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Sample records for bucal1 computer code

  1. MELCOR computer code manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  2. The SHIELD11 Computer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W

    2005-02-02

    SHIELD11 is a computer code for performing shielding analyses around a high-energy electron accelerator. It makes use of simple analytic expressions for the production and attenuation of photons and neutrons resulting from electron beams striking thick targets, such as dumps, stoppers, collimators, and other beam devices. The formulae in SHIELD11 are somewhat unpretentious in that they are based on the extrapolation (scaling) of experimental data using rather simple physics ideas. Because these scaling methods have only been tested over a rather limited set of conditions--namely, 1-15 GeV electrons striking 10-20 radiation lengths of iron--a certain amount of care and judgment must be exercised whenever SHIELD11 is used. Nevertheless, for many years these scaling methods have been applied rather successfully to a large variety of problems at SLAC, as well as at other laboratories throughout the world, and the SHIELD11 code has been found to be a fast and convenient tool. In this paper we present, without extensive theoretical justification or experimental verification, the five-component model on which the SHIELD11 code is based. Our intent is to demonstrate how to use the code by means of a few simple examples. References are provided that are considered to be essential for a full understanding of the model. The code itself contains many comments to provide some guidance for the informed user, who may wish to improve on the model.

  3. Computer Code Aids Design Of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    AERO2S computer code developed to aid design engineers in selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing/canard and wing/horizontal-tail configurations that includes simple hinged-flap systems. Code rapidly estimates longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting-surface arrangements. Developed in FORTRAN V on CDC 6000 computer system, and ported to MS-DOS environment.

  4. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  5. Cloud Computing for Complex Performance Codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klein, Brandon Thorin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miner, John Gifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes the use of cloud computing services for running complex public domain performance assessment problems. The work consisted of two phases: Phase 1 was to demonstrate complex codes, on several differently configured servers, could run and compute trivial small scale problems in a commercial cloud infrastructure. Phase 2 focused on proving non-trivial large scale problems could be computed in the commercial cloud environment. The cloud computing effort was successfully applied using codes of interest to the geohydrology and nuclear waste disposal modeling community.

  6. Gender codes why women are leaving computing

    CERN Document Server

    Misa, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The computing profession is facing a serious gender crisis. Women are abandoning the computing field at an alarming rate. Fewer are entering the profession than anytime in the past twenty-five years, while too many are leaving the field in mid-career. With a maximum of insight and a minimum of jargon, Gender Codes explains the complex social and cultural processes at work in gender and computing today. Edited by Thomas Misa and featuring a Foreword by Linda Shafer, Chair of the IEEE Computer Society Press, this insightful collection of essays explores the persisting gender imbalance in computing and presents a clear course of action for turning things around.

  7. New coding technique for computer generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, R. E.; Culver, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    A coding technique is developed for recording computer generated holograms on a computer controlled CRT in which each resolution cell contains two beam spots of equal size and equal intensity. This provides a binary hologram in which only the position of the two dots is varied from cell to cell. The amplitude associated with each resolution cell is controlled by selectively diffracting unwanted light into a higher diffraction order. The recording of the holograms is fast and simple.

  8. Computer Security: is your code sane?

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    How many of us write code? Software? Programs? Scripts? How many of us are properly trained in this and how well do we do it? Do we write functional, clean and correct code, without flaws, bugs and vulnerabilities*? In other words: are our codes sane?   Figuring out weaknesses is not that easy (see our quiz in an earlier Bulletin article). Therefore, in order to improve the sanity of your code, prevent common pit-falls, and avoid the bugs and vulnerabilities that can crash your code, or – worse – that can be misused and exploited by attackers, the CERN Computer Security team has reviewed its recommendations for checking the security compliance of your code. “Static Code Analysers” are stand-alone programs that can be run on top of your software stack, regardless of whether it uses Java, C/C++, Perl, PHP, Python, etc. These analysers identify weaknesses and inconsistencies including: employing undeclared variables; expressions resu...

  9. Concatenated codes for fault tolerant quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.; Zurek, W.

    1995-05-01

    The application of concatenated codes to fault tolerant quantum computing is discussed. We have previously shown that for quantum memories and quantum communication, a state can be transmitted with error {epsilon} provided each gate has error at most c{epsilon}. We show how this can be used with Shor`s fault tolerant operations to reduce the accuracy requirements when maintaining states not currently participating in the computation. Viewing Shor`s fault tolerant operations as a method for reducing the error of operations, we give a concatenated implementation which promises to propagate the reduction hierarchically. This has the potential of reducing the accuracy requirements in long computations.

  10. Computational approaches in detecting non- coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyu; Wei, Leyi; Guo, Maozu; Zou, Quan

    2013-09-01

    The important role of non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the cell has made their identification a critical issue in the biological research. However, traditional approaches such as PT-PCR and Northern Blot are costly. With recent progress in bioinformatics and computational prediction technology, the discovery of ncRNAs has become realistically possible. This paper aims to introduce major computational approaches in the identification of ncRNAs, including homologous search, de novo prediction and mining in deep sequencing data. Furthermore, related software tools have been compared and reviewed along with a discussion on future improvements.

  11. H/sup 0/ precessor computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Floyd, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    A spin precessor using H/sup -/ to H/sup 0/ stripping, followed by small precession magnets, has been developed for the LAMPF 800-MeV polarized H/sup -/ beam. The performance of the system was studied with the computer code documented in this report. The report starts from the fundamental physics of a system of spins with hyperfine coupling in a magnetic field and contains many examples of beam behavior as calculated by the program.

  12. Hanford meteorological station computer codes: Volume 9, The quality assurance computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burk, K.W.; Andrews, G.L.

    1989-02-01

    The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) was established in 1944 on the Hanford Site to collect and archive meteorological data and provide weather forecasts and related services for Hanford Site approximately 1/2 mile east of the 200 West Area and is operated by PNL for the US Department of Energy. Meteorological data are collected from various sensors and equipment located on and off the Hanford Site. These data are stored in data bases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS (hereafter referred to as the HMS computer). Files from those data bases are routinely transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) computer at the Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC). To ensure the quality and integrity of the HMS data, a set of Quality Assurance (QA) computer codes has been written. The codes will be routinely used by the HMS system manager or the data base custodian. The QA codes provide detailed output files that will be used in correcting erroneous data. The following sections in this volume describe the implementation and operation of QA computer codes. The appendices contain detailed descriptions, flow charts, and source code listings of each computer code. 2 refs.

  13. New developments in the Saphire computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.D.; Wood, S.T.; Kvarfordt, K.J. [Idaho Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a suite of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear power plant. Many recent enhancements to this suite of codes have been made. This presentation will provide an overview of these features and capabilities. The presentation will include a discussion of the new GEM module. This module greatly reduces and simplifies the work necessary to use the SAPHIRE code in event assessment applications. An overview of the features provided in the new Windows version will also be provided. This version is a full Windows 32-bit implementation and offers many new and exciting features. [A separate computer demonstration was held to allow interested participants to get a preview of these features.] The new capabilities that have been added since version 5.0 will be covered. Some of these major new features include the ability to store an unlimited number of basic events, gates, systems, sequences, etc.; the addition of improved reporting capabilities to allow the user to generate and {open_quotes}scroll{close_quotes} through custom reports; the addition of multi-variable importance measures; and the simplification of the user interface. Although originally designed as a PRA Level 1 suite of codes, capabilities have recently been added to SAPHIRE to allow the user to apply the code in Level 2 analyses. These features will be discussed in detail during the presentation. The modifications and capabilities added to this version of SAPHIRE significantly extend the code in many important areas. Together, these extensions represent a major step forward in PC-based risk analysis tools. This presentation provides a current up-to-date status of these important PRA analysis tools.

  14. Development and application of computational aerothermodynamics flowfield computer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1994-01-01

    Research was performed in the area of computational modeling and application of hypersonic, high-enthalpy, thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flow (Aerothermodynamics) problems. A number of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes were developed and applied to simulate high altitude rocket-plume, the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE), hypersonic base flow for planetary probes, the single expansion ramp model (SERN) connected with the National Aerospace Plane, hypersonic drag devices, hypersonic ramp flows, ballistic range models, shock tunnel facility nozzles, transient and steady flows in the shock tunnel facility, arc-jet flows, thermochemical nonequilibrium flows around simple and complex bodies, axisymmetric ionized flows of interest to re-entry, unsteady shock induced combustion phenomena, high enthalpy pulsed facility simulations, and unsteady shock boundary layer interactions in shock tunnels. Computational modeling involved developing appropriate numerical schemes for the flows on interest and developing, applying, and validating appropriate thermochemical processes. As part of improving the accuracy of the numerical predictions, adaptive grid algorithms were explored, and a user-friendly, self-adaptive code (SAGE) was developed. Aerothermodynamic flows of interest included energy transfer due to strong radiation, and a significant level of effort was spent in developing computational codes for calculating radiation and radiation modeling. In addition, computational tools were developed and applied to predict the radiative heat flux and spectra that reach the model surface.

  15. Neutron spectrum unfolding using computer code SAIPS

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, S

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to study the neutron energy spectrum at rabbit station-1 in Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-I). To do so, multiple foils activation method was used to get the saturated activities. The computer code SAIPS was used to unfold the neutron spectra from the measured reaction rates. Of the three built in codes in SAIPS, only SANDI and WINDOWS were used. Contribution of thermal part of the spectra was observed to be higher than the fast one. It was found that the WINDOWS gave smooth spectra while SANDII spectra have violet oscillations in the resonance region. The uncertainties in the WINDOWS results are higher than those of SANDII. The results show reasonable agreement with the published results.

  16. Computation of the Weight Distribution of CRC Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Manganiello, F

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we illustrate an algorithm for the computation of the weight distribution of CRC codes. The recursive structure of CRC codes will give us an iterative way to compute the weight distribution of their dual codes starting from just some ``representative'' words. Thanks to MacWilliams Theorem, the computation of the weight distribution of dual codes can be easily brought back to that of CRC codes. This algorithm is a good alternative to the standard algorithm that involves listin...

  17. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  18. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today.

  19. Development of probabilistic internal dosimetry computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2017-02-01

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values ( e.g. the 2.5th, 5th, median, 95th, and 97.5th percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various situations. In cases of

  20. Development of Probabilistic Internal Dosimetry Computer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Siwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae-Eun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai-Ki [Korean Association for Radiation Protection, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values (e.g. the 2.5{sup th}, 5{sup th}, median, 95{sup th}, and 97.5{sup th} percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various

  1. Using Binary Code Instrumentation in Computer Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius POPA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches the low-level details of the code generated by compilers whose format permits outside actions. Binary code modifications are manually done when the internal format is known and understood, or automatically by certain tools developed to process the binary code. The binary code instrumentation goals may be various from security increasing and bug fixing to development of malicious software. The paper highlights the binary code instrumentation techniques by code injection to increase the security and reliability of a software application. Also, the paper offers examples for binary code formats understanding and how the binary code injection may be applied.

  2. ICAN Computer Code Adapted for Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in developing composite micromechanics and macromechanics theories over the last three decades. These activities have resulted in several composite mechanics theories and structural analysis codes whose applications range from material behavior design and analysis to structural component response. One of these computer codes, the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN), is designed primarily to address issues related to designing polymer matrix composites and predicting their properties - including hygral, thermal, and mechanical load effects. Recently, under a cost-sharing cooperative agreement with a Fortune 500 corporation, Master Builders Inc., ICAN was adapted to analyze building materials. The high costs and technical difficulties involved with the fabrication of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites sometimes limit their use. Particulate-reinforced composites can be thought of as a viable alternative. They are as easily processed to near-net shape as monolithic materials, yet have the improved stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness that is characteristic of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. For example, particlereinforced metal-matrix composites show great potential for a variety of automotive applications, such as disk brake rotors, connecting rods, cylinder liners, and other hightemperature applications. Building materials, such as concrete, can be thought of as one of the oldest materials in this category of multiphase, particle-reinforced materials. The adaptation of ICAN to analyze particle-reinforced composite materials involved the development of new micromechanics-based theories. A derivative of the ICAN code, ICAN/PART, was developed and delivered to Master Builders Inc. as a part of the cooperative activity.

  3. Functional computational model for optimal color coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romney, A Kimball; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2009-06-23

    This paper presents a computational model for color coding that provides a functional explanation of how humans perceive colors in a homogeneous color space. Beginning with known properties of human cone photoreceptors, the model estimates the locations of the reflectance spectra of Munsell color chips in perceptual color space as represented in the CIE L*a*b* color system. The fit between the two structures is within the limits of expected measurement error. Estimates of the structure of perceptual color space for color anomalous dichromats missing one of the normal cone photoreceptors correspond closely to results from the Farnsworth-Munsell color test. An unanticipated outcome of the model provides a functional explanation of why additive lights are always red, green, and blue and provide maximum gamut for color monitors and color television even though they do not correspond to human cone absorption spectra.

  4. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  5. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  6. User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2004-09-14

    This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

  7. An Object-Oriented Approach to Writing Computational Electromagnetics Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Martin; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    Presently, most computer software development in the Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) community employs the structured programming paradigm, particularly using the Fortran language. Other segments of the software community began switching to an Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm in recent years to help ease design and development of highly complex codes. This paper examines design of a time-domain numerical analysis CEM code using the OOP paradigm, comparing OOP code and structured programming code in terms of software maintenance, portability, flexibility, and speed.

  8. VISWAM. A computer code package for thermal reactor physics computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannathan, V.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ganesan, S.; Jain, R.P.; Pal, U. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Karthikeyan, R. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The nuclear cross section data and reactor physics design methods developed over the past three decades have attained a high degree of reliability for thermal power reactor design and analysis. This is borne out from the analysis of physics commissioning experiments and several reactor-years of operational experience of two types of Indian thermal power reactors, viz. BWRs and PHWRs. Our computational tools were also developed and tested against a large number of IAEA CRP benchmarks on in-core fuel management code package validation for the modern BWR, PWR, VVER and PHWR. Though the computational algorithms are well tested, their mode of use has remained rather obsolete since the codes were developed when the modern high-speed large memory computers were not available. The use of Fortran language limits their potential use for varied applications. We are developing specific Visual Interface Software as the Work Aid support for effective Man-Machine interface (VISWAM). The VISWAM package when fully developed and tested will enable handling the input description of complex fuel assembly and the reactor core geometry with immaculate ease. Selective display of the three dimensional distribution of multi-group fluxes, power distribution and hot spots will provide a good insight into the analysis and also enable inter comparison of different nuclear datasets and methods. Since the new package will be user-friendly, training of requisite human resource for the expanding Indian nuclear power programme will be rendered easier and the gap between an expert and a novice will be greatly reduced. (author)

  9. 40 CFR 194.23 - Models and computer codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the theoretical backgrounds of each model and the method of analysis or assessment; (2) General... input and output files from a sample computer run; and reports on code verification, benchmarking, validation, and quality assurance procedures; (3) Detailed descriptions of the structure of computer codes...

  10. Optimization of KINETICS Chemical Computation Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donastorg, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    NASA JPL has been creating a code in FORTRAN called KINETICS to model the chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Recently there has been an effort to introduce Message Passing Interface (MPI) into the code so as to cut down the run time of the program. There has been some implementation of MPI into KINETICS; however, the code could still be more efficient than it currently is. One way to increase efficiency is to send only certain variables to all the processes when an MPI subroutine is called and to gather only certain variables when the subroutine is finished. Therefore, all the variables that are used in three of the main subroutines needed to be investigated. Because of the sheer amount of code that there is to comb through this task was given as a ten-week project. I have been able to create flowcharts outlining the subroutines, common blocks, and functions used within the three main subroutines. From these flowcharts I created tables outlining the variables used in each block and important information about each. All this information will be used to determine how to run MPI in KINETICS in the most efficient way possible.

  11. Codes of Ethics for Computing at Russian Institutions and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourciau, Lester J.; Spain, Victoria, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the degree to which Russian institutions and universities have formulated and promulgated codes of ethics or policies for acceptable computer use, the author examined Russian institution and university home pages. Lists home pages examined, 10 commandments for computer ethics from the Computer Ethics Institute, and a policy statement…

  12. Continuous Materiality: Through a Hierarchy of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The legacy of Cartesian dualism inherent in linguistic theory deeply influences current views on the relation between natural language, computer code, and the physical world. However, the oversimplified distinction between mind and body falls short of capturing the complex interaction between the material and the immaterial. In this paper, we posit a hierarchy of codes to delineate a wide spectrum of continuous materiality. Our research suggests that diagrams in architecture provide a valuable analog for approaching computer code in emergent digital systems. After commenting on ways that Cartesian dualism continues to haunt discussions of code, we turn our attention to diagrams and design morphology. Finally we notice the implications a material understanding of code bears for further research on the relation between human cognition and digital code. Our discussion concludes by noticing several areas that we have projected for ongoing research.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method fundamentals and engineering applications with computer codes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad, A A

    2014-01-01

    Introducing the Lattice Boltzmann Method in a readable manner, this book provides detailed examples with complete computer codes. It avoids the most complicated mathematics and physics without scarifying the basic fundamentals of the method.

  14. Code Saturne: A Finite Volume Code for the computation of turbulent incompressible flows - Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Archambeau, Frédéric; Méchitoua, Namane; Sakiz, Marc

    2004-01-01

    International audience; This paper describes the finite volume method implemented in Code Saturne, Electricite de France general-purpose computational fluid dynamic code for laminar and turbulent flows in complex two and three- dimensional geometries. The code is used for industrial applications and research activities in several fields related to energy production (nuclear power thermal-hydraulics, gas and coal combustion, turbomachinery, heating, ventilation and air conditioning...). The se...

  15. Nonuniform code concatenation for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikahd, Eesa; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saheb Zamani, Morteza

    2017-09-01

    Using transversal gates is a straightforward and efficient technique for fault-tolerant quantum computing. Since transversal gates alone cannot be computationally universal, they must be combined with other approaches such as magic state distillation, code switching, or code concatenation to achieve universality. In this paper we propose an alternative approach for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing, mainly based on the code concatenation approach proposed in [T. Jochym-O'Connor and R. Laflamme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 010505 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.010505], but in a nonuniform fashion. The proposed approach is described based on nonuniform concatenation of the 7-qubit Steane code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, as well as the 5-qubit code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, which lead to two 49-qubit and 47-qubit codes, respectively. These codes can correct any arbitrary single physical error with the ability to perform a universal set of fault-tolerant gates, without using magic state distillation.

  16. Reducing Computational Overhead of Network Coding with Intrinsic Information Conveying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Zhang, Qi; Pedersen, Morten V.

    This paper investigated the possibility of intrinsic information conveying in network coding systems. The information is embedded into the coding vector by constructing the vector based on a set of predefined rules. This information can subsequently be retrieved by any receiver. The starting point...... is RLNC (Random Linear Network Coding) and the goal is to reduce the amount of coding operations both at the coding and decoding node, and at the same time remove the need for dedicated signaling messages. In a traditional RLNC system, coding operation takes up significant computational resources and adds...... to the overall energy consumption, which is particular problematic for mobile battery-driven devices. In RLNC coding is performed over a FF (Finite Field). We propose to divide this field into sub fields, and let each sub field signify some information or state. In order to embed the information correctly...

  17. Two-phase computer codes for zero-gravity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krotiuk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses the problems existing in the development of computer codes which can analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior of two-phase fluids especially in low gravity nuclear reactors. The important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and heat transfer in reduced gravity is discussed. The applicability of using existing computer codes for space applications is assessed. Recommendations regarding the use of existing earth based fluid flow and heat transfer correlations are made and deficiencies in these correlations are identified.

  18. Computer codes for beam dynamics analysis of cyclotronlike accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.

    2017-12-01

    Computer codes suitable for the study of beam dynamics in cyclotronlike (classical and isochronous cyclotrons, synchrocyclotrons, and fixed field alternating gradient) accelerators are reviewed. Computer modeling of cyclotron segments, such as the central zone, acceleration region, and extraction system is considered. The author does not claim to give a full and detailed description of the methods and algorithms used in the codes. Special attention is paid to the codes already proven and confirmed at the existing accelerating facilities. The description of the programs prepared in the worldwide known accelerator centers is provided. The basic features of the programs available to users and limitations of their applicability are described.

  19. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  20. Computer vision cracks the leaf code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Peter; Zhang, Shengping; Chikkerur, Sharat; Little, Stefan A; Wing, Scott L; Serre, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Understanding the extremely variable, complex shape and venation characters of angiosperm leaves is one of the most challenging problems in botany. Machine learning offers opportunities to analyze large numbers of specimens, to discover novel leaf features of angiosperm clades that may have phylogenetic significance, and to use those characters to classify unknowns. Previous computer vision approaches have primarily focused on leaf identification at the species level. It remains an open question whether learning and classification are possible among major evolutionary groups such as families and orders, which usually contain hundreds to thousands of species each and exhibit many times the foliar variation of individual species. Here, we tested whether a computer vision algorithm could use a database of 7,597 leaf images from 2,001 genera to learn features of botanical families and orders, then classify novel images. The images are of cleared leaves, specimens that are chemically bleached, then stained to reveal venation. Machine learning was used to learn a codebook of visual elements representing leaf shape and venation patterns. The resulting automated system learned to classify images into families and orders with a success rate many times greater than chance. Of direct botanical interest, the responses of diagnostic features can be visualized on leaf images as heat maps, which are likely to prompt recognition and evolutionary interpretation of a wealth of novel morphological characters. With assistance from computer vision, leaves are poised to make numerous new contributions to systematic and paleobotanical studies.

  1. PCTRAN: a transient analysis code for personal computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichi Cliff Po

    1988-05-01

    The PCTRAN code has been developed to enable analysis and real-time reactor simulation to be carried out on personal computers. It is designed to exploit all the advantages of personal computers, including accessibility, interactive capabilities, convenience, economy and the ability to get certain kinds of analysis performed at short notice.

  2. HUDU: The Hanford Unified Dose Utility computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherpelz, R.I.

    1991-02-01

    The Hanford Unified Dose Utility (HUDU) computer program was developed to provide rapid initial assessment of radiological emergency situations. The HUDU code uses a straight-line Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model to estimate the transport of radionuclides released from an accident site. For dose points on the plume centerline, it calculates internal doses due to inhalation and external doses due to exposure to the plume. The program incorporates a number of features unique to the Hanford Site (operated by the US Department of Energy), including a library of source terms derived from various facilities' safety analysis reports. The HUDU code was designed to run on an IBM-PC or compatible personal computer. The user interface was designed for fast and easy operation with minimal user training. The theoretical basis and mathematical models used in the HUDU computer code are described, as are the computer code itself and the data libraries used. Detailed instructions for operating the code are also included. Appendices to the report contain descriptions of the program modules, listings of HUDU's data library, and descriptions of the verification tests that were run as part of the code development. 14 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Computer Security: better code, fewer problems

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2016-01-01

    The origin of many security incidents is negligence or unintentional mistakes made by web developers or programmers. In the rush to complete the work, due to skewed priorities, or just to ignorance, basic security principles can be omitted or forgotten.   The resulting vulnerabilities lie dormant until the evil side spots them and decides to hit hard. Computer security incidents in the past have put CERN’s reputation at risk due to websites being defaced with negative messages about the Organization, hash files of passwords being extracted, restricted data exposed… And it all started with a little bit of negligence! If you check out the Top 10 web development blunders, you will see that the most prevalent mistakes are: Not filtering input, e.g. accepting “<“ or “>” in input fields even if only a number is expected.  Not validating that input: you expect a birth date? So why accept letters? &...

  4. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  5. Abstracts of digital computer code packages. Assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center. [Radiation transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Anthony, C.M.; Comolander, H.E.; Hendrickson, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    The term ''code package'' is used to describe a miscellaneous grouping of materials which, when interpreted in connection with a digital computer, enables the scientist--user to solve technical problems in the area for which the material was designed. In general, a ''code package'' consists of written material--reports, instructions, flow charts, listings of data, and other useful material and IBM card decks (or, more often, a reel of magnetic tape) on which the source decks, sample problem input (including libraries of data) and the BCD/EBCDIC output listing from the sample problem are written. In addition to the main code, and any available auxiliary routines are also included. The abstract format was chosen to give to a potential code user several criteria for deciding whether or not he wishes to request the code package. (RWR)

  6. Low Computational Complexity Network Coding For Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus

    2012-01-01

    -flow coding technique. One of the key challenges of this technique is its inherent computational complexity which can lead to high computational load and energy consumption in particular on the mobile platforms that are the target platform in this work. To increase the coding throughput several...... library and will be available for researchers and students in the future. Chapter 1 introduces motivating examples and the state of art when this work commenced. In Chapter 2 selected publications are presented and how their content is related. Chapter 3 presents the main outcome of the work and briefly...

  7. Prodeto, a computer code for probabilistic fatigue design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braam, H. [ECN-Solar and Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Christensen, C.J.; Thoegersen, M.L. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Ronold, K.O. [Det Norske Veritas, Hoevik (Norway)

    1999-03-01

    A computer code for structural relibility analyses of wind turbine rotor blades subjected to fatigue loading is presented. With pre-processors that can transform measured and theoretically predicted load series to load range distributions by rain-flow counting and with a family of generic distribution models for parametric representation of these distribution this computer program is available for carying through probabilistic fatigue analyses of rotor blades. (au)

  8. Upgrades of Two Computer Codes for Analysis of Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2005-01-01

    Major upgrades have been made in two of the programs reported in "ive Computer Codes for Analysis of Turbomachinery". The affected programs are: Swift -- a code for three-dimensional (3D) multiblock analysis; and TCGRID, which generates a 3D grid used with Swift. Originally utilizing only a central-differencing scheme for numerical solution, Swift was augmented by addition of two upwind schemes that give greater accuracy but take more computing time. Other improvements in Swift include addition of a shear-stress-transport turbulence model for better prediction of adverse pressure gradients, addition of an H-grid capability for flexibility in modeling flows in pumps and ducts, and modification to enable simultaneous modeling of hub and tip clearances. Improvements in TCGRID include modifications to enable generation of grids for more complicated flow paths and addition of an option to generate grids compatible with the ADPAC code used at NASA and in industry. For both codes, new test cases were developed and documentation was updated. Both codes were converted to Fortran 90, with dynamic memory allocation. Both codes were also modified for ease of use in both UNIX and Windows operating systems.

  9. Plagiarism Detection Algorithm for Source Code in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Xu, Chan; Ouyang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, computer programming is getting more necessary in the course of program design in college education. However, the trick of plagiarizing plus a little modification exists among some students' home works. It's not easy for teachers to judge if there's plagiarizing in source code or not. Traditional detection algorithms cannot fit this…

  10. Benchmarking severe accident computer codes for heavy water reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    Consideration of severe accidents at a nuclear power plant (NPP) is an essential component of the defence in depth approach used in nuclear safety. Severe accident analysis involves very complex physical phenomena that occur sequentially during various stages of accident progression. Computer codes are essential tools for understanding how the reactor and its containment might respond under severe accident conditions. International cooperative research programmes are established by the IAEA in areas that are of common interest to a number of Member States. These co-operative efforts are carried out through coordinated research projects (CRPs), typically 3 to 6 years in duration, and often involving experimental activities. Such CRPs allow a sharing of efforts on an international basis, foster team-building and benefit from the experience and expertise of researchers from all participating institutes. The IAEA is organizing a CRP on benchmarking severe accident computer codes for heavy water reactor (HWR) applications. The CRP scope includes defining the severe accident sequence and conducting benchmark analyses for HWRs, evaluating the capabilities of existing computer codes to predict important severe accident phenomena, and suggesting necessary code improvements and/or new experiments to reduce uncertainties. The CRP has been planned on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for HWRs. (author)

  11. War of ontology worlds: mathematics, computer code, or Esperanto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Evans, James A

    2011-09-01

    The use of structured knowledge representations-ontologies and terminologies-has become standard in biomedicine. Definitions of ontologies vary widely, as do the values and philosophies that underlie them. In seeking to make these views explicit, we conducted and summarized interviews with a dozen leading ontologists. Their views clustered into three broad perspectives that we summarize as mathematics, computer code, and Esperanto. Ontology as mathematics puts the ultimate premium on rigor and logic, symmetry and consistency of representation across scientific subfields, and the inclusion of only established, non-contradictory knowledge. Ontology as computer code focuses on utility and cultivates diversity, fitting ontologies to their purpose. Like computer languages C++, Prolog, and HTML, the code perspective holds that diverse applications warrant custom designed ontologies. Ontology as Esperanto focuses on facilitating cross-disciplinary communication, knowledge cross-referencing, and computation across datasets from diverse communities. We show how these views align with classical divides in science and suggest how a synthesis of their concerns could strengthen the next generation of biomedical ontologies.

  12. War of ontology worlds: mathematics, computer code, or Esperanto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Rzhetsky

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of structured knowledge representations-ontologies and terminologies-has become standard in biomedicine. Definitions of ontologies vary widely, as do the values and philosophies that underlie them. In seeking to make these views explicit, we conducted and summarized interviews with a dozen leading ontologists. Their views clustered into three broad perspectives that we summarize as mathematics, computer code, and Esperanto. Ontology as mathematics puts the ultimate premium on rigor and logic, symmetry and consistency of representation across scientific subfields, and the inclusion of only established, non-contradictory knowledge. Ontology as computer code focuses on utility and cultivates diversity, fitting ontologies to their purpose. Like computer languages C++, Prolog, and HTML, the code perspective holds that diverse applications warrant custom designed ontologies. Ontology as Esperanto focuses on facilitating cross-disciplinary communication, knowledge cross-referencing, and computation across datasets from diverse communities. We show how these views align with classical divides in science and suggest how a synthesis of their concerns could strengthen the next generation of biomedical ontologies.

  13. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stage, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  14. Validation and testing of the VAM2D computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This document describes two modeling studies conducted by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. for the US NRC under contract no. NRC-04089-090, entitled, Validation and Testing of the VAM2D Computer Code.'' VAM2D is a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow and transport code, with applications for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. The computer code itself is documented in a separate NUREG document (NUREG/CR-5352, 1989). The studies presented in this report involve application of the VAM2D code to two diverse subsurface modeling problems. The first one involves modeling of infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes in an initially dry, heterogeneous field soil. This application involves detailed modeling over a relatively short, 9-month time period. The second problem pertains to the application of VAM2D to the modeling of a waste disposal facility in a fractured clay, over much larger space and time scales and with particular emphasis on the applicability and reliability of using equivalent porous medium approach for simulating flow and transport in fractured geologic media. Reflecting the separate and distinct nature of the two problems studied, this report is organized in two separate parts. 61 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Computational radiology and imaging with the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    MCNP, a 3D coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently used in medical applications such as cancer radiation treatment planning, interpretation of diagnostic radiation images, and treatment beam optimization. This paper will discuss MCNP`s current uses and capabilities, as well as envisioned improvements that would further enhance MCNP role in computational medicine. It will be demonstrated that the methodology exists to simulate medical images (e.g. SPECT). Techniques will be discussed that would enable the construction of 3D computational geometry models of individual patients for use in patient-specific studies that would improve the quality of care for patients.

  16. Bragg optics computer codes for neutron scattering instrument design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovici, M.; Yelon, W.B.; Berliner, R.R. [Missouri Univ. Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Stoica, A.D. [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, Bucharest (Romania)

    1997-09-01

    Computer codes for neutron crystal spectrometer design, optimization and experiment planning are described. Phase space distributions, linewidths and absolute intensities are calculated by matrix methods in an extension of the Cooper-Nathans resolution function formalism. For modeling the Bragg reflection on bent crystals the lamellar approximation is used. Optimization is done by satisfying conditions of focusing in scattering and in real space, and by numerically maximizing figures of merit. Examples for three-axis and two-axis spectrometers are given.

  17. Code manual for CONTAIN 2.0: A computer code for nuclear reactor containment analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, K.K.; Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Gido, R.G.; Tadios, E.L.; Davis, F.J.; Martinez, G.M.; Washington, K.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tills, J. [J. Tills and Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The CONTAIN 2.0 computer code is an integrated analysis tool used for predicting the physical conditions, chemical compositions, and distributions of radiological materials inside a containment building following the release of material from the primary system in a light-water reactor accident. It can also predict the source term to the environment. CONTAIN 2.0 is intended to replace the earlier CONTAIN 1.12, which was released in 1991. The purpose of this Code Manual is to provide full documentation of the features and models in CONTAIN 2.0. Besides complete descriptions of the models, this Code Manual provides a complete description of the input and output from the code. CONTAIN 2.0 is a highly flexible and modular code that can run problems that are either quite simple or highly complex. An important aspect of CONTAIN is that the interactions among thermal-hydraulic phenomena, aerosol behavior, and fission product behavior are taken into account. The code includes atmospheric models for steam/air thermodynamics, intercell flows, condensation/evaporation on structures and aerosols, aerosol behavior, and gas combustion. It also includes models for reactor cavity phenomena such as core-concrete interactions and coolant pool boiling. Heat conduction in structures, fission product decay and transport, radioactive decay heating, and the thermal-hydraulic and fission product decontamination effects of engineered safety features are also modeled. To the extent possible, the best available models for severe accident phenomena have been incorporated into CONTAIN, but it is intrinsic to the nature of accident analysis that significant uncertainty exists regarding numerous phenomena. In those cases, sensitivity studies can be performed with CONTAIN by means of user-specified input parameters. Thus, the code can be viewed as a tool designed to assist the knowledge reactor safety analyst in evaluating the consequences of specific modeling assumptions.

  18. WSRC approach to validation of criticality safety computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, D.R.; Mincey, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    Recent hardware and operating system changes at Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRC) have necessitated review of the validation for JOSHUA criticality safety computer codes. As part of the planning for this effort, a policy for validation of JOSHUA and other criticality safety codes has been developed. This policy will be illustrated with the steps being taken at WSRC. The objective in validating a specific computational method is to reliably correlate its calculated neutron multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) with known values over a well-defined set of neutronic conditions. Said another way, such correlations should be: (1) repeatable; (2) demonstrated with defined confidence; and (3) identify the range of neutronic conditions (area of applicability) for which the correlations are valid. The general approach to validation of computational methods at WSRC must encompass a large number of diverse types of fissile material processes in different operations. Special problems are presented in validating computational methods when very few experiments are available (such as for enriched uranium systems with principal second isotope {sup 236}U). To cover all process conditions at WSRC, a broad validation approach has been used. Broad validation is based upon calculation of many experiments to span all possible ranges of reflection, nuclide concentrations, moderation ratios, etc. Narrow validation, in comparison, relies on calculations of a few experiments very near anticipated worst-case process conditions. The methods and problems of broad validation are discussed.

  19. WSRC approach to validation of criticality safety computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, D.R.; Mincey, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Recent hardware and operating system changes at Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRC) have necessitated review of the validation for JOSHUA criticality safety computer codes. As part of the planning for this effort, a policy for validation of JOSHUA and other criticality safety codes has been developed. This policy will be illustrated with the steps being taken at WSRC. The objective in validating a specific computational method is to reliably correlate its calculated neutron multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) with known values over a well-defined set of neutronic conditions. Said another way, such correlations should be: (1) repeatable; (2) demonstrated with defined confidence; and (3) identify the range of neutronic conditions (area of applicability) for which the correlations are valid. The general approach to validation of computational methods at WSRC must encompass a large number of diverse types of fissile material processes in different operations. Special problems are presented in validating computational methods when very few experiments are available (such as for enriched uranium systems with principal second isotope {sup 236}U). To cover all process conditions at WSRC, a broad validation approach has been used. Broad validation is based upon calculation of many experiments to span all possible ranges of reflection, nuclide concentrations, moderation ratios, etc. Narrow validation, in comparison, relies on calculations of a few experiments very near anticipated worst-case process conditions. The methods and problems of broad validation are discussed.

  20. GERMINAL — A computer code for predicting fuel pin behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, J. C.; Roche, L.; Piron, J. P.; Truffert, J.

    1992-06-01

    In the frame of the R and D on FBR fuels, CEA/DEC is developing the computer code GERMINAL to study the fuel pin thermal-mechanical behaviour during steady-state and incidental conditions. The development of GERMINAL is foreseen in two steps: (1) The GERMINAL 1 code designed as a "working horse" for immediate applications. The version 1 of GERMINAL 1 is presently delivered fully documented with a physical qualification guaranteed up to 8 at%. (2) The version 2 of GERMINAL 1, in addition to what is presently treated in GERMINAL 1 includes the treatment of high burnup effects on the fission gas release and the fuel-clad joint. This version, GERMINAL 1.2, is presently under testing and will be completed up to the end of 1991. The GERMINAL 2 code designed as a reference code for future applications will cover all the aspects of GERMINAL 1 (including high burnup effects) with a more general mechanical treatment, and a completely revised and advanced informatical structure.

  1. Overview of Key Computer Codes for the PGSFR Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won-Pyo; Lee, Kwi-Lim; Yoo, Jaewoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The engineering project for licensing and construction of a PGSFR (Proto-type Generation IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor) was launched in 2012. The efficient electricity generation as well as the high level of safety is a requirement for the PGSFR design. In this context, the safety analysis is a key concern for the PGSFR specific design. In this regard, the present manuscript is aimed at sharing the knowledge on the PGSFR safety analysis with concerned individuals or organizations for a mutual understanding and collaboration. It introduces overall characteristics of the PGSFR design first, and then describes an accident classification with acceptance criteria, highlights of safety analysis computer codes, and discussion of covering ranges and availability of the codes. MARSLMR has a wide range of applicability to accident analyses for an integrated system. SAS4A/SASSYS-1 also has a capability to model a system, but its models address more to the fuel failures during the initiating phase of HCDA. On the other hand, the codes such as MATRA-LMR/FB, SWAAM-II, and CONTAIN-LMR have their specific purposes and limited applications, while ORIGEN-2, ISFRA, and MACCS-II are used for the PSA purpose. A code which can analyze the molten core progress post assembly duct failure is not available at present time.

  2. Multicode comparison of selected source-term computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.; Renier, J.P.; Roddy, J.W.; Ashline, R.C.; Wilson, W.B.; LaBauve, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to assess the predictive capabilities of three radionuclide inventory/depletion computer codes, ORIGEN2, ORIGEN-S, and CINDER-2. The task was accomplished through a series of comparisons of their output for several light-water reactor (LWR) models (i.e., verification). Of the five cases chosen, two modeled typical boiling-water reactors (BWR) at burnups of 27.5 and 40 GWd/MTU and two represented typical pressurized-water reactors (PWR) at burnups of 33 and 50 GWd/MTU. In the fifth case, identical input data were used for each of the codes to examine the results of decay only and to show differences in nuclear decay constants and decay heat rates. Comparisons were made for several different characteristics (mass, radioactivity, and decay heat rate) for 52 radionuclides and for nine decay periods ranging from 30 d to 10,000 years. Only fission products and actinides were considered. The results are presented in comparative-ratio tables for each of the characteristics, decay periods, and cases. A brief summary description of each of the codes has been included. Of the more than 21,000 individual comparisons made for the three codes (taken two at a time), nearly half (45%) agreed to within 1%, and an additional 17% fell within the range of 1 to 5%. Approximately 8% of the comparison results disagreed by more than 30%. However, relatively good agreement was obtained for most of the radionuclides that are expected to contribute the greatest impact to waste disposal. Even though some defects have been noted, each of the codes in the comparison appears to produce respectable results. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Buren, Kendra L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Jesse M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sauer, Jeremy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  4. Analysis of the Length of Braille Texts in English Braille American Edition, the Nemeth Code, and Computer Braille Code versus the Unified English Braille Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Marie; Wetzel, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the length of text in English Braille American Edition, the Nemeth code, and the computer braille code with the Unified English Braille Code (UEBC)--also known as Unified English Braille (UEB). The findings indicate that differences in the length of text are dependent on the type of material that is transcribed and the grade…

  5. Geometric plane shapes for computer-generated holographic engraving codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augier, Ángel G.; Rabal, Héctor; Sánchez, Raúl B.

    2017-04-01

    We report a new theoretical and experimental study on hologravures, as holographic computer-generated laser-engravings. A geometric theory of images based on the general principles of light ray behaviour is shown. The models used are also applicable for similar engravings obtained by any non-laser method, and the solutions allow for the analysis of particular situations, not only in the case of light reflection mode, but also in transmission mode geometry. This approach is a novel perspective allowing the three-dimensional (3D) design of engraved images for specific ends. We prove theoretically that plane curves of very general geometric shapes can be used to encode image information onto a two-dimensional (2D) engraving, showing notable influence on the behaviour of reconstructed images that appears as an exciting investigation topic, extending its applications. Several cases of code using particular curvilinear shapes are experimentally studied. The computer-generated objects are coded by using the chosen curve type, and engraved by a laser on a plane surface of suitable material. All images are recovered optically by adequate illumination. The pseudoscopic or orthoscopic character of these images is considered, and an appropriate interpretation is presented.

  6. Parameters that affect parallel processing for computational electromagnetic simulation codes on high performance computing clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hongsik

    What is the impact of multicore and associated advanced technologies on computational software for science? Most researchers and students have multicore laptops or desktops for their research and they need computing power to run computational software packages. Computing power was initially derived from Central Processing Unit (CPU) clock speed. That changed when increases in clock speed became constrained by power requirements. Chip manufacturers turned to multicore CPU architectures and associated technological advancements to create the CPUs for the future. Most software applications benefited by the increased computing power the same way that increases in clock speed helped applications run faster. However, for Computational ElectroMagnetics (CEM) software developers, this change was not an obvious benefit - it appeared to be a detriment. Developers were challenged to find a way to correctly utilize the advancements in hardware so that their codes could benefit. The solution was parallelization and this dissertation details the investigation to address these challenges. Prior to multicore CPUs, advanced computer technologies were compared with the performance using benchmark software and the metric was FLoting-point Operations Per Seconds (FLOPS) which indicates system performance for scientific applications that make heavy use of floating-point calculations. Is FLOPS an effective metric for parallelized CEM simulation tools on new multicore system? Parallel CEM software needs to be benchmarked not only by FLOPS but also by the performance of other parameters related to type and utilization of the hardware, such as CPU, Random Access Memory (RAM), hard disk, network, etc. The codes need to be optimized for more than just FLOPs and new parameters must be included in benchmarking. In this dissertation, the parallel CEM software named High Order Basis Based Integral Equation Solver (HOBBIES) is introduced. This code was developed to address the needs of the

  7. Education:=Coding+Aesthetics; Aesthetic Understanding, Computer Science Education, and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jonathon; Keenan, Sarah; Mishra, Punya

    2016-01-01

    The popular press is rife with examples of how students in the United States and around the globe are learning to program, make, and tinker. The Hour of Code, maker-education, and similar efforts are advocating that more students be exposed to principles found within computer science. We propose an expansion beyond simply teaching computational…

  8. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  9. GAM-HEAT -- a computer code to compute heat transfer in complex enclosures. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.E.; Taylor, J.R.; Kielpinski, A.L.; Steimke, J.L.

    1991-02-01

    The GAM-HEAT code was developed for heat transfer analyses associated with postulated Double Ended Guillotine Break Loss Of Coolant Accidents (DEGB LOCA) resulting in a drained reactor vessel. In these analyses the gamma radiation resulting from fission product decay constitutes the primary source of energy as a function of time. This energy is deposited into the various reactor components and is re- radiated as thermal energy. The code accounts for all radiant heat exchanges within and leaving the reactor enclosure. The SRS reactors constitute complex radiant exchange enclosures since there are many assemblies of various types within the primary enclosure and most of the assemblies themselves constitute enclosures. GAM-HEAT accounts for this complexity by processing externally generated view factors and connectivity matrices, and also accounts for convective, conductive, and advective heat exchanges. The code is applicable for many situations involving heat exchange between surfaces within a radiatively passive medium. The GAM-HEAT code has been exercised extensively for computing transient temperatures in SRS reactors with specific charges and control components. Results from these computations have been used to establish the need for and to evaluate hardware modifications designed to mitigate results of postulated accident scenarios, and to assist in the specification of safe reactor operating power limits. The code utilizes temperature dependence on material properties. The efficiency of the code has been enhanced by the use of an iterative equation solver. Verification of the code to date consists of comparisons with parallel efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory and with similar efforts at Westinghouse Science and Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA, and benchmarked using problems with known analytical or iterated solutions. All comparisons and tests yield results that indicate the GAM-HEAT code performs as intended.

  10. Reasoning with Computer Code: a new Mathematical Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissanetzky, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A logic is a mathematical model of knowledge used to study how we reason, how we describe the world, and how we infer the conclusions that determine our behavior. The logic presented here is natural. It has been experimentally observed, not designed. It represents knowledge as a causal set, includes a new type of inference based on the minimization of an action functional, and generates its own semantics, making it unnecessary to prescribe one. This logic is suitable for high-level reasoning with computer code, including tasks such as self-programming, objectoriented analysis, refactoring, systems integration, code reuse, and automated programming from sensor-acquired data. A strong theoretical foundation exists for the new logic. The inference derives laws of conservation from the permutation symmetry of the causal set, and calculates the corresponding conserved quantities. The association between symmetries and conservation laws is a fundamental and well-known law of nature and a general principle in modern theoretical Physics. The conserved quantities take the form of a nested hierarchy of invariant partitions of the given set. The logic associates elements of the set and binds them together to form the levels of the hierarchy. It is conjectured that the hierarchy corresponds to the invariant representations that the brain is known to generate. The hierarchies also represent fully object-oriented, self-generated code, that can be directly compiled and executed (when a compiler becomes available), or translated to a suitable programming language. The approach is constructivist because all entities are constructed bottom-up, with the fundamental principles of nature being at the bottom, and their existence is proved by construction. The new logic is mathematically introduced and later discussed in the context of transformations of algorithms and computer programs. We discuss what a full self-programming capability would really mean. We argue that self

  11. ZEUS-MP/2: Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John C.; Norman, Michael L.; Fiedler, Robert A.; Bordner, James O.; Li, Pak Shing; Clark, Stephen E.; Ud-Doula, Asif; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2011-02-01

    ZEUS-MP is a multiphysics, massively parallel, message-passing implementation of the ZEUS code. ZEUS-MP offers an MHD algorithm that is better suited for multidimensional flows than the ZEUS-2D module by virtue of modifications to the method of characteristics scheme first suggested by Hawley & Stone. This MHD module is shown to compare quite favorably to the TVD scheme described by Ryu et al. ZEUS-MP is the first publicly available ZEUS code to allow the advection of multiple chemical (or nuclear) species. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations are enabled via an implicit flux-limited radiation diffusion (FLD) module. The hydrodynamic, MHD, and FLD modules can be used, singly or in concert, in one, two, or three space dimensions. In addition, so-called 1.5D and 2.5D grids, in which the "half-D'' denotes a symmetry axis along which a constant but nonzero value of velocity or magnetic field is evolved, are supported. Self-gravity can be included either through the assumption of a GM/r potential or through a solution of Poisson's equation using one of three linear solver packages (conjugate gradient, multigrid, and FFT) provided for that purpose. Point-mass potentials are also supported. Because ZEUS-MP is designed for large simulations on parallel computing platforms, considerable attention is paid to the parallel performance characteristics of each module in the code. Strong-scaling tests involving pure hydrodynamics (with and without self-gravity), MHD, and RHD are performed in which large problems (2563 zones) are distributed among as many as 1024 processors of an IBM SP3. Parallel efficiency is a strong function of the amount of communication required between processors in a given algorithm, but all modules are shown to scale well on up to 1024 processors for the chosen fixed problem size.

  12. A computer code for analysis of severe accidents in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The ICARE2 computer code, developed and validated since 1988 at IPSN (nuclear safety and protection institute), calculates in a mechanistic way the physical and chemical phenomena involved in the core degradation process during possible severe accidents in LWR's. The coupling between ICARE2 and the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code CATHARE2 was completed at IPSN and led to the release of a first ICARE/CATHARE V1 version in 1999, followed by 2 successive revisions in 2000 and 2001. This documents gathers all the contributions presented at the first international ICARE/CATHARE users'club seminar that took place in November 2001. This seminar was characterized by a high quality and variety of the presentations, showing an increase of reactor applications and user needs in this area (2D/3D aspects, reflooding, corium slumping into the lower head,...). 2 sessions were organized. The first one was dedicated to the applications of ICARE2 V3mod1 against small-scale experiments such as PHEBUS FPT2 and FPT3 tests, PHEBUS AIC, QUENCH experiments, NRU-FLHT-5 test, ACRR-MP1 and DC1 experiments, CORA-PWR tests, and PBF-SFD1.4 test. The second session involved ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 reactor applications and users'guidelines. Among reactor applications we found: code applicability to high burn-up fuel rods, simulation of the TMI-2 transient, simulation of a PWR-900 high pressure severe accident sequence, and the simulation of a VVER-1000 large break LOCA scenario. (A.C.)

  13. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, Khairina; Yazid, Putranto Ilham; Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi

    2014-09-01

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects.

  14. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  15. Results of comparative RBMK neutron computation using VNIIEF codes (cell computation, 3D statics, 3D kinetics). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, A.N.; Zhitnik, A.K.; Zvenigorodskaya, O.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In conformity with the protocol of the Workshop under Contract {open_quotes}Assessment of RBMK reactor safety using modern Western Codes{close_quotes} VNIIEF performed a neutronics computation series to compare western and VNIIEF codes and assess whether VNIIEF codes are suitable for RBMK type reactor safety assessment computation. The work was carried out in close collaboration with M.I. Rozhdestvensky and L.M. Podlazov, NIKIET employees. The effort involved: (1) cell computations with the WIMS, EKRAN codes (improved modification of the LOMA code) and the S-90 code (VNIIEF Monte Carlo). Cell, polycell, burnup computation; (2) 3D computation of static states with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes and comparison with results of computation with the NESTLE code (USA). The computations were performed in the geometry and using the neutron constants presented by the American party; (3) 3D computation of neutron kinetics with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes. These computations were performed in two formulations, both being developed in collaboration with NIKIET. Formulation of the first problem maximally possibly agrees with one of NESTLE problems and imitates gas bubble travel through a core. The second problem is a model of the RBMK as a whole with imitation of control and protection system controls (CPS) movement in a core.

  16. Just-in-Time Compilation-Inspired Methodology for Parallelization of Compute Intensive Java Code

    OpenAIRE

    GHULAM MUSTAFA; WAQAR MAHMOOD; MUHAMMAD USMAN GHANI

    2017-01-01

    Compute intensive programs generally consume significant fraction of execution time in a small amount of repetitive code. Such repetitive code is commonly known as hotspot code. We observed that compute intensive hotspots often possess exploitable loop level parallelism. A JIT (Just-in-Time) compiler profiles a running program to identify its hotspots. Hotspots are then translated into native code, for efficient execution. Using similar approach, we propose a methodology to identify hotspots ...

  17. Implementation of a 3D mixing layer code on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, K.; Thakur, R.; Dang, T.; Bogucz, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes our progress and experience in the development of a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics code on parallel computers to simulate three-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers. In this initial study, the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are solved using a finite-volume explicit time-marching algorithm. The code was first programmed in Fortran 77 for sequential computers. The code was then converted for use on parallel computers using the conventional message-passing technique, while we have not been able to compile the code with the present version of HPF compilers.

  18. Assessment of the computer code COBRA/CFTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxi, C. B.; Burhop, C. J.

    1981-07-01

    The COBRA/CFTL code has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for thermal-hydraulic analysis of simulated gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) core assemblies to be tested in the core flow test loop (CFTL). The COBRA/CFTL code was obtained by modifying the General Atomic code COBRA*GCFR. This report discusses these modifications, compares the two code results for three cases which represent conditions from fully rough turbulent flow to laminar flow. Case 1 represented fully rough turbulent flow in the bundle. Cases 2 and 3 represented laminar and transition flow regimes. The required input for the COBRA/CFTL code, a sample problem input/output and the code listing are included in the Appendices.

  19. MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eileen P. Poeter and Mary C. Hill

    2007-08-20

    This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations.

  20. User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1979-02-01

    PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

  1. Transport capacity of wireless networks: benefits from multi-access computation coding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goseling, Jasper; Gastpar, Michael; Weber, Jos H.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effect on the transport capacity of wireless networks of different physical layer coding mechanisms. We compare the performance of traditional channel coding techniques, turning the wireless network in reliable point-to-point channels, with multi-access computation coding, in which

  2. 3-D field computation: The near-triumph of commerical codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L.R.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, more and more of those who design and analyze magnets and other devices are using commercial codes rather than developing their own. This paper considers the commercial codes and the features available with them. Other recent trends with 3-D field computation include parallel computation and visualization methods such as virtual reality systems.

  3. Performance analysis of large scale parallel CFD computing based on Code_Saturne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhi

    2013-02-01

    In order to run computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes on large scales, parallel computing has to be employed. For instance, on Petascale computing, general parallel computing without any optimization is not enough, especially for complex industrial issues that employ a large number of mesh cells to capture the details of the geometry. How to distribute these mesh cells among the multi-processors for Terascale and Petascale systems to obtain a good performance on parallel computing is really a challenge. Some mesh partitioning software packages, such as Metis, ParMetis, PT-Scotch and Zoltan, were chosen as the candidates ported into Code_Saturne to test if they can lead Code_Saturne towards Petascale and Exascale parallel CFD computing. Through the studies, it was found that mesh partitioning optimization software packages based on the graph mesh partitioning method can help the CFD code obtain good mesh distributions for high performance computing (HPC).

  4. Benchmark and partial validation testing of the FLASH computer code, Version 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martian, P.; Smith, C.S.

    1993-09-01

    This document presents methods and results of benchmark testing (i.e., code-to-code comparisons) and partial validation testing (i.e., tests which compare field data to the computer generated solutions) of the FLASH computer code, Version 3.0, which were conducted to determine if the code is ready for performance assessment studies of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Three test problems are presented that were designed to check computational efficiency, accuracy of the numerical algorithms, and the capability of the code to simulate diverse hydrological conditions. These test problems were designed to specifically test the code`s ability to simulate, (a) seasonal infiltration in response to meteorological conditions, (b) changing watertable elevations due to a transient areal source of water, (i.e., influx from spreading basins), and (c) infiltration into fractured basalt as a result of seasonal water in drainage ditches. The FLASH simulations generally compared well with the benchmark codes, indicating good stability and acceptable computational efficiency while simulating a wide range of conditions. The code appears operational for modeling both unsaturated and saturated flow in fractured, heterogeneous porous media. However, the code failed to converge when a unsaturated to saturated transition occurred. Consequently, the code should not be used when this condition occurs or is expected to occur, i.e. when perched water is present or when infiltration rates exceed the saturated conductivity of the soil.

  5. MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, Eileen P.; Hill, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations. Many applications of MMA will

  6. Application of computational fluid dynamics methods to improve thermal hydraulic code analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, Jr.

    A computational fluid dynamics code is used to model the primary natural circulation loop of a proposed small modular reactor for comparison to experimental data and best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code results. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics code modeling capabilities make them attractive alternatives to the current conservative approach of coupled best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes and uncertainty evaluations. The results from a computational fluid dynamics analysis are benchmarked against the experimental test results of a 1:3 length, 1:254 volume, full pressure and full temperature scale small modular reactor during steady-state power operations and during a depressurization transient. A comparative evaluation of the experimental data, the thermal hydraulic code results and the computational fluid dynamics code results provides an opportunity to validate the best-estimate thermal hydraulic code's treatment of a natural circulation loop and provide insights into expanded use of the computational fluid dynamics code in future designs and operations. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine those physical phenomena most impactful on operations of the proposed reactor's natural circulation loop. The combination of the comparative evaluation and sensitivity analysis provides the resources for increased confidence in model developments for natural circulation loops and provides for reliability improvements of the thermal hydraulic code.

  7. Efficient Quantification of Uncertainties in Complex Computer Code Results Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Propagation of parameter uncertainties through large computer models can be very resource intensive. Frameworks and tools for uncertainty quantification are...

  8. Two-Phase Flow in Geothermal Wells: Development and Uses of a Good Computer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Ramirez, Jaime

    1983-06-01

    A computer code is developed for vertical two-phase flow in geothermal wellbores. The two-phase correlations used were developed by Orkiszewski (1967) and others and are widely applicable in the oil and gas industry. The computer code is compared to the flowing survey measurements from wells in the East Mesa, Cerro Prieto, and Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal fields with success. Well data from the Svartsengi field in Iceland are also used. Several applications of the computer code are considered. They range from reservoir analysis to wellbore deposition studies. It is considered that accurate and workable wellbore simulators have an important role to play in geothermal reservoir engineering.

  9. Code of Ethical Conduct for Computer-Using Educators: An ICCE Policy Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computing Teacher, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Prepared by the International Council for Computers in Education's Ethics and Equity Committee, this code of ethics for educators using computers covers nine main areas: curriculum issues, issues relating to computer access, privacy/confidentiality issues, teacher-related issues, student issues, the community, school organizational issues,…

  10. Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B.P.; Mahoney, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-level waste (LLW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. Currently available computer codes were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical process expected to affect LLW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the ARES-CT code developed at PNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of and land disposal sites.

  11. Evaluation of Computational Codes for Underwater Hull Analysis Model Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    Simulia product family. At present ABAQUS does not offer modeling in electrochemistry . Even though it does not have a 8 corrosion or cathodic... electrochemistry dominated corrosion . Unique among the codes considered is the ability of COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the more general form of...2014 Memorandum Report Corrosion Finite element modeling Boundary element modeling Polarization 01-10-2007 – 09-09-2009 Unclassified Unlimited

  12. GATO Code Modification to Compute Plasma Response to External Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; Ng, E.; Li, X. S.; James, A.

    2006-10-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the plasma response to an external nonaxiymmetric magnetic perturbation cannot be neglected in many situations of interest. This response can be described as a linear combination of the eigenmodes of the ideal MHD operator. The eigenmodes of the system can be obtained numerically with the GATO ideal MHD stability code, which has been modified for this purpose. A key requirement is the removal of inadmissible continuum modes. For Finite Hybrid Element codes such as GATO, a prerequisite for this is their numerical restabilization by addition of small numerical terms to δ,to cancel the analytic numerical destabilization. In addition, robustness of the code was improved and the solution method speeded up by use of the SuperLU package to facilitate calculation of the full set of eigenmodes in a reasonable time. To treat resonant plasma responses, the finite element basis has been extended to include eigenfunctions with finite jumps at rational surfaces. Some preliminary numerical results for DIII-D equilibria will be given.

  13. Computational optimization of global gyrokinetic particle code GTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Swamy, Aditya; Ethier, Stephane; Wang, Weixing; Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-Li; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2017-10-01

    Electromagnetic microturbulence is an important source of anomalous ion and electron transport in tokamak plasmas. Gyrokinetic Tokamak Simulation (GTS), a global PIC code presents a first-principles based method to understand and predict such transport. Recently, the double-split-weight scheme that avoids the high-beta ``cancelation problem'' has been developed and implemented in GTS to study electromagnetic turbulence. Use of magnetic coordinates and a field-line following grid in GTS provides a highly efficient means to resolve a relatively larger set of modes in the same run. The misalignment of the field-line following grid with cylindrical grid, however, makes Fourier-filtering of single mode highly inefficient, and therefore makes benchmarking of linear modes with other codes time consuming. Recent algorithmic optimizations to align this subroutine with the 2-d domain have resulted in a significant performance improvement of 20x, with an overall code speedup of 3x. These and further improvements to the filtering capability, along with linear benchmarks of electromagnetic instabilities such as MTM and KBM will be discussed. SERB Indo-US Research Fellowship.

  14. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, R K; Srivastava, R

    1979-12-01

    Models and computer codes which may be used to describe flow reactors in which high purity, solar grade silicon is produced via reduction of gaseous silicon halides are described. A prominent example of the type of process which may be studied using the codes developed in this program is the SiCl/sub 4//Na reactor currently being developed by the Westinghouse Electric Corp. During this program two large computer codes were developed. The first is the CHEMPART code, an axisymmetric, marching code which treats two-phase flows with models describing detailed gas-phase chemical kinetics, particle formation, and particle growth. This code, based on the AeroChem LAPP (Low Altitude Plume Program) code can be used to describe flow reactors in which reactants mix, react, and form a particulate phase. Detailed radial gas-phase composition, temperature, velocity, and particle size distribution profiles are computed. Also, depositon of heat, momentum, and mass (either particulate or vapor) on reactor walls is described. The second code is a modified version of the GENMIX boundary layer code which is used to compute rates of heat, momentum, and mass transfer to the reactor walls. This code lacks the detailed chemical kinetics and particle handling features of the CHEMPART code but has the virtue of running much more rapidly than CHEMPART, while treating the phenomena occurring in the boundary layer in more detail than can be afforded using CHEMPART. These two codes have been used in this program to predict particle formation characteristics and wall collection efficiencies for SiCl/sub 4//Na flow reactors. Results are described.

  15. Code and papers: computing publication patterns in the LHC era

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Publications in scholarly journals establish the body of knowledge deriving from scientific research; they also play a fundamental role in the career path of scientists and in the evaluation criteria of funding agencies. This presentation reviews the evolution of computing-oriented publications in HEP following the start of operation of LHC. Quantitative analyses are illustrated, which document the production of scholarly papers on computing-related topics by HEP experiments and core tools projects (including distributed computing R&D), and the citations they receive. Several scientometric indicators are analyzed to characterize the role of computing in HEP literature. Distinctive features of scholarly publication production in the software-oriented and hardware-oriented experimental HEP communities are highlighted. Current patterns and trends are compared to the situation in previous generations' HEP experiments at LEP, Tevatron and B-factories. The results of this scientometric analysis document objec...

  16. A Coding System for Qualitative Studies of the Information-Seeking Process in Computer Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Cristian; de Antonio, Angelica; Ferre, Xavier; Lara, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this article we propose a qualitative analysis tool--a coding system--that can support the formalisation of the information-seeking process in a specific field: research in computer science. Method: In order to elaborate the coding system, we have conducted a set of qualitative studies, more specifically a focus group and some…

  17. The Unified English Braille Code: Examination by Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science Technical Expert Braille Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, M. Cay; MacCuspie, P. Ann

    2010-01-01

    Braille-reading mathematicians, scientists, and computer scientists were asked to examine the usability of the Unified English Braille Code (UEB) for technical materials. They had little knowledge of the code prior to the study. The research included two reading tasks, a short tutorial about UEB, and a focus group. The results indicated that the…

  18. Computing the Feng-Rao distances for codes from order domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruano Benito, Diego

    2007-01-01

    We compute the Feng–Rao distance of a code coming from an order domain with a simplicial value semigroup. The main tool is the Apéry set of a semigroup that can be computed using a Gröbner basis.......We compute the Feng–Rao distance of a code coming from an order domain with a simplicial value semigroup. The main tool is the Apéry set of a semigroup that can be computed using a Gröbner basis....

  19. PEBBLES: A COMPUTER CODE FOR MODELING PACKING, FLOW AND RECIRCULATIONOF PEBBLES IN A PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive, high fidelity model for pebble flow has been developed and embodied in the PEBBLES computer code. In this paper, a description of the physical artifacts included in the model is presented and some results from using the computer code for predicting the features of pebble flow and packing in a realistic pebble bed reactor design are shown. The sensitivity of models to various physical parameters is also discussed.

  20. Plutonium explosive dispersal modeling using the MACCS2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, C.M.; Wald, T.L.; Chanin, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the necessary parameters to be used to establish a defensible methodology to perform explosive dispersal modeling of respirable plutonium using Gaussian methods. A particular code, MACCS2, has been chosen for this modeling effort due to its application of sophisticated meteorological statistical sampling in accordance with the philosophy of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.145, ``Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants``. A second advantage supporting the selection of the MACCS2 code for modeling purposes is that meteorological data sets are readily available at most Department of Energy (DOE) and NRC sites. This particular MACCS2 modeling effort focuses on the calculation of respirable doses and not ground deposition. Once the necessary parameters for the MACCS2 modeling are developed and presented, the model is benchmarked against empirical test data from the Double Tracks shot of project Roller Coaster (Shreve 1965) and applied to a hypothetical plutonium explosive dispersal scenario. Further modeling with the MACCS2 code is performed to determine a defensible method of treating the effects of building structure interaction on the respirable fraction distribution as a function of height. These results are related to the Clean Slate 2 and Clean Slate 3 bunkered shots of Project Roller Coaster. Lastly a method is presented to determine the peak 99.5% sector doses on an irregular site boundary in the manner specified in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 (1983). Parametric analyses are performed on the major analytic assumptions in the MACCS2 model to define the potential errors that are possible in using this methodology.

  1. A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with multiple feed points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, F.V.; Tsang, C.F.

    1988-03-01

    Investigators wish to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersecting a wellbore to understand the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. Often inflow from these fractures into the wellbore is at very low rates. A new procedure has been proposed and a corresponding method of analysis developed to obtain fracture inflow parameters from a time sequence of electric conductivity logs of the borehole fluid. The present report gives the details of equations and computer code used to compute borehole fluid conductivity distributions. Verification of the code used and a listing of the code are also given. 9 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  3. FRAPCON-1: a computer code for the steady state analysis of oxide fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A.; Bohn, M. P.; Coleman, D. R.; Lanning, D. D.

    1978-08-01

    FRAPCON is a FORTRAN IV computer code which predicts the steady state long-term burnup response of a light water reactor fuel rod. The coupled effects of fuel and cladding deformation, temperature, and internal gas pressure on the behavior of the fuel rod are considered in determining fuel rod response. The cladding deformation model includes multi-axial, elasto-plastic analysis and considers both primary and secondary creep. The fuel temperature model considers the effects of fuel cracking and relocation in determining the fuel temperature distribution. Burnup dependent fission gas generation and release is included in calculating fuel rod internal pressure. An integral fuel rod failure subcode determines failure and failure modes based on the operating conditions at each timestep. The material property subcode, MATPRO, provides gas, fuel and cladding properties to the computational subcodes in FRAPCON. No material properties need to be supplied by the code user. FRAPCON is a completely modular code with each major computational subcode isolated within the code and coupled to the main code by subroutine calls and data transfer through argument lists. FRAPCON is soft-coupled to the transient fuel rod code, FRAP-T, to provide initial conditions to initiate analysis of such off-normal transients as a loss-of-coolant accident. The code is presently programmed and running on a CDC 7600 computer.

  4. Proceedings of the conference on computer codes and the linear accelerator community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.K. (comp.)

    1990-07-01

    The conference whose proceedings you are reading was envisioned as the second in a series, the first having been held in San Diego in January 1988. The intended participants were those people who are actively involved in writing and applying computer codes for the solution of problems related to the design and construction of linear accelerators. The first conference reviewed many of the codes both extant and under development. This second conference provided an opportunity to update the status of those codes, and to provide a forum in which emerging new 3D codes could be described and discussed. The afternoon poster session on the second day of the conference provided an opportunity for extended discussion. All in all, this conference was felt to be quite a useful interchange of ideas and developments in the field of 3D calculations, parallel computation, higher-order optics calculations, and code documentation and maintenance for the linear accelerator community. A third conference is planned.

  5. Comparison of various NLTE codes in computing the charge-state populations of an argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, S.R.; Weisheit, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    A comparison among nine computer codes shows surprisingly large differences where it had been believed that the theroy was well understood. Each code treats an argon plasma, optically thin and with no external photon flux; temperatures vary around 1 keV and ion densities vary from 6 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ to 6 x 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. At these conditions most ions have three or fewer bound electrons. The calculated populations of 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-electron ions differ from code to code by typical factors of 2, in some cases by factors greater than 300. These differences depend as sensitively on how may Rydberg states a code allows as they do on variations among computed collision rates. 29 refs., 23 figs.

  6. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  7. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  8. ECON-KG: A Code for Computation of Electrical Conductivity Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AND SUBTITLE ECON-KG: A Code for Computation of Electrical Conductivity Using Density Functional Theory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER ...Functional Theory by DeCarlos E Taylor Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers The...Computation of Electrical Conductivity Using Density Functional Theory by DeCarlos E Taylor Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  9. Compendium of computer codes for the safety analysis of fast breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    The objective of the compendium is to provide the reader with a guide which briefly describes many of the computer codes used for liquid metal fast breeder reactor safety analyses, since it is for this system that most of the codes have been developed. The compendium is designed to address the following frequently asked questions from individuals in licensing and research and development activities: (1) What does the code do. (2) To what safety problems has it been applied. (3) What are the code's limitations. (4) What is being done to remove these limitations. (5) How does the code compare with experimental observations and other code predictions. (6) What reference documents are available.

  10. High pressure humidification columns: Design equations, algorithm, and computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enick, R.M. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Klara, S.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Marano, J.J. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the detailed development of a computer model to simulate the humidification of an air stream in contact with a water stream in a countercurrent, packed tower, humidification column. The computer model has been developed as a user model for the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulator. This was done to utilize the powerful ASPEN flash algorithms as well as to provide ease of use when using ASPEN to model systems containing humidification columns. The model can easily be modified for stand-alone use by incorporating any standard algorithm for performing flash calculations. The model was primarily developed to analyze Humid Air Turbine (HAT) power cycles; however, it can be used for any application that involves a humidifier or saturator. The solution is based on a multiple stage model of a packed column which incorporates mass and energy, balances, mass transfer and heat transfer rate expressions, the Lewis relation and a thermodynamic equilibrium model for the air-water system. The inlet air properties, inlet water properties and a measure of the mass transfer and heat transfer which occur in the column are the only required input parameters to the model. Several example problems are provided to illustrate the algorithm`s ability to generate the temperature of the water, flow rate of the water, temperature of the air, flow rate of the air and humidity of the air as a function of height in the column. The algorithm can be used to model any high-pressure air humidification column operating at pressures up to 50 atm. This discussion includes descriptions of various humidification processes, detailed derivations of the relevant expressions, and methods of incorporating these equations into a computer model for a humidification column.

  11. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, A.; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucky, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:{0,1}Ω(n)→{0,1}n with minimum distance Ω(n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: 1) if d=2, then w=Θ(n (lgn/lglgn)2); 2) if d=3, then w...... bound gives the largest known lower bound for computing any linear map. The upper bounds imply that a (necessarily dense) generator matrix for our code can be written as the product of two sparse matrices. Using known techniques, we also obtain similar (but not tight) bounds for computing pairwise......-independent hash functions. Our lower bounds are based on a superconcentrator-like condition that the graphs of circuits computing good codes must satisfy. This condition is provably intermediate between superconcentrators and their weakenings considered before...

  12. Automatic Parallelization Tool: Classification of Program Code for Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Basthikodi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Performance growth of single-core processors has come to a halt in the past decade, but was re-enabled by the introduction of parallelism in processors. Multicore frameworks along with Graphical Processing Units empowered to enhance parallelism broadly. Couples of compilers are updated to developing challenges forsynchronization and threading issues. Appropriate program and algorithm classifications will have advantage to a great extent to the group of software engineers to get opportunities for effective parallelization. In present work we investigated current species for classification of algorithms, in that related work on classification is discussed along with the comparison of issues that challenges the classification. The set of algorithms are chosen which matches the structure with different issues and perform given task. We have tested these algorithms utilizing existing automatic species extraction toolsalong with Bones compiler. We have added functionalities to existing tool, providing a more detailed characterization. The contributions of our work include support for pointer arithmetic, conditional and incremental statements, user defined types, constants and mathematical functions. With this, we can retain significant data which is not captured by original speciesof algorithms. We executed new theories into the device, empowering automatic characterization of program code.

  13. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  14. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  15. Algorithms and computer codes for atomic and molecular quantum scattering theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, L. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    This workshop has succeeded in bringing up 11 different coupled equation codes on the NRCC computer, testing them against a set of 24 different test problems and making them available to the user community. These codes span a wide variety of methodologies, and factors of up to 300 were observed in the spread of computer times on specific problems. A very effective method was devised for examining the performance of the individual codes in the different regions of the integration range. Many of the strengths and weaknesses of the codes have been identified. Based on these observations, a hybrid code has been developed which is significantly superior to any single code tested. Thus, not only have the original goals been fully met, the workshop has resulted directly in an advancement of the field. All of the computer programs except VIVS are available upon request from the NRCC. Since an improved version of VIVS is contained in the hybrid program, VIVAS, it was not made available for distribution. The individual program LOGD is, however, available. In addition, programs which compute the potential energy matrices of the test problems are also available. The software library names for Tests 1, 2 and 4 are HEH2, LICO, and EN2, respectively.

  16. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  17. Development of computing code system for level 3 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Yu, Dong Han; Kim, Seung Hwan

    1997-07-01

    Among the various research areas of the level 3 PSA, the effect of terrain on the transport of radioactive material was investigated through wind tunnel experiment. These results will give a physical insight in the development of a new dispersion model. Because there are some discrepancies between the results from Gaussian plume model and those from field test, the effect of terrain on the atmospheric dispersion was investigated by using CTDMPLUS code. Through this study we find that the model which can treat terrain effect is essential in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials and the CTDMPLUS model can be used as a useful tool. And it is suggested that modification of a model and experimental study should be made through the continuous effort. The health effect assessment near the Yonggwang site by using IPE (Individual plant examination) results and its site data was performed. The health effect assessment is an important part of consequence analysis of a nuclear power plant site. The MACCS was used in the assessment. Based on the calculation of CCDF for each risk measure, it is shown that CCDF has a slow slope and thus wide probability distribution in cases of early fatality, early injury, total early fatality risk, and total weighted early fatality risk. And in cases of cancer fatality and population dose within 48km and 80km, the CCDF curve have a steep slope and thus narrow probability distribution. The establishment of methodologies for necessary models for consequence analysis resulting form a server accident in the nuclear power plant was made and a program for consequence analysis was developed. The models include atmospheric transport and diffusion, calculation of exposure doses for various pathways, and assessment of health effects and associated risks. Finally, the economic impact resulting form an accident in a nuclear power plant was investigated. In this study, estimation models for each cost terms that considered in economic

  18. Computational and Experimental Methods to Decipher the Epigenetic Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ede Pretis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-layered set of epigenetic marks, including post-translational modifications of histones and methylation of DNA, is finely tuned to define the epigenetic state of chromatin in any given cell type under specific conditions. Recently, the knowledge about the combinations of epigenetic marks occurring in the genome of different cell types under various conditions is rapidly increasing. Computational methods were developed for the identification of these states, unraveling the combinatorial nature of epigenetic marks and their association to genomic functional elements and transcriptional states. Nevertheless, the precise rules defining the interplay between all these marks remain poorly characterized. In this perspective we review the current state of this research field, illustrating the power and the limitations of current approaches. Finally, we sketch future avenues of research illustrating how the adoption of specific experimental designs coupled with available experimental approaches could be critical for a significant progress in this area.

  19. UCODE, a computer code for universal inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, Eileen P.; Hill, Mary C.

    1999-05-01

    This article presents the US Geological Survey computer program UCODE, which was developed in collaboration with the US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station and the International Ground Water Modeling Center of the Colorado School of Mines. UCODE performs inverse modeling, posed as a parameter-estimation problem, using nonlinear regression. Any application model or set of models can be used; the only requirement is that they have numerical (ASCII or text only) input and output files and that the numbers in these files have sufficient significant digits. Application models can include preprocessors and postprocessors as well as models related to the processes of interest (physical, chemical and so on), making UCODE extremely powerful for model calibration. Estimated parameters can be defined flexibly with user-specified functions. Observations to be matched in the regression can be any quantity for which a simulated equivalent value can be produced, thus simulated equivalent values are calculated using values that appear in the application model output files and can be manipulated with additive and multiplicative functions, if necessary. Prior, or direct, information on estimated parameters also can be included in the regression. The nonlinear regression problem is solved by minimizing a weighted least-squares objective function with respect to the parameter values using a modified Gauss-Newton method. Sensitivities needed for the method are calculated approximately by forward or central differences and problems and solutions related to this approximation are discussed. Statistics are calculated and printed for use in (1) diagnosing inadequate data or identifying parameters that probably cannot be estimated with the available data, (2) evaluating estimated parameter values, (3) evaluating the model representation of the actual processes and (4) quantifying the uncertainty of model simulated values. UCODE is intended for use on any computer operating

  20. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  1. Compilation of documented computer codes applicable to environmental assessment of radioactivity releases. [Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, F. O.; Miller, C. W.; Shaeffer, D. L.; Garten, Jr., C. T.; Shor, R. W.; Ensminger, J. T.

    1977-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a compilation of computer codes for the assessment of accidental or routine releases of radioactivity to the environment from nuclear power facilities. The capabilities of 83 computer codes in the areas of environmental transport and radiation dosimetry are summarized in tabular form. This preliminary analysis clearly indicates that the initial efforts in assessment methodology development have concentrated on atmospheric dispersion, external dosimetry, and internal dosimetry via inhalation. The incorporation of terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways has been a more recent development and reflects the current requirements of environmental legislation and the needs of regulatory agencies. The characteristics of the conceptual models employed by these codes are reviewed. The appendixes include abstracts of the codes and indexes by author, key words, publication description, and title.

  2. Compendium of computer codes for the researcher in magnetic fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.D. (ed.)

    1989-03-10

    This is a compendium of computer codes, which are available to the fusion researcher. It is intended to be a document that permits a quick evaluation of the tools available to the experimenter who wants to both analyze his data, and compare the results of his analysis with the predictions of available theories. This document will be updated frequently to maintain its usefulness. I would appreciate receiving further information about codes not included here from anyone who has used them. The information required includes a brief description of the code (including any special features), a bibliography of the documentation available for the code and/or the underlying physics, a list of people to contact for help in running the code, instructions on how to access the code, and a description of the output from the code. Wherever possible, the code contacts should include people from each of the fusion facilities so that the novice can talk to someone ''down the hall'' when he first tries to use a code. I would also appreciate any comments about possible additions and improvements in the index. I encourage any additional criticism of this document. 137 refs.

  3. COMMUNICATIVE ASPECTS OF MULTILINGUAL CODE SWITCHING IN COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Caparas; Leah Gustilo

    2017-01-01

    The quintessential role of language has been punctiliously studied relative to intercultural communication, cultural heritage, social development, education, identity construction and many more domains. One forum wherein language is investigated is the Computer-mediated Communication (CMC) which provides a fertile ground for linguistic and sociolinguistic analyses. The present study aims at investigating the preferred codes used in code switching (CS), functions of CS, and the motives of user...

  4. Computer code for controller partitioning with IFPC application: A user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Phillip H.; Yarkhan, Asim

    1994-01-01

    A user's manual for the computer code for partitioning a centralized controller into decentralized subcontrollers with applicability to Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control (IFPC) is presented. Partitioning of a centralized controller into two subcontrollers is described and the algorithm on which the code is based is discussed. The algorithm uses parameter optimization of a cost function which is described. The major data structures and functions are described. Specific instructions are given. The user is led through an example of an IFCP application.

  5. STATIC_TEMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, E.; Garcia, A.; Espinosa, G.; Hernandez, I.; Santoyo, S.

    2000-03-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC_TEMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC_TEMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliable used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC_TEMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented.

  6. A Multiple Sphere T-Matrix Fortran Code for Use on Parallel Computer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    A general-purpose Fortran-90 code for calculation of the electromagnetic scattering and absorption properties of multiple sphere clusters is described. The code can calculate the efficiency factors and scattering matrix elements of the cluster for either fixed or random orientation with respect to the incident beam and for plane wave or localized- approximation Gaussian incident fields. In addition, the code can calculate maps of the electric field both interior and exterior to the spheres.The code is written with message passing interface instructions to enable the use on distributed memory compute clusters, and for such platforms the code can make feasible the calculation of absorption, scattering, and general EM characteristics of systems containing several thousand spheres.

  7. Computer codes used in the calculation of high-temperature thermodynamic properties of sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.

    1979-12-01

    Three computer codes - SODIPROP, NAVAPOR, and NASUPER - were written in order to calculate a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for saturated, subcooled, and superheated sodium. These calculations incorporate new critical parameters (temperature, pressure, and density) and recently derived single equations for enthalpy and vapor pressure. The following thermodynamic properties have been calculated in these codes: enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, density, volumetric thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. In the code SODIPROP, these properties are calculated for saturated and subcooled liquid sodium. Thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium vapor are calculated in the code NAVAPOR. The code NASUPER calculates thermodynamic properties for super-heated sodium vapor only for low (< 1644 K) temperatures. No calculations were made for the supercritical region.

  8. Development of a system of computer codes for severe accident analysis and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S. H.; Chun, S. W.; Jang, H. S. and others [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-15

    As a continuing study for the development of a system of computer codes to analyze severe accidents which had been performed last year, major focuses were on the aspect of application of the developed code systems. As the first step, two most commonly used code packages other than STCP, i.e., MELCOR of NRC and MAAP of IDCOR were reviewed to compare the models that they used. Next, important heat transfer phenomena were surveyed as severe accident progressed. Particularly, debris bed coolability and molten core-concrete interaction were selected as sample models, and they were studied extensively. The recent theoretical works and experiments for these phenomena were surveyed, and also the relevant models adopted by major code packages were compared and assessed. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is expected to be able to take into account these phenomenological uncertainties when one uses the severe accident code packages for probabilistic safety assessments or accident management programs.

  9. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S[sub 4]), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0[sub 2], H[sub 2]0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  10. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  11. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This manual covers an array of modules written for the SCALE package, consisting of drivers, system libraries, cross section and materials properties libraries, input/output routines, storage modules, and help files.

  12. ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

    1980-05-01

    A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

  13. Coupling meso- and micro-scale fluid dynamics codes for wind-energy computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkauskas, Ignas; Sprague, Michael; Churchfield, Matt

    2012-11-01

    Enabled by peta-scale supercomputing, the next generation of computer models for wind energy will simulate a vast range of scales and physics, spanning from wind-turbine structural dynamics and blade-scale turbulence to meso-scale atmospheric flow. This work focuses on new mathematical interface conditions and computational algorithms for coupling meso-scale numerical-weather-prediction codes with micro-scale turbine-vicinity fluid-dynamics codes. Here, an inherent challenge exists when the weather code is based on the compressible Euler equations while the turbine-vicinity flow is modeled by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We propose several one- and two-way code-interaction approaches. These approaches are implemented in a two-dimensional testing platform composed of two in-house codes: (1) a finite-difference code that mimics the weather research and forecasting (WRF) solver and (2) an embedded-domain code based on a common finite-volume approach. Supported by the Center for Research and Education in Wind.

  14. The FOCON96 1.0 computer code; Le logiciel FOCON96 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Szeremeta, A.; Thomassin, A. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), 92 (France)

    1999-07-01

    The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.P.S.N.) has developed a computer code, FOCON96 1.0 to calculate the dosimetric consequences of atmospheric radioactive releases from nuclear installations after several years of usual operation. This communication describes the principal characteristics of FOCON96 1.0 and its functionalities. The principal elements of a comparison between FOCON96 1.0 and PC-CREAM ( European computer code developed by the N.R.P.B. and answering the same criteria) are given here. (N.C.)

  15. The AQUAREJ2.3 computer code; Le logiciel AQUAREJ 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, A. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), 92 (France)

    1999-07-01

    The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.P.S.N.) in the frame of dosimetric impact estimation of releases from nuclear facilities in usual operation, evaluates the contamination transfer by the continental aquatic medium, then by the food chain up to man. To do it, I.P.S.N. has the AQUAREJ 2.3 computer code for the evaluation of dosimetric consequences of liquid radioactive effluents releases in the rivers. A comparison is made with the PC-CREAM computer code. (N.C.)

  16. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gál, Anna; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2012-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:{0,1}Ω(n) -> {0,1}n with minimum distance Ω(n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: (1) If d=2 then w = Θ(n ({log n/ log log n})2). (2) If d...... on a superconcentrator-like condition that the graphs of circuits computing good codes must satisfy. This condition is provably intermediate between superconcentrators and their weakenings considered before....

  17. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Oberkampf, W. L.; Blottner, F. G.

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  18. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1995-07-01

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  19. VVER-1000 MOX Core Computational Benchmark analysis using indigenous codes EXCEL, TRIHEX-FA and HEXPIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilagam, L. [AERB-Safety Research Institute, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603 102 (India)], E-mail: thilagam@igcar.gov.in; Jagannathan, V. [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: v_jagan1952@rediffmail.com; Sunil sunny, C.; Subbaiah, K.V. [AERB-Safety Research Institute, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603 102 (India)

    2009-10-15

    Validation studies based on the analysis of theoretical benchmarks play a key role in the identification of deficiencies in the reactor physics design computational codes and the associated nuclear data libraries. Implementation of improvements, if any, in theoretical models and the choice of appropriate nuclear data libraries help in enhancing the accuracy of calculations. As part of the effort for the validation of computer codes for plutonium utilization in VVER type reactors, the indigenous codes EXCEL, TRIHEX-FA and HEXPIN, developed at Light Water Reactor Physics Section (LWRPS), RPDD, BARC, and the associated nuclear data library (JEF22XS), were employed to analyse 'VVER-1000 MOX Core Computational Benchmark'. The few group homogenized parameters of assembly cell or individual lattice cells were obtained by the hexagonal lattice burn-up code EXCEL and the core diffusion calculations were then performed using hexagonal assembly geometric code TRIHEX-FA or the pin-by-pin diffusion code HEXPIN. VVER-1000 reactor core loaded with 2/3rd of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FAs) and 1/3rd of weapons grade MOX FAs was investigated. Effective multiplication factors and assembly average fission reaction rate distributions have been calculated for various reactor state descriptions using 3-D diffusion theory codes TRIHEX-FA and HEXPIN. Further, estimate of detailed pin-by-pin fission reaction rate distributions of a few selected assemblies were made for the normal working state of the reactor using pin-by-pin core simulation code HEXPIN. A comparison of results was done with the reported Monte Carlo (MC) values of the benchmark and in most cases good agreement was observed with the benchmark results.

  20. TERRA: a computer code for simulating the transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1984-11-01

    TERRA is a computer code which calculates concentrations of radionuclides and ingrowing daughters in surface and root-zone soil, produce and feed, beef, and milk from a given deposition rate at any location in the conterminous United States. The code is fully integrated with seven other computer codes which together comprise a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System, CRRIS. Output from either the long range (> 100 km) atmospheric dispersion code RETADD-II or the short range (<80 km) atmospheric dispersion code ANEMOS, in the form of radionuclide air concentrations and ground deposition rates by downwind location, serves as input to TERRA. User-defined deposition rates and air concentrations may also be provided as input to TERRA through use of the PRIMUS computer code. The environmental concentrations of radionuclides predicted by TERRA serve as input to the ANDROS computer code which calculates population and individual intakes, exposures, doses, and risks. TERRA incorporates models to calculate uptake from soil and atmospheric deposition on four groups of produce for human consumption and four groups of livestock feeds. During the environmental transport simulation, intermediate calculations of interception fraction for leafy vegetables, produce directly exposed to atmospherically depositing material, pasture, hay, and silage are made based on location-specific estimates of standing crop biomass. Pasture productivity is estimated by a model which considers the number and types of cattle and sheep, pasture area, and annual production of other forages (hay and silage) at a given location. Calculations are made of the fraction of grain imported from outside the assessment area. TERRA output includes the above calculations and estimated radionuclide concentrations in plant produce, milk, and a beef composite by location.

  1. A toolchain for the automatic generation of computer codes for correlated wavefunction calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupička, Martin; Sivalingam, Kantharuban; Huntington, Lee; Auer, Alexander A; Neese, Frank

    2017-06-05

    In this work, the automated generator environment for ORCA (ORCA-AGE) is described. It is a powerful toolchain for the automatic implementation of wavefunction-based quantum chemical methods. ORCA-AGE consists of three main modules: (1) generation of "raw" equations from a second quantized Ansatz for the wavefunction, (2) factorization and optimization of equations, and (3) generation of actual computer code. We generate code for the ORCA package, making use of the powerful functionality for wavefunction-based correlation calculations that is already present in the code. The equation generation makes use of the most elementary commutation relations and hence is extremely general. Consequently, code can be generated for single reference as well as multireference approaches and spin-independent as well as spin-dependent operators. The performance of the generated code is demonstrated through comparison with efficient hand-optimized code for some well-understood standard configuration interaction and coupled cluster methods. In general, the speed of the generated code is no more than 30% slower than the hand-optimized code, thus allowing for routine application of canonical ab initio methods to molecules with about 500-1000 basis functions. Using the toolchain, complicated methods, especially those surpassing human ability for handling complexity, can be efficiently and reliably implemented in very short times. This enables the developer to shift the attention from debugging code to the physical content of the chosen wavefunction Ansatz. Automatic code generation also has the desirable property that any improvement in the toolchain immediately applies to all generated code. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Just-in-Time Compilation-Inspired Methodology for Parallelization of Compute Intensive Java Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHULAM MUSTAFA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compute intensive programs generally consume significant fraction of execution time in a small amount of repetitive code. Such repetitive code is commonly known as hotspot code. We observed that compute intensive hotspots often possess exploitable loop level parallelism. A JIT (Just-in-Time compiler profiles a running program to identify its hotspots. Hotspots are then translated into native code, for efficient execution. Using similar approach, we propose a methodology to identify hotspots and exploit their parallelization potential on multicore systems. Proposed methodology selects and parallelizes each DOALL loop that is either contained in a hotspot method or calls a hotspot method. The methodology could be integrated in front-end of a JIT compiler to parallelize sequential code, just before native translation. However, compilation to native code is out of scope of this work. As a case study, we analyze eighteen JGF (Java Grande Forum benchmarks to determine parallelization potential of hotspots. Eight benchmarks demonstrate a speedup of up to 7.6x on an 8-core system

  3. Algorithms and computer codes for atomic and molecular quantum scattering theory. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, L. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The goals of this workshop are to identify which of the existing computer codes for solving the coupled equations of quantum molecular scattering theory perform most efficiently on a variety of test problems, and to make tested versions of those codes available to the chemistry community through the NRCC software library. To this end, many of the most active developers and users of these codes have been invited to discuss the methods and to solve a set of test problems using the LBL computers. The first volume of this workshop report is a collection of the manuscripts of the talks that were presented at the first meeting held at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois June 25-27, 1979. It is hoped that this will serve as an up-to-date reference to the most popular methods with their latest refinements and implementations.

  4. A computer code simulating multistage chemical exchange column under wide range of operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Okuno, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-09-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate a multistage CECE(Combined Electrolysis Chemical Exchange) column. The solution of basic equations can be found out by the Newton-Raphson method. The independent variables are the atom fractions of D and T in each stage for the case where H is dominant within the column. These variables are replaced by those of H and T under the condition that D is dominant. Some effective techniques have also been developed to get a set of solutions of the basic equations: a setting procedure of initial values of the independent variables; and a procedure for the convergence of the Newton-Raphson method. The computer code allows us to simulate the column behavior under a wide range of the operating conditions. Even for a severe case, where the dominant species changes along the column height, the code can give a set of solutions of the basic equations. (author)

  5. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  6. Event and effectiveness models for simulating computer security. [SECSIM code, in FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelonka, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The development and application of a series of simulation codes (designated SECSIM) that are used for computer security analysis and design are described. Individual barrier characteristics are incorporated into generalized architectural reduction algorithms providing numerical indices in selected subcategories and for the system as a whole. 7 figures, 13 tables.

  7. Users manual for CAFE-3D : a computational fluid dynamics fire code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Imane; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Alion Science and Technology, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-01

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code has been developed to model all relevant fire physics for predicting the thermal response of massive objects engulfed in large fires. It provides realistic fire thermal boundary conditions for use in design of radioactive material packages and in risk-based transportation studies. The CAFE code can be coupled to commercial finite-element codes such as MSC PATRAN/THERMAL and ANSYS. This coupled system of codes can be used to determine the internal thermal response of finite element models of packages to a range of fire environments. This document is a user manual describing how to use the three-dimensional version of CAFE, as well as a description of CAFE input and output parameters. Since this is a user manual, only a brief theoretical description of the equations and physical models is included.

  8. TEMP: a computer code to calculate fuel pin temperatures during a transient. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, F E; Christensen, B Y; Gneiting, B C

    1980-04-01

    The computer code TEMP calculates fuel pin temperatures during a transient. It was developed to accommodate temperature calculations in any system of axi-symmetric concentric cylinders. When used to calculate fuel pin temperatures, the code will handle a fuel pin as simple as a solid cylinder or as complex as a central void surrounded by fuel that is broken into three regions by two circumferential cracks. Any fuel situation between these two extremes can be analyzed along with additional cladding, heat sink, coolant or capsule regions surrounding the fuel. The one-region version of the code accurately calculates the solution to two problems having closed-form solutions. The code uses an implicit method, an explicit method and a Crank-Nicolson (implicit-explicit) method.

  9. Recommendations for computer modeling codes to support the UMTRA groundwater restoration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the US. The surface restoration phase, which includes containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, has a specific termination date and is nearing completion. Therefore, attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase, which began in 1991. Regulated constituents in groundwater whose concentrations or activities exceed maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or background levels at one or more sites include, but are not limited to, uranium, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, gross alpha, radium-226 and radium-228. The purpose of this report is to recommend computer codes that can be used to assist the UMTRA groundwater restoration effort. The report includes a survey of applicable codes in each of the following areas: (1) groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling codes, (2) hydrogeochemical modeling codes, (3) pump and treat optimization codes, and (4) decision support tools. Following the survey of the applicable codes, specific codes that can best meet the needs of the UMTRA groundwater restoration program in each of the four areas are recommended.

  10. A proposed framework for computational fluid dynamics code calibration/validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    The paper reviews the terminology and methodology that have been introduced during the last several years for building confidence n the predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CID) codes. Code validation terminology developed for nuclear reactor analyses and aerospace applications is reviewed and evaluated. Currently used terminology such as ``calibrated code,`` ``validated code,`` and a ``validation experiment`` is discussed along with the shortcomings and criticisms of these terms. A new framework is proposed for building confidence in CFD code predictions that overcomes some of the difficulties of past procedures and delineates the causes of uncertainty in CFD predictions. Building on previous work, new definitions of code verification and calibration are proposed. These definitions provide more specific requirements for the knowledge level of the flow physics involved and the solution accuracy of the given partial differential equations. As part of the proposed framework, categories are also proposed for flow physics research, flow modeling research, and the application of numerical predictions. The contributions of physical experiments, analytical solutions, and other numerical solutions are discussed, showing that each should be designed to achieve a distinctively separate purpose in building confidence in accuracy of CFD predictions. A number of examples are given for each approach to suggest methods for obtaining the highest value for CFD code quality assurance.

  11. An Object-Oriented Computer Code for Aircraft Engine Weight Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Michael T.; Naylor, Bret A.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. At NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code, originally developed by Boeing Aircraft, has been used to estimate the engine weight of various conceptual engine designs. The code, written in FORTRAN, was originally developed for NASA in 1979. Since then, substantial improvements have been made to the code to improve the weight calculations for most of the engine components. Most recently, to improve the maintainability and extensibility of WATE, the FORTRAN code has been converted into an object-oriented version. The conversion was done within the NASA's NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) framework. This enables WATE to interact seamlessly with the thermodynamic cycle model which provides component flow data such as airflows, temperatures, and pressures, etc., that are required for sizing the components and weight calculations. The tighter integration between the NPSS and WATE would greatly enhance system-level analysis and optimization capabilities. It also would facilitate the enhancement of the WATE code for next-generation aircraft and space propulsion systems. In this paper, the architecture of the object-oriented WATE code (or WATE++) is described. Both the FORTRAN and object-oriented versions of the code are employed to compute the dimensions and weight of a 300-passenger aircraft engine (GE90 class). Both versions of the code produce essentially identical results as should be the case.

  12. Complex FEM based system of computer codes to model nuclear fuel rod thermomechanical behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valach, M.; Dostal, M.; Zymak, J. (Nuclear Reseach Institute, Rez-Husinec (Czech Republic)), e-mail: dostal@nri.cz

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents long-term effort to establish closed chain of computer codes, which allow computer modeling of the thermo-mechanical fuel rod behaviour from the 1D representation to the 3D detailed problem description. The whole complex uses the same FEM based mathematical approach. The principle of this modular approach is to handle boundary and initial conditions by the similar transfer independent on the complexity of solved problem. The goal of our modeling work was to develop model (FRA - Fuel Rod Analyser) capable of computing the spatial distribution of temperature and stress-strain in the fuel and cladding especially during power transients

  13. Verification of Compressible and Incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes and Residual-based Mesh Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Aniruddha

    Code verifition is the process of ensuring, to the degree possible, that there are no algorithm deficiencies and coding mistakes (bugs) in a scientific computing simulation. In this work, techniques are presented for performing code verifition of boundary conditions commonly used in compressible and incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Using a compressible CFD code, this study assesses the subsonic in flow (isentropic and fixed-mass), subsonic out ow, supersonic out ow, no-slip wall (adiabatic and isothermal), and inviscid slip-wall. The use of simplified curved surfaces is proposed for easier generation of manufactured solutions during the verifition of certain boundary conditions involving many constraints. To perform rigorous code verifition, general grids with mixed cell types at the verified boundary are used. A novel approach is introduced to determine manufactured solutions for boundary condition verifition when the velocity-field is constrained to be divergence-free during the simulation in an incompressible CFD code. Order of accuracy testing using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is employed here for code verifition of the major components of an open-source, multiphase ow code - MFIX. The presence of two-phase governing equations and a modified SIMPLE-based algorithm requiring divergence-free flows makes the selection of manufactured solutions more involved than for single-phase, compressible flows. Code verifition is performed here on 2D and 3D, uniform and stretched meshes for incompressible, steady and unsteady, single-phase and two-phase flows using the two-fluid model of MFIX. In a CFD simulation, truncation error (TE) is the difference between the continuous governing equation and its discrete approximation. Since TE can be shown to be the local source term for the discretization error, TE is proposed as the criterion for determining which regions of the computational mesh should be refined/coarsened. For mesh

  14. Multiple frequencies sequential coding for SSVEP-based brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangsong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP-based brain-computer interface (BCI has become one of the most promising modalities for a practical noninvasive BCI system. Owing to both the limitation of refresh rate of liquid crystal display (LCD or cathode ray tube (CRT monitor, and the specific physiological response property that only a very small number of stimuli at certain frequencies could evoke strong SSVEPs, the available frequencies for SSVEP stimuli are limited. Therefore, it may not be enough to code multiple targets with the traditional frequencies coding protocols, which poses a big challenge for the design of a practical SSVEP-based BCI. This study aimed to provide an innovative coding method to tackle this problem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we present a novel protocol termed multiple frequencies sequential coding (MFSC for SSVEP-based BCI. In MFSC, multiple frequencies are sequentially used in each cycle to code the targets. To fulfill the sequential coding, each cycle is divided into several coding epochs, and during each epoch, certain frequency is used. Obviously, different frequencies or the same frequency can be presented in the coding epochs, and the different epoch sequence corresponds to the different targets. To show the feasibility of MFSC, we used two frequencies to realize four targets and carried on an offline experiment. The current study shows that: 1 MFSC is feasible and efficient; 2 the performance of SSVEP-based BCI based on MFSC can be comparable to some existed systems. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed protocol could potentially implement much more targets with the limited available frequencies compared with the traditional frequencies coding protocol. The efficiency of the new protocol was confirmed by real data experiment. We propose that the SSVEP-based BCI under MFSC might be a promising choice in the future.

  15. Development of computer code for level 2 PSA of CANDU plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Jin, Young Ho; Park, Soo Yong; Song, Yong Mann

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plants), which could handle the severe accident phenomena at Wolsong plants. The MAAP 4 computer code, which is a fast running code with state-of-the-art models, has been used as a basis. The new features in ISAAC are : (1) core module describing the configuration of core (horizontal fuel channel, calandria tubes, pressure tubes, fuel bundles, etc.) and core behavior such as channel heatup, oxidation, sagging and relocation of molten corium into the calandria, (2) the PHTS module modeling water/gas pressure and temperature, water level, break flow rates in the two separated figure-of-eight primary loop, (3) calandria transfer rates between calandria and water in the calandria bottom, (4) special safety systems including emergency core cooling system (ECCS), dousing sprays, moderator cooling system, shield cooling system, and over-pressure protection system which mitigate the severe accidents. The code has been tested for the various representative severe accidents. The results were reasonable from the view point of accident progression and its phenomena. Therefore, ISAAC can be said to have the basic capability to simulate the severe accidents in the Wolsong plants. (author). 28 refs., 7 tabs., 140 figs.

  16. Computation of Program Source Code Similarity by Composition of Parse Tree and Call Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Je Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method to compute how similar two program source codes are. Since a program source code is represented as a structural form, the proposed method adopts convolution kernel functions as a similarity measure. Actually, a program source code has two kinds of structural information. One is syntactic information and the other is the dependencies of function calls lying on the program. Since the syntactic information of a program is expressed as its parse tree, the syntactic similarity between two programs is computed by a parse tree kernel. The function calls within a program provide a global structure of a program and can be represented as a graph. Therefore, the similarity of function calls is computed with a graph kernel. Then, both structural similarities are reflected simultaneously into comparing program source codes by composing the parse tree and the graph kernels based on a cyclomatic complexity. According to the experimental results on a real data set for program plagiarism detection, the proposed method is proved to be effective in capturing the similarity between programs. The experiments show that the plagiarized pairs of programs are found correctly and thoroughly by the proposed method.

  17. Combining Topological Hardware and Topological Software: Color-Code Quantum Computing with Topological Superconductor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Litinski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a scalable architecture for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation using networks of voltage-controlled Majorana Cooper pair boxes and topological color codes for error correction. Color codes have a set of transversal gates which coincides with the set of topologically protected gates in Majorana-based systems, namely, the Clifford gates. In this way, we establish color codes as providing a natural setting in which advantages offered by topological hardware can be combined with those arising from topological error-correcting software for full-fledged fault-tolerant quantum computing. We provide a complete description of our architecture, including the underlying physical ingredients. We start by showing that in topological superconductor networks, hexagonal cells can be employed to serve as physical qubits for universal quantum computation, and we present protocols for realizing topologically protected Clifford gates. These hexagonal-cell qubits allow for a direct implementation of open-boundary color codes with ancilla-free syndrome read-out and logical T gates via magic-state distillation. For concreteness, we describe how the necessary operations can be implemented using networks of Majorana Cooper pair boxes, and we give a feasibility estimate for error correction in this architecture. Our approach is motivated by nanowire-based networks of topological superconductors, but it could also be realized in alternative settings such as quantum-Hall–superconductor hybrids.

  18. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  19. V.S.O.P. (99/05) computer code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, H.J.; Haas, K.A.; Brockmann, H.; Scherer, W.

    2005-11-01

    V.S.O.P. is a computer code system for the comprehensive numerical simulation of the physics of thermal reactors. It implies the setup of the reactor and of the fuel element, processing of cross sections, neutron spectrum evaluation, neutron diffusion calculation in two or three dimensions, fuel burnup, fuel shuffling, reactor control, thermal hydraulics and fuel cycle costs. The thermal hydraulics part (steady state and time-dependent) is restricted to HTRs and to two spatial dimensions. The code can simulate the reactor operation from the initial core towards the equilibrium core. V.S.O.P.(99 / 05) represents the further development of V.S.O.P. (99). Compared to its precursor, the code system has been improved in many details. Major improvements and extensions have been included concerning the neutron spectrum calculation, the 3-d neutron diffusion options, and the thermal hydraulic section with respect to 'multi-pass'-fuelled pebblebed cores. This latest code version was developed and tested under the WINDOWS-XP - operating system. The storage requirement for the executables and the basic libraries associated with the code amounts to about 15 MB. Another 5 MB are required - if desired - for storage of the source code ({approx}65000 Fortran statements). (orig.)

  20. Implementing Scientific Simulation Codes Highly Tailored for Vector Architectures Using Custom Configurable Computing Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, David

    2006-01-01

    The motivation for this work comes from an observation that amidst the push for Massively Parallel (MP) solutions to high-end computing problems such as numerical physical simulations, large amounts of legacy code exist that are highly optimized for vector supercomputers. Because re-hosting legacy code often requires a complete re-write of the original code, which can be a very long and expensive effort, this work examines the potential to exploit reconfigurable computing machines in place of a vector supercomputer to implement an essentially unmodified legacy source code. Custom and reconfigurable computing resources could be used to emulate an original application's target platform to the extent required to achieve high performance. To arrive at an architecture that delivers the desired performance subject to limited resources involves solving a multi-variable optimization problem with constraints. Prior research in the area of reconfigurable computing has demonstrated that designing an optimum hardware implementation of a given application under hardware resource constraints is an NP-complete problem. The premise of the approach is that the general issue of applying reconfigurable computing resources to the implementation of an application, maximizing the performance of the computation subject to physical resource constraints, can be made a tractable problem by assuming a computational paradigm, such as vector processing. This research contributes a formulation of the problem and a methodology to design a reconfigurable vector processing implementation of a given application that satisfies a performance metric. A generic, parametric, architectural framework for vector processing implemented in reconfigurable logic is developed as a target for a scheduling/mapping algorithm that maps an input computation to a given instance of the architecture. This algorithm is integrated with an optimization framework to arrive at a specification of the architecture parameters

  1. GAM-HEAT: A computer code to compute heat transfer in complex enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.E.; Taylor, J.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses the GAM[underscore]HEAT code which was developed for heat transfer analyses associated with postulated Double Ended Guilliotine Break Loss Of Coolant Accidents (DEGB LOCA) resulting in a drained reactor vessel. In these analyses the gamma radiation resulting from fission product decay constitutes the primary source of energy as a function of time. This energy is deposited into the various reactor components and is re-radiated as thermal energy. The code accounts for all radiant heat exchanges within and leaving the reactor enclosure. The SRS reactors constitute complex radiant exchange enclosures since there are many assemblies of various types within the primary enclosure and most of the assemblies themselves constitute enclosures. GAM-HEAT accounts for this complexity by processing externally generated view factors and connectivity matrices as discussed below, and also accounts for convective, conductive, and advective heat exchanges. The code is structured such that it is applicable for many situations involving heat exchange between surfaces within a radiatively passive medium.

  2. GAM-HEAT: A computer code to compute heat transfer in complex enclosures. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.E.; Taylor, J.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses the GAM{underscore}HEAT code which was developed for heat transfer analyses associated with postulated Double Ended Guilliotine Break Loss Of Coolant Accidents (DEGB LOCA) resulting in a drained reactor vessel. In these analyses the gamma radiation resulting from fission product decay constitutes the primary source of energy as a function of time. This energy is deposited into the various reactor components and is re-radiated as thermal energy. The code accounts for all radiant heat exchanges within and leaving the reactor enclosure. The SRS reactors constitute complex radiant exchange enclosures since there are many assemblies of various types within the primary enclosure and most of the assemblies themselves constitute enclosures. GAM-HEAT accounts for this complexity by processing externally generated view factors and connectivity matrices as discussed below, and also accounts for convective, conductive, and advective heat exchanges. The code is structured such that it is applicable for many situations involving heat exchange between surfaces within a radiatively passive medium.

  3. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gál, Anna; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:01(n)01n with minimum distance (n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: (1) If d=2 then w=(n(lognloglogn)2) . (2) If d=3 then w=(nlglgn). (3......, our (n(lognloglogn)2) lower bound gives the largest known lower bound for computing any linear map, improving on the (nlg32n) bound of Pudlak and Rodl (Discrete Mathematics '94). We find the upper bounds surprising. They imply that a (necessarily dense) generator matrix for the code can be written...... as the product of two sparse matrices. The upper bounds are non-explicit: we show the existence of circuits (consisting of only XOR gates) computing good codes within the stated bounds. Using a result by Ishai, Kushilevitz, Ostrovsky, and Sahai (STOC '08), we also obtain similar bounds for computing pairwise...

  4. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatham, N.; Hughes, H.; Ellis, W.E.; Shaw, T.L. (AEA Technology, Windscale (UK))

    1990-04-01

    This Paper describes the modelling of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCI) in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth Computer code. The code is based on the fundamental physical mechanisms causing PCI (differential thermal expansion, fuel swelling, cladding creep-down, etc.) coupled with an estimate of strain concentrations over fuel cracks. It uses the classical 1 1/2 dimensional method which subdivides the fuel both axially and radially. While Sleuth was originally developed to predict PCI failure/survival, it has evolved into a general fuel performance code. The latest version, Sleuth 86, which is a modular form with mnemonic variable names, has proved to be an ideal vehicle for testing new sub-models which have been required as the experimental data base has been expanded. (author).

  5. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Computation of Thermodynamic Equilibria Pertinent to Nuclear Materials in Multi-Physics Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Markus Hans Alexander

    Nuclear energy plays a vital role in supporting electrical needs and fulfilling commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Research is a continuing necessity to improve the predictive capabilities of fuel behaviour in order to reduce costs and to meet increasingly stringent safety requirements by the regulator. Moreover, a renewed interest in nuclear energy has given rise to a "nuclear renaissance" and the necessity to design the next generation of reactors. In support of this goal, significant research efforts have been dedicated to the advancement of numerical modelling and computational tools in simulating various physical and chemical phenomena associated with nuclear fuel behaviour. This undertaking in effect is collecting the experience and observations of a past generation of nuclear engineers and scientists in a meaningful way for future design purposes. There is an increasing desire to integrate thermodynamic computations directly into multi-physics nuclear fuel performance and safety codes. A new equilibrium thermodynamic solver is being developed with this matter as a primary objective. This solver is intended to provide thermodynamic material properties and boundary conditions for continuum transport calculations. There are several concerns with the use of existing commercial thermodynamic codes: computational performance; limited capabilities in handling large multi-component systems of interest to the nuclear industry; convenient incorporation into other codes with quality assurance considerations; and, licensing entanglements associated with code distribution. The development of this software in this research is aimed at addressing all of these concerns. The approach taken in this work exploits fundamental principles of equilibrium thermodynamics to simplify the numerical optimization equations. In brief, the chemical potentials of all species and phases in the system are constrained by estimates of the chemical potentials of the system

  7. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art.

  8. Computing element evolution towards Exascale and its impact on legacy simulation codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin de Verdière, Guillaume J. L.

    2015-12-01

    In the light of the current race towards the Exascale, this article highlights the main features of the forthcoming computing elements that will be at the core of next generations of supercomputers. The market analysis, underlying this work, shows that computers are facing a major evolution in terms of architecture. As a consequence, it is important to understand the impacts of those evolutions on legacy codes or programming methods. The problems of dissipated power and memory access are discussed and will lead to a vision of what should be an exascale system. To survive, programming languages had to respond to the hardware evolutions either by evolving or with the creation of new ones. From the previous elements, we elaborate why vectorization, multithreading, data locality awareness and hybrid programming will be the key to reach the exascale, implying that it is time to start rewriting codes.

  9. Life Prediction for a CMC Component Using the NASALIFE Computer Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2005-01-01

    The computer code, NASALIFE, was used to provide estimates for life of an SiC/SiC stator vane under varying thermomechanical loading conditions. The primary intention of this effort is to show how the computer code NASALIFE can be used to provide reasonable estimates of life for practical propulsion system components made of advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMC). Simple loading conditions provided readily observable and acceptable life predictions. Varying the loading conditions such that low cycle fatigue and creep were affected independently provided expected trends in the results for life due to varying loads and life due to creep. Analysis was based on idealized empirical data for the 9/99 Melt Infiltrated SiC fiber reinforced SiC.

  10. HIBRA: A computer code for heavy ion binary reaction analysis employing ion track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Khalid; Ahmad, Siraj-ul-Islam; Manzoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of heavy ions many times result in production of only two reaction products. Study of heavy ions using ion track detectors allows experimentalists to observe the track length in the plane of the detector, depth of the tracks in the volume of the detector and angles between the tracks on the detector surface, all known as track parameters. How to convert these into useful physics parameters such as masses, energies, momenta of the reaction products and the Q-values of the reaction? This paper describes the (a) model used to analyze binary reactions in terms of measured etched track parameters of the reaction products recorded in ion track detectors, and (b) the code developed for computing useful physics parameters for fast and accurate analysis of a large number of binary events. A computer code, HIBRA (Heavy Ion Binary Reaction Analysis) has been developed both in C++ and FORTRAN programming languages. It has been tested on the binary reactions from 12.5 MeV/u 84Kr ions incident upon U (natural) target deposited on mica ion track detector. The HIBRA code can be employed with any ion track detector for which range-velocity relation is available including the widely used CR-39 ion track detectors. This paper provides the source code of HIBRA in C++ language along with input and output data to test the program.

  11. [Series: Medical Applications of the PHITS Code (2): Acceleration by Parallel Computing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takuya; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Time-consuming Monte Carlo dose calculation becomes feasible owing to the development of computer technology. However, the recent development is due to emergence of the multi-core high performance computers. Therefore, parallel computing becomes a key to achieve good performance of software programs. A Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS contains two parallel computing functions, the distributed-memory parallelization using protocols of message passing interface (MPI) and the shared-memory parallelization using open multi-processing (OpenMP) directives. Users can choose the two functions according to their needs. This paper gives the explanation of the two functions with their advantages and disadvantages. Some test applications are also provided to show their performance using a typical multi-core high performance workstation.

  12. A computational code for two-dimensional unsteady magnetohydrodynamics by the method of characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Y. Q.; Rosner, R.; Ulmschneider, P.

    1987-01-01

    A computational code for solving two-dimensional, time-dependent MHD equations by the method of characteristics is presented. Its capabilities are demonstrated by solving two very different problems for which analytical solutions exist: linearized, standing MHD wave motions in a magnetized cylindrical plasma, and nonlinear self-similar expansion of a magnetized plasma ball. The nonlinear development of standing MHD wave solutions in a cylindrical plasma is also studied. The method can be naturally embedded in the computational architecture of massively parallel processors.

  13. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user's manual for the FORTRAN computer code.

  14. Method for computing self-consistent solution in a gun code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Eric M

    2014-09-23

    Complex gun code computations can be made to converge more quickly based on a selection of one or more relaxation parameters. An eigenvalue analysis is applied to error residuals to identify two error eigenvalues that are associated with respective error residuals. Relaxation values can be selected based on these eigenvalues so that error residuals associated with each can be alternately reduced in successive iterations. In some examples, relaxation values that would be unstable if used alone can be used.

  15. A Computer Scientist’s Evaluation of Publically Available Hardware Trojan Benchmarks [code

    OpenAIRE

    Slayback, Scott (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    This code supplements the author's thesis: https://calhoun.nps.edu/handle/10945/47330 This archive contains 5 Verilog files developed as part of the thesis "A Computer Scientist’s Evaluation of Publically Available Hardware Trojan Benchmarks." These files are a provided as an aid to researchers who wish to verify conclusions drawn as part of this thesis or conduct additional research into the RS232 benchmarks found at trust-hub.org. The first two files are module libraries whic...

  16. PREMOR: a point reactor exposure model computer code for survey analysis of power plant performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1979-10-01

    The PREMOR computer code was written to exploit a simple, two-group point nuclear reactor power plant model for survey analysis. Up to thirteen actinides, fourteen fission products, and one lumped absorber nuclide density are followed over a reactor history. Successive feed batches are accounted for with provision for from one to twenty batches resident. The effect of exposure of each of the batches to the same neutron flux is determined.

  17. Uniform physical theory of diffraction equivalent edge currents for implementation in general computer codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter Meincke

    1996-01-01

    New uniform closed-form expressions for physical theory of diffraction equivalent edge currents are derived for truncated incremental wedge strips. In contrast to previously reported expressions, the new expressions are well-behaved for all directions of incidence and observation and take a finite...... value for zero strip length. Consequently, the new equivalent edge currents are, to the knowledge of the author, the first that are well-suited for implementation in general computer codes...

  18. Interim report on verification and benchmark testing of the NUFT computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.; Nitao, J.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kulshrestha, A. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This interim report presents results of work completed in the ongoing verification and benchmark testing of the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) computer code. NUFT is a suite of multiphase, multicomponent models for numerical solution of thermal and isothermal flow and transport in porous media, with application to subsurface contaminant transport problems. The code simulates the coupled transport of heat, fluids, and chemical components, including volatile organic compounds. Grid systems may be cartesian or cylindrical, with one-, two-, or fully three-dimensional configurations possible. In this initial phase of testing, the NUFT code was used to solve seven one-dimensional unsaturated flow and heat transfer problems. Three verification and four benchmarking problems were solved. In the verification testing, excellent agreement was observed between NUFT results and the analytical or quasianalytical solutions. In the benchmark testing, results of code intercomparison were very satisfactory. From these testing results, it is concluded that the NUFT code is ready for application to field and laboratory problems similar to those addressed here. Multidimensional problems, including those dealing with chemical transport, will be addressed in a subsequent report.

  19. A VVER-1000 LEU and MOX assembly computational benchmark analysis using the lattice burnup code EXCEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilagam, L. [AERB-Safety Research Institute, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603 102 (India)], E-mail: thilagam@igcar.gov.in; Sunil Sunny, C. [AERB-Safety Research Institute, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603 102 (India); Jagannathan, V. [Light Water Reactor Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: v_jagan1952@rediffmail.com; Subbaiah, K.V. [AERB-Safety Research Institute, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603 102 (India)

    2009-05-01

    Utilization of Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide (MOX) fuel in VVER-1000 reactors envisages the core physics analysis using computational methods and validation of the related computer codes. Towards this objective, an international experts group has been established at OECD/NEA. The experts group facilitates sharing of existing information on physics parameters and fuel behaviour. Several benchmark exercises have been proposed by them with intent to investigate the core physics behaviour of a VVER-1000 reactor loaded with 2/3rd of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA) and 1/3rd of weapons grade mixed oxide (MOX) FA. In the present study an attempt is made to analyse 'AVVER-1000LEUandMOXAssemblyComputationalBenchmark' and predict the neutronics behaviour at the lattice level. The lattice burnup code EXCEL, developed at Light Water Reactor Physics Section, BARC is employed for this task. The EXCEL code uses the 172 energy group 'JEFF31GX' cross-section library in WIMS-D format. Assembly level fuel depletion calculations are performed up to a burnup of 40 MWD/kg of heavy metal (HM). Studies are made for the parametric variations of fuel and moderator temperatures, coolant density and boron content in the coolant. Both operational and off-normal states are analysed to determine the corresponding infinite neutron multiplication factor (k{sub {infinity}}). Pin wise isotopic compositions are computed as a function of burnup. Isotopic compositions in different annular regions of Uranium-Gadolinium (UGD) pin, fission rate distributions in UGD, UO{sub 2} and MOX pin cells are also computed. The predicted results are compared with the benchmark mean results.

  20. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  1. Test spectra experimental construction for evaluating gamma-spectrometry computer codes for the 235U determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karfopoulos Konstantinos L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of 235U in environmental samples from its 185.72 keV photons may require the deconvolution of the multiplet photopeak at ~186 keV, due to the co-existence of the 186.25 keV photons of 226Ra in the spectrum. Successful deconvolution depends on many parameters, such as the detector characteristics, the activity concentration of the 235U and 226Ra in the sample, the background continuum in the 186 keV energy region and the gamma-spectrometry computer code used. In this work two sets of experimental test spectra were constructed for examining the deconvolution of the multiplet photopeak performed by different codes. For the construction of the test spectra, a high-resolution low energy germanium detector was used. The first series consists of 140 spectra and simulates environmental samples containing various activity concentration levels of 235U and 226Ra. The second series consists of 280 spectra and has been derived by adding 137Cs, corresponding to various activity concentration levels, to specific first series test spectra. As the 137Cs backscatter edge is detected in the energy region of the multiplet photopeak at ~186 keV, this second series of test spectra tests the analysis of the multiplet photopeak in high background continuum conditions. The analysis of the test spectra is performed by two different g-spectrometry analysis codes: (a spectrum unix analysis code, a computer code developed in-house and (b analysis of germanium detector spectra, a program freely available from the IAEA. The results obtained by the two programs are compared in terms of photopeak detection and photopeak area determination.

  2. Application of the TEMPEST computer code to canister-filling heat transfer problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Faletti, D.W.; Budden, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers used the TEMPEST computer code to simulate thermal cooldown behavior of nuclear waste glass after it was poured into steel canisters for long-term storage. The objective of this work was to determine the accuracy and applicability of the TEMPEST code when used to compute canister thermal histories. First, experimental data were obtained to provide the basis for comparing TEMPEST-generated predictions. Five canisters were instrumented with appropriately located radial and axial thermocouples. The canister were filled using the pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) at PNL. Each canister was filled in either a continous or a batch filling mode. One of the canisters was also filled within a turntable simulant (a group of cylindrical shells with heat transfer resistances similar to those in an actual melter turntable). This was necessary to provide a basis for assessing the ability of the TEMPEST code to also model the transient cooling of canisters in a melter turntable. The continous-fill model, Version M, was found to predict temperatures with more accuracy. The turntable simulant experiment demonstrated that TEMPEST can adequately model the asymmetric temperature field caused by the turntable geometry. Further, TEMPEST can acceptably predict the canister cooling history within a turntable, despite code limitations in computing simultaneous radiation and convection heat transfer between shells, along with uncertainty in stainless-steel surface emissivities. Based on the successful performance of TEMPEST Version M, development was initiated to incorporate 1) full viscous glass convection, 2) a dynamically adaptive grid that automatically follows the glass/air interface throughout the transient, and 3) a full enclosure radiation model to allow radiation heat transfer to non-nearest neighbor cells. 5 refs., 47 figs., 17 tabs.

  3. Energy Scaling Advantages of Resistive Memory Crossbar Based Computation and its Application to Sparse Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapan eAgarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase in data over the last decade presents a significant challenge to analytics efforts that seek to process and interpret such data for various applications. Neural-inspired computing approaches are being developed in order to leverage the computational advantages of the analog, low-power data processing observed in biological systems. Analog resistive memory crossbars can perform a parallel read or a vector-matrix multiplication as well as a parallel write or a rank-1 update with high computational efficiency. For an NxN crossbar, these two kernels are at a minimum O(N more energy efficient than a digital memory-based architecture. If the read operation is noise limited, the energy to read a column can be independent of the crossbar size (O(1. These two kernels form the basis of many neuromorphic algorithms such as image, text, and speech recognition. For instance, these kernels can be applied to a neural sparse coding algorithm to give an O(N reduction in energy for the entire algorithm. Sparse coding is a rich problem with a host of applications including computer vision, object tracking, and more generally unsupervised learning.

  4. On the Computational Complexity of Sphere Decoder for Lattice Space-Time Coded MIMO Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Abediseid, Walid

    2011-01-01

    The exact complexity analysis of the basic sphere decoder for general space-time codes applied to multi-input multi-output (MIMO) wireless channel is known to be difficult. In this work, we shed the light on the computational complexity of sphere decoding for the quasi-static, LAttice Space-Time (LAST) coded MIMO channel. Specifically, we derive the asymptotic tail distribution of the decoder's computational complexity in the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. For the uncoded $M\\times N$ MIMO channel (e.g., V-BLAST), the analysis in [6] revealed that the tail distribution of such a decoder is of a Pareto-type with tail exponent that is equivalent to $N-M+1$. In our analysis, we show that the tail exponent of the sphere decoder's complexity distribution is equivalent to the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff achieved by LAST coding and lattice decoding schemes. This leads to extend the channel's tradeoff to include the decoding complexity. Moreover, we show analytically how minimum-mean square-error decisio...

  5. Computational approaches towards understanding human long non-coding RNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Saakshi; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Bhartiya, Deeksha; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-07-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest class of non-protein coding genes in the human genome. While a small subset of well-characterized lncRNAs has demonstrated their significant role in diverse biological functions like chromatin modifications, post-transcriptional regulation, imprinting etc., the functional significance of a vast majority of them still remains an enigma. Increasing evidence of the implications of lncRNAs in various diseases including cancer and major developmental processes has further enhanced the need to gain mechanistic insights into the lncRNA functions. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the various computational approaches and tools available for the identification and annotation of long non-coding RNAs. We also discuss a conceptual roadmap to systematically explore the functional properties of the lncRNAs using computational approaches. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems.

  7. COMMUNICATIVE ASPECTS OF MULTILINGUAL CODE SWITCHING IN COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Caparas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The quintessential role of language has been punctiliously studied relative to intercultural communication, cultural heritage, social development, education, identity construction and many more domains. One forum wherein language is investigated is the Computer-mediated Communication (CMC which provides a fertile ground for linguistic and sociolinguistic analyses. The present study aims at investigating the preferred codes used in code switching (CS, functions of CS, and the motives of users for employing CS in CMC. The present study was based on the investigation of 200 status updates and 100 wall posts of 50 Facebook accounts of students who are enrolled in a leading state university in Mindanao and professionals who graduated from the same university. Besides English and Filipino, these Facebook users speak various regional languages such as Chavacano, Cebuano, and Tausug. Their posts were analyzed employing eclectic approaches in analyzing inter-sentential and intra-sentential code switching. The findings reveal that the preferred code in their online communication is Taglish. It implies that Taglish is an equalizer, non-privileging, non-discriminating, and more unifying. The primary reason for CS is because of real lexical need. Besides the given categories, the study determined four other reasons for CS, namely: to express ideas spontaneously, to retain native terminology, to express disappointment, and to promote relationship. The findings vouch for the viability of regional languages to co-exist with English and other languages in the gamut of human interactions in the internet.

  8. Relating population-code representations between man, monkey, and computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Kriegeskorte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual and cognitive content is thought to be represented in the brain by patterns of activity across populations of neurons. In order to test whether a computational model can explain a given population code and whether corresponding codes in man and monkey convey the same information, we need to quantitatively relate population-code representations. Here I give a brief introduction to representational similarity analysis (RSA, a particular approach to this problem. A population code is characterized by a representational dissimilarity matrix (RDM, which contains a dissimilarity for each pair of activity patterns elicited by a given stimulus set. The RDM encapsulates which distinctions the representation emphasizes and which it deemphasizes. By analyzing correlations between RDMs we can test models and compare different species. Moreover, we can study how representations are transformed across stages of processing and how they relate to behavioral measures of object similarity. We use an example from object vision to illustrate the method’s potential to bridge major divides that have hampered progress in systems neuroscience.

  9. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  10. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  11. Development and validation of the pressure surge computer code DYVRO mod. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhaus, T.; Schaffrath, A. [TUEV NORD Systec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung (IFS)

    2008-11-15

    Pressure fluctuations are generated in pipeline systems, when a fluid is rapidly accelerated or decelerated by fast closing or opening a valve, pump trip or start, breaking of pipes etc. TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG performs calculations of pressure surges in power plants and especially in nuclear power plants for many years. For this reason TUEV NORD has developed and qualified the pressure surge computer code DYVRO. This contribution describes in detail the actual code version DYVRO mod. 3 that has been modified with regard to the system of partial differential equations and the numerical scheme. Also the validation against representative experiments like the Simpson's experiment and an experiment at the Cold Water Hammer Test Facility CWHTF is shown. Results of DYVRO calculations are afterwards compared with results of own and external simulations with system codes (ATHLET and RELAP5) and with the pressure surge code WAHA. For this purpose the outcome of the EU project WAHALOADS that was supported within the 5{sup th} framework programme has been used. (orig.)

  12. Key for protein coding sequences identification: computer analysis of codon strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, F; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Ehrlich, R; Reiss, C

    1982-01-11

    The signal qualifying an AUG or GUG as an initiator in mRNAs processed by E. coli ribosomes is not found to be a systematic, literal homology sequence. In contrast, stability analysis reveals that initiators always occur within nucleic acid domains of low stability, for which a high A/U content is observed. Since no aminoacid selection pressure can be detected at N-termini of the proteins, the A/U enrichment results from a biased usage of the code degeneracy. A computer analysis is presented which allows easy detection of the codon strategy. N-terminal codons carry rather systematically A or U in third position, which suggests a mechanism for translation initiation and helps to detect protein coding sequences in sequenced DNA.

  13. Validation of a Computer Code for Use in the Mechanical Design of Spallation Neutron Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Montanez, P A

    2000-01-01

    The present work concentrates on comparing a numerical code and a closed-form analytic solution for determining transient stress waves generated by an impinging, high-intensity proton pulse onto a perfectly elastic solid cylindrical target. The comparison of the two methods serves both to benchmark the physics and numerical methods of the codes, and to verify them against analytic expressions that can be established for calculating the response of the target for simple cases of loading and geometry. Additionally, the comparison elucidated the effects of approximations used in the computation of the analytic results. Two load cases have been investigated: (1) an instantaneously uniform thermal loading along the central core, and (2) a ramped and uniform thermal load applied along the central core. In addition, the influence of the approximations applied to the accurate analytic forms has been elucidated. By validating these analytical results, the closed-form solution may be confidently used to "bound" the sol...

  14. Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes. Part 3; The Validation of Antice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Horvath, Charles; Miller, Dean R.; Wright, William B.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental program was generated by the Icing Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center to validate two ice protection simulation codes: (1) LEWICE/Thermal for transient electrothermal de-icing and anti-icing simulations, and (2) ANTICE for steady state hot gas and electrothermal anti-icing simulations. An electrothermal ice protection system was designed and constructed integral to a 36 inch chord NACA0012 airfoil. The model was fully instrumented with thermo-couples, RTD'S, and heat flux gages. Tests were conducted at several icing environmental conditions during a two week period at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel. Experimental results of running-wet and evaporative cases were compared to the ANTICE computer code predictions and are presented in this paper.

  15. ENGRID: A graphical interactive code for the computation of structured grids for blocked flow domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekreijse, S. P.

    1992-12-01

    The underlying idea of the widely used and accepted multiblock approach for flow analysis is to subdivide a geometrical complex flow domain region into several smaller, more manageable regions, referred to as blocks. Typically there are several individual blocks in a given flow domain, each block having three computational coordinates. In the present approach the grid generation process is divided into two sub-processes: (1) block decomposition, i.e., the creation of blocked flow domains; and (2) grid generation, i.e., the computation of structured grids in the blocks. The ENGRID code is a general purpose multi-block grid generation code for the computation of Euler or Navier-Stokes types of grids in flow domains which are already subdivided into blocks. The two required input files for ENGRID are a topology and a geometry file. The topology file defines the topology of a multi-block flow domain. The topology of a blocked flow domain describes how the blocks are connected to each other. The geometry file contains the geometrical information of a multi-block flow domain. The file contains the geometrical definition of all vertices, all non-default elementary edges, and all non-default elementary faces.

  16. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 3: Assessment Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, C.; Hughes, E. D.; Niederauer, G. F.; Wilkening, H.; Travis, J. R.; Spore, J. W.; Royl, P.; Baumann, W.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best- estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume

  17. Apparatus, Method, and Computer Program for a Resolution-Enhanced Pseudo-Noise Code Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Steven X. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus, method, and computer program for a resolution enhanced pseudo-noise coding technique for 3D imaging is provided. In one embodiment, a pattern generator may generate a plurality of unique patterns for a return to zero signal. A plurality of laser diodes may be configured such that each laser diode transmits the return to zero signal to an object. Each of the return to zero signal includes one unique pattern from the plurality of unique patterns to distinguish each of the transmitted return to zero signals from one another.

  18. Capabilities of the ATHENA computer code for modeling the SP-100 space reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1985-09-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of an SP-100 space reactor was demonstrated using the ATHENA computer code. The preliminary General Electric SP-100 design was modeled using Athena. The model simulates the fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of this design. Two ATHENA demonstration calculations were performed simulating accident scenarios. A mask for the SP-100 model and an interface with the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) were developed, allowing a graphic display of the calculated results on the NPA. 22 figs.

  19. A new decay heat standard proposition based on a technical specifications guide for computation codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, Frederic; Garzenne, Claude [EDF R and D SINETICS, 1 av. du Gal de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Diop, Cheikh [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ebalard, Sylvie [AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Sargeni, Antonio [IRSN, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2008-07-01

    The existing ISO international decay heat standard provides the basis for calculating the decay heat power of non-recycled nuclear fuel of light water reactors. Computing decay heat with this standard can be really efficient for standard uranium fuels. Though, for Mixed Oxide fuels, high Burn-Up uranium fuels or for non standard irradiation sequences, decay heat can only be estimated by more complex decay heat computation codes. Therefore, a new ISO international standard, a 'Technical specifications guide for decay heat computation' has been proposed to reflect the international way to compute decay heat in light water reactors. The aim of this article is to give the justifications for the methods that lead to simplified modelization of the decay heat and that will be put into this standard. These methods are useful for rapid and precise determination of reaction rates and for nuclide chains simplifications. We propose also a simple method to evaluate the sensitivity of decay heat computations with respect to nuclear data. (authors)

  20. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-01

    We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A computer code (SKINTEMP) for predicting transient missile and aircraft heat transfer characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Mary L.

    1994-09-01

    A FORTRAN computer code (SKINTEMP) has been developed to calculate transient missile/aircraft aerodynamic heating parameters utilizing basic flight parameters such as altitude, Mach number, and angle of attack. The insulated skin temperature of a vehicle surface on either the fuselage (axisymmetric body) or wing (two-dimensional body) is computed from a basic heat balance relationship throughout the entire spectrum (subsonic, transonic, supersonic, hypersonic) of flight. This calculation method employs a simple finite difference procedure which considers radiation, forced convection, and non-reactive chemistry. Surface pressure estimates are based on a modified Newtonian flow model. Eckert's reference temperature method is used as the forced convection heat transfer model. SKINTEMP predictions are compared with a limited number of test cases. SKINTEMP was developed as a tool to enhance the conceptual design process of high speed missiles and aircraft. Recommendations are made for possible future development of SKINTEMP to further support the design process.

  2. An implementation of a tree code on a SIMD, parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kevin M.; Dorband, John E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a fast tree algorithm for gravitational N-body simulation on SIMD parallel computers. The tree construction uses fast, parallel sorts. The sorted lists are recursively divided along their x, y and z coordinates. This data structure is a completely balanced tree (i.e., each particle is paired with exactly one other particle) and maintains good spatial locality. An implementation of this tree-building algorithm on a 16k processor Maspar MP-1 performs well and constitutes only a small fraction (approximately 15%) of the entire cycle of finding the accelerations. Each node in the tree is treated as a monopole. The tree search and the summation of accelerations also perform well. During the tree search, node data that is needed from another processor is simply fetched. Roughly 55% of the tree search time is spent in communications between processors. We apply the code to two problems of astrophysical interest. The first is a simulation of the close passage of two gravitationally, interacting, disk galaxies using 65,636 particles. We also simulate the formation of structure in an expanding, model universe using 1,048,576 particles. Our code attains speeds comparable to one head of a Cray Y-MP, so single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) type computers can be used for these simulations. The cost/performance ratio for SIMD machines like the Maspar MP-1 make them an extremely attractive alternative to either vector processors or large multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) type parallel computers. With further optimizations (e.g., more careful load balancing), speeds in excess of today's vector processing computers should be possible.

  3. Computer simulation of Angra-2 PWR nuclear reactor core using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C. de; Rebello, Wilson F., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@ime.eb.br, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia - Secao de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Claudio L. [Universidade Gama Filho, Departamento de Matematica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vellozo, Sergio O., E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.br [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito. Divisao de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos Gaduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) code was used to develop a computerized model of the core of Angra 2 PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear reactor. The model was created without any kind of homogenization, but using real geometric information and material composition of that reactor, obtained from the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report). The model is still being improved and the version presented in this work is validated by comparing values calculated by MCNPX with results calculated by others means and presented on FSAR. This paper shows the results already obtained to K{sub eff} and K{infinity}, general parameters of the core, considering the reactor operating under stationary conditions of initial testing and operation. Other stationary operation conditions have been simulated and, in all tested cases, there was a close agreement between values calculated computationally through this model and data presented on the FSAR, which were obtained by other codes. This model is expected to become a valuable tool for many future applications. (author)

  4. STEEP4 code for computation of specific thermonuclear reaction rates from pointwise cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.R.; Dei, D.E.; Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Hale, G.M.

    1976-05-01

    A code module, STEEP4, is developed to calculate the fusion reaction rates in terms of the specific reactivity (sigma v) which is the product of cross section and relative velocity averaged over the actual ion distributions of the interacting particles in the plasma. The module is structured in a way suitable for incorporation in thermonuclear burn codes to provide rapid and yet relatively accurate on-line computation of (sigma v) as a function of plasma parameters. Ion distributions are modified to include slowing-down contributions which are characterized in terms of plasma parameters. Rapid and accurate algorithms are used for integrating (sigma v) from cross sections and spectra. The main program solves for (sigma v) by the method of steepest descent. However, options are provided to use Gauss-Hermite and dense trapezoidal quadrature integration techniques. Options are also provided for rapid calculation of screening effects on specific reaction rates. Although such effects are not significant in cases of plasmas of laboratory interest, the options are included to increase the range of applicability of the code. Gamow penetration form, log-log interpolation, and cubic interpolation routines are included to provide the interpolated values of cross sections.

  5. Sodium combustion computer code ASSCOPS version 2.0 user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Satoshi; Ohno, Shuji; Seino, Hiroshi; Miyake, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-12-01

    ASSCOPS (Analysis of Simultaneous Sodium Combustion in Pool and Spray) has been developed for analyses of thermal consequences of sodium leak and fire accidents in LMFBRs. This report presents a description of the computational models, input, and output as the user`s manual of ASSCOPS version 2.0. ASSCOPS is an integrated code based on the sodium pool fire code SOFIRE II developed by the Atomics International Division of Rockwell International, and the sodium spray fire code SPRAY developed by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in the U.S. The experimental studies conducted at PNC have been reflected in the ASSCOPS improvement. The users of ASSCOPS need to specify the sodium leak conditions (leak flow rate and temperature, etc.), the cell geometries (volume and structure surface area and thickness, etc.), and the atmospheric initial conditions, such as gas temperature, pressure, and gas composition. ASSCOPS calculates the time histories of atmospheric pressure and temperature changes along with those of the structural temperatures. (author)

  6. Dynamic Load-balancing and GPU Computing With the Particle-In-Cell Code PSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaschewski, K.; Ruhl, H.; Raeder, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new version of the Particle Simulation Code (PSC), originally written by H. Ruhl. The new code is designed with contemporary state-of-the-art and future massively parallel high-performance computers in mind, and has extensible support for various physics modules, e.g., modeling collisions. At its core, the code uses the explicit particle-in-cell method to solve the Vlasov-Maxwell equations in 3D and in reduced dimensions. We recently developed a novel dynamic load balancing method based on space-filling curves that reduces the imbalance of a sample production run from a factor of larger than 2 to just a few percent. Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have shown large promise in achieving substantially enhanced performance over conventional processors, but it is hard to find particle-in-cell algorithms that efficiently exploit the fine-grained parallelism provided through nvidia's CUDA programming model. We will present different algorithms and evaluate the performance achieved, with a focus on the charge-conservative current deposition step used in PSC. As an application, we numerically investigate the stability of the kinetic mirror mode, which is often observed in Earth's magnetosphere. We study the dependence of the growth rate on electron and ion pressure anisotropy.

  7. Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Code for Supersonic Axisymmetric Base Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently calculate the flow structure in the base region of bodies of revolution in supersonic flight is a significant step in CFD code validation for applications ranging from base heating for rockets to drag for protectives. The FDNS code is used to compute such a flow and the results are compared to benchmark quality experimental data. Flowfield calculations are presented for a cylindrical afterbody at M = 2.46 and angle of attack a = O. Grid independent solutions are compared to mean velocity profiles in the separated wake area and downstream of the reattachment point. Additionally, quantities such as turbulent kinetic energy and shear layer growth rates are compared to the data. Finally, the computed base pressures are compared to the measured values. An effort is made to elucidate the role of turbulence models in the flowfield predictions. The level of turbulent eddy viscosity, and its origin, are used to contrast the various turbulence models and compare the results to the experimental data.

  8. The Computer Code NOVO for the Calculation of Wake Potentials of the Very Short Ultra-relativistic Bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2005-12-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interaction of a beam and accelerator elements is very important for linear colliders, electron-positron factories, and free electron lasers. Precise calculation of wake fields is required for beam dynamics study in these machines. We describe a method which allows computation of wake fields of the very short bunches. Computer code NOVO was developed based on this method. This method is free of unphysical solutions like ''self-acceleration'' of a bunch head, which is common to well known wake field codes. Code NOVO was used for the wake fields study for many accelerator projects all over the world.

  9. JADAMILU: a software code for computing selected eigenvalues of large sparse symmetric matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollhöfer, Matthias; Notay, Yvan

    2007-12-01

    A new software code for computing selected eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors of a real symmetric matrix is described. The eigenvalues are either the smallest or those closest to some specified target, which may be in the interior of the spectrum. The underlying algorithm combines the Jacobi-Davidson method with efficient multilevel incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioning. Key features are modest memory requirements and robust convergence to accurate solutions. Parameters needed for incomplete LU preconditioning are automatically computed and may be updated at run time depending on the convergence pattern. The software is easy to use by non-experts and its top level routines are written in FORTRAN 77. Its potentialities are demonstrated on a few applications taken from computational physics. Program summaryProgram title: JADAMILU Catalogue identifier: ADZT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 101 359 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 493 144 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Intel or AMD with g77 and pgf; Intel EM64T or Itanium with ifort; AMD Opteron with g77, pgf and ifort; Power (IBM) with xlf90. Operating system: Linux, AIX RAM: problem dependent Word size: real:8; integer: 4 or 8, according to user's choice Classification: 4.8 Nature of problem: Any physical problem requiring the computation of a few eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix. Solution method: Jacobi-Davidson combined with multilevel ILU preconditioning. Additional comments: We supply binaries rather than source code because JADAMILU uses the following external packages: MC64. This software is copyrighted software and not freely available. COPYRIGHT (c) 1999

  10. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules, F9-F11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with three of the functional modules in the code. Those are the Morse-SGC for the SCALE system, Heating 7.2, and KENO V.a. The manual describes the latest released versions of the codes.

  11. FORTRAN Automated Code Evaluation System (faces) system documentation, version 2, mod 0. [error detection codes/user manuals (computer programs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A system is presented which processes FORTRAN based software systems to surface potential problems before they become execution malfunctions. The system complements the diagnostic capabilities of compilers, loaders, and execution monitors rather than duplicating these functions. Also, it emphasizes frequent sources of FORTRAN problems which require inordinate manual effort to identify. The principle value of the system is extracting small sections of unusual code from the bulk of normal sequences. Code structures likely to cause immediate or future problems are brought to the user's attention. These messages stimulate timely corrective action of solid errors and promote identification of 'tricky' code. Corrective action may require recoding or simply extending software documentation to explain the unusual technique.

  12. Coupling Computer Codes for The Analysis of Severe Accident Using A Pseudo Shared Memory Based on MPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Chul; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Min [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As there are four codes in-vessel analysis code (CSPACE), ex-vessel analysis code (SACAP), corium behavior analysis code (COMPASS), and fission product behavior analysis code, for the analysis of severe accident, it is complex to implement the coupling of codes with the similar methodologies for RELAP and CONTEMPT or SPACE and CAP. Because of that, an efficient coupling so called Pseudo shared memory architecture was introduced. In this paper, coupling methodologies will be compared and the methodology used for the analysis of severe accident will be discussed in detail. The barrier between in-vessel and ex-vessel has been removed for the analysis of severe accidents with the implementation of coupling computer codes with pseudo shared memory architecture based on MPI. The remaining are proper choice and checking of variables and values for the selected severe accident scenarios, e.g., TMI accident. Even though it is possible to couple more than two computer codes with pseudo shared memory architecture, the methodology should be revised to couple parallel codes especially when they are programmed using MPI.

  13. Expanding Capacity and Promoting Inclusion in Introductory Computer Science: A Focus on Near-Peer Mentor Preparation and Code Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon-Barry, Heather; Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; St. John, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    A dilemma within computer science departments is developing sustainable ways to expand capacity within introductory computer science courses while remaining committed to inclusive practices. Training near-peer mentors for peer code review is one solution. This paper describes the preparation of near-peer mentors for their role, with a focus on…

  14. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  15. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    Simulation of radiation hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions is developed, having in mind, in particular, target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement energy (IFE) and the interpretation of related experiments. Intense radiation pulses by laser or particle beams heat high-Z target configurations of different geometries and lead to a regime which is optically thick in some regions and optically thin in others. A diffusion description is inadequate in this situation. A new numerical code has been developed which describes hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions (cylindrical R-Z geometry) and radiation transport along rays in three dimensions with the 4 π solid angle discretized in direction. Matter moves on a non-structured mesh composed of trilateral and quadrilateral elements. Radiation flux of a given direction enters on two (one) sides of a triangle and leaves on the opposite side(s) in proportion to the viewing angles depending on the geometry. This scheme allows to propagate sharply edged beams without ray tracing, though at the price of some lateral diffusion. The algorithm treats correctly both the optically thin and optically thick regimes. A symmetric semi-implicit (SSI) method is used to guarantee numerical stability. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI2D Catalogue identifier: AECV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 151 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 889 622 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC (32 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 2 Mbytes Word size: 32 bits Classification: 19.7 External routines: X-window standard library (libX11.so) and corresponding heading files (X11/*.h) are

  16. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Control modules C4, C6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume is part of the manual related to the control modules for the newest updated version of this computational package.

  17. Establishing a communications link between two different, incompatible, personal computers: with practical examples and illustrations and program code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, R W

    1985-01-01

    The increasing need to communicate to exchange data can be handled by personal microcomputers. The necessity for the transference of information stored in one type of personal computer to another type of personal computer is often encountered in the process of integrating multiple sources of information stored in different and incompatible computers in Medical Research and Practice. A practical example is demonstrated with two relatively inexpensive commonly used computers, the IBM PC jr. and the Apple IIe. The basic input/output (I/O) interface chip for serial communication for each computer are joined together using a Null connector and cable to form a communications link. Using BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) Computer Language and the Disk Operating System (DOS) the communications handshaking protocol and file transfer is established between the two computers. The BASIC programming languages used are Applesoft (Apple Personal Computer) and PC BASIC (IBM Personal computer).

  18. A computational model of cellular mechanisms of temporal coding in the medial geniculate body (MGB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cal F Rabang

    Full Text Available Acoustic stimuli are often represented in the early auditory pathway as patterns of neural activity synchronized to time-varying features. This phase-locking predominates until the level of the medial geniculate body (MGB, where previous studies have identified two main, largely segregated response types: Stimulus-synchronized responses faithfully preserve the temporal coding from its afferent inputs, and Non-synchronized responses, which are not phase locked to the inputs, represent changes in temporal modulation by a rate code. The cellular mechanisms underlying this transformation from phase-locked to rate code are not well understood. We use a computational model of a MGB thalamocortical neuron to test the hypothesis that these response classes arise from inferior colliculus (IC excitatory afferents with divergent properties similar to those observed in brain slice studies. Large-conductance inputs exhibiting synaptic depression preserved input synchrony as short as 12.5 ms interclick intervals, while maintaining low firing rates and low-pass filtering responses. By contrast, small-conductance inputs with Mixed plasticity (depression of AMPA-receptor component and facilitation of NMDA-receptor component desynchronized afferent inputs, generated a click-rate dependent increase in firing rate, and high-pass filtered the inputs. Synaptic inputs with facilitation often permitted band-pass synchrony along with band-pass rate tuning. These responses could be tuned by changes in membrane potential, strength of the NMDA component, and characteristics of synaptic plasticity. These results demonstrate how the same synchronized input spike trains from the inferior colliculus can be transformed into different representations of temporal modulation by divergent synaptic properties.

  19. Complex of codes for computer-aided design of electron guns with grid control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, A. I.; Juravleva, V. D.; Penzyakov, V. V.; Rogovin, V. I.

    2003-03-01

    The computer-aided design of gridded electron guns on a basis of two, two and half and 3D mathematical models is carried out. The parameters of cathode-grid assembly (CGA) are calculated, synthesis and the trajectories analysis of ungridded gun, in which a control grid is supposed to be established, are realized. The trajectories analysis of a beam in CGA cells is fulfilled, the coordinates, velocites and charges of large particles on an exit from CGA cells are used for definition of the initial data for solving beam motion equations in the gridded electron gun and further in magnetic focusing system. Electron-optical systems with gridded electron gun, designed with the help of this complex of codes, do not require experimental correction and provide good current permeability in microwave tubes.

  20. Simulation of the preliminary General Electric SP-100 space reactor concept using the ATHENA computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of a space reactor using the ATHENA computer code is demonstrated. The fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of the preliminary General electric SP-100 design were modeled with ATHENA. Two demonstration transient calculations were performed simulating accident conditions. Calculated results are available for display using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer color graphics analysis tool in addition to traditional plots. ATHENA-calculated results appear reasonable, both for steady state full power conditions, and for the two transients. This analysis represents the first known transient thermal-hydraulic simulation using an integral space reactor system model incorporating heat pipes. 6 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  1. ACUTRI a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Noguchi, H; Ryufuku, S; Sasaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: i...

  2. Feasibility study for improved steady-state initialization algorithms for the RELAP5 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, M.P.; Peterson, C.E.; Katsma, K.R. (Computer Simulation and Analysis, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1993-04-01

    A design for a new steady-state initialization method is presented that represents an improvement over the current method used in RELAP5. Current initialization methods for RELAP5 solve the transient fluidflow balance equations simulating a transient to achieve steady-state conditions. Because the transient solution is used, the initial conditions may change from the desired values requiring the use of controllers and long transient running times to obtain steady-state conditions for system problems. The new initialization method allows the user to fix thermal-hydraulic values in volumes and junctions where the conditions are best known and have the code compute the initial conditions in other areas of the system. The steady-state balance equations and solution methods are presented. The constitutive, component, and specialpurpose models are reviewed with respect to modifications required for the new steady-state initialization method. The requirements for user input are defined and the feasibility of the method is demonstrated with a testbed code by initializing some simple channel problems. The initialization of the sample problems using, the old and the new methods are compared.

  3. Computer-based coding of free-text job descriptions to efficiently identify occupations in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Colt, Joanne S; Armenti, Karla R; Baris, Dalsu; Chow, Wong-Ho; Davis, Faith; Johnson, Alison; Purdue, Mark P; Karagas, Margaret R; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Silverman, Debra T; Johnson, Calvin A; Friesen, Melissa C

    2016-06-01

    Mapping job titles to standardised occupation classification (SOC) codes is an important step in identifying occupational risk factors in epidemiological studies. Because manual coding is time-consuming and has moderate reliability, we developed an algorithm called SOCcer (Standardized Occupation Coding for Computer-assisted Epidemiologic Research) to assign SOC-2010 codes based on free-text job description components. Job title and task-based classifiers were developed by comparing job descriptions to multiple sources linking job and task descriptions to SOC codes. An industry-based classifier was developed based on the SOC prevalence within an industry. These classifiers were used in a logistic model trained using 14 983 jobs with expert-assigned SOC codes to obtain empirical weights for an algorithm that scored each SOC/job description. We assigned the highest scoring SOC code to each job. SOCcer was validated in 2 occupational data sources by comparing SOC codes obtained from SOCcer to expert assigned SOC codes and lead exposure estimates obtained by linking SOC codes to a job-exposure matrix. For 11 991 case-control study jobs, SOCcer-assigned codes agreed with 44.5% and 76.3% of manually assigned codes at the 6-digit and 2-digit level, respectively. Agreement increased with the score, providing a mechanism to identify assignments needing review. Good agreement was observed between lead estimates based on SOCcer and manual SOC assignments (κ 0.6-0.8). Poorer performance was observed for inspection job descriptions, which included abbreviations and worksite-specific terminology. Although some manual coding will remain necessary, using SOCcer may improve the efficiency of incorporating occupation into large-scale epidemiological studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Computational Code to Determinate the Optical Constants of Materials with Atrophysical Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    Several environments in the interstellar medium (ISM) are composed by dust grains (e.g. silicates), that in somewhere can be covered by astrophysical ices (frozen molecular species). The presence of this materials inside dense and cold regions in space such as molecular clouds and circumstellar disks around young stars is proven by space telescopes (e. g. Herschel, Spitzer, ISO) using infrared spectroscopy. In such environments, molecules such as H _{2}O, CO, CO _{2}, NH _{3}, CH _{3}OH among others, may exist in the solid phase and constitute what we call as the interstellar ices. In this work we present a code called NKABS (acronym for “N and K determination from ABSorbance data”) to calculate the optical constants of materials with astrophysical importance directly from absorbance data in the infrared. It is a free code, developed in Python Programing Language, available for Windows (®) operating system. The parameters obtained using the NKABS code are essentials to perform studies involving computational modeling of star forming regions in the infrared. The experimental data have been obtained using a high vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratorio de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP). The samples used to calculate the optical constants presented here, were obtained from the condensation of pure gases (e.g. CO, CO _{2} , NH _{3} , SO _{2}), from the sublimation in vacuum of pure liquids (e.g. water, acetone, acetonitrile, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol and methanol) and from mixtures of different species (e.g. H _{2}O:CO _{2}, H _{2}O:CO:NH _{3}, H _{2}O:CO _{2}:NH _{3}:CH _{4}). Additionally films of solid biomolecules samples of astrochemistry/astrobiology interest (e.g. glycine, adenine) were probed. The NKABS code may also calculate the optical constants of materials processed by the radiation, a scenario very common in star forming regions. Authors would like to thanks the agencies FAPESP (JP#2009/18304-0 and PHD#2013/07657-5), FVE

  5. STATIC{sub T}EMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoyo, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Temixco (Mexico); Garcia, A.; Santoyo, S. [Unidad Geotermia, Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico); Espinosa, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Co. Vicentina (Mexico); Hernandez, I. [ITESM, Centro de Sistemas de Manufactura, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC{sub T}EMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC{sub T}EMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliably used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC{sub T}EMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented. (Author)

  6. The Semi-Automatic Parallelisation of Scientific Application Codes Using a Computer Aided Parallelisation Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Ierotheou

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The shared-memory programming model can be an effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. Historically however, the lack of a programming standard using directives and the limited scalability have affected its take-up. Recent advances in hardware and software technologies have resulted in improvements to both the performance of parallel programs with compiler directives and the issue of portability with the introduction of OpenMP. In this study, the Computer Aided Parallelisation Toolkit has been extended to automatically generate OpenMP-based parallel programs with nominal user assistance. We categorize the different loop types and show how efficient directives can be placed using the toolkit's in-depth interprocedural analysis. Examples are taken from the NAS parallel benchmarks and a number of real-world application codes. This demonstrates the great potential of using the toolkit to quickly parallelise serial programs as well as the good performance achievable on up to 300 processors for hybrid message passing-directive parallelisations.

  7. The Automatic Parallelisation of Scientific Application Codes Using a Computer Aided Parallelisation Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierotheou, C.; Johnson, S.; Leggett, P.; Cross, M.; Evans, E.; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, M.; Yan, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shared-memory programming model is a very effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. Historically, the lack of a programming standard for using directives and the rather limited performance due to scalability have affected the take-up of this programming model approach. Significant progress has been made in hardware and software technologies, as a result the performance of parallel programs with compiler directives has also made improvements. The introduction of an industrial standard for shared-memory programming with directives, OpenMP, has also addressed the issue of portability. In this study, we have extended the computer aided parallelization toolkit (developed at the University of Greenwich), to automatically generate OpenMP based parallel programs with nominal user assistance. We outline the way in which loop types are categorized and how efficient OpenMP directives can be defined and placed using the in-depth interprocedural analysis that is carried out by the toolkit. We also discuss the application of the toolkit on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks and a number of real-world application codes. This work not only demonstrates the great potential of using the toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs but also the good performance achievable on up to 300 processors for hybrid message passing and directive-based parallelizations.

  8. Computational modeling of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Guilherme J. de S.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Morales, Rudnei K., E-mail: guilhermeime@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebelloime@ime.eb.b, E-mail: karam@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos O.; Correa, Samanda C.A., E-mail: domin@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: scorrea@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (CT/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of a detection system is crucial to determine the real activity of a radioactive source. When it's possible, the system's calibration should be performed using a standard source. Unfortunately, there are only a few cases that it can be done this way, considering the difficulty of obtaining appropriate standard sources for each type of measurement. In such cases, computer simulations can be performed to assist in calculating of the efficiency of the system with a similar configuration. This work aims to create, using the MCNPX code, a computer model of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector belonged to the Radiometry Laboratory of Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), adapted for the calculation of the full-energy peak efficiency of {sup 137}Cs. The model was created representing in details an experimental arrangement assembled in IME considering the HPGe detector and measuring a {sup 137}Cs source. The calculated results are being compared with those obtained experimentally and the model is in process of validation. (author)

  9. A simulation of a pebble bed reactor core by the MCNP-4C computer code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshayesh Moshkbar Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of energy is a major crisis of our century; the irregular increase of fossil fuel costs has forced us to search for novel, cheaper, and safer sources of energy. Pebble bed reactors - an advanced new generation of reactors with specific advantages in safety and cost - might turn out to be the desired candidate for the role. The calculation of the critical height of a pebble bed reactor at room temperature, while using the MCNP-4C computer code, is the main goal of this paper. In order to reduce the MCNP computing time compared to the previously proposed schemes, we have devised a new simulation scheme. Different arrangements of kernels in fuel pebble simulations were investigated and the best arrangement to decrease the MCNP execution time (while keeping the accuracy of the results, chosen. The neutron flux distribution and control rods worth, as well as their shadowing effects, have also been considered in this paper. All calculations done for the HTR-10 reactor core are in good agreement with experimental results.

  10. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Mikhail [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Niita, Koji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  11. Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B.P.; Bacon, D.H.

    1998-02-01

    Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-activity waste (LAW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. The available computer codes with suitable capabilities at the time Revision 0 of this document was prepared were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical processes expected to affect LAW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. This analysis was repeated in this report but updated to include additional processes that have been found to be important since Revision 0 was issued and to include additional codes that have been released. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the STORM code developed at PNNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of arid land disposal sites.

  12. Grid cells generate an analog error-correcting code for singularly precise neural computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Sameet; Fiete, Ila

    2011-09-11

    Entorhinal grid cells in mammals fire as a function of animal location, with spatially periodic response patterns. This nonlocal periodic representation of location, a local variable, is unlike other neural codes. There is no theoretical explanation for why such a code should exist. We examined how accurately the grid code with noisy neurons allows an ideal observer to estimate location and found this code to be a previously unknown type of population code with unprecedented robustness to noise. In particular, the representational accuracy attained by grid cells over the coding range was in a qualitatively different class from what is possible with observed sensory and motor population codes. We found that a simple neural network can effectively correct the grid code. To the best of our knowledge, these results are the first demonstration that the brain contains, and may exploit, powerful error-correcting codes for analog variables. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual Determination of Conjugate Eye Deviation on Computed Tomography Scan Predicts Diagnosis of Stroke Code Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Ilana; Chen, James Y; Raman, Rema; Ernstrom, Karin; Agrawal, Kunal; Modir, Royya F; Meyer, Dawn M; Meyer, Brett C

    2016-12-01

    Head computed tomography (CT) is critical for stroke code evaluations and often happens prior to completion of the neurological exam. Eye deviation on neuroimaging (DeyeCOM sign) has utility for predicting stroke diagnosis and correlates with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) gaze score. We further assessed the utility of the DeyeCOM sign, without complex caliper-based eye deviation calculations, but simply with a visual determination method. Patients with initial head CT and final diagnosis from an institutional review board-approved consecutive prospective registry of stroke codes at the University of California, San Diego, were included. Five stroke specialists and 1 neuroradiologist reviewed each CT. DeyeCOM+ patients were compared to DeyeCOM- patients (baseline characteristics, diagnosis, and NIHSS gaze score). Kappa statistics compared stroke specialists to neuroradiologist reads, and visual determination to caliper measurement of DeyeCOM sign. Of 181 patients, 46 were DeyeCOM+. Ischemic stroke was more commonly diagnosed in DeyeCOM+ patients compared to other diagnoses (P = .039). DeyeCOM+ patients were more likely to have an NIHSS gaze score of 1 or higher (P = .006). The NIHSS score of DeyeCOM+ stroke versus DeyeCOM- stroke patients was 8.3 ± 6.0 versus 6.7 ± 8.0 (P = .065). Functional outcomes were similar (P = .59). Stroke specialists had excellent agreement with the neuroradiologist (Κ = .89). Visual inspection had excellent agreement with the caliper method (Κ = .88). Using a time-sensitive visual determination of gaze deviation on imaging was predictive of ischemic stroke diagnosis and presence of NIHSS gaze score, and was consistent with the more complex caliper method. This study furthers the clinical utility of the DeyeCOM sign for predicting ischemic strokes. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Parijat Tripathi

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool, QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA by ab initio methods helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is

  15. DIST: a computer code system for calculation of distribution ratios of solutes in the purex system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachimori, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-05-01

    Purex is a solvent extraction process for reprocessing the spent nuclear fuel using tri n-butylphosphate (TBP). A computer code system DIST has been developed to calculate distribution ratios for the major solutes in the Purex process. The DIST system is composed of database storing experimental distribution data of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}: DISTEX and of Zr(IV), Tc(VII): DISTEXFP and calculation programs to calculate distribution ratios of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}(DIST1), and Zr(IV), Tc(VII)(DITS2). The DIST1 and DIST2 determine, by the best-fit procedures, the most appropriate values of many parameters put on empirical equations by using the DISTEX data which fulfill the assigned conditions and are applied to calculate distribution ratios of the respective solutes. Approximately 5,000 data were stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. In the present report, the following items are described, 1) specific features of DIST1 and DIST2 codes and the examples of calculation 2) explanation of databases, DISTEX, DISTEXFP and a program DISTIN, which manages the data in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP by functions as input, search, correction and delete. and at the annex, 3) programs of DIST1, DIST2, and figure-drawing programs DIST1G and DIST2G 4) user manual for DISTIN. 5) source programs of DIST1 and DIST2. 6) the experimental data stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. (author). 122 refs.

  16. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules F1-F8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with eight of the functional modules in the code. Those are: BONAMI - resonance self-shielding by the Bondarenko method; NITAWL-II - SCALE system module for performing resonance shielding and working library production; XSDRNPM - a one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code for transport analysis; XSDOSE - a module for calculating fluxes and dose rates at points outside a shield; KENO IV/S - an improved monte carlo criticality program; COUPLE; ORIGEN-S - SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms; ICE.

  17. STEMsalabim: A high-performance computing cluster friendly code for scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of thin specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, Jan Oliver, E-mail: jan.oliver.oelerich@physik.uni-marburg.de; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Baranovskii, Sergei D.; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We present STEMsalabim, a modern implementation of the multislice algorithm for simulation of STEM images. • Our package is highly parallelizable on high-performance computing clusters, combining shared and distributed memory architectures. • With STEMsalabim, computationally and memory expensive STEM image simulations can be carried out within reasonable time. - Abstract: We present a new multislice code for the computer simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images based on the frozen lattice approximation. Unlike existing software packages, the code is optimized to perform well on highly parallelized computing clusters, combining distributed and shared memory architectures. This enables efficient calculation of large lateral scanning areas of the specimen within the frozen lattice approximation and fine-grained sweeps of parameter space.

  18. Alfvén eigenmode evolution computed with the VENUS and KINX codes for the ITER baseline scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaev, M. Yu., E-mail: isaev-my@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Medvedev, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute (Russian Federation); Cooper, W. A. [Suisse Plasma Centre (Switzerland)

    2017-02-15

    A new application of the VENUS code is described, which computes alpha particle orbits in the perturbed electromagnetic fields and its resonant interaction with the toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) for the ITER device. The ITER baseline scenario with Q = 10 and the plasma toroidal current of 15 MA is considered as the most important and relevant for the International Tokamak Physics Activity group on energetic particles (ITPA-EP). For this scenario, typical unstable TAE-modes with the toroidal index n = 20 have been predicted that are localized in the plasma core near the surface with safety factor q = 1. The spatial structure of ballooning and antiballooning modes has been computed with the ideal MHD code KINX. The linear growth rates and the saturation levels taking into account the damping effects and the different mode frequencies have been calculated with the VENUS code for both ballooning and antiballooning TAE-modes.

  19. Computer codes for checking, plotting and processing of neutron cross-section covariance data and their application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E. [OECD/NEA Data Bank, Issy les Moulineaux (France); Roussin, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a brief review of computer codes concerned with checking, plotting, processing and using of covariances of neutron cross-section data. It concentrates on those available from the computer code information centers of the United States and the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency. Emphasis will be placed also on codes using covariances for specific applications such as uncertainty analysis, data adjustment and data consistency analysis. Recent evaluations contain neutron cross section covariance information for all isotopes of major importance for technological applications of nuclear energy. It is therefore important that the available software tools needed for taking advantage of this information are widely known as hey permit the determination of better safety margins and allow the optimization of more economic, I designs of nuclear energy systems.

  20. Dual Coding Theory Explains Biphasic Collective Computation in Neural Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Bryan C; Flack, Jessica C; Krakauer, David C

    2017-01-01

    A central question in cognitive neuroscience is how unitary, coherent decisions at the whole organism level can arise from the distributed behavior of a large population of neurons with only partially overlapping information. We address this issue by studying neural spiking behavior recorded from a multielectrode array with 169 channels during a visual motion direction discrimination task. It is well known that in this task there are two distinct phases in neural spiking behavior. Here we show Phase I is a distributed or incompressible phase in which uncertainty about the decision is substantially reduced by pooling information from many cells. Phase II is a redundant or compressible phase in which numerous single cells contain all the information present at the population level in Phase I, such that the firing behavior of a single cell is enough to predict the subject's decision. Using an empirically grounded dynamical modeling framework, we show that in Phase I large cell populations with low redundancy produce a slow timescale of information aggregation through critical slowing down near a symmetry-breaking transition. Our model indicates that increasing collective amplification in Phase II leads naturally to a faster timescale of information pooling and consensus formation. Based on our results and others in the literature, we propose that a general feature of collective computation is a "coding duality" in which there are accumulation and consensus formation processes distinguished by different timescales.

  1. Space Debris Surfaces (Computer Code): Probability of No Penetration Versus Impact Velocity and Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, N.; Meibaum, R.; Olsen, G.

    1995-01-01

    A unique collection of computer codes, Space Debris Surfaces (SD_SURF), have been developed to assist in the design and analysis of space debris protection systems. SD_SURF calculates and summarizes a vehicle's vulnerability to space debris as a function of impact velocity and obliquity. An SD_SURF analysis will show which velocities and obliquities are the most probable to cause a penetration. This determination can help the analyst select a shield design that is best suited to the predominant penetration mechanism. The analysis also suggests the most suitable parameters for development or verification testing. The SD_SURF programs offer the option of either FORTRAN programs or Microsoft-EXCEL spreadsheets and macros. The FORTRAN programs work with BUMPERII. The EXCEL spreadsheets and macros can be used independently or with selected output from the SD_SURF FORTRAN programs. Examples will be presented of the interaction between space vehicle geometry, the space debris environment, and the penetration and critical damage ballistic limit surfaces of the shield under consideration.

  2. Investigation of station blackout scenario in VVER440/v230 with RELAP5 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gencheva, Rositsa Veselinova, E-mail: roseh@mail.bg; Stefanova, Antoaneta Emilova, E-mail: antoanet@inrne.bas.bg; Groudev, Pavlin Petkov, E-mail: pavlinpg@inrne.bas.bg

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We have modeled SBO in VVER440. • RELAP5/MOD3 computer code has been used. • Base case calculation has been done. • Fail case calculation has been done. • Operator and alternative operator actions have been investigated. - Abstract: During the development of symptom-based emergency operating procedures (SB-EOPs) for VVER440/v230 units at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) a number of analyses have been performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 (Carlson et al., 1990). Some of them investigate the response of VVER440/v230 during the station blackout (SBO). The main purpose of the analyses presented in this paper is to identify the behavior of important VVER440 parameters in case of total station blackout. The RELAP5/MOD3 has been used to simulate the SBO in VVER440 NPP model (Fletcher and Schultz, 1995). This model was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (INRNE-BAS), Sofia, for analyses of operational occurrences, abnormal events and design based scenarios. The model provides a significant analytical capability for specialists working in the field of NPP safety.

  3. Development of an aeroelastic code based on three-dimensional viscous–inviscid method for wind turbine computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic and structural dynamic performance analysis of modern wind turbines are routinely estimated in the wind energy field using computational tools known as aeroelastic codes. Most aeroelastic codes use the blade element momentum (BEM) technique to model the rotor aerodynamics and a modal...... Code Comparison Collaboration Project. Simulation tests consist of steady wind inflow conditions with different combinations of yaw error, wind shear, tower shadow and turbine-elastic modeling. Turbulent inflow created by using a Mann box is also considered. MIRAS-FLEX results, such as blade tip......, multi-body or the finite-element approach to model the turbine structural dynamics. The present work describes the development of a novel aeroelastic code that combines a three-dimensional viscous–inviscid interactive method, method for interactive rotor aerodynamic simulations (MIRAS...

  4. The TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) computer code user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the confinement and transport of plasma in a magnetic mirror device, including tandem mirror configurations. Mirror plasmas may be modeled in a system which includes an applied magnetic field and/or a self-consistent or applied electrostatic potential. The PIC code TESS is similar to the PIC code DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) which is designed to study plasma transport to and interaction with a solid surface. The codes TESS and DIPSI are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. The DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) computer code user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the interaction of plasma with a solid surface, such as a limiter or divertor plate in a tokamak fusion device. Plasma confinement and transport may be studied in a system which includes an applied magnetic field (oriented normal to the solid surface) and/or a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The PIC code DIPSI is an offshoot of the PIC code TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) which was developed to study plasma confinement in mirror devices. The codes DIPSI and TESS are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. V.S.O.P. (99/09) computer code system for reactor physics and fuel cycle simulation. Version 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, H.J.; Haas, K.A.; Brockmann, H.; Ohlig, U.; Pohl, C.; Scherer, W.

    2010-07-15

    V.S.O.P. (99/ 09) represents the further development of V.S.O.P. (99/ 05). Compared to its precursor, the code system has been improved again in many details. The main motivation for this new code version was to update the basic nuclear libraries used by the code system. Thus, all cross section libraries involved in the code have now been based on ENDF/B-VII. V.S.O.P. is a computer code system for the comprehensive numerical simulation of the physics of thermal reactors. It implies the setup of the reactor and of the fuel element, processing of cross sections, neutron spectrum evaluation, neutron diffusion calculation in two or three dimensions, fuel burnup, fuel shuffling, reactor control, thermal hydraulics and fuel cycle costs. The thermal hydraulics part (steady state and time-dependent) is restricted to gas-cooled reactors and to two spatial dimensions. The code can simulate the reactor operation from the initial core towards the equilibrium core. This latest code version was developed and tested under the WINDOWS-XP - operating system. (orig.)

  7. Analog Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CODING, ANALOG SYSTEMS), INFORMATION THEORY, DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS , TRANSMITTER RECEIVERS, WHITE NOISE, PROBABILITY, ERRORS, PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, SET THEORY, COMPUTER PROGRAMS

  8. International standard problem (ISP) no. 41 follow up exercise: Containment iodine computer code exercise: parametric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Glowa, G.; Wren, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ewig, F. [GRS Koln (Germany); Dickenson, S. [AEAT, (United Kingdom); Billarand, Y.; Cantrel, L. [IPSN (France); Rydl, A. [NRIR (Czech Republic); Royen, J. [OECD/NEA (France)

    2001-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I{sup -} concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE(IPSN), IODE(NRIR), IMPAIR(GRS), INSPECT(AEAT), IMOD(AECL) and LIRIC(AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained front intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility, (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (author)

  9. Further development of the computer code ATHLET-CD; Weiterentwicklung des Rechenprogramms ATHLET-CD. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Sebastian; Austregesilo, Henrique; Bals, Christine; Band, Sebastian; Hollands, Thorsten; Koellein, Carsten; Lovasz, Liviusz; Pandazis, Peter; Schubert, Johann-Dietrich; Sonnenkalb, Martin

    2016-10-15

    In the framework of the reactor safety research program sponsored by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), the computer code system ATHLET/ATHLET-CD has been further developed as an analysis tool for the simulation of accidents in nuclear power plants with pressurized and boiling water reactors as well as for the evaluation of accident management procedures. The main objective was to provide a mechanistic analysis tool for best estimate calculations of transients, accidents, and severe accidents with core degradation in light water reactors. With the continued development, the capability of the code system has been largely improved, allowing best estimate calculations of design and beyond design base accidents, and the simulation of advanced core degradation with enhanced model extent in a reasonable calculation time. ATHLET comprises inter alia a 6-equation model, models for the simulation of non-condensable gases and tracking of boron concentration, as well as additional component and process models for the complete system simulation. Among numerous model improvements, the code application has been extended to super critical pressures. The mechanistic description of the dynamic development of flow regimes on the basis of a transport equation for the interface area has been further developed. This ATHLET version is completely integrated in ATHLET-CD. ATHLET-CD further comprises dedicated models for the simulation of fuel and control assembly degradation for both pressurized and boiling water reactors, debris bed with melting in the core region, as well as fission product and aerosol release and transport in the cooling system, inclusive of decay of nuclide inventories and of chemical reactions in the gas phase. The continued development also concerned the modelling of absorber material release, of melting, melt relocation and freezing, and the interaction with the wall of the reactor pressure vessel. The following models were newly

  10. Computationally Efficient Blind Code Synchronization for Asynchronous DS-CDMA Systems with Adaptive Antenna Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chang Hu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel space-time adaptive near-far robust code-synchronization array detector for asynchronous DS-CDMA systems is developed in this paper. There are the same basic requirements that are needed by the conventional matched filter of an asynchronous DS-CDMA system. For the real-time applicability, a computationally efficient architecture of the proposed detector is developed that is based on the concept of the multistage Wiener filter (MWF of Goldstein and Reed. This multistage technique results in a self-synchronizing detection criterion that requires no inversion or eigendecomposition of a covariance matrix. As a consequence, this detector achieves a complexity that is only a linear function of the size of antenna array (J, the rank of the MWF (M, the system processing gain (N, and the number of samples in a chip interval (S, that is, 𝒪(JMNS. The complexity of the equivalent detector based on the minimum mean-squared error (MMSE or the subspace-based eigenstructure analysis is a function of 𝒪((JNS3. Moreover, this multistage scheme provides a rapid adaptive convergence under limited observation-data support. Simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance and convergence behavior of the proposed detector with the size of the J-element antenna array, the amount of the L-sample support, and the rank of the M-stage MWF. The performance advantage of the proposed detector over other DS-CDMA detectors is investigated as well.

  11. On the performance of a 2D unstructured computational rheology code on a GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, S.P.; Vuik, K.; Pinho, F.T.; Nobrega, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present work explores the massively parallel capabilities of the most advanced architecture of graphics processing units (GPUs) code named “Fermi”, on a two-dimensional unstructured cell-centred finite volume code. We use the SIMPLE algorithm to solve the continuity and momentum equations that

  12. User's manual for GEOTEMP, a computer code for predicting downhole wellbore and soil temperatures in geothermal wells. Appendix to Part I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, G.R.

    1980-03-01

    GEOTEMP is a computer code that calculates downhole temperatures in and surrounding a well. Temperatures are computed as a function of time in a flowing stream, in the wellbore, and in the soil. Flowing options available in the model include the following: injection/production, forward/reverse circulation, and drilling. This manual describes how to input data to the code and what results are printed out, provides six examples of both input and output, and supplies a listing of the code. The user's manual is an appendix to the Part I report Development of Computer Code and Acquisition of Field Temperature Data.

  13. A neutron spectrum unfolding computer code based on artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer consists of a thermal neutron sensor placed at the center of a number of moderating polyethylene spheres of different diameters. From the measured readings, information can be derived about the spectrum of the neutron field where measurements were made. Disadvantages of the Bonner system are the weight associated with each sphere and the need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, requiring long exposure periods. Provided a well-established response matrix and adequate irradiation conditions, the most delicate part of neutron spectrometry, is the unfolding process. The derivation of the spectral information is not simple because the unknown is not given directly as a result of the measurements. The drawbacks associated with traditional unfolding procedures have motivated the need of complementary approaches. Novel methods based on Artificial Intelligence, mainly Artificial Neural Networks, have been widely investigated. In this work, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural nets technology is presented. This code is called Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural networks unfolding code that was designed in a graphical interface. The core of the code is an embedded neural network architecture previously optimized using the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology. The main features of the code are: easy to use, friendly and intuitive to the user. This code was designed for a Bonner Sphere System based on a 6LiI(Eu) neutron detector and a response matrix expressed in 60 energy bins taken from an International Atomic Energy Agency compilation. The main feature of the code is that as entrance data, for unfolding the neutron spectrum, only seven rate counts measured with seven Bonner spheres are required; simultaneously the code calculates 15 dosimetric quantities as well as the total flux for radiation protection purposes. This code generates a full report with all information of the unfolding in

  14. The Manifestation of Stopping Sets and Absorbing Sets as Deviations on the Computation Trees of LDPC Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Psota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The error mechanisms of iterative message-passing decoders for low-density parity-check codes are studied. A tutorial review is given of the various graphical structures, including trapping sets, stopping sets, and absorbing sets that are frequently used to characterize the errors observed in simulations of iterative decoding of low-density parity-check codes. The connections between trapping sets and deviations on computation trees are explored in depth using the notion of problematic trapping sets in order to bridge the experimental and analytic approaches to these error mechanisms. A new iterative algorithm for finding low-weight problematic trapping sets is presented and shown to be capable of identifying many trapping sets that are frequently observed during iterative decoding of low-density parity-check codes on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Finally, a new method is given for characterizing the weight of deviations that result from problematic trapping sets.

  15. Cyclone Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Schindelhauer, Christian; Jakoby, Andreas; Köhler, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Cyclone codes which are rateless erasure resilient codes. They combine Pair codes with Luby Transform (LT) codes by computing a code symbol from a random set of data symbols using bitwise XOR and cyclic shift operations. The number of data symbols is chosen according to the Robust Soliton distribution. XOR and cyclic shift operations establish a unitary commutative ring if data symbols have a length of $p-1$ bits, for some prime number $p$. We consider the graph given by code sym...

  16. Development of the Computer Code to Determine an Individual Radionuclides in the Rad-wastes Container for Ulchin Units 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D.W.; Chi, J.H.; Goh, E.O. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    A computer program, RASSAY was developed to evaluate accurately the activities of various nuclides in the rad-waste container for Ulchin units 3 and 4. This is the final report of the project, {sup D}evelopment of the Computer Code to Determine an Individual Radionuclides in the Rad-wastes Container for Ulchin Units 3 and 4 and includes the followings; 1) Structure of the computer code, RASSAY 2) An example of surface dose calculation by computer simulation using MCNP code 3) Methods of sampling and activity measurement of various Rad-wastes. (author). 21 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  18. Measurement of depth-dose of linear accelerator and simulation by use of Geant4 computer code

    OpenAIRE

    Sardari, D.; Maleki, R.; Samavat, H.; Esmaeeli, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an established method of cancer treatment. New technologies in cancer radiotherapy need a more accurate computation of the dose delivered in the radiotherapy treatment plan. This study presents some results of a Geant4-based application for simulation of the absorbed dose distribution given by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC geometry is accurately described in the Monte Carlo code with use of the accelerator manufacturer's specifications. The capability of...

  19. SACRD: a data base for fast reactor safety computer codes, contents and glossary of Version 1 of the system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, N.M.; Forsberg, V.M.; Raiford, G.B.; Arwood, J.W.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    SACRD is a data base of material properties and other handbook data needed in computer codes used for fast reactor safety studies. This document lists the contents of Version 1 and also serves as a glossary of terminology used in the data base. Data are available in the thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, aerosol transport, meteorology, neutronics and dosimetry areas. Tabular, graphical and parameterized data are provided in many cases.

  20. Neptune: An astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics code for massively parallel computer architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalski, Stou

    Smooth particle hydrodynamics is an efficient method for modeling the dynamics of fluids. It is commonly used to simulate astrophysical processes such as binary mergers. We present a newly developed GPU accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulations. The code is named neptune after the Roman god of water. It is written in OpenMP parallelized C++ and OpenCL and includes octree based hydrodynamic and gravitational acceleration. The design relies on object-oriented methodologies in order to provide a flexible and modular framework that can be easily extended and modified by the user. Several pre-built scenarios for simulating collisions of polytropes and black-hole accretion are provided. The code is released under the MIT Open Source license and publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/neptune-sph/.

  1. BCM-2.0 - The new version of computer code ;Basic Channeling with Mathematica©;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrashitov, S. V.; Bogdanov, O. V.; Korotchenko, K. B.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Rozhkova, E. I.; Tukhfatullin, T. A.; Eikhorn, Yu. L.

    2017-07-01

    The new symbolic-numerical code devoted to investigation of the channeling phenomena in periodic potential of a crystal has been developed. The code has been written in Wolfram Language taking advantage of analytical programming method. Newly developed different packages were successfully applied to simulate scattering, radiation, electron-positron pair production and other effects connected with channeling of relativistic particles in aligned crystal. The result of the simulation has been validated against data from channeling experiments carried out at SAGA LS.

  2. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the two-dimensional or axisymmetric, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 2 is the User's Guide, and describes the program's general features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  3. Development of probabilistic RESRAD computer codes for NRC decommissioning and license termination applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. Y.; Yu, C.; Mo. T.; Trottier, C.

    2000-10-17

    In 1999, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) tasked Argonne National Laboratory to modify the existing RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes to perform probabilistic, site-specific dose analysis for use with the NRC's Standard Review Plan for demonstrating compliance with the license termination rule. The RESRAD codes have been developed by Argonne to support the US Department of Energy's (DOEs) cleanup efforts. Through more than a decade of application, the codes already have established a large user base in the nation and a rigorous QA support. The primary objectives of the NRC task are to: (1) extend the codes' capabilities to include probabilistic analysis, and (2) develop parameter distribution functions and perform probabilistic analysis with the codes. The new codes also contain user-friendly features specially designed with graphic-user interface. In October 2000, the revised RESRAD (version 6.0) and RESRAD-BUILD (version 3.0), together with the user's guide and relevant parameter information, have been developed and are made available to the general public via the Internet for use.

  4. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration.

  5. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  6. Role of Wind Tunnels and Computer Codes in the Certification and Qualification of Rotorcraft for Flight in Forecast Icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Robert J.; Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    The cost and time to certify or qualify a rotorcraft for flight in forecast icing has been a major impediment to the development of ice protection systems for helicopter rotors. Development and flight test programs for those aircraft that have achieved certification or qualification for flight in icing conditions have taken many years, and the costs have been very high. NASA, Sikorsky, and others have been conducting research into alternative means for providing information for the development of ice protection systems, and subsequent flight testing to substantiate the air-worthiness of a rotor ice protection system. Model rotor icing tests conducted in 1989 and 1993 have provided a data base for correlation of codes, and for the validation of wind tunnel icing test techniques. This paper summarizes this research, showing test and correlation trends as functions of cloud liquid water content, rotor lift, flight speed, and ambient temperature. Molds were made of several of the ice formations on the rotor blades. These molds were used to form simulated ice on the rotor blades, and the blades were then tested in a wind tunnel to determine flight performance characteristics. These simulated-ice rotor performance tests are discussed in the paper. The levels of correlation achieved and the role of these tools (codes and wind tunnel tests) in flight test planning, testing, and extension of flight data to the limits of the icing envelope are discussed. The potential application of simulated ice, the NASA LEWICE computer, the Sikorsky Generalized Rotor Performance aerodynamic computer code, and NASA Icing Research Tunnel rotor tests in a rotorcraft certification or qualification program are also discussed. The correlation of these computer codes with tunnel test data is presented, and a procedure or process to use these methods as part of a certification or qualification program is introduced.

  7. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  8. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes. Fifth quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R.K.

    1979-02-01

    This program aims at developing mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models, which will allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed-phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H/sub 2/ or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction. During this report period computer codes were developed and used to calculate: (1) coefficients for Si vapor and Si particles describing transport due to concentration and temperature gradients (i.e., Fick and Soret diffusion, respectively), and (2) estimates of thermochemical properties of Si n-mers. The former are needed to allow the mass flux of Si to reactor walls to be calculated. Because of the extremely large temperature gradients that exist in some of the reactors to be used in producing Si (particularly the Westinghouse reactor), it was found that thermal (Soret) diffusion can be the dominant transport mechanism for certain sizes of Si particles. The thermochemical estimates are required to allow computation of the formation rate of Si droplets. With the completion of these calculations the information and coding of the particle routines in the modified LAPP code is at the point where debugging can be done and that is now in progress.

  9. Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchett, J.W.

    1980-11-01

    The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

  10. Computationally Efficient Amplitude Modulated Sinusoidal Audio Coding using Frequency-Domain Linear Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M. G.; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2006-01-01

    -domain linear prediction and the prediction coefficients are quantized. As a proof of concept, we evaluate different configurations in a subjective listening test, and this shows that the proposed method offers significant improvements in sinusoidal coding. Furthermore, the properties of the frequency......-domain linear prediction-based envelope estimator are analyzed.......A method for amplitude modulated sinusoidal audio coding is presented that has low complexity and low delay. This is based on a subband processing system, where, in each subband, the signal is modeled as an amplitude modulated sum of sinusoids. The envelopes are estimated using frequency...

  11. A Three-Phase Decision Model of Computer-Aided Coding for the Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadmanjir, Zahra; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mokhtaran, Mehrshad; Kameli, Mohammad Esmail

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Accurate coded data in the healthcare are critical. Computer-Assisted Coding (CAC) is an effective tool to improve clinical coding in particular when a new classification will be developed and implemented. But determine the appropriate method for development need to consider the specifications of existing CAC systems, requirements for each type, our infrastructure and also, the classification scheme. Aim: The aim of the study was the development of a decision model for determining accurate code of each medical intervention in Iranian Classification of Health Interventions (IRCHI) that can be implemented as a suitable CAC system. Methods: first, a sample of existing CAC systems was reviewed. Then feasibility of each one of CAC types was examined with regard to their prerequisites for their implementation. The next step, proper model was proposed according to the structure of the classification scheme and was implemented as an interactive system. Results: There is a significant relationship between the level of assistance of a CAC system and integration of it with electronic medical documents. Implementation of fully automated CAC systems is impossible due to immature development of electronic medical record and problems in using language for medical documenting. So, a model was proposed to develop semi-automated CAC system based on hierarchical relationships between entities in the classification scheme and also the logic of decision making to specify the characters of code step by step through a web-based interactive user interface for CAC. It was composed of three phases to select Target, Action and Means respectively for an intervention. Conclusion: The proposed model was suitable the current status of clinical documentation and coding in Iran and also, the structure of new classification scheme. Our results show it was practical. However, the model needs to be evaluated in the next stage of the research. PMID:28883671

  12. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  13. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Code for Computing Second-Order Wiener Kernels and Spike-Triggered Covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Omer; Clark, Damon A

    2017-01-01

    Sensory neuroscience seeks to understand and predict how sensory neurons respond to stimuli. Nonlinear components of neural responses are frequently characterized by the second-order Wiener kernel and the closely-related spike-triggered covariance (STC). Recent advances in data acquisition have made it increasingly common and computationally intensive to compute second-order Wiener kernels/STC matrices. In order to speed up this sort of analysis, we developed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated module that computes the second-order Wiener kernel of a system's response to a stimulus. The generated kernel can be easily transformed for use in standard STC analyses. Our code speeds up such analyses by factors of over 100 relative to current methods that utilize central processing units (CPUs). It works on any modern GPU and may be integrated into many data analysis workflows. This module accelerates data analysis so that more time can be spent exploring parameter space and interpreting data.

  14. Parabolized Navier-Stokes Code for Computing Magneto-Hydrodynamic Flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel B. (Technical Monitor); Tannehill, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of two published papers, 'Computation of Magnetohydrodynamic Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm' and 'Numerical Simulation of Turbulent MHD Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm'.

  15. Simultaneous fluid-flow, heat-transfer and solid-stress computation in a single computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, D.B. [Concentration Heat and Momentum Ltd, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Computer simulation of flow- and thermally-induced stresses in mechanical-equipment assemblies has, in the past, required the use of two distinct software packages, one to determine the forces and the temperatures, and the other to compute the resultant stresses. The present paper describes how a single computer program can perform both tasks at the same time. The technique relies on the similarity of the equations governing velocity distributions in fluids to those governing displacements in solids. The same SIMPLE-like algorithm is used for solving both. Applications to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional situations are presented. It is further suggested that Solid-Fluid-Thermal, ie SFT analysis may come to replace CFD on the one hand and the analysis of stresses in solids on the other, by performing the functions of both. (author) 7 refs.

  16. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Miscellaneous -- Volume 3, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, L.M.; Jordon, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice; (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System developments has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3--for the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  17. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  18. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This User's Guide describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  19. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the User's Guide, and describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  20. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the 2-D or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating-direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 3 is the Programmer's Reference, and describes the program structure, the FORTRAN variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram.

  1. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the two-dimensional or axisymmetric, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 1 is the Analysis Description, and describes in detail the governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models.

  2. MELCOR computer code manuals: Primer and user`s guides, Version 1.8.3 September 1994. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users` Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  3. SMILEI: A collaborative, open-source, multi-purpose PIC code for the next generation of super-computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Mickael; Derouillat, J.; Beck, A.; Chiaramello, M.; Grassi, A.; Niel, F.; Perez, F.; Vinci, T.; Fle, M.; Aunai, N.; Dargent, J.; Plotnikov, I.; Bouchard, G.; Savoini, P.; Riconda, C.

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decades, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes have been central tools for plasma simulations. Today, new trends in High-Performance Computing (HPC) are emerging, dramatically changing HPC-relevant software design and putting some - if not most - legacy codes far beyond the level of performance expected on the new and future massively-parallel super computers. SMILEI is a new open-source PIC code co-developed by both plasma physicists and HPC specialists, and applied to a wide range of physics-related studies: from laser-plasma interaction to astrophysical plasmas. It benefits from an innovative parallelization strategy that relies on a super-domain-decomposition allowing for enhanced cache-use and efficient dynamic load balancing. Beyond these HPC-related developments, SMILEI also benefits from additional physics modules allowing to deal with binary collisions, field and collisional ionization and radiation back-reaction. This poster presents the SMILEI project, its HPC capabilities and illustrates some of the physics problems tackled with SMILEI.

  4. Modeling warm dense matter experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR code and the move toward exascale computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koniges Alice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR, has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related computational changes on general modeling codes in fusion.

  5. Validation of Mean Drift Forces Computed with the BEM Code NEMOH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg

    This report covers a simple investigation of mean drift forces found by use of the boundary element method code NEMOH. The results from NEMOH are compared to analytical results from literature and to numerical values found from the commercial software package WADAM by DNV-GL. The work was conducted...

  6. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Development of computing code system for level 3 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Won Seok; Hwang, Mi Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Among the various research areas of the level 3 PSA, the effect of terrain on the transport of radioactive material was investigated. These results will give a physical insight in the development of a new dispersion model. A wind tunnel experiment with bell shaped hill model was made in order to develop a new dispersion model. And an improved dispersion model was developed based on the concentration distribution data obtained from the wind tunnel experiment. This model will be added as an option to the atmospheric dispersion code. A stand-alone atmospheric code using MS Visual Basic programming language which runs at the Windows environment of a PC was developed. A user can easily select a necessary data file and type input data by clicking menus, and can select calculation options such building wake, plume rise etc., if necessary. And a user can easily understand the meaning of concentration distribution on the map around the plant site as well as output files. Also the methodologies for the estimation of radiation exposure and for the calculation of risks was established. These methodologies will be used for the development of modules for the radiation exposure and risks respectively. These modules will be developed independently and finally will be combined to the atmospheric dispersion code in order to develop a level 3 PSA code. 30 tabs., 56 figs., refs. (Author).

  7. DENSJT: statistical shell-model level density computer code description and user's manual. [In FORTRAN for CDC Cyber-70 computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.

    1976-07-01

    The FORTRAN code DENSJT described here is constructed to calculate the appropriate moments and dimensions needed in describing the Gaussian level density for fixed values of the total angular momentum (J) and isobaric spin (T = T/sub 0/). The input for this code is the same as in the usual shell-model codes, namely, the single-particle orbital properties and the antisymmetric two-body matrix elements. To calculate the moments for fixed values of the angular momentum (J) a method described by Ginocchio is used. All of the ''basic inputs'' needed in the reduction formula were derived without any restrictions on the orbitals. The formulas used in DENSJT are described, and the basic inputs are listed in tables. A block flow chart showing the general structure and the specific function of each subroutine is included. All necessary information for the input and output of this code is described. A calculation involving 3 orbitals in the s--d shell took 1 second on a CDC Cyber-70 computer. (RWR)

  8. [Footwear according to the "business dress code", and the health condition of women's feet--computer-assisted holistic evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław; Kotela, Ireneusz; Kiełbasiewicz-Lorkowska, Ewa; Teul, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    According to the verdict of the Supreme Court in 2005, an employer may dismiss an employee if their conduct (including dress) exposes the employer to losses or threatens his interests. The aim of the study was a holistic assessment of the pleiotropic effects of high-heeled pointed shoes on the health condition of women's feet, wearing them at work, in accordance with the existing rules of the "business dress code". A holistic multidisciplinary analysis was performed. It takes into account: 1) women employees of banks and other large corporations (82 persons); 2) 2D FEM computer model developed by the authors of foot deformed by pointed high-heeled shoes; 3) web site found after entering the code "business dress code". Over 60% of women in the office wore high-heeled shoes. The following has been found among people walking to work in high heels: 1) reduction in the quality of life in about 70% of cases, through periodic occurrence of pain and reduction of functional capacity of the feet; 2) increase in the pressure on the plantar side of the forefoot at least twice; 3) the continued effects the forces deforming the forefoot. 1. An evolutionary change of "dress code" shoes is necessary in order to lead to a reduction in non-physiological overload of feet and the consequence of their disability. 2. These changes are particularly urgent in patients with so-called "sensitive foot".

  9. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Why zombies cannot write significant source code: The Knowledge Game and the art of computer programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbo, F.; Benini, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the knowledge needed to understand a computer program within the philosophy of information. L. Floridi's method of levels of abstraction is applied to the relation between an ideal programmer and a modern computer seen together as an informational organism. The results obtained

  11. Computer code analysis of steam generator in thermal-hydraulic test facility simulating nuclear power plant; Ydinvoimalaitosta kuvaavan koelaitteiston hoeyrystimien analysointi tietokoneohjelmilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, E.

    1995-12-31

    In the study three loss-of-feedwater type experiments which were preformed with the PACTEL facility has been calculated with two computer codes. The purpose of the experiments was to gain information about the behaviour of horizontal steam generator in a situation where the water level on the secondary side of the steam generator is decreasing. At the same time data that can be used in the assessment of thermal-hydraulic computer codes was assembled. The purpose of the work was to study the capabilities of two computer codes, APROS version 2.11 and RELAP5/MOD3.1, to calculate the phenomena in horizontal steam generator. In order to make the comparison of the calculation results easier the same kind of model of the steam generator was made for both codes. Only the steam generator was modelled, the rest of the facility was given for the codes as a boundary condition. (23 refs.).

  12. Convolutional-Code-Specific CRC Code Design

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Chung-Yu; Daneshrad, Babak; Wesel, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic redundancy check (CRC) codes check if a codeword is correctly received. This paper presents an algorithm to design CRC codes that are optimized for the code-specific error behavior of a specified feedforward convolutional code. The algorithm utilizes two distinct approaches to computing undetected error probability of a CRC code used with a specific convolutional code. The first approach enumerates the error patterns of the convolutional code and tests if each of them is detectable. Th...

  13. TCODE: a computer code for analysis of tritium and vacuum systems for tokamak fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmer, R.G.

    1978-08-01

    TCODE can be used for either near-term experimental reactors or for commercial reactors. The code provides options for items that may be included in a commercial reactor such as a divertor, neutral beam heating, and a breeding blanket. The code was used to calculate tritium and vacuum system parameters for the near term reactors ITR, TNS-UP and EPR as well as for some commercial reactor designs, the UWMAK series. A selected sample of the tritium and vacuum parameters for these reactor designs is shown. Also shown are parameters for a hypothetical reactor UWMAK-III M having similar characteristics to UWMAK-III but with a higher fractional burnup (5.0% cf. 0.83%). The impact of the reactor design scenario upon major tritium and vacuum systems is discussed.

  14. Electron-beam lithographic computer-generated holograms designed by direct search coding algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hitoshi; Torii, Yasuhiro

    2009-08-01

    An optimized encoding algorithm is required to produce high-quality computer generated holograms (CGH). For such purpose, we have proposed that usage of the direct search algorithm (DSA) is effective for encoding the Lohmann-type binary amplitude and phase CGH. However, it takes much time for a computation time to get an optical solution by a DSA. To solve this problem, we have newly found that simultaneously selective direct search algorithm (SDSA) is greatly effective to shorten a computing time for encoding a Lohmann-type CGH.

  15. Coding Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  16. Computer Program of SIE ASME-NH (Revision 1.0) Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H

    2008-01-15

    In this report, the SIE ASME (Structural Integrity Evaluations by ASME-NH) (Revision 1.0), which has a computerized implementation of ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Code Section III Subsection NH rules, is developed to apply to the next generation reactor design subjecting to the elevated temperature operations over 500 .deg. C and over 30 years design lifetime, and the user's manual for this program is described in detail.

  17. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Weir-Sen

    2016-03-02

    The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients' true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access.

  18. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, B. D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G. A.; Travis, J. R.; Spore, J. W.; Lam, K. L.; Royl, P.; Wilson, T. L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III

  19. Delta: An object-oriented finite element code architecture for massively parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherby, J.R.; Schutt, J.A.; Peery, J.S.; Hogan, R.E.

    1996-02-01

    Delta is an object-oriented code architecture based on the finite element method which enables simulation of a wide range of engineering mechanics problems in a parallel processing environment. Written in C{sup ++}, Delta is a natural framework for algorithm development and for research involving coupling of mechanics from different Engineering Science disciplines. To enhance flexibility and encourage code reuse, the architecture provides a clean separation of the major aspects of finite element programming. Spatial discretization, temporal discretization, and the solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations are each implemented separately, independent from the governing field equations. Other attractive features of the Delta architecture include support for constitutive models with internal variables, reusable ``matrix-free`` equation solvers, and support for region-to-region variations in the governing equations and the active degrees of freedom. A demonstration code built from the Delta architecture has been used in two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations involving dynamic and quasi-static solid mechanics, transient and steady heat transport, and flow in porous media.

  20. Direct search coding algorithm with reduction in computing time by simultaneous selection rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    An optimized encoding algorithm is required to produce high-quality computer-generated holograms (CGHs). For such a purpose, I have proposed that the use of the direct search algorithm (DSA) is effective for encoding the amplitude and phase in the Lohmann-type CGH. However, it takes much computation time to obtain an optimum solution by the DSA. To solve this problem, I have newly found that the simultaneous direct search algorithm (SDSA) is greatly effective for shortening the computation time for encoding the Lohmann-type CGH. As a result, the evaluation value of the reconstructed image for the SDSA is the same as that of 0.992 for the DSA. The computation time for the SDSA is drastically shortened from 3575 to 55 s for the DSA.

  1. Central Computing Facility operator training system. [Listings of CCFOTS codes for PDP-11/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, C.; Locke, T.; Maestas, M.; Schultz, D.

    1977-05-01

    The problems of providing operational support and operator training for a large-scale computing facility are described. Solutions to the training problem are outlined, and a minicomputer-based training system is discussed. This training system incorporates reference material and multiple choice questions covering all aspects of the computing facility operations. Operator acceptance and test results indicate that this new training method is successful. 2 figures.

  2. Computational Approaches Reveal New Insights into Regulation and Function of Non; coding RNAs and their Targets

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2016-11-28

    Regulation and function of protein-coding genes are increasingly well-understood, but no comparable evidence exists for non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes, which appear to be more numerous than protein-coding genes. We developed a novel machine-learning model to distinguish promoters of long ncRNA (lncRNA) genes from those of protein-coding genes. This represents the first attempt to make this distinction based on properties of the associated gene promoters. From our analyses, several transcription factors (TFs), which are known to be regulated by lncRNAs, also emerged as potential global regulators of lncRNAs, suggesting that lncRNAs and TFs may participate in bidirectional feedback regulatory network. Our results also raise the possibility that, due to the historical dependence on protein-coding gene in defining the chromatin states of active promoters, an adjustment of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate lncRNAs is warranted in the future. Secondly, we developed a novel method to infer functions for lncRNA and microRNA (miRNA) transcripts based on their transcriptional regulatory networks in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. This method for the first time combines information of cell/tissueVspecific expression of a transcript and the TFs and transcription coVfactors (TcoFs) that control activation of that transcript. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues and associated knowledgebase (FARNA) is developed. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across the widest spectrum of cells/tissues, has a potential to contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. Thirdly, we developed a novel machine-learning model to identify LD motif (a protein interaction motif) of paxillin, a ncRNA target that is involved in cell motility and cancer metastasis. Our recognition model identified new proteins not

  3. Wakefield Computations for the CLIC PETS using the Parallel Finite Element Time-Domain Code T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the high-performance parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code, T3P, for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on advanced higher-order Finite Element methods on unstructured grids with quadratic surface approximation. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) are presented.

  4. AXAIR: A Computer Code for SAR Assessment of Plume-Exposure Doses from Potential Process-Accident Releases to Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillinger, W.L.

    2001-05-17

    This report describes the AXAIR computer code which is available to terminal users for evaluating the doses to man from exposure to the atmospheric plume from postulated stack or building-vent releases at the Savannah River Plant. The emphasis herein is on documentation of the methodology only. The total-body doses evaluated are those that would be exceeded only 0.5 percent of the time based on worst-sector, worst-case meteorological probability analysis. The associated doses to other body organs are given in the dose breakdowns by radionuclide, body organ and pathway.

  5. HADES. A computer code for fast neutron cross section from the Optical Model; HADES. Un programa numerico para el calculo de seccciones eficaces neutronicas mediante el modelo optico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Navarro, C.

    1973-07-01

    A FORTRAN V computer code for UNIVAC 1108/6 using a local Optical Model with spin-orbit interaction is described. The code calculates fast neutron cross sections, angular distribution, and Legendre moments for heavy and intermediate spherical nuclei. It allows for the possibility of automatic variation of potential parameters for experimental data fitting. (Author) 55 refs.

  6. Verification and benchmarking of MAGNUM-2D: a finite element computer code for flow and heat transfer in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess prediction capabilities and features of the MAGNUM-2D computer code in relation to its intended use in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). This objective is accomplished through a code verification and benchmarking task. Results are documented which support correctness of prediction capabilities in areas of intended model application. 10 references, 43 figures, 11 tables.

  7. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  8. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  9. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  10. Validation of the solar heating and cooling high speed performance (HISPER) computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Developed to give a quick and accurate predictions HISPER, a simplification of the TRNSYS program, achieves its computational speed by not simulating detailed system operations or performing detailed load computations. In order to validate the HISPER computer for air systems the simulation was compared to the actual performance of an operational test site. Solar insolation, ambient temperature, water usage rate, and water main temperatures from the data tapes for an office building in Huntsville, Alabama were used as input. The HISPER program was found to predict the heating loads and solar fraction of the loads with errors of less than ten percent. Good correlation was found on both a seasonal basis and a monthly basis. Several parameters (such as infiltration rate and the outside ambient temperature above which heating is not required) were found to require careful selection for accurate simulation.

  11. A computer code for multiphase all-speed transient flows in complex geometries. MAST version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Jiang, Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of the MAST code, which computes transient solutions to the multiphase flow equations applicable to all-speed flows, is described. Two-phase flows are formulated based on the Eulerian-Lagrange scheme in which the continuous phase is described by the Navier-Stokes equation (or Reynolds equations for turbulent flows). Dispersed phase is formulated by a Lagrangian tracking scheme. The numerical solution algorithms utilized for fluid flows is a newly developed pressure-implicit algorithm based on the operator-splitting technique in generalized nonorthogonal coordinates. This operator split allows separate operation on each of the variable fields to handle pressure-velocity coupling. The obtained pressure correction equation has the hyperbolic nature and is effective for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic flow regimes. The present code adopts a nonstaggered grid arrangement; thus, the velocity components and other dependent variables are collocated at the same grid. A sequence of benchmark-quality problems, including incompressible, subsonic, transonic, supersonic, gas-droplet two-phase flows, as well as spray-combustion problems, were performed to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the present code.

  12. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. The Programmer's Reference contains detailed information useful when modifying the program. The program structure, the Fortran variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram are described.

  13. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D has been developed to solve the three dimensional, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort has been to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation have been emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized non-orthogonal body-fitted coordinates by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the Analysis Description, and presents the equations and solution procedure. It describes in detail the governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models.

  14. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. The Programmer's Reference contains detailed information useful when modifying the program. The program structure, the Fortran variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram are described.

  15. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the Analysis Description, and presents the equations and solution procedure. The governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models are described in detail.

  16. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  17. An interactive computer code for calculation of gas-phase chemical equilibrium (EQLBRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, B. S.; Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    A user friendly, menu driven, interactive computer program known as EQLBRM which calculates the adiabatic equilibrium temperature and product composition resulting from the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with air, at specified constant pressure and enthalpy is discussed. The program is developed primarily as an instructional tool to be run on small computers to allow the user to economically and efficiency explore the effects of varying fuel type, air/fuel ratio, inlet air and/or fuel temperature, and operating pressure on the performance of continuous combustion devices such as gas turbine combustors, Stirling engine burners, and power generation furnaces.

  18. AN EFFICIENT CODE TO COMPUTE NONPARALLEL STEADY FLOWS AND THEIR LINEAR-STABILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKSTRA, HA; MOLEMAKER, MJ; VANDERPLOEG, A; BOTTA, EFF

    A simple, fast and efficient algorithm to compute steady non-parallel flows and their linear stability in parameter space is described. The pseudo-arclength continuation method is used to trace branches of steady states as one of the parameters is varied. To determine the linear stability of each

  19. A new computer code for quantitative analysis of low-energy ion scattering data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, G; Breeman, M; Boerma, D.O

    We have developed a computer program for the full analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) data, i.e. an analysis that is equivalent to the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories of beam particles through a number of layers in the solid, and ending in the detector. A dedicated

  20. Computational methods and implementation of the 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragones, J.M.; Ahnert, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    New computational methods have been developed in our 3-D PWR core dynamics SIMTRAN code for online surveillance and prediction. They improve the accuracy and efficiency of the coupled neutronic-thermalhydraulic solution and extend its scope to provide, mainly, the calculation of: the fission reaction rates at the incore mini-detectors; the responses at the excore detectors (power range); the temperatures at the thermocouple locations; and the in-vessel distribution of the loop cold-leg inlet coolant conditions in the reflector and core channels, and to the hot-leg outlets per loop. The functional capabilities implemented in the extended SIMTRAN code for online utilization include: online surveillance, incore-excore calibration, evaluation of peak power factors and thermal margins, nominal update and cycle follow, prediction of maneuvers and diagnosis of fast transients and oscillations. The new code has been installed at the Vandellos-II PWR unit in Spain, since the startup of its cycle 7 in mid-June, 1994. The computational implementation has been performed on HP-700 workstations under the HP-UX Unix system, including the machine-man interfaces for online acquisition of measured data and interactive graphical utilization, in C and X11. The agreement of the simulated results with the measured data, during the startup tests and first months of actual operation, is well within the accuracy requirements. The performance and usefulness shown during the testing and demo phase, to be extended along this cycle, has proved that SIMTRAN and the man-machine graphic user interface have the qualities for a fast, accurate, user friendly, reliable, detailed and comprehensive online core surveillance and prediction.

  1. Development of dynamic control rod reactivity measurement methodology and computer code system for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, Chung Chan; Song, Jae Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-09-01

    In order to apply dynamic control rod reactivity measurement (DCRM) method to domestic nuclear power reactor, the methodology of EPRC, 'Dynamic Reactivity Measurement of Rod Worth', was reviewed. It was also reviewed that items should be improve in three-dimensional kinetics code MASTER, which was developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, for use in DCRM. The validity of DORT two-dimensional synthesis method to calculate excore detector weighting factor were benchmarked via Yonggwang Unit 3 three-dimensional TORT calculation. The consistency of MASTER static core calculation results using neutron cross sections generated by commercial design tools PHENIX/ANC and DIT/ROCS were also verified via rodded and unrodded radial power distributions and control rod worth comparisons. 14 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  2. Development of computer code SAFFRON for evaluating breached pin performance in FBR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukai, Shigeharu; Shikakura, Sakae (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center); Sano, Yuji; Takita, Masami

    1994-07-01

    In order to evaluate the breached pin behavior in FBR, the breached pin performance analysis code SAFFRON was developed. Based on the results of run-beyond-cladding-breach test in FBR-II as a collaborative program between PNC and U.S.DOE, the following behaviors were taken into consideration; fuel sodium reaction product (FSRP) formation, resultant fuel expansion, breach extension of cladding and release of delayed neutron precursors into the coolant. Using 3-dimensional elastic analyses by finite element method, breached pin diameter increase is adequately predicted with the reduced Young's modulus of the breached fuel. The delayed neutron signal response in on-line diagnosis was evaluated in relation to the growth of FSRP and breached area enlargement. (author).

  3. Computer vision for detecting and quantifying gamma-ray sources in coded-aperture images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaich, P.C.; Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Ziock, K.P.

    1994-11-02

    The authors report the development of an automatic image analysis system that detects gamma-ray source regions in images obtained from a coded aperture, gamma-ray imager. The number of gamma sources in the image is not known prior to analysis. The system counts the number (K) of gamma sources detected in the image and estimates the lower bound for the probability that the number of sources in the image is K. The system consists of a two-stage pattern classification scheme in which the Probabilistic Neural Network is used in the supervised learning mode. The algorithms were developed and tested using real gamma-ray images from controlled experiments in which the number and location of depleted uranium source disks in the scene are known.

  4. GSGPEs: A MATLAB code for computing the ground state of systems of Gross-Pitaevskii equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari, Marco; Rainer, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    GSGPEs is a Matlab/GNU Octave suite of programs for the computation of the ground state of systems of Gross-Pitaevskii equations. It can compute the ground state in the defocusing case, for any number of equations with harmonic or quasi-harmonic trapping potentials, in spatial dimension one, two or three. The computation is based on a spectral decomposition of the solution into Hermite functions and direct minimization of the energy functional through a Newton-like method with an approximate line-search strategy. Catalogue identifier: AENT_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1417 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13673 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab/GNU Octave. Computer: Any supporting Matlab/GNU Octave. Operating system: Any supporting Matlab/GNU Octave. RAM: About 100 MB for a single three-dimensional equation (test run output). Classification: 2.7, 4.9. Nature of problem: A system of Gross-Pitaevskii Equations (GPEs) is used to mathematically model a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) for a mixture of different interacting atomic species. The equations can be used both to compute the ground state solution (i.e., the stationary order parameter that minimizes the energy functional) and to simulate the dynamics. For particular shapes of the traps, three-dimensional BECs can be also simulated by lower dimensional GPEs. Solution method: The ground state of a system of Gross-Pitaevskii equations is computed through a spectral decomposition into Hermite functions and the direct minimization of the energy functional. Running time: About 30 seconds for a single three-dimensional equation with d.o.f. 40 for each spatial direction (test run output).

  5. Computational Account of Spontaneous Activity as a Signature of Predictive Coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Koren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous activity is commonly observed in a variety of cortical states. Experimental evidence suggested that neural assemblies undergo slow oscillations with Up ad Down states even when the network is isolated from the rest of the brain. Here we show that these spontaneous events can be generated by the recurrent connections within the network and understood as signatures of neural circuits that are correcting their internal representation. A noiseless spiking neural network can represent its input signals most accurately when excitatory and inhibitory currents are as strong and as tightly balanced as possible. However, in the presence of realistic neural noise and synaptic delays, this may result in prohibitively large spike counts. An optimal working regime can be found by considering terms that control firing rates in the objective function from which the network is derived and then minimizing simultaneously the coding error and the cost of neural activity. In biological terms, this is equivalent to tuning neural thresholds and after-spike hyperpolarization. In suboptimal working regimes, we observe spontaneous activity even in the absence of feed-forward inputs. In an all-to-all randomly connected network, the entire population is involved in Up states. In spatially organized networks with local connectivity, Up states spread through local connections between neurons of similar selectivity and take the form of a traveling wave. Up states are observed for a wide range of parameters and have similar statistical properties in both active and quiescent state. In the optimal working regime, Up states are vanishing, leaving place to asynchronous activity, suggesting that this working regime is a signature of maximally efficient coding. Although they result in a massive increase in the firing activity, the read-out of spontaneous Up states is in fact orthogonal to the stimulus representation, therefore interfering minimally with the network

  6. Modelling artificial night-sky brightness with a polarized multiple scattering radiative transfer computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerola, Dana Xavier

    2006-02-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of radiative effects produced by hazy atmospheres, computational procedures have been developed for use in determining the brightening of the night sky as a result of urban illumination. The downwardly and upwardly directed radiances of multiply scattered light from an offending metropolitan source are computed by a straightforward Gauss-Seidel (G-S) iterative technique applied directly to the integrated form of Chandrasekhar's vectorized radiative transfer equation. Initial benchmark night-sky brightness tests of the present G-S model using fully consistent optical emission and extinction input parameters yield very encouraging results when compared with the double scattering treatment of Garstang, the only full-fledged previously available model.

  7. Novel Spectro-Temporal Codes and Computations for Auditory Signal Representation and Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) for a five-formant synthetic vowel a)Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Rhode...different CF regions driven by different dominant, formant-region harmonics of the multi-formant vowel . Note that in Figure 1a other non-dominant...harmonics in the vowel formant regions are not explicitly represented. (a) (b) Peristimulus time (ms) --> fre qu en cy in k H z Low freq High freq High freq

  8. Deciphering the plant splicing code: Experimental and computational approaches for predicting alternative splicing and splicing regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anireddy S.N. Reddy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive alternative splicing (AS of precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs in multicellular eukaryotes increases the protein-coding capacity of a genome and allows novel ways to regulate gene expression. In fowering plants, up to 48% of intron-containing genes exhibit AS. However, the full extent of AS in plants is not yet known, as only a few high throughput RNA-Seq studies have been performed. As the cost of obtaining RNA-Seq reads continues to fall, it is anticipated that huge amounts of plant sequence data will accumulate and help in obtaining a more complete picture of AS in plants. Although it is not an onerous task to obtain hundreds of millions of reads using high throughput sequencing technologies, computational tools to accurately predict and visualize AS are still being developed and refined. This review will discuss the tools to predict and visualize transcriptome-wide AS in plants using short reads and highlight their limitations. Comparative studies of AS events between plants and animals have revealed that there are major differences in the most prevalent types of AS events, suggesting that plants and animals differ in the way they recognize exons and introns. Extensive studies have been performed in animals to identify cis-elements involved in regulating AS, especially in exon skipping. However, such studies are in their infancy in plants. Here, we review the current state of research on splicing regulatory elements (SREs and briefly discuss emerging experimental and computational tools to identify cis-elements involved in regulation of AS in plants. The availability of curated alternative splice forms in plants makes it possible to use computational tools to predict SREs involved in AS regulation, which can then be verified experimentally. Such studies will permit identification of plant-specific features involved in AS regulation and contribute to deciphering the splicing code in plants.

  9. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Variable selection in Bayesian smoothing spline ANOVA models: Application to deterministic computer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Brian J.; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bondell, Howard D.

    2009-01-01

    With many predictors, choosing an appropriate subset of the covariates is a crucial, and difficult, step in nonparametric regression. We propose a Bayesian nonparametric regression model for curve-fitting and variable selection. We use the smoothing spline ANOVA framework to decompose the regression function into interpretable main effect and interaction functions. Stochastic search variable selection via MCMC sampling is used to search for models that fit the data well. Also, we show that variable selection is highly-sensitive to hyperparameter choice and develop a technique to select hyperparameters that control the long-run false positive rate. The method is used to build an emulator for a complex computer model for two-phase fluid flow. PMID:19789732

  11. Measurement of depth-dose of linear accelerator and simulation by use of Geant4 computer code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardari, D; Maleki, R; Samavat, H; Esmaeeli, A

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an established method of cancer treatment. New technologies in cancer radiotherapy need a more accurate computation of the dose delivered in the radiotherapy treatment plan. This study presents some results of a Geant4-based application for simulation of the absorbed dose distribution given by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC geometry is accurately described in the Monte Carlo code with use of the accelerator manufacturer's specifications. The capability of the software for evaluating the dose distribution has been verified by comparisons with measurements in a water phantom; the comparisons were performed for percentage depth dose (PDD) and profiles for various field sizes and depths, for a 6-MV electron beam. Experimental and calculated dose values were in good agreement both in PDD and in transverse sections of the water phantom.

  12. Quasi-optical converters for high-power gyrotrons: a brief review of physical models, numerical methods and computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabchevski, S [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Benova, E [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Atanassov, V [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dankov, P [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Thumm, M [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arnold, A [University of Karlsruhe, Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jin, J [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rzesnicki, T [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Quasi-optical (QO) mode converters are used to transform electromagnetic waves of complex structure and polarization generated in gyrotron cavities into a linearly polarized, Gaussian-like beam suitable for transmission. The efficiency of this conversion as well as the maintenance of low level of diffraction losses are crucial for the implementation of powerful gyrotrons as radiation sources for electron-cyclotron-resonance heating of fusion plasmas. The use of adequate physical models, efficient numerical schemes and up-to-date computer codes may provide the high accuracy necessary for the design and analysis of these devices. In this review, we briefly sketch the most commonly used QO converters, the mathematical base they have been treated on and the basic features of the numerical schemes used. Further on, we discuss the applicability of several commercially available and free software packages, their advantages and drawbacks, for solving QO related problems.

  13. Development of a computer code to predict a ventilation requirement for an underground radioactive waste storage tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.J.; Dalpiaz, E.L. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Computer code, WTVFE (Waste Tank Ventilation Flow Evaluation), has been developed to evaluate the ventilation requirement for an underground storage tank for radioactive waste. Heat generated by the radioactive waste and mixing pumps in the tank is removed mainly through the ventilation system. The heat removal process by the ventilation system includes the evaporation of water from the waste and the heat transfer by natural convection from the waste surface. Also, a portion of the heat will be removed through the soil and the air circulating through the gap between the primary and secondary tanks. The heat loss caused by evaporation is modeled based on recent evaporation test results by the Westinghouse Hanford Company using a simulated small scale waste tank. Other heat transfer phenomena are evaluated based on well established conduction and convection heat transfer relationships. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Application for pinch design of heat exchanger networks by use of a computer code employing an improved problem algorithm table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, Semra; Dincer, Salih [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chemical-Metallurgical Faculty, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Kampusu, No 127, 34210 Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    In this work, the methods used in pinch design were applied to a heat exchanger network with the aid of an improved problem algorithm table. This table enables one to compose composite and grand composite curves in a simplified way. A user friendly computer code entitled DarboTEK, compiled by using Visual Basic 3.0, was developed for the design of integrated heat exchanger networks and estimation of related capital costs. Based on the data obtained from the TUPRAS petroleum refinery at Izmit, a retrofit design of heat exchanger networks was accomplished using DarboTEK. An investment of 3,576,627 dollars is needed which will be paid back in 1.69 years simply by energy conservation due to heat integration. (Author)

  15. A computer code for forward calculation and inversion of the H/V spectral ratio under the diffuse field assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Piña-Flores, José; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Luzón, Francisco; Perton, Mathieu

    2016-12-01

    During a quarter of a century, the main characteristics of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of ambient noise HVSRN have been extensively used for site effect assessment. In spite of the uncertainties about the optimum theoretical model to describe these observations, over the last decade several schemes for inversion of the full HVSRN curve for near surface surveying have been developed. In this work, a computer code for forward calculation of H/V spectra based on the diffuse field assumption (DFA) is presented and tested. It takes advantage of the recently stated connection between the HVSRN and the elastodynamic Green's function which arises from the ambient noise interferometry theory. The algorithm allows for (1) a natural calculation of the Green's functions imaginary parts by using suitable contour integrals in the complex wavenumber plane, and (2) separate calculation of the contributions of Rayleigh, Love, P-SV and SH waves as well. The stability of the algorithm at high frequencies is preserved by means of an adaptation of the Wang's orthonormalization method to the calculation of dispersion curves, surface-waves medium responses and contributions of body waves. This code has been combined with a variety of inversion methods to make up a powerful tool for passive seismic surveying.

  16. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xu, Guang-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  17. Theoretical background and user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in porous rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, Toshihiko [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hatanaka, Koichiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    In order to document a basic manual about input data, output data, execution of computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation in heterogeneous porous rock, we investigated the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport which calculates water flow in three dimension, the path of moving radionuclide, and one dimensional radionuclide migration. In this report, based on above investigation we describe the geostatistical background about simulating heterogeneous permeability field. And we describe construction of files, input and output data, a example of calculating of the programs which simulates heterogeneous permeability field, and calculates groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Therefore, we can document a manual by investigating the theoretical background about geostatistical computer codes and the user's manual for the computer code on groundwater flow and radionuclide transport calculation. And we can model heterogeneous porous rock and analyze groundwater flow and radionuclide transport by utilizing the information from this report. (author)

  18. BIGHORN Computational Fluid Dynamics Theory, Methodology, and Code Verification & Validation Benchmark Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yidong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This document presents the theoretical background for a hybrid finite-element / finite-volume fluid flow solver, namely BIGHORN, based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) computational framework developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An overview of the numerical methods used in BIGHORN are discussed and followed by a presentation of the formulation details. The document begins with the governing equations for the compressible fluid flow, with an outline of the requisite constitutive relations. A second-order finite volume method used for solving the compressible fluid flow problems is presented next. A Pressure-Corrected Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (PCICE) formulation for time integration is also presented. The multi-fluid formulation is being developed. Although multi-fluid is not fully-developed, BIGHORN has been designed to handle multi-fluid problems. Due to the flexibility in the underlying MOOSE framework, BIGHORN is quite extensible, and can accommodate both multi-species and multi-phase formulations. This document also presents a suite of verification & validation benchmark test problems for BIGHORN. The intent for this suite of problems is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the BIGHORN solution methods on problems that vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. Wherever possible, some form of solution verification has been attempted to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and suggest best practices when using BIGHORN.

  19. Processing experimental data and analysis of simulation codes from Nuclear Physics using distributed and parallel computing

    CERN Document Server

    Niculescu, Mihai; Hristov, Peter

    In this thesis we tried to show the impact of new technologies on scientific work in the large field of heavy ion physics and as a case study, we present the implementation of the event plane method, on a highly parallel technology: the graphic processor. By the end of the thesis, a comparison of the analysis results with the elliptic flow published by ALICE is made. In Chapter 1 we presented the computing needs at the heavy ion physics experiment ALICE and showed the current state of software and technologies. The new technologies available for some time, Chapter 2, present new performance capabilities and generated a trend in preparing for the new wave of technologies and software, which most indicators show will dominate the future. This was not disregarded by the scientific community and in consequence section 2.2 shows the rising interest in the new technologies by the High Energy Physics community. A real case study was needed to better understand how the new technologies can be applied in HEP and aniso...

  20. The November 2002 Pyroclastic Flows at El Reventador, Ecuador: Computer Simulations Using the TITAN Thin-layer Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, B.; Sheridan, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    On November 3, 2002, El Reventador volcano, located on the eastern flank of the Ecuadorian Andes, produced a sudden, violent eruption culminating in a 17km high column containing mostly steam and ash. Explosions in the initial phase created a summit crater while generating four lithic-rich andesitic pyroclastic flows. The longest of these flows traveled ESE out of the breached caldera, obliquely overriding the 200-400m southern caldera wall, reaching the Quijos River 8km distant. This flow crossed the major oil pipelines of Ecuador, displacing a pressurized crude oil pipeline more than 100m. The flows contained mostly lithic fragments with only minor juvenile pumice. The accompanying ash-cloud surge deposited a thin layer on top of the PF deposit, indicating an abundance of gas within the flow. The eruption came with practically no warning and yet had a large socio- economic impact for Ecuador. While the flows themselves resulted in no loss of life, the lack of significant precursor activity underscores the necessity for detailed pre-eruption knowledge of the potential hazards and risk zones around a particular volcano so as to be prepared in the event of such "surprise" eruptions. In conjunction with field mapping, computer models of volcanogenic flows can be used not only to identify risk zones but to understand the evolution of these flows. A new set of computer simulations using the TITAN (www.gmfg.buffalo.edu) thin-layer code allows a more complete exploration of important flow properties associated with this type of eruption. Realizations of this code simulate the path, extent, flow thickness, velocity, and momentum of the flows given the set of initial conditions (volume, starting location, flux hydrograph, internal friction, and basal friction). The TITAN code was used to simulate the four lithic-rich pyroclastic flows generated at the beginning of the 2002 eruption. Using field estimated volumes and starting positions of the PFs, simulations of the two

  1. RAMONA-4B a computer code with three-dimensional neutron kinetics for BWR and SBWR system transient - user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.; Neymotin, L.Y.

    1998-03-01

    This document is the User`s Manual for the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) systems transient code RAMONA-4B. The code uses a three-dimensional neutron-kinetics model coupled with a multichannel, nonequilibrium, drift-flux, phase-flow model of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor vessel. The code is designed to analyze a wide spectrum of BWR core and system transients. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the code`s capabilities and limitations; Chapter 2 describes the code`s structure, lists major subroutines, and discusses the computer requirements. Chapter 3 is on code, auxillary codes, and instructions for running RAMONA-4B on Sun SPARC and IBM Workstations. Chapter 4 contains component descriptions and detailed card-by-card input instructions. Chapter 5 provides samples of the tabulated output for the steady-state and transient calculations and discusses the plotting procedures for the steady-state and transient calculations. Three appendices contain important user and programmer information: lists of plot variables (Appendix A) listings of input deck for sample problem (Appendix B), and a description of the plotting program PAD (Appendix C). 24 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Apolux : an innovative computer code for daylight design and analysis in architecture and urbanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, A.; Pereira, F.O.R.; Ledo, R.Z. [Santa Catarina Federal Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The main capabilities of a new computer program for calculating and analyzing daylighting in architectural space were discussed. Apolux 1.0 was designed to use three-dimensional files generated in graphic editors in the data exchange file (DXF) format and was developed to integrate an architect's design characteristics. An example of its use in a design context development was presented. The program offers fast and flexible manipulation of video card models in different visualization conditions. The algorithm for working with the physics of light is based on the radiosity method representing the surfaces through finite elements divided in small triangular units of area which are fully confronted to each other. The form factors of each triangle are determined in relation to all others in the primary calculation. Visible directions of the sky are also included according to the modular units of a subdivided globe. Following these primary calculations, the different and successive daylighting solutions can be determined under different sky conditions. The program can also change the properties of the materials to quickly recalculate the solutions. The program has been applied in an office building in Florianopolis, Brazil. The four stages of design include initial discussion with the architects about the conceptual possibilities; development of a comparative study based on 2 architectural designs with different conceptual elements regarding daylighting exploitation in order to compare internal daylighting levels and distribution of the 2 options exposed to the same external conditions; study the solar shading devices for specific facades; and, simulations to test the performance of different designs. The program has proven to be very flexible with reliable results. It has the possibility of incorporating situations of the real sky through the input of the Spherical model of real sky luminance values. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  3. A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1989-02-01

    This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  4. ACDOS1: a computer code to calculate dose rates from neutron activation of neutral beamlines and other fusion-reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keney, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    A computer code has been written to calculate neutron induced activation of neutral-beam injector components and the corresponding dose rates as a function of geometry, component composition, and time after shutdown. The code, ACDOS1, was written in FORTRAN IV to calculate both activity and dose rates for up to 30 target nuclides and 50 neutron groups. Sufficient versatility has also been incorporated into the code to make it applicable to a variety of general activation problems due to neutrons of energy less than 20 MeV.

  5. Ethical sensitivity intervention in science teacher education: Using computer simulations and professional codes of ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Shawn Yvette

    A simulation was created to emulate two Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test (REST) videos (Brabeck et al., 2000). The REST is a reliable assessment for ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerant behaviors in educational settings. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the REST was performed using the Quick-REST survey and an interview protocol. The purpose of this study was to affect science educator ability to recognize instances of racial and gender intolerant behaviors by levering immersive qualities of simulations. The fictitious Hazelton High School virtual environment was created by the researcher and compared with the traditional REST. The study investigated whether computer simulations can influence the ethical sensitivity of preservice and inservice science teachers to racial and gender intolerant behaviors in school settings. The post-test only research design involved 32 third-year science education students enrolled in science education classes at several southeastern universities and 31 science teachers from the same locale, some of which were part of an NSF project. Participant samples were assigned to the video control group or the simulation experimental group. This resulted in four comparison group; preservice video, preservice simulation, inservice video and inservice simulation. Participants experienced two REST scenarios in the appropriate format then responded to Quick-REST survey questions for both scenarios. Additionally, the simulation groups answered in-simulation and post-simulation questions. Nonparametric analysis of the Quick-REST ascertained differences between comparison groups. Cronbach's alpha was calculated for internal consistency. The REST interview protocol was used to analyze recognition of intolerant behaviors in the in-simulation prompts. Post-simulation prompts were analyzed for emergent themes concerning effect of the simulation on responses. The preservice video group had a significantly higher mean rank score than

  6. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    Speaking Code begins by invoking the “Hello World” convention used by programmers when learning a new language, helping to establish the interplay of text and code that runs through the book. Interweaving the voice of critical writing from the humanities with the tradition of computing and software...... development, Speaking Code unfolds an argument to undermine the distinctions between criticism and practice, and to emphasize the aesthetic and political aspects of software studies. Not reducible to its functional aspects, program code mirrors the instability inherent in the relationship of speech......; alternatives to mainstream development, from performances of the live-coding scene to the organizational forms of commons-based peer production; the democratic promise of social media and their paradoxical role in suppressing political expression; and the market’s emptying out of possibilities for free...

  7. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  8. Comparison of the protein-coding gene content of Chlamydia trachomatis and Protochlamydia amoebophila using a Raspberry Pi computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, James F; Barker, Daniel

    2015-10-13

    To demonstrate the bioinformatics capabilities of a low-cost computer, the Raspberry Pi, we present a comparison of the protein-coding gene content of two species in phylum Chlamydiae: Chlamydia trachomatis, a common sexually transmitted infection of humans, and Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila, a recently discovered amoebal endosymbiont. Identifying species-specific proteins and differences in protein families could provide insights into the unique phenotypes of the two species. Using a Raspberry Pi computer, sequence similarity-based protein families were predicted across the two species, C. trachomatis and P. amoebophila, and their members counted. Examples include nine multi-protein families unique to C. trachomatis, 132 multi-protein families unique to P. amoebophila and one family with multiple copies in both. Most families unique to C. trachomatis were polymorphic outer-membrane proteins. Additionally, multiple protein families lacking functional annotation were found. Predicted functional interactions suggest one of these families is involved with the exodeoxyribonuclease V complex. The Raspberry Pi computer is adequate for a comparative genomics project of this scope. The protein families unique to P. amoebophila may provide a basis for investigating the host-endosymbiont interaction. However, additional species should be included; and further laboratory research is required to identify the functions of unknown or putative proteins. Multiple outer membrane proteins were found in C. trachomatis, suggesting importance for host evasion. The tyrosine transport protein family is shared between both species, with four proteins in C. trachomatis and two in P. amoebophila. Shared protein families could provide a starting point for discovery of wide-spectrum drugs against Chlamydiae.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouse, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCoy, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Verdon, C. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  10. A Monte Carlo computer code for evaluating energy loss of 10 keV to 10 MeV ions in amorphous silicon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erramli, H. [Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, BP 2390, University Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco)], E-mail: hassane@ucam.ac.ma; Elbounagui, O.; Misdaq, M.A. [Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, BP 2390, University Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Merzouki, A. [Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, BP 2390, University Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Remote Sensing and Geomatics of the Environment Laboratory, Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, Marion Hall, 140 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON, KIN6N5 (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    The basic concepts of a computer simulation code for determining the energy loss of ions in the 10 keV to 10 MeV energy range in amorphous silicon materials were presented and discussed. Data obtained were found in good agreement with those obtained by using a SRIM programme. Electronic and nuclear energy losses were evaluated. Variation of the energy loss as a function of the incident ion energy were studied. This new computer code is a good tool for evaluating stopping powers of various materials for light and heavy ions.

  11. UCODE_2005 and six other computer codes for universal sensitivity analysis, calibration, and uncertainty evaluation constructed using the JUPITER API

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, Eileen E.; Hill, Mary C.; Banta, Edward R.; Mehl, Steffen; Christensen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the computer codes UCODE_2005 and six post-processors. Together the codes can be used with existing process models to perform sensitivity analysis, data needs assessment, calibration, prediction, and uncertainty analysis. Any process model or set of models can be used; the only requirements are that models have numerical (ASCII or text only) input and output files, that the numbers in these files have sufficient significant digits, that all required models can be run from a single batch file or script, and that simulated values are continuous functions of the parameter values. Process models can include pre-processors and post-processors as well as one or more models related to the processes of interest (physical, chemical, and so on), making UCODE_2005 extremely powerful. An estimated parameter can be a quantity that appears in the input files of the process model(s), or a quantity used in an equation that produces a value that appears in the input files. In the latter situation, the equation is user-defined. UCODE_2005 can compare observations and simulated equivalents. The simulated equivalents can be any simulated value written in the process-model output files or can be calculated from simulated values with user-defined equations. The quantities can be model results, or dependent variables. For example, for ground-water models they can be heads, flows, concentrations, and so on. Prior, or direct, information on estimated parameters also can be considered. Statistics are calculated to quantify the comparison of observations and simulated equivalents, including a weighted least-squares objective function. In addition, data-exchange files are produced that facilitate graphical analysis. UCODE_2005 can be used fruitfully in model calibration through its sensitivity analysis capabilities and its ability to estimate parameter values that result in the best possible fit to the observations. Parameters are estimated using nonlinear regression: a

  12. The effect of computer-based resuscitation simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2014-01-01

    Computer-based simulation has intuitive appeal to both educators and learners with the flexibility of time, place, immediate feedback, and self-paced and consistent curriculum. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of computer-based simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between computer-based simulation plus instructor-led cardiopulmonary resuscitation training group and instructor-led resuscitation training-only group. This study was a nonequivalent control group posttest-only design. There were 213 second year nursing students randomly assigned to one of two groups: 109 nursing students with computer-based simulation or 104 with control group. Overall nursing students' performance score was higher in the computer-based simulation group than in the control group but reached no statistical significance (t = 1.086, p = .283). There were no significant differences in resuscitation-specific self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between the two groups. Computer-based simulation combined with hands-on practice did not affect in nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction in nursing students. Further study must be conducted to inform instructional design and help integrate computer-based simulation and rigorous scoring rubrics.

  13. Modernization of the graphics post-processors of the Hamburg German Climate Computer Center Carbon Cycle Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, E.J.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    The existing National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) code in the Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model and the Hamburg Large-Scale Geostrophic Ocean General Circulation Model was modernized and reduced in size while still producing an equivalent end result. A reduction in the size of the existing code from more than 50,000 lines to approximately 7,500 lines in the new code has made the new code much easier to maintain. The existing code in Hamburg model uses legacy NCAR (including even emulated CALCOMP subrountines) graphics to display graphical output. The new code uses only current (version 3.1) NCAR subrountines.

  14. SUSD3D Computer Code as Part of the XSUN-2017 Windows Interface Environment for Deterministic Radiation Transport and Cross-Section Sensitivity-Uncertainty Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Kodeli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Windows interface XSUN-2017 facilitating the deterministic radiation transport and cross-section sensitivity-uncertainty (S/U calculation is presented. The package was developed to assist the users in the preparation of input cards, rapid modification, and execution of the complete chain of codes including TRANSX, PARTISN, and SUSD3D, all available from the OECD/NEA Data Bank and RSICC. The objective of this work was to make the input and output handling for these codes as user-friendly as possible, passing information among codes internally. XSUN-2017 allows a user-friendly viewing of results obtained from the PARTISN and SUSD3D programs. The first version of the Windows interface XSUN-2013 was developed in 2013 and submitted to OECD/NEA Data Bank Computer Code Collection and RSICC in early 2014. An updated version, XSUN-2017, will be released in 2017. The package includes also the new version of the SUSD3D code. The XSUN-2017 and SUSD3D code systems and recent improvements and updates are described. Examples of the use and validation are presented, including the S/U intercomparison exercise using the SNEAK-7 benchmarks involving the XSUN-2017 code system comparison with the codes such as TSUNAMI, SERPENT, and MCNP6, and the S/U analysis of the keff and βeff parameters for the MYRRHA accelerator driven system (ADS.

  15. The DEPOSIT computer code: Calculations of electron-loss cross-sections for complex ions colliding with neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsarev, Mikhail S.

    2013-02-01

    A description of the DEPOSIT computer code is presented. The code is intended to calculate total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections (m is the number of ionized electrons) and the energy T(b) deposited to the projectile (positive or negative ion) during a collision with a neutral atom at low and intermediate collision energies as a function of the impact parameter b. The deposited energy is calculated as a 3D integral over the projectile coordinate space in the classical energy-deposition model. Examples of the calculated deposited energies, ionization probabilities and electron-loss cross-sections are given as well as the description of the input and output data. Program summaryProgram title: DEPOSIT Catalogue identifier: AENP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8726 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer that can run C++ compiler. Operating system: Any operating system that can run C++. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: An MPI version is included in the distribution. Classification: 2.4, 2.6, 4.10, 4.11. Nature of problem: For a given impact parameter b to calculate the deposited energy T(b) as a 3D integral over a coordinate space, and ionization probabilities Pm(b). For a given energy to calculate the total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections using T(b) values. Solution method: Direct calculation of the 3D integral T(b). The one-dimensional quadrature formula of the highest accuracy based upon the nodes of the Yacobi polynomials for the cosθ=x∈[-1,1] angular variable is applied. The Simpson rule for the φ∈[0,2π] angular variable is used. The Newton-Cotes pattern of the seventh order

  16. Estimation of doses received by operators in the 1958 RB reactor accident using the MCNP5 computer code simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation of the radiological consequences of the RB reactor reactivity excursion accident, which occurred on October 15, 1958, and an estimation of the total doses received by the operators were run by the MCNP5 computer code. The simulation was carried out under the same assumptions as those used in the 1960 IAEA-organized experimental simulation of the accident: total fission energy of 80 MJ released in the accident and the frozen positions of the operators. The time interval of exposure to high doses received by the operators has been estimated. Data on the RB1/1958 reactor core relevant to the accident are given. A short summary of the accident scenario has been updated. A 3-D model of the reactor room and the RB reactor tank, with all the details of the core, created. For dose determination, 3-D simplified, homogenised, sexless and faceless phantoms, placed inside the reactor room, have been developed. The code was run for a number of neutron histories which have given a dose rate uncertainty of less than 2%. For the determination of radiation spectra escaping the reactor core and radiation interaction in the tissue of the phantoms, the MCNP5 code was run (in the KCODE option and “mode n p e”, with a 55-group neutron spectra, 35-group gamma ray spectra and a 10-group electron spectra. The doses were determined by using the conversion of flux density (obtained by the F4 tally in the phantoms to doses using factors taken from ICRP-74 and from the deposited energy of neutrons and gamma rays (obtained by the F6 tally in the phantoms’ tissue. A rough estimation of the time moment when the odour of ozone was sensed by the operators is estimated for the first time and given in Appendix A.1. Calculated total absorbed and equivalent doses are compared to the previously reported ones and an attempt to understand and explain the reasons for the obtained differences has been made. A Root Cause Analysis of the accident was done and

  17. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 1, Part 2: Control modules S1--H1; Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

  18. Review of the status of validation of the computer codes used in the severe accident source term reassessment study (BMI-2104). [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, T. S. [comp.

    1985-04-01

    The determination of severe accident source terms must, by necessity it seems, rely heavily on the use of complex computer codes. Source term acceptability, therefore, rests on the assessed validity of such codes. Consequently, one element of NRC's recent efforts to reassess LWR severe accident source terms is to provide a review of the status of validation of the computer codes used in the reassessment. The results of this review is the subject of this document. The separate review documents compiled in this report were used as a resource along with the results of the BMI-2104 study by BCL and the QUEST study by SNL to arrive at a more-or-less independent appraisal of the status of source term modeling at this time.

  19. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 2, Part 3: Functional modules F16--F17; Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

  20. Improvement of level-1 PSA computer code package - Modeling and analysis for dynamic reliability of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Baek, Sang Yeup; Shin, In Sup; Moon, Shin Myung; Moon, Jae Phil; Koo, Hoon Young; Kim, Ju Shin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jung Sik [Seoul National Polytechnology University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Jin [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a methodology of the dynamic reliability analysis for NPP. The first year`s research was focused on developing a procedure for analyzing failure data of running components and a simulator for estimating the reliability of series-parallel structures. The second year`s research was concentrated on estimating the lifetime distribution and PM effect of a component from its failure data in various cases, and the lifetime distribution of a system with a particular structure. Computer codes for performing these jobs were also developed. The objectives of the third year`s research is to develop models for analyzing special failure types (CCFs, Standby redundant structure) that were nor considered in the first two years, and to complete a methodology of the dynamic reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. The analysis of failure data of components and related researches for supporting the simulator must be preceded for providing proper input to the simulator. Thus this research is divided into three major parts. 1. Analysis of the time dependent life distribution and the PM effect. 2. Development of a simulator for system reliability analysis. 3. Related researches for supporting the simulator : accelerated simulation analytic approach using PH-type distribution, analysis for dynamic repair effects. 154 refs., 5 tabs., 87 figs. (author)

  1. How to put plant root uptake into a soil water flow model: A documentation with complete computer code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The need for improved crop water use efficiency calls for flexible modeling platforms to implement new ideas in plant root uptake and its regulation mechanisms. This paper documents the details of modifying a soil infiltration and redistribution model to include (a) dynamic root growth, (b) non-uniform root distribution and water uptake, (c) the effect of water stress on plant water uptake, and (d) soil evaporation. The paper also demonstrates strategies of using the modified model to simulate soil water dynamics and plant transpiration considering different sensitivity of plants to soil dryness and different mechanisms of root water uptake. In particular, the flexibility of simulating various degrees of compensated uptake (whereby plants tend to maintain potential transpiration under mild water stress) is emphasized. The paper also describes how to estimate unknown root distribution and rooting depth parameters by the use of a simulation-based searching method. The full documentation of the computer code will allow further applications and new development.

  2. Comparing the effects of derived relational training and computer coding on intellectual potential in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer; Stewart, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Previous research found that pre-teenage ability to derive arbitrary 'same', 'opposite', 'more', and 'less' relations correlated with measured intelligence quotient (IQ) and that training this derived relational responding (DRR) skill produced substantial IQ rises. This study extended previous work by comparing the effects of DRR training (using strengthening mental abilities with relational training [SMART], an automated online training protocol) with the effects of a similar quantity of training in 'Scratch' computer coding. Twenty-eight children (13 girls) aged 10-11 (M = 10.34) participated, all members of the same class in a primary school in Co. Limerick, Ireland. Participants were tested before and after training for DRR ability as well as on standardized tests of IQ and academic attainment. Training time was limited to 29 hrs over two academic semesters in twice-weekly 1-hr instalments. Significant improvements were seen in measures of overall intellectual performance; in digit span and letter/number sequencing; and in academic attainment, including spelling, reading, and numerical operations, in the SMART/DRR group alone, and there was significantly more improvement on these measures in the SMART/DRR group than in the Scratch group. These findings extend the evidence that training DRR can produce improvements in intellectual and academic ability. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Predicting thermal performance of heat exchangers using in-situ testing and statistical correlation: Computer code ST{_}XPERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K.P.; Iulianetti, K.M. [Holtec International, Cherry Hill, NJ (United States); Scott, B.H. [Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Lusby, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the methodology to ascertain the heat transfer capability of a tubular heat exchanger from steady state field test data. Periodic assessment of the heat duty capability of heat exchangers utilizing a fluid stream capable of inducing appreciable fouling and deemed to be critical to safety in operating nuclear power plants has become a common practice in the wake of USNRC`s issuance of the Generic Letter 89-13. Since the measured test data invariably have a measure of uncertainty due to bias in the measurement instrumentation and errors in the measuring process and the heat transfer coefficient can only be calculated as an approximate value with an associated uncertainty, the calculation of the fouling factor must utilize concepts from statistics of multivariate random phenomena. For simplicity, and without loss of appreciable accuracy, all variables and measurement parameters are assumed to follow Gaussian probability distribution. The solution process permits and utilizes redundant measurements to improve the quality of the result. Although work was specifically carried out to deal with the thermal performance safety issues raised by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1989, it can be utilized in the performance assessment of any heat exchanger in any industrial application where in-situ testing is carried out. The methodology described herein is implemented in the computer code ST{_}XPERT, whose features are also described in this paper.

  4. A computer code for forward calculation and inversion of the H/V spectral ratio under the diffuse field assumption

    CERN Document Server

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J; Luzón, Francisco; Perton, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    During a quarter of a century, the main characteristics of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of ambient noise HVSRN have been extensively used for site effect assessment. In spite of the uncertainties about the optimum theoretical model to describe these observations, several schemes for inversion of the full HVSRN curve for near surface surveying have been developed over the last decade. In this work, a computer code for forward calculation of H/V spectra based on the diffuse field assumption (DFA) is presented and tested.It takes advantage of the recently stated connection between the HVSRN and the elastodynamic Green's function which arises from the ambient noise interferometry theory. The algorithm allows for (1) a natural calculation of the Green's functions imaginary parts by using suitable contour integrals in the complex wavenumber plane, and (2) separate calculation of the contributions of Rayleigh, Love, P-SV and SH waves as well. The stability of the algorithm at high frequencies is preserv...

  5. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 2: Code description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  6. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Coding Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony McCosker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As well as introducing the Coding Labour section, the authors explore the diffusion of code across the material contexts of everyday life, through the objects and tools of mediation, the systems and practices of cultural production and organisational management, and in the material conditions of labour. Taking code beyond computation and software, their specific focus is on the increasingly familiar connections between code and labour with a focus on the codification and modulation of affect through technologies and practices of management within the contemporary work organisation. In the grey literature of spreadsheets, minutes, workload models, email and the like they identify a violence of forms through which workplace affect, in its constant flux of crisis and ‘prodromal’ modes, is regulated and governed.

  8. Numerical simulation of fragmentation of hot metal and oxide melts with the computer code IVA3; Rechnungen mit dem Computer Code IVA3 zur Fragmentation heisser Metall- und Oxidschmelzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussa, S.; Tromm, W.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomena of fragmentation of melts caused by water-inlet from the bottom with the computer code IVA3/11,12,13/ are investigated. With the computer code IVA3 three-component-multiphase flows can be numerically simulated. Two geometrical models are used. Both consist of a cylindrical vessel for water lying beneath a cylindrical vessel for melt. The vessels are connected to each other through a hole. Steel and UO{sub 2} melts are. The following parameters were varied: the type of the melt (steel,UO{sub 2}), the water supply pressure and the geometry of the hole in the bottom plate through which the water and melt vessels are connected. As results of the numerical simulations temperature and pressure versus time curves are plotted. Additionally the volume flow rates and the volume fractions of the various phases in the vessels and the increase in surface and enthalpy of the melt during the time of simulation are depicted. With steel melts the rate of fragmentation increases with increasing water pressure and melt temperature, whereby stable channels are formed in the melt layer showing a very low flow resistance for steam. With UO{sub 2} the formations of channels are also observed. However, these channels are not so stable that they eventually break apart and lead to the fragmentation of the UO{sub 2} melt in drops. The fragmentation of the steel melt in water vessel is less than that of UO{sub 2}. No essential solidification of the melt is observed in the respective duration of the simulations. However, a small drop in the melt temperature is observed. With a slight or no water pressure the melt flows from the upper vessel into the water vessel via the connecting hole. The processes take place in a very slow manner and with such a low steam production so that despite the occuring pressure peaks no sign of steam explosions could be observed. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Die Phaenomene der Fragmentation von Schmelzen bei Wasserzutritt von unten mit Hilfe des

  9. Coding for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on exercises help you learn to code like a pro No coding experience is required for Coding For Dummies,your one-stop guide to building a foundation of knowledge inwriting computer code for web, application, and softwaredevelopment. It doesn't matter if you've dabbled in coding or neverwritten a line of code, this book guides you through the basics.Using foundational web development languages like HTML, CSS, andJavaScript, it explains in plain English how coding works and whyit's needed. Online exercises developed by Codecademy, a leading online codetraining site, help hone coding skill

  10. TAV-IR: a visible and near-IR radiometric analysis code which operates with an off-the-shelf computer animation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Andrew C.; Mischel, Dennis P.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a new image generation software code for creating radiometrically accurate images in the visible and near-infrared wavelength band. It was developed to evaluate pilot vision through aircraft windscreens and was written to operate in conjunction with an off- the-shelf computer animation software package. This capability allows the user to take advantage of the geometric modeling and motion generation capabilities inherent within the computer animation software for scene and scenario generation while using the new image generation codes for sensor modeling. The code, called TAV-IR, uses spectral reflectance and transmittance data as a function of incidence angle to describe surface material properties and spectral illumination data to model light sources. Once the operator selects the wavelength band of interest, the spectral sampling rate and the image size, the code produces an `image cube' consisting of floating point radiometric values for each pixel and each wavelength bin modeled. This image cube is then post-processed for sensor modeling purposes and image display. The code also reads an output file from a thin-film optical coating analysis package so that the reflective and transmissive properties of coated windscreens can be modeled. An interactive image inspection and display tool with a graphical user interface was also developed. This interactive tool, called SPEC, allows image pan and zoom and permits the operator to select pixels in the scene and view the spectral data contained in the selected pixels.

  11. Development of a computer code for thermal–hydraulic design and analysis of helically coiled tube once-through steam generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoli Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Helically coiled tube Once-Through Steam Generator (H-OTSG is a key piece of equipment for compact small reactors. The present study developed and verified a thermal–hydraulic design and performance analysis computer code for a countercurrent H-OTSG installed in a small pressurized water reactor. The H-OTSG is represented by one characteristic tube in the model. The secondary side of the H-OTSG is divided into single-phase liquid region, nucleate boiling region, postdryout region, and single-phase vapor region. Different heat transfer correlations and pressure drop correlations are reviewed and applied. To benchmark the developed physical models and the computer code, H-OTSGs developed in Marine Reactor X and System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor are simulated by the code, and the results are compared with the design data. The overall characteristics of heat transfer area, temperature distributions, and pressure drops calculated by the code showed general agreement with the published data. The thermal–hydraulic characteristics of a typical countercurrent H-OTSG are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the code can be utilized for design and performance analysis of an H-OTSG.

  12. Neural Computation via Neural Geometry: A Place Code for Inter-whisker Timing in the Barrel Cortex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stuart P.; Bednar, James A.; Prescott, Tony J.; Mitchinson, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The place theory proposed by Jeffress (1948) is still the dominant model of how the brain represents the movement of sensory stimuli between sensory receptors. According to the place theory, delays in signalling between neurons, dependent on the distances between them, compensate for time differences in the stimulation of sensory receptors. Hence the location of neurons, activated by the coincident arrival of multiple signals, reports the stimulus movement velocity. Despite its generality, most evidence for the place theory has been provided by studies of the auditory system of auditory specialists like the barn owl, but in the study of mammalian auditory systems the evidence is inconclusive. We ask to what extent the somatosensory systems of tactile specialists like rats and mice use distance dependent delays between neurons to compute the motion of tactile stimuli between the facial whiskers (or ‘vibrissae’). We present a model in which synaptic inputs evoked by whisker deflections arrive at neurons in layer 2/3 (L2/3) somatosensory ‘barrel’ cortex at different times. The timing of synaptic inputs to each neuron depends on its location relative to sources of input in layer 4 (L4) that represent stimulation of each whisker. Constrained by the geometry and timing of projections from L4 to L2/3, the model can account for a range of experimentally measured responses to two-whisker stimuli. Consistent with that data, responses of model neurons located between the barrels to paired stimulation of two whiskers are greater than the sum of the responses to either whisker input alone. The model predicts that for neurons located closer to either barrel these supralinear responses are tuned for longer inter-whisker stimulation intervals, yielding a topographic map for the inter-whisker deflection interval across the surface of L2/3. This map constitutes a neural place code for the relative timing of sensory stimuli. PMID:22022245

  13. Analytical validation of operator actions based on SAMG for VVER 1000 with ASTECv2r3 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, Antoaneta Emilova, E-mail: antoanet@inrne.bas.bg; Gencheva, Rositsa Veselinova, E-mail: roseh@mail.bg; Groudev, Pavlin Petkov, E-mail: pavlinpg@inrne.bas.bg

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Performing of analytical validation of operator action based SAMG. • Simulation of base calculation of SBO scenario without operator action for VVER 1000. • Simulation of SBO scenario with investigation of operator actions based on SAMG for VVER 1000. - Abstract: This paper presents the analytical validation of operator action based on severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Kozloduy NPP VVER1000 with severe accident computer code ASTECv2r3. The work is oriented on investigation of plant behavior during total loss of power and the operator actions performed based on strategies considered in severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) in Kozloduy nuclear power plant (KNPP). Using the SAMG strategies the operator depressurize primary circuit by gas removing system (YR) and try to cool down the reactor core by high pressure injection system (HPIS). The purpose of these analyses is to examine the possibility of keeping the core from further damage during a severe accident and to assess the likelihood of additional generation of hydrogen by additional flooding of the heated core. For this purpose it have been simulated a SBO scenario with injection of cold water by a high pressure pump (HPP) in cold leg at different core exit temperatures at 923 K and 1253 K. The selection of investigated analyses was based on severe accident management strategy of KNPP VVER1000. The presented work is important for analytical validation, verification, and further improvements of SAMG as well as for assessment of Level 2 probabilistic safety analyses (L2 PSA). The work was performed at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) in the frame of severe accident research.

  14. Neural computation via neural geometry: a place code for inter-whisker timing in the barrel cortex?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P Wilson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The place theory proposed by Jeffress (1948 is still the dominant model of how the brain represents the movement of sensory stimuli between sensory receptors. According to the place theory, delays in signalling between neurons, dependent on the distances between them, compensate for time differences in the stimulation of sensory receptors. Hence the location of neurons, activated by the coincident arrival of multiple signals, reports the stimulus movement velocity. Despite its generality, most evidence for the place theory has been provided by studies of the auditory system of auditory specialists like the barn owl, but in the study of mammalian auditory systems the evidence is inconclusive. We ask to what extent the somatosensory systems of tactile specialists like rats and mice use distance dependent delays between neurons to compute the motion of tactile stimuli between the facial whiskers (or 'vibrissae'. We present a model in which synaptic inputs evoked by whisker deflections arrive at neurons in layer 2/3 (L2/3 somatosensory 'barrel' cortex at different times. The timing of synaptic inputs to each neuron depends on its location relative to sources of input in layer 4 (L4 that represent stimulation of each whisker. Constrained by the geometry and timing of projections from L4 to L2/3, the model can account for a range of experimentally measured responses to two-whisker stimuli. Consistent with that data, responses of model neurons located between the barrels to paired stimulation of two whiskers are greater than the sum of the responses to either whisker input alone. The model predicts that for neurons located closer to either barrel these supralinear responses are tuned for longer inter-whisker stimulation intervals, yielding a topographic map for the inter-whisker deflection interval across the surface of L2/3. This map constitutes a neural place code for the relative timing of sensory stimuli.

  15. Accuracy Maximization Analysis for Sensory-Perceptual Tasks: Computational Improvements, Filter Robustness, and Coding Advantages for Scaled Additive Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Accuracy Maximization Analysis (AMA) is a recently developed Bayesian ideal observer method for task-specific dimensionality reduction. Given a training set of proximal stimuli (e.g. retinal images), a response noise model, and a cost function, AMA returns the filters (i.e. receptive fields) that extract the most useful stimulus features for estimating a user-specified latent variable from those stimuli. Here, we first contribute two technical advances that significantly reduce AMA’s compute time: we derive gradients of cost functions for which two popular estimators are appropriate, and we implement a stochastic gradient descent (AMA-SGD) routine for filter learning. Next, we show how the method can be used to simultaneously probe the impact on neural encoding of natural stimulus variability, the prior over the latent variable, noise power, and the choice of cost function. Then, we examine the geometry of AMA’s unique combination of properties that distinguish it from better-known statistical methods. Using binocular disparity estimation as a concrete test case, we develop insights that have general implications for understanding neural encoding and decoding in a broad class of fundamental sensory-perceptual tasks connected to the energy model. Specifically, we find that non-orthogonal (partially redundant) filters with scaled additive noise tend to outperform orthogonal filters with constant additive noise; non-orthogonal filters and scaled additive noise can interact to sculpt noise-induced stimulus encoding uncertainty to match task-irrelevant stimulus variability. Thus, we show that some properties of neural response thought to be biophysical nuisances can confer coding advantages to neural systems. Finally, we speculate that, if repurposed for the problem of neural systems identification, AMA may be able to overcome a fundamental limitation of standard subunit model estimation. As natural stimuli become more widely used in the study of psychophysical and

  16. Teaching the computer to code frames in news: comparing two supervised machine learning approaches to frame analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burscher, B.; Odijk, D.; Vliegenthart, R.; de Rijke, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the application of supervised machine learning (SML) to frame coding. By automating the coding of frames in news, SML facilitates the incorporation of large-scale content analysis into framing research, even if financial resources are scarce. This furthers a more integrated investigation

  17. mGrid: a load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-03-15

    Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel) execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else). Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web-based infrastructure of mGrid allows for it to be easily extensible over

  18. mGrid: A load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. Results mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else. Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Conclusion Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web

  19. Using the Electronic Industry Code of Conduct to Evaluate Green Supply Chain Management: An Empirical Study of Taiwan’s Computer Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ching Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronics companies throughout Asia recognize the benefits of Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM for gaining competitive advantage. A large majority of electronics companies in Taiwan have recently adopted the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC Code of Conduct for defining and managing their social and environmental responsibilities throughout their supply chains. We surveyed 106 Tier 1 suppliers to the Taiwanese computer industry to determine their environmental performance using the EICC Code of Conduct (EICC Code and performed Analysis of Variance (ANOVA on the 63/106 questionnaire responses collected. We test the results to determine whether differences in product type, geographic area, and supplier size correlate with different levels of environmental performance. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyze questionnaire data on supplier adoption to optimize the implementation of GSCM. The results suggest that characteristic classification of suppliers could be employed to enhance the efficiency of GSCM.

  20. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/..mu..Ci-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult.

  1. ABCXYZ: vector potential (A) and magnetic field (B) code (C) for Cartesian (XYZ) geometry using general current elements. [In LRL TRAN for CDC > 600 computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.V.; Breazeal, J.; Finan, C.H.; Johnston, B.M.

    1976-09-14

    ABCXYZ is a computer code for obtaining the Cartesian components of the vector potential and the magnetic field on an observed grid from an arrangement of current-carrying wires. Arbitrary combinations of straight line segments, arcs, and loops are allowed in the specification of the currents. Arbitrary positions and orientations of the current-carrying elements are also allowed. Specification of the wire diameter permits the computation of well-defined fields, even in the interiors of the conductors. An optical feature generates magnetic field lines. Extensive graphical and printed output is available to the user including contour, grid-line, and field-line plots. 12 figures, 1 table.

  2. Circus, software for computation of flow induced vibrations in piping system. General purpose; Code circus, logiciel pour la prediction des vibrations sous ecoulement. Une presentation generale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligmann, D.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is a presentation of the code CIRCUS version 2. CIRCUS deals with the hydraulic, acoustic and vibratory behaviour of piping systems under acoustic loads. CIRCUS first computes permanent mean-flow, and associated acoustic loads. It then determines the acoustic and vibration response along the piping system. The CIRCUS software is used at EDF to check the design of piping system and to investigate solutions in case of damage or troubleshooting. (author). 10 refs.

  3. The Bethe Free Energy Allows to Compute the Conditional Entropy of Graphical Code Instances. A Proof from the Polymer Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Macris, Nicolas; Vuffray, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore the precise relationship between the Bethe free energy (or entropy) and the Shannon conditional entropy of graphical error correcting codes. The main result shows that the Bethe free energy associated with a low-density parity-check code used over a binary symmetric channel in a large noise regime is, with high probability, asymptotically exact as the block length grows. To arrive at this result we develop new techniques for rather general graphi...

  4. PACER -- A fast running computer code for the calculation of short-term containment/confinement loads following coolant boundary failure. Volume 2: User information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1997-06-01

    A fast running and simple computer code has been developed to calculate pressure loadings inside light water reactor containments/confinements under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. PACER was originally developed to calculate containment/confinement pressure and temperature time histories for loss-of-coolant accidents in Soviet-designed VVER reactors and is relevant to the activities of the US International Nuclear Safety Center. The code employs a multicompartment representation of the containment volume and is focused upon application to early time containment phenomena during and immediately following blowdown. PACER has been developed for FORTRAN 77 and earlier versions of FORTRAN. The code has been successfully compiled and executed on SUN SPARC and Hewlett-Packard HP-735 workstations provided that appropriate compiler options are specified. The code incorporates both capabilities built around a hardwired default generic VVER-440 Model V230 design as well as fairly general user-defined input. However, array dimensions are hardwired and must be changed by modifying the source code if the number of compartments/cells differs from the default number of nine. Detailed input instructions are provided as well as a description of outputs. Input files and selected output are presented for two sample problems run on both HP-735 and SUN SPARC workstations.

  5. Fracture Analysis of Vessels. Oak Ridge FAVOR, v06.1, Computer Code: Theory and Implementation of Algorithms, Methods, and Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yin, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-12-01

    The current regulations to insure that nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events were derived from computational models developed in the early-to-mid 1980s. Since that time, advancements and refinements in relevant technologies that impact RPV integrity assessment have led to an effort by the NRC to re-evaluate its PTS regulations. Updated computational methodologies have been developed through interactions between experts in the relevant disciplines of thermal hydraulics, probabilistic risk assessment, materials embrittlement, fracture mechanics, and inspection (flaw characterization). Contributors to the development of these methodologies include the NRC staff, their contractors, and representatives from the nuclear industry. These updated methodologies have been integrated into the Fracture Analysis of Vessels -- Oak Ridge (FAVOR, v06.1) computer code developed for the NRC by the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FAVOR, v04.1, code represents the baseline NRC-selected applications tool for re-assessing the current PTS regulations. This report is intended to document the technical bases for the assumptions, algorithms, methods, and correlations employed in the development of the FAVOR, v06.1, code.

  6. Development of an R-based wrapper code for the computation of hydrochemical predominance diagrams based on PHREEQC modeling outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, M. W.; Kracht, O.

    2012-04-01

    When investigating stability relations in aquatic solutions or rock-water interactions, the number of dissolved species and mineral phases involved can be overwhelming. To facilitate an overview about equilibrium relationships and how chemical elements are distributed between different aqueous ions, complexes, and solids, predominance diagrams are a widely used tool in aquatic chemistry. In the simplest approach, the predominance field boundaries can be calculated based on a set of mass action equations and log K values for the reactions between different species. Example given, for the popular redox diagram (pe-pH diagram), half cell reactions according to Nernst's equation can be used (Garrels & Christ 1965). In such case, boundaries between different species are "equal-activity" lines. However, for boundaries between solids and dissolved species a specific concentration needs to be stipulated, and the same applies if other components than those displayed in the diagram are involved in the possible reactions. In such case, the predominance field boundaries depend on the actual concentration values chosen. An alternative approach can be the computation of predominance diagrams using the full speciation obtained from a geochemical speciation program, which then needs to be coupled with an external wrapper code for appropriate control and data pre- and post-processing. In this way, the distribution of different species can be based on the consideration of complete chemical analysis obtained from laboratory investigations. We present the results of a student semester-project that aimed to develop and test an external wrapper program for the computation of pe-pH diagrams based on modeling outputs obtained with PHREEQC (Parkhurst & Appelo 1999). We have chosen PHREEQC for this core task as a geochemical calculation module, because of its capabilities to simulate a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals. Due to the intended final users, a free

  7. JASMINE-pro: A computer code for the analysis of propagation process in steam explosions. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanhua; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Maruyama, Yu; Nakamura, Hideo; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-12-01

    A steam explosion is a phenomenon where a high temperature liquid gives its internal energy very rapidly to another low temperature volatile liquid, causing very strong pressure build up due to rapid vaporization of the latter. In the field of light water reactor safety research, steam explosions caused by the contact of molten core and coolant has been recognized as a potential threat which could cause failure of the pressure vessel or the containment vessel during a severe accident. A numerical simulation code JASMINE was developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to evaluate the impact of steam explosions on the integrity of reactor boundaries. JASMINE code consists of two parts, JASMINE-pre and -pro, which handle the premixing and propagation phases in steam explosions, respectively. JASMINE-pro code simulates the thermo-hydrodynamics in the propagation phase of a steam explosion on the basis of the multi-fluid model for multiphase flow. This report, 'User's Manual', gives the usage of JASMINE-pro code as well as the information on the code structures which should be useful for users to understand how the code works. (author)

  8. Human population doses: Comparative analysis of CREAM code results with currently computer codes of Nuclear Regulatory Authority; Dosis en la poblacion: comparacion de los resultados del codigo CREAM con resultados de modelos vigentes en la ARN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso Jimenez, Maria Teresa; Curti, Adriana [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: mtalonso@sede.arn.gov.ar; acurti@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2001-07-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority is performing an analysis with PC CREAM, developed at the NRPB, for updating computer programs and models used for calculating the transfer of radionuclides through the environment. For CREAM dose assessment verification for local scenarios, this paper presents a comparison of population doses assessed with the computer codes used nowadays and with CREAM, for unitary releases of main radionuclides in nuclear power plant discharges. The results of atmospheric dispersion processes and the transfer of radionuclides through the environment for local scenarios are analysed. The programs used are PLUME for atmospheric dispersion, FARMLAND for the transfer of radionuclides into foodstuffs following atmospheric deposition in the terrestrial environment and ASSESSOR for individual and collective dose assessments.This paper presents the general assumptions made for dose assessments. The results show some differences between doses due to differences in models, in the complexity level of the same models, or in parameters. (author)

  9. Comparative Neutronics Analysis of DIMPLE S06 Criticality Benchmark with Contemporary Reactor Core Analysis Computer Code Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-leakage core has been known to be a challenging problem not only for a two-step homogenization approach but also for a direct heterogeneous approach. In this paper the DIMPLE S06 core, which is a small high-leakage core, has been analyzed by a direct heterogeneous modeling approach and by a two-step homogenization modeling approach, using contemporary code systems developed for reactor core analysis. The focus of this work is a comprehensive comparative analysis of the conventional approaches and codes with a small core design, DIMPLE S06 critical experiment. The calculation procedure for the two approaches is explicitly presented in this paper. Comprehensive comparative analysis is performed by neutronics parameters: multiplication factor and assembly power distribution. Comparison of two-group homogenized cross sections from each lattice physics codes shows that the generated transport cross section has significant difference according to the transport approximation to treat anisotropic scattering effect. The necessity of the ADF to correct the discontinuity at the assembly interfaces is clearly presented by the flux distributions and the result of two-step approach. Finally, the two approaches show consistent results for all codes, while the comparison with the reference generated by MCNP shows significant error except for another Monte Carlo code, SERPENT2.

  10. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menthe, R. W.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  11. Comparative simulations of a two-layer landfill barrier using the HELP Version 2. 0 and UNSAT-H Version 2. 0 computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents the results of a simulation of the performance of a two-layer infiltration barrier for a nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (NRDWL) at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in semi-arid southeast Washington State. The performance of the barrier was simulated for a period of 10 years using the UNSAT-H version 2.0 groundwater flow computer code. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed this simulation to compare results using UNSAT-H 2.0 with those of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) version 2.0 code. A conceptualization of the actual landfill barrier design was modeled using both codes. This model was simulated using 10 years of daily meteorological data collected at the Hanford Meteorological Station from 1979 through 1988. The intent of the comparison was to demonstrate that HELP conservatively predicts deep percolation of meteoric water at the Hanford Site. This demonstration required that the two codes be used to simulate the same conceptual model using identical, or at least essentially equivalent, input data. Comparing the results of the 10-year simulations showed that for the meteorological data and soil properties modeled the HELP 2.0 code was more conservative than the UNSAT-H code. HELP predicted a net drainage or deep percolation of 0.3592 cm (0.1556 in.) from the barrier for the 10-year period simulated. None to the UNSAT-H simulations predicted any deep percolation. HELP also predicted a greater proportion of precipitation returned to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration than did the UNSAT-H simulations in spite of the larger precipitation values being provided to HELP through an apparent data entry error. 14 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Computer code system for the R and D of nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactor. 2. Development and application of analytical evaluation system for thermal striping phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2001-09-01

    Fluid-structure thermal interaction phenomena characterized by stationary random temperature fluctuations, namely thermal striping are observed in the downstream region such as a T-junction piping system of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). Therefore, the piping wall located in the downstream region must be protected against the stationary random thermal process, which might induce high-cycle fatigue. This paper describes the evaluation system based on numerical simulation methods consisting of three thermohydraulics computer programs AQUA, DINUS-3 and THEMIS and of three thermomechanical computer programs BEMSET, FINAS and CANIS, for the thermal striping developed at Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Verification results for each computer code and the system are also introduced based on out-of-pile experimental data using water and sodium as working fluids. (author)

  13. The Aesthetics of Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    Computer art is often associated with computer-generated expressions (digitally manipulated audio/images in music, video, stage design, media facades, etc.). In recent computer art, however, the code-text itself – not the generated output – has become the artwork (Perl Poetry, ASCII Art, obfuscated...... code, etc.). The presentation relates this artistic fascination of code to a media critique expressed by Florian Cramer, claiming that the graphical interface represents a media separation (of text/code and image) causing alienation to the computer’s materiality. Cramer is thus the voice of a new ‘code...... avant-garde’. In line with Cramer, the artists Alex McLean and Adrian Ward (aka Slub) declare: “art-oriented programming needs to acknowledge the conditions of its own making – its poesis.” By analysing the Live Coding performances of Slub (where they program computer music live), the presentation...

  14. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 1: Computational technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Salas, M.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  15. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  16. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

  17. Vectorization, parallelization and implementation of nuclear codes =MVP/GMVP, QMDRELP, EQMD, HSABC, CURBAL, STREAM V3.1, TOSCA, EDDYCAL, RELAP5/MOD2/C36-05, RELAP5/MOD3= on the VPP500 computer system. Progress report 1995 fiscal year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Hideo; Fujita, Toyozo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawai, Wataru; Harada, Hiroo; Gorai, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Shoji, Makoto; Fujii, Minoru

    1996-06-01

    At Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, time consuming eight nuclear codes suggested by users have been vectorized, parallelized on the VPP500 computer system. In addition, two nuclear codes used on the VP2600 computer system were implemented on the VPP500 computer system. Neutron and photon transport calculation code MVP/GMVP and relativistic quantum molecular dynamics code QMDRELP have been parallelized. Extended quantum molecular dynamics code EQMD and adiabatic base calculation code HSABC have been parallelized and vectorized. Ballooning turbulence simulation code CURBAL, 3-D non-stationary compressible fluid dynamics code STREAM V3.1, operating plasma analysis code TOSCA and eddy current analysis code EDDYCAL have been vectorized. Reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/MOD2/C36-05 and RELAP5/MOD3 were implemented on the VPP500 computer system. (author)

  18. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and {gamma} ray spectrum. FPGS90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting {gamma} ray and {beta} ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted {gamma} ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library `JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -`, which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author).

  19. Computing travel time when the exact address is unknown: a comparison of point and polygon ZIP code approximation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Ethan M; Shi, Xun

    2009-04-29

    Travel time is an important metric of geographic access to health care. We compared strategies of estimating travel times when only subject ZIP code data were available. Using simulated data from New Hampshire and Arizona, we estimated travel times to nearest cancer centers by using: 1) geometric centroid of ZIP code polygons as origins, 2) population centroids as origin, 3) service area rings around each cancer center, assigning subjects to rings by assuming they are evenly distributed within their ZIP code, 4) service area rings around each center, assuming the subjects follow the population distribution within the ZIP code. We used travel times based on street addresses as true values to validate estimates. Population-based methods have smaller errors than geometry-based methods. Within categories (geometry or population), centroid and service area methods have similar errors. Errors are smaller in urban areas than in rural areas. Population-based methods are superior to the geometry-based methods, with the population centroid method appearing to be the best choice for estimating travel time. Estimates in rural areas are less reliable.

  20. Automated and Assistive Tools for Accelerated Code migration of Scientific Computing on to Heterogeneous MultiCore Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    modelling code, a parallel benchmark, and a communication avoiding version of the QR algorithm. Further, several improvements to the OmpSs model were...communication avoiding version of the QR algorithm. Further, several improvements to the OmpSs model were accomplished, including: proper support

  1. A research on the verification of models used in the computational codes and the uncertainty reduction method for the containment integrity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moo Hwan; Seo, Kyoung Woo [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    In the probability approach, the calculated CCFPs of all the scenarios were zero, which meant that it was expected that for all the accident scenarios the maximum pressure load induced by DCH was lower than the containment failure pressure obtained from the fragility curve. Thus, it can be stated that the KSNP containment is robust to the DCH threat. And uncertainty of computer codes used to be two (deterministic and probabilistic) approaches were reduced by the sensitivity tests and the research with the verification and comparison of the DCH models in each code. So, this research was to evaluate synthetic result of DCH issue and expose accurate methodology to assess containment integrity about operating PWR in Korea.

  2. Simulation of thermal fluid dynamics in parabolic trough receiver tubes with direct steam generation using the computer code ATHLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Alexander; Merk, Bruno [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Hirsch, Tobias; Pitz-Paal, Robert [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Solarforschung

    2014-06-15

    In the present feasibility study the system code ATHLET, which originates from nuclear engineering, is applied to a parabolic trough test facility. A model of the DISS (DIrect Solar Steam) test facility at Plataforma Solar de Almeria in Spain is assembled and the results of the simulations are compared to measured data and the simulation results of the Modelica library 'DissDyn'. A profound comparison between ATHLET Mod 3.0 Cycle A and the 'DissDyn' library reveals the capabilities of these codes. The calculated mass and energy balance in the ATHLET simulations are in good agreement with the results of the measurements and confirm the applicability for thermodynamic simulations of DSG processes in principle. Supplementary, the capabilities of the 6-equation model with transient momentum balances in ATHLET are used to study the slip between liquid and gas phases and to investigate pressure wave oscillations after a sudden valve closure. (orig.)

  3. Application of Coding Methods in Development of Symbology for a Computer-Generated Topographic Display for Army Aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    experimental studies have attempted to specify easily identifiable shape codes. Much of this early research focused on claims by Gestalt psychologists...to direct empirical test. The Gestalt school was shown to be incorrect in their assertion, as many investigations demonstrated that absolute... advertising . Nine subjects were presented single letters with a 0.01 second viewing time and brightness contrast ratios ranging from 4:1 to 10:1

  4. SAGE: A 2-D self-adaptive grid evolution code and its application in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    SAGE is a user-friendly, highly efficient, two-dimensional self-adaptive grid code based on Nakahashi and Deiwert's variational principles method. Grid points are redistributed into regions of high flowfield gradients while maintaining smoothness and orthogonality of the grid. Efficiency is obtained by splitting the adaption into 2 directions and applying one-sided torsion control, thus producing a 1-D elliptic system that can be solved as a set of tridiagonal equations.

  5. GETRAN: A generic, modularly structured computer code for simulation of dynamic behavior of aero- and power generation gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Attia, M.; Lippke, C.

    1994-07-01

    The design concept, the theoretical background essential for the development of the modularly structured simulation code GETRAN, and several critical simulation cases are presented in this paper. The code being developed under contract with NASA Lewis Research Center is capable of simulating the nonlinear dynamic behavior of single- and multispool core engines, turbofan engines, and power generation gas turbine engines under adverse dynamic operating conditions. The modules implemented into GETRAN correspond to components of existing and new-generation aero- and stationary gas turbine engines with arbitrary configuration and arrangement. For precise simulation of turbine and compressor components, row-by-row diabatic and adiabatic calculation procedures are implemented that account for the specific turbine and compressor cascade, blade geometry, and characteristics. The nonlinear, dynamic behavior of the subject engine is calculated solving a number of systems of partial differential equations, which describe the unsteady behavior of each component individually. To identify each differential equation system unambiguously, special attention is paid to the addressing of each component. The code is capable of executing the simulation procedure at four levels, which increase with the degree of complexity of the system and dynamic event. As representative simulations, four different transient cases with single- and multispool thrust and power generation engines were simulated. These transient cases vary from throttling the exit nozzle area, operation with fuel schedule, rotor speed control, to rotating stall and surge.

  6. Starting Point, Keys and Milestones of a Computer Code for the Simulation of the Behaviour of a Nuclear Fuel Rod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando C. Marino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The BaCo code (“Barra Combustible” was developed at the Atomic Energy National Commission of Argentina (CNEA for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod behaviour under irradiation conditions. We present in this paper a brief description of the code and the strategy used for the development, improvement, enhancement, and validation of a BaCo during the last 30 years. “Extreme case analysis”, parametric (or sensitivity, probabilistic (or statistic analysis plus the analysis of the fuel performance (full core analysis are the tools developed in the structure of BaCo in order to improve the understanding of the burnup extension in the Atucha I NPP, and the design of advanced fuel elements as CARA and CAREM. The 3D additional tools of BaCo can enhance the understanding of the fuel rod behaviour, the fuel design, and the safety margins. The modular structure of the BaCo code and its detailed coupling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation-induced phenomena make it a powerful tool for the prediction of the influence of material properties on the fuel rod performance and integrity.

  7. Quantum Genetics in terms of Quantum Reversible Automata and Quantum Computation of Genetic Codes and Reverse Transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu,I C

    2004-01-01

    The concepts of quantum automata and quantum computation are studied in the context of quantum genetics and genetic networks with nonlinear dynamics. In previous publications (Baianu,1971a, b) the formal concept of quantum automaton and quantum computation, respectively, were introduced and their possible implications for genetic processes and metabolic activities in living cells and organisms were considered. This was followed by a report on quantum and abstract, symbolic computation based on the theory of categories, functors and natural transformations (Baianu,1971b; 1977; 1987; 2004; Baianu et al, 2004). The notions of topological semigroup, quantum automaton, or quantum computer, were then suggested with a view to their potential applications to the analogous simulation of biological systems, and especially genetic activities and nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks. Further, detailed studies of nonlinear dynamics in genetic networks were carried out in categories of n-valued, Lukasiewicz Logic Algebra...

  8. A Computer Code for SAR Assessment of Plume-Exposure Doses from Potential Process-Accident Releases to Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillinger, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Huang, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    1986-06-12

    Safety analysis reports (SAR's) usually require the dose consequences of postulated releases of radioactivity in potential accident scenarios. Standard methods and easily-invoked computational means are being developed to facilitate such dose assessments.

  9. User manual for version 4.3 of the Tripoli-4 Monte-Carlo method particle transport computer code; Notice d'utilisation du code Tripoli-4, version 4.3: code de transport de particules par la methode de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Mazzolo, A.; Peneliau, Y.; Petit, O.; Roesslinger, B

    2003-07-01

    This manual relates to Version 4.3 TRIPOLI-4 code. TRIPOLI-4 is a computer code simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. It can be used for radiation shielding calculations (long-distance propagation with flux attenuation in non-multiplying media) and neutronic calculations (fissile medium, criticality or sub-criticality basis). This makes it possible to calculate k{sub eff} (for criticality), flux, currents, reaction rates and multi-group cross-sections. TRIPOLI-4 is a three-dimensional code that uses the Monte-Carlo method. It allows for point-wise description in terms of energy of cross-sections and multi-group homogenized cross-sections and features two modes of geometrical representation: surface and combinatorial. The code uses cross-section libraries in ENDF/B format (such as JEF2-2, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL) for point-wise description cross-sections in APOTRIM format (from the APOLLO2 code) or a format specific to TRIPOLI-4 for multi-group description. (authors)

  10. Burnup calculations using the OREST computer code for uranium dioxide fuel elements of boiling water reactors. Abbrandberechnung mit OREST fuer Urandioxid-Siedewasserreaktor-Brennelemente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, U.

    1991-01-01

    There are plans to also use plutonium containing fuel elements (mixed oxide fuel) in the BWR type reactors, with a proportion of up to one third of the entire fuel core. The new concept uses complete MOX fuel elements, as are used in the PWR type reactors. The OREST computer code has been designed for burnup calculations in PWRs. The situation in BWRs is different, as in these reactor types, fuel elements are heterogenous in design, and burnup calculations have to take into account the axial variations of the void fraction, so that multi-dimensional effects have to be calculated. The report explains that the one-dimensional OREST code can be enhanced by supplementing calculations, performed with the Monte-Carlo type KENO code in this case, and is thus suitable without restrictions for performing burnup calculations for MOX fuel elements in BWRs. The calculation method and performance is illustrated by the example of a UO{sub 2} fuel element of the Wuergassen reactor. The model calculations predict a relatively high residual activity in the upper part of the fuel element, and a distinct curium buildup in the lower third of the BWR fuel element. (orig./HP).

  11. Computational prediction of over-annotated protein-coding genes in the genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Sui, Tian-Xiang; Wang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Chun-Ling; Jing, Li; Wang, Ji-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 is a type of pathogen that can cause tumors in some dicotyledonous plants. Ever since the genome of A. tumefaciens strain C58 was sequenced, the quality of annotation of its protein-coding genes has been queried continually, because the annotation varies greatly among different databases. In this paper, the questionable hypothetical genes were re-predicted by integrating the TN curve and Z curve methods. As a result, 30 genes originally annotated as “hypothetical” were discriminated as being non-coding sequences. By testing the re-prediction program 10 times on data sets composed of the function-known genes, the mean accuracy of 99.99% and mean Matthews correlation coefficient value of 0.9999 were obtained. Further sequence analysis and COG analysis showed that the re-annotation results were very reliable. This work can provide an efficient tool and data resources for future studies of A. tumefaciens strain C58. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61302186 and 61271378) and the Funding from the State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics of Southeast University.

  12. Icarus: A 2D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for parallel computers. User`s manual - V.3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Plimpton, S.; Johannes, J.; Payne, J.

    1996-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modelled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modelled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates. Surface chemistry is modelled with surface reaction probabilities. The electron number density is either a fixed external generated field or determined using a local charge neutrality assumption. Ion chemistry is modelled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electrostatic fields can either be externally input or internally generated using a Langmuir-Tonks model. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, postprocessing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. The majority of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  13. Validation of a computer code for analysis of subsonic aerodynamic performance of wings with flaps in combination with a canard or horizontal tail and an application to optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.; Mann, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive correlations of computer code results with experimental data are employed to illustrate the use of a linearized theory, attached flow method for the estimation and optimization of the longitudinal aerodynamic performance of wing-canard and wing-horizontal tail configurations which may employ simple hinged flap systems. Use of an attached flow method is based on the premise that high levels of aerodynamic efficiency require a flow that is as nearly attached as circumstances permit. The results indicate that linearized theory, attached flow, computer code methods (modified to include estimated attainable leading-edge thrust and an approximate representation of vortex forces) provide a rational basis for the estimation and optimization of aerodynamic performance at subsonic speeds below the drag rise Mach number. Generally, good prediction of aerodynamic performance, as measured by the suction parameter, can be expected for near optimum combinations of canard or horizontal tail incidence and leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections at a given lift coefficient (conditions which tend to produce a predominantly attached flow).

  14. Evaluating Students' Programming Skill Behaviour and Personalizing Their Computer Learning Environment Using "The Hour of Code" Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallios, Nikolaos; Vassilakopoulos, Michael Gr.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing objectives when teaching computer science in mid-adolescence high school students is attracting and mainly maintaining their concentration within the limits of the class. A number of theories have been proposed and numerous methodologies have been applied, aiming to assist in the implementation of a personalized learning…

  15. Application of multi-thread computing and domain decomposition to the 3-D neutronics Fem code Cronos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragusa, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes des Reacteurs et de Modelisations Avancees (DEN/SERMA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the parallelization of the flux solver and the isotopic depletion module of the code, either using Message Passing Interface (MPI) or OpenMP. Thread parallelism using OpenMP was used to parallelize the mixed dual FEM (finite element method) flux solver MINOS. Investigations regarding the opportunity of mixing parallelism paradigms will be discussed. The isotopic depletion module was parallelized using domain decomposition and MPI. An attempt at using OpenMP was unsuccessful and will be explained. This paper is organized as follows: the first section recalls the different types of parallelism. The mixed dual flux solver and its parallelization are then presented. In the third section, we describe the isotopic depletion solver and its parallelization; and finally conclude with some future perspectives. Parallel applications are mandatory for fine mesh 3-dimensional transport and simplified transport multigroup calculations. The MINOS solver of the FEM neutronics code CRONOS2 was parallelized using the directive based standard OpenMP. An efficiency of 80% (resp. 60%) was achieved with 2 (resp. 4) threads. Parallelization of the isotopic depletion solver was obtained using domain decomposition principles and MPI. Efficiencies greater than 90% were reached. These parallel implementations were tested on a shared memory symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) cluster machine. The OpenMP implementation in the solver MINOS is only the first step towards fully using the SMPs cluster potential with a mixed mode parallelism. Mixed mode parallelism can be achieved by combining message passing interface between clusters with OpenMP implicit parallelism within a cluster.

  16. Experimental validation of computational fluid dynamic codes (CFD for liquid-solid risers in clean alkylation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duduković Milorad P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript, based on the presentation given by one of the authors (M.P. Dudukovic at the Technological and Engineering Forum in Pančevo, May 21 2002, summarizes the use of the computer automated radioactive particle tracking (CARPT and gamma computed tomography (CT in obtaining the data needed to validate the Euler-Euler based CFD simulations for solids distribution, flow pattern and mixing in a liquid-solid riser. The riser is one of the reactors considered for acid solid catalyst promoted alkylation. It is shown that CFD calculations, validated by CARPT-CT data, show promise for scale-up and design of this novel reactor type.

  17. Physics study of microbeam radiation therapy with PSI-version of Monte Carlo code GEANT as a new computational tool

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanek, J; Laissue, J A; Lyubimova, N; Di Michiel, F; Slatkin, D N

    2000-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a currently experimental method of radiotherapy which is mediated by an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X-rays. Suitably selected, nominally supralethal doses of X-rays delivered to parallel microslices of tumor-bearing tissues in rats can be either palliative or curative while causing little or no serious damage to contiguous normal tissues. Although the pathogenesis of MRT-mediated tumor regression is not understood, as in all radiotherapy such understanding will be based ultimately on our understanding of the relationships among the following three factors: (1) microdosimetry, (2) damage to normal tissues, and (3) therapeutic efficacy. Although physical microdosimetry is feasible, published information on MRT microdosimetry to date is computational. This report describes Monte Carlo-based computational MRT microdosimetry using photon and/or electron scattering and photoionization cross-section data in the 1 e V through 100 GeV range distrib...

  18. ASTEROFF: A Computer Code to Deflect NEOs by Missiles shot from L1 and L3 (Earth-Moon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccone, C.

    We develop the mathematical theory for an automatic, space-based system to deflect NEOs by virtue of missiles shot from the Earth-Moon L1 and L3 Lagrangian Points. A patent application has been filed for the relevant code, dubbed ASTEROFF (= Asteroids OFF !). This code was already implemented, and a copyright for it was registered. In a paper published in Acta Astronautica, Vol. 50, No. 3, pp. 185-199 (2002), this author proved mathematically the following theorem (hereafter called the ``confocal conics theorem''): ``Within the sphere of influence of the Earth, any NEO could be hit by a missile at just an angle of 90 degrees, was the missile shot from Lagrangian Points L1 or L3 of the Earth-Moon system, rather than from the surface of the Earth''. As a consequence, the hitting missile would have move along a ``confocal ellipse'' (centered at the Earth) uniquely determined by the NEO's incoming hyperbola. Based on the above theorem, the author further shows in this paper that: The proposed defense system would be ideal to deflect NEOs that are small, i.e. less than one kilometer in diameter. Small NEOs are just the most difficult ones to be detected early enough and to such an orbital accuracy to be positively sure that they are indeed hazardous. The traditional theory of Keplerian orbits can successfully be applied to get an excellent first-order approximation of the (otherwise unknown) mathematical formulae of the energy/momentum requested to achieve the NEO deflection. Many engineering details about the missiles shot from L1 and L3, however, still have to be implemented into our simulations, partly because they are classified. Was one missile not enough to deflect the NEO completely, it is a great advantage of the ``confocal conics'' used here that the new, slightly deflected NEO's hyperbola would certainly be hit at nearly 90 degrees by another and slightly more eccentric elliptical missile trajectory. A sufficient number of missiles could thus be launched in a

  19. Computer Simulation of Cure Process of an Axisymmetric Rubber Article Reinforced by Metal Plates Using Extended ABAQUS Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Afinite element model is developed for simulation of the curing process of a thick axisymmetric rubber article reinforced by metal plates during the molding and cooling stages. The model consists of the heat transfer equation and a newly developed kinetics model for the determination of the state of cure in the rubber. The latter is based on the modification of the well-known Kamal-Sourour model. The thermal contact of the rubber with metallic surfaces (inserts and molds and the variation of the thermal properties (conductivity and specific heat with temperature and state-of-cure are taken into consideration. The ABAQUS code is used in conjunction with an in-house developed user subroutine to solve the governing equations. Having compared temperature profile and variation of the state-of-cure with experimentally measured data, the accuracy and applicability of the model is confirmed. It is also shown that this model can be successfully used for the optimization of curing process which gives rise to reduction of the molding time.

  20. Analysis of the IRIS pressurizer behavior in the presence of noncondensable gases using RELAP5 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Eduarda da C.A.; Castrillo, Lazara S., E-mail: e.camedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: lazara@poli.br [Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    Insurge and outsurge phenomena are transient states and could be analyzed by thermodynamics principles, the pressurizer behavior will vary in response to mass flow changes. These surges can occur in the presence of noncondensable gases. On this paper, with the code RELAP5, the IRIS reactor pressurizer is described to analyze surges phenomena in their control volumes with non-condensable gases since they modify the pressure response. A set of three pipes components represents the pressurizer regions, connected with each other by single junctions components, the bottom volume control is connected to the primary circuit, represented by a time dependent volume component, through a time dependent junction component, which describes the mass flow behavior during surges through surge orifices. The hydrodynamic components representing the pressurizer are surrounded by heat structures, in addition there are heat structures inside the bottom volume control describing the behavior of electrical heaters, that operate in cases of outsurges. The analysis are intended to detail the behavior variables as pressure, temperature and volume of liquid inside the pressurizer during a water surge coming from the primary circuit or a water surge coming from the pressurizer to the primary circuit. (author)

  1. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analysis of TRIGA Mark II reactor using MCNPX and COOLOD-N2 computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyapun, K.; Wetchagarun, S.

    2017-06-01

    The neutronic analysis of TRIGA Mark II reactor has been performed. A detailed model of the reactor core was conducted including standard fuel elements, fuel follower control rods, and irradiation devices. As the approach to safety nuclear design are based on determining the criticality (keff), reactivity worth, reactivity excess, hot rod power factor and power peaking of the reactor, the MCNPX code had been used to calculate the nuclear parameters for different core configuration designs. The thermal-hydraulic model has been developed using COOLOD-N2 for steady state, using the nuclear parameters and power distribution results from MCNPX calculation. The objective of the thermal-hydraulic model is to determine the thermal safety margin and to ensure that the fuel integrity is maintained during steady state as well as during abnormal condition at full power. The hot channel fuel centerline temperature, fuel surface temperature, cladding surface temperature, the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and DNB ratio were determined. The good agreement between experimental data and simulation concerning reactor criticality proves the reliability of the methodology of analysis from neutronic and thermal hydraulic perspective.

  2. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  3. Dynamic parameters’ identification for the feeding system of computer numerical control machine tools stimulated by G-code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangsheng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed a dynamic parameters’ identification method for the feeding system of computer numerical control machine tools based on internal sensor. A simplified control model and linear identification model of the feeding system were established, in which the input and output signals are from sensors embedded in computer numerical control machine tools, and the dynamic parameters of the feeding system, including the equivalent inertia, equivalent damping, worktable damping, and the overall stiffness of the mechanical system, were solved by the least square method. Using the high-order Taylor expansion, the nonlinear Stribeck friction model was linearized and the parameters of the Stribeck friction model were obtained by the same way. To verify the validity and effectiveness of the identification method, identification experiments, circular motion testing, and simulations were conducted. The results obtained were stable and suggested that inertia and damping identification experiments converged fast. Stiffness identification experiments showed some deviation from simulation due to the influences of geometric error and nonlinear of stiffness. However, the identification results were still of reference significance and the method is convenient, effective, and suited for industrial condition.

  4. TRUMP-BD: A computer code for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Marseille, T.J.; White, M.D.; Lowery, P.S.

    1990-06-01

    TRUMP-BD (Boil Down) is an extension of the TRUMP (Edwards 1972) computer program for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions. This extension allows prediction of the heat transfer rates, metal-water oxidation rates, fission product release rates, steam generation and consumption rates, and temperature distributions for nuclear fuel assemblies under core uncovery conditions. The heat transfer processes include conduction in solid structures, convection across fluid-solid boundaries, and radiation between interacting surfaces. Metal-water reaction kinetics are modeled with empirical relationships to predict the oxidation rates of steam-exposed Zircaloy and uranium metal. The metal-water oxidation models are parabolic in form with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Uranium oxidation begins when fuel cladding failure occurs; Zircaloy oxidation occurs continuously at temperatures above 13000{degree}F when metal and steam are available. From the metal-water reactions, the hydrogen generation rate, total hydrogen release, and temporal and spatial distribution of oxide formations are computed. Consumption of steam from the oxidation reactions and the effect of hydrogen on the coolant properties is modeled for independent coolant flow channels. Fission product release from exposed uranium metal Zircaloy-clad fuel is modeled using empirical time and temperature relationships that consider the release to be subject to oxidation and volitization/diffusion ( bake-out'') release mechanisms. Release of the volatile species of iodine (I), tellurium (Te), cesium (Ce), ruthenium (Ru), strontium (Sr), zirconium (Zr), cerium (Cr), and barium (Ba) from uranium metal fuel may be modeled.

  5. An algebraic approach to graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinero, Fernando

    theory as evaluation codes. Chapter three consists of the introduction to graph based codes, such as Tanner codes and graph codes. In Chapter four, we compute the dimension of some graph based codes with a result combining graph based codes and subfield subcodes. Moreover, some codes in chapter four...... are optimal or best known for their parameters. In chapter five we study some graph codes with Reed–Solomon component codes. The underlying graph is well known and widely used for its good characteristics. This helps us to compute the dimension of the graph codes. We also introduce a combinatorial concept...... related to the iterative encoding of graph codes with MDS component code. The last chapter deals with affine Grassmann codes and Grassmann codes. We begin with some previously known codes and prove that they are also Tanner codes of the incidence graph of the point–line partial geometry...

  6. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 1. Error Correcting Codes The Hamming Codes. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 1 January ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  7. Comparison study of the thermal mechanical performance of fuel rods during BWR fuel preconditioning operations using the computer codes FUELSIM and FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: rafael.pantoja10@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The safety of nuclear power plants requires monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behaviour under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, pre-conditioning simulations are necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod during any power ramp, and mainly during reactor startup, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with array 8 x 8, and the other one from a 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM, and compared against results previously obtained from similar simulation with the code FEMAXI-V. (Author)

  8. Computational wavelength resolution for in-line lensless holography: phase-coded diffraction patterns and wavefront group-sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Shevkunov, Igor; Petrov, Nikolay V.; Egiazarian, Karen

    2017-06-01

    In-line lensless holography is considered with a random phase modulation at the object plane. The forward wavefront propagation is modelled using the Fourier transform with the angular spectrum transfer function. The multiple intensities (holograms) recorded by the sensor are random due to the random phase modulation and noisy with Poissonian noise distribution. It is shown by computational experiments that high-accuracy reconstructions can be achieved with resolution going up to the two thirds of the wavelength. With respect to the sensor pixel size it is a super-resolution with a factor of 32. The algorithm designed for optimal superresolution phase/amplitude reconstruction from Poissonian data is based on the general methodology developed for phase retrieval with a pixel-wise resolution in V. Katkovnik, "Phase retrieval from noisy data based on sparse approximation of object phase and amplitude", http://www.cs.tut.fi/ lasip/DDT/index3.html.

  9. A validation report for the KALIMER core design computing system by the Monte Carlo transport theory code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Bog; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Kang Seok; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young Gyun; Song, Hoon; Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Jang, Jin Wook; Lim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hak Sung

    2004-05-01

    In this report, the results of KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) core design calculated by the K-CORE computing system are compared and analyzed with those of MCDEP calculation. The effective multiplication factor, flux distribution, fission power distribution and the number densities of the important nuclides effected from the depletion calculation for the R-Z model and Hex-Z model of KALIMER core are compared. It is confirmed that the results of K-CORE system compared with those of MCDEP based on the Monte Carlo transport theory method agree well within 700 pcm for the effective multiplication factor estimation and also within 2% in the driver fuel region, within 10% in the radial blanket region for the reaction rate and the fission power density. Thus, the K-CORE system for the core design of KALIMER by treating the lumped fission product and mainly important nuclides can be used as a core design tool keeping the necessary accuracy.

  10. Single Use Letter Report for the Verification and Validation of the RADNUC-2A and ORIGEN2 S.2 Computer Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-06-20

    This report documents the verification and validation (V&V) activities undertaken to support the use of the RADNUC2-A and ORIGEN2 S.2 computer codes for the specific application of calculating isotopic inventories and decay heat loadings for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) activities as described herein. Two recent applications include the reports HNF-SD-SNF-TI-009, 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Facilities, Volume 1, Fuel (Praga, 1998), and HNF-3035, Rev. 0B, MCO Gas Composition for Low Reactive Surface Areas (Packer, 1998). Representative calculations documented in these two reports were repeated using RADNUC2-A, and the results were identical to the documented results. This serves as verification that version 2A of Radnuc was used for the applications noted above; the same version was tested herein, and perfect agreement was shown. Comprehensive V&V is demonstrated for RADNUC2-A in Appendix A.

  11. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  12. Predicting Motivation: Computational Models of PFC Can Explain Neural Coding of Motivation and Effort-based Decision-making in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassena, Eliana; Deraeve, James; Alexander, William H

    2017-10-01

    Human behavior is strongly driven by the pursuit of rewards. In daily life, however, benefits mostly come at a cost, often requiring that effort be exerted to obtain potential benefits. Medial PFC (MPFC) and dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC) are frequently implicated in the expectation of effortful control, showing increased activity as a function of predicted task difficulty. Such activity partially overlaps with expectation of reward and has been observed both during decision-making and during task preparation. Recently, novel computational frameworks have been developed to explain activity in these regions during cognitive control, based on the principle of prediction and prediction error (predicted response-outcome [PRO] model [Alexander, W. H., & Brown, J. W. Medial prefrontal cortex as an action-outcome predictor. Nature Neuroscience, 14, 1338-1344, 2011], hierarchical error representation [HER] model [Alexander, W. H., & Brown, J. W. Hierarchical error representation: A computational model of anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Neural Computation, 27, 2354-2410, 2015]). Despite the broad explanatory power of these models, it is not clear whether they can also accommodate effects related to the expectation of effort observed in MPFC and DLPFC. Here, we propose a translation of these computational frameworks to the domain of effort-based behavior. First, we discuss how the PRO model, based on prediction error, can explain effort-related activity in MPFC, by reframing effort-based behavior in a predictive context. We propose that MPFC activity reflects monitoring of motivationally relevant variables (such as effort and reward), by coding expectations and discrepancies from such expectations. Moreover, we derive behavioral and neural model-based predictions for healthy controls and clinical populations with impairments of motivation. Second, we illustrate the possible translation to effort-based behavior of the HER model, an extended version of PRO

  13. Transient heat transfer analysis up to dryout in 3D fuel rods under unideal conditions through the development of a computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Rodolfo I.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes; Sampaio, Paulo A. B. de, E-mail: rodolfoienny@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we analyze a conjugated transient heat transfer problem consisting of a nuclear reactor's fuel rod and its intrinsic coolant channel. Our analysis is made possible through a computer code being developed at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN). This code is meant to study the temperature behavior in fuel rods which exhibit deviation from their ideal conditions, that is, rods in which the cladding is deformed or the fuel is dislocated. It is also designed to avoid the use of the computationally expensive Navier-Stokes equations. For these reasons, its physical model has as basis a three-dimensional fuel rod coupled to a one-dimensional coolant channel, which are discretized using the finite element method. Intending to study accidental conditions in which the coolant (light water) transcends its saturation temperature, turning into vapor, a homogeneous mixture is used to represent the two-phase flow, and so the coolant channel's energy equation is described using enthalpy. Owing to the fact that temperature and enthalpy are used in the physical model, it became impractical to generate a fully coupled method for solving the pertinent equations. Thus, the conjugated heat transfer problem is solved in a segregated manner through the implementation of an iterative method. Finally, as study cases for this paper we present analyses concerning the behavior of the hottest fuel rod in a Pressurized Water Reactor during a shutdown wherein the residual heat removal system is lost (loss of the reactor's coolant pumps). These studies contemplate cases in which the fuel rod's geometry is ideal or curved. Analyses are also performed for two circumstances of positioning of the fuel inside the rod: concentric and eccentric. (author)

  14. Design of convolutional tornado code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Yang, Yao; Gao, Hongmin; Tan, Lu

    2017-09-01

    As a linear block code, the traditional tornado (tTN) code is inefficient in burst-erasure environment and its multi-level structure may lead to high encoding/decoding complexity. This paper presents a convolutional tornado (cTN) code which is able to improve the burst-erasure protection capability by applying the convolution property to the tTN code, and reduce computational complexity by abrogating the multi-level structure. The simulation results show that cTN code can provide a better packet loss protection performance with lower computation complexity than tTN code.

  15. Fundamentals, current state of the development of, and prospects for further improvement of the new-generation thermal-hydraulic computational HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code for simulation of fast reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipchenkov, V. M.; Anfimov, A. M.; Afremov, D. A.; Gorbunov, V. S.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Osipov, S. L.; Mosunova, N. A.; Strizhov, V. F.; Usov, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    The conceptual fundamentals of the development of the new-generation system thermal-hydraulic computational HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code are presented. The code is intended to simulate the thermalhydraulic processes that take place in the loops and the heat-exchange equipment of liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems under normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences and during accidents. The paper provides a brief overview of Russian and foreign system thermal-hydraulic codes for modeling liquid-metal coolants and gives grounds for the necessity of development of a new-generation HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code. Considering the specific engineering features of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) equipped with the BN-1200 and the BREST-OD-300 reactors, the processes and the phenomena are singled out that require a detailed analysis and development of the models to be correctly described by the system thermal-hydraulic code in question. Information on the functionality of the computational code is provided, viz., the thermalhydraulic two-phase model, the properties of the sodium and the lead coolants, the closing equations for simulation of the heat-mass exchange processes, the models to describe the processes that take place during the steam-generator tube rupture, etc. The article gives a brief overview of the usability of the computational code, including a description of the support documentation and the supply package, as well as possibilities of taking advantages of the modern computer technologies, such as parallel computations. The paper shows the current state of verification and validation of the computational code; it also presents information on the principles of constructing of and populating the verification matrices for the BREST-OD-300 and the BN-1200 reactor systems. The prospects are outlined for further development of the HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code, introduction of new models into it, and enhancement of its usability. It is shown that the program of development and

  16. Coding vs non-coding: Translatability of short ORFs found in putative non-coding transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yuji; Kondo, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Yoshiko

    2011-11-01

    Genome analysis has identified a number of putative non-protein-coding transcripts that do not contain ORFs longer than 100 codons. Although evidence strongly suggests that non-coding RNAs are important in a variety of biological phenomena, the discovery of small peptide-coding mRNAs confirms that some transcripts that have been assumed to be non-coding actually have coding potential. Their abundance and importance in biological phenomena makes the sorting of non-coding RNAs from small peptide-coding mRNAs a key issue in functional genomics. However, validating the coding potential of small peptide-coding RNAs is complicated, because their ORF sequences are usually too short for computational analysis. In this review, we discuss computational and experimental methods for validating the translatability of these non-coding RNAs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Computational modelling and analysis of hippocampal-prefrontal information coding during a spatial decision-making task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eJahans-Price

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a computational model describing rat behaviour and the interactions of neural populations processing spatial and mnemonic information during a maze-based, decision-making task. The model integrates sensory input and implements a working memory to inform decisions at a choice point, reproducing rat behavioural data and predicting the occurrence of turn- and memory-dependent activity in neuronal networks supporting task performance. We tested these model predictions using a new software toolbox (Maze Query Language, MQL to analyse activity of medial prefrontal cortical (mPFC and dorsal hippocampal (dCA1 neurons recorded from 6 adult rats during task performance. The firing rates of dCA1 neurons discriminated context (i.e. the direction of the previous turn, whilst a subset of mPFC neurons was selective for current turn direction or context, with some conjunctively encoding both. mPFC turn-selective neurons displayed a ramping of activity on approach to the decision turn and turn-selectivity in mPFC was significantly reduced during error trials. These analyses complement data from neurophysiological recordings in non-human primates indicating that firing rates of cortical neurons correlate with integration of sensory evidence used to inform decision-making.

  18. User`s Manual for the SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 Computer Codes: Models for Evaluating Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Source Terms (Version 2.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhour, A.S.; Tharp, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    The SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 computer codes calculate source terms (i.e. radionuclide release rates) for performance assessments of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. SOURCE1 is used to simulate radionuclide releases from tumulus-type facilities. SOURCE2 is used to simulate releases from silo-, well-, well-in-silo-, and trench-type disposal facilities. The SOURCE codes (a) simulate the degradation of engineered barriers and (b) provide an estimate of the source term for LLW disposal facilities. This manual summarizes the major changes that have been effected since the codes were originally developed.

  19. Expander chunked codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Shenghao; Ye, Baoliu; Yin, Yitong; Lu, Sanglu

    2015-12-01

    Chunked codes are efficient random linear network coding (RLNC) schemes with low computational cost, where the input packets are encoded into small chunks (i.e., subsets of the coded packets). During the network transmission, RLNC is performed within each chunk. In this paper, we first introduce a simple transfer matrix model to characterize the transmission of chunks and derive some basic properties of the model to facilitate the performance analysis. We then focus on the design of overlapped chunked codes, a class of chunked codes whose chunks are non-disjoint subsets of input packets, which are of special interest since they can be encoded with negligible computational cost and in a causal fashion. We propose expander chunked (EC) codes, the first class of overlapped chunked codes that have an analyzable performance, where the construction of the chunks makes use of regular graphs. Numerical and simulation results show that in some practical settings, EC codes can achieve rates within 91 to 97 % of the optimum and outperform the state-of-the-art overlapped chunked codes significantly.

  20. On the Dimension of Graph Codes with Reed–Solomon Component Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beelen, Peter; Høholdt, Tom; Pinero, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    We study a class of graph based codes with Reed-Solomon component codes as affine variety codes. We give a formulation of the exact dimension of graph codes in general. We give an algebraic description of these codes which makes the exact computation of the dimension of the graph codes easier....

  1. PYFLOW: A computer code for the calculation of the impact parameters of Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents (DPDC) based on field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2014-05-01

    PYFLOW is a computer code designed for quantifying the hazard related to Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents (DPDC). DPDCs are multiphase flows that form during explosive volcanic eruptions. They are the major source of hazard related to volcanic eruptions, as they exert a significant stress over buildings and transport significant amounts of volcanic ash, which is hot and unbreathable. The program calculates the DPDC's impact parameters (e.g. dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration) and is founded on the turbulent boundary layer theory adapted to a multiphase framework. Fluid-dynamic variables are searched with a probabilistic approach, meaning that for each variable the average, maximum and minimum solutions are calculated. From these values, PYFLOW creates probability functions that allow to calculate the parameter at a given percentile. The code is written in Fortran 90 and can be compiled and installed on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux operating systems (OS). A User's manual is provided, explaining the details of the theoretical background, the setup and running procedure and the input data. The model inputs are DPDC deposits data, e.g. particle grainsize, layer thickness, particles shape factor and density. PYFLOW reads input data from a specifically designed input file or from the user's direct typing by command lines. Guidelines for writing input data are also contained in the package. PYFLOW guides the user at each step of execution, asking for additional data and inputs. The program is a tool for DPDC hazard assessment and, as an example, an application to the DPDC deposits of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.1 ky BP) at Campi Flegrei (Italy) is presented.

  2. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class......Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class...

  3. code {poems}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishac Bertran

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available "Exploring the potential of code to communicate at the level of poetry," the code­ {poems} project solicited submissions from code­writers in response to the notion of a poem, written in a software language which is semantically valid. These selections reveal the inner workings, constitutive elements, and styles of both a particular software and its authors.

  4. On the safety and performance demonstration tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and validation and verification of computational codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jeong, Ji Young; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Sung Kyun; Euh, Dong Jin; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) has been developed and the validation and verification (V and V) activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1), produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V and V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs) have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  5. Simplified 3D model of a PWR reactor vessel using fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX computational; Modelo simplificado 3D de la vasija de un reactor PWR mediante el codigo de dinamica de fluidos computacional ANSYS CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results from the calculation of the steady state simulation with model of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) operating under conditions of operation at full power (Hot Full Power). Development and the CFD model results show the usefulness of these codes for calculating 3D of the variable thermohydraulics of these reactors.

  6. Computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. The second volume describes the computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of the system.

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  11. Instructions for the use of the CIVM-Jet 4C finite-strain computer code to calculate the transient structural responses of partial and/or complete arbitrarily-curved rings subjected to fragment impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodal, J. J. A.; French, S. E.; Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The CIVM-JET 4C computer program for the 'finite strain' analysis of 2 d transient structural responses of complete or partial rings and beams subjected to fragment impact stored on tape as a series of individual files. Which subroutines are found in these files are described in detail. All references to the CIVM-JET 4C program are made assuming that the user has a copy of NASA CR-134907 (ASRL TR 154-9) which serves as a user's guide to (1) the CIVM-JET 4B computer code and (2) the CIVM-JET 4C computer code 'with the use of the modified input instructions' attached hereto.

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  13. Sharing code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  14. On the Safety and Performance Demonstration Tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Validation and Verification of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Bum Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR has been developed and the validation and verification (V&V activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1, produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V&V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  15. Aquelarre. A computer code for fast neutron cross sections from the statistical model; AQUELARRE. Un programa numerico para el calculo de secciones eficaces neutronicas mediante el modelo de nucleo compuesto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.

    1974-07-01

    A Fortran V computer code for Univac 1108/6 using the partial statistical (or compound nucleus) model is described. The code calculates fast neutron cross sections for the (n, n'), (n, p), (n, d) and (n, {alpha}) reactions and the angular distributions and Legendre moments for the (n, n) and (n, n') processes in heavy and intermediate spherical nuclei. A local Optical Model with spin-orbit interaction for each level is employed, allowing for the width fluctuation and Moldauer corrections, as well as the inclusion of discrete and continuous levels. (Author) 67 refs.

  16. Introduction to coding and information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Steven

    1997-01-01

    This book is intended to introduce coding theory and information theory to undergraduate students of mathematics and computer science. It begins with a review of probablity theory as applied to finite sample spaces and a general introduction to the nature and types of codes. The two subsequent chapters discuss information theory: efficiency of codes, the entropy of information sources, and Shannon's Noiseless Coding Theorem. The remaining three chapters deal with coding theory: communication channels, decoding in the presence of errors, the general theory of linear codes, and such specific codes as Hamming codes, the simplex codes, and many others.

  17. Coding Theory and Projective Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Natalia

    2008-05-01

    The projective space of order n over a finite field F_q is a set of all subspaces of the vector space F_q^{n}. In this work, we consider error-correcting codes in the projective space, focusing mainly on constant dimension codes. We start with the different representations of subspaces in the projective space. These representations involve matrices in reduced row echelon form, associated binary vectors, and Ferrers diagrams. Based on these representations, we provide a new formula for the computation of the distance between any two subspaces in the projective space. We examine lifted maximum rank distance (MRD) codes, which are nearly optimal constant dimension codes. We prove that a lifted MRD code can be represented in such a way that it forms a block design known as a transversal design. The incidence matrix of the transversal design derived from a lifted MRD code can be viewed as a parity-check matrix of a linear code in the Hamming space. We find the properties of these codes which can be viewed also as LDPC codes. We present new bounds and constructions for constant dimension codes. First, we present a multilevel construction for constant dimension codes, which can be viewed as a generalization of a lifted MRD codes construction. This construction is based on a new type of rank-metric codes, called Ferrers diagram rank-metric codes. Then we derive upper bounds on the size of constant dimension codes which contain the lifted MRD code, and provide a construction for two families of codes, that attain these upper bounds. We generalize the well-known concept of a punctured code for a code in the projective space to obtain large codes which are not constant dimension. We present efficient enumerative encoding and decoding techniques for the Grassmannian. Finally we describe a search method for constant dimension lexicodes.

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  20. Quasi-cyclic unit memory convolutional codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Paaske, Erik; Ballan, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Unit memory convolutional codes with generator matrices, which are composed of circulant submatrices, are introduced. This structure facilitates the analysis of efficient search for good codes. Equivalences among such codes and some of the basic structural properties are discussed. In particular......, catastrophic encoders and minimal encoders are characterized and dual codes treated. Further, various distance measures are discussed, and a number of good codes, some of which result from efficient computer search and some of which result from known block codes, are presented...

  1. Efficient convolutional sparse coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    2017-06-20

    Computationally efficient algorithms may be applied for fast dictionary learning solving the convolutional sparse coding problem in the Fourier domain. More specifically, efficient convolutional sparse coding may be derived within an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) framework that utilizes fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to solve the main linear system in the frequency domain. Such algorithms may enable a significant reduction in computational cost over conventional approaches by implementing a linear solver for the most critical and computationally expensive component of the conventional iterative algorithm. The theoretical computational cost of the algorithm may be reduced from O(M.sup.3N) to O(MN log N), where N is the dimensionality of the data and M is the number of elements in the dictionary. This significant improvement in efficiency may greatly increase the range of problems that can practically be addressed via convolutional sparse representations.

  2. Multiple LDPC decoding for distributed source coding and video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Luong, Huynh Van; Huang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Distributed source coding (DSC) is a coding paradigm for systems which fully or partly exploit the source statistics at the decoder to reduce the computational burden at the encoder. Distributed video coding (DVC) is one example. This paper considers the use of Low Density Parity Check Accumulate...... (LDPCA) codes in a DSC scheme with feed-back. To improve the LDPC coding performance in the context of DSC and DVC, while retaining short encoder blocks, this paper proposes multiple parallel LDPC decoding. The proposed scheme passes soft information between decoders to enhance performance. Experimental...

  3. Divergence coding for convolutional codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Zolotarev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we propose a new coding/decoding on the divergence principle. A new divergent multithreshold decoder (MTD for convolutional self-orthogonal codes contains two threshold elements. The second threshold element decodes the code with the code distance one greater than for the first threshold element. Errorcorrecting possibility of the new MTD modification have been higher than traditional MTD. Simulation results show that the performance of the divergent schemes allow to approach area of its effective work to channel capacity approximately on 0,5 dB. Note that we include the enough effective Viterbi decoder instead of the first threshold element, the divergence principle can reach more. Index Terms — error-correcting coding, convolutional code, decoder, multithreshold decoder, Viterbi algorithm.

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  11. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 10. Error Correcting Codes How Numbers Protect Themselves. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 1 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  12. Decoding Codes on Graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computer Science and. Automation, liSe. Their research addresses various aspects of algebraic and combinatorial coding theory. 1 low Density Parity Check ..... lustrating how the variable Xd is decoded. As mentioned earlier, this algorithm runs iteratively. To start with, in the first iteration, only bits in the first level of the ...

  13. TOCAR: a code to interface FOURACES - CARNAVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, G.C.; Vaccari, M.

    1981-08-01

    The TOCAR code, written in FORTRAN-IV for IBM-370 computers, is an interface between the output of the FOURACES code and the CARNAVAL binary format for the multigroup neutron cross-sections, scattering matrices and related quantities. Besides the description of the code and the how to use, the report contains the code listing.

  14. Fulcrum Network Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Fulcrum network codes, which are a network coding framework, achieve three objectives: (i) to reduce the overhead per coded packet to almost 1 bit per source packet; (ii) to operate the network using only low field size operations at intermediate nodes, dramatically reducing complexity...... in the network; and (iii) to deliver an end-to-end performance that is close to that of a high field size network coding system for high-end receivers while simultaneously catering to low-end ones that can only decode in a lower field size. Sources may encode using a high field size expansion to increase...... the number of dimensions seen by the network using a linear mapping. Receivers can tradeoff computational effort with network delay, decoding in the high field size, the low field size, or a combination thereof....

  15. Pyramid image codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  3. Coding labour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCosker, Anthony; Milne, Esther

    2014-01-01

    ... software. Code encompasses the laws that regulate human affairs and the operation of capital, behavioural mores and accepted ways of acting, but it also defines the building blocks of life as DNA...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  5. Development of a computer code to calculate the distribution of radionuclides within the human body by the biokinetic models of the ICRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masaki; Yamanaka, Tsuneyasu; Hayakawa, Nobuhiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Sugiura, Nobuyuki

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the Basic Radionuclide vAlue for Internal Dosimetry (BRAID) code, which was developed to calculate the time-dependent activity distribution in each organ and tissue characterised by the biokinetic compartmental models provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Translocation from one compartment to the next is taken to be governed by first-order kinetics, which is formulated by the first-order differential equations. In the source program of this code, the conservation equations are solved for the mass balance that describes the transfer of a radionuclide between compartments. This code is applicable to the evaluation of the radioactivity of nuclides in an organ or tissue without modification of the source program. It is also possible to handle easily the cases of the revision of the biokinetic model or the application of a uniquely defined model by a user, because this code is designed so that all information on the biokinetic model structure is imported from an input file. The sample calculations are performed with the ICRP model, and the results are compared with the analytic solutions using simple models. It is suggested that this code provides sufficient result for the dose estimation and interpretation of monitoring data. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  7. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  8. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations; Quantifizierung der Rechengenauigkeit von Codesystemen zum Abbrandkredit durch Experimentnachrechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthias; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Moser, Franz-Eberhard; Pfeiffer, Arndt; Stuke, Maik

    2014-06-15

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor k{sub eff} (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  9. Application of ASTEC, MELCOR, and MAAP Computer Codes for Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of a PWR Containment Equipped with the PCFV and PAR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of the containment will be challenged during a severe accident due to pressurization caused by the accumulation of steam and other gases and possible ignition of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Installation of a passive filtered venting system and passive autocatalytic recombiners allows control of the pressure, radioactive releases, and concentration of flammable gases. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the containment equipped with dedicated passive safety systems after a hypothetical station blackout event is performed for a two-loop pressurized water reactor NPP with three integral severe accident codes: ASTEC, MELCOR, and MAAP. MELCOR and MAAP are two major US codes for severe accident analyses, and the ASTEC code is the European code, joint property of Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN, France and Gesellschaft für Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Germany. Codes’ overall characteristics, physics models, and the analysis results are compared herein. Despite considerable differences between the codes’ modelling features, the general trends of the NPP behaviour are found to be similar, although discrepancies related to simulation of the processes in the containment cavity are also observed and discussed in the paper.

  10. The Aster code; Code Aster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The Aster code is a 2D or 3D finite-element calculation code for structures developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF). This dossier presents a complete overview of the characteristics and uses of the Aster code: introduction of version 4; the context of Aster (organisation of the code development, versions, systems and interfaces, development tools, quality assurance, independent validation); static mechanics (linear thermo-elasticity, Euler buckling, cables, Zarka-Casier method); non-linear mechanics (materials behaviour, big deformations, specific loads, unloading and loss of load proportionality indicators, global algorithm, contact and friction); rupture mechanics (G energy restitution level, restitution level in thermo-elasto-plasticity, 3D local energy restitution level, KI and KII stress intensity factors, calculation of limit loads for structures), specific treatments (fatigue, rupture, wear, error estimation); meshes and models (mesh generation, modeling, loads and boundary conditions, links between different modeling processes, resolution of linear systems, display of results etc..); vibration mechanics (modal and harmonic analysis, dynamics with shocks, direct transient dynamics, seismic analysis and aleatory dynamics, non-linear dynamics, dynamical sub-structuring); fluid-structure interactions (internal acoustics, mass, rigidity and damping); linear and non-linear thermal analysis; steels and metal industry (structure transformations); coupled problems (internal chaining, internal thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, chaining with other codes); products and services. (J.S.)

  11. Code query by example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  12. Network Coding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Network coding is a technique to increase the amount of information °ow in a network by mak- ing the key observation that information °ow is fundamentally different from commodity °ow. Whereas, under traditional methods of opera- tion of data networks, intermediate nodes are restricted to simply forwarding their incoming.

  13. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Denne rapport rummer evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet1. Coding Class projektet blev igangsat i skoleåret 2016/2017 af IT-Branchen i samarbejde med en række medlemsvirksomheder, Københavns kommune, Vejle Kommune, Styrelsen for IT- og Læring (STIL) og den frivillige forening...... Coding Pirates2. Rapporten er forfattet af Docent i digitale læringsressourcer og forskningskoordinator for forsknings- og udviklingsmiljøet Digitalisering i Skolen (DiS), Mikala Hansbøl, fra Institut for Skole og Læring ved Professionshøjskolen Metropol; og Lektor i læringsteknologi, interaktionsdesign......, design tænkning og design-pædagogik, Stine Ejsing-Duun fra Forskningslab: It og Læringsdesign (ILD-LAB) ved Institut for kommunikation og psykologi, Aalborg Universitet i København. Vi har fulgt og gennemført evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet i perioden november 2016 til maj 2017...

  14. Network Coding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Network Coding. K V Rashmi Nihar B Shah P Vijay Kumar. General Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 604-621. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/07/0604-0621. Keywords.

  15. Securing mobile code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called &apos

  16. Code Generation with Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Arnoldus, Jeroen; Serebrenik, A

    2012-01-01

    Templates are used to generate all kinds of text, including computer code. The last decade, the use of templates gained a lot of popularity due to the increase of dynamic web applications. Templates are a tool for programmers, and implementations of template engines are most times based on practical experience rather than based on a theoretical background. This book reveals the mathematical background of templates and shows interesting findings for improving the practical use of templates. First, a framework to determine the necessary computational power for the template metalanguage is presen

  17. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  18. Computer Program of SIE ASME-NH Code for Structural Integrity Evaluation of Next Generation Reactors Subjecting to Elevated Temperature Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H

    2006-03-15

    In this report, the SIE ASME (Structural Integrity Evaluations by ASME-NH), which has a computerized implementation of ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Code Section III Subsection NH rules, is developed to apply to the next generation reactor design subjecting to the elevated temperature operations over 500 .deg. C and over 30 years design lifetime, and the user's manual for this program is described in detail.

  19. Coding as literacy metalithikum IV

    CERN Document Server

    Bühlmann, Vera; Moosavi, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in computer science, particularly "data-driven procedures" have opened a new level of design and engineering. This has also affected architecture. The publication collects contributions on Coding as Literacy by computer scientists, mathematicians, philosophers, cultural theorists, and architects. "Self-Organizing Maps" (SOM) will serve as the concrete reference point for all further discussions.

  20. Code Modernization of VPIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Robert; Nystrom, David; Albright, Brian

    2017-10-01

    The ability of scientific simulations to effectively deliver performant computation is increasingly being challenged by successive generations of high-performance computing architectures. Code development to support efficient computation on these modern architectures is both expensive, and highly complex; if it is approached without due care, it may also not be directly transferable between subsequent hardware generations. Previous works have discussed techniques to support the process of adapting a legacy code for modern hardware generations, but despite the breakthroughs in the areas of mini-app development, portable-performance, and cache oblivious algorithms the problem still remains largely unsolved. In this work we demonstrate how a focus on platform agnostic modern code-development can be applied to Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to facilitate effective scientific delivery. This work builds directly on our previous work optimizing VPIC, in which we replaced intrinsic based vectorisation with compile generated auto-vectorization to improve the performance and portability of VPIC. In this work we present the use of a specialized SIMD queue for processing some particle operations, and also preview a GPU capable OpenMP variant of VPIC. Finally we include a lessons learnt. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and supported by the LANL LDRD program.