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Sample records for budding yeast saccharomyces

  1. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  2. The Budding YeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae” as a Drug Discovery Tool to Identify Plant-Derived Natural Products with Anti-Proliferative Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchra Qaddouri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable system to study cell-cycle regulation, which is defective in cancer cells. Due to the highly conserved nature of the cell-cycle machinery between yeast and humans, yeast studies are directly relevant to anticancer-drug discovery. The budding yeast is also an excellent model system for identifying and studying antifungal compounds because of the functional conservation of fungal genes. Moreover, yeast studies have also contributed greatly to our understanding of the biological targets and modes of action of bioactive compounds. Understanding the mechanism of action of clinically relevant compounds is essential for the design of improved second-generation molecules. Here we describe our methodology for screening a library of plant-derived natural products in yeast in order to identify and characterize new compounds with anti-proliferative properties.

  3. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  4. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO4 post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components

  5. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kazum@nips.ac.jp [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru [Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo [Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO{sub 4} post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components.

  6. Newly identified prions in budding yeast, and their possible functions

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Emily T.; Li, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are atypical genetic elements that are transmitted as heritable protein conformations. [PSI+], [URE3], and [PIN+] are three well-studied prions in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the last three years, several additional prions have been reported in yeast, including [SWI+], [OCT+], [MCA], [GAR+], [MOT3+], [ISP+], and [NSI+]. The growing number of yeast prions suggests that protein-based inheritance might be a widespread biological phenomenon. In this review, we sum...

  7. Important role of catalase in the cellular response of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation indirectly causes oxidative stress in cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals (OH(-)) generated by the radiolysis of water. We investigated how the catalase function was affected by ionizing radiation and analyzed the phenotype of mutants with a disrupted catalase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to radiation. The wild-type yeast strain and isogenic mutants with disrupted catalase genes were exposed to various doses of (60)Co gamma-rays. There was no difference between the wild-type strain and the cta1 disruption mutant following exposure to gamma-ray irradiation. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that this strain exhibited decreased survival on gamma-ray exposure compared with other strains. In all three strains, stationary phase cells were more tolerant to the exposure of gamma-rays than exponential phase cells, whereas the catalase activity in the wild-type strain and cta1 disruption mutant was higher in the stationary phase than in the exponential phase. These data suggest a correlation between catalase activity and survival following gamma-ray exposure. However, this correlation was not clear in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that other factors are involved in the tolerance to ROS induced by irradiation. PMID:25416226

  8. Sociobiology of the budding yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dominika M Wloch-Salamon

    2014-04-01

    Social theory has provided a useful framework for research with microorganisms. Here I describe the advantages and possible risks of using a well-known model organism, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for sociobiological research. I discuss the problems connected with clear classification of yeast behaviour based on the fitness-based Hamilton paradigm. Relevant traits include different types of communities, production of flocculins, invertase and toxins, and the presence of apoptosis.

  9. Measuring Replicative Life Span in the Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Kristan K.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Aging is a degenerative process characterized by a progressive deterioration of cellular components and organelles resulting in mortality. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively to study the biology of aging, and several determinants of yeast longevity have been shown to be conserved in multicellular eukaryotes, including worms, flies, and mice 1. Due to the lack of easily quantified age-associated phenotypes, aging in yeast has been assayed almost exclusively by...

  10. Evaluation and Properties of the Budding Yeast Phosphoproteome

    OpenAIRE

    Amoutzias, G. D.; He, Y.; Lilley, K. S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Oliver, S G

    2012-01-01

    We have assembled a reliable phosphoproteomic data set for budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and have investigated its properties. Twelve publicly available phosphoproteome data sets were triaged to obtain a subset of high-confidence phosphorylation sites (p-sites), free of "noisy" phosphorylations. Analysis of this combined data set suggests that the inventory of phosphoproteins in yeast is close to completion, but that these proteins may have many undiscovered p-sites. Proteins involve...

  11. Checkpoints Studies Using the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Analysis of changes in protein level and subcellular localization during cell cycle progression

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaorong; Liu, Lili; HUANG, Mingxia

    2011-01-01

    Methods are described here to monitor changes in protein level and subcellular localization during the cell cycle progression in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Cell synchronization is achieved by an α-factor mediated block-and-release protocol. Cells are collected at different time points for the first two cell cycles upon release. Cellular DNA contents are analyzed by flow cytometry. Trichloroacetic acid protein precipitates are prepared for monitoring levels of cell cycle regulated protei...

  12. Dynamical Analysis of Protein Regulatory Network in Budding Yeast Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Ting; JIA Xun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recent progresses in the protein regulatory network of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided a global picture of its protein network for further dynamical research. We simplify and modularize the protein regulatory networks in yeast nucleus, and study the dynamical properties of the core 37-node network by a Boolean network model, especially the evolution steps and final fixed points. Our simulation results show that the number of fixed points N(k) for a given size of the attraction basin k obeys a power-law distribution N(k)∝k-2.024. The yeast network is more similar to a scale-free network than a random network in the above dynamical properties.

  13. Chemical Genetics: Budding Yeast as a Platform for Drug Discovery and Mapping of Genetic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorrit M. Enserink

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used model organism, and yeast genetic methods are powerful tools for discovery of novel functions of genes. Recent advancements in chemical-genetics and chemical-genomics have opened new avenues for development of clinically relevant drug treatments. Systematic mapping of genetic networks by high-throughput chemical-genetic screens have given extensive insight in connections between genetic pathways. Here, I review some of the recent developments in chemical-genetic techniques in budding yeast.

  14. Bipolar budding in yeasts - an electron microscope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreger-van Rij, N.J.W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1971-01-01

    Bud formation in yeasts with bipolar budding was studied by electron microscopy of thin sections. Budding in yeasts of the species Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Hanseniaspora valbyensis and Wickerhamia fluorescens resulted in concentric rings of scar ridges on the wall of the mother cell. The wall betwe

  15. CENP-A exceeds microtubule attachment sites in centromere clusters of both budding and fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Coffman, Valerie C.; Wu, Pengcheng; Parthun, Mark R.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2011-01-01

    The stoichiometries of kinetochores and their constituent proteins in yeast and vertebrate cells were determined using the histone H3 variant CENP-A, known as Cse4 in budding yeast, as a counting standard. One Cse4-containing nucleosome exists in the centromere (CEN) of each chromosome, so it has been assumed that each anaphase CEN/kinetochore cluster contains 32 Cse4 molecules. We report that anaphase CEN clusters instead contained approximately fourfold more Cse4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  16. Live cell imaging of the assembly, disassembly, and actin cable–dependent movement of endosomes and actin patches in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Huckaba, Thomas M.; Gay, Anna Card; Pantalena, Luiz Fernando; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Liza A Pon

    2004-01-01

    Using FM4-64 to label endosomes and Abp1p-GFP or Sac6p-GFP to label actin patches, we find that (1) endosomes colocalize with actin patches as they assemble at the bud cortex; (2) endosomes colocalize with actin patches as they undergo linear, retrograde movement from buds toward mother cells; and (3) actin patches interact with and disassemble at FM4-64–labeled internal compartments. We also show that retrograde flow of actin cables mediates retrograde actin patch movement. An Arp2/3 complex...

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Neiman, Aaron M

    2016-05-01

    The precise regulation of gene expression is essential for developmental processes in eukaryotic organisms. As an important post-transcriptional regulatory point, translational control is complementary to transcriptional regulation. Sporulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process controlled by a well-studied transcriptional cascade that drives the cell through the events of DNA replication, meiotic chromosome segregation, and spore assembly. Recent studies have revealed that as cells begin the meiotic divisions, translational regulation of gene expression fine tunes this transcriptional cascade. The significance and mechanisms of this translational regulation are beginning to emerge. These studies may also provide insights into translational regulation in germ cell development of multicellular organisms. PMID:26613728

  18. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones Data detail Data name 5'-end sequence...s of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones Description of data contents cDNA sequence...e Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Calling Card Analysis in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, David; Mitra, Robi D

    2016-02-01

    Calling card analysis is a high-throughput method for identifying the genomic binding sites of multiple transcription factors in a single experiment in budding yeast. By tagging a DNA-binding protein with a targeting domain that directs the insertion of the Ty5 retrotransposon, the genomic binding sites for that transcription factor are marked. The transposition locations are then identified en masse by Illumina sequencing. The calling card protocol allows for simultaneous analysis of multiple transcription factors. By cloning barcodes into the Ty5 transposon, it is possible to pair a unique barcode with every transcription factor in the experiment. The method presented here uses expression of transcription factors from their native loci; however, it can also be altered to measure binding sites of transcription factors overexpressed from a plasmid. PMID:26832687

  20. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  1. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Kron, S J; Styles, C. A.; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and d...

  2. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast

  3. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  4. Systems Level Modeling of the Cell Cycle Using Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle are highly conserved across all eukaryotes, and so a relatively simple eukaryote such as yeast can provide insight into a variety of cell cycle perturbations including those that occur in human cancer. To date, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided the largest amount of experimental and modeling data on the progression of the cell cycle, making it a logical choice for in-depth studies of this process. Moreover, the advent of methods for collection of high-throughput genome, transcriptome, and proteome data has provided a means to collect and precisely quantify simultaneous cell cycle gene transcript and protein levels, permitting modeling of the cell cycle on the systems level. With the appropriate mathematical framework and suffi cient and accurate data on cell cycle components, it should be possible to create a model of the cell cycle that not only effectively describes its operation, but can also predict responses to perturbations such as variation in protein levels and responses to external stimuli including targeted inhibition by drugs. In this review, we summarize existing data on the yeast cell cycle, proteomics technologies for quantifying cell cycle proteins, and the mathematical frameworks that can integrate this data into representative and effective models. Systems level modeling of the cell cycle will require the integration of high-quality data with the appropriate mathematical framework, which can currently be attained through the combination of dynamic modeling based on proteomics data and using yeast as a model organism.

  5. A Monitor for Bud Emergence in the Yeast Morphogenesis Checkpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Bardes, Elaine G.S.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell cycle transitions are subject to regulation by both external signals and internal checkpoints that monitor satisfactory progression of key cell cycle events. In budding yeast, the morphogenesis checkpoint arrests the cell cycle in response to perturbations that affect the actin cytoskeleton and bud formation. Herein, we identify a step in this checkpoint pathway that seems to be directly responsive to bud emergence. Activation of the kinase Hsl1p is dependent upon...

  6. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  7. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E.; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant c...

  8. Sequence analysis of three mitochondrial DNA molecules reveals interesting differences among Saccharomyces yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Casaregola, S.; Ussery, David;

    2003-01-01

    The complete sequences of mitochondrial DNA ( mtDNA) from the two budding yeasts Saccharomyces castellii and Saccharomyces servazzii, consisting of 25 753 and 30 782 bp, respectively, were analysed and compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA. While some of the traits are very similar among...... Saccharomyces yeasts, others have highly diverged. The two mtDNAs are much more compact than that of S. cerevisiae and contain fewer introns and intergenic sequences, although they have almost the same coding potential. A few genes contain group I introns, but group II introns, otherwise found in S. cerevisiae...... mtDNA, are not present. Surprisingly, four genes (ATP6, COX2, COX3 and COB) in the mtDNA of S. servazzii contain, in total, five + 1 frameshifts. mtDNAs of S. castellii, S. servazzii and S. cerevisiae contain all genes on the same strand, except for one tRNA gene. On the other hand, the gene order is...

  9. Enzyme contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to wine production

    OpenAIRE

    Maicas i Prieto, Sergi; Mateo Tolosa, José Juan

    2015-01-01

    The fermentation of grape must to produce wine is a biologically complex process, carried on by yeasts and malolactic bacteria. The yeasts present in spontaneous fermentation may be divided into two groups, the Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. cerevisiae, and the non-Saccharomyces yeasts which include members of the genera Rhodotorula, Pichia, Candida, Debaryomyces, Metschtnikowia, Hansenula and Hanseniaspora. S. cerevisiae yeasts are able to convert sugar into ethanol and CO2 via fermen...

  10. A Monitor for Bud Emergence in the Yeast Morphogenesis Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Bardes, Elaine G.S.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell cycle transitions are subject to regulation by both external signals and internal checkpoints that monitor satisfactory progression of key cell cycle events. In budding yeast, the morphogenesis checkpoint arrests the cell cycle in response to perturbations that affect the actin cytoskeleton and bud formation. Herein, we identify a step in this checkpoint pathway that seems to be directly responsive to bud emergence. Activation of the kinase Hsl1p is dependent upon its recruitment to a cortical domain organized by the septins, a family of conserved filament-forming proteins. Under conditions that delayed or blocked bud emergence, Hsl1p recruitment to the septin cortex still took place, but hyperphosphorylation of Hsl1p and recruitment of the Hsl1p-binding protein Hsl7p to the septin cortex only occurred after bud emergence. At this time, the septin cortex spread to form a collar between mother and bud, and Hsl1p and Hsl7p were restricted to the bud side of the septin collar. We discuss models for translating cellular geometry (in this case, the emergence of a bud) into biochemical signals regulating cell proliferation. PMID:12925763

  11. Apoptosis at inflection point in liquid culture of budding yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Hagiwara

    Full Text Available Budding yeasts are highly suitable for aging studies, because the number of bud scars (stage proportionally correlates with age. Its maximum stages are known to reach at 20-30 stages on an isolated agar medium. However, their stage dynamics in a liquid culture is virtually unknown. We investigate the population dynamics by counting scars in each cell. Here one cell division produces one new cell and one bud scar. This simple rule leads to a conservation law: "The total number of bud scars is equal to the total number of cells." We find a large discrepancy: extremely fewer cells with over 5 scars than expected. Almost all cells with 6 or more scars disappear within a short period of time in the late log phase (corresponds to the inflection point. This discrepancy is confirmed directly by the microscopic observations of broken cells. This finding implies apoptosis in older cells (6 scars or more.

  12. The Malleable Nature of the Budding Yeast Nuclear Envelope: Flares, Fusion, and Fenestrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseroll, Rebecca A; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2016-11-01

    In eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope (NE) physically separates nuclear components and activities from rest of the cell. The NE also provides rigidity to the nucleus and contributes to chromosome organization. At the same time, the NE is highly dynamic; it must change shape and rearrange its components during development and throughout the cell cycle, and its morphology can be altered in response to mutation and disease. Here we focus on the NE of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has several unique features: it remains intact throughout the cell cycle, expands symmetrically during interphase, elongates during mitosis and, expands asymmetrically during mitotic delay. Moreover, its NE is safely breached during mating and when large structures, such as nuclear pore complexes and the spindle pole body, are embedded into its double membrane. The budding yeast NE lacks lamins and yet the nucleus is capable of maintaining a spherical shape throughout interphase. Despite these eccentricities, studies of the budding yeast NE have uncovered interesting, and likely conserved, processes that contribute to NE dynamics. In particular, we discuss the processes that drive and enable NE expansion and the dramatic changes in the NE that lead to extensions and fenestrations. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2353-2360, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26909870

  13. FLO1 Is a Variable Green Beard Gene that Drives Biofilm-like Cooperation in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Smukalla, Scott; Caldara, Marina; Pochet, Nathalie; Beauvais, Anne; Guadagnini, Stephanie; Yan, Chen; Vinces, Marcelo; Jansen, An; Prevost, Marie Christine; Latge, Jean-Paul; Fink, Gerald R.; Foster, Kevin R.; Verstrepen, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has emerged as an archetype of eukaryotic cell biology. Here we show that S. cerevisiae is also a model for the evolution of cooperative behavior by revisiting flocculation, a self-adherence phenotype lacking in most laboratory strains. Expression of the gene FLO1 in the laboratory strain S288C restores flocculation, an altered physiological state, reminiscent of bacterial biofilms. Flocculation protects the FLO1 expressing cells from multiple stre...

  14. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    OpenAIRE

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentatio...

  15. A comprehensive web resource on RNA helicases from the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, P; Gasteiger, E; Bairoch, A

    2000-04-01

    Members of the RNA helicase protein family are defined by several motifs that have been widely conserved during evolution. They are found in all organisms-from bacteria to humans-and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has confirmed the significance of RNA helicases for most cellular RNA metabolic processes. We have assembled a web resource that focuses on RNA helicases from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It includes descriptions of RNA helicases and their functions, links to sequence- and yeast-specific databases, an extensive list of references, and links to non-yeast helicase web resources. PMID:10790687

  16. Reconstitution of hemisomes on budding yeast centromeric DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Takehito; Codomo, Christine A.; Henikoff, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The structure of nucleosomes that contain the cenH3 histone variant has been controversial. In budding yeast, a single right-handed cenH3/H4/H2A/H2B tetramer wraps the ∼80-bp Centromere DNA Element II (CDE II) sequence of each centromere into a ‘hemisome’. However, attempts to reconstitute cenH3 particles in vitro have yielded exclusively ‘octasomes’, which are observed in vivo on chromosome arms only when Cse4 (yeast cenH3) is overproduced. Here, we show that Cse4 octamers remain intact unde...

  17. TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells and macromolecules (e.g. fats, lipids, proteins and DNA from the damage of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Sacchamomyces cerevisiae are know as organisms with very important antioxidative enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase or catalase. The total antioxidant activity (mmol Trolox equivalent – TE.g-1 d.w. of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was measured by 2,2´-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid during the yeast cultivation. It was found that the total antioxidant activity was the highest (1.08 mmol TE.g-1 d.w. in the strain Kolín after 32 hours of cultivation and the lowest (0.26 mmol TE.g-1 d.w. in the strain Gyöng after 12 hours of cultivation.

  18. Influence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts on white dry wines

    OpenAIRE

    Poulard, Alain; Pascari, Xenia; Boris GAINA

    2014-01-01

    It was demonstrated a positive action of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on the organoleptic properties of wines. Also, their participation in fermentation process did not involve an excessive accumulation of volatile acidity or other taste and aroma defects. The involvement of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts in practical oenology that keeps on recent achievements in oenological biotechnologies allow an increase of aromatic intensity (floral, fruitful etc.) in varietal wines and preserve the variet...

  19. CENP-A exceeds microtubule attachment sites in centromere clusters of both budding and fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Valerie C; Wu, Pengcheng; Parthun, Mark R; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2011-11-14

    The stoichiometries of kinetochores and their constituent proteins in yeast and vertebrate cells were determined using the histone H3 variant CENP-A, known as Cse4 in budding yeast, as a counting standard. One Cse4-containing nucleosome exists in the centromere (CEN) of each chromosome, so it has been assumed that each anaphase CEN/kinetochore cluster contains 32 Cse4 molecules. We report that anaphase CEN clusters instead contained approximately fourfold more Cse4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ~40-fold more CENP-A (Cnp1) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe than predicted. These results suggest that the number of CENP-A molecules exceeds the number of kinetochore-microtubule (MT) attachment sites on each chromosome and that CENP-A is not the sole determinant of kinetochore assembly sites in either yeast. In addition, we show that fission yeast has enough Dam1-DASH complex for ring formation around attached MTs. The results of this study suggest the need for significant revision of existing CEN/kinetochore architectural models. PMID:22084306

  20. Astral microtubule pivoting promotes their search for cortical anchor sites during mitosis in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Baumgärtner

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast.

  1. Divergence of a conserved elongation factor and transcription regulation in budding and fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gregory T; Wang, Isabel X; Cheung, Vivian G; Lis, John T

    2016-06-01

    Complex regulation of gene expression in mammals has evolved from simpler eukaryotic systems, yet the mechanistic features of this evolution remain elusive. Here, we compared the transcriptional landscapes of the distantly related budding and fission yeast. We adapted the Precision Run-On sequencing (PRO-seq) approach to map the positions of RNA polymerase active sites genome-wide in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, we mapped preferred sites of transcription initiation in each organism using PRO-cap. Unexpectedly, we identify a pause in early elongation, specific to S. pombe, that requires the conserved elongation factor subunit Spt4 and resembles promoter-proximal pausing in metazoans. PRO-seq profiles in strains lacking Spt4 reveal globally elevated levels of transcribing RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) within genes in both species. Messenger RNA abundance, however, does not reflect the increases in Pol II density, indicating a global reduction in elongation rate. Together, our results provide the first base-pair resolution map of transcription elongation in S. pombe and identify divergent roles for Spt4 in controlling elongation in budding and fission yeast. PMID:27197211

  2. Tripartite organization of centromeric chromatin in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Krassovsky, Kristina; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Henikoff, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centromere is the genetic locus that organizes the proteinaceous kinetochore and is responsible for attachment of the chromosome to the spindle at mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, the centromere consists of highly repetitive DNA sequences that are occupied by nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant, whereas in budding yeast, a ∼120-bp centromere DNA element (CDE) that is sufficient for centromere function is occupied by a single right-handed histone variant CenH3 (Cse4) n...

  3. Measurement of the volume growth rate of single budding yeast with the MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiashu; Stowers, Chris C; Boczko, Erik M; Li, Deyu

    2010-11-01

    We report on measurements of the volume growth rate of ten individual budding yeast cells using a recently developed MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter. The MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter is very sensitive, provides signals that are immune from the baseline drift, and can work with cell culture media of complex composition. These desirable features allow us to directly measure the volume growth rate of single cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae LYH3865 strain budding yeast in YNB culture media over a whole cell cycle. Results indicate that all budding yeast follow a sigmoid volume growth profile with reduced growth rates at the initial stage before the bud emerges and the final stage after the daughter gets mature. Analysis of the data indicates that even though all piecewise linear, Gomperitz, and Hill's function models can fit the global growth profile equally well, the data strongly support local exponential growth phenomenon. Accurate volume growth measurements are important for applications in systems biology where quantitative parameters are required for modeling and simulation. PMID:20717618

  4. Development of automatic image analysis algorithms for protein localization studies in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logg, Katarina; Kvarnström, Mats; Diez, Alfredo; Bodvard, Kristofer; Käll, Mikael

    2007-02-01

    Microscopy of fluorescently labeled proteins has become a standard technique for live cell imaging. However, it is still a challenge to systematically extract quantitative data from large sets of images in an unbiased fashion, which is particularly important in high-throughput or time-lapse studies. Here we describe the development of a software package aimed at automatic quantification of abundance and spatio-temporal dynamics of fluorescently tagged proteins in vivo in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most important model organisms in proteomics. The image analysis methodology is based on first identifying cell contours from bright field images, and then use this information to measure and statistically analyse protein abundance in specific cellular domains from the corresponding fluorescence images. The applicability of the procedure is exemplified for two nuclear localized GFP-tagged proteins, Mcm4p and Nrm1p.

  5. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  6. Vector sequences - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project Vector sequences Data detail Data name Vector sequences Description of data contents Vector seq...wnload License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Vector sequences - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ... ...uences used for sequencing. Multi FASTA format. 7 entries. Data file File name: vec

  7. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  8. The Histone Fold Domain of Cse4 Is Sufficient for CEN Targeting and Propagation of Active Centromeres in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Morey, Lisa; Barnes, Kelly; Chen, Yinhuai; Fitzgerald-Hayes, Molly; Baker, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Centromere-specific H3-like proteins (CenH3s) are conserved across the eukaryotic kingdom and are required for packaging centromere DNA into a specialized chromatin structure required for kinetochore assembly. Cse4 is the CenH3 protein of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Like all CenH3 proteins, Cse4 consists of a conserved histone fold domain (HFD) and a divergent N terminus (NT). The Cse4 NT contains an essential domain designated END (for essential N-terminal domain); deletion o...

  9. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  10. Structure of Ynk1 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of Ynk1, an NDPK from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been solved at 3.1 Å resolution. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate from nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates. In addition to biochemical studies, a number of crystal structures of NDPK from various organisms, including both native proteins and complexes with nucleotides or nucleotide analogues, have been determined. Here, the crystal structure of Ynk1, an NDPK from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been solved at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural analysis strongly supports the oligomerization state of this protein being hexameric rather than tetrameric

  11. Dissecting ribosome assembly and transport in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, Martin; Schütz, Sabina; Chang, Yiming; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2014-01-01

    Construction of the eukaryotic ribosome begins in the nucleolus and requires >300 evolutionarily conserved nonribosomal trans-acting factors, which transiently associate with preribosomal subunits at distinct assembly stages. A subset of trans-acting and transport factors passage assembled preribosomal subunits in a functionally inactive state through the nuclear pore complexes (NPC) into the cytoplasm, where they undergo final maturation before initiating translation. Here, we summarize the repertoire of tools developed in the model organism budding yeast that are spearheading the functional analyses of trans-acting factors involved in the assembly and intracellular transport of preribosomal subunits. We elaborate on different GFP-tagged ribosomal protein reporters and a pre-rRNA reporter that reliably monitors the movement of preribosomal particles from the nucleolus to cytoplasm. We discuss the powerful yeast heterokaryon assay, which can be employed to uncover shuttling trans-acting factors that need to accompany preribosomal subunits to the cytoplasm to be released prior to initiating translation. Moreover, we present two biochemical approaches, namely sucrose gradient analyses and tandem affinity purification, that are rapidly facilitating the uncovering of regulatory processes that control the compositional dynamics of trans-acting factors on maturing preribosomal particles. Altogether, these approaches when combined with traditional analytical biochemistry, targeted proteomics and structural methodologies, will contribute to the dissection of the assembly and intracellular transport of preribosomal subunits, as well as other macromolecular assemblies that influence diverse biological pathways. PMID:24857742

  12. Probiotic Properties of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech

    when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. While the majority of probiotic microorganisms studied to date are lactic acid bacteria, research in yeasts with potentially beneficial influences on human health has mainly revolved around Saccharomyces boulardii. This yeast...... interactions with cells of the human gastrointestinal tract. Specifically, the included publications represent scientific investigation of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of human DC function, induction of human T cell responses indicating inflammation versus tolerance, capacity for enhancing human...... epithelial cell barrier function, and properties of pathogen inhibition. In a large-scale in vitro study, 170 strains representing 75 diverse yeast species were evaluated for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs, as compared to cytokine responses induced by S. boulardii. Our findings...

  13. The cellular robustness by genetic redundancy in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequent dispensability of duplicated genes in budding yeast is heralded as a hallmark of genetic robustness contributed by genetic redundancy. However, theoretical predictions suggest such backup by redundancy is evolutionarily unstable, and the extent of genetic robustness contributed from redundancy remains controversial. It is anticipated that, to achieve mutual buffering, the duplicated paralogs must at least share some functional overlap. However, counter-intuitively, several recent studies reported little functional redundancy between these buffering duplicates. The large yeast genetic interactions released recently allowed us to address these issues on a genome-wide scale. We herein characterized the synthetic genetic interactions for ∼500 pairs of yeast duplicated genes originated from either whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD events. We established that functional redundancy between duplicates is a pre-requisite and thus is highly predictive of their backup capacity. This observation was particularly pronounced with the use of a newly introduced metric in scoring functional overlap between paralogs on the basis of gene ontology annotations. Even though mutual buffering was observed to be prevalent among duplicated genes, we showed that the observed backup capacity is largely an evolutionarily transient state. The loss of backup capacity generally follows a neutral mode, with the buffering strength decreasing in proportion to divergence time, and the vast majority of the paralogs have already lost their backup capacity. These observations validated previous theoretic predictions about instability of genetic redundancy. However, departing from the general neutral mode, intriguingly, our analysis revealed the presence of natural selection in stabilizing functional overlap between SSD pairs. These selected pairs, both WGD and SSD, tend to have decelerated functional evolution, have higher propensities of co

  14. Robust heat shock induces eIF2α-phosphorylation-independent assembly of stress granules containing eIF3 and 40S ribosomal subunits in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Groušl, Tomáš; Ivanov, P.; Frýdlová, Ivana; Vašicová, Pavla; Janda, Filip; Vojtová, Jana; Malínská, Kateřina; Malcová-Janatová, Ivana; Nováková, Lenka; Janošková, Dana; Valášek, Leoš; Hašek, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 12 (2009), s. 2078-2088. ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1424; GA ČR GA204/05/0838; GA ČR GA204/09/1924; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk ME 939 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : p-bodies * stress granules * yeast Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.144, year: 2009

  15. Isolation of a cdc28 mutation that abrogates the dependence of S phase on completion of M phase of the budding yeast cell cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Kumar Ghosh; Pratima Sinha

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a mutation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisisae CDC28 gene that allows cdc13 cells, carrying damaged DNA, to continue with the cell division cycle. While cdc13 mutant cells are arrested as large-budded cells at the nonpermissive temperature 37°C, the cdc13 cdc28 double mutant culture showed cells with one or more buds, most of which showed apical growth. The additional buds emerged without the intervening steps of nuclear division and cell separation. We suggest that the cdc28 mutation abrogates a checkpoint function and allows cells with damaged or incompletely replicated DNA an entry to another round of cell cycle and bypasses the mitotic phase of the cell cycle.

  16. Concentration-Dependent Effects of Rhodiola Rosea on Long-Term Survival and Stress Resistance of Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: The Involvement of YAP 1 and MSN2/4 Regulatory Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bayliak, Maria M.; Burdyliuk, Nadia I.; Izers’ka, Lilia I.; Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2013-01-01

    Concentration-dependent effects of aqueous extract from R. rosea root on long-term survival and stress resistance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. At low concentrations, R. rosea aqueous extract extended yeast chronological lifespan, enhanced oxidative stress resistance of stationary-phase cells and resistance to number stressors in exponentially growing cultures. At high concentrations, R. rosea extract sensitized yeast cells to stresses and shortened yeast lifespan. T...

  17. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  18. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  19. Integrative analysis of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Katherine C; Calzone, Laurence; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Cross, Frederick R; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2004-08-01

    The adaptive responses of a living cell to internal and external signals are controlled by networks of proteins whose interactions are so complex that the functional integration of the network cannot be comprehended by intuitive reasoning alone. Mathematical modeling, based on biochemical rate equations, provides a rigorous and reliable tool for unraveling the complexities of molecular regulatory networks. The budding yeast cell cycle is a challenging test case for this approach, because the control system is known in exquisite detail and its function is constrained by the phenotypic properties of >100 genetically engineered strains. We show that a mathematical model built on a consensus picture of this control system is largely successful in explaining the phenotypes of mutants described so far. A few inconsistencies between the model and experiments indicate aspects of the mechanism that require revision. In addition, the model allows one to frame and critique hypotheses about how the division cycle is regulated in wild-type and mutant cells, to predict the phenotypes of new mutant combinations, and to estimate the effective values of biochemical rate constants that are difficult to measure directly in vivo. PMID:15169868

  20. Timing robustness in the budding and fission yeast cell cycles.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangla, Karan

    2010-02-01

    Robustness of biological models has emerged as an important principle in systems biology. Many past analyses of Boolean models update all pending changes in signals simultaneously (i.e., synchronously), making it impossible to consider robustness to variations in timing that result from noise and different environmental conditions. We checked previously published mathematical models of the cell cycles of budding and fission yeast for robustness to timing variations by constructing Boolean models and analyzing them using model-checking software for the property of speed independence. Surprisingly, the models are nearly, but not totally, speed-independent. In some cases, examination of timing problems discovered in the analysis exposes apparent inaccuracies in the model. Biologically justified revisions to the model eliminate the timing problems. Furthermore, in silico random mutations in the regulatory interactions of a speed-independent Boolean model are shown to be unlikely to preserve speed independence, even in models that are otherwise functional, providing evidence for selection pressure to maintain timing robustness. Multiple cell cycle models exhibit strong robustness to timing variation, apparently due to evolutionary pressure. Thus, timing robustness can be a basis for generating testable hypotheses and can focus attention on aspects of a model that may need refinement.

  1. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality ...scores Data detail Data name 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores De...from the budding yeast full-length cDNA library by the vector-capping method, the sequence quality score gen...s accession only. Sequence 5'-end sequence data of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones. FASTA format. Quality Phred's quality... Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality

  2. TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    OpenAIRE

    Blažena Lavová; Dana Urminská

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells and macromolecules (e.g. fats, lipids, proteins and DNA) from the damage of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sacchamomyces cerevisiae are know as organisms with very important antioxidative enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase or catalase. The total antioxidant activity (mmol Trolox equivalent – TE.g-1 d.w.) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was measured by 2,2´-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) during the yeas...

  3. Specific residues of the GDP/GTP exchange factor Bud5p are involved in establishment of the cell type-specific budding pattern in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pil Jung; Lee, Bongyong; Park, Hay-Oak

    2004-07-01

    Cells of the budding yeast undergo oriented cell division by choosing a specific site for growth depending on their cell type. Haploid a and alpha cells bud in an axial pattern whereas diploid a/alpha cells bud in a bipolar pattern. The Ras-like GTPase Rsr1p/Bud1p, its GDP-GTP exchange factor Bud5p, and its GTPase-activating protein Bud2p are essential for selecting the proper site for polarized growth in all cell types. Here we showed that specific residues at the N terminus and the C terminus of Bud5p were important for bipolar budding, while some residues were involved in both axial and bipolar budding. These bipolar-specific mutations of BUD5 disrupted proper localization of Bud5p in diploid a/alpha cells without affecting Bud5p localization in haploid alpha cells. In contrast, Bud5p expressed in the bud5 mutants defective in both budding patterns failed to localize in all cell types. Thus, these results identify specific residues of Bud5p that are likely to be involved in direct interaction with spatial landmarks, which recruit Bud5p to the proper bud site. Finally, we found a new start codon of BUD5, which extends the open reading frame to 210 bp upstream of the previously estimated start site, thus encoding a polypeptide of 608 amino acid residues. Bud5p with these additional N-terminal residues interacted with Bud8p, a potential bipolar landmark, suggesting that the N-terminal region is necessary for recognition of the spatial cues. PMID:15136576

  4. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27610566

  5. Genome annotation of a Saccharomyces sp. lager brewer's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León-Medina, Patricia Marcela; Elizondo-González, Ramiro; Damas-Buenrostro, Luis Cástulo; Geertman, Jan-Maarten; Van den Broek, Marcel; Galán-Wong, Luis Jesús; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito

    2016-09-01

    The genome of lager brewer's yeast is a hybrid, with Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as sub-genomes. Due to their specific use in the beer industry, relatively little information is available. The genome of brewing yeast was sequenced and annotated in this study. We obtained a genome size of 22.7 Mbp that consisted of 133 scaffolds, with 65 scaffolds larger than 10 kbp. With respect to the annotation, 9939 genes were obtained, and when they were submitted to a local alignment, we found that 53.93% of these genes corresponded to S. cerevisiae, while another 42.86% originated from S. eubayanus. Our results confirm that our strain is a hybrid of at least two different genomes. PMID:27330999

  6. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural pract...

  7. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary hi...

  8. 'Yeast mail': a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) to encrypt messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemeyer, Helmut; Paululat, Achim; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2014-09-01

    The universal genetic code is used by all life forms to encode biological information. It can also be used to encrypt semantic messages and convey them within organisms without anyone but the sender and recipient knowing, i.e., as a means of steganography. Several theoretical, but comparatively few experimental, approaches have been dedicated to this subject, so far. Here, we describe an experimental system to stably integrate encrypted messages within the yeast genome using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based, one-step homologous recombination system. Thus, DNA sequences encoding alphabetical and/or numerical information will be inherited by yeast propagation and can be sent in the form of dried yeast. Moreover, due to the availability of triple shuttle vectors, Saccharomyces cerevisiae can also be used as an intermediate construction device for transfer of information to either Drosophila or mammalian cells as steganographic containers. Besides its classical use in alcoholic fermentation and its modern use for heterologous gene expression, we here show that baker's yeast can thus be employed in a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) as a simple steganographic container to hide and convey messages. PMID:25238077

  9. Dynamic behaviour of the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' in a starving budding yeast cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In vivo molecular-level information is essentially important for understanding the structure, dynamics and functions of living cells. We use Raman microspectroscopy to single living budding yeast cells under a starving condition and study the dynamic behaviour of the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' (Y. Naito et al., J. Raman. Spectrosc., 36 (2005) 837-839. and Y-S. Huang et al., Biochemistry, 44 (2005) 10009-10019.) in relation to the formation and disappearance of a 'dancing body' in a vacuole. A focus is placed on the cell death process and the recovery from it. Our previous studies have shown that, under a starving condition, a dancing body appears suddenly in a vacuole and that the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' disappears concomitantly indicating the loss of the mitochondrial metabolic activity. This event is followed by gradual deterioration of the cell structure leading to death. This cell death process was visualized at the molecular level by time-resolved Raman imaging. In the present study, we show strong correlations not only between the appearance of a dancing body and the loss of the mitochondrial activity but also between the disappearance of the dancing body and the recovery of the activity. Time- and space-resolved Raman spectra of a single living budding yeast cell were recorded on a confocal Raman microspectrometer with 632.8 nm line of a He-Ne laser for excitation. The laser power at the sample was about 5 mW. The lateral and depth resolutions were about 300 nm with a 100 x oil immersion objective lens (N.A.=1.3) and about 2 μm with a 100 μm pinhole for a confocal detection. Raman spectra were recorded in the wavenumber range 300 - 1800 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 3 cm-1. The exposure time was 150 sec. Saccharomyces cerevisiae/ Saccharomyces Bayanus hybrid, strain AJL3062 from, was grown at 30 deg C under a stationary cultivation condition in wort medium. The cells dispersed in 1 ml

  10. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains. PMID:26205244

  11. Effect of Yeast : Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Marine Yeast as probiotic supplement on performance of poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Kompiang

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment had been conducted to evaluate the effect of marine yeast and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc as probiotic supplement on poultry performance. Marine yeast isolated from rotten sea-weed and commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used. Evaluation was conducted by comparing performance of broiler chicken supplemented with marine yeast or Sc, which were given through drinking water (5 ml/l to negative control (feed without antibiotic growth promotor/GPA, positive control (feed with GPA, and reference commercial probiotic. Forty DOC broiler birds were used for each treatment, divided into 4 replicates (10 birds/replicate and raised in wire cages for 5 weeks. Body weight and feed consumption were measured weekly and mortality was recorded during the trial. The results showed that there were no significant difference on the birds performance among marine yeast, Sc, positive control and probiotic reference control treatments. However their effects on bird performance were better (P<0.05 than treatment of negative control. It is concluded that marine yeast or Saccharomyces cerevisiae could replace the function of antibiotic as a growth promotant.

  12. Thermal resistance of Saccharomyces yeast ascospores in beers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Elham A; Gardner, Richard C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2015-08-01

    The industrial production of beer ends with a process of thermal pasteurization. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus are yeasts used to produce top and bottom fermenting beers, respectively. In this research, first the sporulation rate of 12 Saccharomyces strains was studied. Then, the thermal resistance of ascospores of three S. cerevisiae strains (DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, Ethanol Red(®)) and one strain of S. pastorianus (ATCC 9080) was determined in 4% (v/v) ethanol lager beer. D60 °C-values of 11.2, 7.5, 4.6, and 6.0 min and z-values of 11.7, 14.3, 12.4, and 12.7 °C were determined for DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, ATCC 9080, and Ethanol Red(®), respectively. Lastly, experiments with 0 and 7% (v/v) beers were carried out to investigate the effect of ethanol content on the thermal resistance of S. cerevisiae (DSMZ 1848). D55 °C-values of 34.2 and 15.3 min were obtained for 0 and 7% beers, respectively, indicating lower thermal resistance in the more alcoholic beer. These results demonstrate similar spore thermal resistance for different Saccharomyces strains and will assist in the design of appropriate thermal pasteurization conditions for preserving beers with different alcohol contents. PMID:25996521

  13. Functional Genomics Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Deletion Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    Constructed by a consortium of 16 laboratories, the Saccharomyces genome-wide deletion collections have, for the past decade, provided a powerful, rapid, and inexpensive approach for functional profiling of the yeast genome. Loss-of-function deletion mutants were systematically created using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene deletion strategy to generate a start-to-stop codon replacement of each open reading frame by homologous recombination. Each strain carries two molecular barcodes that serve as unique strain identifiers, enabling their growth to be analyzed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays or through the use of next-generation sequencing technologies. Functional profiling of the deletion collections, using either strain-by-strain or parallel assays, provides an unbiased approach to systematically survey the yeast genome. The Saccharomyces yeast deletion collections have proved immensely powerful in contributing to the understanding of gene function, including functional relationships between genes and genetic pathways in response to diverse genetic and environmental perturbations. PMID:27587784

  14. Whole lifespan microscopic observation of budding yeast aging through a microfluidic dissection platform

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung Sik; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Huberts, Daphne H. E. W.; Lee, Luke P; Heinemann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Important insights into aging have been generated with the genetically tractable and short-lived budding yeast. However, it is still impossible today to continuously track cells by high-resolution microscopic imaging (e.g., fluorescent imaging) throughout their entire lifespan. Instead, the field still needs to rely on a 50-y-old laborious and time-consuming method to assess the lifespan of yeast cells and to isolate differentially aged cells for microscopic snapshots via manual dissection of...

  15. A septin from the filamentous fungus A. nidulans induces atypical pseudohyphae in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septins were first discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae where they form a scaffold that organizes the bud site and are a component of the morphogenesis checkpoint that coordinates budding with mitosis. Five of the seven S. cerevisiae septins (Cdc3, Cdc10, Cdc11, Cdc12 and Shs1) colocalize as a rin...

  16. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  17. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  18. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    OpenAIRE

    Nadejda EFREMOVA; Elena MOLODOI; Agafia USATÎI; Ludmila FULGA; Tamara BORISOVA

    2013-01-01

    It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein) compared with other samples. Maximum increase of ...

  19. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; S Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccha...

  20. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; S Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccha...

  1. Whole lifespan microscopic observation of budding yeast aging through a microfluidic dissection platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sung Sik; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Huberts, Daphne H E W; Lee, Luke P; Heinemann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Important insights into aging have been generated with the genetically tractable and short-lived budding yeast. However, it is still impossible today to continuously track cells by high-resolution microscopic imaging (e.g., fluorescent imaging) throughout their entire lifespan. Instead, the field st

  2. Continuous High-resolution Microscopic Observation of Replicative Aging in Budding Yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne H. E. W.; Janssens, Georges E.; Lee, Sung Sik; Vizcarra, Ima Avalos; Heinemann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a simple microfluidic setup, in which single budding yeast cells can be tracked throughout their entire lifespan. The microfluidic chip exploits the size difference between mother and daughter cells using an array of micropads. Upon loading, cells are trapped underneath the

  3. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  4. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  5. INVESTIGATIONS INTO MAGNESIUM BIOSORPTION BY WASTE BREWERY YEAST SACCHAROMYCES UVARUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Gniewosz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out into the capacity of waste brewery yeast Saccharomyces uvarum for biosorption of magnesium originated from a solution of dehydrated salt of magnesium chloride, depending on the number of cells and diferent pH of the suspension during 6 hours. The concentration of MgCl2•6H2O in the solution was adjusted so as to maintain a stable content of magnesium as expressed per pure element, i.e. 1.25 g/dm3 of solution. In the first stage, the number of cells was differentiated in yeast slurry through either condensation or dilution. In the second stage, pH of yeast suspension was differentiated (pH 5.5, 6.0 and 7.0 at a constant number of cells. The solutions examined were kept under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Determination of magnesium content of yeast biomass was carried out with the method of atomic adsorption spectroscopy after 15 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 6 h of experiments. The highest content of magnesium (13.76 mg/g d.m. was obtained at the lowest number of cells in the solution, i.e. 3.5 × 108 cells/cm3 under aerobic conditions. An increase in solution pH facilitated biosorption of magnesium by the yeast. At pH 7.0, after 6 hours of the experiment, the yeasts contained 15.19 mg Mg/g d.m. when kept under anaerobic conditions and 17.22 mg Mg/g d.m. when kept under aerobic conditions.

  6. Optimization of feeding strategy for the ergosterol production by yeasts saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Mojmir Rychtera; Josef Cermak; Jaroslav Votruba; Jan Nahlik; Karel Melzoch; Christopher A. Kent; Estela Escalante, Waldir D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective of this study was to optimize ergosterol production by yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the use of computer controlled feeding of cultivation medium. Baker´s yeasts strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally modified and selected as mutant D7 was further applied in an industrial scale and also in this investigation. Composition of cultivation medium was optimized with the use of a modified Rosenbrock´s method with regard to following components: glucose, yeast extract, ...

  7. PHENOTYPES INVESTIGATION IN THE YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE ISOLATED FROM DIFFERENT GRAPE CULTIVARS FOLLOWIG FERMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraktar V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Micobiological investigation was carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures, which were isolated from different varieties of vintage grape harvested from the ―Koblevo‖ winery, Nikolaev region of Ukraine. It was determined that wild yeast cultures tend to be of one of three different phenotypes. For comparison and reference, investigation of test cultures was performed with previously known phenotypes and yeast cultures Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in wine industry. It was noted...

  8. Automated Yeast Mating Protocol Using Open Reading Frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome to Improve Yeast Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineering the industrial ethanologen Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is critical for commercializing cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Approaches to engineer pentose-fermenting yeasts have required expression of additional genes. We implemented a...

  9. Septin Filament Formation is Essential in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, Michael A.; Bertin, Aurelie; Garcia, Galo; Lam, Lisa; Nogales, Eva; Thorner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form ordered, rod-like multimeric complexes and polymerize into filaments, but how such supramolecular structure is related to septin function was unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four septins form an apolar hetero-octamer (Cdc11–Cdc12–Cdc3–Cdc10–Cdc10–Cdc3–Cdc12–Cdc11) that associates end-to-end to form filaments. We show that septin filament assembly displays previously unanticipated plasticity. Cells lacking Cdc10 or Cdc11 are able to divide becau...

  10. Budding yeast PAK kinases regulate mitotic exit by two different mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Chiroli, Elena; Fraschini, Roberta; Beretta, Alessia; Tonelli, Mariagrazia; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of the dominant-negative CLA4t allele of the budding yeast CLA4 gene, encoding a member of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of protein kinases, which, together with its homologue STE20, plays an essential role in promoting budding and cytokinesis. Overproduction of the Cla4t protein likely inhibits both endogenous Cla4 and Ste20 and causes a delay in the onset of anaphase that correlates with inactivation of Cdc20/anaphase-promoting complex (APC)–dependent ...

  11. The Snf1 Protein Kinase in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Snf1 protein kinase is primarily known as a key component of the glucose repression regulatory cascade. The Snf1 kinase is highly conserved among eukaryotes and its mammalian homolog AMPK is responsible for energy homeostasis in cells, organs and whole bodies....... Failure in the AMPK regulatory cascade leads to metabolic disorders, such as obesity or type 2 diabetes. The knowledge about the Snf1 protein kinase remains to be of much interest in studying yeast carbon metabolism and human biology. To investigate the effect of Snf1 kinase and its regulatory subunit Snf...... was the lack of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. To reconstruct a regulatory map of the yeast Snf1 protein kinase, I used the abundances of 5716 mRNAs, 2388 proteins, and 44 metabolites measured for the wild-type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 strains. By integrating these...

  12. Proliferation enhancement of budding yeast and mammalian cells with periodic oxygen radical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Jun; Murata, Tomiyasu; Hahizume, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have been intensively studied for biological applications. However, the each effect of species in plasmas to biological tissue has not been clarified yet because various factors exist in the plasmas. Accordingly, we have studied effects of atomic oxygen dose on cell growth such as budding yeast and mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts of mammalian cells. Both of cells were suspended with PBS, and treated using oxygen radical source. In order to prevent the radicals from reacting with the ambient air, the treatment region was surrounded by a plastic cover and purged with Ar. The proliferative effect of 15 % was observed at the O3Pj dose of around 1 . 0 ×1017 cm-3 in NIH3T3 cells as well as in yeast cells. Moreover, periodic oxygen treatment enhanced the effect in budding yeast cells. The best interval of periodic oxygen radical treatment was around 2 hours, which is almost the same period as that of their cell cycle. With the optimum interval time, we have investigated the effect of the number of the treatments. As the number of treatments increases, the growth rate of budding yeast cells was gradually enhanced and saturated at thrice treatments. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26286072 and project for promoting Research Center in Meijo University.

  13. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The def...

  14. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  15. Advanced biofuel production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Replacement of conventional transportation fuels with biofuels will require production of compounds that can cover the complete fuel spectrum, ranging from gasoline to kerosene. Advanced biofuels are expected to play an important role in replacing fossil fuels because they have improved properties compared with ethanol and some of these may have the energy density required for use in heavy duty vehicles, ships, and aviation. Moreover, advanced biofuels can be used as drop-in fuels in existing internal combustion engines. The yeast cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be turned into a producer of higher alcohols (1-butanol and isobutanol), sesquiterpenes (farnesene and bisabolene), and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel), and here we discusses progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for production of these advanced biofuels. PMID:23628723

  16. Pyruvate decarboxylases from the petite-negative yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Nielsen, Jens; Piskur, Jure; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Saccharomyces kluyveri is a petite-negative yeast, which is less prone to form ethanol under aerobic conditions than is S. cerevisiae. The first reaction on the route from pyruvate to ethanol is catalysed by pyruvate decarboxylase, and the differences observed between S. kluyveri and S. cerevisiae...... with respect to ethanol formation under aerobic conditions could be caused by differences in the regulation of this enzyme activity. We have identified and cloned three genes encoding functional pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes ( PDC genes) from the type strain of S. kluyveri (Sk-PDC11, Sk-PDC12 and Sk...... activity was controlled by variations in the amount of mRNA. The mRNA level and the pyruvate decarboxylase activity responded to anaerobiosis and growth on different carbon sources in essentially the same fashion as in S. cerevisiae. This indicates that the difference in ethanol formation between these two...

  17. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis in budding yeast at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rebecca; Drubin, David G; Sun, Yidi

    2016-04-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is an essential cellular process that involves the concerted assembly and disassembly of many different proteins at the plasma membrane. In yeast, live-cell imaging has shown that the spatiotemporal dynamics of these proteins is highly stereotypical. Recent work has focused on determining how the timing and functions of endocytic proteins are regulated. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we review our current knowledge of the timeline of endocytic site maturation and discuss recent works focusing on how phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and lipids regulate various aspects of the process. PMID:27084361

  18. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijender K. Bajaj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling.

  19. The conserved protein kinase Ipl1 regulates microtubule binding to kinetochores in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Biggins, Sue; Fedor F. Severin; Bhalla, Needhi; Sassoon, Ingrid; Hyman, Anthony A.; Murray, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome segregation depends on kinetochores, the structures that mediate chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. We isolated mutants in IPL1, which encodes a protein kinase, in a screen for budding yeast mutants that have defects in sister chromatid separation and segregation. Cytological tests show that ipl1 mutants can separate sister chromatids but are defective in chromosome segregation. Kinetochores assembled in extracts from ipl1 mutants show altered binding to microtubules. Ip...

  20. The budding yeast Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase regulates mitotic spindle disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Buvelot, Stéphanie; Tatsutani, Sean Y.; Vermaak, Danielle; Biggins, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Ipl1p is the budding yeast member of the Aurora family of protein kinases, critical regulators of genomic stability that are required for chromosome segregation, the spindle checkpoint, and cytokinesis. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Ipl1p also has a function in mitotic spindle disassembly that is separable from its previously identified roles. Ipl1–GFP localizes to kinetochores from G1 to metaphase, transfers to the spindle after metaphase, and accumulates at the spindle midzone ...

  1. Biophysical Characterization of the Centromere-specific Nucleosome from Budding Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Isabel J.; Yung, Jasmine S. Y.; Singleton, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    The centromeric DNA of all eukaryotes is assembled upon a specialized nucleosome containing a histone H3 variant known as CenH3. Despite the importance and conserved nature of this protein, the characteristics of the centromeric nucleosome are still poorly understood. In particular, the stoichiometry and DNA-binding properties of the CenH3 nucleosome have been the subject of some debate. We have characterized the budding yeast centromeric nucleosome by biochemical and biophysical methods and ...

  2. Cse4 is Part of an Octameric Nucleosome in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Camahort, Raymond; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Mattingly, Mark; Li, Bing; Nakanishi, Shima; Zhu, Dongxiao; Shilatifard, Ali; Workman, Jerry L.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast CenH3 histone variant Cse4 localizes to centromeric nucleosomes and is required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The exact composition of centromeric Cse4–containing nucleosomes is a subject of debate. ChIP-chip experiments and high resolution quantitative PCR confirm that there is a single Cse4 nucleosome at each centromere, and additional regions of the genome contain Cse4 nucleosomes at low levels. Using unbiased biochemical, cell biological, and genet...

  3. Screening the Budding Yeast Genome Reveals Unique Factors Affecting K2 Toxin Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Servienė; Juliana Lukša; Irma Orentaitė; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Jaunius Urbonavičius

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion...

  4. cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project cDNA sequence quality data Data detail Data name cDNA sequence quality... data Description of data contents Phred's quality score. PHD format, one file to a single cDNA data, and co...ription Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  5. Relationship between sensitivity to ultraviolet light and budding in yeast cells of different culture ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subpopulations of yeast cells, consisting of cells of different sizes and different percentages of budding cells, were prepared by centrifugation through sucrose solutions with linear density gradients of cultures at different phases of the growth cycle. Ultraviolet survival of these cells was determined by colony counting, and the survival rate was compared with the cells' respiratory rates. Individual budding cells and interdivisional cells, and also mother cells and daughter cells derived from irradiated budding cells, were isolated by the micromanipulation technique. The number of divisions in each cell was measured during a 21-hr incubation period immediately after irradiation. In the population in the logarithmic phase consisting of homogeneous cells of middle size, no difference in uv sensitivity was observed between mother cells and daughter cells, irrespective of mutual adhesion. Budding cell resistance was observed in the population in the transitional phase; this was due to the lesser uv sensitivity of daughter cells in the fresh medium. In the stationary phase, daughter cells were rather more sensitive than mother cells or interdivisional cells, so there was little difference in uv sensitivity between budding cells and interdivisional cells

  6. Stable Pseudohyphal Growth in Budding Yeast Induced by Synergism between Septin Defects and Altered MAP-kinase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junwon; Rose, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    Upon nutrient limitation, budding yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be induced to adopt alternate filament-like growth patterns called diploid pseudohyphal or invasive haploid growth. Here, we report a novel constitutive pseudohyphal growth state, sharing some characteristics with classic forms of filamentous growth, but differing in crucial aspects of morphology, growth conditions and genetic regulation. The constitutive pseudohyphal state is observed in fus3 mutants containing various septin assembly defects, which we refer to as sadF growth (septin assembly defect induced filamentation) to distinguish it from classic filamentation pathways. Similar to other filamentous states, sadF cultures comprise aggregated chains of highly elongated cells. Unlike the classic pathways, sadF growth occurs in liquid rich media, requiring neither starvation nor the key pseudohyphal proteins, Flo8p and Flo11p. Moreover sadF growth occurs in haploid strains of S288C genetic background, which normally cannot undergo pseudohyphal growth. The sadF cells undergo highly polarized bud growth during prolonged G2 delays dependent on Swe1p. They contain septin structures distinct from classical pseudo-hyphae and FM4-64 labeling at actively growing tips similar to the Spitzenkörper observed in true hyphal growth. The sadF growth state is induced by synergism between Kss1p-dependent signaling and septin assembly defects; mild disruption of mitotic septins activates Kss1p-dependent gene expression, which exacerbates the septin defects, leading to hyper-activation of Kss1p. Unlike classical pseudo-hyphal growth, sadF signaling requires Ste5, Ste4 and Ste18, the scaffold protein and G-protein β and γ subunits from the pheromone response pathway, respectively. A swe1 mutation largely abolished signaling, breaking the positive feedback that leads to amplification of sadF signaling. Taken together, our findings show that budding yeast can access a stable constitutive pseudohyphal growth

  7. Stable Pseudohyphal Growth in Budding Yeast Induced by Synergism between Septin Defects and Altered MAP-kinase Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Upon nutrient limitation, budding yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be induced to adopt alternate filament-like growth patterns called diploid pseudohyphal or invasive haploid growth. Here, we report a novel constitutive pseudohyphal growth state, sharing some characteristics with classic forms of filamentous growth, but differing in crucial aspects of morphology, growth conditions and genetic regulation. The constitutive pseudohyphal state is observed in fus3 mutants containing various septin assembly defects, which we refer to as sadF growth (septin assembly defect induced filamentation to distinguish it from classic filamentation pathways. Similar to other filamentous states, sadF cultures comprise aggregated chains of highly elongated cells. Unlike the classic pathways, sadF growth occurs in liquid rich media, requiring neither starvation nor the key pseudohyphal proteins, Flo8p and Flo11p. Moreover sadF growth occurs in haploid strains of S288C genetic background, which normally cannot undergo pseudohyphal growth. The sadF cells undergo highly polarized bud growth during prolonged G2 delays dependent on Swe1p. They contain septin structures distinct from classical pseudo-hyphae and FM4-64 labeling at actively growing tips similar to the Spitzenkörper observed in true hyphal growth. The sadF growth state is induced by synergism between Kss1p-dependent signaling and septin assembly defects; mild disruption of mitotic septins activates Kss1p-dependent gene expression, which exacerbates the septin defects, leading to hyper-activation of Kss1p. Unlike classical pseudo-hyphal growth, sadF signaling requires Ste5, Ste4 and Ste18, the scaffold protein and G-protein β and γ subunits from the pheromone response pathway, respectively. A swe1 mutation largely abolished signaling, breaking the positive feedback that leads to amplification of sadF signaling. Taken together, our findings show that budding yeast can access a stable constitutive

  8. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  9. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensly, Fernanda; Picheth, Geraldo; Brand, Debora; Bonfim, Tania M B

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended. PMID:25242932

  10. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gaensly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  11. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Gaensly; Geraldo Picheth; Debora Brand; Tania M. B. Bonfim

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  12. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure;

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybrids...

  13. Biogeographical characterisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RosannaTofalo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualise patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast”, is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere”. Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir’, have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality and the unique flavour of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast.

  14. Early manifestations of replicative aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim I. Sorokin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is successfully used as a model organism to find genes responsible for lifespan control of higher organisms. As functional decline of higher eukaryotes can start as early as one quarter of the average lifespan, we asked whether S. cerevisiae can be used to model this manifestation of aging. While the average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae mother cells ranges between 15 and 30 division cycles, we found that resistances to certain stresses start to decrease much earlier. Looking into the mechanism, we found that knockouts of genes responsible for mitochondriato-nucleus (retrograde signaling, RTG1 or RTG3, significantly decrease the resistance of cells that generated more than four daughters, but not of the younger ones. We also found that even young mother cells frequently contain mitochondria with heterogeneous transmembrane potential and that the percentage of such cells correlates with replicative age. Together, these facts suggest that retrograde signaling starts to malfunction in relatively young cells, leading to accumulation of heterogeneous mitochondria within one cell. The latter may further contribute to a decline in stress resistances.

  15. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  16. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Tingting; Sun Lin; Xin Ying; Ma Lixia; Zhang Youyou; Wang Xin; Xu Kun; Ren Chonghua; Zhang Cunfang; Chen Zhilong; Yang Hanjiang; Zhang Zhiying

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concern...

  17. Screening the budding yeast genome reveals unique factors affecting K2 toxin susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Servienė

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion leakage. K28 toxin is active in the cell nucleus, blocking DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, thereby triggering apoptosis. Genome-wide screens in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae identified several hundred effectors of K1 and K28 toxins. Surprisingly, no such screen had been performed for K2 toxin, the most frequent killer toxin among industrial budding yeasts. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted several concurrent genome-wide screens in S. cerevisiae and identified 332 novel K2 toxin effectors. The effectors involved in K2 resistance and hypersensitivity largely map in distinct cellular pathways, including cell wall and plasma membrane structure/biogenesis and mitochondrial function for K2 resistance, and cell wall stress signaling and ion/pH homeostasis for K2 hypersensitivity. 70% of K2 effectors are different from those involved in K1 or K28 susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates that despite the fact that K1 and K2 toxins share some aspects of their killing strategies, they largely rely on different sets of effectors. Since the vast majority of the host factors identified here is exclusively active towards K2, we conclude that cells have acquired a specific K2 toxin effectors set. Our work thus indicates that K1 and K2 have elaborated different biological pathways and provides a first step towards the detailed characterization of K2 mode of action.

  18. The centromeric nucleosome of budding yeast is perfectly positioned and covers the entire centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Hope A.; Howard, Bruce H.; David J Clark

    2011-01-01

    The centromeres of budding yeast are ∼120 bp in size and contain three functional elements: an AT-rich region flanked by binding sites for Cbf1 and CBF3. A specialized nucleosome containing the H3 variant Cse4 (CenH3) is formed at the centromere. Our genome-wide paired-end sequencing of nucleosomal DNA reveals that the centromeric nucleosome contains a micrococcal nuclease-resistant kernel of 123–135 bp, depending on the centromere, and is therefore significantly shorter than the canonical nu...

  19. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  20. Bread, beer and wine: yeast domestication in the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Delphine; Legras, Jean-Luc

    2011-03-01

    Yeasts of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto species complex are able to convert sugar into ethanol and CO(2) via fermentation. They have been used for thousands years by mankind for fermenting food and beverages. In the Neolithic times, fermentations were probably initiated by naturally occurring yeasts, and it is unknown when humans started to consciously add selected yeast to make beer, wine or bread. Interestingly, such human activities gave rise to the creation of new species in the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex by interspecies hybridization or polyploidization. Within the S. cerevisiae species, they have led to the differentiation of genetically distinct groups according to the food process origin. Although the evolutionary history of wine yeast populations has been well described, the histories of other domesticated yeasts need further investigation. PMID:21377618

  1. Past and Future of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts: From Spoilage Microorganisms to Biotechnological Tools for Improving Wine Aroma Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Gil, José V; Manzanares, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition, and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed. PMID:27065975

  2. Past and Future of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts: From Spoilage Microorganisms to Biotechnological Tools for Improving Wine Aroma Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Gil, José V.; Manzanares, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition, and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed. PMID:27065975

  3. Past and future of non-Saccharomyces yeasts: from spoilage microorganisms to biotechnological tools for improving wine aroma complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz ePadilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed.

  4. Ingression Progression Complexes Control Extracellular Matrix Remodelling during Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Arcones, Irene; Sacristan, Carlos; Filali-Mouncef, Yasmina; Roncero, Cesar; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells must coordinate contraction of the actomyosin ring at the division site together with ingression of the plasma membrane and remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cytokinesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In eukaryotes, glycosyltransferases that synthesise ECM polysaccharides are emerging as key factors during cytokinesis. The budding yeast chitin synthase Chs2 makes the primary septum, a special layer of the ECM, which is an essential process during cell division. Here we isolated a group of actomyosin ring components that form complexes together with Chs2 at the cleavage site at the end of the cell cycle, which we named ‘ingression progression complexes’ (IPCs). In addition to type II myosin, the IQGAP protein Iqg1 and Chs2, IPCs contain the F-BAR protein Hof1, and the cytokinesis regulators Inn1 and Cyk3. We describe the molecular mechanism by which chitin synthase is activated by direct association of the C2 domain of Inn1, and the transglutaminase-like domain of Cyk3, with the catalytic domain of Chs2. We used an experimental system to find a previously unanticipated role for the C-terminus of Inn1 in preventing the untimely activation of Chs2 at the cleavage site until Cyk3 releases the block on Chs2 activity during late mitosis. These findings support a model for the co-ordinated regulation of cell division in budding yeast, in which IPCs play a central role. PMID:26891268

  5. Inheritance and organisation of the mitochondrial genome differ between two Saccharomyces yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Hvidtfeldt, J.; Gartner, J.; Palmen, W.; Ussery, David; Piskur, Jure

    2002-01-01

    Petite-positive Saccharomyces yeasts can be roughly divided into the sensu stricto, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sensu lato group, including Saccharomyces castellii; the latter was recently studied for transmission and the organisation of its mitochondrial genome. S. castellii mitochon......Petite-positive Saccharomyces yeasts can be roughly divided into the sensu stricto, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sensu lato group, including Saccharomyces castellii; the latter was recently studied for transmission and the organisation of its mitochondrial genome. S. castellii...... mitochondrial molecules (mtDNA) carrying point mutations, which confer antibiotic resistance, behaved in genetic crosses as the corresponding point mutants of S. cerevisiae. While S. castellii generated spontaneous petite mutants in a similar way as S. cerevisiae, the petites exhibited a different inheritance...... pattern. In crosses with the wild type strains a majority of S. castellii petites was neutral, and the suppressivity in suppressive petites was never over 50%. The two yeasts also differ in organisation of their mtDNA molecules. The 25,753 bp sequence of S. castellii mtDNA was determined and the coding...

  6. Use of non-saccharomyces Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast strains in winemaking and brewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tataridis Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Selected Saccharomyces yeast strains have been used for more than 150 years in brewing and for several decades in winemaking. They are necessary in brewing because of the boiling of the wort, which results in the death of all yeast cells, with the exception of some Belgian style beers (ex. Lambic, where the wort is left to be colonized by indigenous yeast and bacteria from the environment and ferment naturally. In winemaking their use is also pertinent because they provide regular and timely fermentations, inhibit the growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms and contribute to the desired sensory characters. Even though the use of selected Saccharomyces strains provides better quality assurance in winemaking in comparison to the unknown microbial consortia in the must, it has been debated for a long time now whether the use of selected industrial Saccharomyces strains results in wines with less sensory complexity and “terroir” character. In previous decades, non-Saccharomyces yeasts were mainly considered as spoilage/problematic yeast, since they exhibited low fermentation ability and other negative traits. In the last decades experiments have shown that there are some non-Saccharomyces strains (Candida, Pichia, Kluyveromyces, Torulaspora, etc which, even though they are not able to complete the fermentation they can still be used in sequential inoculation-fermentation with Saccharomyces to increase sensory complexity of the wines. Through fermentation in a laboratory scale, we have observed that the overall effects of selected Torulaspora delbrueckii yeast strains, is highly positive, leading to products with pronounced sensory complexity and floral/fruity aroma in winemaking and brewing.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Indigenous Saccharomyces sensu stricto Yeasts Isolated from Southern Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Skelin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic fermentation is a polimicrobial process involving a large number of genera and species of yeast and bacteria. The major yeast genera involved in this process belongs to the Saccharomyces spp. The aim of this study was the isolation, identification and determination of genetic diversity of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae natural population taken from cv. Plavac mali from secluded wine growing areas of Southern Croatia. Must samples were taken during the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation followed by yeast isolation. A total of 40 isolates that were physiologically confirmed to belong to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group were furthermore differentiated by molecular methods. PCR-RFLP analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 region of the 18S ribosomal DNA identified 37 of the isolates as S. cerevisiae and two of the isolates as S. bayanus/pastorianus. All isolates were further analyzed by RAPD fingerprinting. The results of this study showed that in some cases the RAPD assay may be useful to separate species within the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group. The molecular analysis confirmed genetic diversity of S. cerevisiae indigenous population and additionally the involvement of indigenous S. paradoxus and S. bayanus was determined.The population structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has indicated that each vineyard is characterized with particular S. cerevisiae microflora. It is an important step towards the preservation and exploitation of yeast biodiversity in Southern Croatia.

  8. Investigation of the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma onto saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mykolenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Additional treatment of water by nonequilibrium contact plasma allows improving consumer characteristics of bakery goods considerably. Determination of the effect of plasma-chemically activated water on morphological, cultural and physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is important from the technological point of view. Materials and Methods. Experimental investigations were carried out in the conditions of bacteriological laboratory by seeding the culture of yeasts of ТМ “Lvivski” and “Kryvorizki” on Sabouraud dense liquid nutrient media. The quantity of viable cells of microorganisms was determined by the method of Gould sector seeds. Morphology of the yeast was investigated by phase-contrast microscopy. Biotechnological properties of yeasts were determined on Giss media. Results. The paper establishes the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma on the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shows absence of suppressive action of treated water with regard to cultural properties of microorganisms. The experiments prove that with the use of plasma-chemically activated water morphological characteristics and biochemical properties of bakery yeasts produced by Lviv and Kryvyi Rig yeast plants are preserved. Culturing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast on the nutrient media prepared with the use of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasm resulted in 6,5–15 times’ increase in quantity of viable microorganisms compared with the control on the mains drinking water. Conclusions. Physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast improved owing to use water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma. Results of investigations are recommended for using in yeast production and bread making.

  9. A new type of postirradiation recovery of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that the survival of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae plated on the nutrient medium containing 8% NaCl rapidly increases with time of postirradiation keeping the cells in water at 28 deg C. The process is completed in 30-40 min. One fails to observe this phenomenon with the exposed cells plated on a standard culture medium for, in this case, the recovery has been fully completed before the first postirradiation division occurs. Haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and diploid Pichia pinus are not capable of ''rapid'' repair of the studied type

  10. Studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts during Alcoholic Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri

    The early death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts during mixed culture spontaneous wine fermentation has traditionally been attributed to the lower capacity of these yeast species to withstand high levels of ethanol, low pH, and other media properties that are a part of progressing fermentation. However...... and ethanol production) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lacchancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii. Given the ability of these non- Saccharomyces yeasts to enhance the wine flavour profile, improvement of culture conditions is of great potential......, other yeast-yeast interactions, such as cell-cell contact mediated growth arrest and/or toxininduced death may also be a significant factor in the relative fragility of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed culture fermentation. In the present work we evaluate the combined roles of cell-cell contact...

  11. Requirements for Recruitment of a G Protein-coupled Receptor to Clathrin-coated Pits in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Toshima, Junko Y.; Nakanishi, Jun-ichi; Mizuno, Kensaku; Toshima, Jiro; Drubin, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Endocytic internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) plays a critical role in down-regulation of GPCR signaling. The yeast mating pheromone receptor Ste2p has been used as a model to investigate mechanisms of signal transduction, modification, and endocytic internalization of GPCRs. We previously used a fluorescently labeled mating pheromone derivative to reveal unappreciated molecular and spatiotemporal features of GPCR endocytosis in budding yeast. Here, we identify recruitment ...

  12. Mitochondrial quality control during inheritance is associated with lifespan and mother-daughter age asymmetry in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    McFaline-Figueroa, José Ricardo; Vevea, Jason; Swayne, Theresa C.; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Christopher; Leung, Galen; Boldogh, Istvan R.; Pon, Liza A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments and analysis of mitochondrial function using superoxide and redox potential biosensors revealed that mitochondria within individual yeast cells are physically and functionally distinct. Mitochondria that are retained in mother cells during yeast cell division have significantly lower redox potential and higher superoxide levels compared to mitochondria in buds. Retention of mitochondria with lower redox potential in mother cells occurs to the sa...

  13. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanda Renata Reis; Ana Paula Guarnieri Bassi; Jessica Carolina Gomes da Silva; Sandra Regina Ceccato-Antonini

    2014-01-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Ch...

  14. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds.

  15. Past and future of non-Saccharomyces yeasts: from spoilage microorganisms to biotechnological tools for improving wine aroma complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz ePadilla; José Vicente Gil; Paloma eManzanares

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of m...

  16. Past and Future of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts: From Spoilage Microorganisms to Biotechnological Tools for Improving Wine Aroma Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Beatriz; Gil, José V.; Manzanares, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition, and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of ...

  17. Update History of This Database - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2010/03/29 Buddin...tio About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History

  18. Effects of low-frequency magnetic fields on the viability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jan; Strašák, Luděk; Fojt, Lukáš; Slaninová, I.; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2007), s. 115-121. ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004404; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : low-frequency electromagnetic field * yeast * Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2007

  19. Investigation of the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma onto saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mykolenko; D. Stepanskiy; Tishchenko, A; O. Pivovarov

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Additional treatment of water by nonequilibrium contact plasma allows improving consumer characteristics of bakery goods considerably. Determination of the effect of plasma-chemically activated water on morphological, cultural and physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is important from the technological point of view. Materials and Methods. Experimental investigations were carried out in the condi...

  20. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila M.P.B.S. de Ponzzes-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 x 10(5 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production.

  2. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the...... development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...

  3. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-01-10

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3){sub 2}-(Ndc10){sub 2} recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly.

  4. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA

  5. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo, E-mail: cklee2005@korea.ac.kr

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  6. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  7. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan

  8. PRIMED: PRIMEr database for deleting and tagging all fission and budding yeast genes developed using the open-source genome retrieval script (GRS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Cummings

    Full Text Available The fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts have served as excellent models for many seminal discoveries in eukaryotic biology. In these organisms, genes are deleted or tagged easily by transforming cells with PCR-generated DNA inserts, flanked by short (50-100 bp regions of gene homology. These PCR reactions use especially designed long primers, which, in addition to the priming sites, carry homology for gene targeting. Primer design follows a fixed method but is tedious and time-consuming especially when done for a large number of genes. To automate this process, we developed the Python-based Genome Retrieval Script (GRS, an easily customizable open-source script for genome analysis. Using GRS, we created PRIMED, the complete PRIMEr D atabase for deleting and C-terminal tagging genes in the main S. pombe and five of the most commonly used S. cerevisiae strains. Because of the importance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs in many biological processes, we also included the deletion primer set for these features in each genome. PRIMED are accurate and comprehensive and are provided as downloadable Excel files, removing the need for future primer design, especially for large-scale functional analyses. Furthermore, the open-source GRS can be used broadly to retrieve genome information from custom or other annotated genomes, thus providing a suitable platform for building other genomic tools by the yeast or other research communities.

  9. Reconstitution of an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernis, L.; Piskur, Jure; Diffley, J.F.X.

    2003-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to incorporate exogenous nucleosides into DNA. We have made a number of improvements to existing strategies to reconstitute an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in yeast. We have constructed strains that express both a nucleoside kinase as well...

  10. Sequential fermentation using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for the reduction of alcohol content in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciani Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades there has been a progressive increase in wine ethanol content due to global climate change and modified wine styles that involved viticulture and oenology practices. Among the different approaches and strategies to reduce alcohol content in wine we propose a sequential fermentation using immobilized non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts. Preliminary results showed that sequential fermentations with Hanseniaspora osmophila, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Starmerella bombicola and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains showed an ethanol reduction when compared with pure S. cerevisiae fermentation trials.

  11. Ctf3p, the Mis6 budding yeast homolog, interacts with Mcm22p and Mcm16p at the yeast outer kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measday, Vivien; Hailey, Dale W; Pot, Isabelle; Givan, Scott A; Hyland, Katherine M; Cagney, Gerard; Fields, Stan; Davis, Trisha N; Hieter, Philip

    2002-01-01

    The budding yeast kinetochore is composed of an inner and outer protein complex, which binds to centromere (CEN) DNA and attaches to microtubules. We performed a genetic synthetic dosage lethality screen to identify novel kinetochore proteins in a collection of chromosome transmission fidelity mutants. Our screen identified several new kinetochore-related proteins including YLR381Wp/Ctf3p, which is a member of a conserved family of centromere-binding proteins. Ctf3p interacts with Mcm22p, Mcm16p, and the outer kinetochore protein Ctf19p. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that Ctf3p, Mcm22p, and Mcm16p bind to CEN DNA in a Ctf19p-dependent manner. In addition, Ctf3p, Mcm22p, and Mcm16p have a localization pattern similar to other kinetochore proteins. The fission yeast Ctf3p homolog, Mis6, is required for loading of a CENP-A centromere specific histone, Cnp1, onto centromere DNA. We find however that Ctf3p is not required for loading of the budding yeast CENP-A homolog, Cse4p, onto CEN DNA. In contrast, Ctf3p and Ctf19p fail to bind properly to the centromere in a cse4-1 mutant strain. We conclude that the requirements for CENP-A loading onto centromere DNA differ in fission versus budding yeast. PMID:11782448

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Baker's Yeast, suppresses the growth of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Noaman, Eman; Tolentino, Lucilene

    2008-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in immunocompetent mice. Swiss albino mice were inoculated intramuscularly in the right thigh with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) cells. At day 8, mice bearing Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma tumor (SEC) were intratumorally (IT) injected with killed S. cerevisiae (10 x 10(6) and 20 x 10(6) cells) for 35 days. Histopathology of yeast-treated mice showed extensive tumor degeneration, apoptosis, and ischemic (coagulative) and liquefactive necrosis. These changes are associated with a tumor growth curve that demonstrates a significant antitumor response that peaked at 35 days. Yeast treatment (20 x 10(6) cells) three times a week resulted in a significant decrease in tumor volume (TV) (67.1%, P Yeast administered three and two times per week induced significant decrease in TV as early as 9 and 25 days post-treatment, respectively. Administration of yeast significantly enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, including macrophages, into the tumors and triggered apoptosis in SEC cells as determined by flow cytometry (78.6%, P yeast treatment elevated TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma plasma levels and lowered the elevated IL-10 levels. No adverse side effects from the yeast treatment were observed, including feeding/drinking cycle and life activity patterns. Indeed, yeast-treated mice showed significant final body weight gain (+21.5%, P yeast, which is known to be safe for human consumption. PMID:17891396

  13. Investigation of nutrient sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre-transportører (di......Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre...

  14. Mum, this bud’s for you: where do you want it? Roles for Cdc42 in controlling bud site selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W. James

    2003-01-01

    The generation of asymmetric cell shapes is a recurring theme in biology. In budding yeast, one form of cell asymmetry occurs for division and is generated by anisotropic growth of the mother cell to form a daughter cell bud. Previous genetic studies uncovered key roles for the small GTPase Cdc42 in organizing the actin cytoskeleton and vesicle delivery to the site of bud growth,(1,2) but a recent paper has also raised questions about how control of Cdc42 activity is integrated into a propose...

  15. EFFECT OF DRY BAKERY YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIАE IN MILK COWS DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryadchikov V. G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary supplementation with dry bakery yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae in high concentrate diet (F:C=47:53 on milk yeald and rumen fermentation were studied on two groups primiparous lactaiting cows (8 cows per group and four ruminally cannulated nonlactaiting cows on diet F:C=25:75. Cows fed yeast during 67 days produced 1.24 kg/d and 1.66 kg/d natural and 4% fat corrected milk respectively more, than control cows. Milk protein and fat percentages were also higher. On diet with yeast ruminal concentration of lactate was lower and butirate+propionate was higher. The yeast incrised rumen pH, decreased NH3 in rumen and urea in blood, decreased viscosity of rumen fluid

  16. Effects of Dietary Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisia Supplementation in Practical Diets of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. P. Cyrino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-day feeding trial was carried out to determine the effects of various dietary levels of brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the growth performance, body composition and nutrient utilization in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, juveniles. Fish (7.6 ± 0.3 g were stocked into eighteen 1,000-L tanks (100 fish per tank; n = 3 and fed to apparent satiation six isonitrogenous (27% crude protein and isoenergetic (19 kJ/g diets, formulated to contain different dried yeast levels (0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30% or 40% diet in substitution to fishmeal. Body weight tripled at the end of the feeding trial for fish fed up to 20% dietary yeast incorporation. Daily growth coefficient (DGC, % body weight/day decreased with increasing dietary yeast level (P < 0.0001. Voluntary feed intake (VFI, %BW/day did not vary significantly with increasing yeast level. Fish fed 40% yeast showed significant reduction in protein efficiency rate, protein retention and nitrogen gain. Increasing levels of dietary yeast did not significantly affect protein or lipid digestibility. Dietary dried yeast was seemingly palatable to tilapia juveniles and was suitable up to 15% inclusion to promote growth and efficient diet utilization, without affecting body composition.

  17. The budding yeast protein kinase Ipl1/Aurora allows the absence of tension to activate the spindle checkpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Biggins, Sue; Murray, Andrew W.

    2001-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint prevents cell cycle progression in cells that have mitotic spindle defects. Although several spindle defects activate the spindle checkpoint, the exact nature of the primary signal is unknown. We have found that the budding yeast member of the Aurora protein kinase family, Ipl1p, is required to maintain a subset of spindle checkpoint arrests. Ipl1p is required to maintain the spindle checkpoint that is induced by overexpression of the protein kinase Mps1. Inactivating I...

  18. The budding yeast protein Chl1p is required to preserve genome integrity upon DNA damage in S-phase

    OpenAIRE

    Laha, Suparna; Das, Shankar Prasad; Hajra, Sujata; Sau, Soumitra; Sinha, Pratima

    2006-01-01

    The budding yeast protein, Chl1p, is required for sister-chromatid cohesion, transcriptional silencing, rDNA recombination and aging. In this work, we show that Chl1p is also required for viability when DNA replication is stressed, either due to mutations or if cells are treated with genotoxic agents like methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and ultraviolet (UV) rays. The chl1 mutation caused synthetic growth defects with mutations in DNA replication genes. At semi-permissive temperatures, the doubl...

  19. Translational control of catalase synthesis by hemin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Barbara; Hofbauer, Reinhold; Ruis, Helmut

    1982-01-01

    mRNA-dependent cell-free protein synthesis systems were prepared from a heme-deficient ole3 mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the absence or in the presence of the heme precursor δ-aminolevulinate. When supplemented with total yeast mRNA, the two systems—from heme-deficient and from heme-containing cells—translate most mRNAs with comparable efficiencies. mRNAs coding for the hemoproteins catalase T and catalase A, however, are translated at a low rate by the system ...

  20. Screening for new brewing yeasts in the non-Saccharomyces sector with Torulaspora delbrueckii as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Maximilian; Kopecká, Jana; Meier-Dörnberg, Tim; Zarnkow, Martin; Jacob, Fritz; Hutzler, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a screening system for future brewing yeasts focusing on non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The aim was to find new yeast strains that can ferment beer wort into a respectable beer. Ten Torulaspora delbrueckii strains were put through the screening system, which included sugar utilization tests, hop resistance tests, ethanol resistance tests, polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, propagation tests, amino acid catabolism and anabolism, phenolic off-flavour tests and trial fermentations. Trial fermentations were analysed for extract reduction, pH drop, yeast concentration in bulk fluid and fermentation by-products. All investigated strains were able to partly ferment wort sugars and showed high tolerance to hop compounds and ethanol. One of the investigated yeast strains fermented all the wort sugars and produced a respectable fruity flavour and a beer of average ethanol content with a high volatile flavour compound concentration. Two other strains could possibly be used for pre-fermentation as a bio-flavouring agent for beers that have been post-fermented by Saccharomyces strains as a consequence of their low sugar utilization but good flavour-forming properties. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26647111

  1. Ctf3p, the Mis6 budding yeast homolog, interacts with Mcm22p and Mcm16p at the yeast outer kinetochore

    OpenAIRE

    Measday, Vivien; Hailey, Dale W.; Pot, Isabelle; Givan, Scott A.; Hyland, Katherine M.; Cagney, Gerard; Fields, Stan; Davis, Trisha N.; Hieter, Philip

    2002-01-01

    The budding yeast kinetochore is composed of an inner and outer protein complex, which binds to centromere (CEN) DNA and attaches to microtubules. We performed a genetic synthetic dosage lethality screen to identify novel kinetochore proteins in a collection of chromosome transmission fidelity mutants. Our screen identified several new kinetochore-related proteins including YLR381Wp/Ctf3p, which is a member of a conserved family of centromere-binding proteins. Ctf3p interacts with Mcm22p, Mcm...

  2. A Cadmium-transporting P1B-type ATPase in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    OpenAIRE

    Adle, David J.; Sinani, Devis; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2006-01-01

    Detoxification and homeostatic acquisition of metal ions are vital for all living organisms. We have identified PCA1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an overexpression suppressor of copper toxicity. PCA1 possesses signatures of a P1B-type heavy metal-transporting ATPase that is widely distributed from bacteria to humans. Copper resistance conferred by PCA1 is not dependent on catalytic activity, but it appears that a cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus sequesters copper. Unexpe...

  3. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla Chakra; Wu Chuang; Farkas Illés J; Bahar Ivet; Oltvai Zoltán N

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR) mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate l...

  4. Transcriptional regulation of an hsp70 heat shock gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, M R; Craig, E A

    1987-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three heat-inducible hsp70 genes. We have characterized the promoter region of the hsp70 heat shock gene YG100, that also displays a basal level of expression. Deletion of the distal region of the promoter resulted in an 80% drop in the basal level of expression without affecting expression after heat shock. Progressive-deletion analysis suggested that sequences necessary for heat-inducible expression are more proximal, within 233 base pairs of the ...

  5. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Bou Zeidan; Giacomo Zara; Carlo Viti; Francesca Decorosi; Ilaria Mannazzu; Marilena Budroni; Luciana Giovannetti; Severino Zara

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and ...

  6. Role of DNA damage in ultraviolet (313 nm) inactivation of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative contribution of photoinhibition of cell respiration and DNA damage to lethal effect, caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of 313 m in certain yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been studied. It is shown that cell inactivation is mainly conditioned by DNA photodamage. When studying photoreactivation it has been established, that dimers of pyrimidine bases are the main lethal photoproducts, formed in DNA Under the effect of UV-radiation of 313 nm

  7. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Bou Zeidan; Giacomo Zara; Carlo Viti; Francesca Decorosi; Ilaria Mannazzu; Marilena Budroni; Luciana Giovannetti; Severino Zara

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides...

  8. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Lauren E.; McDermott, Courtney D.; Stewart, Taryn P; Hudson, William H.; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B.; Corbett, Anita H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to w...

  9. The nuclear exosome is active and important during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Frenk

    Full Text Available Nuclear RNA degradation pathways are highly conserved across eukaryotes and play important roles in RNA quality control. Key substrates for exosomal degradation include aberrant functional RNAs and cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. It has recently been reported that the nuclear exosome is inactivated during meiosis in budding yeast through degradation of the subunit Rrp6, leading to the stabilisation of a subset of meiotic unannotated transcripts (MUTs of unknown function. We have analysed the activity of the nuclear exosome during meiosis by deletion of TRF4, which encodes a key component of the exosome targeting complex TRAMP. We find that TRAMP mutants produce high levels of CUTs during meiosis that are undetectable in wild-type cells, showing that the nuclear exosome remains functional for CUT degradation, and we further report that the meiotic exosome complex contains Rrp6. Indeed Rrp6 over-expression is insufficient to suppress MUT transcripts, showing that the reduced amount of Rrp6 in meiotic cells does not directly cause MUT accumulation. Lack of TRAMP activity stabilises ∼ 1600 CUTs in meiotic cells, which occupy 40% of the binding capacity of the nuclear cap binding complex (CBC. CBC mutants display defects in the formation of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs, and we see similar defects in TRAMP mutants, suggesting that a key function of the nuclear exosome is to prevent saturation of the CBC complex by CUTs. Together, our results show that the nuclear exosome remains active in meiosis and has an important role in facilitating meiotic recombination.

  10. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization

  11. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Hoggard; Ivan Liachko; Cassaundra Burt; Troy Meikle; Katherine Jiang; Gheorghe Craciun; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chrom...

  12. Exploring the phenotypic space of non-Saccharomyces wine yeast biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Debra; Bauer, Florian F

    2016-05-01

    Tremendous microbial diversity exists in vineyards, and the potential to harness this diversity for novel mixed or pure starter cultures for wine fermentation has received significant attention in recent years. However, most studies are limited to a small subset of strains and species. Here we present data from a systematic screen of 91 yeast isolates from South African grape must and vineyard samples for oenologically relevant traits. One focus area was finding non-Saccharomyces isolates showing both reduced ethanol yields, as well as improved aromatic characteristics. Of the 91 isolates evaluated initially, 21 showed lower ethanol yields when compared to commercial wine yeast strain controls. Collectively, the metabolic data (primary fermentation and secondary aroma compounds) highlight the enormity of the 'phenotypic space' of yeast communities in South African vineyards. The data also emphasise intraspecies variability, challenging our concept of species typicity. Of particular oenological interest was the ability of several isolates to produce high levels of terpenoid compounds. A few strains were ultimately found which showed a substantial reduction (>1.5%) in the final ethanol content of sequential fermentations, as well as unique aroma compound production profiles. Four of these strains were selected for comprehensive wine trials in both red and white grape musts, complete with microbial, chemical and sensory analyses of the red wines. This presents, for the first time, a full bench-to-bottle characterisation of non-Saccharomyces strains showing the most potential for commercial application. The findings of this study enlarge the potential range of oenological applications for non-Saccharomyces yeast, while also suggesting the potential usefulness of several yeast species that have previously not been considered for winemaking applications. PMID:26742614

  13. Antifungal modes of action of Saccharomyces and other biocontrol yeasts against fungi isolated from sour and grey rots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nally, M C; Pesce, V M; Maturano, Y P; Rodriguez Assaf, L A; Toro, M E; Castellanos de Figueroa, L I; Vazquez, F

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the putative modes of action of 59 viticultural yeasts (31 Saccharomyces and 28 non-Saccharomyces) that inhibited fungi isolated from sour and grey rot in grapes. Inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, enzyme activities (laminarinases, chitinases), antifungal volatiles, competition for nutrients (siderophores, Niche Overlap Index (NOI)), inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length and induction of resistance were assayed. Biofungicide yeasts were classified into "antifungal patterns", according to their mechanisms of action. Thirty isolates presented at least two of the mechanisms assayed. We propose that inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, laminarinases, competition for nutrients, inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length, and antifungal volatiles by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces viticultural yeasts is used as putative biocontrol mechanisms against phytopathogenic fungi. Twenty-four different antifungal patterns were identified. Siderophore production (N)and a combination of siderophore production and NOI>0.92 (M)were the most frequent antifungal patterns observed in the biofungicide yeasts assayed. Elucidation of these mechanisms could be useful for optimization of an inoculum formulation, resulting in a more consistent control of grey and sour rot with Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces biocontrol yeasts. PMID:25863340

  14. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  15. Biodiversity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in distilleries of the La Mancha region (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, Juan; Maldonado Gil, María; Chiva, Rosana; Guillamón, José M; Briones, Ana

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this pioneering study was to determine the biodiversity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in ancient distilleries located in the La Mancha region, which is the principal area for the production of bioethanol and grape-based distillates in Spain. In this study, the yeast populations that were present during the process of extraction of alcohol and residual sugars from the byproducts of vinification, such as piquettes, pomace and grape skins, were studied. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts were identified by PCR-RFLP analysis of the 5.8S rRNA genes and, when necessary, by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of the 26S and/or 5.8S rRNA genes. Further, fermentation and the assimilation of carbon compounds were studied, to identify potential industrial applications. Phylogenetic trees and heat-maps were constructed for the genetic and phenotypic traits, respectively. Twenty yeast species belonging to eight genera were identified (Torulaspora, Candida, Zygosaccharomyces, Pichia, Hanseniaspora, Kluyveromyces, Ogataea and Saccharomycodes). Pichia galeiformis, Candida lactis-condensi, Hanseniaspora osmophila and Torulaspora delbrueckii were the most abundant species and were found principally in sweet and fermented piquettes. PMID:24656143

  16. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  17. Effects of mill stream flours technological quality on fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Katarina V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work in concerned with the interdependence between technological quality of mill stream flours and fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each mill stream flour has its own specific properties, determined by the particle size, technological phase of its formation and part of the wheat kernel it consists of. Biochemical complexity of dough during examination of fermentative activity of baker's yeast confirmed the influence of a number of physical and biochemical flour properties, such as ash content, wet gluten content, rheological flour properties, phytic acid content and amylograph peak viscosity. Abudance of significant flour characteristic, their interaction and different behavior in the presence of the yeast, showed diversity and variation of result within the same category of the mill stream flour.

  18. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer events revealed by the genome sequence of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, Maite; Bigey, Frederic; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Galeote, Virginie; Gavory, Frédérick; Mallet, Sandrine; Cambon, Brigitte; Legras, Jean Luc; Wincker, Patrick; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in winemaking, but little is known about the selective forces acting on the wine yeast genome. We sequenced the complete genome of the diploid commercial wine yeast EC1118, resulting in an assembly of 31 scaffolds covering 97% of the S288c reference genome. The wine yeast differed strikingly from the other S. cerevisiae isolates in possessing 3 unique large regions, 2 of which were subtelomeric, the other being inserted within an EC1...

  19. Molecular Basis of Fructose Utilization by the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a Mutated HXT3 Allele Enhances Fructose Fermentation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume, Carole; Delobel, Pierre; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie; Blondin, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Fructose utilization by wine yeasts is critically important for the maintenance of a high fermentation rate at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast able to ferment grape must sugars to dryness was found to have a high fructose utilization capacity. We investigated the molecular basis of this enhanced fructose utilization capacity by studying the properties of several hexose transporter (HXT) genes. We found that this wine yeast harbored a mutated HXT3 allel...

  20. A novel role for the GTPase-activating protein Bud2 in the spindle position checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Nelson

    Full Text Available The spindle position checkpoint (SPC ensures correct mitotic spindle position before allowing mitotic exit in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In a candidate screen for checkpoint genes, we identified bud2Δ as deficient for the SPC. Bud2 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP, and the only known substrate of Bud2 was Rsr1/Bud1, a Ras-like GTPase and a central component of the bud-site-selection pathway. Mutants lacking Rsr1/Bud1 had no checkpoint defect, as did strains lacking and overexpressing Bud5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rsr1/Bud1. Thus, the checkpoint function of Bud2 is distinct from its role in bud site selection. The catalytic activity of the Bud2 GAP domain was required for the checkpoint, based on the failure of the known catalytic point mutant Bud2(R682A to function in the checkpoint. Based on assays of heterozygous diploids, bud2(R682A, was dominant for loss of checkpoint but recessive for bud-site-selection failure, further indicating a separation of function. Tem1 is a Ras-like protein and is the critical regulator of mitotic exit, sitting atop the mitotic exit network (MEN. Tem1 is a likely target for Bud2, supported by genetic analyses that exclude other Ras-like proteins.

  1. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast...

  2. Yeast 5 – an expanded reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heavner Benjamin D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to improve the computational reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae biochemical reaction network and to refine the stoichiometrically constrained metabolic models that can be derived from such a reconstruction have continued since the first stoichiometrically constrained yeast genome scale metabolic model was published in 2003. Continuing this ongoing process, we have constructed an update to the Yeast Consensus Reconstruction, Yeast 5. The Yeast Consensus Reconstruction is a product of efforts to forge a community-based reconstruction emphasizing standards compliance and biochemical accuracy via evidence-based selection of reactions. It draws upon models published by a variety of independent research groups as well as information obtained from biochemical databases and primary literature. Results Yeast 5 refines the biochemical reactions included in the reconstruction, particularly reactions involved in sphingolipid metabolism; updates gene-reaction annotations; and emphasizes the distinction between reconstruction and stoichiometrically constrained model. Although it was not a primary goal, this update also improves the accuracy of model prediction of viability and auxotrophy phenotypes and increases the number of epistatic interactions. This update maintains an emphasis on standards compliance, unambiguous metabolite naming, and computer-readable annotations available through a structured document format. Additionally, we have developed MATLAB scripts to evaluate the model’s predictive accuracy and to demonstrate basic model applications such as simulating aerobic and anaerobic growth. These scripts, which provide an independent tool for evaluating the performance of various stoichiometrically constrained yeast metabolic models using flux balance analysis, are included as Additional files 1, 2 and 3. Additional file 1 Function testYeastModel.m.m. Click here for file Additional file 2 Function model

  3. Genetic control of x-ray resistance in budding yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five x-ray-sensitive mutants were selected from 10,000 colonies arising from survivors of ultraviolet light. These were named XS5, XS6, XS7, XS8, and XS9. Mutant XS1 was donated by Nakai. These mutations affect the resistant budding cell survival component of the survival curve and, in diploids, the low-dose interdivisional cell shoulder. They are of two types: Class I, in which budding cells lack resistance; and Class II, in which budding cells show reduced resistance. When crossed with one another, they show a complex complementation pattern. Gene dosage effects are seen in XS1 heterozygotes, while budding but not between divisions. No direct correlation between radiation sensitivity, meiosis, and sporulation is observed; genes which influence radiation sensitivity do not affect meiotic recombination. A single mutation (XS1 or XS5) suppresses the shoulders of the survival curves of both budding haploid cells and diploid nonbudding cells

  4. Fission yeast mating-type switching: programmed damage and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast follows similar rules as in budding yeast, but the underlying mechanisms are entirely different. Whilst the initiating double-strand cut in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires recombinational repair for survival, the initial damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  5. Utilization and Transport of L-Arabinose by Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Franden, M. A.; Stambuk, B. U.; Zhang, M.; Singh, A.

    2009-01-01

    L-Arabinose is one of the sugars found in hemicellulose, a major component of plant cell walls. The ability to convert L-arabinose to ethanol would improve the economics of biomass to ethanol fermentations. One of the limitations for L-arabinose fermentation in the current engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is poor transport of the sugar. To better understand L-arabinose transport and use in yeasts and to identify a source for efficient L-arabinose transporters, 165 non-Saccharomyces yeast strains were studied. These yeast strains were arranged into six groups based on the minimum time required to utilize 20 g/L of L-arabinose. Initial transport rates of L-arabinose were determined for several species and a more comprehensive transport study was done in four selected species. Detailed transport kinetics in Arxula adeninivorans suggested both low and high affinity components while Debaryomyces hansenii var. fabryii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii possessed a single component, high affinity active transport systems.

  6. The YeastGenome app: the Saccharomyces Genome Database at your fingertips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edith D; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) is a scientific database that provides researchers with high-quality curated data about the genes and gene products of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To provide instant and easy access to this information on mobile devices, we have developed YeastGenome, a native application for the Apple iPhone and iPad. YeastGenome can be used to quickly find basic information about S. cerevisiae genes and chromosomal features regardless of internet connectivity. With or without network access, you can view basic information and Gene Ontology annotations about a gene of interest by searching gene names and gene descriptions or by browsing the database within the app to find the gene of interest. With internet access, the app provides more detailed information about the gene, including mutant phenotypes, references and protein and genetic interactions, as well as provides hyperlinks to retrieve detailed information by showing SGD pages and views of the genome browser. SGD provides online help describing basic ways to navigate the mobile version of SGD, highlights key features and answers frequently asked questions related to the app. The app is available from iTunes (http://itunes.com/apps/yeastgenome). The YeastGenome app is provided freely as a service to our community, as part of SGD's mission to provide free and open access to all its data and annotations. PMID:23396302

  7. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Todd Hittinger, Chris; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-06-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  8. Mitotic Spindle Positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Accomplished by Antagonistically Acting Microtubule Motor Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cottingham, Frank R.; Hoyt, M. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is often essential for cell division and differentiation processes. The asymmetric cell division characteristic of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, requires that the spindle be positioned at the mother–bud neck and oriented along the mother–bud axis. The single dynein motor encoded by the S. cerevisiae genome performs an important but nonessential spindle-positioning role. We demonstrate that kinesin-related Kip3p makes a major contribution to...

  9. The lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus removes and transforms Fusarium trichothecene mycotoxins during fermentation of brewer's wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanail, Alexis V; Gibson, Brian; Han, Li; Peltonen, Kimmo; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Jestoi, Marika; Laitila, Arja

    2016-07-15

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fate of deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, HT-2 toxin and T-2 toxin, during a four-day fermentation with the lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus. The influence of excessive mycotoxin concentrations on yeast growth, productivity and viability were also assessed. Mycotoxins were dosed at varying concentrations to 11.5° Plato wort. Analysis of yeast revealed that presence of the toxins even at concentrations up to 10,000 μg/L had little or no effect on sugar utilisation, alcohol production, pH, yeast growth or cell viability. Of the dosed toxin amounts 9-34% were removed by the end of fermentation, due to physical binding and/or biotransformation by yeast. Deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside was not reverted to its toxic precursor during fermentation. Processing of full-scan liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) data with MetaboLynx and subsequent LC-QTOF-MS/MS measurements resulted in annotation of several putative metabolites. De(acetylation), glucosylation and sulfonation were the main metabolic pathways activated. PMID:26948637

  10. Investigation of Arsenic-Stressed Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Bioassay in Homeopathic Basic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Jäger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the response of arsenic-stressed yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards homeopathically potentized Arsenicum album, a duckweed nosode, and gibberellic acid. The three test substances were applied in five potency levels (17x, 18x, 24x, 28x, 30x and compared to controls (unsuccussed and succussed water with respect to influencing specific growth parameters. Five independent experiments were evaluated for each test substance. Additionally, five water control experiments were analyzed to investigate the stability of the experimental setup (systematic negative control experiments. All experiments were randomized and blinded. Yeast grew in microplates over a period of 38 h in either potentized substances or water controls with 250 mg/l arsenic(V added over the entire cultivation period. Yeast's growth kinetics (slope, Et50, and yield were measured photometrically. The test system exhibited a low coefficient of variation (slope 1.2%, Et50 0.3%, yield 2.7%. Succussed water did not induce any significant differences compared to unsuccussed water. Data from the control and treatment groups were both pooled to increase statistical power. In this study with yeast, no significant effects were found for any outcome parameter or any homeopathic treatment. Since in parallel experiments arsenic-stressed duckweed showed highly significant effects after application of potentized Arsenicum album and duckweed nosode preparations from the same batch as used in the present study, some specific properties of this experimental setup with yeast must be responsible for the lacking response.

  11. Evaluation of Yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae in Weight Gain of Crossbred Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Daniel Cifuentes Ruiz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics has been used to substitute antibiotic treatments used as growth promoters and to improve productive performance. The term probiotic is used to namelive micro-organisms such as microbes and bacteria with beneficial effects to livestock farms when consumed as dietary supplements. This review investigates the evidence for the use of probiotics in sheep’s final body weight gain combined with livestock grazing management system with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twenty one native sheep were chosen randomly for this study, with an average weight of 14.71 kg ± 1.9 under continuous grazing; the meadows are used as sheep pastures where Kikuyo grass grows (Pennisetum clandestinum and water ad libitum. Sheep were classified in three different treatments: T1, control treatment, without adding yeast; T2, added with 5 g/day of yeast; and T3, supplemented with 15 g/day of yeast. Throughout this study was possible to find a beneficial effect on final weight and average daily gain. The results were compared by ANOVA with a significance level of 95%. A significant difference was observed on final body weight of sheep for T3 (p ≤ 0.05. In addition, it was found that daily weight gain was 100 g, 120 g and 220 g for T1, T2 and T3 respectively. This research leads us to conclude that the addition of 15 g of yeast improves daily bodyweight gain and final weight of grazing native sheep.

  12. Effect of live yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production and some blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Peter Szucs

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of live yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sc 47 on milk yield, milk composition and some blood parameters of dairy cows during their early lactation on farm conditions. The live yeast culture was given in the diet of heifers and cows (5 g day-1 solid Actisaf for 14 days before calving and exclusively for the treated cows 12 g day-1 dissolved in 500 ml of water, during 14 days after calving. The experiment took until 100th day of lactation on farm conditions. Yeast culture supplementation was the most effective for the performance of primiparous cows: It was advantageous for blod plasma parameters: decreased the beta-hydroxy butyrate (BHB content and free fatty acids (FFA which indicated the protection of the animals against ketosis or other metabolic disorders. Increased the daily milk production and the lactose /glucose content of the milk. The live yeast culture increased the lactose content of the milk and decreased the somatic cell count of multiparous cows. The listed parameters were not significant (P<0.05 compare to the results of positive control groups. The applied live yeast culture supplementation did not significant affect for other performance of the cows.

  13. Thioredoxins function as deglutathionylase enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrone Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-SH groups are amongst the most easily oxidized residues in proteins, but irreversible oxidation can be prevented by protein glutathionylation, in which protein-SH groups form mixed disulphides with glutathione. Glutaredoxins and thioredoxins are key oxidoreductases which have been implicated in regulating glutathionylation/deglutathionylation in diverse organisms. Glutaredoxins have been proposed to be the predominant deglutathionylase enzymes in many plant and mammalian species, whereas, thioredoxins have generally been thought to be relatively inefficient in deglutathionylation. Results We show here that the levels of glutathionylated proteins in yeast are regulated in parallel with the growth cycle, and are maximal during stationary phase growth. This increase in glutathionylation is not a response to increased reactive oxygen species generated from the shift to respiratory metabolism, but appears to be a general response to starvation conditions. Our data indicate that glutathionylation levels are constitutively high in all growth phases in thioredoxin mutants and are unaffected in glutaredoxin mutants. We have confirmed that thioredoxins, but not glutaredoxins, catalyse deglutathionylation of model glutathionylated substrates using purified thioredoxin and glutaredoxin proteins. Furthermore, we show that the deglutathionylase activity of thioredoxins is required to reduce the high levels of glutathionylation in stationary phase cells, which occurs as cells exit stationary phase and resume vegetative growth. Conclusions There is increasing evidence that the thioredoxin and glutathione redox systems have overlapping functions and these present data indicate that the thioredoxin system plays a key role in regulating the modification of proteins by the glutathione system.

  14. Reconstruction of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway from Neurospora crassa in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Jaco; Burger, Anita; Swiegers, Jan H; Bauer, Florian F

    2015-08-01

    Industrial synthesis of L-carnitine is currently performed by whole-cell biotransformation of industrial waste products, mostly D-carnitine and cronobetaine, through specific bacterial species. No comparable system has been established using eukaryotic microorganisms, even though there is a significant and growing international demand for either the pure compound or carnitine-enriched consumables. In eukaryotes, including the fungus Neurospora crassa, L-carnitine is biosynthesized through a four-step metabolic conversion of trimethyllysine to L-carnitine. In contrast, the industrial yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks the enzymes of the eukaryotic biosynthesis pathway and is unable to synthesize carnitine. This study describes the cloning of all four of the N. crassa carnitine biosynthesis genes and the reconstruction of the entire pathway in S. cerevisiae. The engineered yeast strains were able to catalyze the synthesis of L-carnitine, which was quantified using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS) analyses, from trimethyllysine. Furthermore, the yeast threonine aldolase Gly1p was shown to effectively catalyze the second step of the pathway, fulfilling the role of a serine hydroxymethyltransferase. The analyses also identified yeast enzymes that interact with the introduced pathway, including Can1p, which was identified as the yeast transporter for trimethyllysine, and the two yeast serine hydroxymethyltransferases, Shm1p and Shm2p. Together, this study opens the possibility of using an engineered, carnitine-producing yeast in various industrial applications while providing insight into possible future strategies aimed at tailoring the production capacity of such strains. PMID:25851717

  15. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Katie E Hyma; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Justin C Fay

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea t...

  16. Optimization of feeding strategy for the ergosterol production by yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojmir Rychtera

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was to optimize ergosterol production by yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the use of computer controlled feeding of cultivation medium. Baker´s yeasts strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally modified and selected as mutant D7 was further applied in an industrial scale and also in this investigation. Composition of cultivation medium was optimized with the use of a modified Rosenbrock´s method with regard to following components: glucose, yeast extract, ammonium sulphate, potassium dihydrogen phosphate, magnesium sulphate and calcium chloride. Cultivation of yeast culture was performed in 7 L laboratory bioreactor with a working volume of 5 L equipped with a control unit and linked to a computer, with dissolved oxygen tension measurement, oxygen and carbon dioxide analyzers. BIOGENES prototype software was created from the commercial control system Genesis for Windows 3.0 (GFW, from Iconics and CLIPS 6.04 for the PC-Windows platform. From various factors affecting sterol biosynthesis a specific growth rate was chosen. Feed rate was controlled according to mathematical model. In this case it dealt with a design of optimal profile of specific growth rate with consequent calculation of carbon dioxide profile. Sterol concentration in the dry biomass increased from 1.0 % up to 3 %. Key words: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, ergosterol, fed-batch cultivation control, effect of the specific growth rate. Resumen: El objetivo de este estudio fue optimizar la producción de ergosterol por una cepa de levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae, controlando la alimentación de medio de cultivo por computadora. La cepa de levadura panadera Saccharomyces cerevisiae originalmente modificada y seleccionada como mutante D7 fue posteriormente utilizada a escala industrial y también para esta investigación. La composición del medio de cultivo fue optimizada usando el método modificado de Rosenbrock respecto a los siguientes

  17. Removal of lead, mercury and nickel using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlys Infante J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study the biomass of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to remove lead, mercury and nickel in the form of ions dissolved in water. Materials and methods. Synthetic solutions were prepared containing the three heavy metals, which were put in contact with viable microorganisms at different conditions of pH, temperature, aeration and agitation. Results. Both individual variables and the interaction effects influenced the biosorption process. Throughout the experimental framework it was observed that the biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae removed a higher percentage of lead (86.4% as compared to mercury and nickel (69.7 and 47.8% respectively. When the pH was set at a value of 5 the effect was positive for all three metals. Conclusions. pH was the variable that had a greater influence on the biosorption of lead on the biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The affinity of the heavy metals for the biomass followed the order Pb>Hg>Ni.

  18. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  19. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  20. A Comparison of Two Yeast MnSODs: Mitochondrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus Cytosolic Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human MnSOD is significantly more product-inhibited than bacterial MnSODs at high concentrations of superoxide (O2-). This behavior limits the amount of H2O2 produced at high [O2-]; its desirability can be explained by the multiple roles of H2O2 in mammalian cells, particularly its role in signaling. To investigate the mechanism of product inhibition in MnSOD, two yeast MnSODs, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria (ScMnSOD) and the other from Candida albicans cytosol (CaMnSODc), were isolated and characterized. ScMnSOD and CaMnSODc are similar in catalytic kinetics, spectroscopy, and redox chemistry, and they both rest predominantly in the reduced state (unlike most other MnSODs). At high [O2-], the dismutation efficiencies of the yeast MnSODs surpass those of human and bacterial MnSODs, due to very low level of product inhibition. Optical and parallel-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra suggest the presence of two Mn3+ species in yeast Mn3+SODs, including the well-characterized 5-coordinate Mn3+ species and a 6-coordinate L-Mn3+ species with hydroxide as the putative sixth ligand (L). The first and second coordination spheres of ScMnSOD are more similar to bacterial than to human MnSOD. Gln154, an H-bond donor to the Mn-coordinated solvent molecule, is slightly further away from Mn in yeast MnSODs, which may result in their unusual resting state. Mechanistically, the high efficiency of yeast MnSODs could be ascribed to putative translocation of an outer-sphere solvent molecule, which could destabilize the inhibited complex and enhance proton transfer from protein to peroxide. Our studies on yeast MnSODs indicate the unique nature of human MnSOD in that it predominantly undergoes the inhibited pathway at high [O2-].

  1. Utilization of waste products of dehydrated onion industry for production of fodder yeast by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonaim, S A; Abou-Zeid, A A; Abd El-Fattah, A F; Farid, M A

    1980-01-01

    One strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was selected from different yeasts, isolated from black strap molasses. This microorganism was cultivated on seven fermentation media for the production of protein. Medium I exhibited the highest potentiality for formation of protein. Therefore strain 1 of S. cerevisiae and medium I were used for further studies in the formation of protein. Factors controlling production of protein were explored. The required incubation period for the fermentation process was 72 hrs, while the initial pH value of the medium was 6.0. Sucrose supported the microorganism for higher production of protein (40.96%), while the best concentration of sucrose was shown to be 10.0 g/l. The best inorganic and organic nitrogen sources for protein formation were (NH4)2HPO4, (NH4)3PO4 and yeast extract, respectively. The best concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 and yeast extract, supporting protein formation, were 5.0 g/l and 10.0 g/l, respectively. Addition of MgSO4, ZnSO4, ferrous ammonium sulphate, copper sulphate, biotin, Ca-pantothenate, thiamine, pyridoxine, and inositol to the synthetic medium did not markedly influence high level of protein formation. Glutamic acid was the best amino acid, supporting protein formation by S. cerevisiae. Onion juice was found to be a good medium, after deletion of inhibitory volatile sulphur organic compounds, for the production of protein by S. cerevisiae. Addition of (NH4)2HPO4 to the best concentration of onion juice assisted the onion medium in production of fodder yeast, containing high level of protein. Addition of MgSO4 to onion juice and (NH4)2HPO4 did not increase the total nitrogen of the biomass. Fodder yeast, produced by onion juice medium, contained more valuable ingredients than fodder yeast, produced by synthetic medium. PMID:6990654

  2. Metabolite Profiling during Fermentation of Makgeolli by the Wild Yeast Strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Bai, Dong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage. The flavor of makgeolli is primarily determined by metabolic products such as free sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and aromatic compounds, which are produced during the fermentation of raw materials by molds and yeasts present in nuruk, a Korean fermentation starter. In this study, makgeolli was brewed using the wild yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5, and temporal changes in the metabolites during fermentation were analyzed b...

  3. Effects of the supplementation with yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae) on milk yield, and milk components of water buffalo cows from northeast of Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    T. Cifuentes; García, N.; Medina, S.; J. F. Ramírez

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of the diet with a commercial yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on yield and milk composition in water buffalo dairy herd located in northeast of Colombia. Multiparous water buffalo cows (n = 24) in second third of lactation were assigned into two treatments: 1) experimental group (n=12) fed with 100 g/day of commercial yeast cultures (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and 2) Control group (n=12) without yeast, during two month...

  4. Effects of Yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Feed Supplement on Milk Production and its Composition in Tunisian Holstein Friesian Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamouri O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 105-day feed trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of probiotic feed supplement containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk yield and its composition in Holstein Friesian cows. The trial was conducted in the region of Sidi Bouzid in the west of Tunisia. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been investigated on eight Holstein Friesian cows randomly divided into two groups of four animals on the basis of age, body weight, average milk yield, and lactation number. The first group was supplemented with 2.5 g/cow/day of probiotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2.5 1010 CFU/day and the second group (control was without the yeast. The study showed that supplementation with 2.5 g of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae per cow per day or 2.5 1010 CFU/day tended (P < 0.06 to increase milk production by 1.1 kg/cow. By cons, there was a significant increase of fat (P < 0.01; 52.8 and 46.9 g/cow/day and protein (P < 0.05; 41.7 and 38.7 g/cow/day content both for treated and control group, respectively. It is concluded that supplementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 2.5 1010 CFU/day in the diet of dairy cows may have positive influence on milk fat and protei n yield (g/cow/day.

  5. The Fission Yeast Ortholog of eIF3a Subunit Is Not Functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malcová-Janatová, Ivana; Koubek, Zdeněk; Malínská, Kateřina; Raková, Radka; Hašek, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2007), s. 555-564. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1424; GA ČR GA204/05/0838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae * yeast * protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of beta-alanine synthase from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobritzsch, D.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Andersen, Birgit;

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes and some bacteria, the third step of reductive pyrimidine catabolism is catalyzed by beta-alanine synthase (EC 3.5.1.6). Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri were obtained using sodium citrate as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P...

  7. Kluyveromyces lactis maintains Saccharomyces cerevisiae intron-encoded splicing signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Deshler, J O; Larson, G P; Rossi, J J

    1989-01-01

    The actin (ACT) gene from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene had a single intron 778 nucleotides in length which possessed the highly conserved splicing signals found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae introns. We demonstrated splicing of heterologous ACT transcripts in both K. lactis and S. cerevisiae.

  8. [Studies of viability and vitality after freezing of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii: physiological preconditioning effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Silvina; Galvagno, Miguel Angel; Cerrutti, Patricia

    2009-06-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vitality and viability of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii after freezing/thawing and the physiological preconditioning effect on these properties. The results indicate that the specific growth rate (0.3/h(-1)) and biomass (2-3 x10(8)cells/ml) of S. boulardii obtained in flasks shaken at 28 degrees C and at 37 degrees C were similar. Batch cultures of the yeast in bioreactors using glucose or sugar-cane molasses as carbon sources, reached yields of 0.28 g biomass/g sugar consumed, after 10h incubation at 28 degrees C; the same results were obtained in fed batch fermentations. On the other hand, in batch cultures, the vitality of cells recovered during the exponential growth phase was greater than the vitality of cells from the stationary phase of growth. Vitality of cells from fed-batch fermentations was similar to that of stationary growing cells from batch fermentations. Survival to freezing at -20 degrees C and subsequent thawing of cells from batch cultures was 0.31% for cells in exponential phase of growth and 11.5% for cells in stationary phase. Pre-treatment of this yeast in media with water activity (a(w)) 0.98 increased the survival to freezing of S. boulardii cells stored at -20 degrees C for 2 months by 10 fold. Exposure of the yeast to media of reduced a(w) and/or freezing/thawing process negatively affected cell vitality. It was concluded that stress conditions studied herein decrease vitality of S. boulardii. Besides, the yeast strain studied presented good tolerance to bile salts even at low pH values. PMID:19631167

  9. Chromium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolation of glucose tolerance factor from yeast biomass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vlatka Gulan Zetic; Vesna Stehlik-Tomas; Slobodan Grba; Lavoslav Lutilsky; Damir Kozlek

    2001-06-01

    Fermentations with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in semiaerobic and in static conditions with the addition of chromic chloride into the used molasses medium were analysed. It was proved that the addition of optimal amounts of CrCl3 into the basal medium enhanced the kinetics of alcohol fermentations. The addition of 200 mg/l CrCl3 into the medium stimulated both the yeast growth and the ethanol production in all experimental conditions. On the other hand, the results showed that Cr3+ ions were incorporated into yeast cells during fermentation. Under these conditions the accumulation of Cr3+ ions was performed by yeast cells during the exponential growth phase, and with enriched amounts of 30–45 g/gd.m. of cells. Yeast biomass enriched with chromium ions was extracted with 0.1 mol/l NH4OH assuming that the extracts had the glucose tolerance factor (GTF). Then the extracts were passed through a gel-filtration column in order to isolate and purify the GTF. The presence of GTF in the purified fractions was determined by measuring the absorbance at 260 nm. It is evident from the obtained results that the added purified fractions enhanced the rates of CO2 production as well as the glucose utilization during alcoholic fermentation. As expected, the enhancement of both rates depended on the amounts of extracts added to the fermentation substrate. Thus, it is evident that purified extracts contained the GTF compound, and that Cr3+ ions were bonded to the protein molecule.

  10. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Hudson

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Fusion of nearby inverted repeats by a replication-based mechanism leads to formation of dicentric and acentric chromosomes that cause genome instability in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Andrew L.; Kaochar, Salma; Jones, Hope; Elezaby, Aly; Shanks, Lisa; Weinert, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale changes (gross chromosomal rearrangements [GCRs]) are common in genomes, and are often associated with pathological disorders. We report here that a specific pair of nearby inverted repeats in budding yeast fuse to form a dicentric chromosome intermediate, which then rearranges to form a translocation and other GCRs. We next show that fusion of nearby inverted repeats is general; we found that many nearby inverted repeats that are present in the yeast genome also fuse, as does a p...

  12. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  13. Effect of a hypoxic radiosensitizer, AK 2123 (Sanazole), on Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can exist in two physiological states, namely anaerobic and aerobic. They differ in their response to gamma- radiation and radiomodification. We report hereon our results concerning radiosensitization by Sanazole (AK-2123), a well-known hypoxic radio sensitizer, whose mechanism of action has been studied extensively. The results have revealed that Sanazole (1 mM) when present during irradiation could specifically sensitize wild-type anaerobic yeast cells with a DMF of 2.4. In a radiation-sensitive mutant which lacks a DNA repair pathway specific for the recovery from gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, the extent of sensitization was considerably lower and the DMF was only 1.3. Studies on the liquid holding recovery of cells of both wild-type and rad52 yeast cells exposed to radiation in presence of Sanazole revealed that sensitization by Sanazole is due to a preferential increase in the DNA damage, and not by impairing DNA repair. This system thus holds promise for screening potential hypoxic chemical radiosensitizers. (author)

  14. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. PMID:26818855

  15. Effects of the supplementation with yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae) on weight gain and development of water buffalo calves

    OpenAIRE

    García, N.; Medina, S.; J. F. Ramírez

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a commercial yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on weight gain and development of buffalo calves from water buffalo herd in north of Colombia. The buffalo calves (age: 71,12 +/- 22 days old) were randomly assigned to one of two treatments, during 45 days. One group (n=13) received 50 gr/day of commercial product of yeast and the other group (n = 13) don’t received yeast. The buffalo calves grazed in same pastures under sam...

  16. Heterologous Expression in Budding Yeast as a Tool for Studying the Plant Cell Morphogenesis Machinery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvrčková, F.; Hála, Michal

    Vol. 1080. New York : Humana Press, 2014 - (Žárský, V.; Cvrčková, F.), s. 267-282 ISBN 978-1-62703-643-6. - (Methods in Molecular Biology) Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * Heterologous gene expression * Inducible expression system Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Vps Factors Are Required for Efficient Transcription Elongation in Budding Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaur, N. A.; Hašek, Jiří; Brickner, D. G.; Qiu, H.; Zhang, F.; Wong, Ch.; M.; Malcová, Ivana; Vašicová, Pavla; Brickner, J. H.; Hinnebusch, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 3 (2013), s. 829-851. ISSN 0016-6731 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/0480 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : RNA-POLYMERASE-II * SACCHAROMYCES - CEREVISIAE GENOME * ELL-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.389, year: 2012

  18. Expression of a bacterial ice nucleation gene in a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its possible application in food freezing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, W Z; Coetzer, C; Tumer, N E; Lee, T C

    2001-10-01

    A 3.6 kb ice nucleation gene (ina) isolated from Erwinia herbicola was placed under control of the galactose-inducible promoter (GAL1) and introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast transformants showed increased ice nucleation activity over untransformed controls. The freezing temperature of a small volume of water droplets containing yeast cells was increased from approximately -13 degrees C in the untransformed controls to -6 degrees C in ina-expressing (Ina(+)) transformants. Lower temperature growth of Ina(+) yeast at temperatures below 25 degrees C was required for the expression of ice nucleation activity. Shift of temperature to 5-20 degrees C could induce the ice nucleation activity of Ina(+) yeast when grown at 25 degrees C, and maximum ice nucleation activity was achieved after induction at 5 degrees C for approximately 12 h. The effects of Ina(+) yeast on freezing and texturization of several food materials was also demonstrated. PMID:11600004

  19. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennubhotla Chakra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate layer of transcription factors naturally segregates into distinct subnetworks. In these topological units transcription factors are densely interlinked in a largely hierarchical manner and respond to external signals by utilizing a fraction of these subnets. Conclusion As transcriptional regulation represents the 'slow' component of overall information processing, the identified topology suggests a model in which successive waves of transcriptional regulation originating from distinct fractions of the TR network control robust integrated responses to complex stimuli.

  20. Photocatalytic activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kaushik; Sarkar, C. K.; Ghosh, C. K.

    2015-11-01

    Synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles through physical and chemical route is quiet common but biological synthesis procedures are gaining momentum due to their simplicity, cost-effectivity and eco-friendliness. Here, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous solution of silver salts using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract. The nanoparticles formation was gradually investigated by UV-Vis spectrometer. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to identify different phases of biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to study the particle size and morphology of silver nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nanoparticles was performed to study the role of biomolecules capped on the surface of Ag nanoparticles during interaction. Photocatalytic activity of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was studied using an organic dye, methylene blue under solar irradiation and these nanoparticles showed efficacy in degrading the dye within a few hours of exposure.

  1. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol. PMID:26712533

  2. Application of synthetic biology for production of chemicals in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    biology has the potential to bring down this cost by improving our ability to predictably engineer biological systems. This review highlights synthetic biology applications for design, assembly, and optimization of non-native biochemical pathways in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe...... computational tools for the prediction of biochemical pathways, molecular biology methods for assembly of DNA parts into pathways, and for introducing the pathways into the host, and finally approaches for optimizing performance of the introduced pathways.......Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering enable generation of novel cell factories that efficiently convert renewable feedstocks into biofuels, bulk, and fine chemicals, thus creating the basis for biosustainable economy independent on fossil resources. While over a hundred proof...

  3. The number and transmission of [PSI] prion seeds (Propagons in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J Byrne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae prions are efficiently propagated and the on-going generation and transmission of prion seeds (propagons to daughter cells during cell division ensures a high degree of mitotic stability. The reversible inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp104p by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl results in cell division-dependent elimination of yeast prions due to a block in propagon generation and the subsequent dilution out of propagons by cell division. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysing the kinetics of the GdnHCl-induced elimination of the yeast [PSI+] prion has allowed us to develop novel statistical models that aid our understanding of prion propagation in yeast cells. Here we describe the application of a new stochastic model that allows us to estimate more accurately the mean number of propagons in a [PSI+] cell. To achieve this accuracy we also experimentally determine key cell reproduction parameters and show that the presence of the [PSI+] prion has no impact on these key processes. Additionally, we experimentally determine the proportion of propagons transmitted to a daughter cell and show this reflects the relative cell volume of mother and daughter cells at cell division. CONCLUSIONS: While propagon generation is an ATP-driven process, the partition of propagons to daughter cells occurs by passive transfer via the distribution of cytoplasm. Furthermore, our new estimates of n(0, the number of propagons per cell (500-1000, are some five times higher than our previous estimates and this has important implications for our understanding of the inheritance of the [PSI+] and the spontaneous formation of prion-free cells.

  4. Corrigendum - Effect of live yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production and some blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Peter Szucs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article Effect of live yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production and some blood parameters, first published in 2013 in Scientific Papers: Animal Science and Biotechnologies, 46 (1, the first author neglected to ask any prior agreement and permission of Lesaffre Feed Additive firm the sponsor of the experiment and Bernhard Feix GmbH the leader of the experiment, for publishing the results, doing so she committed serious mistakes: Ethically: The first author published data for which she had no permission, and she did not indicate the name of the owners, neither did she refere to them. On the scientific basis: She was not able to evaluate properly the real effect of Saccharomices cerevisiae containing Actisaf additive since the introduced experiment was a basic large farm size /scale research work that could not be measured precisely without the planned and ongoing further experiments.   Acknowledgement The first author highly appreciates Lesaffre Feed Additive and Bernhard Feix GmbH firms for the possibility of taking part in the research work together with her students. She is most grateful for the generous promise of the leaders of both Lesaffre Feed Additive and Bernhard Feix GmbH for disregarding to take any legal steps. She gives thanks especially to the leader of the experiment Zoltan Pachinger for his wise and helpful contribution to this consensus. The first author apologises for this oversight.     This article corrects: Effect of live yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production and some blood parameters, Vol. 46, Issue 1, p. 40-44. Article first published online: 30 May 2013

  5. A Comparison of Two Yeast MnSODs: Mitochondrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus Cytosolic Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Y.; Cabelli D.; Stich, T.A.; Barnese, K.; Gralla, E.B.; Cascio, D.; Britt, R.D.; Valentine, J.S.

    2011-12-28

    Human MnSOD is significantly more product-inhibited than bacterial MnSODs at high concentrations of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}). This behavior limits the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced at high [O{sub 2}{sup -}]; its desirability can be explained by the multiple roles of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in mammalian cells, particularly its role in signaling. To investigate the mechanism of product inhibition in MnSOD, two yeast MnSODs, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria (ScMnSOD) and the other from Candida albicans cytosol (CaMnSODc), were isolated and characterized. ScMnSOD and CaMnSODc are similar in catalytic kinetics, spectroscopy, and redox chemistry, and they both rest predominantly in the reduced state (unlike most other MnSODs). At high [O{sub 2}{sup -}], the dismutation efficiencies of the yeast MnSODs surpass those of human and bacterial MnSODs, due to very low level of product inhibition. Optical and parallel-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra suggest the presence of two Mn{sup 3+} species in yeast Mn{sup 3+}SODs, including the well-characterized 5-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species and a 6-coordinate L-Mn{sup 3+} species with hydroxide as the putative sixth ligand (L). The first and second coordination spheres of ScMnSOD are more similar to bacterial than to human MnSOD. Gln154, an H-bond donor to the Mn-coordinated solvent molecule, is slightly further away from Mn in yeast MnSODs, which may result in their unusual resting state. Mechanistically, the high efficiency of yeast MnSODs could be ascribed to putative translocation of an outer-sphere solvent molecule, which could destabilize the inhibited complex and enhance proton transfer from protein to peroxide. Our studies on yeast MnSODs indicate the unique nature of human MnSOD in that it predominantly undergoes the inhibited pathway at high [O{sub 2}{sup -}].

  6. The glyoxylate shunt is essential for desiccation tolerance in C. elegans and budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkut, Cihan; Gade, Vamshidhar R; Laxman, Sunil; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms, including species from all kingdoms of life, can survive desiccation by entering a state with no detectable metabolism. To survive, C. elegans dauer larvae and stationary phase S. cerevisiae require elevated amounts of the disaccharide trehalose. We found that dauer larvae and stationary phase yeast switched into a gluconeogenic mode in which metabolism was reoriented toward production of sugars from non-carbohydrate sources. This mode depended on full activity of the glyoxylate shunt (GS), which enables synthesis of trehalose from acetate. The GS was especially critical during preparation of worms for harsh desiccation (preconditioning) and during the entry of yeast into stationary phase. Loss of the GS dramatically decreased desiccation tolerance in both organisms. Our results reveal a novel physiological role for the GS and elucidate a conserved metabolic rewiring that confers desiccation tolerance on organisms as diverse as worm and yeast. PMID:27090086

  7. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Susanne M; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo A; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott J; Jensen, Niels B; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen G; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jérôme; Forster, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L(-1) in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays the basis for further developing a yeast cell factory for biological production of melatonin. PMID:26710256

  8. Effect of source-separated urine storage on estrogenic activity detected using bioluminescent yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Kivistö, Anniina; Palmroth, Marja R T; Karp, Matti

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that a microbial whole cell biosensor, bioluminescent yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BMAEREluc/ERα) can be applied to detect overall estrogenic activity from fresh and stored human urine. The use of source-separated urine in agriculture removes a human originated estrogen source from wastewater influents, subsequently enabling nutrient recycling. Estrogenic activity in urine should be diminished prior to urine usage in agriculture in order to prevent its migration to soil. A storage period of 6 months is required for hygienic reasons; therefore, estrogenic activity monitoring is of interest. The method measured cumulative female hormone-like activity. Calibration curves were prepared for estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α- ethinylestradiol and estriol. Estrogen concentrations of 0.29-29,640 μg L(-1) were detectable while limit of detection corresponded to 0.28-35 μg L(-1) of estrogens. The yeast sensor responded well to fresh and stored urine and gave high signals corresponding to 0.38-3,804 μg L(-1) of estrogens in different urine samples. Estrogenic activity decreased during storage, but was still higher than in fresh urine implying insufficient storage length. The biosensor was suitable for monitoring hormonal activity in urine and can be used in screening anthropogenic estrogen-like compounds interacting with the receptor. PMID:26804108

  9. Physicochemical characterization of pomegranate wines fermented with three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, María; Vegara, Salud; Barrajón, Enrique; Saura, Domingo; Valero, Manuel; Martí, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains: Viniferm Revelación, Viniferm SV and Viniferm PDM were evaluated for the production of pomegranate wine from a juice coupage of the two well-known varieties Mollar and Wonderfull. Further malolactic fermentation was carried out spontaneously. The same fermentation patterns were observed for pH, titratable acidity, density, sugar consumption, and ethanol and glycerol production. Glucose was exhausted while fructose residues remained at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A high ethanol concentration (10.91 ± 0.27% v/v) in combination with 1.49 g/L glycerol was achieved. Citric acid concentration increased rapidly a 31.7%, malic acid disappeared as result of malolactic fermentation and the lactic acid levels reached values between 0.40 and 0.96 g/L. The analysis of CIEa parameter and total anthocyanin content highlights a lower degradation of monomeric anthocyanins during winemaking with Viniferm PDM yeast. The resulting wine retains a 34.5% of total anthocyanin content of pomegranate juice blend. PMID:26213048

  10. Requirement of copper for 1st-log growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Como, S.A.; Valerio, V.; Nickless, S.; Connelly, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Routine evaluation of the role of copper (Cu) in the growth of various mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae disclosed an unexpected effect of Cu on the fermentative first-log growth. The authors subsequent studies are attempting to ascertain the nature and significance of this observation. Cells are grown on glucose in a supplemented minimal media at 29/sup 0/C for 48-72 hrs. using New Brunswick incubator shaking at 200 rpm. Cu concentration was varied by addition of Cu salts or bathocuproine disulfonate (BC), a highly specific Cu chelator. Samples were removed periodically from flasks and dry weights were determined. Growth curve plots of normal yeasts grown in the presence of 1mM to 38mM Cu showed little variation in the expected 1st log; diauxi; 2nd log; stationary phase picture. However, in the presence of BC growth rate in the 1st log was significantly slowed and as expected 2nd log growth was essentially stopped. The low 1st log growth rate could be titrated to normal (+Cu) levels by increments of added Cu but not by added iron. The effect was not seen when Rho-minus strains were used nor when growth was followed under anaerobic conditions. Results to date implicate a mitochondrial protein, oxygen and copper in the 1st log growth of S Cerevisiae. The character of the protein agent and the possible contribution of cytochrome oxidase activity to the lst log growth are being evaluated.

  11. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines. PMID:26549518

  12. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Renata Reis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Characterisation tests for invasiveness in Agar medium, killer activity, flocculation and fermentative capacity were performed on 22 strains (11 rough and 11 smooth colonies. The effects of acid treatment at different pH values on the growth of two strains ("52" -rough and "PE-02" smooth as well as batch fermentation tests with cell recycling and acid treatment of the cells were also evaluated. Invasiveness in YPD Agar medium occurred at low frequency; ten of eleven rough yeasts exhibited flocculation; none of the strains showed killer activity; and the rough strains presented lower and slower fermentative capacities compared to the smooth strains in a 48-h cycle in a batch system with sugar cane juice. The growth of the rough strain was severely affected by the acid treatment at pH values of 1.0 and 1.5; however, the growth of the smooth strain was not affected. The fermentative efficiency in mixed fermentation (smooth and rough strains in the same cell mass proportion did not differ from the efficiency obtained with the smooth strain alone, most likely because the acid treatment was conducted at pH 1.5 in a batch cell-recycle test. A fermentative efficiency as low as 60% was observed with the rough colony alone.

  13. Influence the oxidant action of selenium in radiosensitivity induction and cell death in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations are from both natural sources such as from anthropogenic sources. Recently, radiotherapy has emerged as one of the most common therapies against cancer. Co-60 irradiators (cobalt-60 linear accelerators) are used to treat of malignant tumors routinely in hospitals around the world. Exposure to ionizing radiation can induce changes in cellular macromolecules and affect its functions, because they cause radiolysis of the water molecule generating reactive oxygen species, which can cause damage to virtually all organelles and cell components known as oxidative damage that can culminate in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a situation in which the balance between oxidants and antioxidants is broken resulting in excessive production of reactive species, it is not accompanied by the increase in antioxidant capacity, making it impossible to neutralize them. Selenium is a micronutrient considered as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, which could prevent cancer. Selenium in biological system exists as seleno proteins. Nowadays, 25 human seleno proteins have been identified, including glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidant enzyme. Yeasts have the ability to incorporate various metals such as iron, cadmium, zinc and selenium, as well as all biological organisms. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unlike mammalian cells is devoid of seleno proteins, being considered as a practical model for studies on the toxicity of selenium, without any interference from the metabolism of seleno proteins. Moreover, yeast cells proliferate through the fermentation, the microbial equivalent of aerobic glycolysis in mammals and the process is also used by tumors. Several reports show that the pro-oxidante effects and induced toxic selenium compounds occur at lower doses and in malignant cells compared with benign cells. Therefore selenium giving a great therapeutic potential in cancer treatment .Our objective was to determine whether selenium is capable to sensitize yeasts

  14. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  15. Molecular analysis of heavy ion induced mutations in the budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is intended to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the mutagenesis caused by High-linear energy transfer (LET) ion beam. The frequency of DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) was estimated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the mutation sites of ura3 mutants were determined by DNA sequencing. The yeast cells were irradiated with carbon ions (12C5+; 290 MeV) with the dose 50 to 200 Gy. Carbon ion beam was generated from synchrotron in HIMAC. The carbon ion beams at 100 Gy generate mutations 10.3 - fold more than spontaneous mutation. The mutation frequency increased consistently with LET. This result indicates the high LET ion beam is more mutagenic than low LET ion beam. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by gamma-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene. (author)

  16. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE LABORATORY SELECTED AND ACTIVE DRIED SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE YEAST CULTURE IN BIOTECHNOLOGY OF THE BRANDY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayraktar V.N.

    2015-04-01

    C and low temperature (+6°C, growth at low pH 2.6–3.0 (acid resistance, growth in the presence of 5, 10, and 15% ethanol (ethanol resistance, and growth in the presence of high concentration potassium bisulfite (bisulfite resistance. Hydrosulfide synthesis (H2S gassing production was studied in addition. Parameters of cellular metabolism in yeast suspension, such as concentration of nitrogen, protein, triglicerides, enzymatic activity and total sugar (which include glucose, fructose, and galactose were determined. Macro- and micro-element concentrations in fermented grape must, which contained pure yeast culture was determined and included: potassium, sodium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, chlorides. In addition to identifying parameters of macro- and micro- element concentration in grape must during and following fermentation based on a principle of photometric analysis, carried out using a biochemical analyser Respons-920 (DiaSys Diagnostic Systems GmbH, Germany. Laboratory selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast showed high enzymatic activity with short lag phase. Since of fermentation started on third day concentration of Triglicerides, Protein (total, Potassium and Sodium increased and then level of Protein (total on the 5th day of fermentation twice decreased. Trigliceride concentration on the 5th day of fermentation continued to increase. Concentration of Iron on the 5th day of fermentation increase in geometrical progression, concentration increase in 4-5 times. Contrary Chloride concentration on the 5th day of fermentation decreased in 3-4 times. Enzymatic activity on 3rd day of fermentation maximal for Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase, Phosphatase. Since of 5th day of fermentation Enzymatic activity for Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase 3-4 times. Especially level of Phosphatase activity very decreased in 6-7 times. Comparative assessment between our Laboratory

  17. The putative phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, PLC1, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for cell growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko-o, T; Matsui, Y; Yagisawa, H; Nojima, H; Uno, I; Toh-E, A

    1993-01-01

    Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, we have isolated a gene that encodes a putative phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nucleotide sequence indicates that the gene encodes a polypeptide of 869 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 101 kDa. This polypeptide has both the X and Y regions conserved among mammalian PLC-beta, -gamma, and -delta, and the structure is most similar to that of mammalian PLC-delta. This ...

  18. Generation of a Uracil Auxotroph Strain of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii as a Host for the Recombinant Protein Production.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedi, Hassan; Misaghi, Ali; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Salehi, Taghi Zahraei; Khorasanizadeh, Dorsa; Khalaj, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) is the best known probiotic yeast. The genetic engineering of this probiotic strain requires the availability of appropriate mutants to accept various gene constructs carrying different selection markers. As the auxotrophy selection markers are under focus, we have generated a ura3 auxotroph mutant of S. boulardii for use in further genetic manipulations. METHODS: Classical UV mutagenesis was used for the generation of auxotroph mutants. The ...

  19. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, LiHui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-01-01

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genet...

  20. Large-scale robot-assisted genome shuffling yields industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts with increased ethanol tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Snoek, Tim; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Mertens, Stijn; Saels, Veerle; Verplaetse, Alex; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background During the final phases of bioethanol fermentation, yeast cells face high ethanol concentrations. This stress results in slower or arrested fermentations and limits ethanol production. Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with superior ethanol tolerance may therefore allow increased yield and efficiency. Genome shuffling has emerged as a powerful approach to rapidly enhance complex traits including ethanol tolerance, yet previous efforts have mostly relied on a mutagenized pool o...

  1. Production and characterization of glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori expressed in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different carbon sources

    OpenAIRE

    Pavezzi, Fabiana Carina; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Glucoamylase is widely used in the food industry to produce high glucose syrup, and also in fermentation processes for production beer and ethanol. In this work the productivity of the glucoamylase of Aspergillus awamori expressed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, produced in submerged fermentation using different starches, was evaluated and characterized physico-chemically. The enzyme presented high specific activity, 13.8 U/mgprotein or 2.9 U/mgbiomass, after 48 h of fermentation using...

  2. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat Dawid; Weber Christian; Lorenzen Wolfram; Bode Helge B; Boles Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobut...

  3. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables increased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat, Dawid; Weber, Christian; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Bode, Helge Björn; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. ...

  4. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...... gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...... on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression....

  5. Frequent and efficient use of the sister chromatid for DNA double-strand break repair during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Goldfarb

    Full Text Available Recombination between homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs is necessary for their accurate segregation during meiosis. It has been suggested that meiotic inter-homolog recombination is promoted by a barrier to inter-sister-chromatid recombination, imposed by meiosis-specific components of the chromosome axis. Consistent with this, measures of Holliday junction-containing recombination intermediates (joint molecules [JMs] show a strong bias towards inter-homolog and against inter-sister JMs. However, recombination between sister chromatids also has an important role in meiosis. The genomes of diploid organisms in natural populations are highly polymorphic for insertions and deletions, and meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs that form within such polymorphic regions must be repaired by inter-sister recombination. Efforts to study inter-sister recombination during meiosis, in particular to determine recombination frequencies and mechanisms, have been constrained by the inability to monitor the products of inter-sister recombination. We present here molecular-level studies of inter-sister recombination during budding yeast meiosis. We examined events initiated by DSBs in regions that lack corresponding sequences on the homolog, and show that these DSBs are efficiently repaired by inter-sister recombination. This occurs with the same timing as inter-homolog recombination, but with reduced (2- to 3-fold yields of JMs. Loss of the meiotic-chromosome-axis-associated kinase Mek1 accelerates inter-sister DSB repair and markedly increases inter-sister JM frequencies. Furthermore, inter-sister JMs formed in mek1Δ mutants are preferentially lost, while inter-homolog JMs are maintained. These findings indicate that inter-sister recombination occurs frequently during budding yeast meiosis, with the possibility that up to one-third of all recombination events occur between sister chromatids. We suggest that a Mek1-dependent reduction in

  6. Molecular analysis of heavy ion induced mutations in the budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis caused with heavy ion irradiation. Yeast cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion (290 MeV/u, 13-75 keV/mm) and helium ion (150 MeV/u, 2.2 keV/mm). The survival rate of carbon ion beam irradiated cells was reduced with linear energy transfer (LET), and the mutation frequency increased consistently with LET. The survival rate of helium ion beam (0.45 keV/mm) was slightly higher than that of carbon ion beam (LET: 25 keV/ mm) irradiated cells. (author)

  7. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  8. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Mehlgarten

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative, which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and

  9. Biosynthesis of levan, a bacterial extracellular polysaccharide, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Jaco; Brandt, Bianca A; Tai, Siew L; Bauer, Florian F

    2013-01-01

    Levans are fructose polymers synthesized by a broad range of micro-organisms and a limited number of plant species as non-structural storage carbohydrates. In microbes, these polymers contribute to the formation of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix and play a role in microbial biofilm formation. Levans belong to a larger group of commercially important polymers, referred to as fructans, which are used as a source of prebiotic fibre. For levan, specifically, this market remains untapped, since no viable production strategy has been established. Synthesis of levan is catalysed by a group of enzymes, referred to as levansucrases, using sucrose as substrate. Heterologous expression of levansucrases has been notoriously difficult to achieve in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a strategy, this study used an invertase (Δsuc2) null mutant and two separate, engineered, sucrose accumulating yeast strains as hosts for the expression of the levansucrase M1FT, previously cloned from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Intracellular sucrose accumulation was achieved either by expression of a sucrose synthase (Susy) from potato or the spinach sucrose transporter (SUT). The data indicate that in both Δsuc2 and the sucrose accumulating strains, the M1FT was able to catalyse fructose polymerisation. In the absence of the predicted M1FT secretion signal, intracellular levan accumulation was significantly enhanced for both sucrose accumulation strains, when grown on minimal media. Interestingly, co-expression of M1FT and SUT resulted in hyper-production and extracellular build-up of levan when grown in rich medium containing sucrose. This study presents the first report of levan production in S. cerevisiae and opens potential avenues for the production of levan using this well established industrial microbe. Furthermore, the work provides interesting perspectives when considering the heterologous expression of sugar polymerizing enzymes in yeast. PMID:24147008

  10. Biosynthesis of levan, a bacterial extracellular polysaccharide, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Franken

    Full Text Available Levans are fructose polymers synthesized by a broad range of micro-organisms and a limited number of plant species as non-structural storage carbohydrates. In microbes, these polymers contribute to the formation of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS matrix and play a role in microbial biofilm formation. Levans belong to a larger group of commercially important polymers, referred to as fructans, which are used as a source of prebiotic fibre. For levan, specifically, this market remains untapped, since no viable production strategy has been established. Synthesis of levan is catalysed by a group of enzymes, referred to as levansucrases, using sucrose as substrate. Heterologous expression of levansucrases has been notoriously difficult to achieve in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a strategy, this study used an invertase (Δsuc2 null mutant and two separate, engineered, sucrose accumulating yeast strains as hosts for the expression of the levansucrase M1FT, previously cloned from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Intracellular sucrose accumulation was achieved either by expression of a sucrose synthase (Susy from potato or the spinach sucrose transporter (SUT. The data indicate that in both Δsuc2 and the sucrose accumulating strains, the M1FT was able to catalyse fructose polymerisation. In the absence of the predicted M1FT secretion signal, intracellular levan accumulation was significantly enhanced for both sucrose accumulation strains, when grown on minimal media. Interestingly, co-expression of M1FT and SUT resulted in hyper-production and extracellular build-up of levan when grown in rich medium containing sucrose. This study presents the first report of levan production in S. cerevisiae and opens potential avenues for the production of levan using this well established industrial microbe. Furthermore, the work provides interesting perspectives when considering the heterologous expression of sugar polymerizing enzymes in yeast.

  11. Direct TFIIA-TFIID protein contacts drive budding yeast ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Justin H; Weil, P Anthony

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that yeast TFIID provides coactivator function on the promoters of ribosomal protein-encoding genes (RPGs) by making direct contact with the transactivator repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1). Further, our structural studies of assemblies generated with purified Rap1, TFIID, and TFIIA on RPG enhancer-promoter DNA indicate that Rap1-TFIID interaction induces dramatic conformational rearrangements of enhancer-promoter DNA and TFIID-bound TFIIA. These data indicate a previously unknown yet critical role for yeast TFIIA in the integration of activator-TFIID contacts with promoter conformation and downstream preinitiation complex formation and/or function. Here we describe the use of systematic mutagenesis to define how specific TFIIA contacts contribute to these processes. We have verified that TFIIA is required for RPG transcription in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the existence of a critical Rap1-TFIIA-TFIID interaction network. We also identified essential points of contact for TFIIA and Rap1 within the Rap1 binding domain of the Taf4 subunit of TFIID. These data suggest a mechanism for how interactions between TFIID, TFIIA, and Rap1 contribute to the high rate of transcription initiation seen on RPGs in vivo. PMID:23814059

  12. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shieh, Grace S.

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3\\' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1) marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3), which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  13. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoqiong Zheng

    Full Text Available The application of active dry yeast (ADY in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  14. Involvement of complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine in endosomal trafficking in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2012-12-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we found that csg2Δ mutant cells defective in the synthesis of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide exhibited abnormal intracellular accumulation of an exocytic v-SNARE, Snc1, under phosphatidylserine synthase gene (PSS1)-repressive conditions, although in wild-type cells, Snc1 was known to cycle between plasma membranes and the late Golgi via post-Golgi endosomes. The mislocalized Snc1 was co-localized with an endocytic marker dye, FM4-64, upon labelling for a short time. The abnormal distribution of Snc1 was suppressed by deletion of GYP2 encoding a GTPase-activating protein that negatively regulates endosomal vesicular trafficking, or expression of GTP-restricted form of Ypt32 GTPase. Furthermore, an endocytosis-deficient mutant of Snc1 was localized to plasma membranes in PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells as well as wild-type cells. Thus, the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells were indicated to be defective in the trafficking of Snc1 from post-Golgi endosomes to the late Golgi. In contrast, the vesicular trafficking pathways via pre-vacuolar endosomes in the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells seemed to be normal. These results suggested that specific complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine are co-ordinately involved in specific vesicular trafficking pathway. PMID:23062277

  15. Positive feedback promotes mitotic exit via the APC/C-Cdh1-separase-Cdc14 axis in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yuhki; Naoki, Koike; Suzuki, Asuka; Ushimaru, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The mitotic inhibitor securin is degraded via the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-Cdc20 after anaphase onset. This triggers activation of the mitotic protease separase and thereby sister chromatid separation. However, only a proportion of securin molecules are degraded at metaphase-anaphase transition and the remaining molecules are still present in anaphase. The roles of securin and separase in late mitosis remain elusive. Here, we show that securin still inhibits separase to repress mitotic exit in anaphase in budding yeast. APC/C-Cdh1-mediated securin degradation at telophase further liberated separase, which promotes Cdc14 release and mitotic exit. Separase executed these events via its proteolytic action and that in the Cdc14 early release (FEAR) network. Cdc14 release further activated APC/C-Cdh1 in the manner of a positive feedback loop. Thus, the positive feedback promotes mitotic exit via the APC/C-Cdh1-separase-Cdc14 axis. This study shows the importance of the two-step degradation mode of securin and the role of separase in mitotic exit. PMID:27418100

  16. Molecular analysis of heavy ion induced mutations in the budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the relation between linear energy transfer (LET) and mutagenesis. Carbon ion beams with varied LET generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) synchrotron were irradiated to several types of yeast cells, and we examined the survival rate and mutation frequencies. The results showed that the survival rates were reduced along with the LET, while the mutation frequencies were enhanced along with the LET, and the mutation frequencies increased consistently with LET. The sequencing analysis of mutations showed that the low LET carbon ion beams induced more deletion and insertion mutations than high LET carbon ion beams did. Furthermore, we also examined the gene expression analysis of RAD50, RAD52 and OGG1 after ion beam radiation to cells. The result indicated that the high-LET carbon-ion beams induced the expression of RAD50 gene. (author)

  17. Multiple stable states and hysteresis in continuous, oscillating cultures of budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamamiri, A Q; Birol, G; Hjortsø, M A

    2001-11-01

    The conditions that precede the onset of autonomous oscillations in continuous yeast cultures were studied in three different types of experiments. It was found that the final state of the culture depended on the protocol used to start up the reactor. Batch cultures, switched to continuous operation at different stages of the batch growth curve, all exhibited similar dynamics-ethanol depletion followed by autonomous oscillations. Small perturbations of the distribution of states in the reactor, achieved by addition of externally grown cells, were able to quench the oscillatory dynamics. Reaching the desired operating point by slow dilution rate changes gave rise to different final states, two oscillatory states and one steady state, depending on the rate of change in dilution rate. The multiplicity of stable states at a single operating point is not explained by any current distributed model and points toward a segregated mechanism of these oscillations. PMID:11590603

  18. The dynamics of homologous pairing during mating type interconversion in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L Houston

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells repair most double-strand breaks (DSBs that arise during replication or by environmental insults through homologous recombination, a high-fidelity process critical for maintenance of genomic integrity. However, neither the detailed mechanism of homologous recombination nor the specific roles of critical components of the recombination machinery-such as Bloom and Werner syndrome proteins-have been resolved. We have taken a novel approach to examining the mechanism of homologous recombination by tracking both a DSB and the template from which it is repaired during the repair process in individual yeast cells. The two loci were labeled with arrays of DNA binding sites and visualized in live cells expressing green fluorescent protein-DNA binding protein chimeras. Following induction of an endonuclease that introduces a DSB next to one of the marked loci, live cells were imaged repeatedly to determine the relative positions of the DSB and the template locus. We found a significant increase in persistent associations between donor and recipient loci following formation of the DSB, demonstrating DSB-induced pairing between donor and template. However, such associations were transient and occurred repeatedly in every cell, a result not predicted from previous studies on populations of cells. Moreover, these associations were absent in sgs1 or srs2 mutants, yeast homologs of the Bloom and Werner syndrome genes, but were enhanced in a rad54 mutant, whose protein product promotes efficient strand exchange in vitro. Our results indicate that a DSB makes multiple and reversible contacts with a template during the repair process, suggesting that repair could involve interactions with multiple templates, potentially creating novel combinations of sequences at the repair site. Our results further suggest that both Sgs1 and Srs2 are required for efficient completion of recombination and that Rad54 may serve to dissociate such interactions. Finally, these

  19. A Genetics Laboratory Module Involving Selection and Identification of Lysine Synthesis Mutants in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B. Keeney

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a laboratory exercise, currently being used with college sophomores, which uses the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convey the concepts of amino acid biosynthesis, mutation, and gene complementation. In brief, selective medium is used to isolate yeast cells carrying a mutation in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. A spontaneous mutation in any one of three separate genetic loci will allow for growth on selective media; however, the frequency of mutations isolated from each locus differs. Following isolation of a mutated strain, students use complementation analysis to identify which gene contains the mutation. Since the yeast genome has been mapped and sequenced, students with access to the Internet can then research and develop hypotheses to explain the differences in frequencies of mutant genes obtained.

  20. Genomic, genetic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying on live cells of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to directly engineer living cells is rapidly becoming a hot field of research for a wide range of applications within the life sciences. 'Bio-electrospraying' cells, a recently developed technique, has great potential in this area. In this paper, we quantify genetic, genomic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying cells of a model eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results demonstrate that yeast cells bio-electrosprayed at 30 kV have not incurred any detectable damage at a genomic or genetic level, and that the detectable physiological stress of the procedure is negligible. These results support our proposal to use yeast as a model system to develop bio-electrospray devices and protocols

  1. Size and position of intervening sequences are critical for the splicing efficiency of pre-mRNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Klinz, F. J.; Gallwitz, D

    1985-01-01

    The size of the 309 bp actin gene intron of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was enlarged by inserting DNA fragments of different lengths and sequence. Enlarging the intron above 551 bp, the largest known yeast intron, led to a decrease in splicing efficiency. The effect on transcript splicing was dependent on the length of the inserted fragments rather than their sequence. It was also observed that insertion of the actin gene intron into different regions of the normally unsplit yeast YP2 ...

  2. RIM15 antagonistic pleiotropy is responsible for differences in fermentation and stress response kinetics in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessi-Pérez, Eduardo I; Araos, Sebastián; García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Abarca, Valentina; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-05-01

    Different natural yeast populations have faced dissimilar selective pressures due to the heterogeneous fermentation substrates available around the world; this increases the genetic and phenotypic diversity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae In this context, we expect prominent differences between isolates when exposed to a particular condition, such as wine or sake musts. To better comprehend the mechanisms underlying niche adaptation between two S. cerevisiae isolates obtained from wine and sake fermentation processes, we evaluated fermentative and fungicide resistance phenotypes and identify the molecular origin of such adaptive variation. Multiple regions were associated with fermentation rate under different nitrogen conditions and fungicide resistance, with a single QTL co-localizing in all traits. Analysis around this region identified RIM15 as the causative locus driving fungicide sensitivity, together with efficient nitrogen utilization and glycerol production in the wine strain. A null RIM15 variant confers a greater fermentation rate through the utilization of available glucose instead of its storage. However, this variant has a detrimental effect on fungicide resistance since complex sugars are not synthesized and transported into the membrane. Together, our results reveal the antagonist pleiotropic nature of a RIM15 null variant, positively affecting a series of fermentation related phenotypes, but apparently detrimental in the wild. PMID:26945894

  3. Genes regulation encoding ADP/ATP carrier in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis were investigated. AAC2 is coding for the major AAC isoform in S. cerevisiae. We suggest that AAC2 is a member of a syn-expression group of genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation proteins. Within our previous studies on the regulation of the AAC2 transcription an UAS (-393/-268) was identified that is essential for the expression of this gene. Two functional regulatory cis-elements are located within this UAS -binding sites for an ABFl factor and for HAP2/3/4/5 heteromeric complex. We examined relative contributions and mutual interactions of the ABFl and HAP2/3/4/5 factors in the activation of transcription from the UAS of the AAC2 gene. The whole UAS was dissected into smaller sub-fragments and tested for (i) the ability to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in vitro, (ii) the ability to confer heterologous expression using AAC3 gene lacking its own promoter, and (iii) the expression of AAC3-lacZ fusion instead of intact AAC3 gene. The obtained results demonstrated that: a) The whole UAS as well as sub-fragment containing only ABF1-binding site are able to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in oxygen- and heme- dependent manner. The experiments with antibody against the ABF1 showed that the ABF1 factor is one of the proteins binding to AAC2 promoter. We have been unsuccessful to prove the binding of cellular proteins to the HAP2/3/4/5-binding site. However, the presence of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is necessary to drive a binding of cellular proteins to the ABF1-binding site in carbon source-dependent manner. b) The presence of both ABF1- and HAP2/3/4/5-binding sites and original spacing between them is necessary to confer the growth of Aaac2 mutant strain on non- fermentable carbon source when put in front of AAC3 gene introduced on centromeric vector to Aaac2 mutant strain. c) For the activation of AAC3-lacZ expression on

  4. Killer toxin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y500-4L active against Fleischmann and Itaiquara commercial brands of yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Giselle A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y500-4L, previously selected from the must of alcohol producing plants and showing high fermentative and killer capacities, was characterized according to the interactions between the yeasts and examined for curing and detection of dsRNA plasmids, which code for the killer character. The killer yeast S. cerevisiae Y500-4L showed considerable killer activity against the Fleischmann and Itaiquara commercial brands of yeast and also against the standard killer yeasts K2 (S. diastaticus NCYC 713, K4 (Candida glabrata NCYC 388 and K11 (Torulopsis glabrata ATCC 15126. However S. cerevisiae Y500-4L showed sensitivity to the killer toxin produced by the standard killer yeasts K8 (Hansenula anomala NCYC 435, K9 (Hansenula mrakii NCYC 500, K10 (Kluyveromyces drosophilarum NCYC 575 and K11 (Torulopsis glabrata ATCC 15126. No M-dsRNA plasmid was detected in the S. cerevisiae Y500-4L strain and these results suggest that the genetic basis for toxin production is encoded by chromosomal DNA. The strain S. cerevisiae Y500-4L was more resistant to the loss of the phenotype killer with cycloheximide and incubation at elevated temperatures (40oC than the standard killer yeast S. cerevisiae K1.

  5. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Ericson, Elke; Gebbia, Marinella; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 comp...

  6. Identification of She3 as an SCF(Grr1 substrate in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiwen Wang

    Full Text Available The highly orchestrated progression of the cell cycle depends on the degradation of many regulatory proteins at different cell cycle stages. One of the key cell cycle ubiquitin ligases is the Skp1-cullin-F-box (SCF complex. Acting in concert with the substrate-binding F-box protein Grr1, SCF(Grr1 promotes the degradation of cell cycle regulators as well as various metabolic enzymes. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with a Grr1 derivative as the bait, we identified She3, which is an adaptor protein in the asymmetric mRNA transport system, as a novel Grr1 substrate. We generated stabilized She3 mutants, which no longer bound to Grr1, and found that the degradation of She3 is not required for regulating asymmetric mRNA transport. However, She3 stabilization leads to slower growth compared to wild-type cells in a co-culture assay, demonstrating that the degradation of She3 by Grr1 is required for optimal cell growth.

  7. Radiation induced formation of giant cells (Saccharomyces uvarum). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-irradiated yeast cells (Saccharomyces uvarum) grown in liquid media stop mitosis and form giant cells. Chitin ring formation, being a prerequisite for cell separation, was studied by fluorescence microscopy using Calcofluor White, a chitin specific dye. Experiments with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (hydroxyurea) and chitin synthesis (polyoxin D) demonstrate chitin ring formation to be dependent on DNA synthesis, whereas bud formation is independent of DNA synthesis and chitin ring formation respectively. Basing on these results the formation of X-ray induced giant cells implies one DNA replication which in turn induces the formation of only one chitin ring between mother cell and giant bud. Obviously no septum can be formed. Thus cell separation does not occur, but the bud already formed, produces another bud demonstrating that bud formation itself is independent of DNA synthesis. (orig.)

  8. Volatile flavour profile of reduced alcohol wines fermented with the non-conventional yeast species Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces uvarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, C; Sengler, F; Solomon, M; Curtin, C

    2016-10-15

    Production of quality wines with decreased alcohol concentration continues to be one of the major challenges facing wine producers. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the isolation or generation of wine yeasts less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol. We recently demonstrated that Metschnikowia pulcherrima AWRI1149 and Saccharomyces uvarum AWRI2846 were both able to produce reduced alcohol wine when used in sequential inoculation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This effect is additive when both strains are co-inoculated in grape must. Here we describe the volatile flavour profile of Chardonnay and Shiraz wines produced with these two strains. Wines fermented with M. pulcherrima showed concentrations of ethyl acetate likely to affect negatively wine aroma. Wines fermented with S. uvarum and with a combination of M. pulcherrima and S. uvarum were characterised by increased concentrations of 2-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate, both associated with positive sensory attributes. PMID:27173534

  9. Self-organization of magnetite nanoparticles in providing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts with magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorobets, S.V., E-mail: pitbm@ukr.net [National Technical University of Ukraine Kiev Polytechnic Institute 03056, Peremogy st., 37, Kiev (Ukraine); Yu, Gorobets O. [National Technical University of Ukraine Kiev Polytechnic Institute 03056, Peremogy st., 37, Kiev (Ukraine); Demianenko, I.V., E-mail: ira-d@yandex.ru [National Technical University of Ukraine Kiev Polytechnic Institute 03056, Peremogy st., 37, Kiev (Ukraine); Nikolaenko, R.N., E-mail: roma.nikolaenko@gmail.com [University of Missouri, School of Biological Sciences 5000 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The compared analyze of four methods of the magnetic nanoparticles clusters parameters estimation were developed and performed, such as, method, which takes into account two magneto-force scans of surface for calculation, geometry distance measurement between two centers of clusters in chains using the functions of NOVA-program, which is the standard computer equipment for scanning probe microscopy SOLVER PRO-M and the model, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization and atomic-force microscopy. The magnetically-controllable biosorbent based on the culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a model object for adequacy analyze of these models. As the result of the work we get the information about the depth of clusters penetration inside biomembrane, the typical sizes of clusters and the dispersion of magnetic clusters sizes. This analyze shows that all four methods can be used for single magnetic clusters, but for clusters, which lay in chains with small distance between their centers, the mode, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization, cannot be used, because this model does not take into account the nearest neighbors contribution of interaction of magnetic fields dipole with magnetic probe. - Highlights: ► We have developed a mathematical model to determine the localization of magnetic phase in the vicinity of the membrane. ► We tried out this model on magnetically-based biosorbent yeast S. cerevisiae. ► We used magnetic force microscopy for the detection of magnetic phase in the biosorbent. ► As a result, it was shown that the magnetic phase is located on the membrane surface, which in turn allows us to estimate its size.

  10. Self-organization of magnetite nanoparticles in providing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts with magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compared analyze of four methods of the magnetic nanoparticles clusters parameters estimation were developed and performed, such as, method, which takes into account two magneto-force scans of surface for calculation, geometry distance measurement between two centers of clusters in chains using the functions of NOVA-program, which is the standard computer equipment for scanning probe microscopy SOLVER PRO-M and the model, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization and atomic-force microscopy. The magnetically-controllable biosorbent based on the culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a model object for adequacy analyze of these models. As the result of the work we get the information about the depth of clusters penetration inside biomembrane, the typical sizes of clusters and the dispersion of magnetic clusters sizes. This analyze shows that all four methods can be used for single magnetic clusters, but for clusters, which lay in chains with small distance between their centers, the mode, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization, cannot be used, because this model does not take into account the nearest neighbors contribution of interaction of magnetic fields dipole with magnetic probe. - Highlights: ► We have developed a mathematical model to determine the localization of magnetic phase in the vicinity of the membrane. ► We tried out this model on magnetically-based biosorbent yeast S. cerevisiae. ► We used magnetic force microscopy for the detection of magnetic phase in the biosorbent. ► As a result, it was shown that the magnetic phase is located on the membrane surface, which in turn allows us to estimate its size

  11. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; McDermott, Courtney D; Stewart, Taryn P; Hudson, William H; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer's patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle. PMID:27064405

  12. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  13. Saccharomyces boulardii

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bowel syndrome. Some people use Saccharomyces boulardii for lactose intolerance, urinary tract infections (UTIs), vaginal yeast infections, high ... cholesterol. Lyme disease. Hives. Fever blisters. Canker sores. Lactose intolerance. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate ...

  14. Biodiversity of Saccharomyces yeast strains from grape berries of wine-producing areas using starters commercial yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Valero, Eva; Cambon, Brigitte; Schuller, Dorit Elisabeth; Casal, Margarida; Dequin, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercial wine yeast strains as starters has been extensively generalised over the past two decades. In this study, a large scale sampling plan was devised over a period of three years in three different vineyards in the south of France, to evaluate autochthonous wine yeast biodiversity in vineyards around wineries where active dry yeasts have been used as fermentation starters during more than 5 years. 72 spontaneous fermentations were performed from a total of 106 grape samples,...

  15. Longevity Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Linking Metabolism, Genome Stability, and Heterochromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Bitterman, Kevin J.; Medvedik, Oliver; Sinclair, David A.

    2003-01-01

    When it was first proposed that the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae might serve as a model for human aging in 1959, the suggestion was met with considerable skepticism. Although yeast had proved a valuable model for understanding basic cellular processes in humans, it was difficult to accept that such a simple unicellular organism could provide information about human aging, one of the most complex of biological phenomena. While it is true that causes of aging are likely to be multifar...

  16. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Astaxanthin Production and Oxidative Stress Tolerance▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ukibe, Ken; Hashida, Keisuke; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The red carotenoid astaxanthin possesses higher antioxidant activity than other carotenoids and has great commercial potential for use in the aquaculture, pharmaceutical, and food industries. In this study, we produced astaxanthin in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by introducing the genes involved in astaxanthin biosynthesis of carotenogenic microorganisms. In particular, expression of genes of the red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous encoding phytoene desaturase (crtI product)...

  17. Outcrossing, mitotic recombination, and life-history trade-offs shape genome evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Magwene, Paul M.; Kayıkçı, Ömür; Granek, Joshua A.; Reininga, Jennifer M.; Scholl, Zackary; Murray, Debra

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a population genomic survey of Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid isolates and find that many budding yeast strains have high levels of genomic heterozygosity, much of which is likely due to outcrossing. We demonstrate that variation in heterozygosity among strains is correlated with a life-history trade-off that involves how readily yeast switch from asexual to sexual reproduction under nutrient stress. This trade-off is reflected in a negative relationship between sporulation e...

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rif1 cooperates with MRX-Sae2 in promoting DNA-end resection

    OpenAIRE

    Martina, Marina; Bonetti, Diego; Villa, Matteo; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Diverse roles in DNA metabolism have been envisaged for budding yeast and mammalian Rif1. In particular, yeast Rif1 is involved in telomere homeostasis, while its mammalian counterpart participates in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rif1 supports cell survival to DNA lesions in the absence of MRX or Sae2. Furthermore, it contributes to the nucleolytic processing (resection) of DSBs. This Rif1-dependent control of DSB resect...

  19. An investigation into the proteins responsible for the translational inhibition seen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae following fusel alcohol exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Jemma

    2013-01-01

    Fusel alcohols signal nitrogen scarcity to elicit a range of responses in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These alcohols activate pseudohyphal growth and cause rapid inhibition of translation initiation. Previous work from our lab has highlighted that the translation initiation factor eIF2B is a target for this regulation. eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor required for recycling eIF2•GDP to eIF2•GTP. The GTP bound form of eIF2 can interact with the Methionyl initiator tRNA ...

  20. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer measurements of phosphate exchange reactions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    31P saturation transfer techniques have been used to measure phosphate kinetics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phosphate comsumption rate observed in acetate grown mid-log cells was combined with measurements of O2 consumption to yield P/O ratios of 2.2 and 2.9, for cells respiring on glucose and ethanol, respectively. However, no phosphate consumption activity was observed in saturation transfer experiments on anaerobic glucose fed cells. The phosphate consumption rates measured by saturation transfer in cells respiring on glucose and ethanol was attributed to the unidirectional rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. (Auth.)

  1. Production of bioethanol from heart and pineapple shell using the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of bioethanol production was evaluated from heart and pineapple shell, using the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, in which has been obtained a maximum output of 1,6% v/v. The research was divided into a phase of characterization and five experimental phases. The heart and pineapple shell were used as substrate for the study. The contents of glucose, reducing sugars and total, moisture, ash, crude fiber and soluble solids content were determined of the heart and golden pineapple shell (MD2). The shell has had a higher content of soluble solids, fiber content, ash and lower moisture content and reducing sugars. In the first experimental phase was made a fermentation of commercial sucrose, with the objective to corroborate the method of measurement of CO2 and the pH was measured of the water that is collected the gas. Great variation between samples has not been observed, comparing the method to estimate the losses of gas, so it is reproducible and the losses of CO2 has been at least of 22%. In the second experimental stage to compare measurement methods of ethanol, for collection of CO2 and gas chromatography, it has been found that for concentrations from 0 to 0,79% v/v, the results have shown a quadratic behavior (second-degree polynomial with 0,83173x2 +0,0024 x, R2=0,9984), while that for higher concentrations to 0,79% the relation has been linear (0,6372 x -0,099, R2=0,9424), in which x is the %v/v of ethanol, of the chromatographic method. In the third experimental stage were compared the effects of the filtration. The significant differences of this effect were not found for either of the two substrates used: hearts and shells. The adjustment parameters of the modified Gompertz equation for mixtures of 53% heart and 47% shell, and concentration of 280 g/L have been: Pm 0,72 %v/v; λ 0,3 h, Rm 0,047 (%v/v)/h; for a concentration of 400 g/L, have been Pm 1,3 %v/v λ 1,8 h and Rm 0,068 (%v/v)/h and for 523 g/L, using extract of yeast have been Pm 1

  2. TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in sake yeast Kyokai no. 7, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Nobushige; Sato, Aya; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Industrial yeasts are generally unable to sporulate but treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin restores this ability in a sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7), Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding suggests that TORC1 is active under sporulation conditions. Here, using a reporter gene assay, Northern and Western blots, we tried to gain insight into how TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. Similarly to a laboratory strain, RPS26A transcription was repressed and Npr1 was dephosphorylated in K7 cells, indicative of the expected loss of TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation. The expression of nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive genes, however, was not induced, the level of Cln3 remained constant, and autophagy was more slowly induced than in a laboratory strain, all suggestive of active TORC1. We conclude that TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. PMID:26272416

  3. Effects of the supplementation with yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae on weight gain and development of water buffalo calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. García

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a commercial yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on weight gain and development of buffalo calves from water buffalo herd in north of Colombia. The buffalo calves (age: 71,12 +/- 22 days old were randomly assigned to one of two treatments, during 45 days. One group (n=13 received 50 gr/day of commercial product of yeast and the other group (n = 13 don’t received yeast. The buffalo calves grazed in same pastures under same milking system. All animals were weighed and measured weekly. During the test the animals gain 11,38 +/- 5,2 Kgr y 13.92 +/- 5,0 Kgr by treated and non treated calves, respectively. The increase of the corporal measures during the test was (cm: Toraxic Circumference 7,0 +/- 5,58 Vs 9,23 +/- 4,02, Height 5,77 +/- 6,81 Vs 5,92 +/- 4,5 and Length 2,92 +/- 8,17 Vrs 0,54 +/- 4,86 by treated and no treated calves, respectively. No statistic difference was found between groups. In conclusion, the feeding with yeast culture didn’t increase significantly the weight gain and development in water buffalo calves.

  4. Reactivation of UV-irradiated plasmid transforming DNA by cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, M.L.; Kozhina, T.N.; Smolina, V.S. (AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1983-01-01

    Data revealing that cells of yeast Sccharomyces cerevisiae can reactivate transforming plasmid DNA after UV-radiation are given, this phenomenon at least partially depends on the system of exision reparation of master cells. Dependence of yeast survival rate and yield of yeast transformants on the UV-radiation dose of transforming DNA plasmid is disclosed.

  5. The final cut: cell polarity meets cytokinesis at the bud neck in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, Maria Angeles; Piatti, Simonetta

    2016-08-01

    Cell division is a fundamental but complex process that gives rise to two daughter cells. It includes an ordered set of events, altogether called "the cell cycle", that culminate with cytokinesis, the final stage of mitosis leading to the physical separation of the two daughter cells. Symmetric cell division equally partitions cellular components between the two daughter cells, which are therefore identical to one another and often share the same fate. In many cases, however, cell division is asymmetrical and generates two daughter cells that differ in specific protein inheritance, cell size, or developmental potential. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an excellent system to investigate the molecular mechanisms governing asymmetric cell division and cytokinesis. Budding yeast is highly polarized during the cell cycle and divides asymmetrically, producing two cells with distinct sizes and fates. Many components of the machinery establishing cell polarization during budding are relocalized to the division site (i.e., the bud neck) for cytokinesis. In this review we recapitulate how budding yeast cells undergo polarized processes at the bud neck for cell division. PMID:27085703

  6. Phenotypic evaluation of natural and industrial Saccharomyces yeasts for different traits desirable in industrial bioethanol production

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Vaskar; Steensels, Jan; Lievens, Bart; Van De Voorde, Ilse; Verplaetse, Alex; Aerts, Guido; Willems, Kris; Thevelein, Johan; Verstrepen, Kevin; Ruyters, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the organism of choice for many food and beverage fermentations because it thrives in high-sugar and high-ethanol conditions. However, the conditions encountered in bioethanol fermentation pose specific challenges, including extremely high sugar and ethanol concentrations, high temperature, and the presence of specific toxic compounds. It is generally considered that exploring the natural biodiversity of Saccharomyces strains may be an interesting route to find sup...

  7. The rhp6+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a structural and functional homolog of the RAD6 gene from the distantly related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Reynolds (Paul); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Prakash; L. Prakash

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a ubiquitin conjugating enzyme and is required for DNA repair, DNA-damage-induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Here, we show that RAD6 and the rhp6+ gene from the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe share a high degree of st

  8. Genome and transcriptome analyses reveal that MAPK- and phosphatidylinositol-signaling pathways mediate tolerance to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde for industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The industrial ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising biocatalyst for next-generation advanced biofuels applications including lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion. Here we present the first insight into the genomic background of NRRL Y-12632, a type strain from a worldwide coll...

  9. Studying Coxiella burnetii Type IV Substrates in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Focus on Subcellular Localization and Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escudero, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Molina, María; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative obligate parasitic bacterium that causes the disease Q-fever in humans. To establish its intracellular niche, it utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) to inject protein effectors into the host cell cytoplasm. The host targets of most cognate and candidate T4BSS-translocated effectors remain obscure. We used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to express and study six C. burnetii effectors, namely AnkA, AnkB, AnkF, CBU0077, CaeA and CaeB, in search for clues about their role in C. burnetii virulence. When ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, these effectors displayed distinct subcellular localizations. Accordingly, GFP fusions of these proteins produced in yeast also decorated distinct compartments, and most of them altered cell growth. CaeA was ubiquitinated both in yeast and mammalian cells and, in S. cerevisiae, accumulated at juxtanuclear quality-control compartments (JUNQs) and insoluble protein deposits (IPODs), characteristic of aggregative or misfolded proteins. AnkA, which was not ubiquitinated, accumulated exclusively at the IPOD. CaeA, but not AnkA or the other effectors, caused oxidative damage in yeast. We discuss that CaeA and AnkA behavior in yeast may rather reflect misfolding than recognition of conserved targets in the heterologous system. In contrast, CBU0077 accumulated at vacuolar membranes and abnormal ER extensions, suggesting that it interferes with vesicular traffic, whereas AnkB associated with the yeast nucleolus. Both effectors shared common localization features in HeLa and yeast cells. Our results support the idea that C. burnetii T4BSS effectors manipulate multiple host cell targets, which can be conserved in higher and lower eukaryotic cells. However, the behavior of CaeA and AnkA prompt us to conclude that heterologous protein aggregation and proteostatic stress can be a limitation to be considered when using the yeast model to assess the function of bacterial effectors

  10. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export. PMID:26784711

  11. Bio-Technological Characterization of the Saccharomyces bayanus Yeast Strains in Order to Preserve the Local Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Gaspar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The wine yeasts have multiple and important applications in the industry, aiming to obtain pure cultures and the selection of those strains which, according to the lab investigations, present superior bio-technological properties. In this study we monitored three types of Saccharomyces bayanus yeast strains, isolated from indigenous grapes varieties, Apold Iordana, Italian Blaj Riesling and Royal Feteasca from Jidvei area, which are present in the collection of the Biotechnologies and Microbiology Research Center of SAIAPM University. The yeast strains were subject to alcoholic fermentation in malt must at different temperatures, in the presence of alcohol, sugar and SO2 in various concentrations. The obtained results led to selecting of those strains which had best results regarding the alcoholic tolerance, osmo-tolerance, fermentation speed under stress conditions and resistance to SO2. These results can have practical applications in using the indigenous strains, isolated from grapes which are from inside the country, so that we preserve the local specificity, and reduce imports regarding this area.

  12. Looking beyond Saccharomyces: the potential of non-conventional yeast species for desirable traits in bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecka, Dorota; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Mateo, Raquel Quintilla; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; Thevelein, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in the production of food and beverages and is by far the most studied yeast species. Currently, it is also the most used microorganism in the production of first-generation bioethanol from sugar or starch crops. Second-generation bioethanol, on the other hand, is produced from lignocellulosic feedstocks that are pretreated and hydrolyzed to obtain monomeric sugars, mainly D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose. Recently, S. cerevisiae recombinant strains capable of fermenting pentose sugars have been generated. However, the pretreatment of the biomass results in hydrolysates with high osmolarity and high concentrations of inhibitors. These compounds negatively influence the fermentation process. Therefore, robust strains with high stress tolerance are required. Up to now, more than 2000 yeast species have been described and some of these could provide a solution to these limitations because of their high tolerance to the most predominant stress conditions present in a second-generation bioethanol reactor. In this review, we will summarize what is known about the non-conventional yeast species showing unusual tolerance to these stresses, namely Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (osmotolerance), Kluyveromyces marxianus and Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha (thermotolerance), Dekkera bruxellensis (ethanol tolerance), Pichia kudriavzevii (furan derivatives tolerance) and Z. bailii (acetic acid tolerance). PMID:26126524

  13. Ascorbate and thiol antioxidants abolish sensitivity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to disulfiram

    OpenAIRE

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity of baker’s yeast to disulfiram (DSF) and hypersensitivity of a mutant devoid of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase to this compound is reported, demonstrating that yeast may be a simple convenient eukaryotic model to study the mechanism of DSF toxicity. DSF was found to induce oxidative stress in yeast cells demonstrated by increased superoxide production and decrease of cellular glutathione content. Anoxic atmosphere and hydrophilic antioxidants (ascorbate, glutathione, dithiothreitol, ...

  14. Aroma profile of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo wine fermented by single and co-culture starters of autochthonous Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna eTofalo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Montepulciano d’Abruzzo is a native grape variety of Vitis vinifera L., grown in central Italy and used for production of high quality red wines. Limited studies have been carried out to improve its enological characteristics through the use of indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The main objective of the present work was to test two indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae (SRS1, RT73, a strain of Starm. bacillaris (STS12, one of H. uvarum (STS45 and a co-culture of S. cerevisiae (SRS1 and Starm. bacillaris (STS12, in an experimental cellar to evaluate their role in the sensory characteristic of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo wine. A S. cerevisiae commercial strain was used. Fermentations were conducted under routine Montepulciano d’Abruzzo wine production, in which the main variables were the yeast strains used for fermentation. Basic winemaking parameters, some key chemical analysis and aroma compounds were considered. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain dynamics during fermentation were determined by molecular methods. The musts inoculated with the co-culture were characterized by a faster fermentation start and a higher content of glycerol after three days of fermentation, as well as the musts added with strains Starm. bacillaris (STS12 and H. uvarum (STS45. At the end of fermentation the parameters studied were quite similar in all the wines. Total biogenic amines (BA content of all the wines was low. Ethanolamine was the predominant BA, with a concentration ranging from 21 to 24 mg/l. Wines were characterized by esters and alcohols. In particular, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methylbut-1-yl methanoate and ethyl ethanoate were the major aroma volatile compounds in all wines. Statistical analysis highlighted the different role played by aroma compounds in the differentiation of wines, even if it was impossible to select a single class as the most important for a specific yeast. The present study represents a further step towards the use of tailored

  15. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  16. Influence of Calcium Ion on Ethanol Tolerance of Saccharomyces bayanus and Alcoholic Fermentation by Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Nabais, Regina C.; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Viegas, Cristina A.; Novais, Júlio M.

    1988-01-01

    The addition of Ca2+ (as CaCl2) in optimal concentrations (0.75 to 2.0 mM) to a fermentation medium with a trace contaminating concentration of Ca2+ (0.025 mM) led to the rapid production of higher concentrations of ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, and Kluyveromyces marxianus. The positive effect of calcium supplementation (0.75 mM) on alcoholic fermentation by S. bayanus was explained by the increase in its ethanol tolerance. The ethanol inhibition of growth and fe...

  17. Heterologous Expression of Membrane and Soluble Proteins Derepresses GCN4 mRNA Translation in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, L.; Pedersen, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    -located endogenous H-ATPase also induced GCN4 translation. Derepression of GCN4 translation required phosphorylation of eIF-2 , the tRNA binding domain of Gcn2p, and the ribosome-associated proteins Gcn1p and Gcn20p. The increase in Gcn4p density in response to heterologous expression did not induce transcription...... from the HIS4 promoter, a traditional Gcn4p target.......This paper describes the first physiological response at the translational level towards heterologous protein production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF-2 ) by Gcn2p protein kinase mediates derepression of GCN4 mRNA translation. Gcn4...

  18. Produksi Bioetanol dari Bahan Baku Singkong, Jagung dan Iles-iles :Pengaruh Suhu Fermentasi dan Berat Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kusmiyati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan bahan bakar di masa sekarang semakin bertambah besar sehingga berdampak pada menipisnya sumber bahan bakar dan meningkatnya polusi udara di lingkungan. Penggunaan bahan bakar alternatif dari sumber non fosil merupakan pilihan terbaik sebagai pengganti bahan bakar fosil. Bioetanol merupakan salah satu energi alternatif yang tepat digunakan baik di masa sekarang ataupun di masa yang akan datang. Bahan baku etanol yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah singkong, dan iles-iles.Variabel penelitian yang diamati temperatur fermentasi (30°C; 40°C;­­ 50°C dan komposisi Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2,5 g; 5 g; 10 g; 15 g Proses pembuatan bioetanol terdiri dari hidrolisis enzim yaitun likuifikasi menggunakan a-amylase1,6% v/w (t = 1 jam; T = 95-100°C; pH 6 dan sakarifikasi menggunakan b-amylase 3,2% v/w (t = 4 jam; T = 60°C; pH 5 serta proses fermentasi menggunakan Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( t = 120 jam; pH 4,5; yeast 5 g. Kadar etanol tertinggi dihasilkan pada temperatur fermentasi 30°C untuk semua bahan baku dengan kadar etanol masing-masing 83,43 g/L untuk singkong,80,77 g/L untuk jagung,dan 79,94 g/L untuk iles-iles. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  19. Evaluation of the lower protein limit in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using TIPI-gTOW

    OpenAIRE

    Sasabe, Masataka; Shintani, Sayumi; Kintaka, Reiko; Kaizu, Kazunari; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying permissible limits of intracellular parameters such as protein expression provides important information for examining robustness. In this study, we used the TEV protease-mediated induction of protein instability (TIPI) in combination with the genetic Tug-of-War (gTOW) to develop a method to measure the lower limit of protein level. We first tested the feasibility of this method using ADE2 as a marker and then analyzed some cell cycle regulators to reveal genetic intera...

  20. New hybrids between Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast species found among wine and cider production strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masneuf, I; Hansen, J.; Groth, C;

    1998-01-01

    Two yeast isolates, a wine-making yeast first identified as a Mel(+) strain (ex. S. uvarum) and a cider-making yeast, were characterized for their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, Electrophoretic karyotyping analyses, restriction fragment length polymorphism maps of PCR-amplified MET2 gene...... different sequences of the OLI1 gene. The sequence of the OLI1 gene from the wine hybrid strain appeared to be the same as that of the S. cerevisiae gene, whereas the OLI1 gene of the cider hybrid strain its equally divergent from both putative parents, S. bayanus and S, cerevisiae, Some fermentative...

  1. Evaluation of growth and survival rate of Artemia parthenogenetica feed with micro algae (Isochrysis galbana and Chlorella vulgaris and bakery yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to evaluate growth and survival rate of Maharloo lake artemia (ArtemiaParthenogenetica (Bowen & Sterling, 1978 which feed with two species of microalgae (IsochrysisGalbana and Chlorella vulgaris and bakery yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different nutritiousingredients for 15 days. We evaluated them in 3rd, 7th, 11th and 15thdays of cultivation period for 4 times. This experiment was done in completely randomized design with 4 treatments (3 treatments and 1 control and each treatment has 3 replicates. Artemia parthenogenetica nauplii were feed with three different types of food that includes Isochrysis galbana microalgae (T1, Chlorella vulgaris (T2 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (T4. Control had feed with blend of these three matters. After 15 days the highest survival rate was observed in control (84.00 and the lowest one was related to the T4 (59.58 which feed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (p<0.05. The highest growth rate was observed in T4, T3, followed by T1 and T2 respectively. Achievement results showed significantdifferences between control and other treatments (p<0.05. This study proved that treatments whichfeed with blend of two micro algae's species and bakery yeast have higher survival ability than theother treatments.

  2. Uranium uptake by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) - development of a biological ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of micro-organisms for decontamination of, and heavy metal recovery from industrial waste water is a modern, low-cost, and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional chemical and physical methods. The uptake of uranium by baker's yeast is investigated under the aspect of application in biotechnology. A novel, regenerable biological ion exchanger was produced by immobilisation of the yeast in agar gel. (orig.)

  3. Interactions of checkpoint-genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24 and RAD53 determining radioresistance of Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of genetic control of progress through the division cell cycle (checkpoint-control) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied intensively. To investigate the role of checkpoint-genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24, RAD53 in cell radioresistance we have investigated cell sensitivity of double mutants to γ-ray. Double mutants involving various combinations with rad9Δ show epistatic interactions, i.e. the sensitivity of the double mutants to γ-ray was no greater than that of more sensitive of the two single mutants. This suggests that all these genes govern the same pathway. This group of genes was named RAD9-epistasis group. It is interesting to note that the genes RAD9 and RAD53 have positive effect but RAD17 and RAD24 have negative effect on radiosensitivity of yeast cells. Interactions between mutations may differ depending on the agent γ-ray or UV-light, for example mutations rad9Δ and rad24Δ show additive effect for γ-ray and epistatic effect for UV-light

  4. Indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts as a source of biodiversity for the selection of starters for specific fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capece Angela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-time studies on wine yeasts have determined a wide diffusion of inoculated fermentations by commercial starters, mainly of Saccharomyces. Although the use of starter cultures has improved the reproducibility of wine quality, the main drawback to this practice is the lack of the typical traits of wines produced by spontaneous fermentation. These findings have stimulated wine-researchers and wine-makers towards the selection of autochthonous strains as starter cultures. The objective of this study was to investigate the biodiversity of 167 S. cerevisiae yeasts, isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes. The genetic variability of isolates was evaluated by PCR amplification of inter-δ region with primer pair δ2/δ12. The same isolates were investigated for characteristics of oenological interest, such as resistance to sulphur dioxide, ethanol and copper and hydrogen sulphide production. On the basis of technological and molecular results, 20 strains were chosen and tested into inoculated fermentations at laboratory scale. The experimental wines were analyzed for the content of some by-products correlated to wine aroma, such as higher alcohols, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and acetic acid. One selected strain was used as starter culture to perform fermentation at cellar level. The selection program followed during this research project represents an optimal combination between two different trends in modern winemaking: the use of S. cerevisiae as starter cultures and the starter culture selection for specific fermentations.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of full-length yeast tropomyosin 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of full-length yeast tropomyosin 2 from S. cerevisiae have been obtained. Tropomyosin is a highly conserved actin-binding protein that is found in most eukaryotic cells. It is critical for actin-filament stabilization and for cooperative regulation of many actin functions. Detailed structural information on tropomyosin is very important in order to understand the mechanisms of its action. Whereas structures of isolated tropomyosin fragments have been obtained at high resolution, the atomic structure of the entire tropomyosin molecule is still unknown. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of full-length yeast tropomyosin 2 (yTm2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae are reported. Recombinant yTm2 expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 154.8, b = 49.9, c = 104.0 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 124.0° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 3.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  6. Old Yellow Enzymes Protect against Acrolein Toxicity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Trotter, Eleanor W; Collinson, Emma J.; Dawes, Ian W.; Grant, Chris M.

    2006-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous reactive aldehyde which is formed as a product of lipid peroxidation in biological systems. In this present study, we screened the complete set of viable deletion strains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sensitivity to acrolein to identify cell functions involved in resistance to reactive aldehydes. We identified 128 mutants whose gene products are localized throughout the cell. Acrolein-sensitive mutants were distributed among most major biological processes but parti...

  7. Directed Evolution of Xylose Isomerase for Improved Xylose Catabolism and Fermentation in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S.

    2012-01-01

    The heterologous expression of a highly functional xylose isomerase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae would have significant advantages for ethanol yield, since the pathway bypasses cofactor requirements found in the traditionally used oxidoreductase pathways. However, nearly all reported xylose isomerase-based pathways in S. cerevisiae suffer from poor ethanol productivity, low xylose consumption rates, and poor cell growth compared with an oxidoreductase pathway and, additionally, often r...

  8. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brat Dawid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. Results Isobutanol production could be improved by re-locating the valine biosynthesis enzymes Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 from the mitochondrial matrix into the cytosol. To prevent the import of the three enzymes into yeast mitochondria, N-terminally shortened Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 versions were constructed lacking their mitochondrial targeting sequences. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed expression and re-localization of the truncated enzymes. Growth tests or enzyme assays confirmed enzymatic activities. Isobutanol production was only increased in the absence of valine and the simultaneous blockage of the mitochondrial valine synthesis pathway. Isobutanol production could be even more enhanced after adapting the codon usage of the truncated valine biosynthesis genes to the codon usage of highly expressed glycolytic genes. Finally, a suitable ketoisovalerate decarboxylase, Aro10, and alcohol dehydrogenase, Adh2, were selected and overexpressed. The highest isobutanol titer was 0.63 g/L at a yield of nearly 15 mg per g glucose. Conclusion A cytosolic isobutanol production pathway was successfully established in yeast by re-localization and optimization of mitochondrial valine synthesis enzymes together with overexpression of Aro10 decarboxylase and Adh2 alcohol dehydrogenase. Driving forces were generated by blocking competition with the mitochondrial valine pathway and by omitting valine from the fermentation medium. Additional deletion of

  9. Comparative physiology and fermentation performance of Saaz and Frohberg lager yeast strains and the parental species Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brian R; Storgårds, Erna; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve

    2013-07-01

    Two distinct genetic groups (Saaz and Frohberg) exist within the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus) taxon. However, physiological/technological differences that exist between the two groups are not known. Fermentative capability of the parental S. eubayanus has likewise never been studied. Here, 58 lager strains were screened to determine which hybrid group they belonged to, and selected strains were characterized to determine salient characteristics. In 15 °P all-malt wort fermentations at 22 °C, Frohberg strains showed greater growth and superior fermentation (80% apparent attenuation, 6.5% alcohol by volume in 3-4 days) compared to all other strains and maintained highest viability values (>93%). Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at the same temperature (33% apparent attenuation, 2.7% alcohol by volume at 6 days and viability reduced to 75%). Saaz strains and S. eubayanus were the least sensitive to cold (10 °C), though this did not translate to greater fermentation performance. Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at 10 °C but equal to or greater than that of the Saaz strains. Performance of Saaz yeast/S. eubayanus was limited by an inability to use wort maltotriose. [(14)C]-Maltotriose transport assays also showed negligible activity in these strains (≤0.5 µmol min(-1) g(-1) dry yeast). Beers from Saaz fermentations were characterized by two- to sixfold lower production of the flavour compounds methyl butanol, ethyl acetate and 3-methylbutyl acetate compared to Frohberg strains. Higher alcohol and ester production by S. eubayanus was similar to that of Frohberg strains. PMID:23695993

  10. Palmitoylation controls the dynamics of budding-yeast heterochromatin via the telomere-binding protein Rif1

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sookhee; Patterson, Erin E.; Cobb, Jenel; Audhya, Anjon; Gartenberg, Marc R.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The posttranslational addition of palmitate to cysteines occurs ubiquitously in eukaryotic cells, where it functions in anchoring target proteins to membranes and in vesicular trafficking. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae palmitoyltransferase Pfa4 enhanced heterochromatin formation at the cryptic mating-type loci HMR and HML via Rif1, a telomere regulatory protein. Acylated Rif1 was detected in extracts from wild-type but not pfa4Δ mutant cells. In a pfa4Δ mutant, Rif1-GFP dispe...

  11. Aroma Profile of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Wine Fermented by Single and Co-culture Starters of Autochthonous Saccharomyces and Non-saccharomyces Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Di Gianvito, Paola; Pizzoni, Daniel; Arfelli, Giuseppe; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is a native grape variety of Vitis vinifera L., grown in central Italy and used for production of high quality red wines. Limited studies have been carried out to improve its enological characteristics through the use of indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The main objective of the present work was to test two indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae (SRS1, RT73), a strain of Starmerella bacillaris (STS12), one of Hanseniaspora uvarum (STS45) and a co-culture of S. cerevisiae (SRS1) and S. bacillaris (STS12), in an experimental cellar to evaluate their role in the sensory characteristic of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo wine. A S. cerevisiae commercial strain was used. Fermentations were conducted under routine Montepulciano d'Abruzzo wine production, in which the main variables were the yeast strains used for fermentation. Basic winemaking parameters, some key chemical analysis and aroma compounds were considered. S. cerevisiae strain dynamics during fermentation were determined by molecular methods. The musts inoculated with the co-culture were characterized by a faster fermentation start and a higher content of glycerol after 3 days of fermentation, as well as the musts added with strains S. bacillaris (STS12) and H. uvarum (STS45). At the end of fermentation the parameters studied were quite similar in all the wines. Total biogenic amines (BA) content of all the wines was low. Ethanolamine was the predominant BA, with a concentration ranging from 21 to 24 mg/l. Wines were characterized by esters and alcohols. In particular, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methylbut-1-yl methanoate, and ethyl ethanoate were the major aroma volatile compounds in all wines. Statistical analysis highlighted the different role played by aroma compounds in the differentiation of wines, even if it was impossible to select a single class of compounds as the most important for a specific yeast. The present study represents a further step toward the use of tailored

  12. Study on the Effect of Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC47) Utilization on the Commercial Layer Hen`s Performance

    OpenAIRE

    S.A. Hosseini; H. Lotfollahian; A. Kamyab; Mahdavi, A.

    2006-01-01

    A trail was conducted to investigate the effect of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC47) utilization on the commercial layer hen`s performance. The experiment consisted of 5 diets (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 g Yeast per kg diet) with five replicates each containing 15 laying hen`s hy-Line W36 from 25 to 78 week of age. The randomized complete design was used for this experiment. During the experiment egg weight, egg production (%), Egg Mass, feed conversion and egg quality were measured daily a...

  13. THE EFFECT INDUCED BY MILLIMETER WAVES WITH THE FREQUENCY 53.33 GHZ ON SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CNMN-Y-18 YEAST STRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Agafia Usatîi; Elena Molodoi; Nadejda Efromova; Ludmila Fulga

    2015-01-01

    The effect of extremely high frequency electromagnetic waves on the biosynthetic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-18 yeast strain in dependence on the duration of irradiation was studied. The maximum amount of biomass, protein, carbohydrates, mannoproteins and catalase has been showed to accumulate when the yeast cells were irradiated with a frequency f = 53.33 GHz for 10 minutes. High degree of dependence between the content of cellular components (a correlation coefficient betwee...

  14. Expression and secretion of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase by using the yeast pheromone alpha-factor promoter and leader sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Southgate, V J; Steyn, A J; Pretorius, I. S.; van Vuuren, H J

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of the regulatory and secretory signals of the alpha-amylase gene (AMY) from Bacillus amylolique-faciens with the complete yeast pheromone alpha-factor prepro region (MF alpha 1p) resulted in increased levels of extracellular alpha-amylase production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the removal of the (Glu-Ala)2 peptide from the MF alpha 1 spacer region (Lys-Arg-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala) yielded decreased levels of extracellular alpha-amylase.

  15. Impact of the co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae–Oenococcus oenion malolactic fermentation and partial characterization of a yeast-derived inhibitory peptidic fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Nehme, Nancy; Mathieu, Florence; Taillandier, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the impact of the co-culture on the output of malolactic fermentation and to further investigate the reasons of the antagonism exerted by yeasts towards bacteria during sequential cultures. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae D strain/Oenococcus oeni X strain combination was tested by applying both sequential culture and co-culture strategies. This pair was chosen amongst others because the malolactic fermentation was particularly difficult to realize during t...

  16. Changes in metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by deletion of the two Pdr transporter genes PDR5 and SNQ2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Otakar; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    Dorchester : Wiley, 2007, s. 2-2. [International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology /23./. Melbourne (AU), 01.07.2007-06.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/05/P175; GA ČR GA525/05/0297; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Pinostrobin from Boesenbergia pandurata is an inhibitor of Ca2+-signal-mediated cell-cycle regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangkangwan, Wachirasak; Boonkerd, Saipin; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Sukapirom, Kasama; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Kongkathip, Ngampong; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Yompakdee, Chulee

    2009-07-01

    Upon searching plant extracts for inhibitors of the Ca(2+) signaling pathway using the zds1Delta-yeast proliferation based assay, a crude rhizome extract of Boesenbergia pandurata was found to be strongly positive, and from this extract pinostrobin, alpinetin, and pinocembrin chalcone were isolated as active components. Further biochemical experiments confirmed that pinostrobin possesses inhibitory activity on the Ca(2+) signals involved in the control of G2/M phase cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19584530

  18. L-Histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11- associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria Maria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides a...

  19. Genome-wide prediction of stop codon readthrough during translation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, I; Richardson, J.; Starkey, A.; Stansfield, I

    2004-01-01

    In-frame stop codons normally signal termination during mRNA translation, but they can be read as ‘sense’ (readthrough) depending on their context, comprising the 6 nt preceding and following the stop codon. To identify novel contexts directing readthrough, under-represented 5′ and 3′ stop codon contexts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by genome-wide survey in silico. In contrast with the nucleotide bias 3′ of the stop codon, codon bias in the two codon positions 5′ of the termi...

  20. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers

  1. Genetic variation and phylogeography of the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus in Eurasia

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Pedro Miguel Coelho de

    2011-01-01

    As leveduras do género Saccharomyces, em particular S. cerevisiae, estão intimamente relacionadas com o bem-estar público das nossas sociedades. As suas contribuições são essenciais quer na área da Biotecnologia como na Medicina. Esta levedura tem vindo a estender a sua importância, estabelecendo-se como organismo modelo em diversos ramos da genética, o que se reflectiu com o primeiro genoma eucariota totalmente sequenciado. Mais recentemente, o aumento do número de isolados de ambientes natu...

  2. A Simple Laboratory Exercise for Ethanol Production by Immobilized Bakery Yeasts ("Saccharomyces Cerevisiae")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Diana L.; Wachsman, Monica B.

    2005-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed for Chemistry, Food Technology, Biology, and Chemical Engineering undergraduate students. This laboratory experience shows the advantages of immobilized bakery yeasts in ethanol production by alcoholic fermentation. The students were able to compare the ethanol production yields by free or calcium alginate…

  3. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  4. Mechanisms of in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF by ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are major inhibitory compounds generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Remediation of inhibitors adds cost and generates extra waste products. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available and the need for tolerant strai...

  5. Some Practical Aspects of Sugar Fermentation by Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes simple quantitative determinations for ethanol and carbon dioxide, together with techniques for examining the effects of a number of environmental factors on their production. The experimental work centers around the growth of a cell population of yeast, and is suitable for senior high school students. (JR)

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus K; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms can be defined as multi-cellular aggregates adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The nonpathogenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, follows the common traits of microbial biofilms with cell-cell and cell-surface adhesion. S. cerevisiae is shown t...... cues, cell-to-cell variation and niches in S. cerevisiae biofilm. Being closely related to Candida species, S. cerevisiae is a model to investigate biofilms of pathogenic yeast....

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae quinone oxidoreductase Lot6p: stability, inhibition and cooperativity

    OpenAIRE

    Megarity, Clare F.; Looi, Hong Keat; Timson, David J

    2014-01-01

    Lot6p (EC 1.5.1.39; Ylr011wp) is the sole quinone oxidoreductase in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using hexahistidine tagged, recombinant Lot6p, we determined the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters with both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; no cooperativity was observed with these substrates. The NQO1 inhibitor curcumin, the NQO2 inhibitor resveratrol, the bacterial nitroreductase inhibitor nicotinamide and the phosphate mimic vanadate all stabilise the enzyme towards the...

  8. Development and utilization of protein enriched feed by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) fermentation in ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two experiments have been carried out to investigate on the development and supplementation of yeast fermented cassava chip (YEFECAP) and yeast-fermented liquid (YEL) with coconut oil (CCO) in concentrate containing soybean meal or cassava hay in rumen ecology, digestibility, nitrogen balance and feed intakes in ruminants. This paper reports on the progress of the on-going work with in vivo digestion trials which are currently evaluating the protein value of the two sources and their effects on the rumen fermentation, microorganisms, fermentation end-products, blood metabolite, nitrogen balance nutrient digest abilities. Based on the preliminary data, the two proteins sources have potential protein and feeding values as protein sources and rumen enhancers for possible rumen fermentation and the subsequent ruminant productivity.

  9. Mitotic recombination induced by chemical and physical agents in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of diploid cultures of yeast with ultraviolet light (uv), γ-rays, nitrous acid (na) and ethyl methane sulphonate (ems) results in increases in cell death, mitotic gene conversion and crossing-over. Acridine orange (ao) treatment, in contrast, was effective only in increasing the frequency of gene conversion. The individual mutagens were effective in the order uv>na>γ-rays>ao>ems. Prior treatment of yeast cultures in starvation medium produced a significant reduction in the yield of induced gene conversion. The results have been interpreted on the basis of a general model of mitotic gene conversion which involves the post-replication repair of induced lesions involving de novo DNA synthesis without genetic exchange. In contrast mitotic crossing-over appears to involve the action of a repair system independent from excision or post-replication repair which involves genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes

  10. Exogenous addition of histidine reduces copper availability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Watanabe; Rie Kikushima; Miho Aitoku; Akira Nishimura; Iwao Ohtsu; Ryo Nasuno; Hiroshi Takag

    2014-01-01

    The basic amino acid histidine inhibited yeast cell growth more severely than lysine and arginine. Overexpression of CTR1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transporter on the plasma membrane, or addition of copper to the medium alleviated this cytotoxicity. However, the intracellular level of copper ions was not decreased in the presence of excess histidine. These results indicate that histidine cytotoxicity is associated with low copper availability inside cells, not with impaired copper...

  11. Adjustable under-expression of yeast mating pathway proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a programmed ribosomal frameshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Yeon; Park, Sang-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Experimental research in molecular biology frequently relies on the promotion or suppression of gene expression, an important tool in the study of its functions. Although yeast is among the most studied model systems with the ease of maintenance and manipulation, current experimental methods are mostly limited to gene deletion, suppression or overexpression of genes. Therefore, the ability to reduce protein expressions and then observing the effects would promote a better understanding of the exact functions and their interactions. Reducing protein expression is mainly limited by the difficulties associated with controlling the reduction level, and in some cases, the initial endogenous abundance is too low. For the under-expression to be useful as an experimental tool, repeatability and stability of reduced expression is important. We found that cis-elements in programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1RFS) of beet western yellow virus (BWYV) could be utilized to reduced protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two main advantages of using -1RFS are adjustable reduction rates and ease of use. To demonstrate the utility of this under-expression system, examples of reduced protein abundance were shown using yeast mating pathway components. The abundance of MAP kinase Fus3 was reduced to approximately 28-75 % of the wild-type value. Other MAP kinase mating pathway components, including Ste5, Ste11, and Ste7, were also under-expressed to verify that the -1RFS system works with different proteins. Furthermore, reduced Fus3 abundance altered the overall signal transduction outcome of the mating pathway, demonstrating the potential for further studies of signal transduction adjustment via under-expression. PMID:26837218

  12. Ethanol fermentation of mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers using free and immobilized yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M R; Kar, S; Sahoo, A K; Ray, R C

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest to find alternate bioresources for production of ethanol, apart from cane/sugar beet molasses and starchy crops like sweet sorghum, cassava and sweet potato. Mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) is a forest tree abundantly available in the Indian subcontinent and its flowers are very rich in fermentable sugars (28.1-36.3 g 100 g(-1)). Batch fermentation of fresh and 12-month-stored flowers with free (whole cells) and immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain CTCRI) was carried out in 2-l Erlenmeyer flasks. The ethanol yields were 193 and 148 g kg(-1) (using free cells) and 205 and 152 g kg(-1) (using immobilized cells) from fresh and 12-month-stored mahula flowers, respectively. PMID:16580830

  13. The application of non-Saccharomyces yeast in fermentations with limited aeration as a strategy for the production of wine with reduced alcohol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, A; Hidalgo, C; Schmidt, S; Henschke, P A; Curtin, C; Varela, C

    2015-07-16

    High alcohol concentrations reduce the complexity of wine sensory properties. In addition, health and economic drivers have the wine industry actively seeking technologies that facilitate the production of wines with lower alcohol content. One of the simplest approaches to achieve this aim would be the use of wine yeast strains which are less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol, however commercially available wine yeasts produce very similar ethanol yields. Non-conventional yeast, in particular non-Saccharomyces species, have shown potential for producing wines with lower alcohol content. These yeasts are naturally present in the early stages of fermentation but in general are not capable of completing alcoholic fermentation. We have evaluated 48 non-Saccharomyces isolates to identify strains that, with limited aeration and in sequential inoculation regimes with S. cerevisiae, could be used for the production of wine with lower ethanol concentration. Two of these, Torulaspora delbrueckii AWRI1152 and Zygosaccharomyces bailii AWRI1578, enabled the production of wine with reduced ethanol concentration under limited aerobic conditions. Depending on the aeration regime T. delbrueckii AWRI1152 and Z. bailii AWRI1578 showed a reduction in ethanol concentration of 1.5% (v/v) and 2.0% (v/v) respectively, compared to the S. cerevisiae anaerobic control. PMID:25866906

  14. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Travis K; Hitz, Benjamin C; Engel, Stacia R; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla S; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley M; Skrzypek, Marek S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  15. Surface functionalization of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles for covalent immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel and efficient immobilization of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC1.1.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been developed by using the surface functionalization of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4/KCTS) as support. The magnetic Fe3O4/KCTS nanoparticles were prepared by binding chitosan alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KCTS) onto the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Later, covalent immobilization of YADH was attempted onto the Fe3O4/KCTS nanoparticles. The effect of various preparation conditions on the immobilized YADH process such as immobilization time, enzyme concentration and pH was investigated. The influence of pH and temperature on the activity of the free and immobilized YADH using phenylglyoxylic acid as substrate has also been studied. The optimum reaction temperature and pH value for the enzymatic conversion catalyzed by the immobilized YADH were 30 oC and 7.4, respectively. Compared to the free enzyme, the immobilized YADH retained 65% of its original activity and exhibited significant thermal stability and good durability.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model in ecotoxicological studies: A post-genomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2016-03-30

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents a well-consolidated and widely used eukaryotic model, with a number of features that make it an ideal organism to carry out functional toxicological studies. Several advantages are permitted by the use of yeast cells, as the possibility to identify molecular biomarkers, unknown mechanisms of action and novel potential targets. Thanks to the evolutionary conservation, yeast can provide also useful clues allowing the prioritization of more complex analyses and toxicity predictions in higher eukaryotes. The last two decades were incredibly fruitful for yeast "omics", but referring to the analysis of the effects of pesticides on yeast much still remains to be done. Furthermore, a deeper knowledge of the effects of environmental pollutants on biotechnological processes associated with the use of yeasts is to be hoped. PMID:26365628

  17. THE EFFECT INDUCED BY MILLIMETER WAVES WITH THE FREQUENCY 53.33 GHZ ON SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CNMN-Y-18 YEAST STRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agafia Usatîi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extremely high frequency electromagnetic waves on the biosynthetic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-18 yeast strain in dependence on the duration of irradiation was studied. The maximum amount of biomass, protein, carbohydrates, mannoproteins and catalase has been showed to accumulate when the yeast cells were irradiated with a frequency f = 53.33 GHz for 10 minutes. High degree of dependence between the content of cellular components (a correlation coefficient between R2 = 0.875 and 0.926 it has been shown which demonstrates that biosynthetic processes were influenced by the same phenomenon - millimeter waves. A procedure for increasing of mannoprotein content in yeasts with the utilization of extremely high frequency waves has been proposed in this study.

  18. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Régis E; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiot...

  19. YALI0E32769g (DGA1) and YALI0E16797g (LRO1) encode major triacylglycerol synthases of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Athenstaedt, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has an outstanding capacity to produce and store triacylglycerols resembling adipocytes of higher eukaryotes. Here, the identification of two genes YALI0E32769g (DGA1) and YALI0E16797g (LRO1) encoding major triacylglycerol synthases of Yarrowia lipolytica is reported. Heterologous expression of either DGA1 or LRO1 in a mutant of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in triacylglycerol synthesis restores the formation of this neutral lipi...

  20. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae

  1. Effects of cell entrapment in Ca-alginate on the metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown in suspension have been immobilized in calcium-alginate beads. Fermentation rates and intracellular composition have been determined under nongrowing conditions in these Ca-alginate entrapped cells and for identical cells in suspension. Glucose uptake and ethanol and glycerol production are approximately two times faster in immobilized cells than in suspended cells. Intermediate metabolite levels such as fructose-1,6-diphosphate, glucose-6-phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate have been determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy under glucose fermenting conditions. Carbon-13 NMR shows an increase in polysaccharide production in immobilized cells. S. cerevisiae cells grown within a Ca-alginate matrix have a specific growth rate 40% lower than the growth rate of similar cells cultivated in suspension. Alginate-grown cells have been used to compare glucose fermentation under nongrowing conditions in suspended and Ca-entrapped cells. Fermentation rate is higher in immobilized cells than in suspended cells. The observed differences in intracellular components between suspended and immobilized cells are qualitatively similar to the differences observed for cells grown in suspension. Ethanol production rate is 2.7 times faster in immobilized alginate-grown cells than in suspended suspension-grown cells

  2. Inheritance and organisation of the mitochondrial genome differ between two Saccharomyces yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Hvidtfeldt, J.;

    2002-01-01

    mitochondrial molecules (mtDNA) carrying point mutations, which confer antibiotic resistance, behaved in genetic crosses as the corresponding point mutants of S. cerevisiae. While S. castellii generated spontaneous petite mutants in a similar way as S. cerevisiae, the petites exhibited a different inheritance...... pattern. In crosses with the wild type strains a majority of S. castellii petites was neutral, and the suppressivity in suppressive petites was never over 50%. The two yeasts also differ in organisation of their mtDNA molecules. The 25,753 bp sequence of S. castellii mtDNA was determined and the coding....... The structure of one suppressive S. castellii mutant, CA38, was also determined. Apparently, a short direct intergenic repeat was involved in the generation of this petite mtDNA molecule....

  3. PP2A(Cdc55)'s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Gary W; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2A(Cdc55) is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2A(Cdc55) activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2A(Cdc55) prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2A(Cdc55)'s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  4. PP2ACdc55’s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Gary W.; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2ACdc55 is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2ACdc55 activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2ACdc55 prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2ACdc55’s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  5. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF Increase the Rate of Glucose Transport and TCA Cycle in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Wei; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE) and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for 10 genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF.

  6. IMPACT OF PESTICIDES USED IN THE CULTURE OF THE VINE ON THE VIABILITY OF THE YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE WINE IN CHRONOLOGICAL AGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Owsiak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides, used in culture, may induce oxidative stress by stimulation of free radicals production, what may result in lipid peroxidation, proteome damage, changes in DNA and RNA structures and disturbance of total antioxidative capacity in organisms’ cells. In disturbances caused by increase synthesis ROS (reactive oxygen species or lack antioxidative defense that is in oxidative stress it is seen one of all causes of aging process. Chronological aging of baker’s and wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in liquid stationary culture is used as model of research on the aging process. As a result of aging changes take place in yeast cells which have physiological, genetic, metabolic and morphological character, what cause their death in consequence. Some scientists treat chronological yeast aging as analogy of fibroblasts aging of multicellular organisms, skeletal muscles or nerve cells. The aim of the experiment was to obtain the answer on question connected with toxicity effect two widely available pesticides in shape of trade preparation, used among other things in culture of grapevine Miedzian 50 WP (Cu 50WP and Siarkol Extra 80 WP (S 80WP on vitality of wine yeast in chronological aging. During research cells of wine yeast Tokay, which are used in production of white wines, and cells of Malaga strain, used in production of white and red wines, were applied. Yeast culture with pesticides supplementation in determined concentrations was conducted through seven days in YPG medium. At that time vitality of yeast cells was determined by the percentage of cells surviving, percentage of dead cells and culture density. Considerable influence on decreasing vitality of yeast cells in the process of aging showed S 80WP, what correlate with the increase of applied concentration in both example of Malaga and Tokay. Obtained results in application of Cu 50WP indicated lower toxicity in culture of both studied strains in comparison to the control. Our

  7. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. → We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. → We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  8. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  9. Use of the BioGRID Database for Analysis of Yeast Protein and Genetic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughtred, Rose; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Chang, Christie S; Rust, Jennifer M; Theesfeld, Chandra L; Heinicke, Sven; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Chen, Daici; Hirschman, Jodi; Kolas, Nadine; Livstone, Michael S; Nixon, Julie; O'Donnell, Lara; Ramage, Lindsay; Winter, Andrew; Reguly, Teresa; Sellam, Adnane; Stark, Chris; Boucher, Lorrie; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The BioGRID database is an extensive repository of curated genetic and protein interactions for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the yeast Candida albicans SC5314, as well as for several other model organisms and humans. This protocol describes how to use the BioGRID website to query genetic or protein interactions for any gene of interest, how to visualize the associated interactions using an embedded interactive network viewer, and how to download data files for either selected interactions or the entire BioGRID interaction data set. PMID:26729909

  10. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations. The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses. All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive

  11. Effects of dietary changes and yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on rumen microbial fermentation of Holstein heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, D; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Blanch, M; Fandiño, J I; Castillejos, L; Yoon, I

    2009-09-01

    The effects of a dietary challenge to induce digestive upsets and supplementation with yeast culture on rumen microbial fermentation were studied using 12 Holstein heifers (277 +/- 28 kg of BW) fitted with a ruminal cannula, in a crossover design with 2 periods of 5 wk. In each period, after 3 wk of adaptation to a 100% forage diet, the dietary challenge consisted of increasing the amount of grain at a rate of 2.5 kg/d (as-fed basis) over a period of 4 d, until a 10:90 forage:concentrate diet was reached, and then it was maintained for 10 d. Between periods, animals were fed again the 100% forage diet without any treatment for 1 wk as a wash-out period. Treatments started the first day of each period, and they were a control diet (CL) or the same diet with addition of yeast culture (YC, Diamond V XPCLS). Digestive upsets were determined by visual observation of bloat or by a reduction in feed intake (as-fed basis) of 50% or more compared with intake on the previous day. Feed intake was determined daily at 24-h intervals during the adaptation period and daily at 2, 6, and 12 h postfeeding during the dietary challenge. Ruminal liquid samples were collected daily during the dietary challenge to determine ruminal pH at 0, 3, 6, and 12 h postfeeding, and total and individual VFA, lactic acid, ammonia-N, and rumen fluid viscosity at 0 and 6 h postfeeding. The 16s rRNA gene copies of Streptococcus bovis and Megasphaera elsdenii were determined by quantitative PCR. Foam height and strength of the rumen fluid were also determined the day after the digestive upset to evaluate potential foam production. A total of 20 cases (83.3%) of digestive upsets were recorded in both periods during the dietary challenge, all diagnosed due to a reduction in feed intake. Rumen fermentation profile at 0 h on the digestive upset day was characterized by low ruminal pH, which remained under 6.0 for 18 h, accompanied by elevated total VFA concentration and, in some cases, by elevated lactate

  12. L-carnosine enhanced reproductive potential of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast growing on medium containing glucose as a source of carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Molon, Mateusz; Kaszycki, Pawel; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-08-01

    Carnosine is an endogenous dipeptide composed of β-alanine and L-histidine, which occurs in vertebrates, including humans. It has a number of favorable properties including buffering, chelating, antioxidant, anti-glycation and anti-aging activities. In our study we used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast as a model organism to examine the impact of L-carnosine on the cell lifespan. We demonstrated that L-carnosine slowed down the growth and decreased the metabolic activity of cells as well as prolonged their generation time. On the other hand, it allowed for enhancement of the yeast reproductive potential and extended its reproductive lifespan. These changes may be a result of the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ATP content in the yeast cells. However, due to reduction of the post-reproductive lifespan, L-carnosine did not have an influence on the total lifespan of yeast. In conclusion, L-carnosine does not extend the total lifespan of S. cerevisiae but rather it increases the yeast's reproductive capacity by increasing the number of daughter cells produced. PMID:27040824

  13. Subproteomics: identification of plasma membrane proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, Catherine; Degand, Hervé; Bennett, Keiryn L; Crawford, Janne S; Mørtz, Ejvind; Boutry, Marc

    2002-12-01

    As a consequence of their poor solubility during isoelectric focusing, integral membrane proteins are generally absent from two-dimensional gel proteome maps. In order to analyze the yeast plasma membrane proteome, a plasma membrane purification protocol was optimized in order to reduce contaminating membranes and cytosolic proteins. Specifically, the new fractionation scheme largely depleted the plasma membrane fraction of cytosolic proteins by deoxycholate stripping and ribosomal proteins by sucrose gradient flotation. The plasma membrane complement was resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis using the cationic detergent cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide in the first, and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the second dimension, and fifty spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectometry. In spite of the presence of still contaminating ribosomal proteins, major proteins corresponded to known plasma membrane residents, the ABC transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p, the P-type H(+)-ATPase Pma1p, the glucose transporter Hxt7p, the seven transmembrane-span Mrh1p, the low affinity Fe(++) transporter Fet4p, the twelve-span Ptr2p, and the plasma membrane anchored casein kinase Yck2p. The four transmembrane-span proteins Sur7p and Nce102p were also present in the isolated plasma membranes, as well as the unknown protein Ygr266wp that probably contains a single transmembrane span. Thus, combining subcellular fractionation with adapted two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in the identification of intrinsic plasma membrane proteins. PMID:12469340

  14. Ethanol production from kitchen waste using the flocculating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KF-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for producing ethanol from kitchen waste was developed in this study. The process consists of freshness preservation of the waste, saccharification of the sugars in the waste, continuous ethanol fermentation of the saccharified liquid, and anaerobic treatment of the saccharification residue and the stillage. Spraying lactic acid bacteria (LCB) on the kitchen waste kept the waste fresh for over 1 week. High glucose recovery (85.5%) from LCB-sprayed waste was achieved after saccharification using Nagase N-40 glucoamylase. The resulting saccharified liquid was used directly for ethanol fermentation, without the addition of any nutrients. High ethanol productivity (24.0 g l-1 h-1) was obtained when the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 was used in a continuous ethanol fermentation process at a dilution rate of 0.8 h-1. The saccharification residue was mixed with stillage and treated in a thermophilic anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR); a VTS loading rate of 6 g l-1 d-1 with 72% VTS digestion efficiency was achieved. Using this process, 30.9 g ethanol, and 65.2 l biogas with 50% methane, was produced from 1 kg of kitchen waste containing 118.0 g total sugar. Thus, energy in kitchen waste can be converted to ethanol and methane, which can then be used as fuels, while simultaneously treating kitchen waste

  15. Sli15 Associates with the Ipl1 Protein Kinase to Promote Proper Chromosome Segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Jung-seog; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The conserved Ipl1 protein kinase is essential for proper chromosome segregation and thus cell viability in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its human homologue has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of diverse forms of cancer. We show here that sister chromatids that have separated from each other are not properly segregated to opposite poles of ipl1-2 cells. Failures in chromosome segregation are often associated with abnormal distribution of the spindle pole–associated Nuf2-GF...

  16. Kar5p Is Required for Multiple Functions in Both Inner and Outer Nuclear Envelope Fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jason V.; Rose, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To sepa...

  17. Co-precipitation of Phosphate and Iron Limits Mitochondrial Phosphate Availability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lacking the Yeast Frataxin Homologue (YFH1)*

    OpenAIRE

    Seguin, Alexandra; Santos, Renata; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the yeast frataxin homologue (Δyfh1) accumulate iron in the mitochondria in the form of nanoparticles of ferric phosphate. The phosphate content of Δyfh1 mitochondria was higher than that of wild-type mitochondria, but the proportion of mitochondrial phosphate that was soluble was much lower in Δyfh1 cells. The rates of phosphate and iron uptake in vitro by isolated mitochondria were higher for Δyfh1 than wild-type mitochondria, and a significant proport...

  18. Role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISA1 and ISA2 in Iron Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Laran T.; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2000-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two homologues of bacterial IscA proteins, designated Isa1p and Isa2p. Bacterial IscA is a product of the isc (iron-sulfur cluster) operon and has been suggested to participate in Fe-S cluster formation or repair. To test the function of yeast Isa1p and Isa2p, single or combinatorial disruptions were introduced in ISA1 and ISA2. The resultant isaΔ mutants were viable but exhibited a dependency on lysine and glutamate for growth and a respira...

  19. The resistance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biocide polyhexamethylene biguanide: involvement of cell wall integrity pathway and emerging role for YAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Morais Marcos A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB is an antiseptic polymer that is mainly used for cleaning hospitals and pools and combating Acantamoeba infection. Its fungicide activity was recently shown by its lethal effect on yeasts that contaminate the industrial ethanol process, and on the PE-2 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main fermenting yeasts in Brazil. This pointed to the need to know the molecular mechanism that lay behind the cell resistance to this compound. In this study, we examined the factors involved in PHMB-cell interaction and the mechanisms that respond to the damage caused by this interaction. To achieve this, two research strategies were employed: the expression of some genes by RT-qPCR and the analysis of mutant strains. Results Cell Wall integrity (CWI genes were induced in the PHMB-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain JP-1, although they are poorly expressed in the PHMB-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE2 strain. This suggested that PHMB damages the glucan structure on the yeast cell wall. It was also confirmed by the observed sensitivity of the yeast deletion strains, Δslg1, Δrom2, Δmkk2, Δslt2, Δknr4, Δswi4 and Δswi4, which showed that the protein kinase C (PKC regulatory mechanism is involved in the response and resistance to PHMB. The sensitivity of the Δhog1 mutant was also observed. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity assay and gene expression analysis showed that the part played by YAP1 and CTT1 genes in cell resistance to PHMB is unrelated to oxidative stress response. Thus, we suggested that Yap1p can play a role in cell wall maintenance by controlling the expression of the CWI genes. Conclusion The PHMB treatment of the yeast cells activates the PKC1/Slt2 (CWI pathway. In addition, it is suggested that HOG1 and YAP1 can play a role in the regulation of CWI genes.

  20. TEP1, the yeast homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1, is linked to the phosphatidylinositol pathway and plays a role in the developmental process of sporulation

    OpenAIRE

    Heymont, Jennifer; Berenfeld, Ludmilla; Collins, Jennifer; Kaganovich, Alexandra; Maynes, Bradford; Moulin, Aaron; Ratskovskaya, Irina; Poon, Pak P.; Johnston, Gerald C.; Kamenetsky, Margarita; DeSilva, John; Sun, Hong; Petsko, Gregory A; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2000-01-01

    PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 (PTEN, phosphatase deleted on chromosome ten; MMAC1, mutated in multiple advanced cancers; TEP1, tensin-like phosphatase) is a major human tumor suppressor gene whose suppressive activity operates on the phosphatidylinositol pathway. A single homologue of this gene, TEP1 (YNL128w), exists in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains deleted for TEP1 exhibit essentially no phenotype in haploids; however, diploids exhibit resistance to...

  1. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  2. Deregulation of DSE1 Gene Expression Results in Aberrant Budding within the Birth Scar and Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frýdlová, Ivana; Malcová-Janatová, Ivana; Vašicová, Pavla; Hašek, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2009), s. 586-594. ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020409; GA MŠk LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : HIGH-EFFICIENCY TRANSFORMATION * CHROMATIN-REMODELING COMPLEX * BUD-SITE SELECTION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.806, year: 2009

  3. Genome-wide Fitness Profiles Reveal a Requirement for Autophagy During Yeast Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Piggott, Nina; Cook, Michael A.; Tyers, Mike; Measday, Vivien

    2011-01-01

    The ability of cells to respond to environmental changes and adapt their metabolism enables cell survival under stressful conditions. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is particularly well adapted to the harsh conditions of anaerobic wine fermentation. However, S. cerevisiae gene function has not been previously systematically interrogated under conditions of industrial fermentation. We performed a genome-wide study of essential and nonessential S. cerevisiae gene req...

  4. Canonical Modeling of the Multi-Scale Regulation of the Heat Stress Response in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Luis L.; Po-Wei Chen; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2012-01-01

    Heat is one of the most fundamental and ancient environmental stresses, and response mechanisms are found in prokaryotes and shared among most eukaryotes. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the heat stress response involves coordinated changes at all biological levels, from gene expression to protein and metabolite abundances, and to temporary adjustments in physiology. Due to its integrative multi-level-multi-scale nature, heat adaptation constitutes a complex dynamic process, wh...

  5. Designer Yeasts for the Fermentation Industry of the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Pretorius, Isak S.; du Toit, Maret; van Rensburg, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enjoyed a long and distinguished history in the fermention industry. Owing to its efficiency in producing alcohol, S. cerevisiae is, without doubt, the most important commercial microorganism with GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) status. By brewing beer and sparkling wine, mankind’s oldest domesticated organism made possible the world’s first biotechnological processes. With the emergence of modern molecular genetics, S. cerevisiae has again b...

  6. Yeast prt1 mutations alter heat-shock gene expression through transcript fragmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, C.A.; Singer, R A; Johnston, G C

    1993-01-01

    The inhibition of translation initiation by modification or mutation of initiation factors can lead to disproportionate effects on gene expression. Here we report disproportionate decreases in gene expression in cells with mutated Prt1 activity. The PRT1 gene product of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is necessary for translation initiation and is thought to be a component of initiation factor 3. At a restrictive temperature the prt1-1 mutation, in addition to decreasing global pro...

  7. Atypical yeasts identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae by MALDI-TOF MS and gene sequencing are the main responsible of fermentation of chicha, a traditional beverage from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Miranda, Patricia; Flores-Félix, José David; Sánchez-Juanes, Fernando; Ageitos, José M; González-Buitrago, José Manuel; Velázquez, Encarna; Villa, Tomás G

    2013-12-01

    Chicha is a drink prepared in several Andean countries from Inca's times by maize fermentation. Currently this fermentation is carried out in familiar artesanal "chicherías" that make one of the most known types of chicha, the "chicha de jora". In this study we isolate and identify the yeasts mainly responsible of the fermentation process in this type of chicha in 10 traditional "chicherías" in Cusco region in Peru. We applied by first time MALDI-TOF MS analysis for the identification of yeast of non-clinic origin and the results showed that all of yeast strains isolated belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results agree with those obtained after the analysis of the D1/D2 and 5.8S-ITS regions. However the chicha strains have a phenotypic profile that differed in more than 40% as compared to that of current S. cerevisiae strains. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report concerning the yeasts involved in chicha fermentation. PMID:24120265

  8. SFH2 regulates fatty acid synthase activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is critical to prevent saturated fatty acid accumulation in response to haem and oleic acid depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Desfougères, Thomas; Ferreira, Thierry; Bergès, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a facultative anaerobic organism. In anaerobiosis, sustained growth relies on the presence of exogenously supplied unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol that yeast is unable to synthesize in the absence of oxygen or upon haem depletion. In the absence of exogenous supplementation with unsaturated fatty acid, a net accumulation of saturated fatty acid (SFA) is observed that induces significant modification of phospholipid profile [1]. ...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  10. Direct Cloning of Yeast Genes from an Ordered Set of Lambda Clones in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Recombination in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, J. R.; Johnston, M

    1993-01-01

    We describe a technique that facilitates the isolation of yeast genes that are difficult to clone. This technique utilizes a plasmid vector that rescues lambda clones as yeast centromere plasmids. The source of these lambda clones is a set of clones whose location in the yeast genome has been determined by L. Riles et al. in 1993. The Esherichia coli-yeast shuttle plasmid carries URA3, ARS4 and CEN6, and contains DNA fragments from the lambda vector that flank the cloned yeast insert. When ye...

  11. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato; João Martins Pizauro Júnior; Márcia Justino Rossini Mutton

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps), Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1), Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2) and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db)], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast stra...

  12. Paclitaxel-induced microtubule stabilization causes mitotic block and apoptotic-like cell death in a paclitaxel-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Foland, Travis B.; Dentler, William L.; SUPRENANT, KATHY A.; Gupta, Mohan L.; Himes, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    Wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae tubulin does not bind the anti-mitotic microtubule stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Previously, we introduced mutations into the S. cerevisiae gene for β-tubulin that imparted paclitaxel binding to the protein, but the mutant strain was not sensitive to paclitaxel and other microtubule-stabilizing agents, due to the multiple ABC transporters in the membranes of budding yeast. Here, we introduced the mutated β-tubulin gene into a S. cerevisiae strain with dimini...

  13. Identification of dosage-sensitive genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the genetic tug-of-war method

    OpenAIRE

    Makanae, Koji; Kintaka, Reiko; Makino, Takashi; Kitano, Hiroaki; Moriya, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Gene overexpression beyond a permissible limit causes defects in cellular functions. However, the permissible limits of most genes are unclear. Previously, we developed a genetic method designated genetic tug-of-war (gTOW) to measure the copy number limit of overexpression of a target gene. In the current study, we applied gTOW to the analysis of all protein-coding genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We showed that the yeast cellular system was robust against an increase in t...

  14. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts. PMID:26865376

  15. APPROBATION OF GENOTYPING METHOD OF WINE YEAST (GENUS SACCHAROMYCES) BY THE ANALYSIS OF INTER-DELTA GENOMIC REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Suprun I. I.; Tokmakov S. V.; Ageeva N. M.; Prakh A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to genotype some commercial wine yeast strains using the assay of Interdelta genomic sequences. Experimental parameters of PCR to identify were optimized and optimal simplified method of DNA extraction from dried preparations of yeast cultures was define. Proven method showed a high level of resolution and can be used for the analysis of genetic diversity wine yeast in combination with SSR-markers

  16. Utilization of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for the production of yeast extract: effects of different enzymatic treatments on solid, protein and carbohydrate recovery

    OpenAIRE

    TATJANA VUKASINOVIC MILIC; MARICA RAKIN; SLAVICA SILER-MARINKOVIC

    2007-01-01

    Yeast extract (YE) was produced from commercial pressed baker's yeast (active and inactivated) using two enzymes: papain and lyticase. The effects of enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the recovery of solid, protein and carbohydrate were investigated. Autolysis, as a basic method for cell lysis was also used and the results compared. The optimal extraction conditions were investigated. The optimal concentrations of papain and lyticase were found to be 2.5 % and 0.025 %, respectively.

  17. Utilization of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of yeast extract: effects of different enzymatic treatments on solid, protein and carbohydrate recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA VUKASINOVIC MILIC

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeast extract (YE was produced from commercial pressed baker's yeast (active and inactivated using two enzymes: papain and lyticase. The effects of enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the recovery of solid, protein and carbohydrate were investigated. Autolysis, as a basic method for cell lysis was also used and the results compared. The optimal extraction conditions were investigated. The optimal concentrations of papain and lyticase were found to be 2.5 % and 0.025 %, respectively.

  18. Influence of the Addition of Riboflavin in Culture Medium on Delivering Biomass Using Yeast Strains of Saccharomyces Carlsbengensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Nicoară

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts requirements for growth factors should be considered both in terms of ability to summarize the simpleaverage and the dependence on external supplies. Vitamins are components of coenzymes or enzymes prostheticgroups and thus they are growth factors for yeast. The study concerns about the influence of the addition ofriboflavin in culture medium in different quantities, the accumulation of yeast biomass under the action of yeaststrains of beer. The process of cultivation has been made for 24 hours at a temperature of 220C. The addition ofriboflavin in culture medium of yeast biomass increased in each strain of yeast compared with the witness - thesample without added riboflavin. Biomass obtained by follow this procedure could be used to create new foodproducts with high ration nutritional value.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a soluble variant of the monoglyceride lipase Yju3p from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soluble variant of the monoglyceride lipase Yju3p was successfully expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The protein Yju3p is the orthologue of monoglyceride lipases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A soluble variant of this lipase termed s-Yju3p (38.3 kDa) was generated and purified to homogeneity by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. s-Yju3p was crystallized in a vapour-diffusion setup at 293 K and a complete data set was collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal form was orthorhombic (space group P212121), with unit-cell parameters a = 77.2, b = 108.6, c = 167.7 Å. The asymmetric unit contained four molecules with a solvent content of 46.4%

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a soluble variant of the monoglyceride lipase Yju3p from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengachari, Srinivasan; Aschauer, Philipp; Sturm, Christian; Oberer, Monika, E-mail: m.oberer@uni-graz.at [University of Graz, Humboldtstrasse 50/3, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2015-01-28

    A soluble variant of the monoglyceride lipase Yju3p was successfully expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The protein Yju3p is the orthologue of monoglyceride lipases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A soluble variant of this lipase termed s-Yju3p (38.3 kDa) was generated and purified to homogeneity by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. s-Yju3p was crystallized in a vapour-diffusion setup at 293 K and a complete data set was collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal form was orthorhombic (space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}), with unit-cell parameters a = 77.2, b = 108.6, c = 167.7 Å. The asymmetric unit contained four molecules with a solvent content of 46.4%.

  1. Influence the oxidant action of selenium in radiosensitivity induction and cell death in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Influencia da acao oxidante do selenio na inducao da radiossensibilidade e morte celular na levedura Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Barbara Abranches de Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are from both natural sources such as from anthropogenic sources. Recently, radiotherapy has emerged as one of the most common therapies against cancer. Co-60 irradiators (cobalt-60 linear accelerators) are used to treat of malignant tumors routinely in hospitals around the world. Exposure to ionizing radiation can induce changes in cellular macromolecules and affect its functions, because they cause radiolysis of the water molecule generating reactive oxygen species, which can cause damage to virtually all organelles and cell components known as oxidative damage that can culminate in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a situation in which the balance between oxidants and antioxidants is broken resulting in excessive production of reactive species, it is not accompanied by the increase in antioxidant capacity, making it impossible to neutralize them. Selenium is a micronutrient considered as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, which could prevent cancer. Selenium in biological system exists as seleno proteins. Nowadays, 25 human seleno proteins have been identified, including glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidant enzyme. Yeasts have the ability to incorporate various metals such as iron, cadmium, zinc and selenium, as well as all biological organisms. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unlike mammalian cells is devoid of seleno proteins, being considered as a practical model for studies on the toxicity of selenium, without any interference from the metabolism of seleno proteins. Moreover, yeast cells proliferate through the fermentation, the microbial equivalent of aerobic glycolysis in mammals and the process is also used by tumors. Several reports show that the pro-oxidante effects and induced toxic selenium compounds occur at lower doses and in malignant cells compared with benign cells. Therefore selenium giving a great therapeutic potential in cancer treatment .Our objective was to determine whether selenium is capable to sensitize yeasts

  2. Induction of energy metabolism related enzymes in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ibogaine is adaptation to acute decrease in ATP energy pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskulin, Roman; Jamnik, Polona; Obermajer, Natasa; Slavić, Marija; Strukelj, Borut

    2010-02-10

    Ibogaine has been extensively studied in the last decades in relation to its anti-addictive properties that have been repeatedly reported as being addiction interruptive and craving eliminative. In our previous study we have already demonstrated induction of energy related enzymes in rat brains treated with ibogaine at a dose of 20mg/kg i.p. 24 and 72 h prior to proteomic analysis. In this study a model organism yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated with ibogaine in a concentration of 1mg/l. Energy metabolism cluster enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase and alcohol dehydrogenase were induced after 5h of exposure. This is a compensation of demonstrated ATP pool decrease after ibogaine. Yeast in a stationary growth phase is an accepted model for studies of housekeeping metabolism of eukaryotes, including humans. Study showed that ibogaine's influence on metabolism is neither species nor tissue specific. Effect is not mediated by binding of ibogaine to receptors, as previously described in literature since they are lacking in this model. PMID:19853595

  3. One-pot green synthesis of carbon dots by using Saccharum officinarum juice for fluorescent imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Vaibhavkumar N. [Applied Chemistry Department, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395 007 (India); Jha, Sanjay [Gujarat Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Navsari Agricultural University, Surat, 395007 (India); Kailasa, Suresh Kumar, E-mail: sureshkumarchem@gmail.com [Applied Chemistry Department, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395 007 (India)

    2014-05-01

    We are reporting highly economical plant-based hydrothermal method for one-pot green synthesis of water-dispersible fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) by using Saccharum officinarum juice as precursor. The synthesized CDs were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM), and laser scanning confocal microscopic techniques. The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm and showed bright blue fluorescence under UV-light (λ{sub ex} = 365 nm). These CDs acted as excellent fluorescent probes in cellular imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). - Highlights: • One-pot green synthesis was used for fluorescent CDs. • FT-IR, DLS, and TEM were used for the characterization of CDs. • The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm. • The CDs acted as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacteria and yeast cells.

  4. One-pot green synthesis of carbon dots by using Saccharum officinarum juice for fluorescent imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting highly economical plant-based hydrothermal method for one-pot green synthesis of water-dispersible fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) by using Saccharum officinarum juice as precursor. The synthesized CDs were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM), and laser scanning confocal microscopic techniques. The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm and showed bright blue fluorescence under UV-light (λex = 365 nm). These CDs acted as excellent fluorescent probes in cellular imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). - Highlights: • One-pot green synthesis was used for fluorescent CDs. • FT-IR, DLS, and TEM were used for the characterization of CDs. • The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm. • The CDs acted as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacteria and yeast cells

  5. Efeito do enriquecimento de biscoitos tipo água e sal, com extrato de levedura (Saccharomyces sp. Effect of enrichment of water and salt biscuits with yeast (Saccharomyces sp. extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Carelli Costa Santucci

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos desta pesquisa foram a caracterização química de um autolisado (AT de levedura (Saccharomyces sp. , subproduto da fermentação alcoólica e de seus derivados, fração solúvel (Ex e insolúvel (FI. O autolisado integral (AT e o extrato (Ex, depois de desidratados por atomização (spray dryer foram utilizados como enriquecedores do gosto e do aroma de biscoitos salgados do tipo água e sal. A adição ao biscoito de 5% de Ex elevou o escore de aminoácidos essenciais (EAE de 38% para 60% e o índice de utilização líquida da proteína (NPR de 1,0 para 2,0 (100%. Houve ainda uma melhora significativa na aceitabilidade e na preferência dos biscoitos enriquecidos, pelos consumidores.The objective of this investigation was to establish the composition of the yeast (Saccharomyces sp. obtained as a byproduct of the alcoholic fermentation industry, in the form of an autolysate (AT and their derivatives, extract (Ex and insoluble fraction (FI. The total autolysate (AT and the extract (Ex, after dehydration in spray dryer, were utilized as flavour enhancers in salted biscuits. Addition to the biscuits of 5% Ex improved the essential amino acid score (EAE from 38 to 60%, and the net protein utilization index (NPR from 1.0 to 2.0 (100%. There was also a significant improvement in the acceptability and preference of the enriched biscuits by the consumers.

  6. POTENCIALIDADES DE LINHAGENS DE LEVEDURA Saccharomyces cerevisiae PARA A FERMENTAÇÃO DO CALDO DE CANA POTENTIALITIES OF YEAST STRAINS OF Saccharomyces cerevisiae FOR SUGAR CANE JUICE FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto França Ribeiro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Três linhagens de levedura da espécie Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sendo duas floculantes, das quais uma não produtora de sulfeto de hidrogênio, foram avaliadas para se verificar seus desempenhos, sob parâmetros cinéticos, bem como a formação de compostos secundários na fermentação do caldo de cana-de-açúcar, destinado à produção de aguardente. O acompanhamento da cinética fermentativa mostrou melhores resultados de eficiência de fermentação, fator de conversão de substrato em etanol e velocidade específica de crescimento pela linhagem floculante IZ 987, que foram de 89,9%, 0,46 g.g-1 e 0,0996 h-1 respectivamente. Esta linhagem foi também responsável pela maior produção de álcoois superiores, 185 mg.L-1, inerente à sua característica de não produzir H2S. A melhor produtividade de fermentação, de 3,40 g.L-1.h-1, foi a obtida pela linhagem floculante LF. A linhagem FP, não floculante, isolada à partir do fermento prensado, proporcionou os menores valores dos parâmetros cinéticos estudados.Three yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, two flocculants, one of them non hydrogen sulfide producer, were evaluated for their behavior on kinetic parameters and production of volatile compounds, during sugar cane juice fermentation. The fermentation kinetics presented better performance in terms of fermentation efficiency, ethanol yield and specific growth rate, 89.9%; 0.46 g.g-1 and 0.0996 h-1, respectively, for the IZ 987 strain, that also produced larger amounts of higher alcohols, 185 mg.L-1, inherent to its H2S negative character. Higher ethanol productivity, about 3.40 g.L-1.h-1, was achieved by the flocculant strain. The strain isolated from baker's yeast promoted the poorest results.

  7. Use of sugarcane molasses "B" as an alternative for ethanol production with wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 at high sugar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, C L; Torrestiana-Sánchez, B; Salgado-Cervantes, M A; García, P G Mendoza; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2012-05-01

    Molasses "B" is a rich co-product of the sugarcane process. It is obtained from the second step of crystallization and is richer in fermentable sugars (50-65%) than the final molasses, with a lower non-sugar solid content (18-33%); this co-product also contains good vitamin and mineral levels. The use of molasses "B" for ethanol production could be a good option for the sugarcane industry when cane sugar prices diminish in the market. In a complex medium like molasses, osmotolerance is a desirable characteristic for ethanol producing strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of molasses "B" for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 (a wild-type yeast isolated from sugarcane molasses) using different initial sugar concentrations (70-291 g L(-1)), two inoculum sizes and the addition of nutrients such as yeast extract, urea, and ammonium sulphate to the culture medium. The results obtained showed that the strain was able to grow at 291 g L(-1) total sugars in molasses "B" medium; the addition of nutrients to the culture medium did not produce a statistically significant difference. This yeast exhibits high osmotolerance in this medium, producing high ethanol yields (0.41 g g(-1)). The best conditions for ethanol production were 220 g L(-1) initial total sugars in molasses "B" medium, pH 5.5, using an inoculum size of 6 × 10(6) cell mL(-1); ethanol production was 85 g L(-1), productivity 3.8 g L(-1 )h(-1) with 90% preserved cell viability. PMID:21971607

  8. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures. PMID:27339306

  9. The Yeast Shu Complex Utilizes Homologous Recombination Machinery for Error-free Lesion Bypass via Physical Interaction with a Rad51 Paralogue

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xin; Ball, Lindsay; Chen, Wangyang; Tian, Xuelei; Lambrecht, Amanda; Hanna, Michelle; Xiao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) is defined as a mechanism by which eukaryotic cells resume DNA synthesis to fill the single-stranded DNA gaps left by replication-blocking lesions. Eukaryotic cells employ two different means of DDT, namely translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and template switching, both of which are coordinately regulated through sequential ubiquitination of PCNA at the K164 residue. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same PCNA-K164 residue can also be sumoylated, which...

  10. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell...

  11. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Emma Rossi; Walter Carotenuto; Michele Giannattasio

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) (1), which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip) (2–4) of replisome components allows the precise localization of al...

  12. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Silvia Emma; Carotenuto, Walter; Giannattasio, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) (1), which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip) (2–4) of replisome components allows the precise localization of al...

  13. Importância da parede celular de levedura (Saccharomyces sp. como fonte de fibra na alimentação Importance of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall as source of dietary fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa A. PÁDUA

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available O principal objetivo desta pesquisa foi estudar a influência da adição de 10% e 20% da fração parede celular de levedura (Saccharomyces sp., a uma dieta hipercolesterolêmica (5% gordura de coco mais 2% colesterol em ratos Wistar. A justificativa para o trabalho está relacionada com a quantidade crescente de levedura gerada como subproduto nas indústrias de álcool e de cerveja e o interesse na utilização de derivados de levedura como ingredientes funcionais em alimentação humana. Utilizou-se como padrão uma dieta de caseína (AIN-93G com 5% de celulose. Foram também utilizadas dietas hipercolesterolêmicas com 10 ou 20% de celulose, para comparação. Foram avaliados os índices: digestibilidade, valor biológico e utilização líquida aparentes da proteína, quociente de eficiência alimentar, velocidade de trânsito do conteúdo intestinal, comprimento do intestino delgado e as concentrações séricas de lipídios totais, triacilgliceróis e colesterol total. A fração parede celular, assim como a celulose provocaram uma diminuição da digestibilidade da proteína e do quociente de eficiência alimentar, mas não se observou influência no valor biológico da proteína e no ganho de peso. A adição de 10% ou 20%, tanto de parede celular como de celulose promoveu aumento da velocidade de trânsito do conteúdo intestinal e aumento no comprimento do intestino delgado. A fração parede celular nas concentrações de 10% (1° ensaio ou 20% (2° ensaio promoveu abaixamento nos níveis de triacilgliceróis séricos, contudo não influiu no abaixamento das concentrações de lipídios totais e de colesterol total.The main objective of this investigation was to study the influence of 10 and 20% addition of yeast (Saccharomyces sp. cell wall into a hypercholesterolemic (5% coconut fat plus 2% cholesterol diet, on Wistar rats. The work is justified by the increasing amount of yeast generated as byproduct of the alcohol and brewer

  14. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway. PMID:27068957

  15. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  16. Electro-stimulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts by Pulsed Electric Field and its effect on fermentation performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mattar, J.; Turk, M.; Nonus, M.; Lebovka, N. I.; Zakhem, H. El; Vorobiev, E.

    2013-01-01

    The batch fermentation process, inoculated by pulsed electric field (PEF) treated wine yeasts (S. cerevisiae Actiflore F33), was studied. PEF treatment was applied to the aqueous yeast suspensions (0.12 % wt.) at the electric field strengths of E=100 and 6000 V/cm using the same pulse protocol (number of pulses of n=1000, pulse duration of ti=100 mks, and pulse repetition time of dt=100 ms). Electro-stimulation was confirmed by the observed growth of electrical conductivity of suspensions. Th...

  17. Cell cycle phases in the unequal mother/daughter cell cycles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Brewer, B J; Chlebowicz-Sledziewska, E; Fangman, W L

    1984-01-01

    During cell division in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother cells produce buds (daughter cells) which are smaller and have longer cell cycles. We performed experiments to compare the lengths of cell cycle phases in mothers and daughters. As anticipated from earlier indirect observations, the longer cell cycle time of daughter cells is accounted for by a longer G1 interval. The S-phase and the G2-phase are of the same duration in mother and daughter cells. An analysis of five isogenic st...

  18. SSI1 encodes a novel Hsp70 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum.

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, B K; James, P; Evans, T.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK); Craig, E A

    1996-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a well-characterized, essential member of the Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones, Kar2p. Kar2p has been shown to be involved in the translocation of proteins into the ER as well as the proper folding of proteins in that compartment. We report the characterization of a novel Hsp70 of the ER, Ssi1p. Ssi1p, which shares 24% of the amino acids of Kar2p, is not essential for growth under normal conditions. Howe...

  19. Polygenic analysis and targeted improvement of the complex trait of high acetic acid tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Randazzo, Paola; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; van den Brink, Joost; Vandecruys, Paul; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Dumortier, Françoise; Zalar, Polona; Boekhout, Teun; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Kokošar, Janez; Štajdohar, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Petrovič, Uroš; Thevelein, Johan M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates used for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Although several genes have been identified in laboratory yeast strains that are required for tolerance to acetic acid, the genetic basis of the high acetic

  20. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lin Zheng

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature.

  1. Yeast artificial chromosomes employed for random assembly of biosynthetic pathways and production of diverse compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Partha P

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural products are an important source of drugs and other commercially interesting compounds, however their isolation and production is often difficult. Metabolic engineering, mainly in bacteria and yeast, has sought to circumvent some of the associated problems but also this approach is impeded by technical limitations. Here we describe a novel strategy for production of diverse natural products, comprising the expression of an unprecedented large number of biosynthetic genes in a heterologous host. Results As an example, genes from different sources, representing enzymes of a seven step flavonoid pathway, were individually cloned into yeast expression cassettes, which were then randomly combined on Yeast Artificial Chromosomes and used, in a single transformation of yeast, to create a variety of flavonoid producing pathways. Randomly picked clones were analysed, and approximately half of them showed production of the flavanone naringenin, and a third of them produced the flavonol kaempferol in various amounts. This reflected the assembly of 5–7 step multi-species pathways converting the yeast metabolites phenylalanine and/or tyrosine into flavonoids, normally only produced by plants. Other flavonoids were also produced that were either direct intermediates or derivatives thereof. Feeding natural and unnatural, halogenated precursors to these recombinant clones demonstrated the potential to further diversify the type of molecules that can be produced with this technology. Conclusion The technology has many potential uses but is particularly suited for generating high numbers of structurally diverse compounds, some of which may not be amenable to chemical synthesis, thus greatly facilitating access to a huge chemical space in the search for new commercially interesting compounds

  2. BioGRID: A Resource for Studying Biological Interactions in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughtred, Rose; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Chang, Christie S; Rust, Jennifer M; Theesfeld, Chandra L; Heinicke, Sven; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Chen, Daici; Hirschman, Jodi; Kolas, Nadine; Livstone, Michael S; Nixon, Julie; O'Donnell, Lara; Ramage, Lindsay; Winter, Andrew; Reguly, Teresa; Sellam, Adnane; Stark, Chris; Boucher, Lorrie; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) is a freely available public database that provides the biological and biomedical research communities with curated protein and genetic interaction data. Structured experimental evidence codes, an intuitive search interface, and visualization tools enable the discovery of individual gene, protein, or biological network function. BioGRID houses interaction data for the major model organism species--including yeast, nematode, fly, zebrafish, mouse, and human--with particular emphasis on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as pioneer eukaryotic models for network biology. BioGRID has achieved comprehensive curation coverage of the entire literature for these two major yeast models, which is actively maintained through monthly curation updates. As of September 2015, BioGRID houses approximately 335,400 biological interactions for budding yeast and approximately 67,800 interactions for fission yeast. BioGRID also supports an integrated posttranslational modification (PTM) viewer that incorporates more than 20,100 yeast phosphorylation sites curated through its sister database, the PhosphoGRID. PMID:26729913

  3. A contribution of budding yeast to unravel aging. Entry into quiescence relies on the transceptor Mtl1 by sensing nutrients and regulation of signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Sundaram, Venkatraghavan

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a premier model system to study ageing in post mitotic cells. In this study, we show that Mtl1, member of the Cell Wall Integrity pathway (CWI), plays a positive role in Chronological Life Span (CLS). The absence of Mtl1 shortens CLS whereas its overexpression extends it. In mtl1 cells, we observe mitochondrial dysfunction during diauxic shift that is reflected in i) increase in uncoupled respiration associated to low oxygen consumption; ii) signific...

  4. Production and characterization of glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori expressed in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different carbon sources Produção e caracterização da glucoamilase do fungo Aspergillus awamori expressa em levedura Saccharomyces cerevisiae usando diferentes fontes de carbono

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Carina Pavezzi; Eleni Gomes; Roberto da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Glucoamylase is widely used in the food industry to produce high glucose syrup, and also in fermentation processes for production beer and ethanol. In this work the productivity of the glucoamylase of Aspergillus awamori expressed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, produced in submerged fermentation using different starches, was evaluated and characterized physico-chemically. The enzyme presented high specific activity, 13.8 U/mgprotein or 2.9 U/mgbiomass, after 48 h of fermentation using...

  5. Functional conservation between Schizosaccharomyces pombe ste8 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11 protein kinases in yeast signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O;

    1992-01-01

    In fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), the mat1-Pm gene, which is required for entry into meiosis, is expressed in response to a pheromone signal. Cells carrying a mutation in the ste8 gene are unable to induce transcription of mat1-Pm in response to pheromone, suggesting that the ste8 gene......, ste8 mutant cells will enter meiosis. This demonstrates that the meiotic defect of ste8 mutants is due to the absence of the mat1-Pm gene product....

  6. Reduction of ethanol yield and improvement of glycerol formation by adaptive evolution of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under hyperosmotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilloy, Valentin; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Dequin, Sylvie

    2014-04-01

    There is a strong demand from the wine industry for methodologies to reduce the alcohol content of wine without compromising wine's sensory characteristics. We assessed the potential of adaptive laboratory evolution strategies under hyperosmotic stress for generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains with enhanced glycerol and reduced ethanol yields. Experimental evolution on KCl resulted, after 200 generations, in strains that had higher glycerol and lower ethanol production than the ancestral strain. This major metabolic shift was accompanied by reduced fermentative capacities, suggesting a trade-off between high glycerol production and fermentation rate. Several evolved strains retaining good fermentation performance were selected. These strains produced more succinate and 2,3-butanediol than the ancestral strain and did not accumulate undesirable organoleptic compounds, such as acetate, acetaldehyde, or acetoin. They survived better under osmotic stress and glucose starvation conditions than the ancestral strain, suggesting that the forces that drove the redirection of carbon fluxes involved a combination of osmotic and salt stresses and carbon limitation. To further decrease the ethanol yield, a breeding strategy was used, generating intrastrain hybrids that produced more glycerol than the evolved strain. Pilot-scale fermentation on Syrah using evolved and hybrid strains produced wine with 0.6% (vol/vol) and 1.3% (vol/vol) less ethanol, more glycerol and 2,3-butanediol, and less acetate than the ancestral strain. This work demonstrates that the combination of adaptive evolution and breeding is a valuable alternative to rational design for remodeling the yeast metabolic network. PMID:24532067

  7. Effects of combined treatment of gamma irradiation and refrigeration on yeast growth (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen) in orange juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of gamma radiation and low temperatures was studied on yeast growth on orange juice. Concentrated orange juice (650 C Brix) was diluted at 10,50 C Brix and inoculated with comercial biological yeasts. The samples were irradiated with doses of 0.0 (control), 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 kGy (Cobalt-60), with 2.83 kGy/h of dose rate. All the samples were stored at 00 C, 05 and 250 C for periods of 1, 7, 14, 21, 30, 60 e 90 days of storage. Combined treatment of 1 kGy and refrigeration at 00 C was effective for orange juice conservation on 90 days of storage. The dose of 2.5 kGy, was enough to conserve the juice on 90 days of storage on 50 C. At 250 C only the two highest radiation doses (5.0 and 7.5 kGy) wereeffective to control yeast growth in orange juice. (author). 11 refs, 4 tabs

  8. Engineering Cofactor Preference of Ketone Reducing Biocatalysts: A Mutagenesis Study on a γ-Diketone Reductase from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Serving as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Katzberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of pharmaceuticals and catalysts more and more relies on enantiopure chiral building blocks. These can be produced in an environmentally benign and efficient way via bioreduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by dehydrogenases. A productive source of these biocatalysts is the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose genome also encodes a reductase catalyzing the sequential reduction of the γ-diketone 2,5-hexanedione furnishing the diol (2S,5S-hexanediol and the γ-hydroxyketone (5S-hydroxy-2-hexanone in high enantio- as well as diastereoselectivity (ee and de >99.5%. This enzyme prefers NADPH as the hydrogen donating cofactor. As NADH is more stable and cheaper than NADPH it would be more effective if NADH could be used in cell-free bioreduction systems. To achieve this, the cofactor binding site of the dehydrogenase was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the rational approach based on a homology model of the enzyme allowed us to generate a mutant enzyme having a relaxed cofactor preference and thus is able to use both NADPH and NADH. Results obtained from other mutants are discussed and point towards the limits of rationally designed mutants.

  9. Improved production of fatty acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuobo; Ji, Haichuan; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Biological production of fatty acid (FA)-derived products has gained increasing attention to replace petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. FA biosynthesis is highly regulated, and usually it is challenging to design rational engineering strategies. In addition, the conventional 'one sample at a time' method for lipid determination is time consuming and laborious, and it is difficult to screen large numbers of samples. Here, a method for detecting free FAs in viable cells using Nile red staining was developed for use in large-scale screening. Following optimization of the method, it was used for screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for identification of genes/enzymes that were able to enhance free FA accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several novel enzymes resulting in increasing FA accumulation were discovered. These targets include a GPI anchor protein, malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, FA hydroxylase, farnesyltransferase, anoctamin, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase and phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein. The best enzyme resulted in a 2.5-fold improvement in production of free FAs. Our findings not only provide a novel method for high-throughput evaluation of the content of free FAs, but also give new insight into how enzymes from Y. lipolytica may increase the production of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26658002

  10. Effect of 905 MHz microwave radiation on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains FF18733, FF1481 and D7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of weak radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by mobile phones on colony growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae strains FF18733 (wild-type), FF1481 (rad1 mutant) and D7 (commonly used to detect reciprocal and nonreciprocal mitotic recombinations) were exposed to a 905 MHz electromagnetic field that closely matched the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) pulse modulation signals for mobile phones at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.12 W/kg. Following 15-, 30- and 60-minutes exposure to RF/MW radiation, strain FF18733 did not show statistically significant changes in colony growth compared to the control sample. The irradiated strains FF1481 and D7 demonstrated statistically significant reduction of colony growth compared to non-irradiated strains after all exposure times. Furthermore, strain FF1481 was more sensitive to RF/MW radiation than strain D7. The findings indicate that pulsed RF/MW radiation at a low SAR level can affect the rate of colony growth of different S. cerevisiae strains

  11. Effect of camelina oil or live yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on ruminal methane production, rumen fermentation, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, A R; Kairenius, P; Stefański, T; Leskinen, H; Comtet-Marre, S; Forano, E; Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Shingfield, K J

    2015-05-01

    The potential of dietary supplements of 2 live yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or camelina oil to lower ruminal methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and the associated effects on animal performance, rumen fermentation, rumen microbial populations, nutrient metabolism, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition of cows fed grass silage-based diets were examined. Four Finnish Ayrshire cows (53±7 d in milk) fitted with rumen cannula were used in a 4×4 Latin square with four 42-d periods. Cows received a basal total mixed ration (control treatment) with a 50:50 forage-to-concentrate ratio [on a dry matter (DM) basis] containing grass silage, the same basal total mixed ration supplemented with 1 of 2 live yeasts, A or B, administered directly in the rumen at 10(10) cfu/d (treatments A and B), or supplements of 60g of camelina oil/kg of diet DM that replaced concentrate ingredients in the basal total mixed ration (treatment CO). Relative to the control, treatments A and B had no effects on DM intake, rumen fermentation, ruminal gas production, or apparent total-tract nutrient digestibility. In contrast, treatment CO lowered DM intake and ruminal CH4 and CO2 production, responses associated with numerical nonsignificant decreases in total-tract organic matter digestibility, but no alterations in rumen fermentation characteristics or changes in the total numbers of rumen bacteria, methanogens, protozoa, and fungi. Compared with the control, treatment CO decreased the yields of milk, milk fat, lactose, and protein. Relative to treatment B, treatment CO improved nitrogen utilization due to a lower crude protein intake. Treatment A had no influence on milk FA composition, whereas treatment B increased cis-9 10:1 and decreased 11-cyclohexyl 11:0 and 24:0 concentrations. Treatment CO decreased milk fat 8:0 to 16:0 and total saturated FA, and increased 18:0, 18:1, 18:2, conjugated linoleic acid, 18:3n-3, and trans FA concentrations. Decreases in ruminal CH4

  12. Defining the Pathogenesis of the Human Atp12p W94R Mutation Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Meulemans, Ann; Seneca, Sara; Pribyl, Thomas; Smet, Joel; Alderweirldt, Valerie; Waeytens, Anouk; Lissens, Willy; Van Coster, Rudy; De Meirleir, Linda; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Gatti, Domenico L; Ackerman, Sharon H.

    2009-01-01

    Studies in yeast have shown that a deficiency in Atp12p prevents assembly of the extrinsic domain (F1) of complex V and renders cells unable to make ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. De Meirleir et al. (De Meirleir, L., Seneca, S., Lissens, W., De Clercq, I., Eyskens, F., Gerlo, E., Smet, J., and Van Coster, R. (2004) J. Med. Genet. 41, 120–124) have reported that a homozygous missense mutation in the gene for human Atp12p (HuAtp12p), which replaces Trp-94 with Arg, was linked to the dea...

  13. Rmi1, a member of the Sgs1–Top3 complex in budding yeast, contributes to sister chromatid cohesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Mong Sing; Seki, Masayuki; Ui, Ayako; Enomoto, Takemi

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RecQ-mediated genome instability (Rmi1) protein was recently identified as the third member of the slow growth suppressor 1–DNA topoisomerase III (Sgs1–Top3) complex, which is required for maintaining genomic stability. Here, we show that cells lacking RMI1 have a mitotic delay, which is partly dependent on the spindle checkpoint, and are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerizing agent benomyl. We show that rmi1 and top3 single mutants are defective in sister ch...

  14. Succinic acid in levels produced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) during fermentation strongly impacts wheat bread dough properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Vinay B; Cuyvers, Sven; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2014-05-15

    Succinic acid (SA) was recently shown to be the major pH determining metabolite produced by yeast during straight-dough fermentation (Jayaram et al., 2013), reaching levels as high as 1.6 mmol/100 g of flour. Here, the impact of such levels of SA (0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 mmol/100 g flour) on yeastless dough properties was investigated. SA decreased the development time and stability of dough significantly. Uniaxial extension tests showed a consistent decrease in dough extensibility upon increasing SA addition. Upon biaxial extension in the presence of 2.4 mmol SA/100 g flour, a dough extensibility decrease of 47-65% and a dough strength increase of 25-40% were seen. While the SA solvent retention capacity of flour increased with increasing SA concentration in the solvent, gluten agglomeration decreased with gluten yield reductions of over 50%. The results suggest that SA leads to swelling and unfolding of gluten proteins, thereby increasing their interaction potential and dough strength, but simultaneously increasing intermolecular electrostatic repulsive forces. These phenomena lead to the reported changes in dough properties. Together, our results establish SA as an important yeast metabolite for dough rheology. PMID:24423552

  15. Electro-stimulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts by Pulsed Electric Field and its effect on fermentation performance

    CERN Document Server

    Mattar, J; Nonus, M; Lebovka, N I; Zakhem, H El; Vorobiev, E

    2013-01-01

    The batch fermentation process, inoculated by pulsed electric field (PEF) treated wine yeasts (S. cerevisiae Actiflore F33), was studied. PEF treatment was applied to the aqueous yeast suspensions (0.12 % wt.) at the electric field strengths of E=100 and 6000 V/cm using the same pulse protocol (number of pulses of n=1000, pulse duration of ti=100 mks, and pulse repetition time of dt=100 ms). Electro-stimulation was confirmed by the observed growth of electrical conductivity of suspensions. The fermentation was running at 30{\\deg}C for 150 hours in an incubator with synchronic agitation. The obtained results clearly evidence the positive impact of PEF treatment on the batch fermentation process. Electro-stimulation resulted in improvement of such process characteristics as mass losses, consumption of soluble matter content ({\\deg}Brix) and synthesis of proteins. It also resulted in a noticeable acceleration of consumption of sugars at the initial stage of fermentation in the lag phase. At the end of the lag ph...

  16. Improvement on the productivity of continuous tequila fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae of Agave tequilana juice with supplementation of yeast extract and aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, Guillermo; Valle-Rodríguez, Juan Octavio; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María; González-García, Yolanda; Escalona-Buendía, Héctor B; Córdova, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    Agave (Agave tequilana Weber var. azul) fermentations are traditionally carried out employing batch systems in the process of tequila manufacturing; nevertheless, continuous cultures could be an attractive technological alternative to increase productivity and efficiency of sugar to ethanol conversion. However, agave juice (used as a culture medium) has nutritional deficiencies that limit the implementation of yeast continuous fermentations, resulting in high residual sugars and low fermentative rates. In this work, fermentations of agave juice using Saccharomyces cerevisiae were put into operation to prove the necessity of supplementing yeast extract, in order to alleviate nutritional deficiencies of agave juice. Furthermore, continuous fermentations were performed at two different aeration flow rates, and feeding sterilized and non-sterilized media. The obtained fermented musts were subsequently distilled to obtain tequila and the preference level was compared against two commercial tequilas, according to a sensorial analysis. The supplementation of agave juice with air and yeast extract augmented the fermentative capacity of S. cerevisiae S1 and the ethanol productivities, compared to those continuous fermentations non supplemented. In fact, aeration improved ethanol production from 37 to 40 g L(-1), reducing sugars consumption from 73 to 88 g L(-1) and ethanol productivity from 3.0 to 3.2 g (Lh)(-1), for non-aerated and aerated (at 0.02 vvm) cultures, respectively. Supplementation of yeast extract allowed an increase in specific growth rate and dilution rates (0.12 h(-1), compared to 0.08 h(-1) of non-supplemented cultures), ethanol production (47 g L(-1)), reducing sugars consumption (93 g L(-1)) and ethanol productivity [5.6 g (Lh)(-1)] were reached. Additionally, the effect of feeding sterilized or non-sterilized medium to the continuous cultures was compared, finding no significant differences between both types of cultures. The overall effect

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation through the HO 3′-UTR by Mpt5, a yeast homolog of Pumilio and FBF

    OpenAIRE

    Tadauchi, Tomofumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Herskowitz, Ira; Irie, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Caenorhabditis elegans FBF bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of their target mRNAs and repress translation. Pum and FBF are members of a large and evolutionarily conserved protein family, the Puf family, found in Drosophila, C.elegans, humans and yeasts. Budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has five proteins with conserved Puf motifs: Mpt5/Uth4, Ygl014w, Yll013c, Jsn1 and Ypr042c. Here we report that Mpt5 negatively regulates expression of the HO gen...

  18. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Schneider, Konstantin;

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly......, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We...... furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L−1 in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our...

  19. Comparative proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A global overview of in vivo targets of the yeast activator protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of the yeast activator protein 1 (Yap1p increases under stress conditions, which leads to enhanced transcription of a number of genes encoding protective enzymes or other proteins. To obtain a global overview of changes in expression of Yap1p-targeted proteins, we compared a Yap1p-overexpressing transformant with a control transformant by triplicate analysis of the proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins of interest were identified using MALDI-MS or LC-MS/MS. Results The relative quantities of 55 proteins were elevated significantly upon overexpression of Yap1p, and most of these proteins were found to have a Yap1p-binding site upstream of their coding sequences. Interestingly, the main metabolic enzymes in the glycolysis and pyruvate-ethanol pathways showed a significant increase in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Moreover, a comparison of our proteome data with transcriptome data from the literature suggested which proteins were regulated at the level of the proteome, and which proteins were regulated at the level of the transcriptome. Eight proteins involved in stress response, including seven heat-shock and chaperone proteins, were significantly more abundant in the Yap1p-overexpressing transformant. Conclusions We have investigated the general protein composition in Yap1p-overexpressing S. cerevisiae using proteomic techniques, and quantified the changes in the expression of the potential Yap1p-targeted proteins. Identification of the potential Yap1p targets and analysis of their role in cellular processes not only give a global overview of the ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by Yap1p, but also provide the framework for understanding the mechanisms behind Yap1p-regulated stress response in yeast.

  20. Sensitive determination of L-lysine with a new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Erdoğan, Ali; Oztürk, Ramazan; Yaşa, Ihsan

    2007-01-15

    A new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-12632 cells, which had been induced for lysine oxidase enzyme and immobilized in gelatin by a cross-linking agent was developed for the sensitive determination of L-lysine amino acid. To construct the microbial biosensor S. cerevisiae cells were activated and cultured in a suitable culture medium. By using gelatine (8.43 mg cm(-2)) and glutaraldehyde (0.25%), cells obtained in the logarithmic phase of the growth curve at the end of a 14 h period were immobilized and fixed on a pretreated oxygen sensitive Teflon membrane of a dissolved oxygen probe. The assay procedure of the microbial biosensor is based on the determination of the differences of the respiration activity of the cells on the oxygenmeter in the absence and the presence of L-lysine. According to the end point measurement technique used in the experiments it was determined that the microbial biosensor response depended linearly on L-lysine concentrations between 1.0 and 10.0 microM with a 1 min response time. In optimization studies of the microbial biosensor, the most suitable microorganism quantities were found to be 0.97x10(5)CFU cm(-2). In addition phosphate buffer (pH 7.5; 50 mM) and 30 degrees C were obtained as the optimum working conditions. In characterization studies of the microbial biosensor some parameters such as substrate specificity, interference effects of some substances on the microbial biosensor responses, reproducibility of the biosensor and operational and storage stability were investigated. PMID:16759846

  1. Functional analysis and localization studies of Phr1 and Gas1 proteins from the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and the budding yeast Saccharamyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón Blanco, Julia

    2009-01-01

    [ES] En esta tesis se estudia la caracterización funcional de dos proteínas contenientes glisosilfosfatidilinositol (GPI), Phr1p en el patógeno fúngico Candida albicans y su homólogo Gas1p en la levadura de gemación Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mediante el uso de técnicas de fusión de proteínas fluorescentes se pretendía llevar a cabo un estudio de la localización de CaPhr1p y ScGas1p con el propósito de analizar la función de dichas proteínas de membrana en distintos procesos morfogenéticas. Ad...

  2. Detection of γ-irradiation induced DNA damage and radioprotection of compounds in yeast using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE), a very rapid and sensitive method, has been applied to follow γ-irradiation induced DNA damage in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Spheroplasting the γ-irradiated yeast cells by enzyme glusulase, before subjecting them to electrophoresis, resulted in a well-defined appearance of comets. Yeast comets look quite different from mammalian comets. A linear relationship was observed between the doses of irradiation and the tail moments of comets. These studies were extended to follow the action of known radio-protectors, i.e., caffeine and disulfiram. The results revealed the usefulness SCGE as applied to yeast in studies of the γ-irradiation-induced DNA breaks and also radio-protection by chemicals at doses that are not feasible with other eukaryotes. (author)

  3. Yeast Bax inhibitor, Bxi1p, is an ER-localized protein that links the unfolded protein response and programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cebulski

    Full Text Available Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1 is an anti-apoptotic gene whose expression is upregulated in a wide range of human cancers. Studies in both mammalian and plant cells suggest that the BI-1 protein resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR that is triggered by ER stress. It is thought to act via a mechanism involving altered calcium dynamics. In this paper, we provide evidence that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein encoded by the open reading frame, YNL305C, is a bona fide homolog for BI-1. First, we confirm that yeast cells from two different strain backgrounds lacking YNL305C, which we have renamed BXI1, are more sensitive to heat-shock induced cell death than wildtype controls even though they have indistinguishable growth rates at 30°C. They are also more susceptible both to ethanol-induced and to glucose-induced programmed cell death. Significantly, we show that Bxi1p-GFP colocalizes with the ER localized protein Sec63p-RFP. We have also discovered that Δbxi1 cells are not only more sensitive to drugs that induce ER stress, but also have a decreased unfolded protein response as measured with a UPRE-lacZ reporter. Finally, we have discovered that deleting BXI1 diminishes the calcium signaling response in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER as measured by a calcineurin-dependent CDRE-lacZ reporter. In toto, our data suggests that the Bxi1p, like its metazoan homologs, is an ER-localized protein that links the unfolded protein response and programmed cell death.

  4. LISTA, LISTA-HOP and LISTA-HON: a comprehensive compilation of protein encoding sequences and its associated homology databases from the yeast Saccharomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölz, R; Mossé, M O; Slonimski, P P; Bairoch, A; Linder, P

    1996-01-01

    We continued our effort to make a comprehensive database (LISTA) for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As in previous editions the genetic names are consistently associated to each sequence with a known and confirmed ORF. If necessary, synonyms are given in the case of allelic duplicated sequences. Although the first publication of a sequence gives-according to our rules-the genetic name of a gene, in some instances more commonly used names are given to avoid nomenclature problems and the use of ancient designations which are no longer used. In these cases the old designation is given as synonym. Thus sequences can be found either by the name or by synonyms given in LISTA. Each entry contains the genetic name, the mnemonic from the EMBL data bank, the codon bias, reference of the publication of the sequence, Chromosomal location as far as known, SWISSPROT and EMBL accession numbers. New entries will also contain the name from the systematic sequencing efforts. Since the release of LISTA4.1 we update the database continuously. To obtain more information on the included sequences, each entry has been screened against non-redundant nucleotide and protein data bank collections resulting in LISTA-HON and LISTA-HOP. This release includes reports from full Smith and Watermann peptide-level searches against a non-redundant protein sequence database. The LISTA data base can be linked to the associated data sets or to nucleotide and protein banks by the Sequence Retrieval System (SRS). The database is available by FTP and on World Wide Web. PMID:8594599

  5. Antitumor and radiation protection effects of β-1,3-D-glucan extracted from yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various natural extracts are manufactured and on sale as health food products, which are raising popular consciousness of being fit, because they are considered effective or suppressible for cancer. In the current experiment, we measured the immunological activity, antitumor effects, and radioprotective effects of β-1,3-D-glucan (Macroglucan) extracted from bread yeast. Macroglucan of 0, 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg were administered intraperitoneally to C3H/HeJ mice, respectively. The antitumor effects of Macroglucan were examined by measuring natural killer (NK) and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity and tumor volume. Change in weight, survival, and microscopic manifestation of the intestine were evaluated in the C3H/HeJ mice received total body irradiation to measure radioprotective effect of Macroglucan. According to measurements of cellular cytotoxicity, levels of NK and LAK cell activity were significantly higher in the group administered Macroglucan than in the control group. Macroglucan's role in immunological activity was suggested by the observed suppression of tumor growth in the Macroglucan-administered group. That group also experienced suppression of weight loss after irradiation in the experiment for radioprotection, and a consequent increase in the survival rate compared with the control group. Protective effects appeared in photomicrographs of the intestinal cells. These results confirmed Macroglucan's radioprotective effects. These effects may be related to the suppression of infection accompanying immunological activation due to Macroglucan administration, antioxidant activity, and radical scavenging capacity. (author)

  6. Requirements of Slm proteins for proper eisosome organization, endocytic trafficking and recycling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kamble; Sandhya Jain; Erin Murphy; Kyoungtae Kim

    2011-03-01

    Eisosomes are large immobile assemblies at the cortex of a cell under the membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC) in yeast. Slm1 has recently been identified as an MCC component that acts downstream of Mss4 in a pathway that regulates actin cytoskeleton organization in response to stress. In this study, we showed that inactivation of Slm proteins disrupts proper localization of the primary eisosome marker Pil1, providing evidence that Slm proteins play a role in eisosome organization. Furthermore, we found that slmts mutant cells exhibit actin defects in both the ability to polarize cortical F-actin and the formation of cytoplasmic actin cables even at the permissive temperature (30°C). We further demonstrated that the actin defect accounts for the slow traffic of FM4-64-labelled endosome in the cytoplasm, supporting the notion that intact actin is essential for endosome trafficking. However, our real-time microscopic analysis of Abp1-RFP revealed that the actin defect in slmts cells was not accompanied by a noticeable defect in actin patch internalization during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In addition, we found that slmts cells displayed impaired membrane recycling and that recycling occurred in an actin-independent manner. Our data provide evidence for the requirement of Slm proteins in eisosome organization and endosome trafficking and recycling.

  7. Avaliação de compostos com atividade antioxidante em células da levedura Saccharomyces cerevisiae Evaluation of compounds with antioxidant activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Grazziotin Soares

    2005-03-01

    biological tests, the antioxidant capacity of L- ascorbic acid, vitamin E (alpha-tocoferol and the flavonoids hesperidin, naringin, naringenin, quercetin, rutin and sukuranetin. The study was carried out on eukaryotic cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with the above mentioned antioxidants in the presence of the stressing agent apomorphine. The results obtained showed that rutin, hesperidin, sakuranetin, quercetin and naringin were the most effective/potent antioxidant compounds followed by naringenin and a-tocopherol. Vitamin C and a mixture of vitamins C and E did not show antioxidant activity against apomorphine in the performed conditions of this work.

  8. Improved production of fatty acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Shuobo; Ji, Haichuan; Siewers, Verena;

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of fatty acid (FA)-derived products has gained increasing attention to replace petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. FA biosynthesis is highly regulated, and usually it is challenging to design rational engineering strategies. In addition, the conventional 'one sample at a time...... screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for identification of genes/enzymes that were able to enhance free FA accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several novel enzymes resulting in increasing FA accumulation were discovered. These targets include a GPI anchor protein...

  9. Puf3p, a Pumilio family RNA binding protein, localizes to mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and motility in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; Gay, Anna Card; Pon, Liza A.

    2007-01-01

    Puf3p binds preferentially to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. We find that Puf3p localizes to the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Overexpression of PUF3 results in reduced mitochondrial respiratory activity and reduced levels of Pet123p, a protein encoded by a Puf3p-binding mRNA. Puf3p levels are reduced during the diauxic shift and growth on a nonfermentable carbon source, conditions that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings support a role for Puf3p in mitochondrial biogenesis through effects on mRNA interactions. In addition, Puf3p links the mitochore, a complex required for mitochondrial–cytoskeletal interactions, to the Arp2/3 complex, the force generator for actin-dependent, bud-directed mitochondrial movement. Puf3p, the mitochore, and the Arp2/3 complex coimmunoprecipitate and have two-hybrid interactions. Moreover, deletion of PUF3 results in reduced interaction between the mitochore and the Arp2/3 complex and defects in mitochondrial morphology and motility similar to those observed in Arp2/3 complex mutants. Thus, Puf3p is a mitochondrial protein that contributes to the biogenesis and motility of the organelle. PMID:17210948

  10. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin. PMID:26883513

  11. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast strains. S. cerevisiae showed slightly more secondary components, whereas wild strains produced more higher alcohols. Wild yeast strains were shown to be adequate for the production of a high quality "cachaça".O presente trabalho visou estabelecer uma comparação entre composição de cachaças produzidas por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc e estirpes de leveduras selvagens [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 e Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isoladas em destilarias da região de Jaboticabal-SP. Os componentes secundários da fração denominada coração foram determinados por cromatografia gasosa. Os níveis dos componentes secundários foram influenciados pelo pH dos respectivos vinhos, os quais dependem da estirpe de levedura empregada no processo fermentativo. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae apresentou valores ligeiramente superiores de componentes secundários, enquanto as estirpes selvagens produziram maiores teores de álcoois superiores. As estirpes selvagens de leveduras mostraram-se adequadas para obtenção de uma cachaça de boa qualidade.

  12. Karyotypes of Saccharomyces sensu lato species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Nilsson-Tilgren, Torsten; Piskur, Jure

    1999-01-01

    Saccharomyces unisporus, 16 in Saccharomyces exiguus and seven in Saccharomyces kluyveri. The sizes of individual chromosomes were resolved and the approximate genome sizes were determined by the addition of individual chromosomes of the karyotypes. Apparently. the genome of S. exiguus, which is the only...... Saccharomyces sensu late yeast to contain small chromosomes, is larger than that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the other hand, other species exhibited genome sizes that were 10-25% smaller than that of S. cerevisiae. Well-defined karyotypes represent the basis for future genome mapping and sequencing projects...

  13. Yeast metabolic state identification using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. S.; Castro, C. C.; Vicente, A. A.; Tafulo, P.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Martins, R. C.

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae morphology is known to be dependent on the cell physiological state and environmental conditions. On their environment, wild yeasts tend to form complex colonies architectures, such as stress response and pseudohyphal filaments morphologies, far away from the ones found inside bioreactors, where the regular cell cycle is observed under controlled conditions (e.g. budding and flocculating colonies). In this work we explore the feasibility of using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy to classify Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C colony structures in YPD media, under different growth conditions, such as: i) no alcohol; ii) 1 % (v/v) Ethanol; iii) 1 % (v/v) 1-butanol; iv) 1 % (v/v) Isopropanol; v) 1 % (v/v) Tert-Amyl alcohol (2 Methyl-2-butanol); vi) 0,2 % (v/v) 2-Furaldehyde; vii) 5 % (w/v) 5 (Hydroxymethyl)-furfural; and viii) 1 % (w/v) (-)-Adenosine3', 5'cyclic monophosphate. The microscopy system includes a hyperspectral camera apparatus and a micro fiber (sustained by micro manipulator) optics system for spectroscopy. Results show that micro fiber optics system spectroscopy has the potential for yeasts metabolic state identification once the spectral signatures of colonies differs from each others. This technique associated with others physico-chemical information can benefit the creation of an information system capable of providing extremely detailed information about yeast metabolic state that will aid both scientists and engineers to study and develop new biotechnological products.

  14. Identification of human ferritin, heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) and yeast RGI1 (YER067W) as pro-survival sequences that counteract the effects of Bax and copper in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rawan; Boucher, Eric; Gharib, Nada; Khoury, Chamel; Arab, Nagla T T; Murray, Alistair; Young, Paul G; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    Ferritin is a sub-family of iron binding proteins that form multi-subunit nanotype iron storage structures and prevent oxidative stress induced apoptosis. Here we describe the identification and characterization of human ferritin, heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) as a suppressor of the pro-apoptotic murine Bax sequence in yeast. In addition we demonstrate that FTH1 is a general pro-survival sequence since it also prevents the cell death inducing effects of copper when heterologously expressed in yeast. Although ferritins are phylogenetically widely distributed and are present in most species of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, ferritin is conspicuously absent in most fungal species including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An in silico analysis of the yeast proteome lead to the identification of the 161 residue RGI1 (YER067W) encoded protein as a candidate for being a yeast ferritin. In addition to sharing 20% sequence identity with the 183 residue FTH1, RGI1 also has similar pro-survival properties as ferritin when overexpressed in yeast. Analysis of recombinant protein by SDS-PAGE and by electron microscopy revealed the expected formation of higher-order structures for FTH1 that was not observed with Rgi1p. Further analysis revealed that cells overexpressing RGI1 do not show increased resistance to iron toxicity and do not have enhanced capacity to store iron. In contrast, cells lacking RGI1 were found to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of iron. Overall, our results suggest that Rgi1p is a novel pro-survival protein whose function is not related to ferritin but nevertheless it may have a role in regulating yeast sensitivity to iron stress. PMID:26886577

  15. A genomic approach highlights common and diverse effects and determinants of susceptibility on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to distinct antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMP was initially correlated with peptide membrane permeation properties. However, recent evidences indicate that action of a number of AMP is more complex and involves specific interactions at cell envelopes or with intracellular targets. In this study, a genomic approach was undertaken on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to characterize the antifungal effect of two unrelated AMP. Results Two differentiated peptides were used: the synthetic cell-penetrating PAF26 and the natural cytolytic melittin. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated distinctive gene expression changes for each peptide. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of selected genes. Gene Ontology (GO annotation of differential gene lists showed that the unique significant terms shared by treatment with both peptides were related to the cell wall (CW. Assays with mutants lacking CW-related genes including those of MAPK signaling pathways revealed genes having influence on sensitivity to peptides. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated PAF26 interaction with cells and internalization that correlated with cell killing in sensitive CW-defective mutants such as Δecm33 or Δssd1. GO annotation also showed differential responses between peptides, which included ribosomal biogenesis, ARG genes from the metabolism of amino groups (specifically induced by PAF26, or the reaction to unfolded protein stress. Susceptibility of deletion mutants confirmed the involvement of these processes. Specifically, mutants lacking ARG genes from the metabolism of arginine pathway were markedly more resistant to PAF26 and had a functional CW. In the deletant in the arginosuccinate synthetase (ARG1 gene, PAF26 interaction occurred normally, thus uncoupling peptide interaction from cell killing. The previously described involvement of the glycosphingolipid gene IPT1 was extended to the peptides studied

  16. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Pretreated Lignocellulosic Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to util...

  17. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance. PMID:26344121

  18. Directed evolution of pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yielding a C2-independent, glucose-tolerant, and pyruvate-hyperproducing yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Maris; J.M. Geertman; A. Vermeulen; M.K. Groothuizen; A.A. Winkler; M.D. Piper; J.P. van Dijken; J.T. Pronk

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe absence of alcoholic fermentation makes pyruvate decarboxylase-negative (Pdc(-)) strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae an interesting platform for further metabolic engineering of central metabolism. However, Pdc(-) S. cerevisiae strains have two growth defects:

  19. Type 1 protein phosphatase acts in opposition to IpL1 protein kinase in regulating yeast chromosome segregation.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, L; Wang, W.; Chan, C S

    1994-01-01

    The IPL1 gene is required for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conditional ipl1ts mutants missegregate chromosomes severely at 37 degrees C. Here, we report that IPL1 encodes an essential putative protein kinase whose function is required during the later part of each cell cycle. At 26 degrees C, the permissive growth temperature, ipl1 mutant cells are defective in the recovery from a transient G2/M-phase arrest caused by the antimicrotubule ...

  20. SFH2 regulates fatty acid synthase activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is critical to prevent saturated fatty acid accumulation in response to haem and oleic acid depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfougères, Thomas; Ferreira, Thierry; Bergès, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu

    2008-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a facultative anaerobic organism. Under anaerobiosis, sustained growth relies on the presence of exogenously supplied unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol that yeast is unable to synthesize in the absence of oxygen or upon haem depletion. In the absence of exogenous supplementation with unsaturated fatty acid, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acid) is observed that induces significant modification of phospholipid profile [Ferreira, Régnacq, Alimardani, Moreau-Vauzelle and Bergès (2004) Biochem. J. 378, 899-908]. In the present paper, we focus on the role of SFH2/CSR1, a hypoxic gene related to SEC14 and its involvement in lipid metabolism upon haem depletion in the absence of oleic acid supplementation. We observed that inactivation of SFH2 results in enhanced accumulation of SFA and phospholipid metabolism alterations. It results in premature growth arrest and leads to an exacerbated sensitivity to exogenous SFA. This phenotype is suppressed in the presence of exogenous oleic acid, or by a controlled expression of FAS1, one of the two genes encoding FAS. We present several lines of evidence to suggest that Sfh2p and oleic acid regulate SFA synthase in yeast at different levels: whereas oleic acid acts on FAS2 at the transcriptional level, we show that Sfh2p inhibits fatty acid synthase activity in response to haem depletion. PMID:17803462

  1. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts in the chemo selective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadien-3-one in biphasic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the chemoselective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 1,4-pentadien-3-one (1) mediated by baker’s yeast (BY, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells) in an aqueous/organic solvent biphasic system. The biotransformation of this compound was chemoselective and formed only the corresponding saturated ketone 1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 3-pentanone (2). The influence of various factors which may alter the bioreduction of 1, such as the type and percentage of co-solvents, use of six different S. cerevisiae yeast samples (four commercial and two industrial), variations in the substrate and yeast concentrations, temperature, pH and volume of aqueous and organic phases, was investigated. The best reaction conditions were 66.7 g L−1 of Fleischmann BY, 8.3 × 10−3 mol L−1 of substrate, pH 6.5 at 35 deg C in the presence of 2.5% (v/v) of N,N-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as an additive and a Vaq/Vorg ratio of 70/30. Under these conditions, the product 2 was recovered in conversions of 82% in 5 h reaction. (author)

  2. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts in the chemo selective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadien-3-one in biphasic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Cesar A.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Nascimento, Maria da G., E-mail: maria.nascimento@ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Stambuk, Boris U. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    This work describes the chemoselective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 1,4-pentadien-3-one (1) mediated by baker's yeast (BY, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells) in an aqueous/organic solvent biphasic system. The biotransformation of this compound was chemoselective and formed only the corresponding saturated ketone 1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 3-pentanone (2). The influence of various factors which may alter the bioreduction of 1, such as the type and percentage of co-solvents, use of six different S. cerevisiae yeast samples (four commercial and two industrial), variations in the substrate and yeast concentrations, temperature, pH and volume of aqueous and organic phases, was investigated. The best reaction conditions were 66.7 g L{sup -1} of Fleischmann BY, 8.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} of substrate, pH 6.5 at 35 deg C in the presence of 2.5% (v/v) of N,N-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as an additive and a V{sub aq}/V{sub org} ratio of 70/30. Under these conditions, the product 2 was recovered in conversions of 82% in 5 h reaction. (author)

  3. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Saccharomyces cereviseae, Saccharomyces fragilis, or Candida utilis) using the sprout portion of malt barley as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt...

  4. Utilização de diferentes níveis de levedura (Saccharomyces cerevisiae em dietas e seus efeitos no desempenho, rendimento da carcaça e gordura abdominal em frangos de cortes - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2004 Use of different levels of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effects, on carcass and abdominal fat in broilers - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fernandes Galão

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o desempenho, o rendimento de carcaça, a gordura abdominal de frangos de corte alimentados com diferentes níveis de levedura (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Utilizaram-se 288 pintos de um dia, distribuídos em delineamento de blocos casualizados, fatorial 3x2. (3 níveis levedura - 0%; 5% e 10% e dois sexos, 4 repetições, 12 aves por parcela. Não houve efeito significativo para o desempenho de frangos de corte com a inclusão de levedura na dieta até os 21 dias de idade, porém, na fase de engorda, no nível de 10% houve uma piora no ganho de peso e na conversão alimentar, concluindo-se que a inclusão de 10% de levedura (Saccharomyces cerevisiae às dietas de frango de corte afetou o desempenho, mas não foram afetados o rendimento da carcaça e a gordura abdominal.The objective of this work was to study performance, carcass yield and abdominal fat of cut chickens fed with different yeast levels (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 288 one-year-old chickens were used, distributed in an outline of randomized blocks, factorial 3x2, (3 yeast levels - 0%; 5% and 10% and two sexes, four repetitions, 12 birds per portion. There was not any significant effect on the performance of cut chickens with the yeast inclusion in the diet until 21 days of age, however, in the fattening phase on the level of 10%, there was a worsening in weight earnings and in feeding conversion. At the end, the inclusion of 10% of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae to in diets of cut chicken affected the performance. However, the carcass yield and the abdominal fat were not affected.

  5. Farinha de mandioca enriquecida com bioproteínas (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, em associação ao feijão e arroz, na dieta de ratos em crescimento Cassava flour enriched with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, in association with beans and rice, in the diet of growing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastácia Cavalcanti Metri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da mistura de feijão, arroz e farinha de mandioca enriquecida com bioproteína (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, em ratos wistar machos recém-desmamados (n=60, durante 28 dias. Foram utilizadas as seguintes dietas: experimentais (feijão, arroz e farinha de mandioca enriquecida com leveduras; feijão, arroz e farinha de mandioca comum; controle (farinha de mandioca enriquecida com levedura; e padrão (caseína. Determinaram-se os testes biológicos. Os orgãos foram removidos para análise de pesos úmido e seco (rim esquerdo, baço e amostras do fígado e cérebro, teor de proteína (fígado e cérebro e histopatologia (fígado, coração e rim direito. Foram ainda quantificados os lipídios totais da carcaça dos animais. Os dados foram estatisticamente avaliados pelo teste Não Paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis e pelo teste de Comparações Múltiplas (pThe effect of a mixture of beans, rice and cassava flour enriched with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein was assessed in weanling male Wistar rats (n=60, during 28 days. The following diets were used: experimental (beans, rice and manioc flour with yeast protein; beans, rice and cassava flour without yeast protein; control (cassava flour with yeast protein; and standard (casein. The biological test were determined. The organs were removed for evaluation of wet and dry weights (left kidney, spleen and liver and brain samples, protein levels (liver and brain, and histopathology (heart, right kidney and liver. Carcass total lipids were also recorded. Results were statistically analyzed by the Nonparametric Test of Kruskal-Wallis and the Test of Multiple Comparisons (p<0.05. The highest values for all investigated parameters were found in the casein-fed group, followed by the experimental groups. Data suggest that flour enriched with yeast protein can be recommended as a dietary supplement to eradicate the nutritional deficiency in the poor population.

  6. Genotypic and Physiological Characterization of Saccharomyces boulardii, the Probiotic Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards-Ingram, Laura; Gitsham, Paul; Burton, Nicola; Warhurst, Geoff; Clarke, Ian; Hoyle, David; Oliver, Stephen G; Stateva, Lubomira

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii, a yeast that was isolated from fruit in Indochina, has been used as a remedy for diarrhea since 1950 and is now a commercially available treatment throughout Europe, Africa, and South America. Though initially classified as a separate species of Saccharomyces, recent publications have shown that the genome of S. boulardii is so similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the two should be classified as conspecific. This raises the question of the distinguishing molecular...

  7. Conserved interaction of Ctf18-RFC with DNA polymerase ε is critical for maintenance of genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimoto, Hiroko; Tanaka, Seiji; Araki, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2016-05-01

    Human Ctf18-RFC, a PCNA loader complex, interacts with DNA polymerase ε (Polε) through a structure formed by the Ctf18, Dcc1 and Ctf8 subunits. The C-terminal stretch of Ctf18, which is highly conserved from yeast to human, is necessary to form the Polε-capturing structure. We found that in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ctf18, Dcc1 and Ctf8 formed the same structure through the conserved C-terminus and interacted specifically with Polε. Thus, the specific interaction of Ctf18-RFC with Polε is a conserved feature between these proteins. A C-terminal deletion mutant of Ctf18 (ctf18(ΔC) ) exhibited the same high sensitivity to hydroxyurea as the complete deletion strain (ctf18Δ) or ATPase-deficient mutant (ctf18(K189A) ), but was somewhat less sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate than either of them. These phenotypes were also observed in dcc1Δ and ctf8Δ, predicted to be deficient in the interaction with Polε. Furthermore, both plasmid loss and gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR) rates were increased in ctf18(ΔC) cells to the same extent as in ctf18Δ cells. These results indicate that the Ctf18-RFC/Polε interaction plays a crucial role in maintaining genome stability in budding yeast, probably through recruitment of this PCNA loader to the replication fork. PMID:26987677

  8. Continuous crossbreeding of sake yeasts using growth selection systems for a-type and α-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Nobuo; Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko; Honda, Shinya

    2016-12-01

    Sake yeasts belong to the budding yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and have high fermentation activity and ethanol production. Although the traditional crossbreeding of sake yeasts is a time-consuming and inefficient process due to the low sporulation rates and spore viability of these strains, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of hybrid strains with superior brewing characteristics. In the present work, we describe a growth selection system for a- and α-type cells aimed at the crossbreeding of industrial yeasts, and performed hybridizations with sake yeast strains Kyokai No. 6, No. 7 and No. 9 to examine the feasibility of this approach. We successfully generated both a- and α-type strains from all parental strains, and acquired six types of hybrids by outcrossing. One of these hybrid strains was subjected to continuous crossbreeding, yielding the multi-hybrid strain, which inherited the genetic characteristics of Kyokai No. 6, No. 7 and No. 9. Notably, because all of the genetic modifications of the yeast cells were introduced using plasmids, these traits can be easily removed. The approach described here has the potential to markedly accelerate the crossbreeding of industrial yeast strains with desirable properties. PMID:27392493

  9. ERAD substrate recognition in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Ng, Davis T W

    2010-07-01

    During protein synthesis, the orderly progression of folding, modification, and assembly is paramount to function and vis-à-vis cellular viability. Accordingly, sophisticated quality control mechanisms have evolved to monitor protein maturation throughout the cell. Proteins failing at any step are segregated and degraded as a preventative measure against potential toxicity. Although protein quality control is generally poorly understood, recent research advances in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways have provided the most detailed view so far. The discovery of distinct substrate processing sites established a biochemical basis for genetic profiles of model misfolded proteins. Detailed mechanisms for substrate recognition were recently uncovered. For some proteins, sequential glycan trimming steps set a time window for folding. Proteins still unfolded at the final stage expose a specific degradation signal recognized by the ERAD machinery. Through this mechanism, the system does not in fact know that a molecule is "misfolded". Instead, it goes by the premise that proteins past due have veered off their normal folding pathways and therefore aberrant. PMID:20178855

  10. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Bharucha, Nikë; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is an effective method for generating large sets of random mutations in target DNA, with applicability toward numerous types of genetic screens in prokaryotes, single-celled eukaryotes, and metazoans alike. Relative to methods of random mutagenesis by chemical/UV treatment, transposon insertions can be easily identified in mutants with phenotypes of interest. The construction of transposon insertion mutants is also less labor-intensive on a genome-wide scale than methods for targeted gene replacement, although transposon insertions are not precisely targeted to a specific residue, and thus coverage of the target DNA can be problematic. The collective advantages of transposon mutagenesis have been well demonstrated in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, as transposon mutagenesis has been used extensively for phenotypic screens in both yeasts. Consequently, we present here protocols for the generation and utilization of transposon-insertion DNA libraries in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Specifically, we present methods for the large-scale introduction of transposon insertion alleles in a desired strain of S. cerevisiae. Methods are also presented for transposon mutagenesis of C. albicans, encompassing both the construction of the plasmid-based transposon-mutagenized DNA library and its introduction into a desired strain of Candida. In total, these methods provide the necessary information to implement transposon mutagenesis in yeast, enabling the construction of large sets of identifiable gene disruption mutations, with particular utility for phenotypic screening in nonstandard genetic backgrounds. PMID:21815095

  11. Utilização de leveduras vivas (Saccharomyces cerevisiae visando à produção de cordeiros Ile de France superprecoces em sistema de creep-feeding Effect of utilization of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae for feeding Ile de France lambs in creep-feeding system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Neumann

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido no Núcleo de Produção Animal da Universidade Estadual do Centro Oeste do Paraná (UNICENTRO com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do nível de suplementação de leveduras vivas secas (Saccharomyces cerevisiae sobre o consumo médio diário de concentrado e o ganho de peso médio diário de cordeiros, em sistema de creep-feeding. Foram testados os seguintes tratamentos: T1 - 0g animal-1 dia-1; T2 - 0,4g animal-1 dia-1; e T3 - 0,8g animal-1 dia-1. Foram utilizados 27 cordeiros Ile de France de partos simples (18 machos e nove fêmeas com peso vivo médio inicial de 19,5kg e idade média de 40 dias. O creep-feeding compreendeu três períodos de 21 dias, totalizando 63 dias de suplementação. Não houve interação significativa (PThe experiment was conducted at the Núcleo de Produção Animal of the Universidade Estadual do Centro Oeste do Paraná (UNICENTRO. The trial aimed to evaluate the effect of living yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on dry matter intake of concentrate and performance of lambs kept in the creep-feeding system, submitted to the following treatments: T1 - 0g animal-1 day-1; T2 - 0.4g animal-1 day-1; e T3 - 0.8g animal-1 day-1. Twenty-seven lambs Ile de France of simple birth with an average age of 40 days and average live weight of 19.5kg were used. The whole supplementation period in creep-feeding was 63 days, divided in three periods of 21 days. No significative interaction was observed between supplementation of level of the yeast and evaluation period for average daily dry matter intake of concentrate, for average daily weight gain and feed conversion of the g of concentrate by 100g weight gain. No difference of supplementation of level of the yeast for average daily dry matter intake of concentrate (635.7g day-1 and average daily weight gain (418g day-1 for Ile de France lambs simple birth on creep-feeding system, according to supplementation of living yeast.

  12. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.;

    2008-01-01

    -type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches was...... labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found...

  13. Glycerol Overproduction by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains Leads to Substantial Changes in By-Product Formation and to a Stimulation of Fermentation Rate in Stationary Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Remize, F.; Roustan, J. L.; Sablayrolles, J. M.; P. Barre; Dequin, S.

    1999-01-01

    Six commercial wine yeast strains and three nonindustrial strains (two laboratory strains and one haploid strain derived from a wine yeast strain) were engineered to produce large amounts of glycerol with a lower ethanol yield. Overexpression of the GPD1 gene, encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, resulted in a 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in glycerol production and a slight decrease in ethanol formation under conditions simulating wine fermentation. All the strains overexpressing GPD1 ...

  14. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the

  15. Cycloheximide Chase Analysis of Protein Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Bryce W; Lloyd, Michael E; Engle, Sarah M; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is crucial to virtually every cellular process. Protein abundance reflects the integration of the rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Many assays reporting on protein abundance (e.g., single-time point western blotting, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, or growth-based reporter assays) do not allow discrimination of the relative effects of translation and proteolysis on protein levels. This article describes the use of cycloheximide chase followed by western blotting to specifically analyze protein degradation in the model unicellular eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). In this procedure, yeast cells are incubated in the presence of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. Aliquots of cells are collected immediately after and at specific time points following addition of cycloheximide. Cells are lysed, and the lysates are separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for western blot analysis of protein abundance at each time point. The cycloheximide chase procedure permits visualization of the degradation kinetics of the steady state population of a variety of cellular proteins. The procedure may be used to investigate the genetic requirements for and environmental influences on protein degradation. PMID:27167179

  16. Data on dynamic study of cytoophidia in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Huang, Yong; Wang, Peng-Ye; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-09-01

    The data in this paper are related to the research article entitled "Filamentation of metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" Q.J. Shen et al. (2016) [1]. Cytoophidia are filamentous structures discovered in fruit flies (doi:10.1016/S1673-8527(09)60046-1) J.L. Liu (2010) [2], bacteria (doi:10.1038/ncb2087) M. Ingerson-Mahar et al. (2010) [3], yeast (doi:10.1083/jcb.201003001; doi:10.1242/bio.20149613) C. Noree et al. (2010) and J. Zhang, L. Hulme, J.L. Liu (2014) [4], [5] and human cells (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029690; doi:10.1016/j.jgg.2011.08.004) K. Chen et al. (2011) and W.C. Carcamo et al. (2011) ( [6], [7]. However, there is little research on the motility of the cytoophidia. Here we selected cytoophidia formed by 6 filament-forming proteins in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, and performed living-cell imaging of cells expressing the proteins fused with GFP. The dynamic features of the six types of cytoophidia were analyzed. In the data, both raw movies and analysed results of the dynamics of cytoophidia are presented. PMID:27274529

  17. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  18. Bud Dormancy and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearly all land plants produce ancillary meristems in the form of axillary or adventitious buds in addition to the shoot apical meristem. Outgrowth of these buds has a significant impact on plant architecture and the ability of plants to compete with neighboring plants, as well as to respond to and ...

  19. Scientific Opinion on safety and efficacy of selenium in the form of organic compounds produced by the selenium-enriched yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC R646 (Selemax 1000/2000 as feed additive for all species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The additive Selemax consists of selenium-containing inactivated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC R646, enriched during the fermentation process with organic selenocompounds, and is intended to be used as a nutritional additive, providing a source of the essential trace element selenium for all animal species. Based on data from a tolerance study in chickens for fattening, the use of Selemax as a selenium source is considered to be safe for all animal species. The FEEDAP Panel reiterates its former conclusion that the use of any selenised yeast would result in similar selenium deposition in tissues and products. To ensure consumer safety from consumption of tissues and products of animals treated with Selemax, the FEEDAP Panel concludes that dietary selenium supplementation from Selemax, as for other selenised yeasts, should not exceed a maximum of 0.2 mg Se/kg complete feed. In the absence of specific data, the product is considered as a potential irritant to skin and eyes and sensitiser to skin. Owing to its proteinaceous nature, the additive is considered a potential respiratory sensitiser. The FEEDAP Panel considers that the use of Selemax in feed does not pose an additional risk to the environment, compared to other sources of selenium for which it will substitute, as long as the maximum authorised content in feedingstuffs is not exceeded. Based on the response of liver glutathione peroxidase activity and the liver/plasma concentration of selenium, the FEEDAP Panel considers Selemax an effective source of selenium for all species. Selemax does not modify the quality of meat as measured by physical parameters.

  20. Toxicity of chlorinated phenoxyacetic acid herbicides in the experimental eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of pH and of growth phase and size of the yeast cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, M G; Viegas, C A; Teixeira, M C; Sá-Correia, I

    2003-04-01

    The inhibitory effect of the herbicides 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth is strongly dependent on medium pH (range 2.5-6.5). Consistent with the concept that the toxic form is the liposoluble undissociated form, at values close to their pK(a) (3.07 and 2.73, respectively) the toxicity is high, decreasing with the increase of external pH. In addition, the toxicity of identical concentrations of the undissociated acid form is pH independent, as observed with 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), an intermediate of 2,4-D degradation. Consequently, at pH values above 3.5 (approximately one unit higher than 2,4-D pK(a)), 2,4-DCP becomes more toxic than the original herbicide. A dose-dependent inhibition of growth kinetics and increased duration of growth latency is observed following sudden exposure of an unadapted yeast cell population to the presence of the herbicides. This contrasts with the effect of 2,4-DCP, which essentially affects growth kinetics. Experimental evidences suggest that the acid herbicides toxicity is not exclusively dependent on the liposolubility of the toxic form, as may essentially be the case of 2,4-DCP. An unadapted yeast cell population at the early stationary-phase of growth under nutrient limitation is significantly more resistant to short-term herbicide induced death than an exponential-phase population. Consequently, the duration of growth latency is reduced, as observed with the increase of the size of the herbicide stressed population. However, these physiological parameters have no significant effect either on growth kinetics, following growth resumption under herbicide stress, or on the growth curve of yeast cells previously adapted to the herbicides, indicating that their role is exerted at the level of cell adaptation. PMID:12586155

  1. Misregulation of Scm3p/HJURP causes chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Mishra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore (centromeric DNA and associated proteins is a key determinant for high fidelity chromosome transmission. Evolutionarily conserved Scm3p is an essential component of centromeric chromatin and is required for assembly and function of kinetochores in humans, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Overexpression of HJURP, the mammalian homolog of budding yeast Scm3p, has been observed in lung and breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis; however, the physiological relevance of these observations is not well understood. We overexpressed SCM3 and HJURP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and HJURP in human cells and defined domains within Scm3p that mediate its chromosome loss phenotype. Our results showed that the overexpression of SCM3 (GALSCM3 or HJURP (GALHJURP caused chromosome loss in a wild-type yeast strain, and overexpression of HJURP led to mitotic defects in human cells. GALSCM3 resulted in reduced viability in kinetochore mutants, premature separation of sister chromatids, and reduction in Cse4p and histone H4 at centromeres. Overexpression of CSE4 or histone H4 suppressed chromosome loss and restored levels of Cse4p at centromeres in GALSCM3 strains. Using mutant alleles of scm3, we identified a domain in the N-terminus of Scm3p that mediates its interaction with CEN DNA and determined that the chromosome loss phenotype of GALSCM3 is due to centromeric association of Scm3p devoid of Cse4p/H4. Furthermore, we determined that similar to other systems the centromeric association of Scm3p is cell cycle regulated. Our results show that altered stoichiometry of Scm3p/HJURP, Cse4p, and histone H4 lead to defects in chromosome segregation. We conclude that stringent regulation of HJURP and SCM3 expression are critical for genome stability.

  2. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D;

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  3. Evolution of ecological dominance of yeast species in high-sugar environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn M; Liu, Ping; Fay, Justin C

    2015-08-01

    In budding yeasts, fermentation in the presence of oxygen evolved around the time of a whole genome duplication (WGD) and is thought to confer dominance in high-sugar environments because ethanol is toxic to many species. Although there are many fermentative yeast species, only Saccharomyces cerevisiae consistently dominates wine fermentations. In this study, we use coculture experiments and intrinsic growth rate assays to examine the relative fitness of non-WGD and WGD yeast species across environments to assess when S. cerevisiae's ability to dominate high-sugar environments arose. We show that S. cerevisiae dominates nearly all other non-WGD and WGD species except for its sibling species S. paradoxus in both grape juice and a high-sugar rich medium. Of the species we tested, S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus have evolved the highest ethanol tolerance and intrinsic growth rate in grape juice. However, the ability of S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus to dominate certain species depends on the temperature and the type of high-sugar environment. Our results indicate that dominance of high-sugar environments evolved much more recently than the WGD, most likely just prior to or during the differentiation of Saccharomyces species, and that evolution of multiple traits contributes to S. cerevisiae's ability to dominate wine fermentations. PMID:26087012

  4. Effects of combined treatment of gamma irradiation and refrigeration on yeast growth (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen) in orange juice; Efeitos do tratamento combinado de irradiacao gama e refrigeracao no crescimento de levedura (Saccharomyces cerevisae Hansen) em suco de laranja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domarco, R.E.; Spoto, M.H.F.; Walder, J.M.M.; Matria, C.; Blumer, L. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Effect of gamma radiation and low temperatures was studied on yeast growth on orange juice. Concentrated orange juice (65{sup 0} C Brix) was diluted at 10,5{sup 0} C Brix and inoculated with comercial biological yeasts. The samples were irradiated with doses of 0.0 (control), 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 kGy (Cobalt-60), with 2.83 kGy/h of dose rate. All the samples were stored at 0{sup 0} C, 0{sup 5} and 25{sup 0} C for periods of 1, 7, 14, 21, 30, 60 e 90 days of storage. Combined treatment of 1 kGy and refrigeration at 0{sup 0} C was effective for orange juice conservation on 90 days of storage. The dose of 2.5 kGy, was enough to conserve the juice on 90 days of storage on 5{sup 0} C. At 25{sup 0} C only the two highest radiation doses (5.0 and 7.5 kGy) wereeffective to control yeast growth in orange juice. (author). 11 refs, 4 tabs.

  5. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangjo [Bioinformatics Lab, Healthcare Group, SK Telecom, 9-1, Sunae-dong, Pundang-gu, Sungnam-si, Kyunggi-do 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minho [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyeshik [Department of Biological Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Miyoung [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corp., 8-11 Munpyeongseo-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Youn-Sig [Department of Applied Biology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hye-jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongsup [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Ook [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inha University Hospital, 7-206 Sinheung-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  6. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  7. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  8. The TOR (target of rapamycin) signal transduction pathway regulates the stability of translation initiation factor eIF4G in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Berset, Catherine; TRACHSEL, HANS; Altmann, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Initiation factor eIF4G is an essential protein required for initiation of mRNA translation via the 5′ cap-dependent pathway. It interacts with eIF4E (the mRNA 5′ cap-binding protein) and serves as an anchor for the assembly of further initiation factors. With treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with rapamycin or with entry of cells into the diauxic phase, eIF4G is rapidly degraded, whereas initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4A remain stable. We propose that nutritional deprivation or interrup...

  9. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stahlberg, A.; Elbing, K.; Andrade-Garda, J.M.; Sjögreen, B.; Forootan, A.; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 170 (2008), s. 1-41. ISSN 1471-2164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Expression Profiling * Real-time PCR * Yeast Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2008

  10. Lack of main K+ uptake systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells affects yeast performance in both potassium-sufficient and potassium-limiting conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navarrete, C.; Petrezsélyová, Silvia; Barreto, L.; Martínez, J. L.; Zahrádka, Jaromír; Ariňo, J.; Sychrová, Hana; Ramos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2010), s. 508-517. ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/0354 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : potassium homeostasis * yeast * Trk transporters Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.279, year: 2010

  11. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Wet oxidation and fermentation by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Olsson, Lisbeth; Thomsen, A.B.;

    2003-01-01

    concentrations of 50-100 times the concentration found in the hydrolysate for their effect on fermentation by yeast. At these high concentrations (10 mM), 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, vanillin, 4-hydroxyacetophenone and acetovanillone caused a 53-67% decrease in the volumetric ethanol productivity in S. cerevisiae...

  12. Overproduction of fission yeast eif3a subunit in saccharomyces cerevisiae results in aberrant cell morphology and g2/m delay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janatová, Ivana; Koubek, Zdeněk; Malínská, Kateřina; Raková, Radka; Hašek, Jiří

    Cold Spring Harbor, New York, 2003, s. 23. [Meeting on Yeast Cell Biology /2003./. Cold Spring Harbor (US), 12.08.2003-17.08.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : facs * rpg1p Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  13. Production of the Anaerobic GMAX-L Yeast Using High-Throughput Mating and Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae With Identified Genes For Simultaneous Cellulosic Ethanol and Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailored GMAX-L yeast engineering for strains capable of universal ethanol production industrially with coproduction of an expressed lipase catalyst for coproduction of ethyl esters from corn oil and ethanol from the modern dry grind ethanol facility: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mann...

  14. Dissecting the fission yeast regulatory network reveals phase-specific control elements of its cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liwen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are among the original model organisms in the study of the cell-division cycle. Unlike budding yeast, no large-scale regulatory network has been constructed for fission yeast. It has only been partially characterized. As a result, important regulatory cascades in budding yeast have no known or complete counterpart in fission yeast. Results By integrating genome-wide data from multiple time course cell cycle microarray experiments we reconstructed a gene regulatory network. Based on the network, we discovered in addition to previously known regulatory hubs in M phase, a new putative regulatory hub in the form of the HMG box transcription factor SPBC19G7.04. Further, we inferred periodic activities of several less known transcription factors over the course of the cell cycle, identified over 500 putative regulatory targets and detected many new phase-specific and conserved cis-regulatory motifs. In particular, we show that SPBC19G7.04 has highly significant periodic activity that peaks in early M phase, which is coordinated with the late G2 activity of the forkhead transcription factor fkh2. Finally, using an enhanced Bayesian algorithm to co-cluster the expression data, we obtained 31 clusters of co-regulated genes 1 which constitute regulatory modules from different phases of the cell cycle, 2 whose phase order is coherent across the 10 time course experiments, and 3 which lead to identification of phase-specific control elements at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in S. pombe. In particular, the ribosome biogenesis clusters expressed in G2 phase reveal new, highly conserved RNA motifs. Conclusion Using a systems-level analysis of the phase-specific nature of the S. pombe cell cycle gene regulation, we have provided new testable evidence for post-transcriptional regulation in the G2 phase of the fission yeast cell cycle

  15. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular genetic tools used in fission yeast have generally been adapted from methods and approaches developed for use in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Initially, the molecular genetics of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was developed to aid gene identification, but it is now applied extensively to the analysis of gene function and the manipulation of noncoding sequences that affect chromosome dynamics. Much current research using fission yeast thus relies on the basic processes of introducing DNA into the organism and the extraction of DNA for subsequent analysis. Targeted integration into specific genomic loci is often used to create site-specific mutants or changes to noncoding regulatory elements for subsequent phenotypic analysis. It is also regularly used to introduce additional sequences that generate tagged proteins or to create strains in which the levels of wild-type protein can be manipulated through transcriptional regulation and/or protein degradation. Here, we draw together a collection of core molecular genetic techniques that underpin much of modern research using S. pombe We summarize the most useful methods that are routinely used and provide guidance, learned from experience, for the successful application of these methods. PMID:27140925

  16. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms. PMID:19421136

  17. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  18. Enriquecimento de macarrão tipo tubo (massa curta com derivados de levedura (Saccharomyces sp.: impacto nutricional e sensorial Enrichment of noodles (short tube with yeast (Saccharomyces sp. derivatives: nutritional and sensorial impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Carelli Costa Santucci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo investigar a viabilidade técnica e os melhores níveis de adição dos derivados de levedura, autolisado (AT e extrato (Ex ao macarrão, visando uma melhoria do valor nutritivo sem diminuir a sua aceitação pelo consumidor. Adição de 5 ou de 7,5% de derivado de levedura melhorou o escore de aminoácidos essenciais (EAE de 9 e 19%, respectivamente, para o AT e o Ex. O índice que mede a capacidade da proteína de promover crescimento (NPR se elevou de 25 e 40% para a adição de 7,5% de autolisado ou de extrato, respectivamente. No macarrão massa branca, a adição de 5% de Ex não alterou a aceitação do produto, contudo 5% de AT teve um impacto negativo na aceitação pelo consumidor. A adição à massa de extrato de espinafre (massa verde de 7,5% de derivado de levedura afetou apenas a aparência do macarrão adicionado de extrato e a aparência e a cor do macarrão com 7,5% de autolisado, em relação ao macarrão contendo apenas extrato de espinafre. A adição de espinafre à massa melhorou as características sensoriais do macarrão adicionado de 7,5% de autolisado. As características tecnológicas de fabricação dos macarrões não foram alteradas pela adição à massa dos derivados de levedura.The objective of this work was to investigate the technical possibility and best levels of addition to noodles of yeast autolysate (AT and extract (Ex aiming at improving nutritive value without a decrease in consumer acceptance. Addition of 5 or 7.5% yeast derivative improved essential aminoacid score (EAS of 9 and 19%, respectively, for the AT and the Ex. The growth promoting index (NPR increased 25 and 40% for the 7.5% addition of AT or Ex, respectively. In the white noodles, 5% addition of extract did not alter the acceptance of the product, however 5% addition of autolysate produced a negative impact on the consumer acceptance. Addition to the mass of spinach extract (green noodle and 7.5% of yeast

  19. Structural, thermal, functional, antioxidant & antimicrobial properties of β-d-glucan extracted from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cereviseae)-Effect of γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asma Ashraf; Gani, Adil; Masoodi, F A; Amin, Furheen; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad; Gani, Asir

    2016-04-20

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of γ-irradiation (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 & 50kGy) on the structural, functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of yeast β-d-glucan. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the thermal properties were studied using DSC. There was a decrease in the average molecular weight of β-d-glucan as the irradiation dose increased. The functional properties of irradiated yeast β-d-glucan were largely influenced by the action of gamma radiation like swelling power and viscosity decreases with increase in the irradiation dose while as fat binding capacity, emulsifying properties, foaming properties and bile acid binding capacity shows an increasing trend. All the antioxidant properties carried out using six different assays increased significantly (p≤0.05) in a dose dependent manner. The antibacterial activity of yeast β-d-glucan also showed an increasing trend with increase in the irradiation dose from 5 to 50kDa. PMID:26876872

  20. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  1. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds. PMID:26108494

  2. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation;Viabilidade celular de Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivada em associacao com bacterias contaminantes da fermentacao alcoolica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, Thais de Paula

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the

  3. Shuttle mutagenesis: a method of transposon mutagenesis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, H S; Chen, E Y; So, M; Heffron, F

    1986-01-01

    We have extended the method of transposon mutagenesis to the eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A bacterial transposon containing a selectable yeast gene can be transposed into a cloned fragment of yeast DNA in Escherichia coli, and the transposon insertion can be returned to the yeast genome by homologous recombination. Initially, the cloned yeast DNA fragment to be mutagenized was transformed into an E. coli strain containing an F factor derivative carrying the transposable element. The c...

  4. Saccharomyces Dışındaki Mayaların Şarap Aromasına Etkileri

    OpenAIRE

    Bağder, Simel; Özçelik, Filiz

    2009-01-01

    Although S. cerevisiae is major wine yeast responsible for wine fermentation, the yeasts other than genus of Saccharomyces, which are called non-Saccharomyces, contribute to wine aroma producing secondary metabolites such as glycerol, higher alcohols and esters. Contrary to S. cerevisiae, the non-Saccharomyces yeasts are able to produce and release several enzymes such as esterases, glycosidases, lipases, β-glycosidases, proteases to the medium where they can interact with grape precursor co...

  5. Quantitative characterization of pyrimidine dimer excision from UV-irradiated DNA (excision capacity) by cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free extracts from wild-type yeast (RAD+) and from rad mutants belonging to the RAD3 epistatic group (rad1-1, rad2-1, rad3-1, rad4-1) contain activities catalyzing the excision of pyrimidine dimers (PD) from purified ultraviolet-irradiated DNA which was not pre-treated with exogenous UV-endonuclease. The level of these activities in cell-free extracts from rad mutants did not differ from that in wild-type extract and was close to the in vivo excision capacity of the latter calculated from the LD37 (about 104 PD per haploid genome). (Auth.)

  6. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Y.; Goh, T K; Tani, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as...

  7. Pengujian Parameter Biji Sorghum dan Pengaruh Analisa Total Asam Laktat dan pH pada Tepung Sorghum Terfermentasi Menggunakan Baker’s Yeast (Saccharomyces Cereviceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelinda Angelina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L Moench, adalah sereal paling penting kelima setelah beras, jagung, barley dan gandum. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kemampuan substitusi biji sorghum terhadap tepung terigu bisa mencapai 50-75%, walaupun nilai protein pembentuk glutennya tidak dapat menyamai tepung terigu. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mempelajari pengaruh waktu fermentasi terhadap penurunan total asam laktat, nilai pH, dan jumlah total khamir (baker’s yeast tanpa menggunakan nutrient kimia tambahan . Analisa komposisi biji sorghum yang diinvestigasi dalam keadaan wet basis dari laboratorium menghasilkan kadar air, lemak, serat, protein, karbohidrat, dan abu masing-masing sebesar 12.85%, 3.10%, 0.56%, 5.87%, 75.82%, dan 1.79%. Untuk nilai energi total dengan metode bomb kalori didapatkan 4375.94 kcal/kg. Pengujian biji sorghum menghasilkan C-organik sebesar 12,47%. Berdasarkan analisa didapatkan hasil optimal dalam membuat tepung sorghum terfermentasi pada proses fermentasi 60 jam dengan jumlah yeast yang dihasilkan 1,7 x 105 sel/ml dengan kondisi yield % asam laktat 0,214%.

  8. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  9. Identification of Chemical-Genetic Interactions via Parallel Analysis of Barcoded Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Miranda, Molly; Davis, Ronald W; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; St Onge, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The Yeast Knockout Collection is a complete set of gene deletion strains for the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae In each strain, one of approximately 6000 open-reading frames is replaced with a dominant selectable marker flanked by two DNA barcodes. These barcodes, which are unique to each gene, allow the growth of thousands of strains to be individually measured from a single pooled culture. The collection, and other resources that followed, has ushered in a new era in chemical biology, enabling unbiased and systematic identification of chemical-genetic interactions (CGIs) with remarkable ease. CGIs link bioactive compounds to biological processes, and hence can reveal the mechanism of action of growth-inhibitory compounds in vivo, including those of antifungal, antibiotic, and anticancer drugs. The chemogenomic profiling method described here measures the sensitivity induced in yeast heterozygous and homozygous deletion strains in the presence of a chemical inhibitor of growth (termed haploinsufficiency profiling and homozygous profiling, respectively, or HIPHOP). The protocol is both scalable and amenable to automation. After competitive growth of yeast knockout collection cultures, with and without chemical inhibitors, CGIs can be identified and quantified using either array- or sequencing-based approaches as described here. PMID:27587778

  10. Viruses and prions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wickner, Reed B.; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a key experimental organism for the study of infectious diseases, including dsRNA viruses, ssRNA viruses, and prions. Studies of the mechanisms of virus and prion replication, virus structure, and structure of the amyloid filaments that are the basis of yeast prions have been at the forefront of such studies in these classes of infectious entities. Yeast has been particularly useful in defining the interactions of the infectious elements with cellular compone...

  11. A High-Definition View of Functional Genetic Variation from Natural Yeast Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Simpson, Jared T.; Salinas, Francisco; Barré, Benjamin; Parts, Leopold; Zia, Amin; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.; Louis, Edward J.; Mustonen, Ville; Warringer, Jonas; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation in a population influences phenotypic variation and evolution is of major importance in modern biology. Yet much is still unknown about the relative functional importance of different forms of genome variation and how they are shaped by evolutionary processes. Here we address these questions by population level sequencing of 42 strains from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative S. paradoxus. We find that genome content variation, in the form of presence or absence as well as copy number of genetic material, is higher within S. cerevisiae than within S. paradoxus, despite genetic distances as measured in single-nucleotide polymorphisms being vastly smaller within the former species. This genome content variation, as well as loss-of-function variation in the form of premature stop codons and frameshifting indels, is heavily enriched in the subtelomeres, strongly reinforcing the relevance of these regions to functional evolution. Genes affected by these likely functional forms of variation are enriched for functions mediating interaction with the external environment (sugar transport and metabolism, flocculation, metal transport, and metabolism). Our results and analyses provide a comprehensive view of genomic diversity in budding yeast and expose surprising and pronounced differences between the variation within S. cerevisiae and that within S. paradoxus. We also believe that the sequence data and de novo assemblies will constitute a useful resource for further evolutionary and population genomics studies. PMID:24425782

  12. METHOD FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HETEROLOGOUS POLYPEPTIDES IN TRANSFORMED YEAST CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    resulting in formation of ethanol and other unwanted primary products of fermentative activity whereby high yields of the heterologous product are obtained. The $i(Saccharomyces) yeast species is preferably a Crabtree negative $i(Saccharomyces species) in particular $i(Saccharomyces kluyveri).......The invention describes industrial fermentation of a $i(Saccharomyces) yeast species for production of a heterologous product encoded by a plasmid or DNA contained in said $i(Saccharomyces) yeast species with method utilizes the substrate more efficiently and without fermentative metabolism...

  13. Flavour-active wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Christopher D.; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2012-01-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can infl...

  14. Effects of Fusariotoxin T-2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis

    OpenAIRE

    Schappert, Keith T.; Khachatourians, George G.

    1983-01-01

    A Fusarium metabolite, T-2 toxin, inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The growth inhibitory concentrations of T-2 toxin were 40 and 100 μg/ml, respectively, for exponentially growing cultures of the two yeasts. S. carlsbergensis was more sensitive to the toxin and exhibited a biphasic dose-response curve. Addition of the toxin at 10 μg/ml of S. carlsbergensis culture resulted in a retardation of growth as measured turbidimetrically, after only 30 ...

  15. Multiple gene mediated aldehyde reduction is a mechanism of in situ detoxification of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural and HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural) are representative inhibitors to ethanologenic yeast generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available. We have developed tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced bio...

  16. Probiotic properties of yeasts occurring in fermented food and beverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lene

    Besides being able to improve the quality and safety of many fermented food and beverages some yeasts offer a number of probiotic traits. Especially a group of yeast referred to as "Saccharomyces boulardii", though taxonomically belonging to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been claimed to have...... probiotic properties. Besides, yeasts naturally occurring globally in food and beverages will have traits that might have a positive impact on human health....

  17. Enzymatic activities produced by mixed Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces cultures: relationship with wine volatile composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturano, Yolanda Paola; Assof, Mariela; Fabani, María Paula; Nally, María Cristina; Jofré, Viviana; Rodríguez Assaf, Leticia Anahí; Toro, María Eugenia; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés; Vazquez, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    During certain wine fermentation processes, yeasts, and mainly non-Saccharomyces strains, produce and secrete enzymes such as β-glucosidases, proteases, pectinases, xylanases and amylases. The effects of enzyme activity on the aromatic quality of wines during grape juice fermentation, using different co-inoculation strategies of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, were assessed in the current study. Three strains with appropriate enological performance and high enzymatic activities, BSc562 (S. cerevisiae), BDv566 (Debaryomyces vanrijiae) and BCs403 (Candida sake), were assayed in pure and mixed Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces cultures. β-Glucosidase, pectinase, protease, xylanase and amylase activities were quantified during fermentations. The aromatic profile of pure and mixed cultures was determined at the end of each fermentation. In mixed cultures, non-Saccharomyces species were detected until day 4-5 of the fermentation process, and highest populations were observed in MSD2 (10% S. cerevisiae/90% D. vanrijiae) and MSC1 (1% S. cerevisiae/99% C. sake). According to correlation and multivariate analysis, MSD2 presented the highest concentrations of terpenes and higher alcohols which were associated with pectinase, amylase and xylanase activities. On the other hand, MSC1 high levels of β-glucosidase, proteolytic and xylanolytic activities were correlated to esters and fatty acids. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the effect of enzymatic activities by yeasts on compound transformations that occur during wine fermentation. PMID:26386703

  18. A new design intended to relate high pressure treatment to yeast cell mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier-Cornet, J M; Maréchal, P A; Gervais, P

    1995-07-15

    A new optical device has been developed to allow the observation of microorganisms during a high pressure treatment up to 700 MPa. To measure cell volume variation during the high pressure application, an image analysis system was connected with the light microscope. With this device, growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied at moderate pressure (10 MPa) through the observation of individual cell budding. Cell volume variations were also measured on the yeast Saccharomycopsis fibuligera on fixed cells as well on a population sample and a shrinkage in average cell volume was observed consequently to a pressure increase of 250 MPa. The observed compression rate (25%) under pressure and the partial irreversibility of cell compression (10%) after return to atmospheric pressure lead to the conclusion that a mass transfer between cell and cultivation medium occurred. The causes of this transfer could be explained by a modification of membrane properties, i.e., disruption or increase in permeability. PMID:7640002

  19. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Stable Multiprotein Complexes in Both Fission and Budding Yeasts Containing Myb-Related Cdc5p/Cef1p, Novel Pre-mRNA Splicing Factors, and snRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Ohi, Melanie D.; Link, Andrew J.; Ren, Liping; Jennings, Jennifer L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2002-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc5p and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog, Cef1p, are essential Myb-related proteins implicated in pre-mRNA splicing and contained within large multiprotein complexes. Here we describe the tandem affinity purification (TAP) of Cdc5p- and Cef1p-associated complexes. Using transmission electron microscopy, we show that the purified Cdc5p complex is a discrete structure. The components of the S. pombe Cdc5p/S. cerevisiae Cef1p complexes (termed Cwfs or Cwcs, respe...

  20. Desempenho de Poedeiras Comerciais Alimentadas com Levedura Seca (Saccharomyces Crevisiae de Cana-de-Açúcar Performance of Commercial Brown Egg Layers Fed Dried Yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae of Sugar-Cane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAR Maia

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Essa pesquisa teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito da adição de levedura seca de álcool (LSA à dieta de poedeiras. Foram utilizadas 120 poedeiras Isabrown com 33 semanas de idade, distribuídas em um delineamento estatístico de blocos ao acaso, com cinco tratamentos (0, 7, 14, 21 e 28% de levedura, quatro repetições e seis aves por unidade experimental. Rações isoprotéicas (18% PB, isoenergéticas (2.800 kcal EM/kg, isocálcicas (3,8% Ca e isofosfóricas (0,38% Pd foram formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja. Os níveis de LSA não afetaram a produção galinha dia (PGD=94,71± 0,96%, peso dos ovos (PO=64,35± 0,85g, peso médio final das aves (PMF=1.872,07± 50,36g, ganho de peso das aves (GP=-52± 25,84g e umidade das excretas (UE=75,85± 3,81%. Observou-se efeito quadrático para as variáveis: consumo de ração (CR=117,03-0,34LSA+0,02LSA² e conversão alimentar por dúzia de ovos (CADO=1,48-0,0025LSA+0,00023LSA². Efeito linear foi observado para a variável conversão alimentar por massa de ovo (CAMO=1,867+0,0072LSA. A utilização de até 14% de levedura proporcionou desempenho semelhante ao obtido com a dieta à base de milho e farelo de soja. A análise econômica mostrou ser viável a utilização de níveis até 28% de levedura.This research had the objective of evaluating the effect of growing levels of dry yeast of alcohol (LSA to the laying hen diet. One hundred and twenty Isabrown laying hens were used with 33 weeks of age, in a randomized complete block design, with five treatments, four replicates and six birds per pen. The diets (18% CP, 2800 kcal ME/kg, 3,8% Ca and 0,38% AP, were formulated based on corn and soybean meal, with five levels of LSA inclusion: 0; 7; 14; 21 and 28,0%. The levels of LSA did not affect the production of hen per day (PGD=94,71± 0,96%, egg weight (PO=64,35± 0,85g, chicken weight (PMF=1.872,07± 50,36g, weight gain (GP=-52± 25,84g, and moisture of faeces (UE=75,85± 3,81%. Quadratic