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Sample records for budding yeast cell

  1. Cell polarization in budding and fission yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophie G; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polarization is a fundamental cellular property, which is essential for the function of numerous cell types. Over the past three to four decades, research using the best-established yeast systems in cell biological research, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (or budding yeast) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (or fission yeast), has brought to light fundamental principles governing the establishment and maintenance of a polarized, asymmetric state. These two organisms, though both ascomycetes, are evolutionarily very distant and exhibit distinct shapes and modes of growth. In this review, we compare and contrast the two systems. We first highlight common cell polarization pathways, detailing the contribution of Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, lipids, and protein scaffolds. We then contrast the major differences between the two organisms, describing their distinct strategies in growth site selection and growth zone dimensions and compartmentalization, which may be the basis for their distinct shapes. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Systems Level Modeling of the Cell Cycle Using Budding Yeast

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    D.R. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle are highly conserved across all eukaryotes, and so a relatively simple eukaryote such as yeast can provide insight into a variety of cell cycle perturbations including those that occur in human cancer. To date, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided the largest amount of experimental and modeling data on the progression of the cell cycle, making it a logical choice for in-depth studies of this process. Moreover, the advent of methods for collection of high-throughput genome, transcriptome, and proteome data has provided a means to collect and precisely quantify simultaneous cell cycle gene transcript and protein levels, permitting modeling of the cell cycle on the systems level. With the appropriate mathematical framework and suffi cient and accurate data on cell cycle components, it should be possible to create a model of the cell cycle that not only effectively describes its operation, but can also predict responses to perturbations such as variation in protein levels and responses to external stimuli including targeted inhibition by drugs. In this review, we summarize existing data on the yeast cell cycle, proteomics technologies for quantifying cell cycle proteins, and the mathematical frameworks that can integrate this data into representative and effective models. Systems level modeling of the cell cycle will require the integration of high-quality data with the appropriate mathematical framework, which can currently be attained through the combination of dynamic modeling based on proteomics data and using yeast as a model organism.

  3. Timing robustness in the budding and fission yeast cell cycles.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangla, Karan

    2010-02-01

    Robustness of biological models has emerged as an important principle in systems biology. Many past analyses of Boolean models update all pending changes in signals simultaneously (i.e., synchronously), making it impossible to consider robustness to variations in timing that result from noise and different environmental conditions. We checked previously published mathematical models of the cell cycles of budding and fission yeast for robustness to timing variations by constructing Boolean models and analyzing them using model-checking software for the property of speed independence. Surprisingly, the models are nearly, but not totally, speed-independent. In some cases, examination of timing problems discovered in the analysis exposes apparent inaccuracies in the model. Biologically justified revisions to the model eliminate the timing problems. Furthermore, in silico random mutations in the regulatory interactions of a speed-independent Boolean model are shown to be unlikely to preserve speed independence, even in models that are otherwise functional, providing evidence for selection pressure to maintain timing robustness. Multiple cell cycle models exhibit strong robustness to timing variation, apparently due to evolutionary pressure. Thus, timing robustness can be a basis for generating testable hypotheses and can focus attention on aspects of a model that may need refinement.

  4. Effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of yeast cells.

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    Egami, Shigeki; Naruse, Yujiro; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of single yeast cells was investigated using a magnetic circuit that was capable of generating a strong magnetic field (2.93 T) and gradient (6100 T²  m⁻¹). Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were grown in an aqueous YPD agar in a silica capillary under either a homogeneous or inhomogeneous static magnetic field. Although the size of budding yeast cells was only slightly affected by the magnetic fields after 4 h, the budding angle was clearly affected by the direction of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the homogeneous magnetic field, the budding direction of daughter yeast cells was mainly oriented in the direction of magnetic field B. However, when subjected to the inhomogeneous magnetic field, the daughter yeast cells tended to bud along the axis of capillary flow in regions where the magnetic gradient, estimated by B(dB/dx), were high. Based on the present experimental results, the possible mechanism for the magnetic effect on the budding direction of daughter yeast cells is theoretically discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Origin of irreversibility of cell cycle start in budding yeast.

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    Gilles Charvin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cells irreversibly commit to a new division cycle at a regulatory transition called Start. This essential decision-making step involves the activation of the SBF/MBF transcription factors. SBF/MBF promote expression of the G1 cyclins encoded by CLN1 and CLN2. Cln1,2 can activate their own expression by inactivating the Whi5 repressor of SBF/MBF. The resulting transcriptional positive feedback provides an appealing, but as yet unproven, candidate for generating irreversibility of Start. Here, we investigate the logic of the Start regulatory module by quantitative single-cell time-lapse microscopy, using strains in which expression of key regulators is efficiently controlled by changes of inducers in a microfluidic chamber. We show that Start activation is ultrasensitive to G1 cyclin. In the absence of CLN1,2-dependent positive feedback, we observe that Start transit is reversible, due to reactivation of the Whi5 transcriptional repressor. Introduction of the positive feedback loop makes Whi5 inactivation and Start activation irreversible, which therefore guarantees unidirectional entry into S phase. A simple mathematical model to describe G1 cyclin turn on at Start, entirely constrained by empirically measured parameters, shows that the experimentally measured ultrasensitivity and transcriptional positive feedback are necessary and sufficient dynamical characteristics to make the Start transition a bistable and irreversible switch. Our study thus demonstrates that Start irreversibility is a property that arises from the architecture of the system (Whi5/SBF/Cln2 loop, rather than the consequence of the regulation of a single component (e.g., irreversible protein degradation.

  6. Pore formation on proliferating yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell buds by HM-1 killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, T; Ohta, T; Urakami, H; Shiratori, Y; Takasuka, T; Satoh, M; Watanabe, T; Furuichi, Y

    1996-04-01

    The cytocidal effect of HM-1 produced by Hansenula mrakii on yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells was studied. The HM-1 strongly inhibited the growth of S. cerevisiae cells at a low concentration (IC50: 2.1 x 10(-8) M) by reducing the number of viable cells. The killer action of HM-1 was most efficient when cells were actively proliferating. Cells in a resting state were resistant, but they became HM-1-sensitive after about 90 min of culturing at 30 degrees C, concomitantly with the increment of budding index. In association with the reduction of viable cell number, ultraviolet light-absorbing cellular components were discharged from sensitive cells. HM-1 molecules appear to bind to susceptible cells rather loosely since cells incubated with HM-1 were able to proliferate after having been washed. By phase-contrast light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, discharge of cell material was observed at the budding portions of HM-1-treated cells. Addition of sorbitol to make the culture medium isotonic partially reduced the cell death induced by HM-1. These results suggest that HM-1 acts on the budding region of proliferating yeast cells, resulting in pore formation, leakage of cell material and eventual cell death.

  7. Dilution of the cell cycle inhibitor Whi5 controls budding yeast cell size

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    Schmoller, Kurt M.; Turner, J.J.; Kõivomägi, M.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell size fundamentally affects all biosynthetic processes by determining the scale of organelles and influencing surface transport1,2. Although extensive studies have identified many mutations affecting cell size, the molecular mechanisms underlying size control have remained elusive3. In budding yeast, size control occurs in G1 phase prior to Start, the point of irreversible commitment to cell division4,5. It was previously thought that activity of the G1 cyclin Cln3 increased with cell size to trigger Start by initiating the inhibition of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi56-8. However, while Cln3 concentration does modulate the rate at which cells pass Start, we found that its synthesis increases in proportion to cell size so that its total concentration is nearly constant during pre-Start G1. Rather than increasing Cln3 activity, we identify decreasing Whi5 activity — due to the dilution of Whi5 by cell growth — as a molecular mechanism through which cell size controls proliferation. Whi5 is synthesized in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a largely size-independent manner. This results in smaller daughter cells being born with higher Whi5 concentrations that extend their pre-Start G1 phase. Thus, at its most fundamental level, budding yeast size control results from the differential scaling of Cln3 and Whi5 synthesis rates with cell size. More generally, our work shows that differential size-dependency of protein synthesis can provide an elegant mechanism to coordinate cellular functions with growth. PMID:26390151

  8. Dilution of the cell cycle inhibitor Whi5 controls budding-yeast cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, Kurt M; Turner, J J; Kõivomägi, M; Skotheim, Jan M

    2015-10-08

    Cell size fundamentally affects all biosynthetic processes by determining the scale of organelles and influencing surface transport. Although extensive studies have identified many mutations affecting cell size, the molecular mechanisms underlying size control have remained elusive. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, size control occurs in G1 phase before Start, the point of irreversible commitment to cell division. It was previously thought that activity of the G1 cyclin Cln3 increased with cell size to trigger Start by initiating the inhibition of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi5 (refs 6-8). Here we show that although Cln3 concentration does modulate the rate at which cells pass Start, its synthesis increases in proportion to cell size so that its total concentration is nearly constant during pre-Start G1. Rather than increasing Cln3 activity, we identify decreasing Whi5 activity--due to the dilution of Whi5 by cell growth--as a molecular mechanism through which cell size controls proliferation. Whi5 is synthesized in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a largely size-independent manner. This results in smaller daughter cells being born with higher Whi5 concentrations that extend their pre-Start G1 phase. Thus, at its most fundamental level, size control in budding yeast results from the differential scaling of Cln3 and Whi5 synthesis rates with cell size. More generally, our work shows that differential size-dependency of protein synthesis can provide an elegant mechanism to coordinate cellular functions with growth.

  9. SNAP-, CLIP- and Halo-tag labelling of budding yeast cells.

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    Franziska Stagge

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy of the localization and the spatial and temporal dynamics of specifically labelled proteins is an indispensable tool in cell biology. Besides fluorescent proteins as tags, tag-mediated labelling utilizing self-labelling proteins as the SNAP-, CLIP-, or the Halo-tag are widely used, flexible labelling systems relying on exogenously supplied fluorophores. Unfortunately, labelling of live budding yeast cells proved to be challenging with these approaches because of the limited accessibility of the cell interior to the dyes. In this study we developed a fast and reliable electroporation-based labelling protocol for living budding yeast cells expressing SNAP-, CLIP-, or Halo-tagged fusion proteins. For the Halo-tag, we demonstrate that it is crucial to use the 6'-carboxy isomers and not the 5'-carboxy isomers of important dyes to ensure cell viability. We report on a simple rule for the analysis of ¹H NMR spectra to discriminate between 6'- and 5'-carboxy isomers of fluorescein and rhodamine derivatives. We demonstrate the usability of the labelling protocol by imaging yeast cells with STED super-resolution microscopy and dual colour live cell microscopy. The large number of available fluorophores for these self-labelling proteins and the simplicity of the protocol described here expands the available toolbox for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. A checkpoints capturing timing-robust Boolean model of the budding yeast cell cycle regulatory network

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    Hong Changki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cycle process of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of four phases: G1, S, G2 and M. Initiated by stimulation of the G1 phase, cell cycle returns to the G1 stationary phase through a sequence of the S, G2 and M phases. During the cell cycle, a cell verifies whether necessary conditions are satisfied at the end of each phase (i.e., checkpoint since damages of any phase can cause severe cell cycle defect. The cell cycle can proceed to the next phase properly only if checkpoint conditions are met. Over the last decade, there have been several studies to construct Boolean models that capture checkpoint conditions. However, they mostly focused on robustness to network perturbations, and the timing robustness has not been much addressed. Only recently, some studies suggested extension of such models towards timing-robust models, but they have not considered checkpoint conditions. Results To construct a timing-robust Boolean model that preserves checkpoint conditions of the budding yeast cell cycle, we used a model verification technique, ‘model checking’. By utilizing automatic and exhaustive verification of model checking, we found that previous models cannot properly capture essential checkpoint conditions in the presence of timing variations. In particular, such models violate the M phase checkpoint condition so that it allows a division of a budding yeast cell into two before the completion of its full DNA replication and synthesis. In this paper, we present a timing-robust model that preserves all the essential checkpoint conditions properly against timing variations. Our simulation results show that the proposed timing-robust model is more robust even against network perturbations and can better represent the nature of cell cycle than previous models. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first work that rigorously examined the timing robustness of the cell cycle process of budding yeast with respect

  11. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

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    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  12. Bipolar budding in yeasts - an electron microscope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreger-van Rij, N.J.W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1971-01-01

    Bud formation in yeasts with bipolar budding was studied by electron microscopy of thin sections. Budding in yeasts of the species Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Hanseniaspora valbyensis and Wickerhamia fluorescens resulted in concentric rings of scar ridges on the wall of the mother cell. The wall

  13. A stochastic model correctly predicts changes in budding yeast cell cycle dynamics upon periodic expression of CLN2.

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    Cihan Oguz

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on a recent stochastic budding yeast cell cycle model. First, we estimate the model parameters using extensive data sets: phenotypes of 110 genetic strains, single cell statistics of wild type and cln3 strains. Optimization of stochastic model parameters is achieved by an automated algorithm we recently used for a deterministic cell cycle model. Next, in order to test the predictive ability of the stochastic model, we focus on a recent experimental study in which forced periodic expression of CLN2 cyclin (driven by MET3 promoter in cln3 background has been used to synchronize budding yeast cell colonies. We demonstrate that the model correctly predicts the experimentally observed synchronization levels and cell cycle statistics of mother and daughter cells under various experimental conditions (numerical data that is not enforced in parameter optimization, in addition to correctly predicting the qualitative changes in size control due to forced CLN2 expression. Our model also generates a novel prediction: under frequent CLN2 expression pulses, G1 phase duration is bimodal among small-born cells. These cells originate from daughters with extended budded periods due to size control during the budded period. This novel prediction and the experimental trends captured by the model illustrate the interplay between cell cycle dynamics, synchronization of cell colonies, and size control in budding yeast.

  14. Bifurcation analysis of a model of the budding yeast cell cycle

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    Battogtokh, Dorjsuren; Tyson, John J.

    2004-09-01

    We study the bifurcations of a set of nine nonlinear ordinary differential equations that describe regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase that triggers DNA synthesis and mitosis in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that Clb2-dependent kinase exhibits bistability (stable steady states of high or low kinase activity). The transition from low to high Clb2-dependent kinase activity is driven by transient activation of Cln2-dependent kinase, and the reverse transition is driven by transient activation of the Clb2 degradation machinery. We show that a four-variable model retains the main features of the nine-variable model. In a three-variable model exhibiting birhythmicity (two stable oscillatory states), we explore possible effects of extrinsic fluctuations on cell cycle progression.

  15. Time scale and dimension analysis of a budding yeast cell cycle model

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    Novák Béla

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress through the eukaryotic cell division cycle is driven by an underlying molecular regulatory network. Cell cycle progression can be considered as a series of irreversible transitions from one steady state to another in the correct order. Although this view has been put forward some time ago, it has not been quantitatively proven yet. Bifurcation analysis of a model for the budding yeast cell cycle has identified only two different steady states (one for G1 and one for mitosis using cell mass as a bifurcation parameter. By analyzing the same model, using different methods of dynamical systems theory, we provide evidence for transitions among several different steady states during the budding yeast cell cycle. Results By calculating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of kinetic differential equations we have determined the stability of the cell cycle trajectories of the Chen model. Based on the sign of the real part of the eigenvalues, the cell cycle can be divided into excitation and relaxation periods. During an excitation period, the cell cycle control system leaves a formerly stable steady state and, accordingly, excitation periods can be associated with irreversible cell cycle transitions like START, entry into mitosis and exit from mitosis. During relaxation periods, the control system asymptotically approaches the new steady state. We also show that the dynamical dimension of the Chen's model fluctuates by increasing during excitation periods followed by decrease during relaxation periods. In each relaxation period the dynamical dimension of the model drops to one, indicating a period where kinetic processes are in steady state and all concentration changes are driven by the increase of cytoplasmic growth. Conclusion We apply two numerical methods, which have not been used to analyze biological control systems. These methods are more sensitive than the bifurcation analysis used before because they identify those

  16. Proteomics analysis for asymmetric inheritance of preexisting proteins between mother and daughter cells in budding yeast.

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    Okada, Mitsuhiro; Kusunoki, Shunta; Ishibashi, Yuko; Kito, Keiji

    2017-06-01

    In budding yeast, a mother cell can produce a finite number of daughter cells over its life. The accumulation of a variety of types of damaged components has an impact on the aging process. Asymmetrical inheritance during cell division causes these aberrant intracellular constituents to be retained in mother cells and prevents them from segregating to daughter cells. However, the understanding of asymmetrical inheritance of individual proteins that are damaged or old age, and their relevance to the aging process, has been limited. The aim of this study is to propose a proteomics strategy for asymmetrical inheritance of preexisting proteins between mother and daughter cells. During synchronous culture for one generation, newly synthesized proteins were labeled with stable isotope amino acids to discriminate preexisting proteins originally expressed in mother cells, followed by separation of mother and daughter cells using a conventional method based on biotin labeling. Isotope incorporation ratios for individual proteins were quantified using mass spectrometry. We successfully identified 21 proteins whose preexisting versions were asymmetrically inherited in mother cells, including plasma membrane transporter involved in the aging process and organelle-anchoring proteins related to the stress response to misfolded proteins. Thus, our approach would be useful for making catalog of asymmetrically inherited proteins. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Reliable cell cycle commitment in budding yeast is ensured by signal integration

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    Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Cells have to make reliable decisions in response to external and/or internal signals that can be noisy and varying. For budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells decide whether and when to commit to cell division at the Start checkpoint. The decision is irreversible and has the physiological significance for coordinating cell growth with cell division. The trigger of the Start, the G1 cyclin Cln3 is a dynamic sensor of the nutrient and cellular conditions with low copy number and rapid turnover time. Here we quantitatively investigate how cells process the information from Cln3 to make the Start decision. By using an inducible Cln3 and monitoring the time cell waits before Start transition (G1 length), we find that G1 length is inversely proportional to Cln3 concentration, which implies that Start is triggered when the integration of Cln3 concentration over time exceeds certain threshold. We identify the Start repressor, Whi5 as the integrator. The instantaneous kinase activity of Cln3-Cdk1 is recorded over time on the phosphorylated Whi5, and the decision is made only when the phosphorylation level of Whi5 reaches a threshold. Furthermore, we find that Whi5 plays an important role for coordinating growth and division - cells modulate Whi5 level in different nutrient conditions to adjust the Start threshold. The strategy of signal integration, which reduces noise and minimizes error and uncertainty, has been found in decision-making behaviors of animals. Our work shows that it is adopted at the cellular level, suggesting a general design principle that may be widely implemented in decision-making and signaling systems.

  18. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

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    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  19. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

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    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  20. Electrochemical Regulation of Budding Yeast Polarity

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    Piel, Matthieu; Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs) at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs), which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization. PMID:25548923

  1. Analyzing DNA replication checkpoint in budding yeast.

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    Hustedt, Nicole; Shimada, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Checkpoints are conserved mechanisms that prevent progression into the next phase of the cell cycle when cells are unable to accomplish the previous event properly. Cells also possess a surveillance mechanism called the DNA replication checkpoint, which consists of a conserved kinase cascade that is provoked by insults that block or slow down replication fork progression. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DNA replication checkpoint controls the timing of S-phase events such as origin firing and spindle elongation. This checkpoint also upregulates dNTP pools and maintains the replication fork structure in order to resume DNA replication after replication block. Many replication checkpoint factors have been found to be tumor suppressors, highlighting the importance of this checkpoint pathway in human health. Here we describe a series of protocols to analyze the DNA replication checkpoint in S. cerevisiae.

  2. The Adder Phenomenon Emerges from Independent Control of Pre- and Post-Start Phases of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle.

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    Chandler-Brown, Devon; Schmoller, Kurt M; Winetraub, Yonatan; Skotheim, Jan M

    2017-09-25

    Although it has long been clear that cells actively regulate their size, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation have remained poorly understood. In budding yeast, cell size primarily modulates the duration of the cell-division cycle by controlling the G1/S transition known as Start. We have recently shown that the rate of progression through Start increases with cell size, because cell growth dilutes the cell-cycle inhibitor Whi5 in G1. Recent phenomenological studies in yeast and bacteria have shown that these cells add an approximately constant volume during each complete cell cycle, independent of their size at birth. These results seem to be in conflict, as the phenomenological studies suggest that cells measure the amount they grow, rather than their size, and that size control acts over the whole cell cycle, rather than specifically in G1. Here, we propose an integrated model that unifies the adder phenomenology with the molecular mechanism of G1/S cell-size control. We use single-cell microscopy to parameterize a full cell-cycle model based on independent control of pre- and post-Start cell-cycle periods. We find that our model predicts the size-independent amount of cell growth during the full cell cycle. This suggests that the adder phenomenon is an emergent property of the independent regulation of pre- and post-Start cell-cycle periods rather than the consequence of an underlying molecular mechanism measuring a fixed amount of growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Apoptosis at inflection point in liquid culture of budding yeasts.

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    Toshiyuki Hagiwara

    Full Text Available Budding yeasts are highly suitable for aging studies, because the number of bud scars (stage proportionally correlates with age. Its maximum stages are known to reach at 20-30 stages on an isolated agar medium. However, their stage dynamics in a liquid culture is virtually unknown. We investigate the population dynamics by counting scars in each cell. Here one cell division produces one new cell and one bud scar. This simple rule leads to a conservation law: "The total number of bud scars is equal to the total number of cells." We find a large discrepancy: extremely fewer cells with over 5 scars than expected. Almost all cells with 6 or more scars disappear within a short period of time in the late log phase (corresponds to the inflection point. This discrepancy is confirmed directly by the microscopic observations of broken cells. This finding implies apoptosis in older cells (6 scars or more.

  4. Budding yeast for budding geneticists: a primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system.

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    Duina, Andrea A; Miller, Mary E; Keeney, Jill B

    2014-05-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans.

  5. Sociobiology of the budding yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for sociobiological research. I discuss the problems connected with clear classification of yeast behaviour based on the fitness-based Hamilton paradigm. Relevant traits include different types of communities, production of flocculins, invertase and toxins, and the presence ...

  6. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  7. TOR regulates cell death induced by telomere dysfunction in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available Telomere dysfunction is known to induce growth arrest (senescence and cell death. However, the regulation of the senescence-death process is poorly understood. Here using a yeast dysfunctional telomere model cdc13-1, which carries a temperature sensitive-mutant telomere binding protein Cdc13p, we demonstrate that inhibition of TOR (Target of Rapamycin, a central regulator of nutrient pathways for cell growth, prevents cell death, but not growth arrest, induced by inactivation of Cdc13-1p. This function of TOR is novel and separable from its G1 inhibition function, and not associated with alterations in the telomere length, the amount of G-tails, and the telomere position effect (TPE in cdc13-1 cells. Furthermore, antioxidants were also shown to prevent cell death initiated by inactivation of cdc13-1. Moreover, inhibition of TOR was also shown to prevent cell death induced by inactivation of telomerase in an est1 mutant. Interestingly, rapamycin did not prevent cell death induced by DNA damaging agents such as etoposide and UV. In the aggregate, our results suggest that the TOR signaling pathway is specifically involved in the regulation of cell death initiated by telomere dysfunction.

  8. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model...... in experimental single-cell studies has taken place in the last decades. It has however not been fully accompanied by similar contributions within data analysis and mathematical modeling. Indeed, literature reporting, for example, quantitative analyses of experimental single-cell observations and validation...... of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate...

  9. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kazum@nips.ac.jp [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru [Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo [Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO{sub 4} post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components.

  10. Evolutionary biology through the lens of budding yeast comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsit, Souhir; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Durand, Éléonore; Marchant, Axelle; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2017-10-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly advanced model system for studying genetics, cell biology and systems biology. Over the past decade, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies to this species has contributed to this yeast also becoming an important model for evolutionary genomics. Indeed, comparative genomic analyses of laboratory, wild and domesticated yeast populations are providing unprecedented detail about many of the processes that govern evolution, including long-term processes, such as reproductive isolation and speciation, and short-term processes, such as adaptation to natural and domestication-related environments.

  11. A CDK-independent metabolic oscillator orchestrates the budding yeast cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, A.; Niebel, B.; Wit, E.; Heinemann, M.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division is known to be controlled by the cyclin/ CDK machinery. However, eukaryotes have evolved prior to CDKs, and cells can divide in the absence of major cyclin/CDK components. We hypothesized that an autonomous metabolic oscillator provides dynamic triggers for cell cycle

  12. Live-cell imaging of budding yeast telomerase RNA and TERRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Hadrien; Lalonde, Maxime; Guérit, David; Chartrand, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    In most eukaryotes, the ribonucleoprotein complex telomerase is responsible for maintaining telomere length. In recent years, single-cell microscopy techniques such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and live-cell imaging have been developed to image the RNA subunit of the telomerase holoenzyme. These techniques are now becoming important tools for the study of telomerase biogenesis, its association with telomeres and its regulation. Here, we present detailed protocols for live-cell imaging of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA subunit, called TLC1, and also of the non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA TERRA. We describe the approach used for genomic integration of MS2 stem-loops in these transcripts, and provide information for optimal live-cell imaging of these non-coding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-resolution transcription atlas of the mitotic cell cycle in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granovskaia, Marina V; Jensen, Lars J; Ritchie, Matthew E

    2010-01-01

    Extensive transcription of non-coding RNAs has been detected in eukaryotic genomes and is thought to constitute an additional layer in the regulation of gene expression. Despite this role, their transcription through the cell cycle has not been studied; genome-wide approaches have only focused on...

  14. Origin plasticity during budding yeast DNA replication in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Julien; Devbhandari, Sujan; Remus, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The separation of DNA replication origin licensing and activation in the cell cycle is essential for genome stability across generations in eukaryotic cells. Pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) license origins by loading Mcm2-7 complexes in inactive form around DNA. During origin firing in S phase, replisomes assemble around the activated Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. Budding yeast pre-RCs have previously been reconstituted in vitro with purified proteins. Here, we show that reconstituted pre-RCs support replication of plasmid DNA in yeast cell extracts in a reaction that exhibits hallmarks of cellular replication initiation. Plasmid replication in vitro results in the generation of covalently closed circular daughter molecules, indicating that the system recapitulates the initiation, elongation, and termination stages of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, yeast origin DNA is not strictly required for DNA replication in vitro, as heterologous DNA sequences could support replication of plasmid molecules. Our findings support the notion that epigenetic mechanisms are important for determining replication origin sites in budding yeast, highlighting mechanistic principles of replication origin specification that are common among eukaryotes. PMID:24566988

  15. Sporulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neiman, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    In response to nitrogen starvation in the presence of a poor carbon source, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and package the haploid nuclei produced in meiosis into spores...

  16. Optimization and model reduction in the high dimensional parameter space of a budding yeast cell cycle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Parameter estimation from experimental data is critical for mathematical modeling of protein regulatory networks. For realistic networks with dozens of species and reactions, parameter estimation is an especially challenging task. In this study, we present an approach for parameter estimation that is effective in fitting a model of the budding yeast cell cycle (comprising 26 nonlinear ordinary differential equations containing 126 rate constants) to the experimentally observed phenotypes (viable or inviable) of 119 genetic strains carrying mutations of cell cycle genes. Results Starting from an initial guess of the parameter values, which correctly captures the phenotypes of only 72 genetic strains, our parameter estimation algorithm quickly improves the success rate of the model to 105–111 of the 119 strains. This success rate is comparable to the best values achieved by a skilled modeler manually choosing parameters over many weeks. The algorithm combines two search and optimization strategies. First, we use Latin hypercube sampling to explore a region surrounding the initial guess. From these samples, we choose ∼20 different sets of parameter values that correctly capture wild type viability. These sets form the starting generation of differential evolution that selects new parameter values that perform better in terms of their success rate in capturing phenotypes. In addition to producing highly successful combinations of parameter values, we analyze the results to determine the parameters that are most critical for matching experimental outcomes and the most competitive strains whose correct outcome with a given parameter vector forces numerous other strains to have incorrect outcomes. These “most critical parameters” and “most competitive strains” provide biological insights into the model. Conversely, the “least critical parameters” and “least competitive strains” suggest ways to reduce the computational complexity of the

  17. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  18. Newly identified prions in budding yeast, and their possible functions

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Emily T.; Li, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are atypical genetic elements that are transmitted as heritable protein conformations. [PSI+], [URE3], and [PIN+] are three well-studied prions in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the last three years, several additional prions have been reported in yeast, including [SWI+], [OCT+], [MCA], [GAR+], [MOT3+], [ISP+], and [NSI+]. The growing number of yeast prions suggests that protein-based inheritance might be a widespread biological phenomenon. In this review, we sum...

  19. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  20. Long-Term Imaging of DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Progression in Budding Yeast Using Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchi, Riccardo; Schwob, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Live cell imaging can monitor biological processes in time and space by providing quantitative measurements of cell behavior on a single-cell basis and in live conditions. However the illumination required to visualize fluorescently tagged endogenous proteins often perturbs cellular physiology, a problem particularly acute for yeast cells that are small, highly photosensitive and with scarce protein content. Analyzing the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) in various yeast mutants or growth conditions, as well as its consequences for cell cycle progression and cell viability over extended periods of time therefore requires a special microscopy setup that does not by itself create DNA damage or perturb cell growth. Here, we provide a quick guide, strains and advice for imaging the DDR in S. cerevisiae for extended time (3-12 h) using spinning-disk confocal microscopy in conditions of limited photobleaching and photodamage. DDR is a conserved mechanism that allows the cell to respond to various stresses, especially those altering DNA integrity or topology. Acquiring time-lapse images of the DDR at high temporal and spatial resolution is of great interest, in particular when studying the effects of mutations or drugs which compromise genomic stability and cell cycle progression.

  1. The budding yeast orthologue of Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1 is a multi-stress response protein protecting cells against toxic glycolytic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkańska, Urszula; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Sieńko, Marzena; Skoneczny, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp31p is a DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI family protein that was previously shown to be important for survival in the stationary phase of growth and under oxidative stress. Recently, it was identified as a chaperone or as glutathione-independent glyoxalase. To elucidate the role played by this protein in budding yeast cells, we investigated its involvement in the protection against diverse environmental stresses. Our study revealed that HSP31 gene expression is controlled by multiple transcription factors, including Yap1p, Cad1p, Msn2p, Msn4p, Haa1p and Hsf1p. These transcription factors mediate the HSP31 promoter responses to oxidative, osmotic and thermal stresses, to potentially toxic products of glycolysis, such as methylglyoxal and acetic acid, and to the diauxic shift. We also demonstrated that the absence of the HSP31 gene sensitizes cells to these stressors. Overproduction of Hsp31p and its homologue Hsp32p rescued the sensitivity of glo1Δ cells to methylglyoxal. Hsp31p also reversed the increased sensitivity of the ald6Δ strain to acetic acid. Since Hsp31p glyoxalase III coexists in S. cerevisiae cells with thousand-fold more potent glyoxalase I/II system, its biological purpose requires substantiation. We postulate that S. cerevisiae Hsp31p may have broader substrate specificity than previously proposed and is able to eliminate various toxic products of glycolysis. Alternatively, Hsp31p might be effective under high concentration of exogenous methylglyoxal present in some natural environmental niches populated by budding yeast, when glyoxalase I/II system capacity is saturated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous High-resolution Microscopic Observation of Replicative Aging in Budding Yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne H. E. W.; Janssens, Georges E.; Lee, Sung Sik; Vizcarra, Ima Avalos; Heinemann, Matthias

    We demonstrate the use of a simple microfluidic setup, in which single budding yeast cells can be tracked throughout their entire lifespan. The microfluidic chip exploits the size difference between mother and daughter cells using an array of micropads. Upon loading, cells are trapped underneath

  3. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-11-05

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. © 2015 Sutradhar, Yadav, Sridhar, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Genetic bypass of essential RNA repair enzymes in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Patrick D; White, Laura K; York, Kerri; Hesselberth, Jay R

    2017-12-06

    RNA repair enzymes catalyze rejoining of an RNA molecule after cleavage of phosphodiester linkages. RNA repair in budding yeast is catalyzed by two separate enzymes that process tRNA exons during their splicing and HAC1 mRNA exons during activation of the unfolded protein response. The RNA ligase Trl1 joins 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl RNA fragments, creating a new phosphodiester linkage with a 2'-phosphate at the junction. The 2'-phosphate is subsequently removed by the 2'-phosphotransferase Tpt1, which catalyzes phosphate transfer to NAD+, producing nicotinamide and a unique ADP ribose metabolite. We bypassed the essential functions of TRL1 and TPT1 in budding yeast by expressing "pre-spliced," intronless versions of the ten normally intron-containing tRNAs, indicating this repair pathway does not have additional essential functions. Consistent with previous studies, expression of intronless tRNAs failed to rescue the growth of cells with deletions in components of the SEN complex, implying an additional essential role for the splicing endonuclease. The trl1∆ and tpt1∆ mutants accumulate tRNA and HAC1 splicing intermediates indicative of specific RNA repair defects and are hypersensitive to drugs that inhibit translation. As expected, failure to induce the unfolded protein response in trl1∆ cells grown with tunicamycin is lethal owing to their inability to ligate HAC1 after its cleavage by Ire1. In contrast, tpt1∆ mutants grow in the presence of tunicamycin despite reduced accumulation of spliced HAC1, suggesting that ligated but 2'-phosphorylated mRNA is decoded by the ribosome. Finally, we optimized a PCR-based method to detect RNA 2'-phosphate modifications and show that they are present on ligated HAC1 mRNA. These RNA repair mutants enable new studies of the role of RNA repair in cellular physiology. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  6. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  7. Whole lifespan microscopic observation of budding yeast aging through a microfluidic dissection platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sung Sik; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Huberts, Daphne H E W; Lee, Luke P; Heinemann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Important insights into aging have been generated with the genetically tractable and short-lived budding yeast. However, it is still impossible today to continuously track cells by high-resolution microscopic imaging (e.g., fluorescent imaging) throughout their entire lifespan. Instead, the field

  8. The Genetic Requirements for Pentose Fermentation in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Mittelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells grow on a wide range of carbon sources by regulating substrate flow through the metabolic network. Incoming sugar, for example, can be fermented or respired, depending on the carbon identity, cell type, or growth conditions. Despite this genetically-encoded flexibility of carbon metabolism, attempts to exogenously manipulate central carbon flux by rational design have proven difficult, suggesting a robust network structure. To examine this robustness, we characterized the ethanol yield of 411 regulatory and metabolic mutants in budding yeast. The mutants showed little variation in ethanol productivity when grown on glucose or galactose, yet diversity was revealed during growth on xylulose, a rare pentose not widely available in nature. While producing ethanol at high yield, cells grown on xylulose produced ethanol at high yields, yet induced expression of respiratory genes, and were dependent on them. Analysis of mutants that affected ethanol productivity suggested that xylulose fermentation results from metabolic overflow, whereby the flux through glycolysis is higher than the maximal flux that can enter respiration. We suggest that this overflow results from a suboptimal regulatory adjustment of the cells to this unfamiliar carbon source.

  9. Functionally homologous DNA replication genes in fission and budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Mar; Calzada, Arturo; Bueno, Avelino

    1999-01-01

    The cdc18+ gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the initiation of DNA replication as well as in coupling the S phase to mitosis. In this work, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC6 gene complements cdc18-K46 ts and cdc18 deletion mutant S. pombe strains. The budding yeast gene suppresses both the initiation and the checkpoint defects associated with the lack of cdc18+. The Cdc6 protein interacts in vivo with Cdc2 kinase complexes. Interestingly, Cdc6 is ...

  10. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Weinberg; K Nakanishi; D Patel; D Bartel

    2011-12-31

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  11. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, David E.; Nakanishi, Kotaro; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Bartel, David P. (Whitehead); (MSKCC)

    2011-09-20

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  12. The linear interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic noises ensures a high accuracy of cell fate selection in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongkai; Yi, Ming; Zou, Xiufen

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the mechanisms of cell fate decision in a noisy environment, the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on cell fate are explored at the single cell level. Specifically, we theoretically define the impulse of Cln1/2 as an indication of cell fates. The strong dependence between the impulse of Cln1/2 and cell fates is exhibited. Based on the simulation results, we illustrate that increasing intrinsic fluctuations causes the parallel shift of the separation ratio of Whi5P but that increasing extrinsic fluctuations leads to the mixture of different cell fates. Our quantitative study also suggests that the strengths of intrinsic and extrinsic noises around an approximate linear model can ensure a high accuracy of cell fate selection. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the selection of cell fates is an entropy-decreasing process. In addition, we reveal that cell fates are significantly correlated with the range of entropy decreases. PMID:25042292

  13. Acquiring fluorescence time-lapse movies of budding yeast and analyzing single-cell dynamics using GRAFTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Christopher J; Maheshri, Narendra

    2013-07-18

    Fluorescence time-lapse microscopy has become a powerful tool in the study of many biological processes at the single-cell level. In particular, movies depicting the temporal dependence of gene expression provide insight into the dynamics of its regulation; however, there are many technical challenges to obtaining and analyzing fluorescence movies of single cells. We describe here a simple protocol using a commercially available microfluidic culture device to generate such data, and a MATLAB-based, graphical user interface (GUI) -based software package to quantify the fluorescence images. The software segments and tracks cells, enables the user to visually curate errors in the data, and automatically assigns lineage and division times. The GUI further analyzes the time series to produce whole cell traces as well as their first and second time derivatives. While the software was designed for S. cerevisiae, its modularity and versatility should allow it to serve as a platform for studying other cell types with few modifications.

  14. CO2 mediated interaction in yeast stimulates budding and growth on minimal media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V Volodyaev

    Full Text Available Here we show that carbon dioxide (CO2 stimulates budding and shortens the lag-period of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures, grown on specific weak media. CO2 can be both exogenous and secreted by another growing yeast culture. We also show that this effect can be observed only in the lag-period, and demonstrate minimal doses and duration of culture exposition to CO2. Opposite to the effects of CO2 sensitivity, previously shown for pathogens, where increased concentration of CO2 suppressed mitosis and stimulated cell differentiation and invasion, here it stimulates budding and culture growth.

  15. Form and function of topologically associating genomic domains in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Umut; Chandler-Brown, Devon; Ay, Ferhat; Straight, Aaron F; Duan, Zhijun; Noble, William Stafford; Skotheim, Jan M

    2017-04-11

    The genome of metazoan cells is organized into topologically associating domains (TADs) that have similar histone modifications, transcription level, and DNA replication timing. Although similar structures appear to be conserved in fission yeast, computational modeling and analysis of high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) data have been used to argue that the small, highly constrained budding yeast chromosomes could not have these structures. In contrast, herein we analyze Hi-C data for budding yeast and identify 200-kb scale TADs, whose boundaries are enriched for transcriptional activity. Furthermore, these boundaries separate regions of similarly timed replication origins connecting the long-known effect of genomic context on replication timing to genome architecture. To investigate the molecular basis of TAD formation, we performed Hi-C experiments on cells depleted for the Forkhead transcription factors, Fkh1 and Fkh2, previously associated with replication timing. Forkhead factors do not regulate TAD formation, but do promote longer-range genomic interactions and control interactions between origins near the centromere. Thus, our work defines spatial organization within the budding yeast nucleus, demonstrates the conserved role of genome architecture in regulating DNA replication, and identifies a molecular mechanism specifically regulating interactions between pericentric origins.

  16. Naumovozyma castellii: an alternative model for budding yeast molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Cohn, Marita

    2017-03-01

    Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii) is a member of the budding yeast family Saccharomycetaceae. It has been extensively used as a model organism for telomere biology research and has gained increasing interest as a budding yeast model for functional analyses owing to its amenability to genetic modifications. Owing to the suitable phylogenetic distance to S. cerevisiae, the whole genome sequence of N. castellii has provided unique data for comparative genomic studies, and it played a key role in the establishment of the timing of the whole genome duplication and the evolutionary events that took place in the subsequent genomic evolution of the Saccharomyces lineage. Here we summarize the historical background of its establishment as a laboratory yeast species, and the development of genetic and molecular tools and strains. We review the research performed on N. castellii, focusing on areas where it has significantly contributed to the discovery of new features of molecular biology and to the advancement of our understanding of molecular evolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The Malleable Nature of the Budding Yeast Nuclear Envelope: Flares, Fusion, and Fenestrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseroll, Rebecca A; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2016-11-01

    In eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope (NE) physically separates nuclear components and activities from rest of the cell. The NE also provides rigidity to the nucleus and contributes to chromosome organization. At the same time, the NE is highly dynamic; it must change shape and rearrange its components during development and throughout the cell cycle, and its morphology can be altered in response to mutation and disease. Here we focus on the NE of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has several unique features: it remains intact throughout the cell cycle, expands symmetrically during interphase, elongates during mitosis and, expands asymmetrically during mitotic delay. Moreover, its NE is safely breached during mating and when large structures, such as nuclear pore complexes and the spindle pole body, are embedded into its double membrane. The budding yeast NE lacks lamins and yet the nucleus is capable of maintaining a spherical shape throughout interphase. Despite these eccentricities, studies of the budding yeast NE have uncovered interesting, and likely conserved, processes that contribute to NE dynamics. In particular, we discuss the processes that drive and enable NE expansion and the dramatic changes in the NE that lead to extensions and fenestrations. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2353-2360, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. A nutrient dependant switch explains mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis initiation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannige, C T; Kulasiri, D; Samarasinghe, S

    2014-01-21

    Nutrients from living environment are vital for the survival and growth of any organism. Budding yeast diploid cells decide to grow by mitosis type cell division or decide to create unique, stress resistant spores by meiosis type cell division depending on the available nutrient conditions. To gain a molecular systems level understanding of the nutrient dependant switching between meiosis and mitosis initiation in diploid cells of budding yeast, we develop a theoretical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including the mitosis initiator and its relations to budding yeast meiosis initiation network. Our model accurately and qualitatively predicts the experimentally revealed temporal variations of related proteins under different nutrient conditions as well as the diverse mutant studies related to meiosis and mitosis initiation. Using this model, we show how the meiosis and mitosis initiators form an all-or-none type bistable switch in response to available nutrient level (mainly nitrogen). The transitions to and from meiosis or mitosis initiation states occur via saddle node bifurcation. This bidirectional switch helps the optimal usage of available nutrients and explains the mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites in the budding yeast proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Esteras

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO is an important mechanism regulating protein function. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites on substrates is a challenging task. Here we employed a proteomic method to map SUMO acceptor lysines in budding yeast proteins. We report the identification of 257 lysine residues where SUMO is potentially attached. Amongst the hits, we identified already known SUMO substrates and sites, confirming the success of the approach. In addition, we tested several of the novel substrates using SUMO immunoprecipitation analysis and confirmed that the SUMO acceptor lysines identified in these proteins are indeed bona fide SUMOylation sites. We believe that the collection of SUMO sites presented here is an important resource for future functional studies of SUMOylation in yeast.

  20. Chromosome Segregation in Budding Yeast: Sister Chromatid Cohesion and Related Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Studies on budding yeast have exposed the highly conserved mechanisms by which duplicated chromosomes are evenly distributed to daughter cells at the metaphase–anaphase transition. The establishment of proteinaceous bridges between sister chromatids, a function provided by a ring-shaped complex known as cohesin, is central to accurate segregation. It is the destruction of this cohesin that triggers the segregation of chromosomes following their proper attachment to microtubules. Since it is irreversible, this process must be tightly controlled and driven to completion. Furthermore, during meiosis, modifications must be put in place to allow the segregation of maternal and paternal chromosomes in the first division for gamete formation. Here, I review the pioneering work from budding yeast that has led to a molecular understanding of the establishment and destruction of cohesion. PMID:24395824

  1. Screening the budding yeast genome reveals unique factors affecting K2 toxin susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Servienė

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion leakage. K28 toxin is active in the cell nucleus, blocking DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, thereby triggering apoptosis. Genome-wide screens in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae identified several hundred effectors of K1 and K28 toxins. Surprisingly, no such screen had been performed for K2 toxin, the most frequent killer toxin among industrial budding yeasts. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted several concurrent genome-wide screens in S. cerevisiae and identified 332 novel K2 toxin effectors. The effectors involved in K2 resistance and hypersensitivity largely map in distinct cellular pathways, including cell wall and plasma membrane structure/biogenesis and mitochondrial function for K2 resistance, and cell wall stress signaling and ion/pH homeostasis for K2 hypersensitivity. 70% of K2 effectors are different from those involved in K1 or K28 susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates that despite the fact that K1 and K2 toxins share some aspects of their killing strategies, they largely rely on different sets of effectors. Since the vast majority of the host factors identified here is exclusively active towards K2, we conclude that cells have acquired a specific K2 toxin effectors set. Our work thus indicates that K1 and K2 have elaborated different biological pathways and provides a first step towards the detailed characterization of K2 mode of action.

  2. The cellular robustness by genetic redundancy in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequent dispensability of duplicated genes in budding yeast is heralded as a hallmark of genetic robustness contributed by genetic redundancy. However, theoretical predictions suggest such backup by redundancy is evolutionarily unstable, and the extent of genetic robustness contributed from redundancy remains controversial. It is anticipated that, to achieve mutual buffering, the duplicated paralogs must at least share some functional overlap. However, counter-intuitively, several recent studies reported little functional redundancy between these buffering duplicates. The large yeast genetic interactions released recently allowed us to address these issues on a genome-wide scale. We herein characterized the synthetic genetic interactions for ∼500 pairs of yeast duplicated genes originated from either whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD events. We established that functional redundancy between duplicates is a pre-requisite and thus is highly predictive of their backup capacity. This observation was particularly pronounced with the use of a newly introduced metric in scoring functional overlap between paralogs on the basis of gene ontology annotations. Even though mutual buffering was observed to be prevalent among duplicated genes, we showed that the observed backup capacity is largely an evolutionarily transient state. The loss of backup capacity generally follows a neutral mode, with the buffering strength decreasing in proportion to divergence time, and the vast majority of the paralogs have already lost their backup capacity. These observations validated previous theoretic predictions about instability of genetic redundancy. However, departing from the general neutral mode, intriguingly, our analysis revealed the presence of natural selection in stabilizing functional overlap between SSD pairs. These selected pairs, both WGD and SSD, tend to have decelerated functional evolution, have higher propensities of co

  3. The step-wise pathway of septin hetero-octamer assembly in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Weems, Andrew; McMurray, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Septin proteins bind guanine nucleotides and form rod-shaped hetero-oligomers. Cells choose from a variety of available septins to assemble distinct hetero-oligomers, but the underlying mechanism was unknown. Using a new in vivo assay, we find that a stepwise assembly pathway produces the two species of budding yeast septin hetero-octamers: Cdc11/Shs1?Cdc12?Cdc3?Cdc10?Cdc10?Cdc3?Cdc12?Cdc11/Shs1. Rapid GTP hydrolysis by monomeric Cdc10 drives assembly of the core Cdc10 homodimer. The extended...

  4. Identification of New Genes that Regulate Telomerase and Telomere Length in Budding Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Otero, Joel

    2003-01-01

    In budding yeast, Cdc13 has both an essential function in chromosome end protection as well as a non-essential role in telomere replication, by mediating recruitment of telomerase to the chromosome end...

  5. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality score...s Data detail Data name 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality score...or-capping method, the sequence quality score generated by the Phred software, and links to SGD, dbEST and U...es. FASTA format. Quality Phred's quality score About This Database Database Desc...g yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  6. Measurement of the volume growth rate of single budding yeast with the MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiashu; Stowers, Chris C; Boczko, Erik M; Li, Deyu

    2010-11-07

    We report on measurements of the volume growth rate of ten individual budding yeast cells using a recently developed MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter. The MOSFET-based microfluidic Coulter counter is very sensitive, provides signals that are immune from the baseline drift, and can work with cell culture media of complex composition. These desirable features allow us to directly measure the volume growth rate of single cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae LYH3865 strain budding yeast in YNB culture media over a whole cell cycle. Results indicate that all budding yeast follow a sigmoid volume growth profile with reduced growth rates at the initial stage before the bud emerges and the final stage after the daughter gets mature. Analysis of the data indicates that even though all piecewise linear, Gomperitz, and Hill's function models can fit the global growth profile equally well, the data strongly support local exponential growth phenomenon. Accurate volume growth measurements are important for applications in systems biology where quantitative parameters are required for modeling and simulation.

  7. Morphogenetic and developmental functions of the Aspergillus nidulans homologues of the yeast bud site selection proteins Bud4 and Axl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Xu, Kaimei; Nicksarlian, Mark; Calvo, Ana M; Harris, Steven D

    2012-07-01

    The yeast bud site selection system represents a paradigm for understanding how fungal cells regulate the formation of a polarity axis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bud4 and Axl2 are components of the axial bud site marker. To address the possibility that these proteins regulate cellular morphogenesis in filamentous fungi, we have characterized homologues of Bud4 and Axl2 in Aspergillus nidulans. Our results show that Bud4 is involved in septum formation in both hyphae and developing conidiophores. Whereas Axl2 appears to have no obvious role in hyphal growth, it is required for the regulation of phialide morphogenesis during conidiation. In particular, Axl2 localizes to the phialide-spore junction, where it appears to promote the recruitment of septins. Furthermore, the developmental regulators BrlA and AbaA control the expression of Axl2. Additional studies indicate that Axl2 is also involved in the regulation of sexual development, not only in A. nidulans, but also in the phylogenetically unrelated fungus Fusarium graminearum. Our results suggest that Axl2 plays a key role in phialide morphogenesis and/or function during conidiation in the aspergilli. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The Budding Yeast “Saccharomyces cerevisiae” as a Drug Discovery Tool to Identify Plant-Derived Natural Products with Anti-Proliferative Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchra Qaddouri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable system to study cell-cycle regulation, which is defective in cancer cells. Due to the highly conserved nature of the cell-cycle machinery between yeast and humans, yeast studies are directly relevant to anticancer-drug discovery. The budding yeast is also an excellent model system for identifying and studying antifungal compounds because of the functional conservation of fungal genes. Moreover, yeast studies have also contributed greatly to our understanding of the biological targets and modes of action of bioactive compounds. Understanding the mechanism of action of clinically relevant compounds is essential for the design of improved second-generation molecules. Here we describe our methodology for screening a library of plant-derived natural products in yeast in order to identify and characterize new compounds with anti-proliferative properties.

  9. Astral microtubule pivoting promotes their search for cortical anchor sites during mitosis in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Baumgärtner

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast.

  10. Download - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available English ]; } else { document.getElementById(lang).innerHTML= '[ Japanese | English ]'; } } window.onload = ...List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project Download First of all, please read the license of this... database. Data names and data descriptions are about the downloadable data in this page. They might not cor... # Data name File Simple search and download 1 README README_e.html - 2 5'-end se...quences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores yeast_seq_qual.zip (59.9MB) Simple search and dow

  11. A Comparative Study of the Cell Wall Structure of Basidiomycetous and Related Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreger-van Rij, N.J.W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1971-01-01

    The wall of basidiomycetous and related yeasts showed a lamellar structure in sections of both budding cells and hyphae fixed with potassium permanganate. The yeasts also had a typical way of bud formation and septation. These features differ from those recorded for ascomycetous yeasts. In the

  12. An insight into the complex prion-prion interaction network in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiqiang; Valtierra, Stephanie; Li, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model system for studying prion-prion interactions as it contains multiple prion proteins. A recent study from our laboratory showed that the existence of Swi1 prion ([SWI(+)]) and overproduction of Swi1 can have strong impacts on the formation of 2 other extensively studied yeast prions, [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] ([RNQ(+)]) (Genetics, Vol. 197, 685-700). We showed that a single yeast cell is capable of harboring at least 3 heterologous prion elements and these prions can influence each other's appearance positively and/or negatively. We also showed that during the de novo [PSI(+)] formation process upon Sup35 overproduction, the aggregation patterns of a preexisting inducer ([RNQ(+)] or [SWI(+)]) can undergo significant remodeling from stably transmitted dot-shaped aggregates to aggregates that co-localize with the newly formed Sup35 aggregates that are ring/ribbon/rod- shaped. Such co-localization disappears once the newly formed [PSI(+)] prion stabilizes. Our finding provides strong evidence supporting the "cross-seeding" model for prion-prion interactions and confirms earlier reports that the interactions among different prions and their prion proteins mostly occur at the initiation stages of prionogenesis. Our results also highlight a complex prion interaction network in yeast. We believe that elucidating the mechanism underlying the yeast prion-prion interaction network will not only provide insight into the process of prion de novo generation and propagation in yeast but also shed light on the mechanisms that govern protein misfolding, aggregation, and amyloidogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  13. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  14. Cell morphology, budding propensity and cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Lewis, Jeffrey; Kumar, Pradeep

    A large biomass on earth thrives in extremes of physical and chemical conditions including high pressure and temperature. Budding yeast, S. cerevisiae, is a eukaryotic model organism due to its amenability to molecular biology tools. To understand the effects of hydrostatic pressure on a eukaryotic cell, we have performed quantitative experiments of the growth, the propensity of budding, and cell death of S. cerevisiae in a wide range of pressures. An automated image analysis method for the quantification of the budding index was developed and applied along with a continuum model of budding to investigate the effects of pressure on cell division and cell morphology. We find that the growth, the budding propensity, the average cell size, and the ellipticity of the cells decrease with increasing pressure. Furthermore, large hydrostatic pressure led to the small but finite probability of cell death. Our experiments suggest that the decrease of budding propensity arises from cellular arrest at the cell cycle checkpoints during different stages of cell division.

  15. Protein acetylation and acetyl coenzyme a metabolism in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron; Vancura, Ales

    2014-12-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Database Description - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project Database Description General information of database D...ases Organism Taxonomy Name: Saccharomyces cerevisiae Taxonomy ID: 4932 Database description 5'-end sequence...nuine 5'-end, mapping the 5'-end sequence to the genome will lead to accurate identification of the transcript... title: A large-scale full-length cDNA analysis to explore the budding yeast transcriptome. Author name(s): ...rvices Not available URL of Web services - Need for user registration - About This Database Database Descript

  17. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin.

  18. Interorganelle interactions and inheritance patterns of nuclei and vacuoles in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Ting; Lin, Jyun-Liang; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Chuang, Yu-Chien; Liang, Shu-Shan; Chuang, Chi-Ning; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Wang, Ting-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Many of the mechanisms by which organelles are inherited by spores during meiosis are not well understood. Dramatic chromosome motion and bouquet formation are evolutionarily conserved characteristics of meiotic chromosomes. The budding yeast bouquet genes (NDJ1, MPS3, CSM4) mediate these movements via telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here, we report that during meiosis the NE is in direct contact with vacuoles via nucleus-vacuole junctions (NVJs). We show that in meiosis NVJs are assembled through the interaction of the outer NE-protein Nvj1 and the vacuolar membrane protein Vac8. Notably, NVJs function as diffusion barriers that exclude the nuclear pore complexes, the bouquet protein Mps3 and NE-tethered telomeres from the outer nuclear membrane and nuclear ER, resulting in distorted NEs during early meiosis. An increase in NVJ area resulting from Nvj1-GFP overexpression produced a moderate bouquet mutant-like phenotype in wild-type cells. NVJs, as the vacuolar contact sites of the nucleus, were found to undergo scission alongside the NE during meiotic nuclear division. The zygotic NE and NVJs were partly segregated into 4 spores. Lastly, new NVJs were also revealed to be synthesized de novo to rejoin the zygotic NE with the newly synthesized vacuoles in the mature spores. In conclusion, our results revealed that budding yeast nuclei and vacuoles exhibit dynamic interorganelle interactions and different inheritance patterns in meiosis, and also suggested that nvj1Δ mutant cells may be useful to resolve the technical challenges pertaining to the isolation of intact nuclei for the biochemical study of meiotic nuclear proteins.

  19. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  20. Cell to cell signalling during vertebrate limb bud development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Communication between cells is essential during embryonic development. The vertebrate limb bud provides us a model to study signalling interactions between cells during patterning of embryonic tissues and organogenesis. In chapter 1 I give an introduction about limb bud development that is focussed

  1. Phosphorylation and cellular function of the human Rpa2 N-terminus in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L; Wilson, Timothy M; Liu, Shengqin; Herauf, Anna; Steffes, Jenna; Mueller, Erica N; Oakley, Gregory G; Haring, Stuart J

    2015-02-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for proper cell growth. This occurs through accurate DNA replication and repair of DNA lesions. A key factor involved in both DNA replication and the DNA damage response is the heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Although the RPA complex appears to be structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes, the primary amino acid sequence of each subunit can vary considerably. Examination of sequence differences along with the functional interchangeability of orthologous RPA subunits or regions could provide insight into important regions and their functions. This might also allow for study in simpler systems. We determined that substitution of yeast Replication Factor A (RFA) with human RPA does not support yeast cell viability. Exchange of a single yeast RFA subunit with the corresponding human RPA subunit does not function due to lack of inter-species subunit interactions. Substitution of yeast Rfa2 with domains/regions of human Rpa2 important for Rpa2 function (i.e., the N-terminus and the loop 3-4 region) supports viability in yeast cells, and hybrid proteins containing human Rpa2 N-terminal phospho-mutations result in similar DNA damage phenotypes to analogous yeast Rfa2 N-terminal phospho-mutants. Finally, the human Rpa2 N-terminus (NT) fused to yeast Rfa2 is phosphorylated in a manner similar to human Rpa2 in human cells, indicating that conserved kinases recognize the human domain in yeast. The implication is that budding yeast represents a potential model system for studying not only human Rpa2 N-terminal phosphorylation, but also phosphorylation of Rpa2 N-termini from other eukaryotic organisms. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo, E-mail: cklee2005@korea.ac.kr

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  3. The Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, M. Joan; Lutz, Sheila; Lesage, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Summary Long-terminal repeat (LTR)-retrotransposons generate a copy of their DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription of their RNA genome in cytoplasmic nucleocapsids. They are widespread in the eukaryotic kingdom and are the evolutionary progenitors of retroviruses [1]. The Ty1 element of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first LTR-retrotransposon demonstrated to mobilize through an RNA intermediate, and not surprisingly, is the best studied. The depth of our knowledge of Ty1 biology stems not only from the predominance of active Ty1 elements in the S. cerevisiae genome but also the ease and breadth of genomic, biochemical and cell biology approaches available to study cellular processes in yeast. This review describes the basic structure of Ty1 and its gene products, the replication cycle, the rapidly expanding compendium of host co-factors known to influence retrotransposition and the nature of Ty1's elaborate symbiosis with its host. Our goal is to illuminate the value of Ty1 as a paradigm to explore the biology of LTR-retrotransposons in multicellular organisms, where the low frequency of retrotransposition events presents a formidable barrier to investigations of retrotransposon biology. PMID:25893143

  4. The nuclear exosome is active and important during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Frenk

    Full Text Available Nuclear RNA degradation pathways are highly conserved across eukaryotes and play important roles in RNA quality control. Key substrates for exosomal degradation include aberrant functional RNAs and cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. It has recently been reported that the nuclear exosome is inactivated during meiosis in budding yeast through degradation of the subunit Rrp6, leading to the stabilisation of a subset of meiotic unannotated transcripts (MUTs of unknown function. We have analysed the activity of the nuclear exosome during meiosis by deletion of TRF4, which encodes a key component of the exosome targeting complex TRAMP. We find that TRAMP mutants produce high levels of CUTs during meiosis that are undetectable in wild-type cells, showing that the nuclear exosome remains functional for CUT degradation, and we further report that the meiotic exosome complex contains Rrp6. Indeed Rrp6 over-expression is insufficient to suppress MUT transcripts, showing that the reduced amount of Rrp6 in meiotic cells does not directly cause MUT accumulation. Lack of TRAMP activity stabilises ∼ 1600 CUTs in meiotic cells, which occupy 40% of the binding capacity of the nuclear cap binding complex (CBC. CBC mutants display defects in the formation of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs, and we see similar defects in TRAMP mutants, suggesting that a key function of the nuclear exosome is to prevent saturation of the CBC complex by CUTs. Together, our results show that the nuclear exosome remains active in meiosis and has an important role in facilitating meiotic recombination.

  5. The budding yeast Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase regulates mitotic spindle disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Buvelot, Stéphanie; Tatsutani, Sean Y.; Vermaak, Danielle; Biggins, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Ipl1p is the budding yeast member of the Aurora family of protein kinases, critical regulators of genomic stability that are required for chromosome segregation, the spindle checkpoint, and cytokinesis. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Ipl1p also has a function in mitotic spindle disassembly that is separable from its previously identified roles. Ipl1–GFP localizes to kinetochores from G1 to metaphase, transfers to the spindle after metaphase, and accumulates at the spindle midzone ...

  6. Increased genome instability is not accompanied by sensitivity to DNA damaging agents in aged yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novarina, Daniele; Mavrova, Sara N.; Janssens, Georges E.; Rempel, Irina L.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Chang, Michael

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae divides asymmetrically, producing a new daughter cell from the original mother cell. While daughter cells are born with a full lifespan, a mother cell ages with each cell division and can only generate on average 25 daughter cells before dying. Aged yeast

  7. Discovery of an unconventional centromere in budding yeast redefines evolution of point centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihiko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Schoenfeld, Lori W; Müller, Carolin A; Nieduszynski, Conrad; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2015-08-03

    Centromeres are the chromosomal regions promoting kinetochore assembly for chromosome segregation. In many eukaryotes, the centromere consists of up to mega base pairs of DNA. On such "regional centromeres," kinetochore assembly is mainly defined by epigenetic regulation [1]. By contrast, a clade of budding yeasts (Saccharomycetaceae) has a "point centromere" of 120-200 base pairs of DNA, on which kinetochore assembly is defined by the consensus DNA sequence [2, 3]. During evolution, budding yeasts acquired point centromeres, which replaced ancestral, regional centromeres [4]. All known point centromeres among different yeast species share common consensus DNA elements (CDEs) [5, 6], implying that they evolved only once and stayed essentially unchanged throughout evolution. Here, we identify a yeast centromere that challenges this view: that of the budding yeast Naumovozyma castellii is the first unconventional point centromere with unique CDEs. The N. castellii centromere CDEs are essential for centromere function but have different DNA sequences from CDEs in other point centromeres. Gene order analyses around N. castellii centromeres indicate their unique, and separate, evolutionary origin. Nevertheless, they are still bound by the ortholog of the CBF3 complex, which recognizes CDEs in other point centromeres. The new type of point centromere originated prior to the divergence between N. castellii and its close relative Naumovozyma dairenensis and disseminated to all N. castellii chromosomes through extensive genome rearrangement. Thus, contrary to the conventional view, point centromeres can undergo rapid evolutionary changes. These findings give new insights into the evolution of point centromeres. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic Analysis of the DNA Damage Response Network in Telomere Defective Budding Yeast

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    Eva-Maria Holstein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional telomeres are critically important to eukaryotic genetic stability. Scores of proteins and pathways are known to affect telomere function. Here, we report a series of related genome-wide genetic interaction screens performed on budding yeast cells with acute or chronic telomere defects. Genetic interactions were examined in cells defective in Cdc13 and Stn1, affecting two components of CST, a single stranded DNA (ssDNA binding complex that binds telomeric DNA. For comparison, genetic interactions were also examined in cells with defects in Rfa3, affecting the major ssDNA binding protein, RPA, which has overlapping functions with CST at telomeres. In more complex experiments, genetic interactions were measured in cells lacking EXO1 or RAD9, affecting different aspects of the DNA damage response, and containing a cdc13-1 induced telomere defect. Comparing fitness profiles across these data sets helps build a picture of the specific responses to different types of dysfunctional telomeres. The experiments show that each context reveals different genetic interactions, consistent with the idea that each genetic defect causes distinct molecular defects. To help others engage with the large volumes of data, the data are made available via two interactive web-based tools: Profilyzer and DIXY. One particularly striking genetic interaction observed was that the chk1∆ mutation improved fitness of cdc13-1 exo1∆ cells more than other checkpoint mutations (ddc1∆, rad9∆, rad17∆, and rad24∆, whereas, in cdc13-1 cells, the effects of all checkpoint mutations were similar. We show that this can be explained by Chk1 stimulating resection—a new function for Chk1 in the eukaryotic DNA damage response network.

  9. The histone deacetylases sir2 and rpd3 act on ribosomal DNA to control the replication program in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazumasa; Bacal, Julien; Desmarais, Damien; Padioleau, Ismaël; Tsaponina, Olga; Chabes, Andrei; Pantesco, Véronique; Dubois, Emeric; Parrinello, Hugues; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe

    2014-05-22

    In S. cerevisiae, replication timing is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms restricting the accessibility of origins to limiting initiation factors. About 30% of these origins are located within repetitive DNA sequences such as the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, but their regulation is poorly understood. Here, we have investigated how histone deacetylases (HDACs) control the replication program in budding yeast. This analysis revealed that two HDACs, Rpd3 and Sir2, control replication timing in an opposite manner. Whereas Rpd3 delays initiation at late origins, Sir2 is required for the timely activation of early origins. Moreover, Sir2 represses initiation at rDNA origins, whereas Rpd3 counteracts this effect. Remarkably, deletion of SIR2 restored normal replication in rpd3Δ cells by reactivating rDNA origins. Together, these data indicate that HDACs control the replication timing program in budding yeast by modulating the ability of repeated origins to compete with single-copy origins for limiting initiation factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators in budding yeast.

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    Michael R Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G1/S transcriptional regulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three main transcriptional components, Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1. These proteins constitute two transcription factor complexes that regulate over 300 G1/S transcripts, namely SBF (Swi4-Swi6 and MBF (Mbp1-Swi6. SBF and MBF are involved in regulating largely non-overlapping sets of G1/S genes via clearly distinct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we establish and confirm protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions using specific polyclonal antisera to whole Swi6 and to the C-terminal domains of related proteins Swi4 and Mbp1. Our data confirm the protein-protein binding specificity of Swi4 and Mbp1 to Swi6 but not to each other, and support the binding specificity of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi5 to SBF and of the corepressor Nrm1 to MBF. We also show the DNA binding preference of Swi4 to the CLN2 promoter and Mbp1 to the RNR1 promoter, while Swi6 binds both promoters. Finally, we establish the binding dynamics of Swi4 and Whi5 to the CLN2 promoter during the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data confirm the binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators. Whereas previous observations were made using tagged Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1, here we use specific polyclonal antisera to reestablish the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions of these G1/S transcriptional components. Our data also reveal the dynamic changes in promoter binding of Swi4 during the cell cycle, which suggests a possible positive feedback loop involving Swi4.

  11. Long-range compaction and flexibility of interphase chromatin in budding yeast analyzed by high-resolution imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystricky, Kerstin; Heun, Patrick; Gehlen, Lutz; Langowski, Jörg; Gasser, Susan M.

    2004-11-01

    Little is known about how chromatin folds in its native state. Using optimized in situ hybridization and live imaging techniques have determined compaction ratios and fiber flexibility for interphase chromatin in budding yeast. Unlike previous studies, ours examines nonrepetitive chromatin at intervals short enough to be meaningful for yeast chromosomes and functional domains in higher eukaryotes. We reconcile high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization data from intervals of 14-100 kb along single chromatids with measurements of whole chromosome arms (122-623 kb in length), monitored in intact cells through the targeted binding of bacterial repressors fused to GFP derivatives. The results are interpreted with a flexible polymer model and suggest that interphase chromatin exists in a compact higher-order conformation with a persistence length of 170-220 nm and a mass density of 110-150 bp/nm. These values are equivalent to 7-10 nucleosomes per 11-nm turn within a 30-nm-like fiber structure. Comparison of long and short chromatid arm measurements demonstrates that chromatin fiber extension is also influenced by nuclear geometry. The observation of this surprisingly compact chromatin structure for transcriptionally competent chromatin in living yeast cells suggests that the passage of RNA polymerase II requires a very transient unfolding of higher-order chromatin structure. higher-order structure | 30-nm fiber | nucleosomes

  12. Cell polarity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on proper localization of the Bud9 landmark protein by the EKC/KEOPS complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yu; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Morishita, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-08-01

    In diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, bud-site selection is determined by two cortical landmarks, Bud8p and Bud9p, at the distal and proximal poles, respectively. Their localizations depend on the multigenerational proteins Rax1p/Rax2p. Many genes involved in bud-site selection were identified previously by genome-wide screening of deletion mutants, which identified BUD32 that causes a random budding in diploid cells. Bud32p is an atypical kinase involved in a signaling cascade of Sch9p kinase, the yeast homolog of Akt/PKB, and a component of the EKC/KEOPS (endopeptidase-like, kinase, chromatin-associated/kinase, putative endopeptidase, and other proteins of small size) complex that functions in telomere maintenance and transcriptional regulation. However, its role in bipolar budding has remained unclear. In this report, we show that the Sch9p kinase cascade does not affect bipolar budding but that the EKC/KEOPS complex regulates the localization of Bud9p. The kinase activity of Bud32p, which is essential for the functions of the EKC/KEOPS complex but is not necessary for the Sch9p signaling cascade, is required for bipolar bud-site selection. BUD9 is necessary for random budding in each deletion mutant of EKC/KEOPS components, and RAX2 is genetically upstream of EKC/KEOPS genes for the regulation of bipolar budding. The asymmetric localization of Bud9p was dependent on the complex, but Bud8p and Rax2p were not. We concluded that the EKC/KEOPS complex is specifically involved in the regulation of Bud9p localization downstream of Rax1p/Rax2p.

  13. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  14. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprian, Edith; Munkler, Caspar; Resnyak, Anna; Zimmermann, Sonja; Tuong, Tan D; Gierlinger, Notburga; Müller, Thomas; Livingston, David P; Neuner, Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50 °C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermography, freeze dehydration and extraorgan freezing by water potential measurements, and cell-specific chemical patterns by Raman microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging. A bowl-like ice barrier tissue insulates primordia from entrance by intrinsic ice. Water repellent and densely packed bud scales prevent extrinsic ice penetration. At -18 °C, break-down of supercooling was triggered by intrinsic ice nucleators whereas the ice barrier remained active. Temperature-dependent freeze dehydration (-0.1 MPa K-1 ) caused accumulation of extraorgan ice masses that by rupture of the shoot, pith tissue are accommodated in large voids. The barrier tissue has exceptionally pectin-rich cell walls and intercellular spaces, and the cell lumina were lined or filled with proteins, especially near the primordium. Primordial cells close to the barrier accumulate di, tri and tetrasaccharides. Bud architecture efficiently prevents ice penetration, but ice nucleators become active inside the primordium below a temperature threshold. Biochemical patterns indicate a complex cellular interplay enabling supercooling and the necessity for cell-specific biochemical analysis. © 2017 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2ACdc55 We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2ACdc55 plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2ACdc55 complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2ACdc55 is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2ACdc55 by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Budding Yeast Rif1 Controls Genome Integrity by Inhibiting rDNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyian, Maksym; Mattarocci, Stefano; Albert, Benjamin; Hafner, Lukas; Lezaja, Aleksandra; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charlie; Shore, David

    2016-11-01

    The Rif1 protein is a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes. Here we show that budding yeast Rif1 inhibits DNA replication initiation at the rDNA locus. Absence of Rif1, or disruption of its interaction with PP1/Glc7 phosphatase, leads to more intensive rDNA replication. The effect of Rif1-Glc7 on rDNA replication is similar to that of the Sir2 deacetylase, and the two would appear to act in the same pathway, since the rif1Δ sir2Δ double mutant shows no further increase in rDNA replication. Loss of Rif1-Glc7 activity is also accompanied by an increase in rDNA repeat instability that again is not additive with the effect of sir2Δ. We find, in addition, that the viability of rif1Δ cells is severely compromised in combination with disruption of the MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 complexes, both of which are implicated in stabilization of stalled replication forks. Significantly, we show that removal of the rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) protein Fob1, alleviation of replisome pausing by deletion of the Tof1/Csm3 complex, or a large deletion of the rDNA repeat array all rescue this synthetic growth defect of rif1Δ cells lacking in addition either MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 activity. These data suggest that the repression of origin activation by Rif1-Glc7 is important to avoid the deleterious accumulation of stalled replication forks at the rDNA RFB, which become lethal when fork stability is compromised. Finally, we show that Rif1-Glc7, unlike Sir2, has an important effect on origin firing outside of the rDNA locus that serves to prevent activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Our results thus provide insights into a mechanism of replication control within a large repetitive chromosomal domain and its importance for the maintenance of genome stability. These findings may have important implications for metazoans, where large blocks of repetitive sequences are much more common.

  18. Budding Yeast Rif1 Controls Genome Integrity by Inhibiting rDNA Replication.

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    Maksym Shyian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Rif1 protein is a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes. Here we show that budding yeast Rif1 inhibits DNA replication initiation at the rDNA locus. Absence of Rif1, or disruption of its interaction with PP1/Glc7 phosphatase, leads to more intensive rDNA replication. The effect of Rif1-Glc7 on rDNA replication is similar to that of the Sir2 deacetylase, and the two would appear to act in the same pathway, since the rif1Δ sir2Δ double mutant shows no further increase in rDNA replication. Loss of Rif1-Glc7 activity is also accompanied by an increase in rDNA repeat instability that again is not additive with the effect of sir2Δ. We find, in addition, that the viability of rif1Δ cells is severely compromised in combination with disruption of the MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 complexes, both of which are implicated in stabilization of stalled replication forks. Significantly, we show that removal of the rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB protein Fob1, alleviation of replisome pausing by deletion of the Tof1/Csm3 complex, or a large deletion of the rDNA repeat array all rescue this synthetic growth defect of rif1Δ cells lacking in addition either MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 activity. These data suggest that the repression of origin activation by Rif1-Glc7 is important to avoid the deleterious accumulation of stalled replication forks at the rDNA RFB, which become lethal when fork stability is compromised. Finally, we show that Rif1-Glc7, unlike Sir2, has an important effect on origin firing outside of the rDNA locus that serves to prevent activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Our results thus provide insights into a mechanism of replication control within a large repetitive chromosomal domain and its importance for the maintenance of genome stability. These findings may have important implications for metazoans, where large blocks of repetitive sequences are much more common.

  19. Asc1 supports cell-wall integrity near bud sites by a Pkc1 independent mechanism.

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    Daniel Melamed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The yeast ribosomal protein Asc1 is a WD-protein family member. Its mammalian ortholog, RACK1 was initially discovered as a receptor for activated protein C kinase (PKC that functions to maintain the active conformation of PKC and to support its movement to target sites. In the budding yeast though, a connection between Asc1p and the PKC signaling pathway has never been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we found that asc1-deletion mutant (asc1Delta presents some of the hallmarks of PKC signaling mutants. These include an increased sensitivity to staurosporine, a specific Pkc1p inhibitor, and susceptibility to cell-wall perturbing treatments such as hypotonic- and heat shock conditions and zymolase treatment. Microscopic analysis of asc1Delta cells revealed cell-wall invaginations near bud sites after exposure to hypotonic conditions, and the dynamic of cells' survival after this stress further supports the involvement of Asc1p in maintaining the cell-wall integrity during the mid-to late stages of bud formation. Genetic interactions between asc1 and pkc1 reveal synergistic sensitivities of a double-knock out mutant (asc1Delta/pkc1Delta to cell-wall stress conditions, and high basal level of PKC signaling in asc1Delta. Furthermore, Asc1p has no effect on the cellular distribution or redistribution of Pkc1p at optimal or at cell-wall stress conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data support the idea that unlike its mammalian orthologs, Asc1p acts remotely from Pkc1p, to regulate the integrity of the cell-wall. We speculate that its role is exerted through translation regulation of bud-site related mRNAs during cells' growth.

  20. Update History of This Database - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2...cription Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update Histor

  1. Stable Pseudohyphal Growth in Budding Yeast Induced by Synergism between Septin Defects and Altered MAP-kinase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junwon; Rose, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    Upon nutrient limitation, budding yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be induced to adopt alternate filament-like growth patterns called diploid pseudohyphal or invasive haploid growth. Here, we report a novel constitutive pseudohyphal growth state, sharing some characteristics with classic forms of filamentous growth, but differing in crucial aspects of morphology, growth conditions and genetic regulation. The constitutive pseudohyphal state is observed in fus3 mutants containing various septin assembly defects, which we refer to as sadF growth (septin assembly defect induced filamentation) to distinguish it from classic filamentation pathways. Similar to other filamentous states, sadF cultures comprise aggregated chains of highly elongated cells. Unlike the classic pathways, sadF growth occurs in liquid rich media, requiring neither starvation nor the key pseudohyphal proteins, Flo8p and Flo11p. Moreover sadF growth occurs in haploid strains of S288C genetic background, which normally cannot undergo pseudohyphal growth. The sadF cells undergo highly polarized bud growth during prolonged G2 delays dependent on Swe1p. They contain septin structures distinct from classical pseudo-hyphae and FM4-64 labeling at actively growing tips similar to the Spitzenkörper observed in true hyphal growth. The sadF growth state is induced by synergism between Kss1p-dependent signaling and septin assembly defects; mild disruption of mitotic septins activates Kss1p-dependent gene expression, which exacerbates the septin defects, leading to hyper-activation of Kss1p. Unlike classical pseudo-hyphal growth, sadF signaling requires Ste5, Ste4 and Ste18, the scaffold protein and G-protein β and γ subunits from the pheromone response pathway, respectively. A swe1 mutation largely abolished signaling, breaking the positive feedback that leads to amplification of sadF signaling. Taken together, our findings show that budding yeast can access a stable constitutive pseudohyphal growth

  2. Recruitment of Rad51 and Rad52 to short telomeres triggers a Mec1-mediated hypersensitivity to double-stranded DNA breaks in senescent budding yeast.

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    Yi-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Telomere maintenance is required for chromosome stability, and telomeres are typically replicated by the action of telomerase. In both mammalian tumor and yeast cells that lack telomerase, telomeres are maintained by an alternative recombination mechanism. Here we demonstrated that the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae type I survivors derived from telomerase-deficient cells were hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents. Assays to track telomere lengths and drug sensitivity of telomerase-deficient cells from spore colonies to survivors suggested a correlation between telomere shortening and bleomycin sensitivity. Our genetic studies demonstrated that this sensitivity depends on Mec1, which signals checkpoint activation, leading to prolonged cell-cycle arrest in senescent budding yeasts. Moreover, we also observed that when cells equipped with short telomeres, recruitments of homologous recombination proteins, Rad51 and Rad52, were reduced at an HO-endonuclease-catalyzed double-strand break (DSB, while their associations were increased at chromosome ends. These results suggested that the sensitive phenotype may be attributed to the sequestration of repair proteins to compromised telomeres, thus limiting the repair capacity at bona fide DSB sites.

  3. A method for labeling proteins with tags at the native genomic loci in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins and epitope tags are often used as protein fusion tags to study target proteins. One prevailing technique in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is to fuse these tags to a target gene at the precise chromosomal location via homologous recombination. However, several limitations hamper the application of this technique, such as the selectable markers not being reusable, tagging of only the C-terminal being possible, and a "scar" sequence being left in the genome. Here, we describe a strategy to solve these problems by tagging target genes based on a pop-in/pop-out and counter-selection system. Three fluorescent protein tag (mCherry, sfGFP, and mKikGR and two epitope tag (HA and 3×FLAG constructs were developed and utilized to tag HHT1, UBC13 or RAD5 at the chromosomal locus as proof-of-concept.

  4. Chromatin-dependent and -independent regulation of DNA replication origin activation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Värv, Signe; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2013-02-01

    To elucidate the role of the chromatin environment in the regulation of replication origin activation, autonomously replicating sequences were inserted into identical locations in the budding yeast genome and their activation times in S phase determined. Chromatin-dependent origins adopt to the firing time of the surrounding locus. In contrast, the origins containing two binding sites for Forkhead transcription factors are activated early in the S phase regardless of their location in the genome. Our results also show that genuinely late-replicating parts of the genome can be converted into early-replicating loci by insertion of a chromatin-independent early replication origin, ARS607, whereas insertion of two Forkhead-binding sites is not sufficient for conversion.

  5. A method for labeling proteins with tags at the native genomic loci in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Xue, Huijun; Li, Siqi; Chen, Ying; Tian, Xuelei; Xu, Xin; Xiao, Wei; Fu, Yu Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and epitope tags are often used as protein fusion tags to study target proteins. One prevailing technique in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is to fuse these tags to a target gene at the precise chromosomal location via homologous recombination. However, several limitations hamper the application of this technique, such as the selectable markers not being reusable, tagging of only the C-terminal being possible, and a "scar" sequence being left in the genome. Here, we describe a strategy to solve these problems by tagging target genes based on a pop-in/pop-out and counter-selection system. Three fluorescent protein tag (mCherry, sfGFP, and mKikGR) and two epitope tag (HA and 3×FLAG) constructs were developed and utilized to tag HHT1, UBC13 or RAD5 at the chromosomal locus as proof-of-concept.

  6. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Koch, Bailey A; Abblett, Rebecca L; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2017-06-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  7. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bailey A.; Han, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery. PMID:28609436

  8. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  9. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-01-10

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3){sub 2}-(Ndc10){sub 2} recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly.

  10. Big Lessons from Little Yeast: Budding and Fission Yeast Centrosome Structure, Duplication, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Ann M; Jaspersen, Sue L

    2017-11-27

    Centrosomes are a functionally conserved feature of eukaryotic cells that play an important role in cell division. The conserved γ-tubulin complex organizes spindle and astral microtubules, which, in turn, separate replicated chromosomes accurately into daughter cells. Like DNA, centrosomes are duplicated once each cell cycle. Although in some cell types it is possible for cell division to occur in the absence of centrosomes, these divisions typically result in defects in chromosome number and stability. In single-celled organisms such as fungi, centrosomes [known as spindle pole bodies (SPBs)] are essential for cell division. SPBs also must be inserted into the membrane because fungi undergo a closed mitosis in which the nuclear envelope (NE) remains intact. This poorly understood process involves events similar or identical to those needed for de novo nuclear pore complex assembly. Here, we review how analysis of fungal SPBs has advanced our understanding of centrosomes and NE events.

  11. NMR analysis of budding yeast metabolomics: a rapid method for sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, C; Tripodi, F; Guzzi, C; Nicastro, R; Coccetti, P

    2015-02-01

    Here we propose the optimization of a rapid and reproducible protocol for intracellular metabolite extraction from yeast cells and their metabolic profiling by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The protocol reliability has been validated through comparison between the metabolome of cells in different phases of growth or with different genetic backgrounds.

  12. Systematic Definition of Protein Constituents along the Major Polarization Axis Reveals an Adaptive Reuse of the Polarization Machinery in Pheromone-Treated Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Polarizing cells extensively restructure cellular components in a spatially and temporally coupled manner along the major axis of cellular extension. Budding yeast are a useful model of polarized growth, helping to define many molecular components of this conserved process. Besides budding, yeast cells also differentiate upon treatment with pheromone from the opposite mating type, forming a mating projection (the ‘shmoo’) by directional restructuring of the cytoskeleton, localized vesicular transport and overall reorganization of the cytosol. To characterize the proteomic localization changes accompanying polarized growth, we developed and implemented a novel cell microarray-based imaging assay for measuring the spatial redistribution of a large fraction of the yeast proteome, and applied this assay to identify proteins localized along the mating projection following pheromone treatment. We further trained a machine learning algorithm to refine the cell imaging screen, identifying additional shmoo-localized proteins. In all, we identified 74 proteins that specifically localize to the mating projection, including previously uncharacterized proteins (Ycr043c, Ydr348c, Yer071c, Ymr295c, and Yor304c-a) and known polarization complexes such as the exocyst. Functional analysis of these proteins, coupled with quantitative analysis of individual organelle movements during shmoo formation, suggests a model in which the basic machinery for cell polarization is generally conserved between processes forming the bud and the shmoo, with a distinct subset of proteins used only for shmoo formation. The net effect is a defined ordering of major organelles along the polarization axis, with specific proteins implicated at the proximal growth tip. PMID:19053807

  13. Distinct roles of the polarity factors Boi1 and Boi2 in the control of exocytosis and abscission in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masgrau, Aina; Battola, Andrea; Sanmartin, Trinidad; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Gabaldón, Toni; Mendoza, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    Boi1 and Boi2 (Boi1/2) are budding yeast plasma membrane proteins that function in polarized growth, and in cytokinesis inhibition in response to chromosome bridges via the NoCut abscission checkpoint. How Boi1/2 act in these two distinct processes is not understood. We demonstrate that Boi1/2 are required for a late step in the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane of the growing bud. Cells lacking Boi1/2 accumulate secretory vesicles and are defective in bud growth. In contrast, Boi2 is specifically required for abscission inhibition in cells with chromatin bridges. The SH3 domain of Boi2, which is dispensable for bud growth and targets Boi2 to the site of abscission, is necessary and sufficient for abscission inhibition. Gain of function of the exocyst, a conserved protein complex involved in tethering of exocytic vesicles to the plasma membrane, rescued secretion and bud growth defects in boi mutant cells, and abrogated NoCut checkpoint function. Thus Boi2 functions redundantly with Boi1 to promote the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane at sites of polarized growth, and acts as an abscission inhibitor during cytokinesis in response to chromatin bridges. © 2017 Masgrau, Battola et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. The Rim15-endosulfine-PP2ACdc55 signalling module regulates entry into gametogenesis and quiescence via distinct mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Dalgaard, Jacob Z; Millar, Jonathan B A; Arumugam, Prakash

    2014-06-01

    Quiescence and gametogenesis represent two distinct survival strategies in response to nutrient starvation in budding yeast. Precisely how environmental signals are sensed by yeast cells to trigger quiescence and gametogenesis is not fully understood. A conserved signalling module consisting of Greatwall kinase, Endosulfine and Protein Phosphatase PP2ACdc55 proteins regulates entry into mitosis in Xenopus egg extracts and meiotic maturation in flies. We report here that an analogous signalling module consisting of the serine-threonine kinase Rim15, the Endosulfines Igo1 and Igo2 and the Protein Phosphatase PP2ACdc55, regulates entry into both quiescence and gametogenesis in budding yeast. PP2ACdc55 inhibits entry into gametogenesis and quiescence. Rim15 promotes entry into gametogenesis and quiescence by converting Igo1 into an inhibitor of PP2ACdc55 by phosphorylating at a conserved serine residue. Moreover, we show that the Rim15-Endosulfine-PP2ACdc55 pathway regulates entry into quiescence and gametogenesis by distinct mechanisms. In addition, we show that Igo1 and Igo2 are required for pre-meiotic autophagy but the lack of pre-meiotic autophagy is insufficient to explain the sporulation defect of igo1Δ igo2Δ cells. We propose that the Rim15-Endosulfine-PP2ACdc55 signalling module triggers entry into quiescence and gametogenesis by regulating dephosphorylation of distinct substrates.

  15. alpha-Synuclein budding yeast model: toxicity enhanced by impaired proteasome and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nijee; Brandis, Katrina A; Herrera, Sara K; Johnson, Brandon E; Vaidya, Tulaza; Shrestha, Ruja; Debburman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that results from the selective loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Misfolding and aggregation of the protein alpha-synuclein, oxidative damage, and proteasomal impairment are all hypotheses for the molecular cause of this selective neurotoxicity. Here, we describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to evaluate the misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity-inducing ability of wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T), and we compare regulation of these properties by dysfunctional proteasomes and by oxidative stress. We found prominent localization of wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein near the plasma membrane, supporting known in vitro lipid-binding ability. In contrast, A30P was mostly cytoplasmic, whereas A30P/A53T displayed both types of fluorescence. Surprisingly, alpha-synuclein was not toxic to several yeast strains tested. When yeast mutants for the proteasomal barrel (doa3-1) were evaluated, delayed alpha-synuclein synthesis and membrane association were observed; yeast mutant for the proteasomal cap (sen3-1) exhibited increased accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Both sen3-1and doa3-1 mutants exhibited synthetic lethality with alpha-synuclein. When yeasts were challenged with an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide), alpha-synuclein was extremely lethal to cells that lacked manganese superoxide dismutase Mn-SOD (sod2Delta) but not to cells that lacked copper, zinc superoxide dismutase Cu,Zn-SOD (sod1Delta). Despite the toxicity, sod2Delta cells never displayed intracellular aggregates of alpha-synuclein. We suggest that the toxic alpha-synuclein species in yeast are smaller than the visible aggregates, and toxicity might involve alpha-synuclein membrane association. Thus, yeasts have emerged effective organisms for characterizing factors and mechanisms that regulate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

  16. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast: e0125965

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elsa Brachet; Claire Béneut; Maria-Elisabetta Serrentino; Valérie Borde

    2015-01-01

    ... by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs...

  17. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Hoggard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS, and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1 present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM, which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may

  18. cDNA sequence quality data - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project cDNA sequence quality data Data detail Data name cDNA sequence quality... data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00838-003 Description of data contents Phred's quality score. P...tion Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us cDNA sequence quality

  19. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Beyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step. The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away.

  1. Regulation of ER-Golgi Transport Dynamics by GTPases in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins are synthesized de novo in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. They are transported through the Golgi apparatus and then delivered to their proper destinations. The ER and the Golgi play a central role in protein processing and sorting and show dynamic features in their forms. Ras super family small GTPases mediate the protein transport through and between these organelles. The ER-localized GTPase, Sar1, facilitates the formation of COPII transport carriers at the ER exit sites (ERES on the ER for the transport of cargo proteins from the ER to the Golgi. The Golgi-localized GTPase, Arf1, controls intra-Golgi, and Golgi-to-ER transport of cargo proteins by the formation of COPI carriers. Rab GTPases localized at the Golgi, which are responsible for fusion of membranes, are thought to establish the identities of compartments. Recent evidence suggests that these small GTPases regulate not only discrete sites for generation/fusion of transport carriers, but also membrane dynamics of the organelles where they locate to ensure the integrity of transport. Here we summarize the current understandings about the membrane traffic between these organelles and highlight the cutting-edge advances from super-resolution live imaging of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Genome-wide Quantification of Translation in Budding Yeast by Ribosome Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupere, Carine; Chen, Rosalyn B; Pelosi, William; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M

    2017-12-21

    Translation of mRNA into proteins is a complex process involving several layers of regulation. It is often assumed that changes in mRNA transcription reflect changes in protein synthesis, but many exceptions have been observed. Recently, a technique called ribosome profiling (or Ribo-Seq) has emerged as a powerful method that allows identification, with high accuracy, which regions of mRNA are translated into proteins and quantification of translation at the genome-wide level. Here, we present a generalized protocol for genome-wide quantification of translation using Ribo-Seq in budding yeast. In addition, combining Ribo-Seq data with mRNA abundance measurements allows us to simultaneously quantify translation efficiency of thousands of mRNA transcripts in the same sample and compare changes in these parameters in response to experimental manipulations or in different physiological states. We describe a detailed protocol for generation of ribosome footprints using nuclease digestion, isolation of intact ribosome-footprint complexes via sucrose gradient fractionation, and preparation of DNA libraries for deep sequencing along with appropriate quality controls necessary to ensure accurate analysis of in vivo translation.

  3. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  4. Both RAD5-dependent and independent pathways are involved in DNA damage-associated sister chromatid exchange in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Fasullo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sister chromatids are preferred substrates for recombinational repair after cells are exposed to DNA damage. While some agents directly cause double-strand breaks (DSBs, others form DNA base adducts which stall or impede the DNA replication fork. We asked which types of DNA damage can stimulate SCE in budding yeast mutants defective in template switch mechanisms and whether PCNA polyubiquitination functions are required for DNA damage-associated SCE after exposure to potent recombinagens. We measured spontaneous and DNA damage-associated unequal sister chromatid exchange (uSCE in yeast strains containing two fragments of his3 after exposure to MMS, 4-NQO, UV, X rays, and HO endonuclease-induced DSBs. We determined whether other genes in the pathway for template switching, including UBC13, MMS2, SGS1, and SRS2 were required for DNA damage-associated SCE. RAD5 was required for DNA damage-associated SCE after exposure to UV, MMS, and 4-NQO, but not for spontaneous, X-ray-associated, or HO endonuclease-induced SCE. While UBC13, MMS2, and SGS1 were required for MMS and 4NQO-associated SCE, they were not required for UV-associated SCE. DNA damage-associated recombination between his3 recombination substrates on non-homologous recombination was enhanced in rad5 mutants. These results demonstrate that DNA damaging agents that cause DSBs stimulate SCE by RAD5-independent mechanisms, while several potent agents that generate bulky DNA adducts stimulate SCE by multiple RAD5-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that DSB-associated recombination that occurs in G2 is RAD5-independent.

  5. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Colette; Zou, Juan; Rappsilber, Juri; Marston, Adele L

    2017-01-05

    Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB) duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This "licensing" ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of cyclical events at the meiosis I to meiosis I

  6. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The cell surface mucin podocalyxin regulates collective breast tumor budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Marcia L; Cipollone, Jane A; Austin, Pamela; Bell, Erin M; Nielsen, Julie S; Gilks, C Blake; McNagny, Kelly M; Roskelley, Calvin D

    2016-01-22

    Overexpression of the transmembrane sialomucin podocalyxin, which is known to play a role in lumen formation during polarized epithelial morphogenesis, is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in a number of epithelial cancers, including those that arise in the breast. Therefore, we set out to determine if podocalyxin plays a functional role in breast tumor progression. MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express little endogenous podocalyxin, were stably transfected with wild type podocalyxin for forced overexpression. 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which express considerable endogenous podocalyxin, were retrovirally transduced with a short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) targeting podocalyxin for stable knockdown. In vitro, the effects of podocalyxin on collective cellular migration and invasion were assessed in two-dimensional monolayer and three-dimensional basement membrane/collagen gel culture, respectively. In vivo, local invasion was assessed after orthotopic transplantation in immunocompromised mice. Forced overexpression of podocalyxin caused cohesive clusters of epithelial MCF-7 breast tumor cells to bud off from the primary tumor and collectively invade the stroma of the mouse mammary gland in vivo. This budding was not associated with any obvious changes in histoarchitecture, matrix deposition or proliferation in the primary tumour. In vitro, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective migration of MCF-7 tumor cells in two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer culture that was dependent on the activity of the actin scaffolding protein ezrin, a cytoplasmic binding partner of podocalyxin. In three-dimensional (3-D) culture, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective budding and invasion that was dependent on actomyosin contractility. Interestingly, the collectively invasive cell aggregates often contained expanded microlumens that were also observed in vivo. Conversely, when endogenous podocalyxin was removed from highly metastatic, but cohesive, 4T1 mammary

  8. Ndj1, a telomere-associated protein, regulates centrosome separation in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Shao, Yize; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Yeast centrosomes (called spindle pole bodies [SPBs]) remain cohesive for hours during meiotic G2 when recombination takes place. In contrast, SPBs separate within minutes after duplication in vegetative cells. We report here that Ndj1, a previously known meiosis-specific telomere-associated protein, is required for protecting SPB cohesion. Ndj1 localizes to the SPB but dissociates from it ∼16 min before SPB separation. Without Ndj1, meiotic SPBs lost cohesion prematurely, whereas overproduction of Ndj1 delayed SPB separation. When produced ectopically in vegetative cells, Ndj1 caused SPB separation defects and cell lethality. Localization of Ndj1 to the SPB depended on the SUN domain protein Mps3, and removal of the N terminus of Mps3 allowed SPB separation and suppressed the lethality of NDJ1-expressing vegetative cells. Finally, we show that Ndj1 forms oligomeric complexes with Mps3, and that the Polo-like kinase Cdc5 regulates Ndj1 protein stability and SPB separation. These findings reveal the underlying mechanism that coordinates yeast centrosome dynamics with meiotic telomere movement and cell cycle progression. PMID:25897084

  9. Tumor budding correlates with poor prognosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Huang, Hongzhang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wang, Anxun; Chen, Xiaohua; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiqiang

    2011-08-01

    Tumor budding is a readily detectable histopathological feature and has been recognized as an adverse prognostic factor in several human cancers. However, the prognostic value of tumor budding in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of tumor budding with the clinicopathologic features, and the known molecular biomarkers (E-cadherin and Vimentin), as well as to evaluate its prognostic significance for TSCC. Archival clinical samples of 230 patients with TSCC were examined for tumor budding. Immunohistochemistry analyses were performed to examine the expression of E-cadherin and Vimentin. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess the correlation of tumor budding with clinicopathologic parameters and patient survival. The potential association between tumor budding and alterations of E-cadherin and Vimentin expression was also assessed. Of the 230 TSCC cases examined, tumor budding was observed in 165 cases (71.7%), with a mean tumor bud count of 7.5 (range from 1 to 48 buds). High-intensity budding (≥5 tumor buds) was observed in 111 cases (48.3%). Statistical analysis revealed that tumor budding was associated with tumor size (P tumor budding and the deregulation of E-cadherin (P Tumor budding, which associates with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a frequent event and appears to be an independent prognostic factor in TSCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. The dynamics of homologous pairing during mating type interconversion in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L Houston

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells repair most double-strand breaks (DSBs that arise during replication or by environmental insults through homologous recombination, a high-fidelity process critical for maintenance of genomic integrity. However, neither the detailed mechanism of homologous recombination nor the specific roles of critical components of the recombination machinery-such as Bloom and Werner syndrome proteins-have been resolved. We have taken a novel approach to examining the mechanism of homologous recombination by tracking both a DSB and the template from which it is repaired during the repair process in individual yeast cells. The two loci were labeled with arrays of DNA binding sites and visualized in live cells expressing green fluorescent protein-DNA binding protein chimeras. Following induction of an endonuclease that introduces a DSB next to one of the marked loci, live cells were imaged repeatedly to determine the relative positions of the DSB and the template locus. We found a significant increase in persistent associations between donor and recipient loci following formation of the DSB, demonstrating DSB-induced pairing between donor and template. However, such associations were transient and occurred repeatedly in every cell, a result not predicted from previous studies on populations of cells. Moreover, these associations were absent in sgs1 or srs2 mutants, yeast homologs of the Bloom and Werner syndrome genes, but were enhanced in a rad54 mutant, whose protein product promotes efficient strand exchange in vitro. Our results indicate that a DSB makes multiple and reversible contacts with a template during the repair process, suggesting that repair could involve interactions with multiple templates, potentially creating novel combinations of sequences at the repair site. Our results further suggest that both Sgs1 and Srs2 are required for efficient completion of recombination and that Rad54 may serve to dissociate such interactions. Finally, these

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavages in budding yeast reveal templated insertions and strand-specific insertion/deletion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Brenda R; Kaplan, Adam C; Bae, Ji Eun; Ferrazzoli, Alexander E; Kuo, James; Anand, Ranjith P; Waterman, David P; Haber, James E

    2018-02-13

    Harnessing CRISPR-Cas9 technology provides an unprecedented ability to modify genomic loci via DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and repair. We analyzed nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair induced by Cas9 in budding yeast and found that the orientation of binding of Cas9 and its guide RNA (gRNA) profoundly influences the pattern of insertion/deletions (indels) at the site of cleavage. A common indel created by Cas9 is a 1-bp (+1) insertion that appears to result from Cas9 creating a 1-nt 5' overhang that is filled in by a DNA polymerase and ligated. The origin of +1 insertions was investigated by using two gRNAs with PAM sequences located on opposite DNA strands but designed to cleave the same sequence. These templated +1 insertions are dependent on the X-family DNA polymerase, Pol4. Deleting Pol4 also eliminated +2 and +3 insertions, which are biased toward homonucleotide insertions. Using inverted PAM sequences, we also found significant differences in overall NHEJ efficiency and repair profiles, suggesting that the binding of the Cas9:gRNA complex influences subsequent NHEJ processing. As with events induced by the site-specific HO endonuclease, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated NHEJ repair depends on the Ku heterodimer and DNA ligase 4. Cas9 events are highly dependent on the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, independent of Mre11's nuclease activity. Inspection of the outcomes of a large number of Cas9 cleavage events in mammalian cells reveals a similar templated origin of +1 insertions in human cells, but also a significant frequency of similarly templated +2 insertions.

  12. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

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    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  13. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordial

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    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50 °C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermog...

  14. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  15. Bioengineered teeth from tooth bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelick, Pamela C; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2006-04-01

    Advances in tissue engineering and materials science have led to significant progress in hard and soft tissue repair and regeneration. Studies demonstrate the successful application of tissue engineering for bioengineering dental tissues. The ability to apply tissue engineering to repair or regenerate dental tissues and even whole teeth is becoming a reality. Current efforts focus on directing the formation of bioengineered dental tissues and whole teeth of predetermined size and shape. Advances in dental progenitor cell characterizations, combined with improved methods of fabricating biodegradable scaffold materials, bring closer the goal of making tooth tissue engineering a clinically relevant practice.

  16. Cell size control in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jonathan J; Ewald, Jennifer C; Skotheim, Jan M

    2012-05-08

    Cell size is an important adaptive trait that influences nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. Despite extensive characterization of the cell-cycle regulatory network, the molecular mechanisms coupling cell growth to division, and thereby controlling cell size, have remained elusive. Recent work in yeast has reinvigorated the size control field and suggested provocative mechanisms for the distinct functions of setting and sensing cell size. Further examination of size-sensing models based on spatial gradients and molecular titration, coupled with elucidation of the pathways responsible for nutrient-modulated target size, may reveal the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell size control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporal Expression of a Master Regulator Drives Synchronous Sporulation in Budding Yeast

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    Minghao Chia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells enter and undergo gametogenesis relatively asynchronously, making it technically challenging to perform stage-specific genomic and biochemical analyses. Cell-to-cell variation in the expression of the master regulator of entry into sporulation, IME1, has been implicated to be the underlying cause of asynchronous sporulation. Here, we find that timing of IME1 expression is of critical importance for inducing cells to undergo sporulation synchronously. When we force expression of IME1 from an inducible promoter in cells incubated in sporulation medium for 2 hr, the vast majority of cells exhibit synchrony during premeiotic DNA replication and meiotic divisions. Inducing IME1 expression too early or too late affects the synchrony of sporulation. Surprisingly, our approach for synchronous sporulation does not require growth in acetate-containing medium, but can be achieved in cells grown in rich medium until saturation. Our system requires solely IME1, because the expression of the N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase IME4, another key regulator of early sporulation, is controlled by IME1 itself. The approach described here can be combined easily with other stage-specific synchronization methods, and thereby applied to study specific stages of sporulation, or the complete sporulation program.

  18. S-Phase Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Promote Sister Chromatid Cohesion in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W.-S.; Erickson, S. L.; Tsai, H.-J.; Andrews, C. A.; Vas, A. C.; Clarke, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome stability depends on faithful chromosome segregation, which relies on maintenance of chromatid cohesion during S phase. In eukaryotes, Pds1/securin is the only known inhibitor that can prevent loss of cohesion. However, pds1Δ yeast cells and securin-null mice are viable. We sought to identify redundant mechanisms that promote cohesion within S phase in the absence of Pds1 and found that cells lacking the S-phase cyclins Clb5 and Clb6 have a cohesion defect under conditions of replication stress. Similar to the phenotype of pds1Δ cells, loss of cohesion in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 is dependent on Esp1. However, Pds1 phosphorylation by Cdk-cyclin is not required for cohesion. Moreover, cells lacking Clb5, Clb6, and Pds1 are inviable and lose cohesion during an unperturbed S phase, indicating that Pds1 and specific B-type cyclins promote cohesion independently of one another. Consistent with this, we find that Mcd1/Scc1 is less abundant on chromosomes in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 during replication stress. However, clb5Δ clb6Δ cells do accumulate Mcd1/Scc1 at centromeres upon mitotic arrest, suggesting that the cyclin-dependent mechanism is S phase specific. These data indicate that Clb5 and Clb6 promote cohesion which is then protected by Pds1 and that both mechanisms are required during replication stress. PMID:21518961

  19. Unidirectional P-body transport during the yeast cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia-Torres, Cecilia; Skupin, Alexander; Michael, Sean A; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kuwada, Nathan J; Falconnet, Didier; Cary, Gregory A; Hansen, Carl; Wiggins, Paul A; Dudley, Aimée M

    2014-01-01

    P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained "hovering" near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions.

  20. Unidirectional P-body transport during the yeast cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Garmendia-Torres

    Full Text Available P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained "hovering" near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions.

  1. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

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    Aurélie Crabbé

    Full Text Available This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation, which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p. infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the

  2. Comparative live-cell imaging analyses of SPA-2, BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora crassa reveal novel features of the filamentous fungal polarisome.

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    Alexander Lichius

    Full Text Available A key multiprotein complex involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and secretory machinery required for polarized growth in fungi, is the polarisome. Recognized core constituents in budding yeast are the proteins Spa2, Pea2, Aip3/Bud6, and the key effector Bni1. Multicellular fungi display a more complex polarized morphogenesis than yeasts, suggesting that the filamentous fungal polarisome might fulfill additional functions. In this study, we compared the subcellular organization and dynamics of the putative polarisome components BUD-6 and BNI-1 with those of the bona fide polarisome marker SPA-2 at various developmental stages of Neurospora crassa. All three proteins exhibited a yeast-like polarisome configuration during polarized germ tube growth, cell fusion, septal pore plugging and tip repolarization. However, the localization patterns of all three proteins showed spatiotemporally distinct characteristics during the establishment of new polar axes, septum formation and cytokinesis, and maintained hyphal tip growth. Most notably, in vegetative hyphal tips BUD-6 accumulated as a subapical cloud excluded from the Spitzenkörper (Spk, whereas BNI-1 and SPA-2 partially colocalized with the Spk and the tip apex. Novel roles during septal plugging and cytokinesis, connected to the reinitiation of tip growth upon physical injury and conidial maturation, were identified for BUD-6 and BNI-1, respectively. Phenotypic analyses of gene deletion mutants revealed additional functions for BUD-6 and BNI-1 in cell fusion regulation, and the maintenance of Spk integrity. Considered together, our findings reveal novel polarisome-independent functions of BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora, but also suggest that all three proteins cooperate at plugged septal pores, and their complex arrangement within the apical dome of mature hypha might represent a novel aspect of filamentous fungal polarisome architecture.

  3. Transcription of two long noncoding RNAs mediates mating-type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werven, Folkert J; Neuert, Gregor; Hendrick, Natalie; Lardenois, Aurélie; Buratowski, Stephen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Primig, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2012-09-14

    The cell-fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/α but not haploid MATa or MATα cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating-type control of sporulation. In MATa or MATα haploids, expression of IME1, the central inducer of gametogenesis, is inhibited in cis by transcription of the lncRNA IRT1, located in the IME1 promoter. IRT1 transcription recruits the Set2 histone methyltransferase and the Set3 histone deacetylase complex to establish repressive chromatin at the IME1 promoter. Inhibiting expression of IRT1 and an antisense transcript that antagonizes the expression of the meiotic regulator IME4 allows cells expressing the haploid mating type to sporulate with kinetics that are indistinguishable from that of MATa/α diploids. Conversely, expression of the two lncRNAs abolishes sporulation in MATa/α diploids. Thus, transcription of two lncRNAs governs mating-type control of gametogenesis in yeast. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ctf4p facilitates Mcm10p to promote DNA replication in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Wu, Rentian; Lu, Yongjun; Liang, Chun

    2010-05-07

    Ctf4p (chromosome transmission fidelity) has been reported to function in DNA metabolism and sister chromatid cohesion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, a ctf4(S143F) mutant was isolated from a yeast genetic screen to identify replication-initiation proteins. The ctf4(S143F) mutant exhibits plasmid maintenance defects which can be suppressed by the addition of multiple origins to the plasmid, like other known replication-initiation mutants. We show that both ctf4(S143F) and ctf4Delta strains have defects in S phase entry and S phase progression at the restrictive temperature of 38 degrees C. Ctf4p localizes in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle but only starts to bind chromatin at the G1/S transition and then disassociates from chromatin after DNA replication. Furthermore, Ctf4p interacts with Mcm10p physically and genetically, and the chromatin association of Ctf4p depends on Mcm10p. Finally, deletion of CTF4 destabilizes Mcm10p and Pol alpha in both mcm10-1 and MCM10 cells. These data indicate that Ctf4p facilitates Mcm10p to promote the DNA replication. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sld7, an Sld3-associated protein required for efficient chromosomal DNA replication in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tamon; Umemori, Toshiko; Endo, Shizuko; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Kanemaki, Masato; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Obuse, Chikashi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2011-05-18

    Genetic screening of yeast for sld (synthetic lethality with dpb11) mutations has identified replication proteins, including Sld2, -3, and -5, and clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication. Here, we report a new replication protein, Sld7, identified by rescreening of sld mutations. Throughout the cell cycle, Sld7 forms a complex with Sld3, which associates with replication origins in a complex with Cdc45, binds to Dpb11 when phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase, and dissociates from origins once DNA replication starts. However, Sld7 does not move with the replication fork. Sld7 binds to the nonessential N-terminal portion of Sld3 and reduces its affinity for Cdc45, a component of the replication fork. Although Sld7 is not essential for cell growth, its absence reduces the level of cellular Sld3, delays the dissociation from origins of GINS, a component of the replication fork, and slows S-phase progression. These results suggest that Sld7 is required for the proper function of Sld3 at the initiation of DNA replication.

  6. Chromatin stiffening underlies enhanced locus mobility after DNA damage in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sébastien; Brion, Alice; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Lelek, Mickaël; Veillet, Adeline; Lelandais, Benoît; Parmar, Jyotsana; Fernández, Fabiola García; Almayrac, Etienne; Khalil, Yasmine; Birgy, Eleonore; Fabre, Emmanuelle; Zimmer, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce a cellular response that involves histone modifications and chromatin remodeling at the damaged site and increases chromosome dynamics both locally at the damaged site and globally in the nucleus. In parallel, it has become clear that the spatial organization and dynamics of chromosomes can be largely explained by the statistical properties of tethered, but randomly moving, polymer chains, characterized mainly by their rigidity and compaction. How these properties of chromatin are affected during DNA damage remains, however, unclear. Here, we use live cell microscopy to track chromatin loci and measure distances between loci on yeast chromosome IV in thousands of cells, in the presence or absence of genotoxic stress. We confirm that DSBs result in enhanced chromatin subdiffusion and show that intrachromosomal distances increase with DNA damage all along the chromosome. Our data can be explained by an increase in chromatin rigidity, but not by chromatin decondensation or centromeric untethering only. We provide evidence that chromatin stiffening is mediated in part by histone H2A phosphorylation. Our results support a genome-wide stiffening of the chromatin fiber as a consequence of DNA damage and as a novel mechanism underlying increased chromatin mobility. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Interaction networks of prion, prionogenic and prion-like proteins in budding yeast, and their role in gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Prions are transmissible, propagating alternative states of proteins. Prions in budding yeast propagate heritable phenotypes and can function in large-scale gene regulation, or in some cases occur as diseases of yeast. Other 'prionogenic' proteins are likely prions that have been determined experimentally to form amyloid in vivo, and to have prion-like domains that are able to propagate heritable states. Furthermore, there are over 300 additional 'prion-like' yeast proteins that have similar amino-acid composition to prions (primarily a bias for asparagines and glutamines). Here, we examine the protein functional and interaction networks that involve prion, prionogenic and prion-like proteins. Set against a marked overall preference for N/Q-rich prion-like proteins not to interact with each other, we observe a significant tendency of prion/prionogenic proteins to interact with other, N/Q-rich prion-like proteins. This tendency is mostly due to a small number of networks involving the proteins NUP100p, LSM4p and PUB1p. In general, different data analyses of functional and interaction networks converge to indicate a strong linkage of prionogenic and prion-like proteins, to stress-granule assembly and related biological processes. These results further elucidate how prions may impact gene regulation, and reveal a broader horizon for the functional relevance of N/Q-rich prion-like domains.

  8. [Effects of basic orange II on proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells in rat embryos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lixin; Feng, Jiawang; Tian, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects of basic orange II on proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells. Limb bud cell were separated from SD rat embryo at 13-day gestational age, limb bud cell were exposed to basic orange II at concentrations of 0.0, 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200, 0 and 400.0 mg/L in the culture medium. The effect of basic orange II on limb bud cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8, the effect of basic orange II on limb bud cell differentiation was assessed by Alcian Blue 8GX. With the increasing of basic orange II concentration, the proliferation and differentiation of embryo limb bud cells were poorer and poorer in vitro, and there was the dose-effect relationship. The pID50 and dLD50 of basic orange II on limb bud cells were 240.6 mg/L and 69.3 mg/L respectively. The inhibition of basic orange II on cell differentiation might exceed that on cell proliferation. Basic orange II could inhibit proliferation and differentiation of embryo limb bud cells. It might be a potential developmental toxic substance in rat embryo.

  9. Increased TERRA levels and RNase H sensitivity are conserved hallmarks of post-senescent survivors in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misino, Stefano; Bonetti, Diego; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Luke, Brian

    2018-02-16

    Cancer cells activate telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs) to bypass replicative senescence and achieve immortality by either upregulating telomerase or promoting homology-directed repair (HDR) at chromosome ends to maintain telomere length, the latter being referred to as ALT (Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres). In yeast telomerase mutants, the HDR-based repair of telomeres leads to the generation of 'survivors' that escape senescence and divide indefinitely. So far, yeast has proven to provide an accurate model to study the generation and maintenance of telomeres via HDR. Recently, it has been established that up-regulation of the lncRNA, TERRA (telomeric repeat-containing RNA), is a novel hallmark of ALT cells. Moreover, RNA-DNA hybrids are thought to trigger HDR at telomeres in ALT cells to maintain telomere length and function. Here we show that, also in established yeast type II survivors, TERRA levels are increased in an analogous manner to human ALT cells. The elevated TERRA levels are independent of yeast-specific subtelomeric structures, i.e. the presence or absence of Y' repetitive elements. Furthermore, we show that RNase H1 overexpression, which degrades the RNA moiety in RNA-DNA hybrids, impairs the growth of yeast survivors. We suggest that even in terms of TERRA regulation, yeast survivors serve as an accurate model that recapitulates many key features of human ALT cells. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

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    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  11. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-05-06

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms.

  12. A sphingolipid-dependent diffusion barrier confines ER stress to the yeast mother cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Lori; Caudron, Fabrice; Denoth-Lippuner, Annina; Boettcher, Barbara; Buvelot Frei, Stéphanie; Snapp, Erik Lee; Barral, Yves

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, lateral diffusion barriers compartmentalize the plasma membrane and, at least in budding yeast, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the molecular nature of these barriers, their mode of action and their cellular functions are unclear. Here, we show that misfolded proteins of the ER remain confined into the mother compartment of budding yeast cells. Confinement required the formation of a lateral diffusion barrier in the form of a distinct domain of the ER-membrane at the bud neck, in a septin-, Bud1 GTPase- and sphingolipid-dependent manner. The sphingolipids, but not Bud1, also contributed to barrier formation in the outer membrane of the dividing nucleus. Barrier-dependent confinement of ER stress into the mother cell promoted aging. Together, our data clarify the physical nature of lateral diffusion barriers in the ER and establish the role of such barriers in the asymmetric segregation of proteotoxic misfolded proteins during cell division and aging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01883.001 PMID:24843009

  13. The DNA repair genes RAD54 and UNG1 are cell cycle regulated in budding yeast but MCB promoter elements have no essential role in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, L H; Johnson, A L

    1995-06-25

    The DNA repair genes RAD54 and UNG1 have MCB elements in their promoters and are shown to be cell cycle regulated. Their transcripts are coordinately expressed with RNR1, ribonucleotide reductase, a MCB-regulated gene known to be expressed in late G1. However, no evidence was obtained for a direct role of MCB elements in DNA repair. Of the proteins that bind and activate MCB elements, only mutations in SWI6 have a defect in DNA repair, showing significant sensitivity to methyl methane sulphonate. Furthermore, analysis of the CDC9 promoter indicates that MCB elements are not required for the induction of the gene by ultraviolet light irradiation. These promoter elements may not respond directly to DNA damage but may have a role in enhancing the induction response.

  14. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition correlates with tumor budding and predicts prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Suguru; Koike, Masahiko; Kanda, Mitsuro; Fujii, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Goro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered to play an important role in cancer invasion. Tumor budding is a prognostic factor in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The aim of this study was to explore the correlation between EMT and tumor budding. Surgical specimens from 78 cases of ESCC resected without preoperative treatment between 2001 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. The mRNA expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin were measured in cancerous tissues using real-time PCR, and each tumor was classified into either epithelial or mesenchymal group. Tumor budding was evaluated in H&E-stained slides and divided into two groups; low-grade budding (budding (≥3). The 5-year survival rate in the epithelial group was significantly higher than that in the mesenchymal group (62.0% vs. 31.5%, P = 0.021). Survival rate of patients in the low-grade budding group was significantly higher than that of patients in the high-grade budding group (75.1% vs. 25.9%, P tumor budding was significantly associated with the mesenchymal group (P = 0.009). EMT was found to occur in ESCC and was significantly associated with tumor budding. Tumor budding was identified as a significant independent prognostic factor among the current population of ESCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    . Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  16. Complete DNA Sequence of Kuraishia capsulata Illustrates Novel Genomic Features among Budding Yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993T), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ∼13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts. PMID:24317973

  17. Vps factors are required for efficient transcription elongation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Naseem A; Hasek, Jiri; Brickner, Donna Garvey; Qiu, Hongfang; Zhang, Fan; Wong, Chi-Ming; Malcova, Ivana; Vasicova, Pavla; Brickner, Jason H; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2013-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that certain Vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) proteins, factors that mediate vesicular protein trafficking, have additional roles in regulating transcription factors at the endosome. We found that yeast mutants lacking the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] kinase Vps34 or its associated protein kinase Vps15 display multiple phenotypes indicating impaired transcription elongation. These phenotypes include reduced mRNA production from long or G+C-rich coding sequences (CDS) without affecting the associated GAL1 promoter activity, and a reduced rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) progression through lacZ CDS in vivo. Consistent with reported genetic interactions with mutations affecting the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, vps15Δ and vps34Δ mutations reduce NuA4 occupancy in certain transcribed CDS. vps15Δ and vps34Δ mutants also exhibit impaired localization of the induced GAL1 gene to the nuclear periphery. We found unexpectedly that, similar to known transcription elongation factors, these and several other Vps factors can be cross-linked to the CDS of genes induced by Gcn4 or Gal4 in a manner dependent on transcriptional induction and stimulated by Cdk7/Kin28-dependent phosphorylation of the Pol II C-terminal domain (CTD). We also observed colocalization of a fraction of Vps15-GFP and Vps34-GFP with nuclear pores at nucleus-vacuole (NV) junctions in live cells. These findings suggest that Vps factors enhance the efficiency of transcription elongation in a manner involving their physical proximity to nuclear pores and transcribed chromatin.

  18. Development of Crystalline Peroxisomes in Methanol-Grown Cells of the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha and Its Relation to Environmental Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Dijken, J.P. van; Pilon, S.A.F.; Harder, W.

    1978-01-01

    The development of peroxisomes has been studied in cells of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha during growth on methanol in batch and chemostat cultures. During bud formation, new peroxisomes were generated by the separation of small peroxisomes from mature organelles in the mother cells. The number of

  19. Loss of membranous Ep-CAM in budding colorectal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, M.J.E.M.; Kempen, L.C. van; Velde, C.J. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2007-01-01

    Tumor budding is a histological feature that reflects loss of adhesion of tumor cells and is associated with locoregional metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. Although nuclear localization of beta-catenin is associated with tumor budding, the molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In this

  20. Ca(2+) homeostasis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Impact of ER/Golgi Ca(2+) storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hooge, Petra; Coun, Catherina; Van Eyck, Vincent; Faes, Liesbeth; Ghillebert, Ruben; Mariën, Lore; Winderickx, Joris; Callewaert, Geert

    2015-08-01

    Yeast has proven to be a powerful tool to elucidate the molecular aspects of several biological processes in higher eukaryotes. As in mammalian cells, yeast intracellular Ca(2+) signalling is crucial for a myriad of biological processes. Yeast cells also bear homologs of the major components of the Ca(2+) signalling toolkit in mammalian cells, including channels, co-transporters and pumps. Using yeast single- and multiple-gene deletion strains of various plasma membrane and organellar Ca(2+) transporters, combined with manipulations to estimate intracellular Ca(2+) storage, we evaluated the contribution of individual transport systems to intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Yeast strains lacking Pmr1 and/or Cod1, two ion pumps implicated in ER/Golgi Ca(2+) homeostasis, displayed a fragmented vacuolar phenotype and showed increased vacuolar Ca(2+) uptake and Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane. In the pmr1Δ strain, these effects were insensitive to calcineurin activity, independent of Cch1/Mid1 Ca(2+) channels and Pmc1 but required Vcx1. By contrast, in the cod1Δ strain increased vacuolar Ca(2+) uptake was not affected by Vcx1 deletion but was largely dependent on Pmc1 activity. Our analysis further corroborates the distinct roles of Vcx1 and Pmc1 in vacuolar Ca(2+) uptake and point to the existence of not-yet identified Ca(2+) influx pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, Ptumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (PTumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis.

  2. Elevated levels of the polo kinase Cdc5 override the Mec1/ATR checkpoint in budding yeast by acting at different steps of the signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Antonio Donnianni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that constitute a barrier to oncogenesis by preserving genome integrity. Loss of checkpoint function is an early event in tumorigenesis. Polo kinases (Plks are fundamental regulators of cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and are frequently overexpressed in tumors. Through their polo box domain, Plks target multiple substrates previously phosphorylated by CDKs and MAPKs. In response to DNA damage, Plks are temporally inhibited in order to maintain the checkpoint-dependent cell cycle block while their activity is required to silence the checkpoint response and resume cell cycle progression. Here, we report that, in budding yeast, overproduction of the Cdc5 polo kinase overrides the checkpoint signaling induced by double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, preventing the phosphorylation of several Mec1/ATR targets, including Ddc2/ATRIP, the checkpoint mediator Rad9, and the transducer kinase Rad53/CHK2. We also show that high levels of Cdc5 slow down DSB processing in a Rad9-dependent manner, but do not prevent the binding of checkpoint factors to a single DSB. Finally, we provide evidence that Sae2, the functional ortholog of human CtIP, which regulates DSB processing and inhibits checkpoint signaling, is regulated by Cdc5. We propose that Cdc5 interferes with the checkpoint response to DSBs acting at multiple levels in the signal transduction pathway and at an early step required to resect DSB ends.

  3. Frequent and efficient use of the sister chromatid for DNA double-strand break repair during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Goldfarb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recombination between homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs is necessary for their accurate segregation during meiosis. It has been suggested that meiotic inter-homolog recombination is promoted by a barrier to inter-sister-chromatid recombination, imposed by meiosis-specific components of the chromosome axis. Consistent with this, measures of Holliday junction-containing recombination intermediates (joint molecules [JMs] show a strong bias towards inter-homolog and against inter-sister JMs. However, recombination between sister chromatids also has an important role in meiosis. The genomes of diploid organisms in natural populations are highly polymorphic for insertions and deletions, and meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs that form within such polymorphic regions must be repaired by inter-sister recombination. Efforts to study inter-sister recombination during meiosis, in particular to determine recombination frequencies and mechanisms, have been constrained by the inability to monitor the products of inter-sister recombination. We present here molecular-level studies of inter-sister recombination during budding yeast meiosis. We examined events initiated by DSBs in regions that lack corresponding sequences on the homolog, and show that these DSBs are efficiently repaired by inter-sister recombination. This occurs with the same timing as inter-homolog recombination, but with reduced (2- to 3-fold yields of JMs. Loss of the meiotic-chromosome-axis-associated kinase Mek1 accelerates inter-sister DSB repair and markedly increases inter-sister JM frequencies. Furthermore, inter-sister JMs formed in mek1Δ mutants are preferentially lost, while inter-homolog JMs are maintained. These findings indicate that inter-sister recombination occurs frequently during budding yeast meiosis, with the possibility that up to one-third of all recombination events occur between sister chromatids. We suggest that a Mek1-dependent reduction in

  4. Cell cycle genes are activated earlier than respiratory genes during release of grapevine buds from endodormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, Ximena; Pérez, Francisco J

    2017-10-03

    Single-bud cuttings of Vitis vinifera L exposed to forced growing conditions were used to investigate the involvement of phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (Aux) and cytokinin (CK) in the release of buds from the ED and in bud-sprouting. This artificial system imitates and hastens the natural sprouting that occurs in spring. Temporal expression analysis of genes related to phytohormones synthesis, showed an early drop in the expression of ABA biosynthesis gene that preceded an increase in Aux and CK biosynthesis genes. Bud-break is headed by the activation of all structures of the latent bud, especially the differentiation of the inflorescence and the development of the early stages of floral organs. Therefore, resumption of cell division and increases in respiration are essential for the activation of the bud. Temporal expression analysis of the cell cycle and respiration genes indicate that an increase in cell division go before the increase in respiration. These results, together with results indicating that the cell cycle genes are upregulated by Aux and CK, suggest that the events before the bud-break, start with a reduction in ABA content, followed by an increase in the content of Aux and CK, which activates the machinery of the cell cycle, which eventually would cause an increase in respiration.

  5. Cell kinetic study on the relation between irradiation hypogeusia and taste buds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Hideharu; Furumoto, Keiichi [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of hypogeusia caused by irradiation. X-ray treatment at 10 Gy or 20 Gy was given to the maxillofacial region including the tongue in rats, and the involvement of taste bud for hypogeusia was investigated. In addition, cytological kinetics were immunohistologically studied using bromodeoxyuridine in the taste bud and in the lingual mucosal epithelium. The following results were obtained: In the 10 Gy group, the number of taste bud become less after the exposure, but no hypogeusia was observed during the experimental period. In the 20 Gy group, any labeled taste bud was not observed on the 7th day, and all taste buds disappeared by the 10th day. In the lingual mucosal epithelium, the number of basal cells decreased to the minimum, and the body weight and total water intake decreased coincidently in the 20 Gy group, which were few in the 10 Gy group. (author)

  6. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF increase the rate of glucose transport and TCA cycle in budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kang-Wei Lin; Chuanjun Yang; Hui-Yong Lian; Peng Cai

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under...

  7. Circulating cytokeratin-positive cells and tumor budding in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märkl, Bruno; Wilhelms, Narjes; Anthuber, Matthias; Schenkirsch, Gerhard; Schlimok, Günter; Oruzio, Daniel

    2016-12-10

    To investigate whether circulating cytokeratin-positive (CK(+)) cells in the mesenteric blood of resected colorectal specimens are prognostic and correlate with tumor budding. Fifty-six colorectal specimens were collected between 9/2007 and 7/2008. Blood from the mesenteric vein was drawn immediately after receiving the fresh and unfixed specimens in the pathology department. After separation of the mononuclear cells by Ficoll-Hypaque density-gradient centrifugation, cytological smears were immunocytochemically stained for CK18. Tumor budding was evaluated on slides stained for pan-cytokeratin. The identification of ≥ 30 buds/1.3 mm(2) was defined as high grade budding. CK(+) cells and clusters were identified in 29 (48%) and 14 (25%) of the samples, respectively. Two cells were identified in one of three non-malignant cases. Clusters were found exclusively in malignant cases. The occurrence of CK(+) cells or clusters was not associated with any of the evaluated clinicopathological factors, including surgical technique and tumor budding. Moreover, the occurrence of CK(+) cells or clusters had no influence on the cancer-specific survival [75 mo (CI: 61; 88) vs 83 mo (CI: 72; 95) and 80 mo (CI: 63; 98) vs 79 mo (CI: 69; 89), respectively]. CK(+) cells and showed neither prognostic significance nor an association with tumor budding. It is very likely that CK18-staining is not specific enough to identify the relevant cells.

  8. Correlation between tumor budding and post-resection prognosis in patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitsugu; Ohara, Masanori; Doumen, Hiromitsu; Kimura, Noriko; Ishidate, Takuzo; Kondo, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    Tumor budding is defined as an isolated single cancer cell or a cluster of cancer cells composed of fewer than five cells at the invasive front of a tumor. The aim of the present study was to identify correlations between tumor budding and clinicopathological factors and their impact on postoperative prognosis in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus. The subjects were 82 patients who underwent curative resection. The number of tumors showing budding was counted immunohistochemically based on positivity for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) to distinguish cancer cells from inflammatory cells, and the patients were divided into low-grade and high-grade budding groups. High-grade budding was defined as ≥5 budding foci per field under a 20× objective lens. One group of 36 patients (43.9%) and a second group of 46 patients (56.1%) were classified into the low-grade and high-grade budding groups, respectively. Patients in the high-grade budding group had significantly larger tumor size, deeper depth of invasion, more frequent lymphatic invasion and venous invasion, as well as more lymph node metastases, than those in the low-grade budding group. Disease-free and overall survivals were worse in the high-grade budding group than in the low-grade budding group (Ptumor recurrence more than 5 years postoperatively belonged to the low-grade budding group. Tumor budding appears to be an indicator of tumor growth and invasiveness. Patients with low-grade budding are likely to have a better prognosis than those with high-grade budding, but the tumor may recur in the late phase postoperatively in patients with low-grade budding.

  9. Localization and Function of Budding Yeast CENP-A Depends upon Kinetochore Protein Interactions and Is Independent of Canonical Centromere Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Hsien Ho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In many eukaryotes, the centromere is epigenetically specified and not strictly defined by sequence. In contrast, budding yeast has a specific 125 bp sequence required for kinetochore function. Despite the difference in centromere specification, budding yeast and multicellular eukaryotic centromeres contain a highly conserved histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The localization of budding yeast CENP-A, Cse4, requires the centromere DNA binding components, which are not conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, we report that Cse4 localizes and functions at a synthetic kinetochore assembly site that lacks centromere sequence. The outer kinetochore Dam1-DASH and inner kinetochore CBF3 complexes are required for Cse4 localization to that site. Furthermore, the natural kinetochore also requires the outer kinetochore proteins for full Cse4 localization. Our results suggest that Cse4 localization at a functional kinetochore does not require the recognition of a specific DNA sequence by the CBF3 complex; rather, its localization depends on stable interactions among kinetochore proteins.

  10. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Brachet

    Full Text Available In the meiotic prophase, programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSB are introduced along chromosomes to promote homolog pairing and recombination. Although meiotic DSBs usually occur in nucleosome-depleted, accessible regions of chromatin, their repair by homologous recombination takes place in a nucleosomal environment. Nucleosomes may represent an obstacle for the recombination machinery and their timely eviction and reincorporation into chromatin may influence the outcome of recombination, for instance by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs. However, the absence of these chaperones has no effect on meiotic recombination, suggesting that timely histone reincorporation following their eviction has no influence on the recombination outcome, or that redundant pathways are activated. This study is the first example of the involvement of histone H3 chaperones at naturally occurring, developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks.

  11. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Elsa; Béneut, Claire; Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    In the meiotic prophase, programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are introduced along chromosomes to promote homolog pairing and recombination. Although meiotic DSBs usually occur in nucleosome-depleted, accessible regions of chromatin, their repair by homologous recombination takes place in a nucleosomal environment. Nucleosomes may represent an obstacle for the recombination machinery and their timely eviction and reincorporation into chromatin may influence the outcome of recombination, for instance by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs. However, the absence of these chaperones has no effect on meiotic recombination, suggesting that timely histone reincorporation following their eviction has no influence on the recombination outcome, or that redundant pathways are activated. This study is the first example of the involvement of histone H3 chaperones at naturally occurring, developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks.

  12. Decreased miR-320a promotes invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nan; Wang, Cheng; Zhuang, Zehang; Hou, Jinson; Liu, Xiqiang; Wu, Yue; Liu, Haichao; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-10-04

    We aimed to determine the specific miRNA profile of tumor budding cells and investigate the potential role of miR-320a in invasion and metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). We collected tumor budding cells and paired central tumor samples from five TSCC specimens with laser capture microdissection and examined the specimens using a miRNA microarray. The specific miRNA signature of tumor budding cells was identified. We found that miR-320a was dramatically decreased in tumor budding cells. Knockdown of miR-320a significantly enhanced migration and invasion of TSCC cell lines. Suz12 was shown to be a direct target of miR-320a. Similar results were also observed in nude mouse models. Multivariate analysis indicated that miR-320a was an independent prognostic factor. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-320a and high intensity of tumor budding were correlated with poor survival rate, especially in the subgroup with high-intensity tumor budding and low expression of miR-320a. We concluded that decreased expression of miR-320a could promote invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells by targeting Suz12 in TSCC. A combination of tumor budding and miR-320a may serve as an index to identify an aggressive sub-population of TSCC cells with high metastatic potential.

  13. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast [version 2; referees: 3 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Fox

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This “licensing” ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of

  14. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Fox

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This “licensing” ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of cyclical events at the meiosis

  15. Live Cell Imaging in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2017-10-03

    Live cell imaging complements the array of biochemical and molecular genetic approaches to provide a comprehensive insight into functional dependencies and molecular interactions in fission yeast. Fluorescent proteins and vital dyes reveal dynamic changes in the spatial distribution of organelles and the proteome and how each alters in response to changes in environmental and genetic composition. This introduction discusses key issues and basic image analysis for live cell imaging of fission yeast. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF increase the rate of glucose transport and TCA cycle in budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Wei Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for ten genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF.

  17. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF Increase the Rate of Glucose Transport and TCA Cycle in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Wei; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE) and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for 10 genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF.

  18. Patterns and Mechanisms of Ancestral Histone Protein Inheritance in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Welsem, Tibor; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J.; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Replicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5′ ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns. PMID:21666805

  19. Tropomyosin is essential for processive movement of a class V myosin from budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Alex R; Krementsova, Elena B; Bookwalter, Carol S; Fagnant, Patricia M; Sladewski, Thomas E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2012-08-07

    Myosin V is an actin-based motor protein involved in intracellular cargo transport [1]. Given this physiological role, it was widely assumed that all class V myosins are processive, able to take multiple steps along actin filaments without dissociating. This notion was challenged when several class V myosins were characterized as nonprocessive in vitro, including Myo2p, the essential class V myosin from S. cerevisiae [2-6]. Myo2p moves cargo including secretory vesicles and other organelles for several microns along actin cables in vivo. This demonstrated cargo transporter must therefore either operate in small ensembles or behave processively in the cellular context. Here we show that Myo2p moves processively in vitro as a single motor when it walks on an actin track that more closely resembles the actin cables found in vivo. The key to processivity is tropomyosin: Myo2p is not processive on bare actin but highly processive on actin-tropomyosin. The major yeast tropomyosin isoform, Tpm1p, supports the most robust processivity. Tropomyosin slows the rate of MgADP release, thus increasing the time the motor spends strongly attached to actin. This is the first example of tropomyosin switching a motor from nonprocessive to processive motion on actin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcription of two long noncoding RNAs mediates mating-type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, F.J.; Neuert, G.; Hendrick, N.; Lardenois, A.; Buratowski, S.; van Oudenaarden, A.; Primig, M.; Amon, A.

    2012-01-01

    The cell-fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/alpha but not haploid MATa or MATalpha cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating-type

  1. The Ddc1-Mec3-Rad17 sliding clamp regulates histone-histone chaperone interactions and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rebecca J; Han, Junhong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-04-11

    The maintenance of genome integrity is regulated in part by chromatin structure and factors involved in the DNA damage response pathway. Nucleosome assembly is a highly regulated process that restores chromatin structure after DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. During S phase the histone chaperones Asf1, CAF-1, and Rtt106 coordinate to deposit newly synthesized histones H3-H4 onto replicated DNA in budding yeast. Here we describe synthetic genetic interactions between RTT106 and the DDC1-MEC3-RAD17 (9-1-1) complex, a sliding clamp functioning in the S phase DNA damage and replication checkpoint response, upon treatment with DNA damaging agents. The DNA damage sensitivity of rad17Δ rtt106Δ cells depends on the function of Rtt106 in nucleosome assembly. Epistasis analysis reveals that 9-1-1 complex components interact with multiple DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly factors, including Rtt106, CAF-1, and lysine residues of H3-H4. Furthermore, rad17Δ cells exhibit defects in the deposition of newly synthesized H3-H4 onto replicated DNA. Finally, deletion of RAD17 results in increased association of Asf1 with checkpoint kinase Rad53, which may lead to the observed reduction in Asf1-H3 interaction in rad17Δ mutant cells. In addition, we observed that the interaction between histone H3-H4 with histone chaperone CAF-1 or Rtt106 increases in cells lacking Rad17. These results support the idea that the 9-1-1 checkpoint protein regulates DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in part through regulating histone-histone chaperone interactions.

  2. Dissecting the fission yeast regulatory network reveals phase-specific control elements of its cell cycle

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    Liu Liwen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are among the original model organisms in the study of the cell-division cycle. Unlike budding yeast, no large-scale regulatory network has been constructed for fission yeast. It has only been partially characterized. As a result, important regulatory cascades in budding yeast have no known or complete counterpart in fission yeast. Results By integrating genome-wide data from multiple time course cell cycle microarray experiments we reconstructed a gene regulatory network. Based on the network, we discovered in addition to previously known regulatory hubs in M phase, a new putative regulatory hub in the form of the HMG box transcription factor SPBC19G7.04. Further, we inferred periodic activities of several less known transcription factors over the course of the cell cycle, identified over 500 putative regulatory targets and detected many new phase-specific and conserved cis-regulatory motifs. In particular, we show that SPBC19G7.04 has highly significant periodic activity that peaks in early M phase, which is coordinated with the late G2 activity of the forkhead transcription factor fkh2. Finally, using an enhanced Bayesian algorithm to co-cluster the expression data, we obtained 31 clusters of co-regulated genes 1 which constitute regulatory modules from different phases of the cell cycle, 2 whose phase order is coherent across the 10 time course experiments, and 3 which lead to identification of phase-specific control elements at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in S. pombe. In particular, the ribosome biogenesis clusters expressed in G2 phase reveal new, highly conserved RNA motifs. Conclusion Using a systems-level analysis of the phase-specific nature of the S. pombe cell cycle gene regulation, we have provided new testable evidence for post-transcriptional regulation in the G2 phase of the fission yeast cell cycle

  3. Mechanisms of taste bud cell loss after head and neck irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha M.; Reyland, Mary E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Taste loss in human patients following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer is a common and significant problem, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this loss are not understood. Taste stimuli are transduced by receptor cells within taste buds, and like epidermal cells, taste cells are regularly replaced throughout adult life. This renewal relies on a progenitor cells adjacent to taste buds, which continually supply new cells to each bud. Here we treated adult mice with a single 8 Gy dose of X-ray irradiation to the head and neck, and analyzed taste epithelium at 1–21 days post-irradiation (dpi). We found irradiation targets the taste progenitor cells, which undergo cell cycle arrest (1–3 dpi) and apoptosis (within 1 dpi). Taste progenitors resume proliferation at 5–7 dpi, with the proportion of cells in S and M phase exceeding control levels at 5–6 and 6 dpi, respectively, suggesting that proliferation is accelerated and/or synchronized following radiation damage. Using BrdU birthdating to identify newborn cells, we found that the decreased proliferation following irradiation reduces the influx of cells at 1–2 dpi, while the robust proliferation detected at 6 dpi accelerates entry of new cells into taste buds. By contrast, the number of differentiated taste cells was not significantly reduced until 7 dpi. These data suggest a model where continued natural taste cell death, paired with temporary interruption of cell replacement underlies taste loss after irradiation. PMID:22399770

  4. Chemotropism during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follette, Peter J; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all eukaryotic cells can grow in a polarized fashion in response to external signals. Cells can respond to gradients of chemoattractants or chemorepellents by directional growth, a process referred to as chemotropism. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes chemotropic growth during mating, in which two haploid cells of opposite mating type grow toward one another. We have shown that mating pheromone gradients are essential for efficient mating in yeast and have examined the chemotropism defects of different yeast mutants. Two methods of assessing the ability of yeast strains to respond to pheromone gradients are presented here.

  5. Budding yeast kinetochore proteins, Chl4 and Ctf19, are required to maintain SPB-centromere proximity during G1 and late anaphase.

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    Soumitra Sau

    Full Text Available In the budding yeast, centromeres stay clustered near the spindle pole bodies (SPBs through most of the cell cycle. This SPB-centromere proximity requires microtubules and functional kinetochores, which are protein complexes formed on the centromeres and capable of binding microtubules. The clustering is suggested by earlier studies to depend also on protein-protein interactions between SPB and kinetochore components. Previously it has been shown that the absence of non-essential kinetochore proteins of the Ctf19 complex weakens kinetochore-microtubule interaction, but whether this compromised interaction affects centromere/kinetochore positioning inside the nucleus is unknown. We found that in G1 and in late anaphase, SPB-centromere proximity was disturbed in mutant cells lacking Ctf19 complex members,Chl4p and/or Ctf19p, whose centromeres lay further away from their SPBs than those of the wild-type cells. We unequivocally show that the SPB-centromere proximity and distances are not dependent on physical interactions between SPB and kinetochore components, but involve microtubule-dependent forces only. Further insight on the positional difference between wild-type and mutant kinetochores was gained by generating computational models governed by (1 independently regulated, but constant kinetochore microtubule (kMT dynamics, (2 poleward tension on kinetochore and the antagonistic polar ejection force and (3 length and force dependent kMT dynamics. Numerical data obtained from the third model concurs with experimental results and suggests that the absence of Chl4p and/or Ctf19p increases the penetration depth of a growing kMT inside the kinetochore and increases the rescue frequency of a depolymerizing kMT. Both the processes result in increased distance between SPB and centromere.

  6. Budding Yeast Kinetochore Proteins, Chl4 and Ctf19, Are Required to Maintain SPB-Centromere Proximity during G1 and Late Anaphase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Soumitra; Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Paul, Raja; Sinha, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    In the budding yeast, centromeres stay clustered near the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) through most of the cell cycle. This SPB-centromere proximity requires microtubules and functional kinetochores, which are protein complexes formed on the centromeres and capable of binding microtubules. The clustering is suggested by earlier studies to depend also on protein-protein interactions between SPB and kinetochore components. Previously it has been shown that the absence of non-essential kinetochore proteins of the Ctf19 complex weakens kinetochore-microtubule interaction, but whether this compromised interaction affects centromere/kinetochore positioning inside the nucleus is unknown. We found that in G1 and in late anaphase, SPB-centromere proximity was disturbed in mutant cells lacking Ctf19 complex members,Chl4p and/or Ctf19p, whose centromeres lay further away from their SPBs than those of the wild-type cells. We unequivocally show that the SPB-centromere proximity and distances are not dependent on physical interactions between SPB and kinetochore components, but involve microtubule-dependent forces only. Further insight on the positional difference between wild-type and mutant kinetochores was gained by generating computational models governed by (1) independently regulated, but constant kinetochore microtubule (kMT) dynamics, (2) poleward tension on kinetochore and the antagonistic polar ejection force and (3) length and force dependent kMT dynamics. Numerical data obtained from the third model concurs with experimental results and suggests that the absence of Chl4p and/or Ctf19p increases the penetration depth of a growing kMT inside the kinetochore and increases the rescue frequency of a depolymerizing kMT. Both the processes result in increased distance between SPB and centromere. PMID:25003500

  7. Cell polarity: wanderful exploration in yeast sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, Robert A

    2013-01-07

    Chemical gradients are used by cells to provide positional information. Two new studies reveal that polarity proteins are highly dynamic in yeast cells responding to a pheromone gradient and suggest that this behavior is important for robust directional growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions.

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    Weitao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell

  9. A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Shor, Erika; Müller, Carolin A.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time. PMID:24068963

  10. Oscillatory dynamics of cell cycle proteins in single yeast cells analyzed by imaging cytometry.

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    David A Ball

    Full Text Available Progression through the cell division cycle is orchestrated by a complex network of interacting genes and proteins. Some of these proteins are known to fluctuate periodically during the cell cycle, but a systematic study of the fluctuations of a broad sample of cell-cycle proteins has not been made until now. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, we profiled 16 strains of budding yeast, each containing GFP fused to a single gene involved in cell cycle regulation. The dynamics of protein abundance and localization were characterized by extracting the amplitude, period, and other indicators from a series of images. Oscillations of protein abundance could clearly be identified for Cdc15, Clb2, Cln1, Cln2, Mcm1, Net1, Sic1, and Whi5. The period of oscillation of the fluorescently tagged proteins is generally in good agreement with the inter-bud time. The very strong oscillations of Net1 and Mcm1 expression are remarkable since little is known about the temporal expression of these genes. By collecting data from large samples of single cells, we quantified some aspects of cell-to-cell variability due presumably to intrinsic and extrinsic noise affecting the cell cycle.

  11. Tumor budding is an independent prognostic factor for prediction of lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Punnya V; Patil, Prakash V; Hallikeri, Kaveri; Mallapur, M D; Hallikerimath, Seema; Kale, Alka D

    2015-04-01

    Despite the enormous advances in diagnostic and management modalities of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the mortality rates have remained stagnant with a 5-year survival rate of tumor budding has been associated with aggressive behavior and is correlated with lymph node metastasis, recurrence, distant metastasis, and decreased survival in several cancers. However, the prognostic significance of this apparently simple to evaluate parameter is sparse in OSCC. A total of 75 cases of surgically excised OSCC were analyzed for tumor budding along with other clinicopathologic parameters. Tumor budding was graded as high and low intensity based on presence and absence of ≥10 or budding foci in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. An association between the clinicopathological parameters, lymph node metastases with the budding index was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Tumor budding was evident in 89% of cases with around 45.3% of the cases demonstrated high-intensity budding. High-intensity tumor budding was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and depth of invasion. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor budding and depth of invasion were significant independent predictors for lymph node metastasis. Tumor budding is frequently encountered histologic marker in OSCC. High-intensity tumor budding is a strong independent prognostic factor for prediction of lymph node metastasis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Protein expression-yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tumor Budding, EMT and Cancer Stem Cells in T1-2/N0 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, Cecilie Gjøvaag; Kumar, Sheeba; Boysen, Morten E; Dhakal, Hari Prasad; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Bryne, Magne

    2015-11-01

    Early oral carcinomas have a high recurrence rate despite surgery with clear margins. In an attempt to classify the risk of recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinomas, we explored the significance of tumor budding, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and certain cancer stem cell markers (CSC). Tumor budding (single cells or clusters of ≤5 cells in the tumor front, divided into high- and low-budding tumors), EMT and CSC markers were studied in 62 immunohistochemically stained slides of T1/2N0M0 oral squamous cell carcinomas. Tissues and records of follow-up were obtained from the Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Tumor budding, EMT and CSC markers were scored and analyzed. The only significant prognostic marker was tumor budding (p=0.043). Expression of the EMT marker E-cadherin was lost from the invasive front and tended to be a prognostic factor (p=0.17), and up-regulation of vimentin in tumor cells in the invasive front was found; this indicates that EMT had occurred. CSC markers were not associated with recurrence rate in the present study. A high budding index was related to poor prognosis in patients with oral cancer. Budding was associated with EMT-like changes. CSC factors were detected but reflected differentiation rather than stemness. Scoring of buds in patients with oral cancer may help discriminate invasive tumors prone to relapse, and thus, provide an indication for adjuvant therapy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Cytology, Cell Walls and septa: A Summary of Yeast Cell Biology from a Phylogenetic Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, I.; Veenhuis, M.; Brul, S.; Klis, F.M.; de Groot, P.W.J.; Müller, W.H.; van Driel, K.G.A.; Boekhout, T.; Kurtzman, C. P.; Fell, J. W.; Boekhout, T.

    2011-01-01

    his chapter aims to present an overview of yeast cell biology, biochemical structure and composition of cell walls in various yeast species, septal pore ultrastructure, and other subcellular characteristics, and a phylogenetic framework to these observations. Yeast cells have ultrastructural

  15. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Keying Che,1,* Yang Zhao,2,3,* Xiao Qu,1 Zhaofei Pang,1 Yang Ni,4 Tiehong Zhang,4 Jiajun Du,1,5 Hongchang Shen4 1Institute of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, 2Department of Breast Surgery, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer in Shanghai, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 3Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 4Department of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, 5Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Gastric carcinoma (GC is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma.Materials and methods: Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS was statistically analyzed.Results: Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145 of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186 and 16.9% (50 of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0

  16. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  17. Lighting up yeast cell factories by transcription factor-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ambrosio, Vasil; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2017-01-01

    process. For this purpose, there is a need to develop new techniques for screening and selection of best-performing cell factory designs in multiplex. Here we review the current status of the sourcing, design and engineering of biosensors derived from allosterically regulated transcription factors applied...... to the biotechnology work-horse budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conclude by providing a perspective on the most important challenges and opportunities lying ahead in order to harness the full potential of biosensor development for increasing both the throughput of cell factory development and robustness...

  18. Live Cell Imaging in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvihill, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    Live cell imaging complements the array of biochemical and molecular genetic approaches to provide a comprehensive insight into functional dependencies and molecular interactions in fission yeast. Fluorescent proteins and vital dyes reveal dynamic changes in the spatial distribution of organelles and the proteome and how each alters in response to changes in environmental and genetic composition. This introduction discusses key issues and basic image analysis for live cell imaging of fission ...

  19. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  20. Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor RHAMM in tumor budding cells identifies aggressive colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Huber, Bettina; Mele, Valentina; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Trippel, Mafalda; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (RHAMM, CD168) predicts adverse clinicopathological features and decreased survival for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Using full tissue sections, we investigated the expression of RHAMM in tumor budding cells of 103 primary CRCs to characterize the biological processes driving single-cell invasion and early metastatic dissemination. RHAMM expression in tumor buds was analyzed with clinicopathological data, molecular features and survival. Tumor budding cells at the invasive front of CRC expressed RHAMM in 68% of cases. Detection of RHAMM-positive tumor budding cells was significantly associated with poor survival outcome (P = .0312), independent of TNM stage and adjuvant therapy in multivariate analysis (P = .0201). RHAMM-positive tumor buds were associated with frequent lymphatic invasion (P = .0007), higher tumor grade (P = .0296), and nodal metastasis (P = .0364). Importantly, the prognostic impact of RHAMM expression in tumor buds was maintained independently of the number of tumor buds found in an individual case (P = .0246). No impact of KRAS/BRAF mutation, mismatch repair deficiency and CpG island methylation was observed. RHAMM expression identifies an aggressive subpopulation of tumor budding cells and is an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRC patients. These data support ongoing efforts to develop RHAMM as a target for precision therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription of two long non-coding RNAs mediates mating type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werven, Folkert J.; Neuert, Gregor; Hendrick, Natalie; Lardenois, Aurélie; Buratowski, Stephen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Primig, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cell fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/α but not haploid MATa or MATα cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating type control of sporulation. In MATa or MATα haploids expression of IME1, the central inducer of gametogenesis, is inhibited in cis by transcription of the lncRNA IRT1, located in the IME1 promoter. IRT1 transcription recruits the Set2 histone methyltransferase and the Set3 histone deacetylase complex to establish repressive chromatin at the IME1 promoter. Inhibiting expression of IRT1 and an antisense transcript that antagonizes the expression of the meiotic regulator IME4, allows cells expressing the haploid mating-type to sporulate with kinetics that are indistinguishable from that of MATa/α diploids. Conversely, expression of the two lncRNAs abolishes sporulation in MATa/α diploids. Thus, transcription of two lncRNAs governs mating type control of gametogenesis in yeast. PMID:22959267

  2. Characterization of the immunophenotype of the tumor budding and its prognostic implications in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Genichiro; Nagai, Kanji; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Yusuke; Matsumura, Yuki; Kojima, Motohiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Takashima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Ohe, Yuichiro; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Tumor budding is morphologically defined as infiltration by small clusters of cancer cells. While the biological properties of budding cells in adenocarcinoma (decreased expression of adhesion molecules and of differentiation markers) have been elucidated, those of the cells in squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) of the lung still remain to be clarified. We examined the clinicopathological data of 217 patients with SqCC of the lung. Furthermore we evaluated the immunohistochemical properties of the budding cells. Tumor budding was observed in 83 (38.2%) patients. A statistically significant difference was observed in overall 5-year survival rates between the cases showing tumor budding and the cases not showing budding (45.6% vs. 64.0%, pbudding cells (BCs) exhibited reduced expression levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (E-cadherin; p=0.004, β-catenin; p=0.002) and increased expression levels of laminin-5γ2 (p=0.001). On the other hand, no significant differences in the staining scores for differentiation markers (p63 and podoplanin) were found between BCs and cancer cells forming nests. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor budding was a significant independent prognostic factor in patients with SqCC of the lung (p=0.022). Tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in patients with SqCC of the lung. Although budding cells in SqCC exhibited reduced expression levels of the cellular adhesion molecules, the expression levels of specific differentiation markers were retained, suggesting that the budding mechanism in SqCC may differ, at least in part, from that in adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanomaterials Enhanced Gene Expression in Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fang Chien

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanomaterials are shown to enhance gene expression for rice -galactosidase gene (-Gal in yeast cells. Au and Ag nanoparticles and their nanocomposites, silica-Au and silica-Ag, were prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM technique. The rice -galactosidase gene was cloned into the yeast chromosome, where the cloned cells were precultured and induced into a medium containing each of the testing nanomaterials. The nanomaterials were observed to incorporate inside the cells, and no cell death has been detected during the course of gene expression. The enzyme activity was determined by a synthetic substrate, p-nitrophenyl--D-galctopyranoside, and the yellow product yield was recorded in a spectrophotometer at 400 nm. When Au and Ag nanoparticles were incorporated with the culture, a 3–5 fold enhancement in -galactosidase was observed for intracellular activity as well as the secreted activity into the medium. The secreted protein was analyzed to have a pure form and displayed as a single protein band in the SDS-gel electrophoresis. The effects of size and chemical nature of nanomaterials on gene expression for the rice -galactosidase gene in yeast cells are discussed.

  4. Yeast Contamination Potential in a Carbonated Soft Drink Industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    species of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Thrall, 2004). Yeasts are useful in bakery and breweries but undesirable in carbonated soft drink industries due to ... characteristics compared to yeast colonies described in Cheesebrough (1985). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The yeasts isolated had some budding cells. The.

  5. The adverse prognostic effect of tumor budding on the evolution of cutaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guerrero, Miriam; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Vivanco, Blanca; Fernández-Vega, Ivan; Munguía-Calzada, Pablo; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Galache, Cristina; Santos-Juanes, Jorge

    2017-06-01

    Tumor budding is a readily detectable histopathologic feature that has been recognized as an adverse prognostic factor in several human cancers. We sought to assess the correlation of tumor budding with the clinicopathologic features and the prognostic value of tumor budding in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Forty-nine primary nonmetastatic and 49 primary metastatic cSCCs to regional lymph nodes were retrospectively studied. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess the relationship between tumor budding, clinicopathologic parameters, and patient survival. Tumor budding was observed in 45 cases of 98 (46%). High-intensity budding (≥5 tumor buds) was observed in 20 tumors. Presence of tumor buds was a significant risk factor for nodal metastasis with crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of 8.92 (95% CI, 4.39-18.1) and 6.93 (95% CI, 3.30-14.5), respectively, and for reduced overall survival time (crude and adjusted HRs of 2.03 [95% CI, 1.26-3.28] and 1.72 [95% CI, 1.05-2.83], respectively). This was a retrospective study limited to cSCCs of the head and neck. Examined tumors were >2 mm thick, and all were from a primary excision. These results indicate an increased frequency of nodal metastasis and risk of death in patients with tumor buds. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Mehlgarten

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative, which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and

  7. Mechanics of cell division in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fred

    2012-02-01

    Cytokinesis is the stage of cell division in which a cell divides into two. A paradigm of cytokinesis in animal cells is that the actomyosin contractile ring provides the primary force to squeeze the cell into two. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis also requires a actomyosin ring, which has been generally assumed to provide the force for cleavage. However, in contrast to animal cells, yeast cells assemble a cell wall septum concomitant with ring contraction and possess large (MPa) internal turgor pressure. Here, we show that the inward force generated by the division apparatus opposes turgor pressure; a decrease in effective turgor pressure leads to an increase in cleavage rate. We show that the ring cannot be the primary force generator. Scaling arguments indicate that the contractile ring can only provide a tiny fraction of the mechanical stress required to overcome turgor. Further, we show that cleavage can occur even in the absence of the contractile ring. Instead of the contractile ring, scaling arguments and modeling suggest that the large forces for cytokinesis are produced by the assembly of cell wall polymers in the growing septum.

  8. Anti-aging and anti-microbial effects of melleolide on various types of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Shigeru; Kobori, Hajime; Sekiya, Atsushi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Ushimaru, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The chronological lifespan (CLS) of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model for the aging of post-mitotic cells in higher eukaryotes. In this study, we found that the sesquiterpene aryl ester melleolide expands the CLS of budding yeast. In contrast, melleolide compromised the CLS of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This indicates that melleolide might have a potential anti-aging activity against some types of cell, and that it might be useful as a selective anti-fungal drug.

  9. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4 and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs, small populations of which have been identified in PDAC, and EMT-type cells play critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. EMT may be histologically represented by the presence of tumor budding which is described as the occurrence of single tumor cells or small clusters (<5 of dedifferentiated cells at the invasive front of gastrointestinal (including colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary carcinomas and is linked to poor prognosis. Tumor budding has recently been shown to occur frequently in PDAC and to be associated with adverse clinicopathological features and decreased disease-free and overall survival. The aim of this review is to present a short overview on the morphological and molecular aspects that underline the relationship between tumor budding cells, CSCs and EMT-type cells in PDAC.

  10. Sea buckthorn bud extract displays activity against cell-cultured Influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, A; Gianchecchi, E; Piccirella, S; Manenti, A; Piccini, G; Llorente Pastor, E; Canovi, B; Montomoli, E

    2015-08-05

    Vaccines and antiviral drugs are the most widely used methods of preventing or treating Influenza virus infection. The role of sea buckthorn (SBT) bud dry extract as a natural antiviral drug against Influenza was investigated. Influenza virus was cultured in the MDCK cell line, with or without SBT bud extract, and virus growth was assessed by HA and TCID50 virus titration in terms of cytopathic effect on cells. Several concentrations of extract were tested, the virus titer being measured on day 4 after infection. After infection, the virus titer in the control sample was calculated to be 2.5 TCID50/ml; treatment with SBT bud extract reduced the virus titer to 2.0 TCID50/ml at 50 μg/ml, while the HA titer was reduced from 1431 (control) to 178. Concentrations lower than 50μg/ml displayed an inhibitory effect in the HA assay, but not in the TCID50 virus titration; however, observation of the viral cultures confirmed a slowdown of viral growth at all concentrations. Natural dietary supplements and phytotherapy are a growing market and offer new opportunities for the treatment of several diseases and disorders. These preliminary experiments are the first to show that SBT bud extract is able to reduce the growth of the Influenza A H1N1 virus in vitro at a concentration of 50 μg/ml. This discovery opens up the possibility of using SBT bud extract as a valid weapon against Influenza and, in addition, as the starting-point for the discovery of new drugs. © Copyright by Pacini Editore SpA, Pisa, Italy.

  11. Automated quantification of budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel image cytometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Daniel J; Kury, Alexandria L; Kuksin, Dmitry; Pirani, Alnoor; Flanagan, Kevin; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The measurements of concentration, viability, and budding percentages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are performed on a routine basis in the brewing and biofuel industries. Generation of these parameters is of great importance in a manufacturing setting, where they can aid in the estimation of product quality, quantity, and fermentation time of the manufacturing process. Specifically, budding percentages can be used to estimate the reproduction rate of yeast populations, which directly correlates with metabolism of polysaccharides and bioethanol production, and can be monitored to maximize production of bioethanol during fermentation. The traditional method involves manual counting using a hemacytometer, but this is time-consuming and prone to human error. In this study, we developed a novel automated method for the quantification of yeast budding percentages using Cellometer image cytometry. The automated method utilizes a dual-fluorescent nucleic acid dye to specifically stain live cells for imaging analysis of unique morphological characteristics of budding yeast. In addition, cell cycle analysis is performed as an alternative method for budding analysis. We were able to show comparable yeast budding percentages between manual and automated counting, as well as cell cycle analysis. The automated image cytometry method is used to analyze and characterize corn mash samples directly from fermenters during standard fermentation. Since concentration, viability, and budding percentages can be obtained simultaneously, the automated method can be integrated into the fermentation quality assurance protocol, which may improve the quality and efficiency of beer and bioethanol production processes.

  12. Laser effects on yeast cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovici, A.; Despa, Sanda I.; Paunescu, Teodor G.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects produced by coherent electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet and visible range on the growth of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell suspension. There were made several experiments in which we used different irradiation parameters (power, irradiation time, wavelength) for pointing out those that produce the stimulation or inhibition of the cellular culture growth. Beyond the modifications that appeared in the culture evolution we investigated other physical and chemical changes induced by the laser light on yeast cell suspensions.

  13. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally. PMID:27935947

  14. Presynaptic (Type III) cells in mouse taste buds sense sour (acid) taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A; Maruyama, Yutaka; Stimac, Robert; Roper, Stephen D

    2008-06-15

    Taste buds contain two types of cells that directly participate in taste transduction - receptor (Type II) cells and presynaptic (Type III) cells. Receptor cells respond to sweet, bitter and umami taste stimulation but until recently the identity of cells that respond directly to sour (acid) tastants has only been inferred from recordings in situ, from behavioural studies, and from immunostaining for putative sour transduction molecules. Using calcium imaging on single isolated taste cells and with biosensor cells to identify neurotransmitter release, we show that presynaptic (Type III) cells specifically respond to acid taste stimulation and release serotonin. By recording responses in cells isolated from taste buds and in taste cells in lingual slices to acetic acid titrated to different acid levels (pH), we also show that the active stimulus for acid taste is the membrane-permeant, uncharged acetic acid moiety (CH(3)COOH), not free protons (H(+)). That observation is consistent with the proximate stimulus for acid taste being intracellular acidification, not extracellular protons per se. These findings may also have implications for other sensory receptors that respond to acids, such as nociceptors.

  15. β-catenin is required for taste bud cell renewal and behavioral taste perception in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Millar, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Taste stimuli are transduced by taste buds and transmitted to the brain via afferent gustatory fibers. Renewal of taste receptor cells from actively dividing progenitors is finely tuned to maintain taste sensitivity throughout life. We show that conditional β-catenin deletion in mouse taste progenitors leads to rapid depletion of progenitors and Shh+ precursors, which in turn causes taste bud loss, followed by loss of gustatory nerve fibers. In addition, our data suggest LEF1, TCF7 and Wnt3 are involved in a Wnt pathway regulatory feedback loop that controls taste cell renewal in the circumvallate papilla epithelium. Unexpectedly, taste bud decline is greater in the anterior tongue and palate than in the posterior tongue. Mutant mice with this regional pattern of taste bud loss were unable to discern sweet at any concentration, but could distinguish bitter stimuli, albeit with reduced sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with published reports wherein anterior taste buds have higher sweet sensitivity while posterior taste buds are better tuned to bitter, and suggest β-catenin plays a greater role in renewal of anterior versus posterior taste buds. PMID:28846687

  16. MicroRNA-200b is downregulated in colon cancer budding cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2017-01-01

    Background The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family acts as a major suppressor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Impaired miR-200 expression may lead to EMT initiation and eventually cancer dissemination. The presence of tumor budding cells (TBC) is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis, and molecular similarities to EMT indicate that these cells may reflect ongoing EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of miR-200b in budding cells of colon cancer and the relationship with the EMT-markers E-cadherin, β-catenin and laminin-5γ2. Material & methods MiR-200b was investigated by in situ hybridization in 58 cases of stage II (n = 36) and III colon (n = 22) cancers with tumor budding. Expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin and laminin-5γ2 was examined by immunohistochemistry. A multiplex fluorescence assay combining miR-200b with cytokeratin and laminin-5γ2 was employed on a subset of 16 samples. Results MiR-200b was downregulated in the TBC at the invasive front of 41 out of 58 (71%) cases. The decline was present in both mismatch satellite stable and instable adenocarcinomas. The majority of cases also showed loss of membranous E-cadherin and increased nuclear β-catenin in the TBC, while laminin-5γ2 expression was upregulated at the invasive front and in the tumor buds of approximately half the adenocarcinomas. However, the miR-200b decline was not statistically associated with the expression of any of the EMT-markers. The miR-200b decline was also documented by multiplex fluorescence. Fourteen out of fifteen cases showed a decrease in miR-200b expression in the majority of the TBC, but no obvious relationship between miR-200b and laminin-5γ2 expression was observed. Conclusion: The findings support the assumption of a miR-200b related downregulation in colon cancer budding cells. Whether miR-200b expression may be of clinical significance awaits further studies. PMID:28552992

  17. Tumor budding and E-cadherin expression are useful predictors of nodal involvement in T1 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuo; Ohira, Masaichi; Kubo, Naoshi; Yamashita, Yoshito; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Shibutani, Masatsune; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Nagahara, Hisashi; Amano, Ryosuke; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2013-11-01

    Endoscopic treatment has been increasingly used for T1 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, this therapy is sometimes incomplete if the depth of the T1 primary tumor reaches the muscularis mucosae or submucosal layer because these tumors have a relatively high incidence of lymph node metastasis. However, to our knowledge, no previous reports on the prediction of nodal metastasis determined by evaluating primary tumor specimens of patients with ESCC are available. A total of 55 patients with T1 ESCC invading as deep as the submucosal layer who underwent curative esophagectomy were examined. We investigated the significance of the immunohistochemical staining of Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and E-cadherin in the primary tumor and Tumor budding for prediction of nodal metastasis. Metastasis to the regional lymph nodes was observed in 26 cases (47.3%) in this setting. VEGF-C expression and reduced E-Cadherin expression in the primary tumor was observed in 32 (58.1%) and 38 cases (69.1%), respectively. High-grade tumor budding was observed in 29 cases (52.7%). E-cadherin expression and tumor budding were closely correlated with nodal metastasis (p=0.04 and tumor budding was significantly correlated (ptumor budding and E-cadherin expression for nodal metastasis were 67.3% and 65.4% respectively, comparable with the one of lymphatic involvement (63%). Tumor budding (ptumor budding are observed in primary tumor specimen.

  18. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Colorectal carcinogenesis is believed to be a multi-stage process that originates with a localized adenoma, which linearly progresses to an intra-mucosal carcinoma, to an invasive lesion, and finally to metastatic cancer. This progression model is supported by tissue culture and animal model studies, but it is difficult to reconcile with several well-established observations, principally among these are that up to 25% of early stage (Stage I/II), node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) develop distant metastasis, and that circulating CRC cells are undetectable in peripheral blood samples of up to 50% of patients with confirmed metastasis, but more than 30% of patients with no detectable metastasis exhibit such cells. The mechanism responsible for this diverse behavior is unknown, and there are no effective means to identify patients with pending, or who are at high risk for, developing metastatic CRC. Novel findings: Our previous studies of human breast and prostate cancer have shown that cancer invasion arises from the convergence of a tissue injury, the innate immune response to that injury, and the presence of tumor stem cells within tumor capsules at the site of the injury. Focal degeneration of a capsule due to age or disease attracts lymphocyte infiltration that degrades the degenerating capsules resulting in the formation of a focal disruption in the capsule, which selectively favors proliferating or “budding” of the underlying tumor stem cells. Our recent studies suggest that lymphocyte infiltration also triggers metastasis by disrupting the intercellular junctions and surface adhesion molecules within the proliferating cell buds causing their dissociation. Then, lymphocytes and tumor cells are conjoined through membrane fusion to form tumor-lymphocyte chimeras (TLCs) that allows the tumor stem cell to avail itself of the lymphocyte's natural ability to migrate and breach cell barriers in order to intravasate and to travel to distant organs

  19. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  20. Release of apical dominance in potato tuber is accompanied by programmed cell death in the apical bud meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds.

  1. Calorie restriction-mediated replicative lifespan extension in yeast is non-cell autonomous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chieh Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA, are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell.

  2. Tumor budding as a useful prognostic marker in T1-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Hitoshi; Koike, Masahiko; Tanaka, Chie; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Fujii, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2013-07-01

    Establishing a new prognostic factor for early-stage cancer may seem difficult due to the small number of disease-specific deaths. Tumor budding has been recognized as a useful microscopic finding reflecting biological activity of the tumor. Tumor budding stand for isolated single cancer cells and cell clusters scattered beyond the tumor margin at the invasive front. It was searched for in the resected esophagus with T1 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and the correlation between the tumor budding, patient survival, and various pathologic factors were analyzed to verify whether tumor budding is a prognostic factor in superficial esophageal cancer. Seventy-nine patients undergoing curative esophagectomy were assigned to frequent (n = 29) and rare (n = 50) groups according to the microscopically observed frequency of tumor budding in the tumor. Three-year survival rates after esophagectomy were 48.8% for the frequent group and 94.5% for the rare group. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model identified this morphological variable as a significant independent prognostic factor. Tumor budding reflects the biological activity of the tumor and may be a useful prognostic indicator even in early-stage SCC of esophagus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  4. Cell-autonomous mechanisms of chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arlia-Ciommo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A body of evidence supports the view that the signaling pathways governing cellular aging – as well as mechanisms of their modulation by longevity-extending genetic, dietary and pharmacological interventions - are conserved across species. The scope of this review is to critically analyze recent advances in our understanding of cell-autonomous mechanisms of chronological aging in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on our analysis, we propose a concept of a biomolecular network underlying the chronology of cellular aging in yeast. The concept posits that such network progresses through a series of lifespan checkpoints. At each of these checkpoints, the intracellular concentrations of some key intermediates and products of certain metabolic pathways - as well as the rates of coordinated flow of such metabolites within an intricate network of intercompartmental communications - are monitored by some checkpoint-specific ′′master regulator′′ proteins. The concept envisions that a synergistic action of these master regulator proteins at certain early-life and late-life checkpoints modulates the rates and efficiencies of progression of such processes as cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, stress resistance, macromolecular homeostasis, survival and death. The concept predicts that, by modulating these vital cellular processes throughout lifespan (i.e., prior to an arrest of cell growth and division, and following such arrest, the checkpoint-specific master regulator proteins orchestrate the development and maintenance of a pro- or anti-aging cellular pattern and, thus, define longevity of chronologically aging yeast.

  5. Viruses budding from either the apical or the basolateral plasma membrane domain of MDCK cells have unique phospholipid compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.; Simons, K.

    1982-01-01

    Influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) obtain their lipid envelope by budding through the plasma membrane of infected cells. When monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a polarized epithelial cell line, are infected with fowl plague virus (FPV), an avian influenza virus,

  6. Bone marrow combined with dental bud cells promotes tooth regeneration in miniature pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Min-Huey; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng

    2011-02-01

    Growth factors and morphogens secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) of bone marrow fluid may promote tooth regeneration. Accordingly, a tissue engineering approach was utilized to develop an economical strategy for obtaining the growth factors and morphogens from BMSCs. Unerupted second molar tooth buds harvested from miniature pigs were cultured in vitro to obtain dental bud cells (DBCs). Bone marrow fluid, which contains BMSCs, was collected from the porcine mandible before operation. DBCs suspended in bone marrow fluid were seeded into a gelatin/chondoitin-6-sulfate/hyaluronan tri-copolymer scaffold (GCHT scaffold). The DBCs/bone marrow fluid/GCHT scaffold was autografted into the original alveolar sockets of the pigs. Radiographic and histological examinations were applied to identify the structure of regenerated tooth at 40 weeks postimplantation. The present results showed that one pig developed a complete tooth with crown, root, pulp, enamel, dentin, odontoblast, cementum, blood vessel, and periodontal ligament in indiscriminate shape. Three animals had an unerupted tooth that expressed dentin matrix protein-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and osteopontin; and two other pigs also had dental-like structure with dentin tubules. This study reveals that DBCs adding bone marrow fluid and a suitable scaffold can promote the tooth regeneration in autogenic cell transplantation. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  8. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Baiano, Antonietta; De Gianni, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify...

  9. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shieh, Grace S.

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3\\' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1) marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3), which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  10. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shieh Grace S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1 marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3, which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  11. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  12. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Chen, Katherine C; Baumann, William T; Tyson, John J

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a "standard component" modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with "standard components" can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

  13. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeraphan Laomettachit

    Full Text Available To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a "standard component" modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with "standard components" can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

  14. Molecular profiling of tumour budding implicates TGFβ-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition as a therapeutic target in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Dabelsteen, Erik; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    analysis to demonstrate that the number of tumour buds in cytokeratin-stained sections correlates with patients having lymph node metastases at diagnosis. The tumour bud count was also a predictor of overall survival, independent of TNM stage. Tumour buds and paired central tumour areas were subsequently...... collected from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) specimens using laser capture microdissection and examined with RNA sequencing and miRNA-qPCR arrays. Compared with cells from the central parts of the tumours, budding cells exhibited a particular gene expression signature comprising factors involved....... Moreover, miR-200 family members were downregulated in budding tumour cells. We used immunohistochemistry to validate five markers of the EMT/MET process in 199 OSCC tumours, as well as in situ hybridization in 20 OSCC samples. Given the strong relationship between tumour budding and the development...

  15. Arf3p GTPase is a key regulator of Bud2p activation for invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Lee, Fang-Jen S

    2013-08-01

    The regulation and signaling pathways involved in the invasive growth of yeast have been studied extensively because of their general applicability to fungal pathogenesis. Bud2p, which functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Bud1p/Rsr1p, is required for appropriate budding patterns and filamentous growth. The regulatory mechanisms leading to Bud2p activation, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we report that ADP-ribosylation factor 3p (Arf3p) acts as a regulator of Bud2p activation during invasive growth. Arf3p binds directly to the N-terminal region of Bud2p and promotes its GAP activity both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic analysis shows that deletion of BUD1 suppresses the defect of invasive growth in arf3Δ or budcells. Lack of Arf3p, like that of Bud2p, causes the intracellular accumulation of Bud1p-GTP. The Arf3p-Bud2p interaction is important for invasive growth and facilitates the Bud2p-Bud1p association in vivo. Finally, we show that under glucose depletion-induced invasion conditions in yeast, more Arf3p is activated to the GTP-bound state, and the activation is independent of Arf3p guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Yel1p. Thus we demonstrate that a novel spatial activation of Arf3p plays a role in regulating Bud2p activation during glucose depletion-induced invasive growth.

  16. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs.

  17. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Zhengduo; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs) induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs. PMID:27843459

  18. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Compartmentalization of ER-Bound Chaperone Confines Protein Deposit Formation to the Aging Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikangas, Juha; Caudron, Fabrice; Prasad, Rupali; Moreno, David F; Bolognesi, Alessio; Aldea, Martí; Barral, Yves

    2017-03-20

    In order to produce rejuvenated daughters, dividing budding yeast cells confine aging factors, including protein aggregates, to the aging mother cell. The asymmetric inheritance of these protein deposits is mediated by organelle and cytoskeletal attachment and by cell geometry. Yet it remains unclear how deposit formation is restricted to the aging lineage. Here, we show that selective membrane anchoring and the compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane confine protein deposit formation to aging cells during division. Supporting the idea that the age-dependent deposit forms through coalescence of smaller aggregates, two deposits rapidly merged when placed in the same cell by cell-cell fusion. The deposits localized to the ER membrane, primarily to the nuclear envelope (NE). Strikingly, weakening the diffusion barriers that separate the ER membrane into mother and bud compartments caused premature formation of deposits in the daughter cells. Detachment of the Hsp40 protein Ydj1 from the ER membrane elicited a similar phenotype, suggesting that the diffusion barriers and farnesylated Ydj1 functioned together to confine protein deposit formation to mother cells during division. Accordingly, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements in dividing cells indicated that a slow-diffusing, possibly client-bound Ydj1 fraction was asymmetrically enriched in the mother compartment. This asymmetric distribution depended on Ydj1 farnesylation and intact diffusion barriers. Taking these findings together, we propose that ER-anchored Ydj1 binds deposit precursors and prevents them from spreading into daughter cells during division by subjecting them to the ER diffusion barriers. This ensures that the coalescence of precursors into a single deposit is restricted to the aging lineage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vitro Propagation and Branching Morphogenesis from Single Ureteric Bud Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Yuri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A method to maintain and rebuild ureteric bud (UB-like structures from UB cells in vitro could provide a useful tool for kidney regeneration. We aimed in our present study to establish a serum-free culture system that enables the expansion of UB progenitor cells, i.e., UB tip cells, and reconstruction of UB-like structures. We found that fibroblast growth factors or retinoic acid (RA was sufficient for the survival of UB cells in serum-free condition, while the proliferation and maintenance of UB tip cells required glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor together with signaling from either WNT-β-catenin pathway or RA. The activation of WNT-β-catenin signaling in UB cells by endogenous WNT proteins required R-spondins. Together with Rho kinase inhibitor, our culture system facilitated the expansion of UB tip cells to form UB-like structures from dispersed single cells. The UB-like structures thus formed retained the original UB characteristics and integrated into the native embryonic kidneys.

  1. Bimolecular Complementation to Visualize Filovirus VP40-Host Complexes in Live Mammalian Cells: Toward the Identification of Budding Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virus-host interactions play key roles in promoting efficient egress of many RNA viruses, including Ebola virus (EBOV or “e” and Marburg virus (MARV or “m”. Late- (L- domains conserved in viral matrix proteins recruit specific host proteins, such as Tsg101 and Nedd4, to facilitate the budding process. These interactions serve as attractive targets for the development of broad-spectrum budding inhibitors. A major gap still exists in our understanding of the mechanism of filovirus budding due to the difficulty in detecting virus-host complexes and mapping their trafficking patterns in the natural environment of the cell. To address this gap, we used a bimolecular complementation (BiMC approach to detect, localize, and follow the trafficking patterns of eVP40-Tsg101 complexes in live mammalian cells. In addition, we used the BiMC approach along with a VLP budding assay to test small molecule inhibitors identified by in silico screening for their ability to block eVP40 PTAP-mediated interactions with Tsg101 and subsequent budding of eVP40 VLPs. We demonstrated the potential broad spectrum activity of a lead candidate inhibitor by demonstrating its ability to block PTAP-dependent binding of HIV-1 Gag to Tsg101 and subsequent egress of HIV-1 Gag VLPs.

  2. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...... for treating severe pain. Their study represents a tour de force in the metabolic engineering of yeast, as it involved the expression of genes for more than 20 enzymatic activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. It clearly represents a breakthrough advance for making complex natural products...

  3. Prognostic and predictive factors in gingivo buccal complex squamous cell carcinoma: role of tumor budding and pattern of invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, B V; Augustine, Suni; Selvam, Sumithra; Mohan, A Mathan

    2015-03-01

    Invasive tumor front (ITF) is the deepest three to six cell layers or detached tumor cell groups at the advancing edge of the tumor. Tumor budding is defined as presence of isolated single cells or small cell clusters scattered in the stroma ahead of the ITF and is characteristic of aggressive cancer. It is recognized as an adverse prognostic factor in several human cancers like colorectal, oesophageal, laryngeal cancers and more recently tongue cancers. However, the prognostic value of tumor budding has not been reported in GBCSCC. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of pattern of invasion (POI) at the ITF, Tumor budding and other clinicopathological parameters in predicting nodal metastases and prognosis in GBCSCC. 33 patients with primary GBCSCC were prospectively evaluated at a tertiary care referral centre. Tumor budding and type of POI was examined in detail and data documented. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess the correlation of tumor budding, POI, and other clinicopathologic parameters (stage, grade of the tumor, tumor thickness, PNI, LVI) with nodal metastases and predict prognosis. Cox regression was used for both Univariate and multivariate analysis. Significant predictors of nodal metastases on Univariate analysis were male gender (p = 0.021), smoking (p = 0.046), Tumor budding (p = 0.014) and diffuse infiltrative/worst POI (p = 0.004), where as on multivariate analysis only worst POI was significantly associated with positive lymph nodes (p = 0.004). Presence of nodal metastases (p = 0.01) and tumor thickness >5 mm (p = 0.009) were independent negative prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Significant single risk factor predictive of positive lymph nodes is worst POI in GBCSCC. Nodal metastases and >5 mm tumor thickness are independent risk factors for disease free survival.

  4. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna Marla K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Results Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. Conclusions p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia

  5. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Theresa A; Smith Adams, Lorraine B; Moore, Preston D; Perna, Marla K; Sword, Jarrod D; Defoe, Dennis M

    2011-04-20

    Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia and tissue disruption seen in certain developing p27Kip1

  6. Mechanical feedback coordinates cell wall expansion and assembly in yeast mating morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The shaping of individual cells requires a tight coordination of cell mechanics and growth. However, it is unclear how information about the mechanical state of the wall is relayed to the molecular processes building it, thereby enabling the coordination of cell wall expansion and assembly during morphogenesis. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, we show that a mechanical feedback coordinating cell wall assembly and expansion is essential to sustain mating projection growth in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our theoretical results indicate that the mechanical feedback provided by the Cell Wall Integrity pathway, with cell wall stress sensors Wsc1 and Mid2 increasingly activating membrane-localized cell wall synthases Fks1/2 upon faster cell wall expansion, stabilizes mating projection growth without affecting cell shape. Experimental perturbation of the osmotic pressure and cell wall mechanics, as well as compromising the mechanical feedback through genetic deletion of the stress sensors, leads to cellular phenotypes that support the theoretical predictions. Our results indicate that while the existence of mechanical feedback is essential to stabilize mating projection growth, the shape and size of the cell are insensitive to the feedback. PMID:29346368

  7. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  8. Osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from dental bud: Role of integrins and cadherins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Posa, Francesca; Ballini, Andrea; Grassi, Felice Roberto; Colaianni, Graziana; Colucci, Silvia; Rossi, Enzo; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Grano, Maria; Mori, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have reported the beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tissue repair and regeneration. New sources of stem cells in adult organisms are continuously emerging; dental tissues have been identified as a source of postnatal MSCs. Dental bud is the immature precursor of the tooth, is easy to access and we show in this study that it can yield a high number of cells with ≥95% expression of mesenchymal stemness makers and osteogenic capacity. Thus, these cells can be defined as Dental Bud Stem Cells (DBSCs) representing a promising source for bone regeneration of stomatognathic as well as other systems. Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and neighboring cells are critical for tissue morphogenesis and architecture; such interactions are mediated by integrins and cadherins respectively. We characterized DBSCs for the expression of these adhesion receptors and examined their pattern during osteogenic differentiation. Our data indicate that N-cadherin and cadherin-11 were expressed in undifferentiated DBSCs and their expression underwent changes during the osteogenic process (decreasing and increasing respectively), while expression of E-cadherin and P-cadherin was very low in DBSCs and did not change during the differentiation steps. Such expression pattern reflected the mesenchymal origin of DBSCs and confirmed their osteoblast-like features. On the other hand, osteogenic stimulation induced the upregulation of single subunits, αV, β3, α5, and the formation of integrin receptors α5β1 and αVβ3. DBSCs differentiation toward osteoblastic lineage was enhanced when cells were grown on fibronectin (FN), vitronectin (VTN), and osteopontin (OPN), ECM glycoproteins which contain an integrin-binding sequence, the RGD motif. In addition we established that integrin αVβ3 plays a crucial role during the commitment of MSCs to osteoblast lineage, whereas integrin α5β1 seems to be dispensable. These data suggest that

  9. The neuropeptides CCK and NPY and the changing view of cell-to-cell communication in the taste bud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herness, Scott; Zhao, Fang-Li

    2009-07-14

    The evolving view of the taste bud increasingly suggests that it operates as a complex signal processing unit. A number of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors are now known to be expressed in subsets of taste receptor cells in the mammalian bud. These expression patterns set up hard-wired cell-to-cell communication pathways whose exact physiological roles still remain obscure. As occurs in other cellular systems, it is likely that neuropeptides are co-expressed with neurotransmitters and function as neuromodulators. Several neuropeptides have been identified in taste receptor cells including cholecystokinin (CCK), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Of these, CCK and NPY are the best studied. These two peptides are co-expressed in the same presynaptic cells; however, their postsynaptic actions are both divergent and antagonistic. CCK and its receptor, the CCK-1 subtype, are expressed in the same subset of taste receptor cells and the autocrine activation of these cells produces a number of excitatory physiological actions. Further, most of these cells are responsive to bitter stimuli. On the other hand, NPY and its receptor, the NPY-1 subtype, are expressed in different cells. NPY, acting in a paracrine fashion on NPY-1 receptors, results in inhibitory actions on the cell. Preliminary evidence suggests the NPY-1 receptor expressing cell co-expresses T1R3, a member of the T1R family of G-protein coupled receptors thought to be important in detection of sweet and umami stimuli. Thus the neuropeptide expressing cells co-express CCK, NPY, and CCK-1 receptor. Neuropeptides released from these cells during bitter stimulation may work in concert to both modulate the excitation of bitter-sensitive taste receptor cells while concurrently inhibiting sweet-sensitive cells. This modulatory process is similar to the phenomenon of lateral inhibition that occurs in other sensory systems.

  10. Sustained glycolytic oscillations in individual isolated yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Anna-Karin; van Niekerk, David D; Adiels, Caroline B; du Preez, Franco B; Goksör, Mattias; Snoep, Jacky L

    2012-08-01

    Yeast glycolytic oscillations have been studied since the 1950s in cell-free extracts and intact cells. For intact cells, sustained oscillations have so far only been observed at the population level, i.e. for synchronized cultures at high biomass concentrations. Using optical tweezers to position yeast cells in a microfluidic chamber, we were able to observe sustained oscillations in individual isolated cells. Using a detailed kinetic model for the cellular reactions, we simulated the heterogeneity in the response of the individual cells, assuming small differences in a single internal parameter. This is the first time that sustained limit-cycle oscillations have been demonstrated in isolated yeast cells. The mathematical model described here has been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database and can be accessed at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/database/gustavsson/index.html free of charge. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  11. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didac Carmona-Gutierrez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing. Here, we propose unified criteria for the definition of accidental, regulated, and programmed forms of cell death in yeast based on a series of morphological and biochemical criteria. Specifically, we provide consensus guidelines on the differential definition of terms including apoptosis, regulated necrosis, and autophagic cell death, as we refer to additional cell death routines that are relevant for the biology of (at least some species of yeast. As this area of investigation advances rapidly, changes and extensions to this set of recommendations will be implemented in the years to come. Nonetheless, we strongly encourage the authors, reviewers and editors of scientific articles to adopt these collective standards in order to establish an accurate framework for yeast cell death research and, ultimately, to accelerate the progress of this vibrant field of research.

  12. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure and Function of the Ankyrin Repeats in the SWi4/SWi6 Transcription Complex of Budding Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breeden, Linda

    1997-01-01

    .... These include Bcl-3, int-3, TAN-i, and pi6. The BCL-3 gene encodes a member of the I kappa B family of proteins and rearrangements involving the ankyrin repeat region BCL-3 have been identified in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemias (14...

  14. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Tomoyuki; Yang, Soo-Jung; Ohno, Sho; Honda, Keita; Deguchi, Ayumi; Doi, Motoaki; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars "Kaname," "Concord," and "Monique" were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3', 5' hydroxylase (SiF3'5'H), WDR1 (SiWDR1), or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H), respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using "Kaname," all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used "Concrd" and "Monique" from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of "Kaname." On the other hand, in "Concord" and "Monique," the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from "Concord" and "Monique" were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which striped flower-colored plants the same as

  15. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nabeshima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars “Kaname,” “Concord,” and “Monique” were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3′, 5′ hydroxylase (SiF3′5′H, WDR1 (SiWDR1, or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H, respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using “Kaname,” all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used “Concrd” and “Monique” from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of “Kaname.” On the other hand, in “Concord” and “Monique,” the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from “Concord” and “Monique” were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity

  16. Tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules: a common pathway for all breast cancer subtype derived invasion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically and immnohistochemically distinct subtypes with substantially different prognoses. Our recent studies have suggested that all breast cancer subtypes, however, may share a common pathway, tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules, for their invasion. The potential mechanisms and clinical implications of our observations are discussed.

  17. Isolation and characterization of embryonic ameloblast lineage cells derived from tooth buds of fetal miniature swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Taka; Tominaga, Noriko; Toyomura, Junko; Tachibana, Toshiaki; Ide, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Dental enamel formation, known as "amelogenesis," is initiated by cytodifferentiation of the ectodermally derived dental epithelium. Enamel cannot regenerate itself because once it is completely formed, ameloblasts are lost as the tooth erupts. Rodent teeth have been useful for studying the mechanisms of amelogenesis because ameloblast cell lines can be derived from the ever-growing incisors. However, higher mammals such as humans have no growing teeth, and cell lines derived from larger animals that are more similar to humans are required for higher fidelity studies. Here, we isolated embryonic enamel epithelium-derived epithelial cells from fetal swine. The explant culture of the developing deciduous molars that had been removed from the dental papilla-derived mesenchymal tissue and cells inside the tooth buds provided the epithelial cell population for the primary culture. To isolate the cell population, we performed a unique cell isolation technique called cell fishing. The isolated cells showed clear embryonic-stage ameloblast characteristics with appropriate gene/protein expressions of enamel matrix and proteinases, abundant glycogen pools, and secretory granular materials. They could be continuously subcultured several times and are presently being maintained. This cell population will facilitate the establishment of a stable cell line and allow us to characterize the definitive phenotype and functional behavior of porcine ameloblasts, which, in turn, promises to yield useful and practical findings that are more relevant than those provided by rodent studies. Finally, analysis of in vitro enamel formation will be important for engineering "bio-enamel" as a new dental therapy to restore enamel defects.

  18. ESCRT-independent budding of HIV-1 gag virus-like particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Norgan

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression of HIV-1 Gag in a variety of host cells results in its packaging into virus-like particles (VLPs that are subsequently released into the extracellular milieu. This phenomenon represents a useful tool for probing cellular factors required for viral budding and has contributed to the discovery of roles for ubiquitin ligases and the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs in viral budding. These factors are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and have been studied extensively in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryote previously utilized as a host for the production of VLPs. We used heterologous expression of HIV Gag in yeast spheroplasts to examine the role of ESCRTs and associated factors (Rsp5, a HECT ubiquitin ligase of the Nedd4 family; Bro1, a homolog of Alix; and Vps4, the AAA-ATPase required for ESCRT function in all contexts/organisms investigated in the generation of VLPs. Our data reveal: 1 characterized Gag-ESCRT interaction motifs (late domains are not required for VLP budding, 2 loss of function alleles of the essential HECT ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 do not display defects in VLP formation, and 3 ESCRT function is not required for VLP formation from spheroplasts. These results suggest that the egress of HIV Gag from yeast cells is distinct from the most commonly described mode of exit from mammalian cells, instead mimicking ESCRT-independent VLP formation observed in a subset of mammalian cells. As such, budding of Gag from yeast cells appears to represent ESCRT-independent budding relevant to viral replication in at least some situations. Thus the myriad of genetic and biochemical tools available in the yeast system may be of utility in the study of this aspect of viral budding.

  19. Dual regulation by pairs of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and histone deacetylases controls G1 transcription in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Huang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available START-dependent transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two transcription factors SBF and MBF, whose activity is controlled by the binding of the repressor Whi5. Phosphorylation and removal of Whi5 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK Cln3-Cdc28 alleviates the Whi5-dependent repression on SBF and MBF, initiating entry into a new cell cycle. This Whi5-SBF/MBF transcriptional circuit is analogous to the regulatory pathway in mammalian cells that features the E2F family of G1 transcription factors and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb. Here we describe genetic and biochemical evidence for the involvement of another CDK, Pcl-Pho85, in regulating G1 transcription, via phosphorylation and inhibition of Whi5. We show that a strain deleted for both PHO85 and CLN3 has a slow growth phenotype, a G1 delay, and is severely compromised for SBF-dependent reporter gene expression, yet all of these defects are alleviated by deletion of WHI5. Our biochemical and genetic tests suggest Whi5 mediates repression in part through interaction with two histone deacetylases (HDACs, Hos3 and Rpd3. In a manner analogous to cyclin D/CDK4/6, which phosphorylates Rb in mammalian cells disrupting its association with HDACs, phosphorylation by the early G1 CDKs Cln3-Cdc28 and Pcl9-Pho85 inhibits association of Whi5 with the HDACs. Contributions from multiple CDKs may provide the precision and accuracy necessary to activate G1 transcription when both internal and external cues are optimal.

  20. The role of mitochondria in yeast programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta eGuaragnella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian apoptosis and yeast programmed cell death (PCD share a variety of features including ROS production, protease activity and a major role played by mitochondria. In view of this, and of the distinctive characteristics differentiating yeast and multicellular organism PCD, the mitochondrial contribution to cell death in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively investigated. In this mini-review we report whether and how yeast mitochondrial function and proteins belonging to oxidative phosphorylation, protein trafficking into and out of mitochondria, and mitochondrial dynamics, play a role in PCD. Since in PCD many processes take place over time, emphasis will be placed on an experimental model based on acetic acid induced PCD (AA-PCD which has the unique feature of having been investigated as a function of time. As will be described there are at least two AA-PCD pathways each with a multifaceted role played by mitochondrial components, in particular by cytochrome c.

  1. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; van der Wielen, L.A.M.; van Dedem, G.W.K.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Gulik, W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the design, modelling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the permittivity of

  2. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachnined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert; Li, X.; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; van der Wielen, L.A.M.; van Dedem, G.W.K.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Gulik, W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the characteristic

  3. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations. The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses. All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive

  4. A Grading System Combining Tumor Budding and Nuclear Diameter Predicts Prognosis in Resected Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Kyuichi; Miyai, Yumi; Katsuki, Naomi; Kushida, Yoshio; Matsunaga, Toru; Okuda, Masaya; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Haba, Reiji

    2017-06-01

    For lung squamous cell carcinomas, there are no histologic findings that have been universally accepted as prognostic factors. Tumor budding and nuclear grade have been recognized as prognostic factors in other carcinomas. In this study, we investigated whether pathologic findings could determine clinical outcome in Japanese patients with lung squamous cell carcinomas. Tumor slides from surgically resected lung squamous cell carcinomas (1999 to 2012) were reviewed (n=216). Tumors were evaluated for histologic subtypes, differentiation, tumor budding, nuclear diameter, and mitosis. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the log-rank test and the Cox proportional hazards model. Tumor budding and large nuclei were independent prognostic factors of a worse RFS (P<0.001 and P=0.002, respectively) and a worse OS (P<0.001 and P=0.038, respectively) on multivariate analysis after adjustment for pathologic stage and lymphatic invasion. However, histologic subtypes, differentiation, and mitotic count did not correlate with prognosis. A grading system combining tumor budding and nuclear diameter was an independent prognostic factors of a worse RFS (grade 2 vs. 1, hazard ratio [HR]=2.91; P<0.001, and grade 3 vs. 1, HR=7.60, P<0.001) and a worse OS (grade 2 vs. 1, HR=2.15; P=0.014, and grade 3 vs. 1, HR=4.54, P<0.001). We found that a grading system combining tumor budding and nuclear diameter was a significant prognostic factor among Japanese patients with resected lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  5. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Laminin-5 gamma 2 chain expression is associated with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon Junior, Helvécio; Rocha, Valéria Nazaré; Leite, Camila Ferreira; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2014-03-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. Laminin-5 gamma 2 chain (laminin-5 γ2) is a protein associated to a migratory phenotype in epithelial neoplastic cells. Stromal myofibroblasts also play a significant role in tumor invasion, due to its ability to modify the extracellular matrix. Tumor budding is a morphologic marker of tumor invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of laminin-5 γ2 in OSCC and its association with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts. Paraffin-embedded archival samples of 57 OSCC patients were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry was employed to detect laminin-5 γ2, alpha smooth muscle actin (marker of stromal myofibroblasts), and multicytokeratin (to identify OSCC cells in tumor budding evaluation). Laminin-5 γ2 expression and its association with intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts were analyzed. Association among intensity of tumor budding and density of stromal myofibroblasts was also evaluated. Higher laminin-5 γ2 expression was associated with high-intensity tumor budding (P tumor budding was associated with higher density of stromal myofibroblasts (P tumor budding and with higher density of stromal myofibroblasts, suggesting that this expression is related to the establishment of an invasive phenotype of neoplastic cells and a permissive environment for tumor invasion in this neoplasia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system.

  8. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Biomimetic Yeast Cell Typing—Application of QCMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Artificial antibodies represent a key factor in the generation of sensing systems for the selective detection of bioanalytes of variable sizes. With biomimetic surfaces, the important model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several of its growth stages may be detected. Quartz crystal microbalances (QCM with 10 MHz fundamental frequency and coated with polymers imprinted with synchronized yeast cells are presented, which are able to detect duplex cells with high selectivity. Furthermore, a multichannel quartz crystal microbalance (MQCM was designed and optimized for the measurement in liquids. This one-chip system based on four-electrode geometry allows the simultaneous detection of four analytes and, thus, provides a monitoring system for biotechnology and process control. For further standardization of the method, synthetic stamps containing plastic yeast cells in different growth stages were produced and utilized for imprinting. Mass-sensitive measurements with such MIPs resulted in the same sensor characteristics as obtained for those imprinted with native yeast cells.

  10. Apn1 and Apn2 endonucleases prevent accumulation of repair-associated DNA breaks in budding yeast as revealed by direct chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenjian; Resnick, Michael A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2008-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) provides relief from many DNA lesions. While BER enzymes have been characterized biochemically, BER functions within cells are much less understood, in part because replication bypass and double-strand break (DSB) repair can also impact resistance to base damage. To investigate BER in vivo, we examined the repair of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induced DNA damage in haploid G1 yeast cells, so that replication bypass and recombinational DSB repair cannot occur. Based on the heat-lability of MMS-induced base damage, an assay was developed that monitors secondary breaks in full-length yeast chromosomes where closely spaced breaks yield DSBs that are observed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The assay detects damaged bases and abasic (AP) sites as heat-dependent breaks as well as intermediate heat-independent breaks that arise during BER. Using a circular chromosome, lesion frequency and repair kinetics could be easily determined. Monitoring BER in single and multiple glycosylase and AP-endonuclease mutants confirmed that Mag1 is the major enzyme that removes MMS-damaged bases. This approach provided direct physical evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 not only repair cellular base damage but also prevent break accumulation that can result from AP sites being channeled into other BER pathway(s).

  11. Ammonium is toxic for aging yeast cells, inducing death and shortening of the chronological lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Santos

    Full Text Available Here we show that in aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast cells, NH(4 (+ induces cell death associated with shortening of chronological life span. This effect is positively correlated with the concentration of NH(4 (+ added to the culture medium and is particularly evident when cells are starved for auxotrophy-complementing amino acids. NH(4 (+-induced cell death is accompanied by an initial small increase of apoptotic cells followed by extensive necrosis. Autophagy is inhibited by NH(4 (+, but this does not cause a decrease in cell viability. We propose that the toxic effects of NH(4 (+ are mediated by activation of PKA and TOR and inhibition of Sch9p. Our data show that NH(4 (+ induces cell death in aging cultures through the regulation of evolutionary conserved pathways. They may also provide new insights into longevity regulation in multicellular organisms and increase our understanding of human disorders such as hyperammonemia as well as effects of amino acid deprivation employed as a therapeutic strategy.

  12. Biocavity laser spectroscopy of genetically altered yeast cells and isolated yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Copeland, R. Guild; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    We report an analysis of 2 yeast cell mutants using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The two yeast strains differed only by the presence or absence of mitochondrial DNA. Strain 104 is a wild-type (ρ +) strain of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strain 110 was derived from strain 104 by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Removal of mtDNA causes strain 110 to grow as a "petite" (ρ -), named because it forms small colonies (of fewer cells because it grows more slowly) on agar plates supplemented with a variety of different carbon sources. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack the normal respiratory chain complexes I, III, IV, and V. Complex II is preserved because its subunits are encoded by genes located in nuclear DNA. The frequency distributions of the peak shifts produced by wild-type and petite cells and mitochondria show striking differences in the symmetry and patterns of the distributions. Wild-type ρ + cells (104) and mitochondria produced nearly symmetric, Gaussian distributions. The ρ - cells (110) and mitochondria showed striking asymmetry and skew that appeared to follow a Poisson distribution.

  13. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Sociobiology of the budding yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-15

    Mar 15, 2014 ... distinct population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in New Zealand: evidence for local dispersal by insects and human-aided global dispersal in oak barrels. Environ. Microbiol. 12 63–73. Goffeau A, Barrell BG, Bussey H, et al. 1996 Life with 6000 genes. Science 274 546- 567. Gomes DS, Pereira MD, Panek ...

  15. Damage of yeast cells induced by pulsed light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kazuko; Shibato, Junko; Sameshima, Takashi; Fukunaga, Sakae; Isobe, Seiichiro; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-08-15

    DNA damage, such as formation of single strand breaks and pyrimidine dimers was induced in yeast cells after irradiation by pulsed light, which were essentially the same as observed with continuous ultraviolet (UV) light. The UV-induced DNA damage is slightly higher than seen with pulsed light. However, increased concentration of eluted protein and structural change in the irradiated yeast cells were observed only in the case of pulsed light. A difference in the inactivation effect between pulsed light and UV light was found and this suggested cell membrane damage induced by pulsed light irradiation. It is proposed that pulsed light can be used as an effective sterilizing method for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  16. Inhibitory components from the buds of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) on melanin formation in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Matsubara, Eri; Kusuma, Irawan Wijaya; Sukaton, Edi; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2011-03-01

    In the course to find a new whitening agent, we evaluated the methanol extract from bud of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) on melanin formation in B16 melanoma cells. Eugenol and eugenol acetate were isolated as the active compounds and showed melanin inhibition of 60% and 40% in B16 melanoma cell with less cytotoxicity at the concentration of 100 and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, an essential oil prepared from the bud of clove, which contain eugenol and eugenol acetate as dominant components, showed melanin inhibition of 50% and 80% in B16 melanoma cells at the concentration of 100 and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor budding correlates with occult cervical lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in clinical early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nan; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Xiqiang; Li, Ruyao; Hou, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaohua; Huang, Hongzhang

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding has been suggested to be a prognostic factor in various human cancers. However, the prognostic value of tumor budding for early-stage (cT1/2N0) tongue squamous cell carcinoma remains inconclusive. This study analyzed the correlation of tumor budding with the clinicopathologic features, and its prognostic significance for cT1/2N0 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma. One hundred and ninety-five patients with T1/2 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma enrolled in the retrospective study. Tumor invasive depth, the intensity of tumor budding, and other clinicopathological features were reviewed. Overall survivals were evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier method. For multivariable analysis, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were performed. The frequency of tumor buds in tongue squamous cell carcinoma is about 85.6% in this study. The intensity of tumor budding showed strong correlations with occult lymph node metastasis (P tumor budding and deeper invasive depth correlated with reduced overall survival. Cox's regression models proved tumor budding to be an independent prognostic factor in clinical early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor local relapses were also a predictor of tongue squamous cell carcinoma progression. Tumor budding is a frequent event in tongue squamous cell carcinoma. It independently predicted prognosis of patients with T1/2 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma and may be used for routing pathological diagnosis and the decision of elective lymph node dissection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Rapid identification of mRNA processing defects with a novel single-cell yeast reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Matthew R; Stevens, Scott W

    2014-05-01

    It has become increasingly evident that gene expression processes in eukaryotes involve communication and coordination between many complex, independent macromolecular machines. To query these processes and to explore the potential relationships between them in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we designed a versatile reporter using multicolor high-throughput flow cytometry. Due to its design, this single reporter exhibits a distinctive signature for many defects in gene expression including transcription, histone modification, pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export, nonsense-mediated decay, and mRNA degradation. Analysis of the reporter in 4967 nonessential yeast genes revealed striking phenotypic overlaps between chromatin remodeling, histone modification, and pre-mRNA splicing. Additionally, we developed a copper-inducible reporter, with which we demonstrate that 5-fluorouracil mimics the mRNA decay phenotype of cells lacking the 3'-5' exonuclease Rrp6p. Our reporter is capable of performing high-throughput, rapid, and large-scale screens to identify and characterize genetic and chemical perturbations of the major eukaryotic gene expression processes.

  19. In Situ Assays of Chemotropism During Yeast Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David E; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all eukaryotic cells can grow in a polarized fashion in response to external signals. Cells can respond to gradients of chemoattractants or chemorepellents by directional growth, a process referred to as chemotropism. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes chemotropic growth during mating, in which two haploid cells of opposite mating type grow towards one another. Mating pheromone gradients are essential for efficient mating in yeast and different yeast mutants are defective in chemotropism. Two methods of assessing the ability of yeast strains to respond to pheromone gradients are presented here.

  20. Tumor budding is an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: a single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Ibu; Warigaya, Kenji; Iwahashi, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Murata, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    Although tumor budding is acknowledged as a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in certain types of carcinoma, it is not well investigated in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). In this study, we analyzed the correlation between tumor budding and nodal metastasis in cutaneous SCC. Histopathologic specimens of 15 metastasizing and 144 non-metastasizing cutaneous SCC were retrospectively reviewed. Cut-off point for tumor budding was determined at five or more foci of an isolated cancer cell or a cluster comprising tumor under hematoxylin and eosin sections. Tumor budding was positive in 93.3% of metastasizing cutaneous SCC and 25.7% of non-metastasizing cutaneous SCC, respectively (p tumor budding was an independent risk factor for nodal metastasis among the other risk factors (tumor size, tumor thickness, Clark level and poor differentiation) (p = 0.0021). In combination with tumor thickness >4 mm, tumor budding became a better marker for predicting nodal metastasis (sensitivity 93.3%, specificity 84.7%). In our cohort, tumor budding was an independent risk factor for nodal metastasis. Our data suggests the promising role of tumor budding in risk evaluation of cutaneous SCC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tumor budding and laminin5-γ2 in squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal are associated with shorter survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Yasuko; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Sueta, Takayuki; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakagawa, Takashi; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) is rare, usually presents at an advanced stage, and is a more aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. The University of Pittsburgh TNM staging system commonly used in prognostication is not perfect, and more accurate biomarkers predicting prognosis are needed. Tumor budding is an established negative prognostic factor at the invasive front in colorectal cancer. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies showed that laminin 5-γ2 (Ln5-γ2) is expressed at the invasive front in tumor or tumor budding cells. We assessed the prognostic significance of tumor budding and Ln5-γ2 expression by performing Ln5-γ2 immunohistochemistry and evaluated the degree of tumor budding in pre-treatment biopsy specimens, and investigated their correlations to clinicopathological parameters in patients with SCC of the EAC. Patients whose tumors had high budding grade and Ln5-γ2 expression had significantly shorter survival times. Budding grade was significantly correlated with Ln5-γ2 expression. Multivariate analysis revealed that high budding grade predicted poorer prognosis regardless of disease stage. Our results suggested that budding grade and Ln5-γ2 expression can be used as indicators of poor prognosis in patients with SCC of the EAC.

  2. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-02

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  3. Measurement of Electromagnetic Activity of Yeast Cells at 42 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ponsonnet

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the possibility of using a device composed of a resonant cavity, preamplifiers, and a spectrum analyzer to detect electromagnetic emission of yeast cells at a frequency of about 42 GHz. Measurement in this frequency range is based on the Frohlich's postulate of coherent polar oscillations as a fundamental biophysical property of biological systems and on the experiments of Grundler and Keilmann who disclosed effects of exposure to the electromagnetic field at 42 GHz on the growth rate of yeast cells. This article includes a detailed description of the laboratory equipment and the methods used to evaluate the obtained results.

  4. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation...... the extracellular medium, thus reducing the complexity of the problem without sacrificing the biochemical realism. The parameters of the model can be derived by a systematic expansion from any full-scale model of the yeast cell kinetics with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Some parameter values can also...

  5. [Electron microscopic study of the penetration and distribution of somitic cells in the mesoblast of the limb buds of reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-09-29

    Based on characteristics of mitochondria and on the amount of lipid inclusions, a distinction between somitic cells and mesoblastic somatopleural cells is possible, at the early stages of the development of the limb bud in Reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis). The dislocation of the ventral processes of the somites and the localisation of the somitic cells in the mesoblast of the anterior limb buds could be studied.

  6. Nonlinear Dielectric Properties of Yeast Cells Cultured in Different Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Gomon; Fukuda, Naoki; Muraji, Masafumi

    The harmonics of the electric current through yeast suspensions, the nonlinear dielectric properties of yeast cells, have particular patterns according to the biological activity of the cells and the measurement of these patterns is a technique for determining the activity of living cells. The concentration of glucose and oxygen in yeast culture medium influences the manifestation of fermentation or respiration of yeast cells. Measurements were made with yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultured aerobically and anaerobically in sufficient glucose concentration, aerobic fermentation and anaerobic fermentation, and aerobically in limited glucose concentration, respiration. The results showed that the harmonics were barely apparent for yeast cells in aerobic fermentation and respiratory; however, cells in the anaerobic fermentation displayed substantial third and fifth harmonics. We can say that environmental condition affects the yeast cells' nonlinear properties, from another viewpoint, the measurements of the nonlinear properties are available to determine the activity of yeast cells adjusted to the conditions of their cultivation.

  7. Binding mechanism of patulin to heat-treated yeast cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Yuan, Y; Yue, T; Hatab, S; Wang, Z

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to assess the removal mechanism of patulin using heat-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and identify the role of different cell wall components in the binding process. In order to understand the binding mechanism, viable cells, heat-treated cells, cell wall and intracellular extract were performed to assess their ability to remove patulin. Additionally, the effects of chemical and enzymatic treatments of yeast on the binding ability were tested. The results showed that there was no significant difference between viable (53·28%) and heat-treated yeast cells (51·71%) in patulin binding. In addition, the cell wall fraction decreased patulin by 35·05%, and the cell extract nearly failed to bind patulin. Treatments with protease E, methanol, formaldehyde, periodate or urea significantly decreased (P patulin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that more functional groups were involved in the binding process of heat-treated cells. Polysaccharides and protein are important components of yeast cell wall involved in patulin removal. In addition, hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding processes. Heat-treated S. cerevisiae cells could be used to control patulin contamination in the apple juice industry. Also, our results proof that the patulin removal process is based mainly on the adsorption not degradation. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna Miles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF, which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state.

  9. Relationship of actin and tubulin distribution to bud growth in wild- type and morphogenetic-mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of actin in wild-type cells and in morphogenetic mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was explored by staining cells with fluorochrome-labeled phallotoxins after fixing and permeabilizing the cells by several methods. The actin appeared to be localized in a set of cortical spots or patches, as well as in a network of cytoplasmic fibers. Bundles of filaments that may possibly correspond to the fibers visualized by fluorescence were observed with the electron microscope. The putative actin spots were concentrated in small and medium-sized buds and at what were apparently the sites of incipient bud formation on unbudded cells, whereas the putative actin fibers were generally oriented along the long axes of the mother-bud pairs. In several morphogenetic mutants that form multiple, abnormally elongated buds, the actin patches were conspicuously clustered at the tips of most buds, and actin fibers were clearly oriented along the long axes of the buds. There was a strong correlation between the occurrence of active growth at particular bud tips and clustering of actin spots at those same tips. Near the end of the cell cycle in wild- type cells, actin appeared to concentrate (as a cluster of spots or a band) in the neck region connecting the mother cell to its bud. Observations made using indirect immunofluorescence with a monoclonal anti-yeast-tubulin antibody on the morphogenetic mutant cdc4 (which forms multiple, abnormally elongated buds while the nuclear cycle is arrested) revealed the surprising occurrence of multiple bundles of cytoplasmic microtubules emanating from the one duplicated spindle-pole body per cell. It seems that most or all of the buds contain one or more of these bundles of microtubules, which often can be seen to extend to the very tips of the buds. These observations are consistent with the hypotheses that actin, tubulin, or both may be involved in the polarization of growth and localization of cell-wall deposition

  10. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in isonitrogenous feed formulations (30% protein) in the diet of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings for a period of 12 weeks. The control diet had fishmeal as the primary protein ...

  11. The impact of metabolism on aging and cell size in single yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to determine how metabolism affects yeast aging in single yeast cells using a novel microfluidic device. We first review how cells are able to sense nutrients in their environment and then describe the use of the microfluidic dissection platform that greatly improves our

  12. ESCRT components regulate the expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 through the Rim101/Nrg1 pathway in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunying; Du, Jingcai; Xiong, Bing; Xu, Huihui; Jiang, Linghuo

    2013-10-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) complexes function to form multivesicular bodies for sorting of proteins destined for the yeast vacuole or the mammalian lysosome. ESCRT components are well conserved in eukaryotes, and their mutations cause neurodegenerative diseases and other cellular pathologies in humans. PMR1 is the orthologous gene of two human genes for calcium pumps secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase (SPCA1, ATP2C1) and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA, ATP2A2), which are mutated in Hailey-Hailey and Darier genetic diseases, respectively. Here we show that deletion mutation of ESCRT components Snf7, Snf8, Stp22, Vps20, Vps25, Vps28, or Vps36 activates the calcium/calcineurin signaling in yeast cells, but surprisingly leads to a nearly 50% reduction in expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 independent of calcium stress. These ESCRT mutants are known to have a defect in Rim101 activation. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101 or further deletion of NRG1 in these mutants partially suppresses their calcium hypersensitivity. Deletion of NRG1 also completely rescues the expression of PMR1 in these mutants to the level of the wild type. Promoter mutagenesis, gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrate that Nrg1 binds to two motifs in the PMR1 promoter. In addition, expression of PMR1 under the control of its promoters with mutated Nrg1-binding motifs suppresses the calcium hypersensitivity of these ESCRT mutants. Collectively, these data have uncovered a function of ESCRT components in regulating PMR1 expression through the Nrg1/Rim101 pathway. Our findings provide important clues for understanding human diseases related to calcium homeostasis.

  13. A Novel Grading System Based on Tumor Budding and Cell Nest Size Is a Strong Predictor of Patient Outcome in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesinghaus, Moritz; Boxberg, Melanie; Konukiewitz, Björn; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Schlitter, Anna M; Steiger, Katja; Specht, Katja; Wieczorek, Kathrin; Warth, Arne; Schmidt, Thomas; Hartmann, Arndt; Demir, Ihsan E; Feith, Markus; Ott, Katja; Weichert, Wilko

    2017-08-01

    The determination of prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is primarily based on staging according to the TNM-classification, whereas conventional grading is of minor clinical importance because of its deficiencies in prognostic patient stratification. Recently, a novel, highly prognostic grading scheme based on budding activity and cell nest size has been proposed for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of both pulmonary as well as oral origin. In order to investigate the utility and transferability of this approach to ESCC, we evaluated budding activity and cell nest size, as well as other histomorphologic characteristics, in a cohort of 135 primarily resected tumors and correlated the results with clinicopathologic and outcome parameters. High budding activity and small cell nest size showed a strong association with reduced overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survival (Ptumor budding and cell nest size as excellent outcome predictors in ESCC and validate the utility of a previously established grading scheme proposed for oral and pulmonary SCC in this tumor entity. Ultimately, these combined efforts may result in a universal grading system for SCC regardless of the site of origin.

  14. Sorption of volatile phenols by yeast cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerea Jiménez-Moreno, Carmen Ancín-AzpilicuetaDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Yeast walls can retain different wine compounds and so its use is interesting in order to eliminate harmful substances from the must which affect alcoholic fermentation (medium chain fatty acids or which affect wine quality in a negative way (ethyl phenols, ochratoxin A. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of commercial yeast cell walls in eliminating volatile phenols (4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol from a synthetic wine that contained 1 mg/L of each one of these compounds. The binding of these compounds to the wall was quite fast which would seem to indicate that the yeast wall-volatile compound union is produced in the outer surface layers of this enological additive. The cell walls used reduced the concentration of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, although it would seem that on modifying the matrix of the wine the number of free binding sites on the walls is also modified.Keywords: volatile phenols, yeast cell walls, wine, sorption

  15. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila M. de Sousa; Martins, Estefania Mara Nascimento; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maressend@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log{sub 10} cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  16. Isolation of two cell populations from yeast during high-level alcoholic fermentation that resemble quiescent and nonquiescent cells from the stationary phase on glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbadis, Laurent; Cot, Marlène; Rigoulet, Michel; Francois, Jean

    2009-12-01

    High-level production of bioethanol (140 g L(-1) in 45 h) in aerated fed-batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to be linked to the length of a production phase uncoupled to the growth. The induction of this phase was characterized by metabolic and morphologic changes reminiscent of those occurring in the stationary phase of growth on glucose. Global transcriptomic analysis of ethanol-stressed yeast cells in the uncoupling phase harboured features similar to those from stationary-phase cells on glucose. Two distinct cellular populations were isolated by Percoll density-gradient centrifugation in this uncoupling phase. The lower fraction was enriched by yeast cells that were mostly uniform in size and opalescent, containing a large amount of glycogen and trehalose, and exhibiting high respiratory activity. In contrast, the upper fraction was characterized by cells heterogeneous in size, with one to several small buds, which did not contain storage carbohydrates and which exhibited a poor respiratory competence while retaining a high relative glycolytic activity. These results are discussed in terms of a possible induction of a state similar to the quiescence state previously observed from yeast stationary-phase cultures, in response to ethanol toxicity, whose acquisition may be critical for performing high-level alcoholic fermentation.

  17. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of polyploid giant cancer cells and budding progeny cells reveals several distinct pathways for ovarian cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Zhang

    Full Text Available Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs are a morphologically distinct subgroup of human tumor cells with increased nuclear size or multiple nuclei, but they are generally considered unimportant because they are presumed to be nondividing and thus nonviable. We have recently shown that these large cancer cells are not only viable but also can divide asymmetrically and yield progeny cancer cells with cancer stem-like properties via budding division. To further understand the molecular events involved in the regulation of PGCCs and the generation of their progeny cancer cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteomic profiles of PGCCs, PGCCs with budding daughter cells, and regular control cancer cells from the HEY and SKOv3 human ovarian cancer cell lines with and without CoCl2. We used a high-throughput iTRAQ-based proteomic methodology coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the differentiated regulated proteins. We performed Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to validate the differences in the expression patterns of a variety of proteins between PGCCs or budding PGCCs and regular cancer cells identified by iTRAQ approach and also a selected group of proteins from the literature. The differentially regulated proteins included proteins involved in response to hypoxia, stem cell generation, chromatin remodeling, cell-cycle regulation, and invasion and metastasis. In particular, we found that HIF-1alpha and its known target STC1 are upregulated in PGCCs. In addition, we found that a panel of stem cell-regulating factors and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition regulatory transcription factors were upregulated in budding PGCCs, whereas expression of the histone 1 family of nucleosomal linker proteins was consistently lower in PGCCs than in control cells. Thus, proteomic expression patterns provide valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms of PGCC formation and the relationship

  18. HSC90 is required for nascent hepatitis C virus core protein stability in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Naoko; Inayoshi, Yasutaka; Satoh, Naoko; Fukuda, Takashi; Iwai, Kenta; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kataoka, Kazuhiro; Shimamoto, Akira; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nomoto, Akio; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2012-07-30

    Hepatitis C virus core protein (Core) contributes to HCV pathogenicity. Here, we demonstrate that Core impairs growth in budding yeast. We identify HSP90 inhibitors as compounds that reduce intracellular Core protein level and restore yeast growth. Our results suggest that HSC90 (Hsc82) may function in the protection of the nascent Core polypeptide against degradation in yeast and the C-terminal region of Core corresponding to the organelle-interaction domain was responsible for Hsc82-dependent stability. The yeast system may be utilized to select compounds that can direct the C-terminal region to reduce the stability of Core protein. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Digital Image Analysis of Yeast Single Cells Growing in Two Different Oxygen Concentrations to Analyze the Population Growth and to Assist Individual-Based Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa; Blanco, Mónica; Portell, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays control of the growth of Saccharomyces to obtain biomass or cellular wall components is crucial for specific industrial applications. The general aim of this contribution is to deal with experimental data obtained from yeast cells and from yeast cultures to attempt the integration of the two levels of information, individual and population, to progress in the control of yeast biotechnological processes by means of the overall analysis of this set of experimental data, and to assist in the improvement of an individual-based model, namely, INDISIM-Saccha. Populations of S. cerevisiae growing in liquid batch culture, in aerobic and microaerophilic conditions, were studied. A set of digital images was taken during the population growth, and a protocol for the treatment and analyses of the images obtained was established. The piecewise linear model of Buchanan was adjusted to the temporal evolutions of the yeast populations to determine the kinetic parameters and changes of growth phases. In parallel, for all the yeast cells analyzed, values of direct morphological parameters, such as area, perimeter, major diameter, minor diameter, and derived ones, such as circularity and elongation, were obtained. Graphical and numerical methods from descriptive statistics were applied to these data to characterize the growth phases and the budding state of the yeast cells in both experimental conditions, and inferential statistical methods were used to compare the diverse groups of data achieved. Oxidative metabolism of yeast in a medium with oxygen available and low initial sugar concentration can be taken into account in order to obtain a greater number of cells or larger cells. Morphological parameters were analyzed statistically to identify which were the most useful for the discrimination of the different states, according to budding and/or growth phase, in aerobic and microaerophilic conditions. The use of the experimental data for subsequent modeling work was then

  20. Release of Apical Dominance in Potato Tuber Is Accompanied by Programmed Cell Death in the Apical Bud Meristem[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds. PMID:22362870

  1. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert Bektaş, Sevda; Inan Mamak, Gülsün; Cırış, Ibrahim Metin; Bozkurt, Kemal Kürşat; Kapucuoğlu, Nilgün

    2012-01-01

    In colorectal carcinomas, tumor budding has been defined as the presence of isolated single tumor cells or small cell clusters in the stroma at the invasive tumor margin. In this study, the relationship between tumor budding density at the invasive tumor margin and pathological parameters is investigated. Haematoxylin and eosin stained slides of 73 cases with colorectal carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated for the presence and intensity of tumor budding by 2 observers. After the specimens were assessed, the highest density of tumor budding area was counted in a microscopic field of x200. Cases were separated into 2 groups according to tumor budding density as low grade ( tumor invasion, histological grade, vascular invasion and lymph node involvement was investigated. Of the 73 colorectal carcinoma cases, 33 (45.2%) had low and 40 (54.8%) had high grade tumor budding density, respectively. There was a statistically significant relationship between high grade tumor budding density and histological grade (p=0.042), lymph node involvement (p=0.0001) and vascular invasion (p=0.0034). High grade tumor budding density is associated with aggressive phenotypical features in colorectal carcinoma.

  2. Novel and improved yeast cell factories for biosustainable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    applications. In addition, strategies for optimizing cellular performance based on either process engineering principles or genetic engineering will be presented. The work focusses on alternative substrates to glucose, the extension of substrate range in S. cerevisiae and an evaluation of nonconventional yeast....... In addition to plant biomass hydrolysates, glycerol is of interest here, being available in amounts relevant for industrial scale bioprocesses due to increased production of biodiesel. The well characterised cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a clear preference for glucose as a carbon source...... with relevant applications as cell factories (including Pichia spp. and Yarrowia lipolytica) and other less well characterized strains (e.g. Pachysolen tannophilus). This presentation will address how we evaluate cellular performance with a view to utilizing yeast species in industrial biotechnology...

  3. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  4. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  5. Systematic analysis of asymmetric partitioning of yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells reveals “aging factors” and mechanism of lifespan asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; McCormick, Mark A.; Zheng, Jiashun; Xie, Zhengwei; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiyama, Scott; El-Samad, Hana; Ouyang, Qi; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K.; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Budding yeast divides asymmetrically, giving rise to a mother cell that progressively ages and a daughter cell with full lifespan. It is generally assumed that mother cells retain damaged, lifespan limiting materials (“aging factors”) through asymmetric division. However, the identity of these aging factors and the mechanisms through which they limit lifespan remain poorly understood. Using a flow cytometry-based, high-throughput approach, we quantified the asymmetric partitioning of the yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells during cell division, discovering 74 mother-enriched and 60 daughter-enriched proteins. While daughter-enriched proteins are biased toward those needed for bud construction and genome maintenance, mother-enriched proteins are biased towards those localized in the plasma membrane and vacuole. Deletion of 23 of the 74 mother-enriched proteins leads to lifespan extension, a fraction that is about six times that of the genes picked randomly from the genome. Among these lifespan-extending genes, three are involved in endosomal sorting/endosome to vacuole transport, and three are nitrogen source transporters. Tracking the dynamic expression of specific mother-enriched proteins revealed that their concentration steadily increases in the mother cells as they age, but is kept relatively low in the daughter cells via asymmetric distribution. Our results suggest that some mother-enriched proteins may increase to a concentration that becomes deleterious and lifespan-limiting in aged cells, possibly by upsetting homeostasis or leading to aberrant signaling. Our study provides a comprehensive resource for analyzing asymmetric cell division and aging in yeast, which should also be valuable for understanding similar phenomena in other organisms. PMID:26351681

  6. Systematic analysis of asymmetric partitioning of yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells reveals "aging factors" and mechanism of lifespan asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; McCormick, Mark A; Zheng, Jiashun; Xie, Zhengwei; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiyama, Scott; El-Samad, Hana; Ouyang, Qi; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K; Li, Hao

    2015-09-22

    Budding yeast divides asymmetrically, giving rise to a mother cell that progressively ages and a daughter cell with full lifespan. It is generally assumed that mother cells retain damaged, lifespan limiting materials ("aging factors") through asymmetric division. However, the identity of these aging factors and the mechanisms through which they limit lifespan remain poorly understood. Using a flow cytometry-based, high-throughput approach, we quantified the asymmetric partitioning of the yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells during cell division, discovering 74 mother-enriched and 60 daughter-enriched proteins. While daughter-enriched proteins are biased toward those needed for bud construction and genome maintenance, mother-enriched proteins are biased towards those localized in the plasma membrane and vacuole. Deletion of 23 of the 74 mother-enriched proteins leads to lifespan extension, a fraction that is about six times that of the genes picked randomly from the genome. Among these lifespan-extending genes, three are involved in endosomal sorting/endosome to vacuole transport, and three are nitrogen source transporters. Tracking the dynamic expression of specific mother-enriched proteins revealed that their concentration steadily increases in the mother cells as they age, but is kept relatively low in the daughter cells via asymmetric distribution. Our results suggest that some mother-enriched proteins may increase to a concentration that becomes deleterious and lifespan-limiting in aged cells, possibly by upsetting homeostasis or leading to aberrant signaling. Our study provides a comprehensive resource for analyzing asymmetric cell division and aging in yeast, which should also be valuable for understanding similar phenomena in other organisms.

  7. Cell polarity: connecting to the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, R A

    2001-08-07

    A GTPase module controls growth-site selection in budding yeast cells. The GDP--GTP exchange factor of this module, Bud5, has now been localized to sites of cell division and shown to interact with a transmembrane protein that marks these sites.

  8. Binding of DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 to the 5'-untranslated region of ASH1 mRNA represses localized translation of ASH1 in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianjun; Meng, Xiuhua; Li, Delin; Chen, Shaoyin; Luo, Jianmin; Zhu, Linjie; Singer, Robert H; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-09

    Local translation of specific mRNAs is regulated by dynamic changes in their subcellular localization, and these changes are due to complex mechanisms controlling cytoplasmic mRNA transport. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well suited to studying these mechanisms because many of its transcripts are transported from the mother cell to the budding daughter cell. Here, we investigated the translational control of ASH1 mRNA after transport and localization. We show that although ASH1 transcripts were translated after they reached the bud tip, some mRNAs were bound by the RNA-binding protein Puf6 and were non-polysomal. We also found that the DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 complexed with the untranslated ASH1 mRNA and Puf6. Loss of Dhh1 affected local translation of ASH1 mRNA and resulted in delocalization of ASH1 transcript in the bud. Forcibly shifting the non-polysomal ASH1 mRNA into polysomes was associated with Dhh1 dissociation. We further demonstrated that Dhh1 is not recruited to ASH1 mRNA co-transcriptionally, suggesting that it could bind to ASH1 mRNA within the cytoplasm. Of note, Dhh1 bound to the 5'-UTR of ASH1 mRNA and inhibited its translation in vitro These results suggest that after localization to the bud tip, a portion of the localized ASH1 mRNA becomes translationally inactive because of binding of Dhh1 and Puf6 to the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of ASH1 mRNA. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. ABA Represses the Expression of Cell Cycle Genes and May Modulate the Development of Endodormancy in Grapevine Buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Ricardo; Noriega, Ximena; Aravena, Karla; Prieto, Humberto; Pérez, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key player in the regulation of endodormancy (ED) in grapevine buds (Vitis vinifera L). In this study, we show that in the vine, the expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of ABA (VvNCED1; VvNCED2) and the content of ABA are significantly higher in the latent bud than at the shoot apex, while the expression of an ABA catabolic gene (VvA8H3) showed no significant difference between either organ. A negative correlation between the content of ABA and transcript levels of cell cycle genes (CCG) was found in both tissues. This result suggested that ABA may negatively regulate the expression of CCG in meristematic tissues of grapevines. To test this proposition, the effect of ABA on the expression of CCG was analyzed in two meristematic tissues of the vine: somatic embryos and shoot apexes. The results indicated that cell cycle progression is repressed by ABA in both organs, since it down-regulated the expression of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinases (VvCDKB1, VvCDKB2) and genes encoding cyclins of type A (VvCYCA1, VvCYCA2, VvCYCA3), B (VvCYCB), and D (VvCYCD3.2a) and up-regulated the expression of VvICK5, a gene encoding an inhibitor of CDKs. During ED, the content of ABA increased, and the expression of CCG decreased. Moreover, the dormancy-breaking compound hydrogen cyanamide (HC) reduced the content of ABA and up-regulated the expression of CCG, this last effect was abolished when HC and ABA were co-applied. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA-mediated repression of CCG transcription may be part of the mechanism through which ABA modulates the development of ED in grapevine buds.

  10. Fibrin glue mixed with platelet-rich fibrin as a scaffold seeded with dental bud cells for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chan, Wing P; Chi, Chau-Hwa; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2012-11-01

    Odontogenesis is a complex process with a series of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and odontogenic molecular cascades. In tissue engineering of teeth from stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), which is rich in growth factors and cytokines, may improve regeneration. Accordingly, PRF was added into fibrin glue to enrich the microenvironment with growth factors. Unerupted second molar tooth buds were harvested from miniature swine and cultured in vitro for 3 weeks to obtain dental bud cells (DBCs). Whole blood was collected for the preparation of PRF and fibrin glue before surgery. DBCs were suspended in fibrin glue and then enclosed with PRF, and the DBC-fibrin glue-PRF composite was autografted back into the original alveolar sockets. Radiographic and histological examinations were used to identify the regenerated tooth structure 36 weeks after implantation. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect proteins specific to tooth regeneration. One pig developed a complete tooth with crown, root, pulp, enamel, dentin, odontoblast, cementum, blood vessels, and periodontal ligaments in indiscriminate shape. Another animal had an unerupted tooth that expressed cytokeratin 14, dentin matrix protein-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and osteopontin. This study demonstrated, using autogenic cell transplantation in a porcine model, that DBCs seeded into fibrin glue-PRF could regenerate a complete tooth. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Influence of the bud neck on nuclear envelope fission in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia G; Rose, Mark D

    2017-09-15

    Studies have shown that nuclear envelope fission (karyokinesis) in budding yeast depends on cytokinesis, but not distinguished whether this was a direct requirement, indirect, because of cell cycle arrest, or due to bud neck-localized proteins impacting both processes. To determine the requirements for karyokinesis, we examined mutants conditionally defective for bud emergence and/or nuclear migration. The common mutant phenotype was completion of the nuclear division cycle within the mother cell, but karyokinesis did not occur. In the cdc24 swe1 mutant, at the non-permissive temperature, multiple nuclei accumulated within the unbudded cell, with connected nuclear envelopes. Upon return to the permissive temperature, the cdc24 swe1 mutant initiated bud emergence, but only the nucleus spanning the neck underwent fission suggesting that the bud neck region is important for fission initiation. The neck may be critical for either mechanical reasons, as the contractile ring might facilitate fission, or for regulatory reasons, as the site of a protein network regulating nuclear envelope fission, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis. We also found that 77-85% of pairs of septin mutant nuclei completed nuclear envelope fission. In addition, 27% of myo1Δ mutant nuclei completed karyokinesis. These data suggested that fission is not dependent on mechanical contraction at the bud neck, but was instead controlled by regulatory proteins there. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interleukin-10 Is Produced by a Specific Subset of Taste Receptor Cells and Critical for Maintaining Structural Integrity of Mouse Taste Buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jinghua; Zhou, Minliang; Simon, Nirvine; Huang, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Although inflammatory responses are a critical component in defense against pathogens, too much inflammation is harmful. Mechanisms have evolved to regulate inflammation, including modulation by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Previously we have shown that taste buds express various molecules involved in innate immune responses, including the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here, using a reporter mouse strain, we show that taste cells also express the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Remarkably, IL-10 is produced by only a specific subset of taste cells, which are different from the TNF-producing cells in mouse circumvallate and foliate taste buds: IL-10 expression was found exclusively in the G-protein gustducin-expressing bitter receptor cells, while TNF was found in sweet and umami receptor cells as reported previously. In contrast, IL-10R1, the ligand-binding subunit of the IL-10 receptor, is predominantly expressed by TNF-producing cells, suggesting a novel cellular hierarchy for regulating TNF production and effects in taste buds. In response to inflammatory challenges, taste cells can increase IL-10 expression both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that taste buds use separate populations of taste receptor cells that coincide with sweet/umami and bitter taste reception to modulate local inflammatory responses, a phenomenon that has not been previously reported. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency in mice leads to significant reductions in the number and size of taste buds, as well as in the number of taste receptor cells per taste bud, suggesting that IL-10 plays critical roles in maintaining structural integrity of the peripheral gustatory system. PMID:24523558

  13. [Export of an invertase by yeast cells (Candida utilis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, O V; Sabirzianova, T A; Celiakh, I O; Kalebina, T S; Kulaev, I S

    2014-01-01

    Export and accumulation of various forms of invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) in the cell wall and culture liquid of the yeast Candida utilis was investigated. It was found that the high-molecular-weight CW-form of invertase is present in the cell wall. This form is not exported into the culture liquid, and it is by a third more glycosylated than the previously described exported S-form. It was shown that one of the two liquid forms of invertase exported into the culture-the glycosylated S-form--is retained in the cell wall, while the other one--the nonglycosylated F-form--was not detected in the cell wall. Based on these results, as well as data on the distribution dynamics of the enzyme in the culture liquid and in the cell wall during different growth stages of a yeast culture, we suggested that the nonglycosylated form was exported into the culture liquid via the zone of abnormal cell wall permeability and the glycosylated forms of this enzyme (both exported and nonexported) did not use this pathway (the degree of N-glycosylation is an important factor determining the final localization of the enzyme).

  14. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  15. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  16. Viable cell yield from active dry yeast products and effects of storage temperature and diluent on yeast cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M L; Bradford, B J

    2011-01-01

    Active dry yeast (ADY) products are commonly fed in the dairy industry, but research regarding quality control for such products is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine yeast viability in field samples relative to manufacturers' guarantees (experiment 1), measure the effects of high-temperature storage on yeast viability (experiment 1), and determine the effect of vitamin-trace mineral (VTM) premix on yeast viability (experiment 2). Commercially available ADY products were acquired in triplicate through normal distribution channels and stored at 4°C upon receipt. Initial samples were evaluated for colony-forming units and compared with product label guarantees. Only 1 of the 6 products sampled in experiment 1 met product guarantees for all 3 samples. To determine effects of storage temperature and duration on viability, ADY samples were stored in an incubator at 40°C with ambient humidity for 1, 2, and 3 mo. High-temperature storage significantly decreased viability over the 3-mo period; approximately 90% of viable cells were lost each month. Three of the 5 products sampled in experiment 2 met product guarantees. Fresh samples of 4 of these 5 ADY products were mixed in duplicate with ground corn (GC) or a VTM premix to achieve a target concentration of 2.2×10(8) cfu/g. For each product, GC and VTM samples were stored at ambient temperature (22°C) and at an elevated temperature (40°C) for 2 wk. No differences in viable yeast count were observed between GC and VTM samples immediately after mixing or after storage at ambient temperature. Yeast viability in GC and VTM samples decreased during storage at an elevated temperature. There also was a significant interaction of diluent and storage temperature; VTM samples had higher cell viability than GC samples when subjected to high-temperature storage. Results suggest that (1) ADY products failed to consistently meet product guarantees; (2) viability of ADY products was greatly diminished during

  17. Boolean network model predicts cell cycle sequence of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Davidich

    Full Text Available A Boolean network model of the cell-cycle regulatory network of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe is constructed solely on the basis of the known biochemical interaction topology. Simulating the model in the computer faithfully reproduces the known activity sequence of regulatory proteins along the cell cycle of the living cell. Contrary to existing differential equation models, no parameters enter the model except the structure of the regulatory circuitry. The dynamical properties of the model indicate that the biological dynamical sequence is robustly implemented in the regulatory network, with the biological stationary state G1 corresponding to the dominant attractor in state space, and with the biological regulatory sequence being a strongly attractive trajectory. Comparing the fission yeast cell-cycle model to a similar model of the corresponding network in S. cerevisiae, a remarkable difference in circuitry, as well as dynamics is observed. While the latter operates in a strongly damped mode, driven by external excitation, the S. pombe network represents an auto-excited system with external damping.

  18. Aging Yeast Cells Undergo a Sharp Entry into Senescence Unrelated to the Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Fehrmann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, a mother cell can produce a finite number of daughter cells before it stops dividing and dies. Such entry into senescence is thought to result from a progressive decline in physiological function, including a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ. Here, we developed a microfluidic device to monitor the dynamics of cell division and ΔΨ in real time at single-cell resolution. We show that cells do not enter senescence gradually but rather undergo an abrupt transition to a slowly dividing state. Moreover, we demonstrate that the decline in ΔΨ, which is observed only in a fraction of cells, is not responsible for entry into senescence. Rather, the loss of ΔΨ is an age-independent and heritable process that leads to clonal senescence and is therefore incompatible with daughter cell rejuvenation. These results emphasize the importance of quantitative single-cell measurements to decipher the causes of cellular aging.

  19. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters.

  20. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  1. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...

  2. All-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) suppresses chondrogenesis of rat primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by downregulating p63 and cartilage-specific molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Guo; Xie, Peng; Wang, Yun-Gong; Li, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Tao-Gen; Liu, Zhao-Yong; Hong, Quan; Du, Shi-Xin

    2014-09-01

    P63 null mice have no or truncated limbs and mutations in human p63 cause several skeletal syndromes that also show limb and digit abnormalities, suggesting its essential role in bone development. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on chondrogenesis using mesenchymal cells from rat hind limb bud and further examined the mRNA and protein expression of Sox9 and Col2a1 and p63 in rat hind limb bud cells. Limb buds were isolated from embryos from euthanized female rats. Growth of hind limb bud mesenchymal cells was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assays. Formation of cartilage nodules was examined by Alcian blue-nuclear fast red staining. The expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 was determined by Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting assays, respectively. Our MTT assays revealed that ATRA at 1 and 10μM significantly suppressed the growth of mesenchymal cells from rat hind limb bud at 24 and 48h (PATRA caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in the area of cartilage nodules (PATRA, the area of cartilage nodules from hind limb bud cells was reduced to 0.05±0.03mm from 0.15±0.01mm in controls. Real-time RT-PCR assays further indicated that 1 and 10μM ATRA markedly reduced the mRNA expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 in hind limb bud cells (PATRA time-dependently inhibits the mRNA expression of p63, Sox9 and Col2al. Western blotting assays additionally showed that ATRA dose-dependently reduced the expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 (PATRA suppresses chondrogenesis by modulating the expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 in primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stochastic Polynomial Dynamic Models of the Yeast Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Indranil; Dimitrova, Elena; Jarrah, Abdul S.

    2010-03-01

    In the last decade a new holistic approach for tackling biological problems, systems biology, which takes into account the study of the interactions between the components of a biological system to predict function and behavior has emerged. The reverse-engineering of biochemical networks from experimental data have increasingly become important in systems biology. Based on Boolean networks, we propose a time-discrete stochastic framework for the reverse engineering of the yeast cell cycle regulatory network from experimental data. With a suitable choice of state set, we have used powerful tools from computational algebra, that underlie the reverse-engineering algorithm, avoiding costly enumeration strategies. Stochasticity is introduced by choosing at each update step a random coordinate function for each variable, chosen from a probability space of update functions. The algorithm is based on a combinatorial structure known as the Gr"obner fans of a polynomial ideal which identifies the underlying network structure and dynamics. The model depicts a correct dynamics of the yeast cell cycle network and reproduces the time sequence of expression patterns along the biological cell cycle. Our findings indicate that the methodolgy has high chance of success when applied to large and complex systems to determine the dynamical properties of corresponding networks.

  4. Taste bud cells of adult mice are responsive to Wnt/β-catenin signaling: implications for the renewal of mature taste cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Dany; Barlow, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling initiates taste papilla development in mouse embryos, however, its involvement in taste cell turnover in adult mice has not been explored. Here we used the BATGAL reporter mouse model, which carries an engineered allele in which the LacZ gene is expressed in the presence of activated β-catenin, to determine the responsiveness of adult taste bud cells to canonical Wnt signaling. Double immunostaining with markers of differentiated taste cells revealed that a subset of type I, II and III taste cells express β-galactosidase. Using in situ hybridization, we showed that β-catenin activates the transcription of the LacZ gene mainly in intragemmal basal cells that are immature taste cells, identified by their expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Finally, we showed that β-catenin activity is significantly reduced in taste buds of 25 week-old mice compared to 10 week-old animals. Our data suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may influence taste cell turnover by regulating cell differentiation. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling in older mice could explain in part the loss of taste sensitivity with aging, implicating a possible deficiency in the rate of taste cell renewal. More investigations are now necessary to understand if and how Wnt signaling regulates adult taste cell turnover. PMID:21328519

  5. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    in an attempt to take advantage of the molecular tools available for S. cerevisiae. Mature biofilms containing mainly growth arrested cells were shown to be tolerant to three out of four tested antifungals, while all drugs had inhibitory activity against proliferating biofilm cells, demonstrating that drug......Fungal infections have become a major problem in the hospital sector in the past decades due to the increased number of immune compromised patients susceptible to mycosis. Most human infections are believed to be associated with biofilm forming cells that are up to 1000-fold more tolerant...... of this thesis has been to explore the tolerance mechanisms of yeast biofilms to systemic antifungal agents and to identify the molecular target of a novel peptidomimetic with anti-biofilm activity. The genetic tractable S. cerevisiae was used as biofilm model system for the pathogenic Candida species...

  6. Synthetic yeast based cell factories for vanillin-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well a characterized microorganism and widely used as eukaryotic model organism as well as a key cell factory for bioproduction of various products. The latter comprise a large variety of scientifically and industrially relevant products such as low-value bulk...... chemicals and biofuels, food additives, high-value chemicals and recombinant proteins. Despite the recent achievements in the fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering together with availability of broad genetic engineering toolbox, the full potential of S. cerevisiae as a cell factory is not yet...... exploited. This will require additional insights into functionality of the production system and improved genetic engineering strategies for efficient cell factory design. The aim of this project was to develop novel genetic engineering tools that allow for rapid and efficient assembly of metabolic pathways...

  7. Determining the fate of fluorescent quantum dots on surface of engineered budding S. cerevisiae cell molecular landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we surface engineered living S. cerevisiae cells by decorating quantum dots (QDs) and traced the fate of QDs on molecular landscape of single mother cell through several generation times (progeny cells). The fate of QDs on cell-surface was tracked through the cellular division events using confocal microscopy and fluorescence emission profiles. The extent of cell-surface QDs distribution among the offspring was determined as the mother cell divides into daughter cells. Fluorescence emission from QDs on progeny cells was persistent through the second-generation time (~240min) until all of the progeny cells lost their cell-bound QDs during the third generation time (~360min). The surface engineered yeast cells were unaffected by the QDs present on their molecular landscapes and retained their normal cellular growth, architecture and metabolic activities as confirmed by their viability, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations and cytotoxicity tests, respectively. Our results demonstrated that QDs on mother cell landscape tend to distribute among its progeny cells that accompanied with concomitant reduction in QDs' fluorescence, which can be quantified. We suggest that surface engineered cells with QDs will enable investigating the cellular behavior and monitoring cell growth patterns as nanobiosensors for screening of drugs/chemicals at single cell level with fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M Smith

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications

  9. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Limb Bud Can Differentiate into All Three Embryonic Germ Layers Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Fei; Wang, Juan; Dong, Zhao-lun; Wu, Min-juan; Zhao, Ting-bao; Li, Dan-dan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from many sources, including adults and fetuses. Previous studies have demonstrated that, compared with their adult counterpart, fetal MSCs with several remarkable advantages may be a better resource for clinical applications. In this study, we successfully isolated a rapidly proliferating cell population from limb bud of aborted fetus and termed them “human limb bud–derived mesenchymal stem cells” (hLB-MSCs). Characteristics of their morphology, phenotype, cell cycle, and differentiation properties were analyzed. These adherent cell populations have a typically spindle-shaped morphology. Flow cytometry analysis showed that hLB-MSCs are positive for CD13, CD29, CD90, CD105, and CD106, but negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD34, CD45, CD45RA, and HLA-DR. The detection of cell cycle from different passages indicated that hLB-MSCs have a similar potential for propagation during long culture in vitro. The most novel finding here is that, in addition to their mesodermal differentiation (osteoblasts and adipocytes), hLB-MSCs can also differentiated into extramesenchymal lineages, such as neural (ectoderm) and hepatic (endoderm) progenies. These results indicate that hLB-MSCs have a high level of plasticity and can differentiate into cell lineages from all three embryonic layers in vitro. PMID:22775353

  10. FGF10 maintains distal lung bud epithelium and excessive signaling leads to progenitor state arrest, distalization, and goblet cell metaplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobberup Sune

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction with the surrounding mesenchyme is necessary for development of endodermal organs, and Fibroblast growth factors have recently emerged as mesenchymal-expressed morphogens that direct endodermal morphogenesis. The fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10 null mouse is characterized by the absence of lung bud development. Previous studies have shown that this requirement for Fgf10 is due in part to its role as a chemotactic factor during branching morphogenesis. In other endodermal organs Fgf10 also plays a role in regulating differentiation. Results Through gain-of-function analysis, we here find that FGF10 inhibits differentiation of the lung epithelium and promotes distalization of the embryonic lung. Ectopic expression of FGF10 in the lung epithelium caused impaired lung development and perinatal lethality in a transgenic mouse model. Lung lobes were enlarged due to increased interlobular distance and hyperplasia of the airway epithelium. Differentiation of bronchial and alveolar cell lineages was inhibited. The transgenic epithelium consisted predominantly of proliferating progenitor-like cells expressing Pro-surfactant protein C, TTF1, PEA3 and Clusterin similarly to immature distal tip cells. Strikingly, goblet cells developed within this arrested epithelium leading to goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion We conclude that FGF10 inhibits terminal differentiation in the embryonic lung and maintains the distal epithelium, and that excessive levels of FGF10 leads to metaplastic differentiation of goblet cells similar to that seen in chronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. HIV Pol inhibits HIV budding and mediates the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gan

    Full Text Available The prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding posits that the viral Gag protein drives budding, and that the Gag p6 peptide plays an essential role by recruiting host-cell budding factors to sites of HIV assembly. HIV also expresses a second Gag protein, p160 Gag-Pol, which lacks p6 and fails to bud from cells, consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding. However, we show here that the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is not caused by the absence of p6, but rather, by the presence of Pol. Specifically, we show that (i the budding defect of Gag-Pol is unaffected by loss of HIV protease activity and is therefore an intrinsic property of the Gag-Pol polyprotein, (ii the N-terminal 433 amino acids of Gag and Gag-Pol are sufficient to drive virus budding even though they lack p6, (iii the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is caused by a dominant, cis-acting inhibitor of budding in the HIV Pol domain, and (iv Gag-Pol inhibits Gag and virus budding in trans, even at normal levels of Gag and Gag-Pol expression. These and other data support an alternative hypothesis of HIV budding as a process that is mediated by the normal, non-viral pathway of exosome/microvesicle biogenesis.

  12. Microbiology and epidemiology of oral yeast colonization in hemopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Steven D; Kirkpatrick, William R; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Freytes, Cesar O; Toro, Juan J; Patterson, Thomas F; Redding, Spencer W

    2013-03-01

    We monitored the epidemiology and microbiology of oral yeast colonization in patients undergoing hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (HPCT) to examine associations between yeast colonization and oral mucositis. One hundred twenty-one consecutive HPCT patients were sampled for oral yeasts prior to fluconazole (FLC) prophylaxis, at transplantation, and weekly until discharge. Clinical oral mucositis screenings were performed triweekly. Yeast colonization was evident at 216 of 510 total visits. Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were the predominant organisms. Eight patients showed elevated minimal inhibitory concentrations to FLC. One patient developed fungal septicemia. Patients with oral mucositis assessment scale scores oral yeasts in HPCT recipients. FLC-resistant yeasts do emerge and can be the source of fungal sepsis. A positive association was not shown between yeast colonization and the presence or severity of oral mucositis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Demonstration, by means of electron microscopy, of the penetration of somitic cells into the mesoblast of the limb buds of reptile embryos (Anguis fragilis, Lacerta viridis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscopic study of the components of anterior limb buds of the slow-worm (Anguis fragilis) and of the green lizard (Lacerta viridis) (embryos of Anguis whose allantoic bud reach 0,7 to 4 mm of length; embryos of Lacerta 2 to 7 days old) provides data on the cytological characteristics of the components of the limb bud at these early stages. 1. The cells of the distal extremity of the somitic processes extending in the limb bud of Anguis and Lacerta, are elongated cells with ovoid nuclei containing large nucleolus; they possess mitochondria always thin and with dense matrix; they are rich in lipid droplets; they possess cilia; they are devoid of myofilaments; endoplasmic reticulum, free ribosomes and polyribosomes are abundant. Golgi networks display signs of activity. These characteristics are also observed in the cells of the "dermatome" layer of the dermo-myotome; and so, it appears probable that the cells of the "dermatome". Furthermore, in Anguis embryos, the cells of the distal extremities of the somitic processes possess numerous lysosomes and a certain number of cells among them, degenerate early. 2. The somatopleural mesoblastic cells of the limb bud of Anguis and Lacerta embryos keep the characters of the cells of the mesodermic layer of lateral plate from which they originate; they have rounded nuclei, cilia, and their mitochondria are always larger and more transparent to electrons, than the ones of cells of the somitic processes and of cells of the epiblastic apical crest. Golgi networks are well developped, endoplasmic reticulum is abundant, lipid droplets are rare. 3. The processes of somites which extend in the dorsal part of the limb bud of Anguis embryos are cords of cells with thin lumina; at the stage of the allantoic bud of 0,6 to 0,8 mm long, the distal extremity of these processes dislocate in group of cells which afterwards dissociate, releasing individual somitic cells which are integrated among the mesoblastic somatopleural

  14. Effects of Selenium on Morphological Changes in Candida utilis ATCC 9950 Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna; Kurcz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of microscopic examinations of the yeast cells cultured in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media supplemented with sodium selenite(IV). The analysis of the morphological changes in yeast cells aimed to determine whether the selected selenium doses and culturing time may affect this element accumulation in yeast cell structures in a form of inorganic or organic compounds, as a result of detoxification processes. The range of characteristic morphological changes in yeasts cultivated in experimental media with sodium selenite(IV) was observed, including cell shrinkage and cytoplasm thickening of the changes within vacuole structure. The processes of vacuole disintegration were observed in aging yeast cells in culturing medium, which may indicate the presence of so-called ghost cells lacking intracellular organelles The changes occurring in the morphology of yeasts cultured in media supplemented with sodium selenite were typical for stationary phase of yeast growth. From detailed microscopic observations, larger surface area of the cell (6.03 μm(2)) and yeast vacuole (2.17 μm(2)) were noticed after 24-h culturing in the medium with selenium of 20 mg Se(4+)/L. The coefficient of shape of the yeast cells cultured in media enriched with sodium selenite as well as in the control YPD medium ranged from 1.02 to 1.22. Elongation of cultivation time (up to 48 and 72 h) in the media supplemented with sodium selenite caused a reduction in the surface area of the yeast cell and vacuole due to detoxification processes.

  15. All-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) may have inhibited chondrogenesis of primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by downregulating Pitx1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-guo; Li, Xue-dong; Liu, Zhao-yong; Zhang, Tao-gen; Chen, Bin; Hou, Guo-qing; Hong, Quan; Xie, Peng; Du, Shi-xin

    2014-01-13

    Despite frequently well-established role of all-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) in congenital limb deformities, its mechanism of action, thus far, is still ambiguous. Pitx1, which is expressed in the hindlimb bud mesenchyme, or its pathways may be etiologically responsible for the increased incidence of clubfoot. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms whereby Pitx1 regulated chondrogenesis of hindlimb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. E12.5 embryonic rat hind limb bud mesenchymal cells were treated with ATRA at appropriate concentrations. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was performed to evaluate cell proliferation. Hematoxylin-safranin-O-fast-green staining assays were used to observe cartilage nodules, and Pitx1 expression was examined by immunofluorescent microscopy. Real-time quantitative PCR and immunoblotting assays were applied to determine the mRNA expressions of Pitx1, Sox9 and type II collagen (Col2al), respectively. The results showed that ATRA inhibited the proliferation of hind limb bud cells dose-dependently. ATRA also induced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of cartilage nodules and the area of cartilage nodules compared with controls. Our real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays revealed that the mRNA expression of Pitx1, Sox9 and Col2al were significantly downregulated by ATRA. Furthermore, our immunofluorescent microscopy and Western blotting assays indicated that Pitx1 was mainly expressed in the cartilage nodules and the levels of Pitx1, Sox9 and Col2al were also downregulated by ATRA dose-dependently. The results indicated that ATRA may decrease chondrogenesis of hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by inhibiting cartilage-specific molecules, such as Sox9 and Col2al, via downregulating Pitx1 expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cell-surface display of enzymes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-02-01

    In yeast cell-surface displays, functional proteins, such as cellulases, are genetically fused to an anchor protein and expressed on the cell surface. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is often utilized as a cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and proteins, is the most commonly used yeast for cell-surface display. To construct yeast cells with a desired function, such as the ability to utilize cellulose as a substrate for bioethanol production, cell-surface display techniques for the efficient expression of enzymes on the cell membrane need to be combined with metabolic engineering approaches for manipulating target pathways within cells. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent progress of biorefinery fields in the development and application of yeast cell-surface displays from a synthetic biology perspective and discuss approaches for further enhancing cell-surface display efficiency. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  17. Yeast cells with impaired drug resistance accumulate glycerol and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicioglu, Duygu; Oc, Sebnem; Rash, Bharat M; Dunn, Warwick B; Pir, Pınar; Kell, Douglas B; Kirdar, Betul; Oliver, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in yeast is effected by two major superfamilies of membrane transporters: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the present work, we investigated the cellular responses to disruptions in both MFS (by deleting the transporter gene, QDR3) and ABC (by deleting the gene for the Pdr3 transcription factor) transporter systems by growing diploid homozygous deletion yeast strains in glucose- or ammonium-limited continuous cultures. The transcriptome and the metabolome profiles of these strains, as well as the flux distributions in the optimal solution space, reveal novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of QDR3 and PDR3. Our results show how cells rearrange their metabolism to cope with the problems that arise from the loss of these drug-resistance genes, which likely evolved to combat chemical attack from bacterial or fungal competitors. This is achieved through the accumulation of intracellular glucose, glycerol, and inorganic phosphate, as well as by repurposing genes that are known to function in other parts of metabolism in order to minimise the effects of toxic compounds.

  18. Biosynthesis of amorphous mesoporous aluminophosphates using yeast cells as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifontes, Ángela B., E-mail: asifonte@ivic.gob.ve [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); González, Gema [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Tovar, Leidy M.; Méndez, Franklin J. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gomes, Maria E. [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Cañizales, Edgar [Área de Análisis Químico Inorgánico, PDVSA, INTEVEP, Los Teques 1070-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Villalobos, Hector [Centro de Microbiología y Biología Celular, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Brito, Joaquin L. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Amorphous aluminophosphates can take place using yeast as template. ► A mesoporous material was obtained. ► The specific surface area after calcinations ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. -- Abstract: In this study aluminophosphates have been synthesized from aluminum isopropoxide and phosphoric acid solutions using yeast cells as template. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis; X-ray diffraction; Fourier transform infrared; N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms; scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and potentiometric titration with N-butylamine for determination of: thermal stability; crystalline structure; textural properties; morphology and surface acidity, respectively. The calcined powders consisted of an intimate mixture of amorphous and crystallized AlPO particles with sizes between 23 and 30 nm. The average pore size observed is 13–16 nm and the specific surface area after calcinations (at 650 °C) ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}.

  19. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is a transmembrane protein present in all cell types of adult Hydra and upregulated at the boundary between bud and parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prexl, Andrea; Münder, Sandra; Loy, Bernhard; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Tischer, Susanne; Böttger, Angelika

    2011-09-07

    The Notch signalling pathway is conserved in pre-bilaterian animals. In the Cnidarian Hydra it is involved in interstitial stem cell differentiation and in boundary formation during budding. Experimental evidence suggests that in Hydra Notch is activated by presenilin through proteolytic cleavage at the S3 site as in all animals. However, the endogenous ligand for HvNotch has not been described yet. We have cloned a cDNA from Hydra, which encodes a bona-fide Notch ligand with a conserved domain structure similar to that of Jagged-like Notch ligands from other animals. Hyjagged mRNA is undetectable in adult Hydra by in situ hybridisation but is strongly upregulated and easily visible at the border between bud and parent shortly before bud detachment. In contrast, HyJagged protein is found in all cell types of an adult hydra, where it localises to membranes and endosomes. Co-localisation experiments showed that it is present in the same cells as HvNotch, however not always in the same membrane structures. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is conserved in Cnidarians. Together with HvNotch it may be involved in the formation of the parent-bud boundary in Hydra. Moreover, protein distribution of both, HvNotch receptor and HyJagged indicate a more widespread function for these two transmembrane proteins in the adult hydra, which may be regulated by additional factors, possibly involving endocytic pathways.

  20. The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is a transmembrane protein present in all cell types of adult Hydra and upregulated at the boundary between bud and parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tischer Susanne

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Notch signalling pathway is conserved in pre-bilaterian animals. In the Cnidarian Hydra it is involved in interstitial stem cell differentiation and in boundary formation during budding. Experimental evidence suggests that in Hydra Notch is activated by presenilin through proteolytic cleavage at the S3 site as in all animals. However, the endogenous ligand for HvNotch has not been described yet. Results We have cloned a cDNA from Hydra, which encodes a bona-fide Notch ligand with a conserved domain structure similar to that of Jagged-like Notch ligands from other animals. Hyjagged mRNA is undetectable in adult Hydra by in situ hybridisation but is strongly upregulated and easily visible at the border between bud and parent shortly before bud detachment. In contrast, HyJagged protein is found in all cell types of an adult hydra, where it localises to membranes and endosomes. Co-localisation experiments showed that it is present in the same cells as HvNotch, however not always in the same membrane structures. Conclusions The putative Notch ligand HyJagged is conserved in Cnidarians. Together with HvNotch it may be involved in the formation of the parent-bud boundary in Hydra. Moreover, protein distribution of both, HvNotch receptor and HyJagged indicate a more widespread function for these two transmembrane proteins in the adult hydra, which may be regulated by additional factors, possibly involving endocytic pathways.

  1. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  2. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mattivi, Fulvio; Silvestri, Romano; La Regina, Giuseppe; Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components. PMID:22970337

  3. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Palermo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components.

  4. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  5. The fission yeast homeodomain protein Yox1p binds to MBF and confines MBF-dependent cell-cycle transcription to G1-S via negative feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Aligianni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle-regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident.

  6. Uncertainties of yeast-based biofuel cell operational characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babanova, S.; Mitov, M.; Mandjukov, P. [Department of Chemistry, South-West University, 66 Ivan Mihailov str., 2700 Blagoevgrad (Bulgaria); Hubenova, Y. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Plovdiv University, 24 Tsar Asen str., 4000 Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    2011-12-15

    The commonly used parameters characterizing fuel cells and in particular microbial fuel cells (MFCs) electrical performance are open circuit voltage (OCV), maximum power, and short circuit current. These characteristics are usually obtained from polarization and power curves. In the present study, the expanded uncertainties of operational characteristics for yeast-based fuel cell were evaluated and the main sources of uncertainty were determined. Two approaches were used: the uncertainty budget building for sources uncertainty estimation and a statistical treatment of identical MFCs results - for operational characteristics uncertainty calculation. It was found that in this particular bioelectrochemical system the major factor contributing to operational characteristics uncertainties was the electrodes' resistance. The operational characteristics uncertainties were decreased from 19 to 13% for OCV, from 42 to 14% for maximal power, and from 46 to 13% for short circuit current with the usage of electrodes with resistance in the interval 6-7 {omega}. The described approaches can be used for operational characteristics expanded uncertainties calculation of all types of fuel cells using data from polarization measurements. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Continuous beer fermentation using immobilized yeast cell bioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, José A

    2005-01-01

    Traditional beer fermentation and maturation processes use open fermentation and lager tanks. Although these vessels had previously been considered indispensable, during the past decades they were in many breweries replaced by large production units (cylindroconical tanks). These have proved to be successful, both providing operating advantages and ensuring the quality of the final beer. Another promising contemporary technology, namely, continuous beer fermentation using immobilized brewing yeast, by contrast, has found only a limited number of industrial applications. Continuous fermentation systems based on immobilized cell technology, albeit initially successful, were condemned to failure for several reasons. These include engineering problems (excess biomass and problems with CO(2) removal, optimization of operating conditions, clogging and channeling of the reactor), unbalanced beer flavor (altered cell physiology, cell aging), and unrealized cost advantages (carrier price, complex and unstable operation). However, recent development in reactor design and understanding of immobilized cell physiology, together with application of novel carrier materials, could provide a new stimulus to both research and application of this promising technology.

  8. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  9. All-trans-retinoic acid inhibits chondrogenesis of rat embryo hindlimb bud mesenchymal cells by downregulating p53 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, TAO-GEN; LI, XUE-DONG; YU, GUO-YONG; XIE, PENG; WANG, YUN-GUO; LIU, ZHAO-YONG; HONG, QUAN; LIU, DE-ZHONG; DU, SHI-XIN

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) in congenital clubfoot (CCF)-like deformities in in vivo models, the essential cellular and molecular targets and the signaling mechanisms for ATRA-induced CCF-like deformities remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated that p53 and p21, expressed in the hindlimb bud mesenchyme, regulate cellular proliferation and differentiation, contributing to a significant proportion of embryonic CCF-like abnormalities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms for ATRA-induced CCF, by assessing ATRA-regulated chondrogenesis in rat embryo hindlimb bud mesenchymal cells (rEHBMCs) in vitro. The experimental study was based on varying concentrations of ATRA exposure on embryonic day 12.5 rEHBMCs in vitro. The present study demonstrated that ATRA inhibited the proliferation of cells by stimulating apoptotic cell death of rEHBMCs. It was also observed that ATRA induced a dose-dependent reduction of cartilage nodules compared with the control group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting assays revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of cartilage-specific molecules, including aggrecan, Sox9 and collagen, type II, α 1 (Col2a1), were downregulated by ATRA in a dose-dependent manner; the mRNA levels of p53 and p21 were dose-dependently upregulated from 16 to 20 h of incubation with ATRA, but dose-dependently downregulated from 24 to 48 h. Of note, p53 and p21 were regulated at the translational level in parallel with the transcription with rEHBMCs treated with ATRA. Furthermore, the immunofluorescent microscopy assays indicated that proteins of p53 and p21 were predominantly expressed in the cartilage nodules. The present study demonstrated that ATRA decreases the chondrogenesis of rEHBMCs by inhibiting cartilage-specific molecules, including aggrecan, Sox9 and Col2al, via regulating the expression of p53 and p21. PMID:25738595

  10. The fission yeast inhibitor of growth (ING) protein Png1p functions in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yang; Pan, Xian; Lei, Bing-Kun; Chang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng-Xun; Lu, Hong

    2010-05-21

    In budding yeast and human cells, ING (inhibitor of growth) tumor suppressor proteins play important roles in response to DNA damage by modulating chromatin structure through collaborating with histone acetyltransferase or histone deacetylase complexes. However, the biological functions of ING family proteins in fission yeast are poorly defined. Here, we report that Png1p, a fission yeast ING homolog protein, is required for cell growth under normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Png1p was further confirmed to regulate histone H4 acetylation through collaboration with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase 1 (Mst1). Additionally, both fission yeast PNG1 and MST1 can functionally complement their budding yeast correspondence homologs YNG2 and ESA1, respectively. These results suggest that ING proteins in fission yeast might also conserve function, similar to ING proteins in budding yeast and human cells. We also showed that decreased acetylation in Deltapng1 cells resulted in genome-wide down-regulation of 756 open reading frames, including the central DNA repair gene RAD22. Overexpression of RAD22 partially rescued the png1 mutant phenotype under both normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Furthermore, decreased expression of RAD22 in Deltapng1 cells was confirmed to be caused by decreased H4 acetylation at its promoter. Altogether, these results indicate that Png1p is required for histone H4 acetylation and functions upstream of RAD22 in the DNA damage response pathway.

  11. Targeting Midbodies in Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells as a Therapeutic Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    budding yeast. Genetics 191, 347–387 74 Chant, J. and Pringle, J.R. (1995) Patterns of bud-site selection in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . J...status and could contribute to these states. Depletion of the ESCRT-associated protein Alix reduced the amount of free MBs in the medium of neural...basal level of MB release (90% of the MBs after abscission), whereas neuroblastoma cells and other cancer cells had only a medium to low level of release

  12. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip To

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load.

  13. Aptamer-guided gene targeting in yeast and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Patrick; Koh, Kyung Duk; Keskin, Havva; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is a genetic technique to modify an endogenous DNA sequence in its genomic location via homologous recombination (HR) and is useful both for functional analysis and gene therapy applications. HR is inefficient in most organisms and cell types, including mammalian cells, often limiting the effectiveness of gene targeting. Therefore, increasing HR efficiency remains a major challenge to DNA editing. Here, we present a new concept for gene correction based on the development of DNA aptamers capable of binding to a site-specific DNA binding protein to facilitate the exchange of homologous genetic information between a donor molecule and the desired target locus (aptamer-guided gene targeting). We selected DNA aptamers to the I-SceI endonuclease. Bifunctional oligonucleotides containing an I-SceI aptamer sequence were designed as part of a longer single-stranded DNA molecule that contained a region with homology to repair an I-SceI generated double-strand break and correct a disrupted gene. The I-SceI aptamer-containing oligonucleotides stimulated gene targeting up to 32-fold in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and up to 16-fold in human cells. This work provides a novel concept and research direction to increase gene targeting efficiency and lays the groundwork for future studies using aptamers for gene targeting. PMID:24500205

  14. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of metal salt catalysts on yeast cell growth in ethanol conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Yin Lin

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the addition of metal salts and metal salt-catalyzed hydrolyzates on yeast cell growth in ethanol fermentation were investigated. Four yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae WT1, Saccharomyces cerevisiae MT81, Candida sp. 1779, and Klumaromyces fragilis), four metal salts (CuCl2, FeCl3, AgNO3, and I2), two metal salt-catalyzed hydrolyzates (...

  16. Types of cell death and methods of their detection in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wloch-Salamon, D.M.; Bem, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of programmed cell death in unicellular organisms is a subject that arouses great interest of theoreticians and experimental scientists. Already found evolutionarily conserved genes and metabolic pathways confirmed its existence in yeast, protozoa and even bacteria. In the yeast

  17. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J B; Krost, Alois

    2009-11-03

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  18. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J. B.; Krost, Alois

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  19. Histologic assessment of tumor budding in preoperative biopsies to predict nodal metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Mai; Sano, Takaaki; Yokoo, Satoshi; Oyama, Tetsunari

    2016-04-01

    In squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue and the floor of the mouth (FOM), it is important to predict lymph node metastasis, including occult metastasis, before operating. The purpose of this study was for us to determine practical histopathologic parameters as predictive factors for lymph node metastasis in preoperative SCC biopsy specimens. We examined 91 cases of SCC for conventional histopathologic assessment and a new factor, tumor budding, and their relationship with lymph node metastasis. Significant factors via univariate analysis (p budding (score ≥3) and tumor depth (≥3 mm) and these were associated with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, both budding and tumor depth significantly correlated with relapse-free survival; however, evaluating biopsy specimens often proved inaccurate for predicting true tumor depth of cancer invasion. Tumor budding using immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin should be added to routine histologic assessments as a new criterion factoring into the decision as to whether neck dissection is indicated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1582-E1590, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Chong; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs). Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genomes. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best ch...

  1. Combination of yeast hydrolysates to improve CHO cell growth and IgG production

    OpenAIRE

    Mosser, Mathilde; Chevalot, Isabelle; Olmos, Eric; Blanchard, Fabrice; Kapel, Romain; Oriol, Eric; Marc, Ivan; Marc, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Many studies underlined the great benefits of hydrolysates used as additives in animal free media on cell culture performances. However, to precisely define hydrolysate supplementation strategies, a deeper understanding of their effect on cell growth and protein production is required. In the present study, the effect of addition of one yeast extract (YE) and two yeast peptones (named YP.A and YP.B) in a chemically defined medium was first assessed on cell culture performances. Interestingly,...

  2. Use of non-conventional cell disruption method for extraction of proteins from black yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eLeitgeb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2 by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35 °C. The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV-Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2 treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use which is also possible for heat sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions.

  3. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  4. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  5. A novel role for the GTPase-activating protein Bud2 in the spindle position checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Nelson

    Full Text Available The spindle position checkpoint (SPC ensures correct mitotic spindle position before allowing mitotic exit in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In a candidate screen for checkpoint genes, we identified bud2Δ as deficient for the SPC. Bud2 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP, and the only known substrate of Bud2 was Rsr1/Bud1, a Ras-like GTPase and a central component of the bud-site-selection pathway. Mutants lacking Rsr1/Bud1 had no checkpoint defect, as did strains lacking and overexpressing Bud5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rsr1/Bud1. Thus, the checkpoint function of Bud2 is distinct from its role in bud site selection. The catalytic activity of the Bud2 GAP domain was required for the checkpoint, based on the failure of the known catalytic point mutant Bud2(R682A to function in the checkpoint. Based on assays of heterozygous diploids, bud2(R682A, was dominant for loss of checkpoint but recessive for bud-site-selection failure, further indicating a separation of function. Tem1 is a Ras-like protein and is the critical regulator of mitotic exit, sitting atop the mitotic exit network (MEN. Tem1 is a likely target for Bud2, supported by genetic analyses that exclude other Ras-like proteins.

  6. Collective and individual glycolytic oscillations in yeast cells encapsulated in alginate microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Takashi; Obase, Kouhei; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Itoh, Kiminori; Shibata, Kenichi; Takinoue, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    2015-06-01

    Yeast cells were encapsulated into alginate microparticles of a few hundred micrometers diameter using a centrifuge-based droplet shooting device. We demonstrate the first experimental results of glycolytic oscillations in individual yeast cells immobilized in this way. We investigated both the individual and collective oscillatory behaviors at different cell densities. As the cell density increased, the amplitude of the individual oscillations increased while their period decreased, and the collective oscillations became more synchronized, with an order parameter close to 1 (indicating high synchrony). We also synthesized biphasic-Janus microparticles encapsulating yeast cells of different densities in each hemisphere. The cellular oscillations between the two hemispheres were entrained at both the individual and population levels. Such systems of cells encapsulated into microparticles are useful for investigating how cell-to-cell communication depends on the density and spatial distribution of cells.

  7. The golden root, Rhodiola rosea, prolongs lifespan but decreases oxidative stress resistance in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2011-11-15

    The effect of aqueous extract from R. rosea root on lifespan and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. The supplementation of the growth medium with R. rosea extract decreased survival of exponentially growing S. cerevisiae cells under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress, but increased viability and reproduction success of yeast cells in stationary phase. The extract did not significantly affect catalase activity and decreased SOD activity in chronologically aged yeast population. These results suggest that R. rosea acts as a stressor for S. cerevisiae cells, what sensitizes yeast cells to oxidative stress at exponential phase, but induces adaptation in stationary phase cells demonstrating the positive effect on yeast survival without activation of major antioxidant enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping of endoglucanases displayed on yeast cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Inokuma, Kentaro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The surface of yeast cells has been an attractive interface for the effective use of cellulose. Surface enzymes, however, are difficult to visualize and evaluate. In this study, two kinds of unique anchoring regions were used to display the cellulase, endoglucanase (EG), on a yeast cell surface. Differences in the display level and the localization of EG were observed by atomic force microscopy. By surveying the yeast cell surface with a chemically modified cantilever, the interactive force between the cellulose and EG was measured. Force curve mapping revealed differences in the display levels and the localization of EG according to anchoring regions. The proposed methodology enables visualization of displayed enzymes such as EG on the yeast cell surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Overexpression of Robo2 causes defects in the recruitment of metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud branching morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jiayao [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Medical College of NanKai University, Tianjin (China); Li, Qinggang; Xie, Yuansheng; Zhang, Xueguang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Shi, Suozhu [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Chen, Xiangmei, E-mail: xmchen301@126.com [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Medical College of NanKai University, Tianjin (China)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 caused reduced UB branching and glomerular number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fewer MM cells surrounding the UB after overexpression of Robo2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No abnormal Epithelial Morphology of UB or apoptosis of mm cells in the kidney. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 affected MM cells migration and caused UB deficit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced glomerular number can also be caused by fewer MM cells. -- Abstract: Roundabout 2 (Robo2) is a member of the membrane protein receptor family. The chemorepulsive effect of Slit2-Robo2 signaling plays vital roles in nervous system development and neuron migration. Slit2-Robo2 signaling is also important for maintaining the normal morphogenesis of the kidney and urinary collecting system, especially for the branching of the ureteric bud (UB) at the proper site. Slit2 or Robo2 mouse mutants exhibit multilobular kidneys, multiple ureters, and dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and collecting duct system, which lead to vesicoureteral reflux. To understand the effect of Robo2 on kidney development, we used microinjection and electroporation to overexpress GFP-Robo2 in an in vitro embryonic kidney model. Our results show reduced UB branching and decreased glomerular number after in vitro Robo2 overexpression in the embryonic kidneys. We found fewer metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells surrounding the UB but no abnormal morphology in the branching epithelial UB. Meanwhile, no significant change in MM proliferation or apoptosis was observed. These findings indicate that Robo2 is involved in the development of embryonic kidneys and that the normal expression of Robo2 can help maintain proper UB branching and glomerular morphogenesis. Overexpression of Robo2 leads to reduced UB branching caused by fewer surrounding MM cells, but MM cell apoptosis is not involved in this effect. Our study demonstrates that

  10. Application of the yeast pheromone system for controlled cell-cell communication and signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A; Rödel, G; Ostermann, K

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the work is to exploit the yeast pheromone system for controlled cell-cell communication and as an amplification circuit in technical applications, e.g. biosensors or sensor-actor systems. As a proof of principle, we developed recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in response to different concentrations of the alpha(α)-factor mating pheromone. A respective reporter construct allowing the pheromone-driven expression of EGFP was transformed into the S. cerevisiae strains BY4741 and BY4741 bar1Δ. Upon addition of synthetic α-factor, the fluorescence strongly increases after 4 h. Furthermore, cells with constitutive α-factor expression were able to induce the expression of EGFP in co-cultivation with sensor cells only if both cell types were deleted for the gene BAR1, encoding α-factor protease. For technical applications, the immobilization of functionalized cells may be beneficial. We show that pheromone-induced expression of EGFP is effective in alginate-immobilized cells. Based on S. cerevisiae α-factor, we developed a controlled cell-cell communication system and amplification circuit for pheromone-driven expression of a target protein. The system is effective both in suspension and after cell immobilization. The developed set of recombinant yeast strains is the basis to apply the yeast pheromone system for signal production and amplification in biosensors or sensor-actor systems. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Characterisation of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Semple, Colin A; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    with other cell proteins, but has also been found to associate with DNA junctions, and to be involved in other processes including transcription regulation and mitochondrial protein import.Here, we characterize NAC in fission yeast. We find that NAC is associated with ribosomes, while a significant fraction...... defects in protein degradation. Accordingly, we find that the NAC UBA domain belongs to an ancient and distinct subgroup of the UBA family. In contrast to the situation with budding yeast, fission yeast cells devoid of NAC were not temperature sensitive. However, they displayed resistance to the amino...

  12. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  13. Yeast peroxisomes : function and biogenesis of a versatile cell organelle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, IJ; Veenhuis, M

    1997-01-01

    Yeast peroxisomes harbour enzymes involved in the metabolism of specific growth substrates, Sequestration of these enzymes increases the efficiency of such pathways. Currently, 16 genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis have been identified, and analysis of their products suggests novel mechanisms

  14. Responding to attraction: chemotaxis and chemotropism in Dictyostelium and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, R A

    1999-01-01

    Polarized growth in response to external signals is essential for both the internal organization of cells and generation of complex multicellular structures during development. Oriented growth or movement requires specific detection of an external cue, reorganization of the cytoskeleton and subsequent growth or movement. Genetic approaches in both the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum have shed light on the molecular and cellular aspects of growth or movement towards an external signal. This review discusses the mechanisms and signalling pathways that enable yeast and Dictyostelium cells to translate external signals into directed growth and movement, respectively.

  15. Plasmids with E2 epitope tags: tagging modules for N- and C-terminal PCR-based gene targeting in both budding and fission yeast, and inducible expression vectors for fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Tiina

    2009-01-01

    A single-step PCR-based epitope tagging enables fast and efficient gene targeting with various epitope tags. This report presents a series of plasmids for the E2 epitope tagging of proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. E2Tags are 10-amino acids (epitope E2a: SSTSSDFRDR)- and 12 amino acids (epitope E2b: GVSSTSSDFRDR)-long peptides derived from the E2 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. The modules for C-terminal tagging with E2a and E2b epitopes were constructed by the modification of the pYM-series plasmid. The N-terminal E2a and E2b tagging modules were based on pOM-series plasmid. The pOM-series plasmids were selected for this study because of their use of the Cre-loxP recombination system. The latter enables a marker cassette to be removed after integration into the loci of interest and, thereafter, the tagged protein is expressed under its endogenous promoter. Specifically for fission yeast, high copy pREP plasmids containing the E2a epitope tag as an N-terminal or C-terminal tag were constructed. The properties of E2a and E2b epitopes and the sensitivity of two anti-E2 monoclonal antibodies (5E11 and 3F12) were tested using several S. cerevisiae and Sz. pombe E2-tagged strains.

  16. Detection and quantitative determination by PIXE of the mutagen Sn{sup 2+} in yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viau, C.M. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Yoneama, M.-L. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, CEP 91501-970, CP 15051, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: jfdias@if.ufrgs.br; Dias, J.F. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, CEP 91501-970, CP 15051, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pungartnik, C. [Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Brendel, M. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC, Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Henriques, J.A.P. [Departamento de Biofisica/Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, ULBRA, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    The main goal of this work was to determine the concentration of Sn{sup 2+} ions in cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to correlate their quantity with the genotoxicity of intracellularly accumulated metal ions. The intracellular metal content of yeast cells was determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) after cell exposure to SnCl{sub 2}. To that end, a thick target protocol was developed for PIXE analysis. The samples were irradiated with a 2 MeV proton beam, while the induced X-rays were detected with a high-purity germanium detector. The results of the toxicity of SnCl{sub 2} and the PIXE analysis performed with two different yeast strains (haploid and diploid) suggest that the exposure of haploid and diploid yeast to Sn{sup 2+} induces DNA lesions and that the absorption depends on the genetic background of each strain.

  17. New roles for old characters: an educational primer for use with "Vps factors are required for efficient transcription elongation in budding yeast".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duina, Andrea A

    2013-05-01

    An article from Alan Hinnebusch's laboratory in the March 2013 issue of GENETICS establishes an exciting new link between proteins with well-established roles in the endomembrane system and the process of transcription elongation. This Primer article provides tools needed for students to fully appreciate, analyze, and critically evaluate the experiments and interpretations of Gaur et al. (2013). The primer includes detailed descriptions of techniques used in the study, such as the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and assays for transcription elongation, and it provides a framework to facilitate an understanding of how a combination of genetic, biochemical, and cell microscopy experimental approaches were used by the authors to converge on a single major conclusion. Suggestions for using this Primer article in an undergraduate or graduate-level course in conjunction with the original article to promote student learning are also presented.

  18. A genome-wide resource of cell cycle and cell shape genes of fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Jacqueline; Wood, Valerie; Jeffery, Linda; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Salas-Pino, Silvia; Heichinger, Christian; Nurse, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To identify near complete sets of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape, we have visually screened a genome-wide gene deletion library of 4843 fission yeast deletion mutants (95.7% of total protein encoding genes) for their effects on these processes. A total of 513 genes have been identified as being required for cell cycle progression, 276 of which have not been previously described as cell cycle genes. Deletions of a further 333 genes lead to specific alterations in cell shape and another 524 genes result in generally misshapen cells. Here, we provide the first eukaryotic resource of gene deletions, which describes a near genome-wide set of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape. PMID:23697806

  19. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: possible involvement of c-Met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-11-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Axillary bud development in chrysanthemum

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiter, de, H.

    1996-01-01


    Each chrysanthemum cutting originates from an axillary bud. For an improvement of the cultivation of cuttings or more specific their quality, it is necessary that the development of an axillary bud can be controlled as good as possible. Axillary bud development can be distinguished into axillary bud formation and axillary bud outgrowth. The effect of assimilates, position and age of axillary buds, and temperature on formation and outgrowth of the axillary buds and the subsequent cu...

  1. High similarity of phylogenetic profiles of rate-limiting enzymes with inhibitory relation in Human, Mouse, Rat, budding Yeast and E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic profile is widely used to characterize functional linkage and conservation between proteins without amino acid sequence similarity. To survey the conservative regulatory properties of rate-limiting enzymes (RLEs) in metabolic inhibitory network across different species, we define the enzyme inhibiting pair as: where the first enzyme in a pair is the inhibitor provider and the second is the target of the inhibitor. Phylogenetic profiles of enzymes in the inhibiting pairs are further generated to measure the functional linkage of these enzymes during evolutionary history. Results We find that the RLEs generate, on average, over half of all in vivo inhibitors in each surveyed model organism. And these inhibitors inhibit on average over 85% targets in metabolic inhibitory network and cover the majority of targets of cross-pathway inhibiting relations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the phylogenetic profiles of the enzymes in inhibiting pairs in which at least one enzyme is rate-limiting often show higher similarities than those in common inhibiting enzyme pairs. In addition, RLEs, compared to common metabolic enzymes, often tend to produce ADP instead of AMP in conservative inhibitory networks. Conclusions Combined with the conservative roles of RLEs in their efficiency in sensing metabolic signals and transmitting regulatory signals to the rest of the metabolic system, the RLEs may be important molecules in balancing energy homeostasis via maintaining the ratio of ATP to ADP in living cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that similarities of phylogenetic profiles of enzymes in the inhibiting enzyme pairs are not only correlated with enzyme topological importance, but also related with roles of the enzymes in metabolic inhibitory network. PMID:22369203

  2. Construction of a pathological risk model of occult lymph node metastases for prognostication by semi-automated image analysis of tumor budding in early-stage oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nicklas Juel; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Lelkaitis, Giedrius

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to identify at diagnosis those patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), who have a poor prognosis and those that have a high risk of harboring occult lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to develop a standardized and objective digital scoring method...... to evaluate the predictive value of tumor budding. We developed a semi-automated image-analysis algorithm, Digital Tumor Bud Count (DTBC), to evaluate tumor budding. The algorithm was tested in 222 consecutive patients with early-stage OSCC and major endpoints were overall (OS) and progression free survival...

  3. Taste buds as peripheral chemosensory processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are peripheral chemosensory organs situated in the oral cavity. Each taste bud consists of a community of 50-100 cells that interact synaptically during gustatory stimulation. At least three distinct cell types are found in mammalian taste buds - Type I cells, Receptor (Type II) cells, and Presynaptic (Type III) cells. Type I cells appear to be glial-like cells. Receptor cells express G protein-coupled taste receptors for sweet, bitter, or umami compounds. Presynaptic cells transduce acid stimuli (sour taste). Cells that sense salt (NaCl) taste have not yet been confidently identified in terms of these cell types. During gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells secrete synaptic, autocrine, and paracrine transmitters. These transmitters include ATP, acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), and GABA. Glutamate is an efferent transmitter that stimulates Presynaptic cells to release 5-HT. This chapter discusses these transmitters, which cells release them, the postsynaptic targets for the transmitters, and how cell-cell communication shapes taste bud signaling via these transmitters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. WARBURG EFFECT AND TRANSLOCATION-INDUCED GENOMIC INSTABILITY: TWO YEAST MODELS FOR CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eTosato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression i the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK, which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and ii Bridge-Induced chromosome Translocation (BIT mimicking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect, and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, pyruvate kinase, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and posttranslational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (translocants, between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the Bridge-Induced Translocation system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast.

  5. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lindemann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems.

  6. Assembly and budding of Ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Noda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus is responsible for highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Like all viruses, it must reproduce its various components and assemble them in cells in order to reproduce infectious virions and perpetuate itself. To generate infectious Ebolavirus, a viral genome-protein complex called the nucleocapsid (NC must be produced and transported to the cell surface, incorporated into virions, and then released from cells. To further our understanding of the Ebolavirus life cycle, we expressed the various viral proteins in mammalian cells and examined them ultrastructurally and biochemically. Expression of nucleoprotein alone led to the formation of helical tubes, which likely serve as a core for the NC. The matrix protein VP40 was found to be critical for transport of NCs to the cell surface and for the incorporation of NCs into virions, where interaction between nucleoprotein and the matrix protein VP40 is likely essential for these processes. Examination of virus-infected cells revealed that virions containing NCs mainly emerge horizontally from the cell surface, whereas empty virions mainly bud vertically, suggesting that horizontal budding is the major mode of Ebolavirus budding. These data form a foundation for the identification and development of potential antiviral agents to combat the devastating disease caused by this virus.

  7. Assembly and budding of Ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi; Ebihara, Hideki; Muramoto, Yukiko; Fujii, Ken; Takada, Ayato; Sagara, Hiroshi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kida, Hiroshi; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-09-01

    Ebolavirus is responsible for highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Like all viruses, it must reproduce its various components and assemble them in cells in order to reproduce infectious virions and perpetuate itself. To generate infectious Ebolavirus, a viral genome-protein complex called the nucleocapsid (NC) must be produced and transported to the cell surface, incorporated into virions, and then released from cells. To further our understanding of the Ebolavirus life cycle, we expressed the various viral proteins in mammalian cells and examined them ultrastructurally and biochemically. Expression of nucleoprotein alone led to the formation of helical tubes, which likely serve as a core for the NC. The matrix protein VP40 was found to be critical for transport of NCs to the cell surface and for the incorporation of NCs into virions, where interaction between nucleoprotein and the matrix protein VP40 is likely essential for these processes. Examination of virus-infected cells revealed that virions containing NCs mainly emerge horizontally from the cell surface, whereas empty virions mainly bud vertically, suggesting that horizontal budding is the major mode of Ebolavirus budding. These data form a foundation for the identification and development of potential antiviral agents to combat the devastating disease caused by this virus.

  8. Tolerance of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs are considered as another ’green solvent’, after the supercritical carbon dioxide. They are a promising reaction medium for biocatalysis process. The tolerance of active cells in hydrophobic imidazolium-based ILs (1-R-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [RMim][PF6] has been studied in this work. Calcium-alginate-entrapped baker’s yeast has been chosen as the model of living cells. The results show that this kind of ILs possess a certain degree of biocompatibility. The tolerance of yeast cells to the ILs decreases with the increase of the R chain length of these ILs. The experiment indicated that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMim][PF6] possessed excellent biocompatibility compared to the other imidazolium-based ILs. The moisture content in the ILs was the key factor that affected the tolerance. The activity retention of yeast cells pretreated with [BMim][PF6] saturated with water and aqueous [BMim][PF6] biphasic system was about 70 %, but it was only 50 % with the anhydrous [BMim][PF6]. Although the yeast cells were pretreated with [BMim][PF6] for 24 h, the activity retention was up to 45 %. The yeast cells had around 50 % activity after being pretreated 4 times with [BMim][PF6]. This shows that the water immiscible ILs possess good biocompatibility, and they are suitable for application as the reaction medium catalyzed by living cells.

  9. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethanol...... tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes...... and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  10. Exploring Neurofibromin Function in a Yeast Model of NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    to define NF1 disease mechanisms. Budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae , have two NF1-like genes, called IRA1 and IRA2. In year one of the project...mammalian cells and in Drosophila. References Hohfeld, J., Veenhuis, M., and Kunau, W.H. (1991). PAS3, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene...anaerobiosis yes yes PEX 11 Peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome proliferation and medium -chain fatty acid oxidation, most abundant

  11. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Telomere clustering and anchoring in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Schober, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Organisation spatiale des 32 télomères de la levure "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" dans des foyers périnucléaires. J'ai posé la question: "Quel télomère se situe dans quel foyer?". Un télomère donné reste-t-il toujours dans le même foyer ou existe-t-il des télomères en dehors des foyers? l'objectif de ma thèse était de visualiser ces foyers des télomères et un télomère individuel dans des cellules vivantes pour répondre à ces questions. En outre j'ai pu montrer que l'interaction de la télomerase ...

  13. Assessing phagotrophy in the mixotrophic ciliate Paramecium bursaria using GFP-expressing yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Moriya, Hisao; Iwai, Sosuke

    2017-07-03

    We used cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as fluorescently labelled prey to assess the phagocytic activities of the mixotrophic ciliate Paramecium bursaria, which harbours symbiotic Chlorella-like algae. Because of different fluorescence spectra of GFP and algal chlorophyll, ingested GFP-expressing yeast cells can be distinguished from endosymbiotic algal cells and directly counted in individual P. bursaria cells using fluorescence microscopy. By using GFP-expressing yeast cells, we found that P. bursaria altered ingestion activities under different physiological conditions, such as different growth phases or the presence/absence of endosymbionts. Use of GFP-expressing yeast cells allowed us to estimate the digestion rates of live prey of the ciliate. In contrast to the ingestion activities, the digestion rate within food vacuoles was not affected by the presence of endosymbionts, consistent with previous findings that food and perialgal vacuoles are spatially and functionally separated in P. bursaria. Thus, GFP-expressing yeast may provide a valuable tool to assess both ingestion and digestion activities of ciliates that feed on eukaryotic organisms. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Yeast cell surface display: An efficient strategy for improvement of bioethanol fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianzhong

    2017-03-04

    The cell surface serves as a functional interface between the inside and the outside of the cell. Within the past 20 y the ability of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to display heterologous proteins on the cell surface has been demonstrated. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae has been both developed and applied in expression of various proteins on the cell surface. Using this novel and useful strategy, proteins and peptides of various kinds can be displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusing the protein of interest with the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring system. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) using S. cerevisiae represents a promising technology for bioethanol production. However, further work is needed to improve the fermentation performance. There is some excellent previous research regarding construction of yeast biocatalyst using the surface display system to decrease cost, increase efficiency of ethanol production and directly utilize starch or biomass for fuel production. In this commentary, we reviewed the yeast surface display system and highlighted recent work. Additionally, the strategy for decrease of phytate phosphate content in dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) by display of phytase on the yeast cell surface is discussed.

  15. Biosorption of mercury on magnetically modified yeast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yavuz, H.; Denizli, A.; Gungunes, H.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2006), s. 253-260 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : mercury removal * magnetic biosorbents * yeast Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.497, year: 2006

  16. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    ). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...... marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future...

  17. Immobilised Sarawak Malaysia yeast cells for production of bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Masniroszaime Mohd; Kofli, Noorhisham Tan; Rozaimah, Siti; Abdullah, Sheikh

    2011-05-01

    Bioethanol production using yeast has become a popular topic due to worrying depleting worldwide fuel reserve. The aim of the study was to investigate the capability of Malaysia yeast strains isolated from starter culture used in traditional fermented food and alcoholic beverages in producing Bioethanol using alginate beads entrapment method. The starter yeast consists of groups of microbes, thus the yeasts were grown in Sabouraud agar to obtain single colony called ST1 (tuak) and ST3 (tapai). The growth in Yeast Potatoes Dextrose (YPD) resulted in specific growth of ST1 at micro = 0.396 h-1 and ST3 at micro = 0.38 h-1, with maximum ethanol production of 7.36 g L-1 observed using ST1 strain. The two strains were then immobilized using calcium alginate entrapment method producing average alginate beads size of 0.51 cm and were grown in different substrates; YPD medium and Local Brown Sugar (LBS) for 8 h in flask. The maximum ethanol concentration measured after 7 h were at 6.63 and 6.59 g L-1 in YPD media and 1.54 and 1.39 g L-1in LBS media for ST1 and ST3, respectively. The use of LBS as carbon source showed higher yield of product (Yp/s), 0.59 g g-1 compared to YPD, 0.25 g g-1 in ST1 and (Yp/s), 0.54 g g-1 compared to YPD, 0.24 g g-1 in ST3 . This study indicated the possibility of using local strains (STI and ST3) to produce bioethanol via immobilization technique with local materials as substrate.

  18. [Effect of triterpene glycosides on RNA biosynthesis in a yeast cell culture of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M M; Baranova, S I; Strigina, L I; Chetyrina, N S; Sokol'skiĭ, I N

    1977-09-01

    The effect of triterpen glycosides of cauloside C from Caulophyllum robustum, theasaponine from Thea sinensis ahd stichoposide A from Stichopus japonicus on multiplication and biosynthesis of RNA in the cells of a 7-hour culture of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was studied. It was shown that cauloside C, theasaponine and stichoposide A in concentrations of 7.5 gamma/ml inhibited multiplication of the yeast cells by 65, 10 and 90 per cent respectively. The summation RNA of the yeast cells is divided into 3 zones on Sephadex G-100. The glycosides induced no pronounced changes in the chromotographic profile of RNA. Biosynthesis of the transport and ribosomal RNA were inhibited to the same extent. Triterpen glycosides inhibited the biosynthesis of RNA at the stage of 14C-uridine in corporation into the nucleotide pool of the yeast cells.

  19. Permeabilization of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls using nanosecond high power electrical pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirke, A.; Zimkus, A.; Balevicius, S.; Stankevic, V.; Ramanaviciene, A.; Ramanavicius, A.; Zurauskiene, N.

    2014-12-01

    The electrical field-induced changes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells permeabilization to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) ions were studied using square-shaped, nanosecond duration high power electrical pulses. It was obtained that pulses having durations ranging from 10 ns to 60 ns, and generating electric field strengths up to 190 kV/cm significantly (up to 65 times) increase the absorption rate of TPP+ ions without any detectible influence on the yeast cell viability. The modelling of the TPP+ absorption process using a second order rate equation demonstrates that depending on the duration of the pulses, yeast cell clusters of different sizes are homogeniously permeabilized. It was concluded, that nanosecond pulse-induced permeabilization can be applied to increase the operational speed of whole cell biosensors.

  20. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  1. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  2. Yeast Killer Toxin K28: Biology and Unique Strategy of Host Cell Intoxication and Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Becker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initial discovery of killer toxin-secreting brewery strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae in the mid-sixties of the last century marked the beginning of intensive research in the yeast virology field. So far, four different S. cerevisiae killer toxins (K28, K1, K2, and Klus, encoded by cytoplasmic inherited double-stranded RNA viruses (dsRNA of the Totiviridae family, have been identified. Among these, K28 represents the unique example of a yeast viral killer toxin that enters a sensitive cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis to reach its intracellular target(s. This review summarizes and discusses the most recent advances and current knowledge on yeast killer toxin K28, with special emphasis on its endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, pointing towards future directions and open questions in this still timely and fascinating field of killer yeast research.

  3. What Are Taste Buds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What Are Taste Buds? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Are Taste Buds? Print A A A en español ¿Qué ... Did you ever wonder why your favorite foods taste so good? Well, you can thank your taste ...

  4. The CWI Pathway: Regulation of the Transcriptional Adaptive Response to Cell Wall Stress in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Sanz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are surrounded by an essential structure, the cell wall, which not only confers cell shape but also protects cells from environmental stress. As a consequence, yeast cells growing under cell wall damage conditions elicit rescue mechanisms to provide maintenance of cellular integrity and fungal survival. Through transcriptional reprogramming, yeast modulate the expression of genes important for cell wall biogenesis and remodeling, metabolism and energy generation, morphogenesis, signal transduction and stress. The yeast cell wall integrity (CWI pathway, which is very well conserved in other fungi, is the key pathway for the regulation of this adaptive response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the yeast transcriptional program elicited to counterbalance cell wall stress situations, the role of the CWI pathway in the regulation of this program and the importance of the transcriptional input received by other pathways. Modulation of this adaptive response through the CWI pathway by positive and negative transcriptional feedbacks is also discussed. Since all these regulatory mechanisms are well conserved in pathogenic fungi, improving our knowledge about them will have an impact in the developing of new antifungal therapies.

  5. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level p...

  6. Spectral characterization of yeast cells with an epitaxy-based UV-Vis optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, M; Zhou, X; Lee, A C; Poenar, D P; Heng, C K; Tan, S N

    2006-06-01

    The optical spectra of yeast cells in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) were analyzed with an optical UV-vis sensor based on a shallow p(+)n junction realized in a low doped n-type epitaxial silicon layer grown on a strongly doped n(+) substrate. The presence of the n/n(+) interface allows a significantly enhanced sensitivity, due to an increased collection of carriers photogenerated both by short and large wavelengths in the range 250...800 nm. In our experiments the optical absorption of yeast cells was investigated in the wavelength range 250...500 nm as a function of the cells concentration in PBS in the range of 6 x 10(6)-2 x 10(8) cells/ml. The main absorption peaks were found at 310, 350, 400 and 427 nm, respectively. A significant red shift of the wide absorption band at 427 nm has been observed when increasing cell concentration. This red shift behaviour was nonlinear, with saturation observed for yeast concentrations larger than 5 x 10(7) cells/ml. The half-peak bandwidth of this peak also showed a most significant nonlinear variation. These findings suggest that monitoring the parameters of the absorption band at 427 nm versus cells concentration could be used, e.g. using a dedicated integrated spectrometric microsystem, for fast quantitative measurements of yeast cell concentrations in various bio-samples, with possible applications in the food industry.

  7. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  8. A method of correlative light and electron microscopy for yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2014-06-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a method of imaging in which the same specimen is observed by both light microscopy and electron microscopy. Specifically, CLEM compares images obtained by light and electron microscopy and makes a correlation between them. After the advent of fluorescent proteins, CLEM was extended by combining electron microscopy with fluorescence microscopy to enable molecular-specific imaging of subcellular structures with a resolution at the nanometer level. This method is a powerful tool that is used to determine the localization of specific molecules of interest in the context of subcellular structures. Knowledge of the localization of target proteins coupled with the functions of the structures to which they are localized yields valuable information about the molecular functions of these proteins. However, this method has been mostly applied to adherent cells due to technical difficulties in immobilizing non-adherent target cells, such as yeasts, during sample preparation. We have developed a method of CLEM applicable to yeast cells. In this report, we detail this method and present its extension to Live CLEM. The Live CLEM method enabled us to link the dynamic properties of molecules of interest to cellular ultrastructures in the yeast cell. Since yeasts are premier organisms in molecular genetics, combining CLEM with yeast genetics promises to provide important new findings for understanding the molecular basis of the function of cellular structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Yeast extract from Express Five serum-free medium contains factors at about 35 kDa, essential for growth of Trichoplusia ni insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ulrika; Häggström, Lena

    2005-10-01

    The yeast extract (of unknown origin) present in the commercially available serum-free medium 'Express Five' contains factors ('yeast extract factors') up to 35 kDa which are essential for growth of Trichoplusia ni insect cells. A yeast extract brand lacking these components could not support growth of T. ni cells. However, cell proliferation was restored by adding chromatographic fractions containing the yeast extract factors. The yeast extract factors were not solely responsible for the growth enhancing effect of yeast extract but some other components, which seem to be generally present in yeast extracts, are also required for T. ni proliferation.

  10. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  11. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.X. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China); College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Y.F.; Wang, Q.S.; Chen, Z.L.; Liao, R.R.; Pan, Y.C. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-12

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  12. Calcium and reactive oxygen species in regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition and of programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Michela; Bernardi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in yeast shares many features with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of mammals. With many stimuli, increased cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and ROS generation are the triggering signals that lead to mitochondrial permeabilization and release of proapoptotic factors, which initiates yeast PCD. While in mammals the permeability transition pore (PTP), a high-conductance inner membrane channel activated by increased matrix Ca(2+) and oxidative stress, is recognized as part of this signaling cascade, whether a similar process occurs in yeast is still debated. The potential role of the PTP in yeast PCD has generally been overlooked because yeast mitochondria lack the Ca(2+) uniporter, which in mammals allows rapid equilibration of cytosolic Ca(2+) with the matrix. In this short review we discuss the nature of the yeast permeability transition and reevaluate its potential role in the effector phase of yeast PCD triggered by Ca(2+) and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic assessment of Capparis spinosa buds on survival of periodontal ligament cells using a real-time cell analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, F; Özan, Ü; Oktay, E A; Toptas, O; Özdemir, H; KürÞat, Er

    2015-01-01

    Tooth avulsion is the most severe type of traumatic dental injuries and it results in the complete displacement of the tooth out of its socket in alveolar bone. Reimplantation of the tooth is considered to be a best treatment modality due to its biological and psychological advantages. Its prognosis depends on the extra alveolar time, the storage medium, and the patient's general health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Capparis spinosa (C. spinosa) in maintaining the viability of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using a real-time cell analysis method. Periodontal ligament cells were obtained from healthy human third molars extracted for orthodontic purposes. The storage media tested were: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), C. spinosa, Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS), and light milk. A real-time cell analyzer system was used to evaluate cell viability. After seeding cell suspensions into the wells of the E-plate 96, PDL cells were treated with each of tested media and monitored for every 5 min for 26 h. Statistical analysis of the data was accomplished using one-way analysis of variance complemented by the Tukey test. The level of significance was set at P spinosa groups had significantly higher cell index values compared with the HBSS and light milk (P spinosa showed better results than DMEM (control), but this difference was not found statistically significant. Capparis spinosa can be a suitable, alternative storage medium for avulsed teeth.

  14. Taste Bud Homeostasis in Health, Disease, and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50–100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature...

  15. A small conserved domain in the yeast Spa2p is necessary and sufficient for its polarized localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, R A; Lowe, N

    1997-07-14

    SPA2 encodes a yeast protein that is one of the first proteins to localize to sites of polarized growth, such as the shmoo tip and the incipient bud. The dynamics and requirements for Spa2p localization in living cells are examined using Spa2p green fluorescent protein fusions. Spa2p localizes to one edge of unbudded cells and subsequently is observable in the bud tip. Finally, during cytokinesis Spa2p is present as a ring at the mother-daughter bud neck. The bud emergence mutants bem1 and bem2 and mutants defective in the septins do not affect Spa2p localization to the bud tip. Strikingly, a small domain of Spa2p comprised of 150 amino acids is necessary and sufficient for localization to sites of polarized growth. This localization domain and the amino terminus of Spa2p are essential for its function in mating. Searching the yeast genome database revealed a previously uncharacterized protein which we name, Sph1p (a2p omolog), with significant homology to the localization domain and amino terminus of Spa2p. This protein also localizes to sites of polarized growth in budding and mating cells. SPH1, which is similar to SPA2, is required for bipolar budding and plays a role in shmoo formation. Overexpression of either Spa2p or Sph1p can block the localization of either protein fused to green fluorescent protein, suggesting that both Spa2p and Sph1p bind to and are localized by the same component. The identification of a 150-amino acid domain necessary and sufficient for localization of Spa2p to sites of polarized growth and the existence of this domain in another yeast protein Sph1p suggest that the early localization of these proteins may be mediated by a receptor that recognizes this small domain.

  16. Glycerol Production by Fermenting Yeast Cells Is Essential for Optimal Bread Dough Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts. PMID:25764309

  17. Bimolecular Complementation to Visualize Filovirus VP40-Host Complexes in Live Mammalian Cells: Toward the Identification of Budding Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Virology [20] J. Martin -Serrano, T. Zang, and P. D. Bieniasz, “Role of ESCRT-I in retroviral budding,” The Journal of Virology, vol. 77, no. 8, pp...4794–4804, 2003. [21] J. Martin -Serrano, T. Zang, and P. D. Bieniasz, “HIV-1 and Ebola virus encode small peptide motifs that recruit Tsg101 to sites of...with the PTAP motif of the HIV-1 p6 protein,” Nature Structural Biology, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 812–817, 2002. [38] G. M. Morris, H. Ruth, W. Lindstrom et

  18. Graphene as membrane for encapsulation of yeast cells: protective and electrically conducting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempaiah, Ravindra; Salgado, Shehan; Chung, Wai L; Maheshwari, Vivek

    2011-11-07

    Graphene sheets (chemically reduced), a high modulus and high thermal and electrically conductive material are coupled with yeast cells to form an encapsulating inorganic functional layer. The coupling of the high modulus sheets with the cells increases their stability to osmotic stresses. The sheets also allow the direct visualization of the cells in an electron microscope. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  19. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved...... equivalent, displaying reduction curves that interrelated directly with CFU counts. For growth rate estimation, the methylene blue reduction test (MBRT) proved superior, since the discriminatory nature of the method allowed for the quantification of metabolically active cells only, excluding dead cells...

  20. Propagation of Mammalian Prions in Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, David A

    2006-01-01

    ...: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This unicellular organism offers a number of potential advantages for the study of prion biology, including rapid generation time, ease of culturing, and facile genetics...

  1. An Imaging Flow Cytometry-based approach to analyse the fission yeast cell cycle in fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James O; Swaffer, Matthew; Filby, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is an excellent model organism for studying eukaryotic cell division because many of the underlying principles and key regulators of cell cycle biology are conserved from yeast to humans. As such it can be employed as tool for understanding complex human diseases that arise from dis-regulation in cell cycle controls, including cancers. Conventional Flow Cytometry (CFC) is a high-throughput, multi-parameter, fluorescence-based single cell analysis technology. It is widely used for studying the mammalian cell cycle both in the context of the normal and disease states by measuring changes in DNA content during the transition through G1, S and G2/M using fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Unfortunately analysis of the fission yeast cell cycle by CFC is not straightforward because, unlike mammalian cells, cytokinesis occurs after S-phase meaning that bi-nucleated G1 cells have the same DNA content as mono-nucleated G2 cells and cannot be distinguished using total integrated fluorescence (pulse area). It has been elegantly shown that the width of the DNA pulse can be used to distinguish G2 cells with a single 2C foci versus G1 cells with two 1C foci, however the accuracy of this measurement is dependent on the orientation of the cell as it traverses the laser beam. To this end we sought to improve the accuracy of the fission yeast cell cycle analysis and have developed an Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC)-based method that is able to preserve the high throughput, objective analysis afforded by CFC in combination with the spatial and morphometric information provide by microscopy. We have been able to derive an analysis framework for subdividing the yeast cell cycle that is based on intensiometric and morphometric measurements and is thus robust against orientation-based miss-classification. In addition we can employ image-based metrics to define populations of septated/bi-nucleated cells and measure cellular dimensions. To our knowledge

  2. Taste bud homeostasis in health, disease, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50-100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8-12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging.

  3. Nutrient sensing and TOR signaling in yeast and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Asier; Hall, Michael N

    2017-02-15

    Coordinating cell growth with nutrient availability is critical for cell survival. The evolutionarily conserved TOR (target of rapamycin) controls cell growth in response to nutrients, in particular amino acids. As a central controller of cell growth, mTOR (mammalian TOR) is implicated in several disorders, including cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Here, we review how nutrient availability is sensed and transduced to TOR in budding yeast and mammals. A better understanding of how nutrient availability is transduced to TOR may allow novel strategies in the treatment for mTOR-related diseases. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Systematic identification of yeast cell cycle transcription factors using multiple data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cell cycle is a complex process and is precisely regulated at many levels. Many genes specific to the cell cycle are regulated transcriptionally and are expressed just before they are needed. To understand the cell cycle process, it is important to identify the cell cycle transcription factors (TFs that regulate the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. Results We developed a method to identify cell cycle TFs in yeast by integrating current ChIP-chip, mutant, transcription factor binding site (TFBS, and cell cycle gene expression data. We identified 17 cell cycle TFs, 12 of which are known cell cycle TFs, while the remaining five (Ash1, Rlm1, Ste12, Stp1, Tec1 are putative novel cell cycle TFs. For each cell cycle TF, we assigned specific cell cycle phases in which the TF functions and identified the time lag for the TF to exert regulatory effects on its target genes. We also identified 178 novel cell cycle-regulated genes, among which 59 have unknown functions, but they may now be annotated as cell cycle-regulated genes. Most of our predictions are supported by previous experimental or computational studies. Furthermore, a high confidence TF-gene regulatory matrix is derived as a byproduct of our method. Each TF-gene regulatory relationship in this matrix is supported by at least three data sources: gene expression, TFBS, and ChIP-chip or/and mutant data. We show that our method performs better than four existing methods for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs. Finally, an application of our method to different cell cycle gene expression datasets suggests that our method is robust. Conclusion Our method is effective for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs and cell cycle-regulated genes. Many of our predictions are validated by the literature. Our study shows that integrating multiple data sources is a powerful approach to studying complex biological systems.

  5. Utilization of exogenous pyrimidines as a source of nitrogen by cells of the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, O A; Bekker, M L

    1976-01-01

    Uptake and intracellular transformation of pyrimidines supplying cells of the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis with nitrogen have been studied. The amine nitrogen of cytosine was found to be the easiest to utilize. The presence in the medium of inorganic ammonia along with cytosine had a slight effect on cytosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.1) activity. The uracil produced entered into the nutrient medium with no fission break of the pyridmidine ring. In the absence of any other source of nitrogen, the cells of the yeast R. glutinis utilized nitrogen of the pyrimidine ring of oxypyrimidines. Catabolism of uracil followed the reductive pattern, with release of carbon dioxide; this was accompanied by synthesis of the key enzyme of pyrimidine catabolism, dihydrouracil dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.1), whose activity rose 10-fold. With thymidne as the sole source of nitrogen, the lag-phase growth of the yeast cells was maximum. Catabolism of the pyrimidine ring of thymine was possibly preceded by its transformation into uracil. With no source of nitrogen easily utilized, the uridine 5'-monophosphate content in the generally acid-soluble pool rose. Our discussion of the regulation of catabolism of exogenous pyrimidine bases by the yeast R. glutinis takes into account the fact that transformations of pyrimidine bases are determined by how easily the cells can use a particular base as a source of nitrogen. PMID:945262

  6. Blastomyces dermatitidis Yeast Cells Inhibit Nitric Oxide Production by Alveolar Macrophage Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Nicole M.; Carmen, John C.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to evade host antimicrobial mechanisms is crucial to their virulence. The dimorphic fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis can infect immunocompetent patients, producing a primary pulmonary infection that can later disseminate to other organs. B. dermatitidis possesses a remarkable ability to resist killing by alveolar macrophages. To date, no mechanism to explain this resistance has been described. Here, we focus on macrophage production of the toxic molecule nitric oxide as a potential target of subversion by B. dermatitidis yeast cells. We report that B. dermatitidis yeast cells reduce nitric oxide levels in the supernatants of activated alveolar macrophages. This reduction is not due to detoxification of nitric oxide, but rather to suppression of macrophage nitric oxide production. We show that B. dermatitidis yeast cells do not block upregulation of macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression or limit iNOS access to its arginine substrate. Instead, B. dermatitidis yeast cells appear to inhibit iNOS enzymatic activity. Further investigation into the genetic basis of this potential virulence mechanism could lead to the identification of novel antifungal drug targets. PMID:21444664

  7. Study of the inhibition of respiration/fermentation in yeast cells by sodium fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Pérez, José Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the necessary guidelines to achieve the observation of the inhibition of sugar metabolism in yeast cells by means of the compound sodium fluoride. This activity is appropriate for the subject of Biology in Secondary Education as well as High School.

  8. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Li, Mingji

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in aromatic chemicals in the chemical industry as these can be used for production of dyes, anti-oxidants, nutraceuticals and food ingredients. Yeast is a widely used cell factory and it is particularly well suited for production of aromatic chemicals via complex biosynthetic...

  9. Yeast single cell protein in the diet of Oreochromis niloticus (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2Department of Animal Science and Fishery, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria. Accepted 27 September ... with yeast single cell protein (SCP) in the order 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%, respectively. Trial feeding was carried out with .... BV = NPU / Apparent protein digestibility coefficient (ADC). (Thonney, 1981 and ...

  10. Yeast cell wall supplementation alters the performance and health of beef heifers during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was designed to determine the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) on performance of newly received crossbred heifers (n = 140; 225 ± 9.4 kg) Heifers were sorted by source (n = 2) and arranged in a completely randomized block design (35 pens; 7 pens/treatment; 4 heifers/pen). Heifers were...

  11. Effect of Growth Conditions on Flocculation and Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Brewing Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecká, J.; Němec, M.; Matoulková, D.; Čejka, P.; Jelínková, Markéta; Felsberg, Jürgen; Sigler, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2015), s. 143-150 ISSN 0361-0470 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ale and lager yeast * Cell surface hydrophobicity * FLO genes Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.492, year: 2015

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  13. Allosteric regulation of phosphofructokinase controls the emergence of glycolytic oscillations in isolated yeast cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustavsson, A.-K.; van Niekerk, D.D.; Adiels, C.B.; Kooi, B.W.; Goksor, M.; Snoep, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations are widely distributed in nature and synchronization of oscillators has been described at the cellular level (e.g. heart cells) and at the population level (e.g. fireflies). Yeast glycolysis is the best known oscillatory system, although it has been studied almost exclusively at the

  14. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence......-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used...... to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: Tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1...

  15. The role of oxygen in yeast metabolism during high cell density brewery fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Delvaux, F; Delvaux, F R

    2009-04-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e., higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density fermentations can have a negative impact on the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. The use of different oxygen conditions (wort aeration, wort oxygenation, yeast preoxygenation) was investigated to improve the growth yield during high cell density fermentations and yeast metabolic and physiological parameters were assessed systematically. Together with a higher extent of growth (dependent on the applied oxygen conditions), the fermentation power and the formation of unsaturated fatty acids were also affected. Wort oxygenation had a significant decreasing effect on the formation of esters, which was caused by a decreased expression of the alcohol acetyl transferase gene ATF1, compared with the other conditions. Lower glycogen and trehalose levels at the end of fermentation were observed in case of the high cell density fermentations with oxygenated wort and the reference fermentation. The expression levels of BAP2 (encoding the branched chain amino acid permease), ERG1 (encoding squalene epoxidase), and the stress responsive gene HSP12 were predominantly influenced by the high cell concentrations, while OLE1 (encoding the fatty acid desaturase) and the oxidative stress responsive genes SOD1 and CTT1 were mainly affected by the oxygen availability per cell. These results demonstrate that optimisation of high cell density fermentations could be achieved by improving the oxygen conditions, without drastically affecting the physiological condition of the yeast and beer quality.

  16. Obtaining sorbents of metal ions based on yeast cells Rhodotorula glutinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh. Tattibayeva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ability to separate Cu2+ and Pb2+ ions from solution using yeast cells Rhodotorulа glutinis were considered. The degree of water purification in this case is of 60-70%. To increase the degree of binding of metal ions with cells and facilitate separation processes of water sorbents their immobilization on the surface of the water in the presence of polyethyleneimine was carried out. It is shown that under optimal conditions on the surface of 1 g diatomite 18 ∙ 106 cells is adsorbed. The high sorption capacity of diatomite justified its porosity. IR spectroscopic study of the interaction of the ions Cu2+ and Pb2+ with cell surface showed that high affinity Pb2 + ions to the surface of yeast cells is connected with form of slightly soluble compounds with the phosphate ions.

  17. Tumor budding in colorectal cancer--ready for diagnostic practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is an important additional prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to 5 cells in the tumor stroma, tumor budding has been likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Based on well-designed retrospective studies, tumor budding is linked to adverse outcome of CRC patients in 3 clinical scenarios: (1) in malignant polyps, detection of tumor buds is a risk factor for lymph node metastasis indicating the need for colorectal surgery; (2) tumor budding in stage II CRC is a highly adverse prognostic indicator and may aid patient selection for adjuvant therapy; (3) in the preoperative setting, presence of tumor budding in biopsy material may help to identify high-risk rectal cancer patients for neoadjuvant therapy. However, lack of consensus guidelines for standardized assessment still limits reporting in daily diagnostic practice. This article provides a practical and comprehensive overview on tumor budding aimed at the practicing pathologist. First, we review the prognostic value of tumor budding for the management of colon and rectal cancer patients. Second, we outline a practical, evidence-based proposal for the assessment of tumor budding in the daily sign-out. Last, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular characteristics of high-grade budding tumors in the context of personalized treatment approaches and biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In cellulo serial crystallography of alcohol oxidase crystals inside yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen J. Jakobi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser to collect diffraction data from protein crystals formed in their native cellular organelle has been explored. X-ray diffraction of submicrometre-sized alcohol oxidase crystals formed in peroxisomes within cells of genetically modified variants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is reported and characterized. The observations are supported by synchrotron radiation-based powder diffraction data and electron microscopy. Based on these findings, the concept of in cellulo serial crystallography on protein targets imported into yeast peroxisomes without the need for protein purification as a requirement for subsequent crystallization is outlined.

  19. Mitochondrial localization of fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase is required for its lysine acetylation and for cellular stress resistance and respiratory growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu, E-mail: hidetakahashi@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Takehiro [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shirai, Atsuko; Matsuyama, Akihisa [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru, E-mail: yoshidam@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is acetylated. {yields} The mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is required for the acetylation of MnSOD. {yields} The MTS is not crucial for MnSOD activity, but is important for respiratory growth. {yields} Posttranslational regulation of MnSOD differs between budding and fission yeast. -- Abstract: Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is localized in the mitochondria and is important for oxidative stress resistance. Although transcriptional regulation of MnSOD has been relatively well studied, much less is known about the protein's posttranslational regulation. In budding yeast, MnSOD is activated after mitochondrial import by manganese ion incorporation. Here we characterize posttranslational modification of MnSOD in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fission yeast MnSOD is acetylated at the 25th lysine residue. This acetylation was diminished by deletion of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that MnSOD is acetylated after import into mitochondria. Mitochondrial localization of MnSOD is not essential for the enzyme activity, but is crucial for oxidative stress resistance and growth under respiratory conditions of fission yeast. These results suggest that, unlike the situation in budding yeast, S. pombe MnSOD is already active even before mitochondrial localization; nonetheless, mitochondrial localization is critical to allow the cell to cope with reactive oxygen species generated inside or outside of mitochondria.

  20. The yeast Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Akihiko

    2012-04-01

    The Golgi apparatus is an organelle that has been extensively studied in the model eukaryote, yeast. Its morphology varies among yeast species; the Golgi exists as a system of dispersed cisternae in the case of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas the Golgi cisternae in Pichia pastoris and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are organized into stacks. In spite of the different organization, the mechanism of trafficking through the Golgi apparatus is believed to be similar, involving cisternal maturation, in which the resident Golgi proteins are transported backwards while secretory cargo proteins can stay in the cisternae. Questions remain regarding the organization of the yeast Golgi, the regulatory mechanisms that underlie cisternal maturation of the Golgi and transport machinery of cargo proteins through this organelle. Studies using different yeast species have provided hints to these mechanisms. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation is enhanced by amplitude modulated radiofrequency radiation in mutant yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Ari; Penttinen, Piia; Naarala, Jonne; Pelkonen, Jukka; Sihvonen, Ari-Pekka; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure affects cell death processes of yeast cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells of the strains KFy417 (wild-type) and KFy437 (cdc48-mutant) were exposed to 900 or 872 MHz RF fields, with or without exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and incubated simultaneously with elevated temperature (+37 degrees C) to induce apoptosis in the cdc48-mutated strain. The RF exposure was carried out in a special waveguide exposure chamber where the temperature of the cell cultures can be precisely controlled. Apoptosis was analyzed using the annexin V-FITC method utilizing flow cytometry. Amplitude modulated (217 pulses per second) RF exposure significantly enhanced UV induced apoptosis in cdc48-mutated cells, but no effect was observed in cells exposed to unmodulated fields at identical time-average specfic absorption rates (SAR, 0.4 or 3.0 W/kg). The findings suggest that amplitude modulated RF fields, together with known damaging agents, can affect the cell death process in mutated yeast cells. Bioelectromagnetics 25:127-133, 2004. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew [Boston, MA; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Highland Ranch, CO; Hause, Benjamin Matthew [Currie, MN; Van Hoek, Pim [Camarillo, CA; Dundon, Catherine Asleson [Minneapolis, MN

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  3. Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2016-01-18

    Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate beads encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate beads were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate beads were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate beads. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast beads were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a glass chromatography column packed with beads, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An algorithm to automate yeast segmentation and tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Doncic

    Full Text Available Our understanding of dynamic cellular processes has been greatly enhanced by rapid advances in quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Imaging single cells has emphasized the prevalence of phenomena that can be difficult to infer from population measurements, such as all-or-none cellular decisions, cell-to-cell variability, and oscillations. Examination of these phenomena requires segmenting and tracking individual cells over long periods of time. However, accurate segmentation and tracking of cells is difficult and is often the rate-limiting step in an experimental pipeline. Here, we present an algorithm that accomplishes fully automated segmentation and tracking of budding yeast cells within growing colonies. The algorithm incorporates prior information of yeast-specific traits, such as immobility and growth rate, to segment an image using a set of threshold values rather than one specific optimized threshold. Results from the entire set of thresholds are then used to perform a robust final segmentation.

  5. An algorithm to automate yeast segmentation and tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncic, Andreas; Eser, Umut; Atay, Oguzhan; Skotheim, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of dynamic cellular processes has been greatly enhanced by rapid advances in quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Imaging single cells has emphasized the prevalence of phenomena that can be difficult to infer from population measurements, such as all-or-none cellular decisions, cell-to-cell variability, and oscillations. Examination of these phenomena requires segmenting and tracking individual cells over long periods of time. However, accurate segmentation and tracking of cells is difficult and is often the rate-limiting step in an experimental pipeline. Here, we present an algorithm that accomplishes fully automated segmentation and tracking of budding yeast cells within growing colonies. The algorithm incorporates prior information of yeast-specific traits, such as immobility and growth rate, to segment an image using a set of threshold values rather than one specific optimized threshold. Results from the entire set of thresholds are then used to perform a robust final segmentation.

  6. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Václav, E-mail: prochazkav@fzu.cz [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Cifra, Michal [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Chaberská 57, 182 51 Prague (Czech Republic); Kulha, Pavel [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Ižák, Tibor [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Rezek, Bohuslav [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 16629 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Interaction of non-adherent yeast cells with H-terminated diamond described. • Effect of cell culture solutions on H-diamond SGFET (positive potential shifts). • H-diamond sensitive to metabolic activity of yeast cells (negative potential shift). - Abstract: Diamond thin films provide unique features as substrates for cell cultures and as bio-electronic sensors. Here we employ solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFET) based on nanocrystalline diamond thin films with H-terminated surface which exhibits the sub-surface p-type conductive channel. We study an influence of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on electrical characteristics of the diamond SGFETs. Two different cell culture solutions (sucrose and yeast peptone dextrose–YPD) are used, with and without the cells. We have found that transfer characteristics of the SGFETs exhibit a negative shift of the gate voltage by −26 mV and −42 mV for sucrose and YPD with cells in comparison to blank solutions without the cells. This effect is attributed to a local pH change in close vicinity of the H-terminated diamond surface due to metabolic processes of the yeast cells. The pH sensitivity of the diamond-based SGFETs, the role of cell and protein adhesion on the gate surface and the role of negative surface charge of yeast cells on the SGFETs electrical characteristics are discussed as well.

  7. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...... fermentation processes in which the escape of genetically modified cells would be considered highly risky....

  8. [Autoradiography of the exchanges that can occur between murine sarcoma cells (BP 8) and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, complete or protoplast)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miegeville, M; Morin, O; Vermeil, C

    1977-01-01

    We can tell after observing the resulting negative that yeasts are able, in our experimental conditions, to collect a sequence of ADN and of ARN proceeding from the cancerous cells. Then, those yeasts could turn their synthesis towards the production of new materials. If those informed yeasts were introduced into a mouse, they would induce at the level of the immunocompetent cells a specific immunizing antitumoral power.

  9. Quantitative characterization of the auxin-inducible degron : a guide for dynamic protein depletion in single yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, Alexandros; de Jonge, Janeska J.; Zhang, Zheng; Heinemann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Perturbations are essential for the interrogation of biological systems. The auxin-inducible degron harbors great potential for dynamic protein depletion in yeast. Here, we thoroughly and quantitatively characterize the auxin-inducible degron in single yeast cells. We show that an auxin

  10. A set of nutrient limitations trigger yeast cell death in a nitrogen-dependent manner during wine alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Camille; Pradal, Martine; Sanchez, Isabelle; Noble, Jessica; Tesnière, Catherine; Blondin, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Yeast cell death can occur during wine alcoholic fermentation. It is generally considered to result from ethanol stress that impacts membrane integrity. This cell death mainly occurs when grape musts processing reduces lipid availability, resulting in weaker membrane resistance to ethanol. However the mechanisms underlying cell death in these conditions remain unclear. We examined cell death occurrence considering yeast cells ability to elicit an appropriate response to a given nutrient limitation and thus survive starvation. We show here that a set of micronutrients (oleic acid, ergosterol, pantothenic acid and nicotinic acid) in low, growth-restricting concentrations trigger cell death in alcoholic fermentation when nitrogen level is high. We provide evidence that nitrogen signaling is involved in cell death and that either SCH9 deletion or Tor inhibition prevent cell death in several types of micronutrient limitation. Under such limitations, yeast cells fail to acquire any stress resistance and are unable to store glycogen. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analyses did not reveal any major changes in stress genes expression, suggesting that post-transcriptional events critical for stress response were not triggered by micronutrient starvation. Our data point to the fact that yeast cell death results from yeast inability to trigger an appropriate stress response under some conditions of nutrient limitations most likely not encountered by yeast in the wild. Our conclusions provide a novel frame for considering both cell death and the management of nutrients during alcoholic fermentation.

  11. A set of nutrient limitations trigger yeast cell death in a nitrogen-dependent manner during wine alcoholic fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Duc

    Full Text Available Yeast cell death can occur during wine alcoholic fermentation. It is generally considered to result from ethanol stress that impacts membrane integrity. This cell death mainly occurs when grape musts processing reduces lipid availability, resulting in weaker membrane resistance to ethanol. However the mechanisms underlying cell death in these conditions remain unclear. We examined cell death occurrence considering yeast cells ability to elicit an appropriate response to a given nutrient limitation and thus survive starvation. We show here that a set of micronutrients (oleic acid, ergosterol, pantothenic acid and nicotinic acid in low, growth-restricting concentrations trigger cell death in alcoholic fermentation when nitrogen level is high. We provide evidence that nitrogen signaling is involved in cell death and that either SCH9 deletion or Tor inhibition prevent cell death in several types of micronutrient limitation. Under such limitations, yeast cells fail to acquire any stress resistance and are unable to store glycogen. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analyses did not reveal any major changes in stress genes expression, suggesting that post-transcriptional events critical for stress response were not triggered by micronutrient starvation. Our data point to the fact that yeast cell death results from yeast inability to trigger an appropriate stress response under some conditions of nutrient limitations most likely not encountered by yeast in the wild. Our conclusions provide a novel frame for considering both cell death and the management of nutrients during alcoholic fermentation.

  12. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between -0.2 and -0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. © FEMS 2015.

  13. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between −0.2 and −0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  14. The effect of ultraviolet light on the sodium and potassium composition of resting yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANDERS, R T; GIESE, A C

    1959-01-20

    The Na(+) and K(+) content of non-metabolizing yeast cells was determined before and after monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. UV facilitated the uptake of Na(+) into and the loss of K(+) from the cells (net ion flux); the effect is greatest for the shortest wavelength employed (239 mmicro) and is partly dependent upon the presence of oxygen. The UV effect on net ion flux persists for at least 90 minutes during which tests were made and it occurs following dosages which are without measurable effect on colony formation. The UV effect on net ion flux is decreased by acidity and promoted by alkalinity. Addition of calcium ions in sufficient amount prevents the usual net ion flux changes observed in irradiated yeast. Increase in concentration gradient between the inside and the outside of the cell increases the net ion flux of irradiated yeast, Na(+) uptake leading K(+) loss in all cases. UV appears to act by disorganizing the constituents of the cell surface, permitting K(+) to leave the cell in exchange for Na(+). At low intensities of UV this ionic exchange approaches equivalence, but at higher intensities more Na(+) is taken up than K(+) is lost. Some evidence suggests that the Na(+) in excess over that exchanged for K(+) is adsorbed to charged groups produced by the photochemical effect of UV on the cell surface.

  15. Characterization of chromosome stability in diploid, polyploid and hybrid yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Rajaraman; Yang, Shi-Yow; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome instability is a key component of cancer progression and many heritable diseases. Understanding why some chromosomes are more unstable than others could provide insight into understanding genome integrity. Here we systematically investigate the spontaneous chromosome loss for all sixteen chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosome instability. We observed that the stability of different chromosomes varied more than 100-fold. Consistent with previous studies on artificial chromosomes, chromosome loss frequency was negatively correlated to chromosome length in S. cerevisiae diploids, triploids and S. cerevisiae-S. bayanus hybrids. Chromosome III, an equivalent of sex chromosomes in budding yeast, was found to be the most unstable chromosome among all cases examined. Moreover, similar instability was observed in chromosome III of S. bayanus, a species that diverged from S. cerevisiae about 20 million years ago, suggesting that the instability is caused by a conserved mechanism. Chromosome III was found to have a highly relaxed spindle checkpoint response in the genome. Using a plasmid stability assay, we found that differences in the centromeric sequence may explain certain aspects of chromosome instability. Our results reveal that even under normal conditions, individual chromosomes in a genome are subject to different levels of pressure in chromosome loss (or gain).

  16. Characterization of chromosome stability in diploid, polyploid and hybrid yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaraman Kumaran

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability is a key component of cancer progression and many heritable diseases. Understanding why some chromosomes are more unstable than others could provide insight into understanding genome integrity. Here we systematically investigate the spontaneous chromosome loss for all sixteen chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosome instability. We observed that the stability of different chromosomes varied more than 100-fold. Consistent with previous studies on artificial chromosomes, chromosome loss frequency was negatively correlated to chromosome length in S. cerevisiae diploids, triploids and S. cerevisiae-S. bayanus hybrids. Chromosome III, an equivalent of sex chromosomes in budding yeast, was found to be the most unstable chromosome among all cases examined. Moreover, similar instability was observed in chromosome III of S. bayanus, a species that diverged from S. cerevisiae about 20 million years ago, suggesting that the instability is caused by a conserved mechanism. Chromosome III was found to have a highly relaxed spindle checkpoint response in the genome. Using a plasmid stability assay, we found that differences in the centromeric sequence may explain certain aspects of chromosome instability. Our results reveal that even under normal conditions, individual chromosomes in a genome are subject to different levels of pressure in chromosome loss (or gain.

  17. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  18. Synthetic biology: lessons from engineering yeast MAPK signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kentaro; Hohmann, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    All living cells respond to external stimuli and execute specific physiological responses through signal transduction pathways. Understanding the mechanisms controlling signalling pathways is important for diagnosing and treating diseases and for reprogramming cells with desired functions. Although many of the signalling components in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified by genetic studies, many features concerning the dynamic control of pathway activity, cross-talk, cell-to-cell variability or robustness against perturbation are still incompletely understood. Comparing the behaviour of engineered and natural signalling pathways offers insight complementary to that achievable with standard genetic and molecular studies. Here, we review studies that aim at a deeper understanding of signalling design principles and generation of novel signalling properties by engineering the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. The underlying approaches can be applied to other organisms including mammalian cells and offer opportunities for building synthetic pathways and functionalities useful in medicine and biotechnology. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Mitochondrion-mediated cell death: Dissecting yeast apoptosis for a better understanding of neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J Braun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington diseases, and the motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Damaged mitochondria pivotally contribute to neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death in these disorders, e.g., due to their inability to provide the high energy requirements for neurons, their generation of reactive oxygen species, and their induction of mitochondrion-mediated cell death pathways. Therefore, in-depth analyses of the underlying molecular pathways, including cellular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of mitochondrial function, is a prerequisite for a better understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mitochondrial quality control mechanisms and the distinct mitochondrial roles during apoptosis and programmed cell death. Cell death upon expression of various human neurotoxic proteins has been characterized in yeast, revealing neurotoxic protein-specific differences. This review summarizes how mitochondria are affected in these neurotoxic yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution and prevention of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic model systems, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of the mitochondrial roles in the human disorders.

  20. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos Geraldo AS

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein, bgl (encoding for a 1,3-β-glucosidase in mycelium cells; and ags (an α-1,3-glucan synthase, cda (a chitin deacetylase and vrp (a verprolin in yeast cells; (ii ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken

  1. Aureobasidin A arrests growth of yeast cells through both ceramide intoxication and deprivation of essential inositolphosphorylceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Guillas, Isabelle; Roubaty, Carole

    2009-01-01

    , 2Delta.YDC1 cells stop growing when exposed to Aureobasidin A (AbA), an inhibitor of the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1, yet their ceramide levels remain very low. This finding argues against a current hypothesis saying that yeast cells do not require inositolphosphorylceramides and die...... in the presence of AbA only because ceramides build up to toxic concentrations. Moreover, W303lag1Delta lac1Delta ypc1Delta ydc1Delta cells, reported to be AbA resistant, stop growing on AbA after a certain number of cell divisions, most likely because AbA blocks the biosynthesis of anomalous...

  2. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YIR016W, YNL161W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olved in cell wall biosynthesis, apical growth, proper mating projection morphology, bipolar bud site select...sis, apical growth, proper mating projection morphology, bipolar bud site selection in diploid cells, and ce

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR319C, YGL015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion and polarized cell growth; isolated as bipolar budding mutant; potential Cdc28p substrate Rows with this...in actin cable nucleation and polarized cell growth; isolated as bipolar budding mutant; potential Cdc28p su

  4. A systems-level approach for metabolic engineering of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Kwon; Roldão, António; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The generation of novel yeast cell factories for production of high-value industrial biotechnological products relies on three metabolic engineering principles: design, construction, and analysis. In the last two decades, strong efforts have been put on developing faster and more efficient strategies and/or technologies for each one of these principles. For design and construction, three major strategies are described in this review: (1) rational metabolic engineering; (2) inverse metabolic engineering; and (3) evolutionary strategies. Independent of the selected strategy, the process of designing yeast strains involves five decision points: (1) choice of product, (2) choice of chassis, (3) identification of target genes, (4) regulating the expression level of target genes, and (5) network balancing of the target genes. At the construction level, several molecular biology tools have been developed through the concept of synthetic biology and applied for the generation of novel, engineered yeast strains. For comprehensive and quantitative analysis of constructed strains, systems biology tools are commonly used and using a multi-omics approach. Key information about the biological system can be revealed, for example, identification of genetic regulatory mechanisms and competitive pathways, thereby assisting the in silico design of metabolic engineering strategies for improving strain performance. Examples on how systems and synthetic biology brought yeast metabolic engineering closer to industrial biotechnology are described in this review, and these examples should demonstrate the potential of a systems-level approach for fast and efficient generation of yeast cell factories. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae accumulates GAPDH-derived peptides on its cell surface that induce death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts by cell-to-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Patrícia; Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Santos, Lara; Diniz, Mário; Caldeira, Jorge; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Arneborg, Nils; Albergaria, Helena

    2017-05-01

    During wine fermentations, Saccharomyces cerevisiae starts to excrete antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) into the growth medium that induce death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts at the end of exponential growth phase (24-48 h). Those AMPs were found to derive from the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). On the other hand, the early death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts during wine fermentations was also found to be mediated by a cell-to-cell contact mechanism. Since GAPDH is a cell-wall-associated protein in S. cerevisiae, we put forward the hypothesis that the GAPDH-derived AMPs could accumulate on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae, thus inducing death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts by cell-to-cell contact. Here we show that 48-h grown (stationary phase) cells of S. cerevisiae induce death of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Lachancea thermotolerans by direct cell-to-cell contact, while 12-h grown cells (mid-exponential phase) do not. Immunological tests performed with a specific polyclonal antibody against the GAPDH-derived AMPs revealed their presence in the cell wall of S. cerevisiae cells grown for 48 h, but not for 12 h. Taken together, our data show that accumulation of GAPDH-derived AMPs on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae is one of the factors underlying death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts by cell-to-cell contact. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The glucose signaling network in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ho; Roy, Adhiraj; Jouandot, David; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Most cells possess a sophisticated mechanism for sensing glucose and responsing to it appropriately. Glucose sensing and signaling in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important paradigm for understanding how extracellular signals lead to changes in the gene expression program in eukaryotes. Scope of review This review focuses on the yeast glucose sensing and signaling pathways that operate in a highly regulated and cooperative manner to bring about glucose-induction of HXT gene expression. Major conclusions The yeast cells possess a family of glucose transporters (HXTs), with different kinetic properties. They employ three major glucose signaling pathways— Rgt2/Snf3, AMPK, and cAMP-PKA—to express only those transporters best suited for the amounts of glucose available. We discuss the current understanding of how these pathways are integrated into a regulatory network to ensure efficient uptake and utilization of glucose. General significance Elucidating the role of multiple glucose signals and pathways involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in yeast may reveal the molecular basis of glucose homeostasis in humans, especially under pathological conditions, such as hyperglycemia in diabetics and the elevated rate of glycolysis observed in many solid tumors. PMID:23911748

  7. Signaling pathways and posttranslational modifications of tau in Alzheimer's disease: the humanization of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, Jürgen J; Brandt, Roland

    2016-03-25

    In the past decade, yeast have been frequently employed to study the molecular mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, generally by means of heterologous expression of genes encoding the relevant hallmark proteins. However, it has become evident that substantial posttranslational modifications of many of these proteins are required for the development and progression of potentially disease relevant changes. This is exemplified by the neuronal tau proteins, which are critically involved in a class of neuro-degenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies and which includes Alz-heimer's disease (AD) as its most common representative. In the course of the disease, tau changes its phosphorylation state and becomes hyperphosphory-lated, gets truncated by proteolytic cleavage, is subject to O-glycosylation, sumoylation, ubiquitinylation, acetylation and some other modifications. This poses the important question, which of these posttranslational modifications are naturally occurring in the yeast model or can be reconstituted by heterol-ogous gene expression. Here, we present an overview on common modifica-tions as they occur in tau during AD, summarize their potential relevance with respect to disease mechanisms and refer to the native yeast enzyme orthologs capable to perform these modifications. We will also discuss potential approaches to humanize yeast in order to create modification patterns resembling the situation in mammalian cells, which could enhance the value of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis as disease models.

  8. Micronucleus, Nucleoplasmic Bridge, and Nuclear Budding in Peripheral Blood Cells of Work