 was essential for propagating in chicken embryonic fibroblast culture and this substitution was promoted by propagation on budgerigar embryonic fibroblast culture. For two isolates, three serial amino acids appeared to be deleted in VP4. However, this deletion had little effect on virus propagation.

  3. Optic flow cues guide flight in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Partha S; Claudianos, Charles; Ibbotson, Michael R; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2011-11-08

    Although considerable effort has been devoted to investigating how birds migrate over large distances, surprisingly little is known about how they tackle so successfully the moment-to-moment challenges of rapid flight through cluttered environments [1]. It has been suggested that birds detect and avoid obstacles [2] and control landing maneuvers [3-5] by using cues derived from the image motion that is generated in the eyes during flight. Here we investigate the ability of budgerigars to fly through narrow passages in a collision-free manner, by filming their trajectories during flight in a corridor where the walls are decorated with various visual patterns. The results demonstrate, unequivocally and for the first time, that birds negotiate narrow gaps safely by balancing the speeds of image motion that are experienced by the two eyes and that the speed of flight is regulated by monitoring the speed of image motion that is experienced by the two eyes. These findings have close parallels with those previously reported for flying insects [6-13], suggesting that some principles of visual guidance may be shared by all diurnal, flying animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Draft De Novo Genome Sequence of Agapornis roseicollis for Application in Avian Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Henriëtte; van der Westhuizen, Francois; Visser, Carina; van der Sluis, Rencia

    2017-10-16

    In aviculture, lovebirds are considered one of the most popular birds to keep. This African parakeet is known for its range of plumage colors and ease to tame. Plumage variation is the most important price-determining trait of these birds, and also the main selection criterion for breeders. Currently, no genetic screening tests for traits of economic importance or to confirm pedigree data are available for any of the nine lovebird species. As a starting point to develop these tests, the de novo genome of Agapornis roseicollis (rosy-faced lovebird) was sequenced, assembled, and annotated. Sequencing was done on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and the assembly was performed using SOAPdenovo v2.04. The genome was found to be 1.1 Gb in size and 16,044 genes were identified and annotated. This compared well with other previously sequenced avian genomes, such as the chicken, zebra finch, and budgerigar. To assess genome completeness, the number of benchmarking universal single-copy orthologs were identified in the genome. This was compared to other previously assembled avian genomes and the results indicated that the genome will be useful in the development of genetic screening tests to aid lovebird breeders in selecting breeding pairs.

  5. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: an assessment of coral reef fishes in the US Pacific Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgliczynski, B. J.; Williams, I. D.; Schroeder, R. E.; Nadon, M. O.; Richards, B. L.; Sandin, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Widespread declines among many coral reef fisheries have led scientists and managers to become increasingly concerned over the extinction risk facing some species. To aid in assessing the extinction risks facing coral reef fishes, large-scale censuses of the abundance and distribution of individual species are critically important. We use fisheries-independent data collected as part of the NOAA Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program from 2000 to 2009 to describe the range and density across the US Pacific of coral reef fishes included on The International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) 2011 Red List of Threatened Species. Forty-five species, including sharks, rays, groupers, humphead wrasse ( Cheilinus undulatus), and bumphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum), included on the IUCN List, were recorded in the US Pacific Islands. Most species were generally rare in the US Pacific with the exception of a few species, principally small groupers and reef sharks. The greatest diversity and densities of IUCN-listed fishes were recorded at remote and uninhabited islands of the Pacific Remote Island Areas; in general, lower densities were observed at reefs of inhabited islands. Our findings complement IUCN assessment efforts, emphasize the efficacy of large-scale assessment and monitoring efforts in providing quantitative data on reef fish assemblages, and highlight the importance of protecting populations at remote and uninhabited islands where some species included on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species can be observed in abundance.

  6. Small mammals of the Mongolian mountain steppe region near Erdensant: insights from live-trapping and bird pellet remains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Isaac

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known of the distribution, abundance and ecology of small mammals in Mongolia and as a result there is scant knowledge of the effects of environmental and anthropogenic factors on small mammal populations. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of small mammals in mountain steppe habitat from live-trapping and analysis of mammal remains from raptor pellets and below nests. During live-trapping, root voles ( Microtus oeconemus were the most commonly caught species accounting for 47.5 % of captures, striped hamsters ( Cricetulus barabensis and pika ( Ochotona hyperborea accounted for 30 % and 22.5 % of captures respectively. Temperature influenced trapping success, with small mammals appearing to avoid being active at temperatures over 20 ̊C. The three species caught on the trapping grid appeared to avoid competition for resources through both temporal and spatial differences in the use of available habitat. Mammals identified from raptor pellets and other remains included the grey hamster ( Cricatulus migratorius , Siberian marmot ( Marmota sibirica , red fox ( Vulpes vulpes , long-tailed souslik ( Citellus undulatus and the Daurian mole ( Myospalax aspalax. Results are discussed in terms of their relevance to the conservation of mammals in Mongolia and their co-existence with livestock and humans.

  7. [Functional similarity of the P-2 form of primary sleep and hypobiosis in the frog Rana temporaria (based on data from luminescent microspectral analysis of the cytoplasm of neurosecretory neurons)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutetskaia, O E; Gordon, R Ia; Karmanova, I G; Karnaukhov, V N

    1989-01-01

    Using luminescent microspectral analysis of preparations stained by acridine orange, studies have been made on the ratio between single- and double-stranded parts in ribosomal RNA from the cytoplasm of neurosecretory neurones of the preoptic nucleus of the frog Rana temporaria. The animals were investigated in active period, during P-2 form of the primary sleep, in hypobiosis, and after injection of the active factor (peptide fraction with a molecular mass 1-10,000 Da) extracted from the small intestine of the ground squirrel Citellus undulatus during winter hibernation. It was shown that unlike actively awake frogs, animals from other experimental series exhibited similar changes, i.e. the decrease in the affinity of acridine orange to single- and double-stranded parts of rRNA and the decrease in the value of alpha which reflects the ratio of single- and double-stranded parts. It was also demonstrated that injection of the active factor from hibernating ground squirrels to frogs results in a condition which is rather similar to a natural resting form (P-2) of the primary sleep in cold-blooded vertebrates.

  8. In Space and Time: Territorial Animals are Attracted to Conspecific Chemical Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Stephanie M.; Strauss, Chloe; Martins, Emília P.

    2017-01-01

    Territorial animals lay scent marks around their territories to broadcast their presence, but these olfactory signals can both attract and repel con-specifics. Attraction or aversion can have a profound impact in terms of space use and thereby influence an individual’s access to resources and mates. Here, we test the impact of chemical signals on the long-term space use and activity of receivers, comparing the response of males and females, territory holders, and temporary visitors in Sceloporus undulatus lizards in the field. We placed either male femoral gland secretions (chemical) or blank (control) cues on resident male landmarks, repeatedly over 5 d, while monitoring the activity and location of all lizards in the vicinity. We found that resident males and females, but not non-resident males, were active on more days near landmarks treated with chemical cues than landmarks treated with control cues. Non-resident males remained closer to chemical than control cues. These results suggest that territorial scent marks are attractive to conspecifics and impact space use, but that the specific effects depend on receiver sex and residency status. Such subtle or gradual changes in behavior may frequently be overlooked by short-term choice experiments. Future studies investigating the behavioral significance of a communicative signal should consider these finer details of behavior for a more comprehensive assessment. PMID:28413237

  9. New Curculionoidea records from New Brunswick, Canada with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Anderson, Robert S; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 27 new records of Curculionoidea for the province of New Brunswick, Canada, including three species new to Canada, and 12 adventive species, as follows: Eusphryrus walshii LeConte, Choragus harrisii LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Choragus zimmermanni LeConte (newly recorded for Canada) (Anthribidae); Cimberis pallipennis (Blatchley) (Nemonychidae); Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze) (Brentidae); Procas lecontei Bedel (Brachyceridae); Anthonomus pusillus LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Anthonomus (Cnemocyllus) pictus Blatchley, Archarius salicivorus (Paykull), Dorytomus hirtus LeConte, Ellescus bipunctatus (Linnaeus), Mecinus janthinus (Germar), Myrmex chevrolatii (Horn), Madarellus undulatus (Say), Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal), Pelenomus waltoni (Boheman), Rhinoncus bruchoides (Herbst), Rhinoncus perpendicularis (Reich), Cossonus impressifrons Boheman, Cossonus pacificus Van Dyke, Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher), Eubulus bisignatus (Say), Polydrusus cervinus (Linnaeus), Magdalis piceae Buchanan, Procryphalus mucronatus (LeConte), Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), and Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford). Recent name changes in the genus Rhinoncus are applied to species known from New Brunswick. In addition, Orchestes alni (Linnaeus) is newly recorded from Nova Scotia.

  10. Comparative ontogeny of the feeding apparatus of sympatric drums (Perciformes: Sciaenidae) in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Alison L; Hilton, Eric J

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the feeding apparatus in fishes, including both oral and pharyngeal jaw elements, is closely related to the ecology of a species. During ontogeny, the oral and pharyngeal jaws undergo dramatic changes. To better understand how such ontogenetic changes occur and relate to the feeding ecology of a species, ontogenetic series of four closely related members of the family Sciaenidae (Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion regalis, Micropogonias undulatus, and Leiostomus xanthurus) were examined. Sciaenids were selected because as adults they exhibit considerable specialization of the feeding apparatus correlated with differences in foraging habitats. However, it is not clear when during ontogeny the structural specializations of the feeding apparatus develop, and thereby enable early life history stage (ELHS) sciaenids to partition their foraging habitats. A regression tree was recovered from the analysis and three divergences were identified during ontogeny. There are no measurable differences in elements of the feeding apparatus until the first divergence at 8.4 mm head length (HL), which was attributed to differences in average gill filament length on the second ceratobranchial. The second divergence occurred at 14.1 mm HL and was associated with premaxilla length. The final divergence occurred at 19.8 mm HL and was associated with differences in the toothed area of the fifth certatobranchial. These morphological divergences suggest that ELHS sciaenids may be structurally able to partition their foraging habitats as early as 8.4 mm HL. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Spatial patterns of coral survivorship: impacts of adult proximity versus other drivers of localized mortality

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    David A. Gibbs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Species-specific enemies may promote prey coexistence through negative distance- and density-dependent survival of juveniles near conspecific adults. We tested this mechanism by transplanting juvenile-sized fragments of the brooding corals Pocillopora damicornis and Seriatopora hystrix 3, 12, 24 and 182 cm up- and down-current of conspecific adults and monitoring their survival and condition over time. We also characterized the spatial distribution of P. damicornis and S. hystrix within replicate plots on three Fijian reef flats and measured the distribution of small colonies within 2 m of larger colonies of each species. Juvenile-sized transplants exhibited no differences in survivorship as a function of distance from adult P. damicornis or S. hystrix. Additionally, both P. damicornis and S. hystrix were aggregated rather than overdispersed on natural reefs. However, a pattern of juveniles being aggregated near adults while larger (and probably older colonies were not suggests that greater mortality near large adults could occur over longer periods of time or that size-dependent mortality was occurring. While we found minimal evidence of greater mortality of small colonies near adult conspecifics in our transplant experiments, we did document hot-spots of species-specific corallivory. We detected spatially localized and temporally persistent predation on P. damicornis by the territorial triggerfish Balistapus undulatus. This patchy predation did not occur for S. hystrix. This variable selective regime in an otherwise more uniform environment could be one mechanism maintaining diversity of corals on Indo-Pacific reefs.

  12. Bioaccumulation factors for chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated butadienes and hexachloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, L.P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab.; Sheedy, B.R. [AScI Corp., Duluth, MN (United States); McCauley, D.J.; DeGraeve, G.M. [Battelle-Great Lakes Environmental Center, Traverse City, MI (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A field study was performed that measured bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated butadienes, and hexachloroethane in four species, Fundulus heteroclitus (mummichog), Callinectes sapidus (blue crabs), Brevoortia patronus (gulf menhaden), and Micropoganias undulatus (Atlantic croaker). The measured BAFs were not significantly different among the fishes. The measured BAFs for the C. sapidus were in good agreement with those measured for the fishes except for hexachloroethane (HCE), E- and Z-1,1,2,3,4-pentachlorobuta-1,3-diene (E-and Z-PeCBD), and hexachlorobuta-1,3-diene (HCBD). Their measured BAFs were approximately an order of magnitude smaller than those measured for the fishes. The measured BAFs were also in good agreement with BAFs reported/derived from the literature and to BAFs predicted using two methods of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) except for HCE, E- and Z-PeCBD, and HCBD in the C. sapidus. These BAFs were much smaller than the reported/derived and predicted BAFs. The smaller BAFs for HCE, E- and Z-PeCBD, and HCBD were consistent with the metabolism abilities for the C. sapidus, and metabolism processes are believed to be the cause for the smaller BAFs. The predicted BAFs were within a factor of five of the measured BAFs for 90% (n = 48) and 94% (n = 32) using the two methods of the EPA.

  13. Are Invasive Species Stressful? The Glucocorticoid Profile of Native Lizards Exposed to Invasive Fire Ants Depends on the Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sean P; Freidenfelds, Nicole A; Thawley, Christopher J; Robbins, Travis R; Langkilde, Tracy

    Invasive species represent a substantial threat to native species worldwide. Research on the impacts of invasive species on wild living vertebrates has focused primarily on population-level effects. The sublethal, individual-level effects of invaders may be equally important but are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of invasive fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) on the physiological stress response of a native lizard (Sceloporus undulatus) within two experimental contexts: directly exposing lizards to a fire ant attack and housing lizards with fire ants in seminatural field enclosures. Lizards directly exposed to brief attack by fire ants had elevated concentrations of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), suggesting that these encounters can be physiologically stressful. However, lizards exposed for longer periods to fire ants in field enclosures had lower concentrations of CORT. This may indicate that the combined effects of confinement and fire ant exposure have pushed lizards into allostatic overload. However, lizards from fire ant enclosures appeared to have intact negative feedback controls of the stress response, evidenced by functioning adrenocorticotropic hormone responsiveness and lack of suppression of innate immunity (plasma bactericidal capacity). We review previous studies examining the stress response of wild vertebrates to various anthropogenic stressors and discuss how these-in combination with our results-underscore the importance of considering context (the length, frequency, magnitude, and types of threat) when assessing these impacts.

  14. Towards an ecosystem approach to small island fisheries: A preliminary study of a balanced fishery in Kotania Bay (Seram Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Hutubessy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries (EAF is a holistic one as EAF considers all species as important elements within the eco-system. An EAF requires that community and ecosystem structure should be maintained by harvesting fish communities in proportion to their natural productivity, thereby sustaining the balance of species and sizes in a community. This article draws from research on the reef fish community and catch in Kotania Bay on Seram Island in Maluku, Indonesia, an area of approximately 6000 ha. Based on the trophic guild (ie the aggregation of species utilizing similar food resources on the reef, the biomass of predator fish currently being captured now represents 40.4% of the total catch biomass. Members of the grouper family, the humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus and trevally (Caranx melampygus in particular, have become targeted for sale in fish markets. If these predators are selectively targeted and exploited, the overall reef fishery and the human populations that depend on it may become imperilled, given these species’ significant roles in controlling those lower in the food chain. This study thereby emphasizes the need for balanced fisheries informed by the EAF model in small island fisheries management in order to sustain food security in such regions.

  15. Beak and feather disease viruses circulating in Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus) in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnard, Guy L; Boyes, Rutledge S; Martin, Rowan O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Captive and wild psittacines are vulnerable to the highly contagious psittacine beak and feather disease. The causative agent, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV), was recently detected in the largest remaining population of endangered Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus), which are endemic to South Africa. Full-length genomes were isolated and sequenced from 26 blood samples collected from wild and captive Cape parrots to determine possible origins of infection. All sequences had characteristic BFDV sequence motifs and were similar in length to those described in the literature. However, BFDV coat protein (CP) sequences from this study did not contain a previously identified bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) within residues 39-56, which indicates that an alternate NLS is involved in shuttling the CP into the nucleus. Sequences from the wild population shared a high degree of similarity, irrespective of year or location, suggesting that the disease outbreak occurred close to the time when the samples were collected. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length genomes showed that the captive Cape parrot sequences cluster with those isolated from captive-bred budgerigars in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Exposure to captive-bred Cape parrots from a breeding facility in KwaZulu-Natal is suggested as a possible source for the virus infection. Phylogenetic analysis of BFDV isolates from wild and captive Cape parrots indicated two separate infection events in different populations, which highlights the potential risk of introducing new strains of the virus into the wild population. The present study represents the first systematic investigation of BFDV virus diversity in the southern-most population of Cape parrots.

  16. Perceptions among university students in Seville (Spain of the rabbit as livestock and as a companion animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro González-Redondo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The rabbit has various utilities and roles, mainly as a meat-producing animal, game species, companion animal, laboratory animal or pest. Among these roles, rabbit breeding for meat has traditionally prevailed in the Mediterranean countries. However, in recent decades the practice of keeping this species as a companion animal has been on the rise; a factor that could be changing public perception of the rabbit. A survey of 492 university students from Seville, Andalusia, Spain, was conducted to determine young people’s perceptions of the rabbit as livestock and as a companion species. The rabbit received the lowest score when regarded as livestock compared to the pig, cow, goat, sheep and hen. Regarding companion animals, young Spanish people preferred the dog and cat, respectively. The rabbit and the hamster were rated at the same level as a pet, while the budgerigar was rated lower than these two mammals by women and higher by men. The goldfish occupied the last position among the pet species in the women’s perceptions. With regard to the perception of various rabbit breeds and varieties when evaluated as pets, it was found that the pet Lop Dwarf, Netherland Dwarf, Angora and Lionhead breeds were rated higher than a typical meat breed (New Zealand White and than the wild rabbit. The gender of the young people surveyed influenced their perception of the rabbit. Women rated the rabbit lower as livestock while they rated it higher as a pet, also rating the pet rabbit breeds higher than men did. It is proposed that, in keeping with the rabbit’s attributes related to its cuteness, conceptually linked with pets, young Andalusian people’s perception of the rabbit is ambivalent and this perception might partly be shifting from perceiving it as livestock to regarding it as a pet.

  17. Patterns of Coral-Reef Finfish Species Disappearances Inferred from Fishers' Knowledge in Global Epicentre of Marine Shorefish Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita N Lavides

    Full Text Available In the Philippines, very high fishing pressure coincides with the globally greatest number of shorefish species, yet no long-term fisheries data are available to explore species-level changes that may have occurred widely in the most species rich and vulnerable marine ecosystem, namely coral reefs. Through 2655 face-to-face interviews conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, we used fishers' recall of past catch rates of reef-associated finfish to infer species disappearances from catches in five marine key biodiversity areas (Lanuza Bay, Danajon Bank, Verde Island Passage, Polillo Islands and Honda Bay. We modeled temporal trends in perceived catch per unit effort (CPUE based on fishers' reports of typical good days' catches using Generalized Linear Mixed Modelling. Fifty-nine different finfish disappeared from catches between the 1950s and 2014; 42 fish were identified to species level, two to genus, seven to family and eight to local name only. Five species occurring at all sites with the greatest number of fishers reporting zero catches were the green bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum, humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus, African pompano (Alectis ciliaris, giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus and mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus. Between the 1950s and 2014, the mean perceived CPUE of bumphead parrotfish declined by 88%, that of humphead wrasse by 82%, African pompano by 66%, giant grouper by 74% and mangrove red snapper by 64%. These declines were mainly associated with excess and uncontrolled fishing, fish life-history traits like maximum body size and socio-economic factors like access to market infrastructure and services, and overpopulation. The fishers' knowledge is indicative of extirpations where evidence for these losses was otherwise lacking. Our models provide information as basis for area-based conservation and regional resource management particularly for the more vulnerable, once common, large

  18. Forecasting the dynamics of a coastal fishery species using a coupled climate--population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jonathan A; Alexander, Michael A; Fogarty, Michael J; Williams, Erik H; Scott, James D

    2010-03-01

    Marine fisheries management strives to maintain sustainable populations while allowing exploitation. However, well-intentioned management plans may not meet this balance as most do not include the effect of climate change. Ocean temperatures are expected to increase through the 21st century, which will have far-reaching and complex impacts on marine fisheries. To begin to quantify these impacts for one coastal fishery along the east coast of the United States, we develop a coupled climate-population model for Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). The model is based on a mechanistic hypothesis: recruitment is determined by temperature-driven, overwinter mortality of juveniles in their estuarine habitats. Temperature forecasts were obtained from 14 general circulation models simulating three CO2 emission scenarios. An ensemble-based approach was used in which a multimodel average was calculated for a given CO2 emission scenario to forecast the response of the population. The coupled model indicates that both exploitation and climate change significantly affect abundance and distribution of Atlantic croaker. At current levels of fishing, the average (2010-2100) spawning biomass of the population is forecast to increase by 60-100%. Similarly, the center of the population is forecast to shift 50 100 km northward. A yield analysis, which is used to calculate benchmarks for fishery management, indicates that the maximum sustainable yield will increase by 30 100%. Our results demonstrate that climate effects on fisheries must be identified, understood, and incorporated into the scientific advice provided to managers if sustainable exploitation is to be achieved in a changing climate.

  19. Dynamics of Necrophagous Insect and Tissue Bacteria for Postmortem Interval Estimation During the Warm Season in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Lavinia; Sahlean, Tiberiu; Purcarea, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) is affected by several factors including the cause of death, the place where the body lay after death, and the weather conditions during decomposition. Given the climatic differences among biogeographic locations, the understanding of necrophagous insect species biology and ecology is required when estimating PMI. The current experimental model was developed in Romania during the warm season in an outdoor location. The aim of the study was to identify the necrophagous insect species diversity and dynamics, and to detect the bacterial species present during decomposition in order to determine if their presence or incidence timing could be useful to estimate PMI. The decomposition process of domestic swine carcasses was monitored throughout a 14-wk period (10 July-10 October 2013), along with a daily record of meteorological parameters. The chronological succession of necrophagous entomofauna comprised nine Diptera species, with the dominant presence of Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann 1819) (Calliphoridae), while only two Coleoptera species were identified, Dermestes undulatus (L. 1758) and Creophilus maxillosus Brahm 1970. The bacterial diversity and dynamics from the mouth and rectum tissues, and third-instar dipteran larvae were identified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments. Throughout the decomposition process, two main bacterial chronological groups were differentiated, represented by Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria. Twenty-six taxa from the rectal cavity and 22 from the mouth cavity were identified, with the dominant phylum in both these cavities corresponding to Firmicutes. The present data strengthen the postmortem entomological and microbial information for the warm season in this temperate-continental area, as well as the role of microbes in carcass decomposition. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  20. Ancestry trumps experience: Transgenerational but not early life stress affects the adult physiological stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Gail L; Robbins, Travis R; Cavigelli, Sonia A; Langkilde, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to stressors can affect an organism's physiology and behavior as well as that of its descendants (e.g. through maternal effects, epigenetics, and/or selection). We examined the relative influence of early life vs. transgenerational stress exposure on adult stress physiology in a species that has populations with and without ancestral exposure to an invasive predator. We raised offspring of eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) from sites historically invaded (high stress) or uninvaded (low stress) by predatory fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) and determined how this different transgenerational exposure to stress interacted with the effects of early life stress exposure to influence the physiological stress response in adulthood. Offspring from these high- and low-stress populations were exposed weekly to either sub-lethal attack by fire ants (an ecologically relevant stressor), topical treatment with a physiologically-appropriate dose of the stress-relevant hormone, corticosterone (CORT), or a control treatment from 2 to 43weeks of age. Several months after treatments ended, we quantified plasma CORT concentrations at baseline and following restraint, exposure to fire ants, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection. Exposure to fire ants or CORT during early life did not affect lizard stress physiology in adulthood. However, offspring of lizards from populations that had experienced multiple generations of fire ant-invasion exhibited more robust adult CORT responses to restraint and ACTH-injection compared to offspring from uninvaded populations. Together, these results indicate that transgenerational stress history may be at least as important, if not more important, than early life stress in affecting adult physiological stress responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Shaping communicative colour signals over evolutionary time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola Morales, José R.; Vital-García, Cuauhcihuatl; Hews, Diana K.; Martins, Emília P.

    2016-01-01

    Many evolutionary forces can shape the evolution of communicative signals, and the long-term impact of each force may depend on relative timing and magnitude. We use a phylogenetic analysis to infer the history of blue belly patches of Sceloporus lizards, and a detailed spectrophotometric analysis of four species to explore the specific forces shaping evolutionary change. We find that the ancestor of Sceloporus had blue patches. We then focus on four species; the first evolutionary shift (captured by comparison of S. merriami and S. siniferus) represents an ancient loss of the belly patch by S. siniferus, and the second evolutionary shift, bounded by S. undulatus and S. virgatus, represents a more recent loss of blue belly patch by S. virgatus. Conspicuousness measurements suggest that the species with the recent loss (S. virgatus) is the least conspicuous. Results for two other species (S. siniferus and S. merriami) suggest that over longer periods of evolutionary time, new signal colours have arisen which minimize absolute contrast with the habitat while maximizing conspicuousness to a lizard receiver. Specifically, males of the species representing an ancient loss of blue patch (S. siniferus) are more conspicuous than are females in the UV, whereas S. merriami males have evolved a green element that makes their belly patches highly sexually dimorphic but no more conspicuous than the white bellies of S. merriami females. Thus, our results suggest that natural selection may act more immediately to reduce conspicuousness, whereas sexual selection may have a more complex impact on communicative signals through the introduction of new colours. PMID:28018661

  2. Health assessment of captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ferreira Júnior, Francisco Carlos; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Donatti, Rogério Venâncio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2012-09-01

    Ninety-five (95) captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) of species Crypturellus obsoletus (brown tinamou), Crypturellus parvirostris (small-billed tinamou), Crypturellus tataupa (Tataupa tinamou), Crypturellus undulatus (undulated tinamou), Rhynchotus rufescens (red-winged tinamou), and Tinamus solitarius (solitary tinamou) were evaluated for diseases of mandatory control in the Brazilian Poultry Health Program (PNSA). Antibodies were detected by serum agglutination test (SAT) in 4 birds for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and in 27 birds for Salmonella Pullorum (SP) and Salmonella Gallinarum (SG). However, by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), sera were negative to MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS). Bacteriology was negative for SP and SG. No antibody was detected by HI to avian paramyxovirus type 1. However, antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were detected in 9.4% (9/95) by ELISA. Fecal parasitology and necropsy revealed Capillaria spp. in 44.2% (42/95), Eimeria rhynchoti in 42.1% (40/95), Strongyloides spp. in 100% (20/20), Ascaridia spp., and unknown sporozoa in small-billed tinamou. Ectoparasites were detected in 42.1% (40/95) by inspection, and collected for identification. The louse Strongylocotes lipogonus (Insecta: Phthiraptera) was found on all Rhynchotus rufescens. An additional four lice species were found on 14 individuals. Traumatic lesions included four individual R. rufescens (4/40, 10%) with rhinotheca fracture, one with mandible fracture and three with posttraumatic ocular lesions (3/40, 7.5%). One C. parvirostris had phalangeal loss, another had tibiotarsal joint ankylosis and another had an open wound on the foot. Results suggest that major poultry infections/ diseases may not be relevant in tinamids, and that this group of birds, as maintained within distances for biosecurity purposes, may not represent a risk to commercial poultry. Ecto- and endoparasites were common, disseminated, and varied; regular monitoring of flocks is recommended

  3. Mesophotic depths as refuge areas for fishery-targeted species on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfield, Steven J.; Harvey, Euan S.; Halford, Andrew R.; McIlwain, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs are subjected to unprecedented levels of disturbance with population growth and climate change combining to reduce standing coral cover and stocks of reef fishes. Most of the damage is concentrated in shallow waters (<30 m deep) where humans can comfortably operate and where physical disturbances are most disruptive to marine organisms. Yet coral reefs can extend to depths exceeding 100 m, potentially offering refuge from the threats facing shallower reefs. We deployed baited remote underwater stereo-video systems (stereo-BRUVs) at depths of 10-90 m around the southern Mariana Islands to investigate whether fish species targeted by fishing in the shallows may be accruing benefits from being at depth. We show that biomass, abundance and species richness of fishery-targeted species increased from shallow reef areas to a depth of 60 m, whereas at greater depths, a lack of live coral habitat corresponded to lower numbers of fish. The majority of targeted species were found to have distributions that ranged from shallow depths (10 m) to depths of at least 70 m, emphasising that habitat, not depth, is the limiting factor in their vertical distribution. While the gradient of abundance and biomass versus depth was steepest for predatory species, the first species usually targeted by fishing, we also found that fishery-targeted herbivores prevailed in similar biomass and species richness to 60 m. Compared to shallow marine protected areas, there was clearly greater biomass of fishery-targeted species accrued in mesophotic depths. Particularly some species typically harvested by depth-limited fishing methods (e.g., spearfishing), such as the endangered humphead wrasse Cheilinus undulatus, were found in greater abundance on deeper reefs. We conclude that mesophotic depths provide essential fish habitat and refuge for fishery-targeted species, representing crucial zones for fishery management and research into the resilience of disturbed coral reef ecosystems.

  4. Can birds perceive rhythmic patterns? A review and experiments on a songbird and a parrot species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eSpierings

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available While humans can easily entrain their behavior with the beat in music, this ability is rare among animals. Yet, comparative studies in non-human species are needed if we want to understand how and why this ability evolved. Entrainment requires two abilities: (1 recognizing the regularity in the auditory stimulus and (2 the ability to adjust the own motor output to the perceived pattern. It has been suggested that beat perception and entrainment are linked to the ability for vocal learning. The presence of some bird species showing beat induction, and also the existence of vocal learning as well as vocal non-learning bird taxa, make them relevant models for comparative research on rhythm perception and its link to vocal learning. Also, some bird vocalizations show strong regularity in rhythmic structure, suggesting that birds might perceive rhythmic structures. In this paper we review the available experimental evidence for the perception of regularity and rhythms by birds, like the ability to distinguish regular from irregular stimuli over tempo transformations and report data from new experiments. While some species show a limited ability to detect regularity, most evidence suggests that birds attend primarily to absolute and not relative timing of patterns and to local features of stimuli. We conclude that, apart from some large parrot species, there is limited evidence for beat and regularity perception among birds and that the link to vocal learning is unclear. We next report experiments in which zebra finches and budgerigars (both vocal learners were first trained to distinguish a regular from an irregular pattern of beats and then tested on various tempo transformations of these stimuli. The results showed that both species reduced the discrimination after tempo transformations. This suggests that, as was found in earlier studies, they attended mainly to local temporal features of the stimuli, and not to their overall regularity. However

  5. Can Birds Perceive Rhythmic Patterns? A Review and Experiments on a Songbird and a Parrot Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Carel; Spierings, Michelle; Hubert, Jeroen; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-01-01

    While humans can easily entrain their behavior with the beat in music, this ability is rare among animals. Yet, comparative studies in non-human species are needed if we want to understand how and why this ability evolved. Entrainment requires two abilities: (1) recognizing the regularity in the auditory stimulus and (2) the ability to adjust the own motor output to the perceived pattern. It has been suggested that beat perception and entrainment are linked to the ability for vocal learning. The presence of some bird species showing beat induction, and also the existence of vocal learning as well as vocal non-learning bird taxa, make them relevant models for comparative research on rhythm perception and its link to vocal learning. Also, some bird vocalizations show strong regularity in rhythmic structure, suggesting that birds might perceive rhythmic structures. In this paper we review the available experimental evidence for the perception of regularity and rhythms by birds, like the ability to distinguish regular from irregular stimuli over tempo transformations and report data from new experiments. While some species show a limited ability to detect regularity, most evidence suggests that birds attend primarily to absolute and not relative timing of patterns and to local features of stimuli. We conclude that, apart from some large parrot species, there is limited evidence for beat and regularity perception among birds and that the link to vocal learning is unclear. We next report the new experiments in which zebra finches and budgerigars (both vocal learners) were first trained to distinguish a regular from an irregular pattern of beats and then tested on various tempo transformations of these stimuli. The results showed that both species reduced the discrimination after tempo transformations. This suggests that, as was found in earlier studies, they attended mainly to local temporal features of the stimuli, and not to their overall regularity. However, some

  6. Complete genome sequence of avian paramyxovirus (APMV serotype 5 completes the analysis of nine APMV serotypes and reveals the longest APMV genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur S Samuel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Avian paramyxoviruses (APMV consist of nine known serotypes. The genomes of representatives of all APMV serotypes except APMV type 5 have recently been fully sequenced. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the APMV-5 prototype strain budgerigar/Kunitachi/74.APMV-5 Kunitachi virus is unusual in that it lacks a virion hemagglutinin and does not grow in the allantoic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs. However, the virus grew in the amniotic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs and in twelve different established cell lines and two primary cell cultures. The genome is 17,262 nucleotides (nt long, which is the longest among members of genus Avulavirus, and encodes six non-overlapping genes in the order of 3'N-P/V/W-M-F-HN-L-5' with intergenic regions of 4-57 nt. The genome length follows the 'rule of six' and contains a 55-nt leader sequence at the 3'end and a 552 nt trailer sequence at the 5' end. The phosphoprotein (P gene contains a conserved RNA editing site and is predicted to encode P, V, and W proteins. The cleavage site of the F protein (G-K-R-K-K-R downward arrowF conforms to the cleavage site motif of the ubiquitous cellular protease furin. Consistent with this, exogenous protease was not required for virus replication in vitro. However, the intracerebral pathogenicity index of APMV-5 strain Kunitachi in one-day-old chicks was found to be zero, indicating that the virus is avirulent for chickens despite the presence of a polybasic F cleavage site.Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the APVM-5 genome and proteins versus those of the other APMV serotypes showed that APMV-5 is more closely related to APMV-6 than to the other APMVs. Furthermore, these comparisons provided evidence of extensive genome-wide divergence that supports the classification of the APMVs into nine separate serotypes. The structure of the F cleavage site does not appear to be a reliable indicator of virulence among APMV serotypes 2-9. The availability of

  7. Species traits and catchment-scale habitat factors influence the occurrence of freshwater mussel populations and assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Tamara J.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Cope, W. Gregory; Heise, Ryan J.; Nichols, Robert B.; Pacifici, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of freshwater unionid mussels presents unique challenges due to their distinctive life cycle, cryptic occurrence and imperilled status. Relevant ecological information is urgently needed to guide their management and conservation.We adopted a modelling approach, which is a novel application to freshwater mussels to enhance inference on rare species, by borrowing data among species in a hierarchical framework to conduct the most comprehensive occurrence analysis for freshwater mussels to date. We incorporated imperfect detection to more accurately examine effects of biotic and abiotic factors at multiple scales on the occurrence of 14 mussel species and the entire assemblage of the Tar River Basin of North Carolina, U.S.A.The single assemblage estimate of detection probability for all species was 0.42 (95% CI, 0.36–0.47) with no species- or site-specific detection effects identified. We empirically observed 15 mussel species in the basin but estimated total species richness at 21 (95% CI, 16–24) when accounting for imperfect detection.Mean occurrence probability among species ranged from 0.04 (95% CI, 0.01–0.16) for Alasmidonta undulata, an undescribed Lampsilis sp., and Strophitus undulatus to 0.67 (95% CI, 0.42–0.86) for Elliptio icterina. Median occurrence probability among sites was power, agricultural land use) and species traits (brood time, host specificity, tribe) influenced the occurrence of mussel assemblages more than reach- or microhabitat-scale features.Our findings reflect the complexity of mussel ecology and indicate that habitat restoration alone may not be adequate for mussel conservation. Catchment-scale management can benefit an entire assemblage, but species-specific strategies may be necessary for successful conservation. The hierarchical multispecies modelling approach revealed findings that could not be elucidated by other means, and the approach may be applied more broadly to other river basins and regions. Accurate

  8. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of