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Sample records for bubonic plague model

  1. Bubonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has the potential to be used as a weapon of bioterrorism; if this were to happen, the ... rat fleas and bubonic plague include India, Vietnam, parts of Africa, and the former Soviet Union. People ...

  2. Spatiotemporal modelling and mapping of the bubonic plague epidemic in India

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    Christakos George

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work studies the spatiotemporal evolution of bubonic plague in India during 1896–1906 using stochastic concepts and geographical information science techniques. In the past, most investigations focused on selected cities to conduct different kinds of studies, such as the ecology of rats. No detailed maps existed incorporating the space-time dependence structure and uncertainty sources of the epidemic system and providing a composite space-time picture of the disease propagation characteristics. Results Informative spatiotemporal maps were generated that represented mortality rates and geographical spread of the disease, and epidemic indicator plots were derived that offered meaningful characterizations of the spatiotemporal disease distribution. The bubonic plague in India exhibited strong seasonal and geographical features. During its entire duration, the plague continued to invade new geographical areas, while it followed a re-emergence pattern at many localities; its rate changed significantly during each year and the mortality distribution exhibited space-time heterogeneous patterns; prevalence usually occurred in the autumn and spring, whereas the plague stopped moving towards new locations during the summers. Conclusion Modern stochastic modelling and geographical information science provide powerful means to study the spatiotemporal distribution of the bubonic plague epidemic under conditions of uncertainty and multi-sourced databases; to account for various forms of interdisciplinary knowledge; and to generate informative space-time maps of mortality rates and propagation patterns. To the best of our knowledge, this kind of plague maps and plots become available for the first time, thus providing novel perspectives concerning the distribution and space-time propagation of the deadly epidemic. Furthermore, systematic maps and indicator plots make possible the comparison of the spatial-temporal propagation

  3. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

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    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  4. Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascuel, Fanny; Choisy, Marc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Débarre, Florence; Brouat, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Although bubonic plague is an endemic zoonosis in many countries around the world, the factors responsible for the persistence of this highly virulent disease remain poorly known. Classically, the endemic persistence of plague is suspected to be due to the coexistence of plague resistant and plague susceptible rodents in natural foci, and/or to a metapopulation structure of reservoirs. Here, we test separately the effect of each of these factors on the long-term persistence of plague. We analyse the dynamics and equilibria of a model of plague propagation, consistent with plague ecology in Madagascar, a major focus where this disease is endemic since the 1920s in central highlands. By combining deterministic and stochastic analyses of this model, and including sensitivity analyses, we show that (i) endemicity is favoured by intermediate host population sizes, (ii) in large host populations, the presence of resistant rats is sufficient to explain long-term persistence of plague, and (iii) the metapopulation structure of susceptible host populations alone can also account for plague endemicity, thanks to both subdivision and the subsequent reduction in the size of subpopulations, and extinction-recolonization dynamics of the disease. In the light of these results, we suggest scenarios to explain the localized presence of plague in Madagascar. PMID:23675291

  5. Urban epidemic of bubonic plague in Majunga, Madagascar: epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisier, P; Rasolomaharo, M; Ranaivoson, G; Rasoamanana, B; Rakoto, L; Andrianirina, Z; Andriamahefazafy, B; Chanteau, S

    1997-05-01

    After an absence of 62 years, an epidemic of plague occurred in the harbour city of Majunga (Madagascar) from July 1995 to March 1996, following sporadic cases in March and May 1995. By 15 March 1996, 617 clinically suspected cases of bubonic plague had been notified. Laboratory testing was carried out for 394 individuals: 60 (15.2%) were confirmed to have bubonic plague and 48 (12.2%) were considered as presumptive cases. The incidence was significantly higher in males in all age groups and in both sexes in the 5-19 age group. Twenty-four deaths were related to plague, but early treatment with streptomycin has confirmed its effectiveness insofar as the case-farality ratio was only 8.7% among confirmed and presumptive cases admitted to hospital. The difficulty of clinically diagnosing bubonic plague was affirmed. The disease met favourable conditions through the poverty and low level of hygiene prevalent in most parts of Majunga. PMID:9217697

  6. Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus

    OpenAIRE

    Gascuel, Fanny; Choisy, Marc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Debarre, Florence; Brouat, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Although bubonic plague is an endemic zoonosis in many countries around the world, the factors responsible for the persistence of this highly virulent disease remain poorly known. Classically, the endemic persistence of plague is suspected to be due to the coexistence of plague resistant and plague susceptible rodents in natural foci, and/or to a metapopulation structure of reservoirs. Here, we test separately the effect of each of these factors on the long-term persistence of plague. We anal...

  7. Epidemiologic Features of Four Successive Annual Outbreaks of Bubonic Plague in Mahajanga, Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Boisier, Pascal; Rahalison, Lila; Rasolomaharo, Monique; Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Mahafaly, Mahafaly; Razafimahefa, Maminirana; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Ratsifasoamanana, Lala; Chanteau, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    From 1995 to 1998, outbreaks of bubonic plague occurred annually in the coastal city of Mahajanga, Madagascar. A total of 1,702 clinically suspected cases of bubonic plague were reported, including 515 laboratory confirmed by Yersinia pestis isolation (297), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or both. Incidence was higher in males and young persons. Most buboes were inguinal, but children had a higher frequency of cervical or axillary buboes. Among laboratory-confirmed hospitalized patients, ...

  8. Epidemiologic features of four successive annual outbreaks of bubonic plague in Mahajanga, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisier, Pascal; Rahalison, Lila; Rasolomaharo, Monique; Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Mahafaly, Mahafaly; Razafimahefa, Maminirana; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Ratsifasoamanana, Lala; Chanteau, Suzanne

    2002-03-01

    From 1995 to 1998, outbreaks of bubonic plague occurred annually in the coastal city of Mahajanga, Madagascar. A total of 1,702 clinically suspected cases of bubonic plague were reported, including 515 laboratory confirmed by Yersinia pestis isolation (297), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or both. Incidence was higher in males and young persons. Most buboes were inguinal, but children had a higher frequency of cervical or axillary buboes. Among laboratory-confirmed hospitalized patients, the case-fatality rate was 7.9%, although all Y. pestis isolates were sensitive to streptomycin, the recommended antibiotic. In this tropical city, plague outbreaks occur during the dry and cool season. Most cases are concentrated in the same crowded and unsanitary districts, a result of close contact among humans, rats, and shrews. Plague remains an important public health problem in Madagascar, and the potential is substantial for spread to other coastal cities and abroad. PMID:11927030

  9. Travel history key to picking up on signs of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Health officials note an uptick in cases of bubonic plague in the United States this year, with at least 12 reported human cases reported since April 1. The CDC notes that healthcare providers should consider plague in patients who have traveled to plague-endemic areas and exhibit fever, headache, chills, weakness, and one or more swollen or tender and painful lymph nodes, referred to as buboes. Officials note that the disease rarely passes from person to person, but that this is a concern with patients who have developed the pneumonic form of the disease. Health officials note that in recent years there has been an average of seven cases of human plague each year in the United States, and that most of these cases are the bubonic form of the illness. Four patients confirmed to have plague this year have died, including the most recent case, a Utah man in his 70s. Most cases of plague in the United States occur in two regions. The first includes northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, and southern Colorado, and the second includes California, southern Oregon, and far western Nevada. When plague is suspected, treatment with antibiotics should begin immediately. PMID:26550675

  10. Detection of Yersinia pestis using real-time PCR in patients with suspected bubonic plague.

    OpenAIRE

    Riehm, Julia M; Rahalison, Lila; Holger C. Scholz; Thoma, Bryan; Pfeffer, Martin; Razanakoto, Léa Mamiharisoa; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Neubauer, Heinrich; Tomaso, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia (Y.) pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic in natural foci of Asia, Africa, and America. Real-time PCR assays have been described as rapid diagnostic tools, but so far none has been validated for its clinical use. In a retrospective clinical study we evaluated three real-time PCR assays in two different assay formats, 5'-nuclease and hybridization probes assays. Lymph node aspirates from 149 patients from Madagascar with the clinical diagnosis of bubonic plague were inves...

  11. Detection of Yersinia pestis using real-time PCR in patients with suspected bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehm, Julia M; Rahalison, Lila; Scholz, Holger C; Thoma, Bryan; Pfeffer, Martin; Razanakoto, Léa Mamiharisoa; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Neubauer, Heinrich; Tomaso, Herbert

    2011-02-01

    Yersinia (Y.) pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic in natural foci of Asia, Africa, and America. Real-time PCR assays have been described as rapid diagnostic tools, but so far none has been validated for its clinical use. In a retrospective clinical study we evaluated three real-time PCR assays in two different assay formats, 5'-nuclease and hybridization probes assays. Lymph node aspirates from 149 patients from Madagascar with the clinical diagnosis of bubonic plague were investigated for the detection of Y. pestis DNA. Results of real-time PCR assays targeting the virulence plasmids pPCP1 (pla gene), and pMT1 (caf1, Ymt genes) were compared with an F1-antigen immunochromatographic test (ICT) and cultivation of the organism. Out of the 149 samples an infection with Y. pestis was confirmed by culture in 47 patients while ICT was positive in 88 including all culture proven cases. The best real-time PCR assay was the 5'-nuclease assay targeting pla which was positive in 120 cases. In conclusion, the 5'-nuclease assay targeting pla can be recommended as diagnostic tool for establishing a presumptive diagnosis when bubonic plague is clinically suspected. PMID:20933595

  12. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques.

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    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain's protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuated by subcutaneous route, elicits an F1-specific antibody titer similar to the EV and provides a protective efficacy similar to the EV against bubonic plague in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques. The Microtus strain 201 could induce elevated secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6), as well as chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8. However, the protected animals developed skin ulcer at challenge site with different severity in most of the immunized and some of the EV-immunized monkeys. Generally, the Microtus strain 201 represented a good plague vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as its good protection against high dose of subcutaneous virulent Y. pestis challenge. PMID:24225642

  13. Diagnosis of bubonic plague by PCR in Madagascar under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahalison, L; Vololonirina, E; Ratsitorahina, M; Chanteau, S

    2000-01-01

    The diagnostic value of a PCR assay that amplifies a 501-bp fragment of the Yersinia pestis caf1 gene has been determined in a reference laboratory with 218 bubo aspirates collected from patients with clinically suspected plague managed in a regional hospital in Madagascar. The culture of Y. pestis and the detection of the F1 antigen (Ag) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used as reference diagnostic methods. The sensitivity of PCR was 89% (57 of 64) for the Y. pestis-positive patients, and 80.7% (63 of 78) for the F1 Ag-positive patients. The specificity of PCR for the culture-, F1 Ag-, and antibody-negative patients (n = 105) was 100%. Because in Madagascar most patients with plague are managed and their clinical samples are collected in remote villages, the usefulness of PCR was evaluated for routine diagnostic use in the operational conditions of the control program. The sensitivity of PCR was 50% (25 of 50) relative to the results of culture and 35.2% (19 of 54) relative to the results of the F1 Ag immunocapture ELISA. The specificity of PCR under these conditions was 96%. In conclusion, the PCR method was found to be very specific but not as sensitive as culture or the F1 Ag detection method. The limitation in sensitivity may have been due to suboptimal field conditions and the small volumes of samples used for DNA extraction. This technique is not recommended as a routine diagnostic test for plague in Madagascar. PMID:10618097

  14. Diagnosis of Bubonic Plague by PCR in Madagascar under Field Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rahalison, L.; Vololonirina, E.; Ratsitorahina, M.; Chanteau, S.

    2000-01-01

    The diagnostic value of a PCR assay that amplifies a 501-bp fragment of the Yersinia pestis caf1 gene has been determined in a reference laboratory with 218 bubo aspirates collected from patients with clinically suspected plague managed in a regional hospital in Madagascar. The culture of Y. pestis and the detection of the F1 antigen (Ag) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used as reference diagnostic methods. The sensitivity of PCR was 89% (57 of 64) for the Y. pestis-positive...

  15. A three-variable chaotic system for the epidemic of bubonic plague in Bombay by the end of the 19th century and its coupling to the epizootics of the two main species of rats

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    Mangiarotti, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A plague epidemic broke out in Bombay by the end of the 19th century. A committee was first appointed by the Bombay City [1] in order to stop the epidemic before the rain season started. Unfortunately, the disease could not be stopped and the epidemic became endemic. After several years, another Advisory Committee [2] was appointed that tried to investigate the causes of plague in all possible directions. An impressing quantity of information was gathered during the period 1907-1911 and published. In particular, it was noticed that the epidemic was systematically preceded by epizootics of rats. For this reason, the populations of the main species of rodents were systematically monitored. This data set is revisited here by using a multivariate version of the global modeling technique [3]. The aim of this technique is to obtain a set of Ordinary Differential Equations directly from time series. Three observational time series are considered: the number of person died of bubonic plague per half month (1), and the number of captured infected black rats Mus rattus (2) and brown rats Mus decumanus (3). Several models are obtained, all based on the same algebraic basic structure. These models are, either directly chaotic, or close to chaos (chaos could easily be obtained by tuning one model parameter). The algebraic structure of the simplest model obtained is analyzed in more details. Surprisingly, it is found that the interpretation of the coupling between the three variables can be done term by term. This interpretation is in quite good coherence with the conclusions of the Advisory Committee published one hundred years ago. This structure also shows that the human action to slow down the disease during this period was obviously effective, although insufficient to stop the epidemic drastically. This result suggests that the global modeling technique can be a powerful tool to detect causal couplings in epidemiology, and, more generally, among observational variables from

  16. Small todents fleas from the bubonic plague focus located in the Serra dos Órgãos Mountain Range, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Raimundo Wilson de Carvalho

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Eleven species of fleas were collected from 601 small rodents, from November 1995 to October 1997, in areas of natural focus of bubonic plague, including the municipalities of Nova Friburgo, Sumidouro and Teresópolis, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Among 924 fleas collected, Polygenis (Polygenis rimatus (Rhopalopsyllidae was the predominant species regarding the frequency, representing 41.3% (N:382, followed by P. (Neopolygenis pradoi, representing 20% (N:185 and Craneopsylla minervaminerva (Stephanocircidae, representing 18.9% (N:175. The host Akodon cursor harbored 47.9% of these fleas. Other six host species were infested by 52.1% of the remaining fleas. Fleas were found on hosts and in places within the focus not previously reported by the literature.

  17. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain’s protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuat...

  18. Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Main Content Area Plague Plague is an infectious disease caused by bacteria called Yersinia pestis . These bacteria are found mainly ... States develop plague, according to the Centers for Disease Control and ... cases of human plague are caused by bites of infected animals or the infected ...

  19. Role of the Yersinia pestis yersiniabactin iron acquisition system in the incidence of flea-borne plague.

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    Florent Sebbane

    Full Text Available Plague is a flea-borne zoonosis caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mutants lacking the yersiniabactin (Ybt siderophore-based iron transport system are avirulent when inoculated intradermally but fully virulent when inoculated intravenously in mice. Presumably, Ybt is required to provide sufficient iron at the peripheral injection site, suggesting that Ybt would be an essential virulence factor for flea-borne plague. Here, using a flea-to-mouse transmission model, we show that a Y. pestis strain lacking the Ybt system causes fatal plague at low incidence when transmitted by fleas. Bacteriology and histology analyses revealed that a Ybt-negative strain caused only primary septicemic plague and atypical bubonic plague instead of the typical bubonic form of disease. The results provide new evidence that primary septicemic plague is a distinct clinical entity and suggest that unusual forms of plague may be caused by atypical Y. pestis strains.

  20. : A framework for multilevel dynamic modelization of bubonic plague in the Madagascar highlands

    OpenAIRE

    Laperrière, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Cet article présente un cadre de modélisation dynamique appliqué à la peste bubonique des Hautes Terres de Madagascar, qui intègre l'hétérogénéité de la structure des populations de rongeurs, les hôtes principaux, et de leurs puces vectrices. Un couplage est proposé entre deux approches de modélisation, l'une individu-centrée, par un formalisme multi-agents, l'autre agrégée, par un système d'équations différentielles, pour relier la dynamique de la maladie au niveau individuel à celle au nive...

  1. Characterization of systemic and pneumonic murine models of plague infection using a conditionally virulent strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Ramirez, Karina; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Rodriguez, Ana L; Galen, James E; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2013-03-01

    Yersinia pestis causes bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pneumonic infection is the most severe and invariably fatal if untreated. Because of its high virulence, ease of delivery and precedent of use in warfare, Y. pestis is considered as a potential bioterror agent. No licensed plague vaccine is currently available in the US. Laboratory research with virulent strains requires appropriate biocontainment (i.e., Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) for procedures that generate aerosol/droplets) and secure facilities that comply with federal select agent regulations. To assist in the identification of promising vaccine candidates during the early phases of development, we characterized mouse models of systemic and pneumonic plague infection using the Y. pestis strain EV76, an attenuated human vaccine strain that can be rendered virulent in mice under in vivo iron supplementation. Mice inoculated intranasally or intravenously with Y. pestis EV76 in the presence of iron developed a systemic and pneumonic plague infection that resulted in disease and lethality. Bacteria replicated and severely compromised the spleen, liver and lungs. Susceptibility was age dependent, with younger mice being more vulnerable to pneumonic infection. We used these models of infection to assess the protective capacity of newly developed Salmonella-based plague vaccines. The protective outcome varied depending on the route and dose of infection. Protection was associated with the induction of specific immunological effectors in systemic/mucosal compartments. The models of infection described could serve as safe and practical tools for identifying promising vaccine candidates that warrant further potency evaluation using fully virulent strains in BSL-3 settings. PMID:23195858

  2. Empirical assessment of a threshold model for sylvatic plague

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Stephen; Leirs, Herwig; Viljugrein, H.;

    2007-01-01

    Plague surveillance programmes established in Kazakhstan, Central Asia, during the previous century, have generated large plague archives that have been used to parameterize an abundance threshold model for sylvatic plague in great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations. Here, we assess the model ...

  3. Thinking extreme social violence: the model of the literary plague.

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    Priel, Beatriz

    2007-12-01

    The author uses literary plagues as a model for thinking psychoanalytically about the basic anxieties activated among perpetrators of sanctioned massacres. The model of the plague allows abstracting an underlying primitive psychological organization characterized by syncretism and a powerful anxiety of de-differentiation and confusion, leading characteristically to imitative behavior within the in-group as well as to the disavowal of the out-group members similarities to oneself, i.e. the disavowal of the other's humanity. Recognizing the historical and social foundations of discrimination and genocide, the author analyzes the interaction between group and individual processes that allow ordinary people to join daily acts of immoral violence. She dramatizes the model of the plague through a psychoanalytic reading of three literary plagues: Thebes' plague according to Sophocles, Camus's chronicle of the plague in Oran, and Saramago's meditation on the plague of white blindness. PMID:18055377

  4. Cethromycin-Mediated Protection against the Plague Pathogen Yersinia pestis in a Rat Model of Infection and Comparison with Levofloxacin ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Brackman, Sheri M.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Sha, Jian; Erova, Tatiana E.; Yeager, Linsey A.; Peterson, Johnny W.; Xu, Ze-Qi; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, has historically been regarded as one of the deadliest pathogens known to mankind, having caused three major pandemics. After being transmitted by the bite of an infected flea arthropod vector, Y. pestis can cause three forms of human plague: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic, with the latter two having very high mortality rates. With increased threats of bioterrorism, it is likely that a multidrug-resistant Y. pestis strain would be emplo...

  5. Modeling Epidemic Spread in Synthetic Populations - Virtual Plagues in Massively Multiplayer Online Games

    CERN Document Server

    Boman, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    A virtual plague is a process in which a behavior-affecting property spreads among characters in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG). The MMOG individuals constitute a synthetic population, and the game can be seen as a form of interactive executable model for studying disease spread, albeit of a very special kind. To a game developer maintaining an MMOG, recognizing, monitoring, and ultimately controlling a virtual plague is important, regardless of how it was initiated. The prospect of using tools, methods and theory from the field of epidemiology to do this seems natural and appealing. We will address the feasibility of such a prospect, first by considering some basic measures used in epidemiology, then by pointing out the differences between real world epidemics and virtual plagues. We also suggest directions for MMOG developer control through epidemiological modeling. Our aim is understanding the properties of virtual plagues, rather than trying to eliminate them or mitigate their effects, as woul...

  6. Plague dynamics are driven by climate variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Samia, Noelle I.; Viljugrein, Hildegunn;

    2006-01-01

    The bacterium Yersinia pestis causes bubonic plague. In Central Asia, where human plague is still reported regularly, the bacterium is common in natural populations of great gerbils. By using field data from 1949-1995 and previously undescribed statistical techniques, we show that Y. pestis preva...... in the same region, and they are expected to  continue or become more favorable as a result of climate change.  Threats of outbreaks may thus be increasing where humans live in close contact with rodents and fleas (or other wildlife) harboring endemic plague....... prevalence in gerbils increases with warmer springs and wetter summers: A 1°C increase in spring is predicted to lead to a >50% increase in prevalence. Climatic conditions favoring plague apparently existed in this region at the onset of the Black Death as well as when the most recent plague pandemic arose...

  7. Human plague in 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-14

    Trends in the incidence of human plague cases reported to the World Health Organization were provided for 1992 and between 1978 and 1992 by country. Not all countries report or record plague. In 1992, there were 9 countries reporting a total of 1582 cases, of which 138 were deaths. In 1991, there were 10 countries reporting a total of 1966 cases, of which 133 were deaths. The case fatality rate in 1992 was 8.7% and 10.4% averaged over the previous 10 years. Between 1978 and 1992, 14,856 cases of plague were reported, of which 1451 cases were fatal. Countries reporting totaled 21, but only 6 reported almost annually: Brazil, Madagascar, Myanmar, the United Republic of Tanzania, the USA, and Viet Nam. Peak numbers of cases occurred in 1984, 1988, and 1990-92. Africa totaled 61% of cases and 77% of deaths. In 1992, Madagascar and Zaire reported 412 cases, of which 102 were fatal. Plague in Madagascar was concentrated in the provinces of Antananarivo, Fianarantsoa, Mahajanga, and Toamasina. Most of the cases in 1991 were from Antananarivo Province (61 cases and 19 deaths) and Fianarantsoa Province (99 case and 5 deaths). Plague peaks occurred in January through May and November and December. Zaire deaths were concentrated in Upper Zaire in 5 rural Heath Zones: Logo (125 cases and 47 deaths), Rethy (54 cases and 4 deaths), Nyarembe (22 cases and 9 deaths), Rimba (11 cases and 4 deaths), and Bunia (2 cases and 1 death). Almost 60% of all deaths occurred during May to July and included bubonic, septicemic, and pulmonary plague. American plague cases totaled 158 and 6 deaths (Peru, Brazil, and the USA). Asia reported 1012 cases and 26 cases (China, Mongolia, Myanmar, and Viet Nam). In the USA, the 13 cases were recorded as 1 each in Frenso County, California; Owyhee County, Idaho; Douglas County, Nevada; Utah County, Utah; and Sheridan County, Wyoming; 2 in New Mexico (Santa Fe, and Albuquerque and San Miguel Counties); and Arizona (3 in Apache County and 1 in Pima County

  8. [Update on plague in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteau, S; Rahalison, L; Duplantier, J M; Rasoamanana, B; Ratsitorahina, M; Dromigny, J A; Laventure, S; Duchemin, J B; Boisier, P; Rabeson, D; Roux, J

    1998-01-01

    After a thirty year period of successful control, bubonic plague showed the first signs of return in Madagascar where a fatal outbreak occurred in Antananarivo in 1978. A second outbreak was observed in Mahajanga in 1991 after more than a half century. In 1997, 459 confirmed or presumptive cases were reported, as compared to 150 to 250 cases during the last years. However the actual extent of this recrudescence must be placed in the perspective of a more efficient control program that has led to better reporting of suspected cases and availability of more accurate diagnostic techniques. Recent research has led to the development of highly effective immunological diagnostic tools (detection of antibodies and F1 antigen) allowing not only better surveillance of the disease in man and animals but also renewed study of the epidemiological cycle in the current environment. In this regard the capacity of several endemic fleas as vectors and the role of the rat Rattus norvegicus and the musk shrew Suncus murinus are currently under investigation. Genetic study of strains collected from 1936 to 1996 has demonstrated the appearance of 3 new ribotypes of Yersinia pestis since 1982 in the zones of strongest plague activity in Madagascar. A strain showing multiresistance to standard therapeutic antibiotic agents was isolated in 1995. Bubonic plaque is a priority health problem in Madagascar but remains a major concern for the rest of the world. PMID:9812306

  9. Plague Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tissues or fluids of a plague-infected animal. Preventive therapy is also recommended in the event of close exposure to another person or to a pet animal with suspected plague pneumonia. For preventive drug therapy, ...

  10. Spatial analysis of plague in California: niche modeling predictions of the current distribution and potential response to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker James R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a public and wildlife health concern in California and the western United States. This study explores the spatial characteristics of positive plague samples in California and tests Maxent, a machine-learning method that can be used to develop niche-based models from presence-only data, for mapping the potential distribution of plague foci. Maxent models were constructed using geocoded seroprevalence data from surveillance of California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi as case points and Worldclim bioclimatic data as predictor variables, and compared and validated using area under the receiver operating curve (AUC statistics. Additionally, model results were compared to locations of positive and negative coyote (Canis latrans samples, in order to determine the correlation between Maxent model predictions and areas of plague risk as determined via wild carnivore surveillance. Results Models of plague activity in California ground squirrels, based on recent climate conditions, accurately identified case locations (AUC of 0.913 to 0.948 and were significantly correlated with coyote samples. The final models were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios. These models suggest that by 2050, climate conditions may reduce plague risk in the southern parts of California and increase risk along the northern coast and Sierras. Conclusion Because different modeling approaches can yield substantially different results, care should be taken when interpreting future model predictions. Nonetheless, niche modeling can be a useful tool for exploring and mapping the potential response of plague activity to climate change. The final models in this study were used to identify potential plague risk areas based on an ensemble of six future climate scenarios, which can help public managers decide where to allocate surveillance resources

  11. Modeling the epidemiological history of plague in Central Asia: Palaeoclimatic forcing on a disease system over the past millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kausrud Kyrre

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cases of plague (Yersinia pestis infection originate, ultimately, in the bacterium's wildlife host populations. The epidemiological dynamics of the wildlife reservoir therefore determine the abundance, distribution and evolution of the pathogen, which in turn shape the frequency, distribution and virulence of human cases. Earlier studies have shown clear evidence of climatic forcing on contemporary plague abundance in rodents and humans. Results We find that high-resolution palaeoclimatic indices correlate with plague prevalence and population density in a major plague host species, the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus, over 1949-1995. Climate-driven models trained on these data predict independent data on human plague cases in early 20th-century Kazakhstan from 1904-1948, suggesting a consistent impact of climate on large-scale wildlife reservoir dynamics influencing human epidemics. Extending the models further back in time, we also find correspondence between their predictions and qualitative records of plague epidemics over the past 1500 years. Conclusions Central Asian climate fluctuations appear to have had significant influences on regional human plague frequency in the first part of the 20th century, and probably over the past 1500 years. This first attempt at ecoepidemiological reconstruction of historical disease activity may shed some light on how long-term plague epidemiology interacts with human activity. As plague activity in Central Asia seems to have followed climate fluctuations over the past centuries, we may expect global warming to have an impact upon future plague epidemiology, probably sustaining or increasing plague activity in the region, at least in the rodent reservoirs, in the coming decades. See commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/108

  12. [Clinical epidemiology of plague in Madagascar (current data)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchy, S; Ranaivoson, G; Rakotojanabelo, A

    1993-01-01

    After a recall of the epidemiological cycle of plague, the authors describe the course of this disease from 1989 to 1992. Out of 2676 pathological samples suspected of plague, 2105 biological examinations were carried out. 312 cases were confirmed and 335 considered as probable. 93% of those positive cases come from the plague triangle located in the Central Highlands and delimited by Ambatondrazaka, Miarinarivo and Fianarantsoa and they occur during the rainy season (November to March). However, an outbreak of urban epidemics is possible on the coast during the cold season. The most frequent clinical form had been bubonic plague (90%). Plague did not much concern young children and men are affected more often than women. Clinically, toxi-infectious syndrome, lymph node reaction and hemoptoïc spits can be noted. The 1989-1992 results are compared with those of the two previous studies. PMID:8192537

  13. Prediction of Frost Risks and Plagues using WRF model: a Port Wine region case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Rocha, A.; Monteiro, A.; Quénol, H.; de Freitas, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    In viticulture where the quality of the wine, the selection of the grapevines or even the characteristics of the farming soil, also depending from local soil features like topography, proximity of a river or water body, will act locally on the weather. Frosts are of significant concern to growers of many cultures crops such as winegrapes. Because of their high latitude and some altitude, the vineyards of the Demarcated Douro Region (DDR) are subjected to the frost, which cause serious damages. But the hazards of vineyard don't confine to the incidents of the fortuitous and meteorological character. The illnesses and plagues affect frequently the vineyards of Demarcated Douro Region due, namely to the weather, to the high power of the regional stocks, to the dense vegetation badly drained and favourable to the setting of numberless fungi, viruses and/or poisonous insects. In the case of DDR it is worth noticing the meteorological conditions due to the weather characteristics. Although there are several illnesses and plagues the most important enemies for the vine in the DDR are the mildew, oidium, grey rottenness, grape moth,. . . , if the climatic conditions favour their appearance and development. For this study, we selected some months for different periods, at the 16 weather stations of the Region of Douro. We use the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) to study and possibly predict the occurrence of risk and plagues (mildew) episodes. The model is first validated with the meteorological data obtained at the weather stations. The knowledge of frost and plagues occurrence allows one to decrease its risks not only by selecting the cultural species and varieties but also the places of growth and the planting and sowing dates.

  14. [The plague in Madagascar: epidemiologic data from 1989 to 1995 and the national control program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champetier de Ribes, G; Rasoamanana, B; Randriambelosoa, J; Rakoto, L J; Rabescn, D; Chanteau, S

    1997-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the history and epidemiological cycle of the plague in Madagascar, we report a detailed analysis of 5,927 suspected cases of plague observed from 1989 to 1995 (average of 846 cases per year). Of those, 1,337 individuals (average of 191 cases per year) were confirmed (by isolation of Yersinia pestis) or indicated to be probable for plague (by positive smears). Since 1994, we observed an increasing number of confirmed and probable cases (252 cases in 1995). Most of the cases occurred between October and April in the central highlands, inside a geographical triangle limited by Alaotra lake, Itasy lake and the city of Fianarantsoa. Two exceptional epidemics occurred in the harbor of Majunga in 1991 and 1995. The bubonic plague was the most frequent clinical from (91.3%), with primarily an inguinal localization (67.8%). The mean case fatality rate was 19% of the confirmed or probable cases (14.8% for the bubonic form and 57.1% for the pneumonic form). The bubonic plague was significantly more frequent between the ages of 5 and 14 years, as compared to the general population, while the pneumonic plague was more frequent over 15 years of age. Males were more effected by the bubonic form, as the sex ratio (m:f) was 1.3. The national control program for plague is being strengthened to improve 1) the patient's early diagnosis and care system; 2) the measures for the prevention of epidemics; 3) the epidemiological surveillance; and 4) the studies on the biology of the plague vectors, rodents and fleas, and the agent, bacilli, in Madagascar. PMID:9172878

  15. Current epidemiology of human plague in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteau, S; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Rasoamanana, B; Chan, F; Boisier, P; Rabeson, D; Roux, J

    2000-01-01

    From 1996 to 1998, 5,965 patients with suspected plague were identified in 38 districts of Madagascar (40% of the total population are exposed). Using standard bacteriology, 917 of them were confirmed or presumptive (C + P) cases. However, more than 2,000 plague cases could be estimated using F1 antigen assay. Two out of the 711 Yersinia pestis isolates tested were resistant to chloramphenicol and to ampicillin (both isolates found in the harbour of Mahajanga). Urban plague (Mahajanga harbour and Antananarivo city) accounted for 37.4% of the C + P cases. Bubonic plague represented 97.2% of the cases, and the lethality rate was still high (20%). In comparing the exposed population, plague was more prevalent in males (M:F sex ratio 1.3:1) and patients under 20 years (2.7% babies under two years). Buboes were mainly localised in the inguinal/femoral regions (55.8%). The epidemiological risk factors are discussed. PMID:10717537

  16. Improvement of disease prediction and modeling through the use of meteorological ensembles: human plague in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sean M; Monaghan, Andrew; Griffith, Kevin S; Apangu, Titus; Mead, Paul S; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2012-01-01

    Climate and weather influence the occurrence, distribution, and incidence of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by vector-borne or zoonotic pathogens. Thus, models based on meteorological data have helped predict when and where human cases are most likely to occur. Such knowledge aids in targeting limited prevention and control resources and may ultimately reduce the burden of diseases. Paradoxically, localities where such models could yield the greatest benefits, such as tropical regions where morbidity and mortality caused by vector-borne diseases is greatest, often lack high-quality in situ local meteorological data. Satellite- and model-based gridded climate datasets can be used to approximate local meteorological conditions in data-sparse regions, however their accuracy varies. Here we investigate how the selection of a particular dataset can influence the outcomes of disease forecasting models. Our model system focuses on plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in the West Nile region of Uganda. The majority of recent human cases have been reported from East Africa and Madagascar, where meteorological observations are sparse and topography yields complex weather patterns. Using an ensemble of meteorological datasets and model-averaging techniques we find that the number of suspected cases in the West Nile region was negatively associated with dry season rainfall (December-February) and positively with rainfall prior to the plague season. We demonstrate that ensembles of available meteorological datasets can be used to quantify climatic uncertainty and minimize its impacts on infectious disease models. These methods are particularly valuable in regions with sparse observational networks and high morbidity and mortality from vector-borne diseases. PMID:23024750

  17. Improvement of disease prediction and modeling through the use of meteorological ensembles: human plague in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Moore

    Full Text Available Climate and weather influence the occurrence, distribution, and incidence of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by vector-borne or zoonotic pathogens. Thus, models based on meteorological data have helped predict when and where human cases are most likely to occur. Such knowledge aids in targeting limited prevention and control resources and may ultimately reduce the burden of diseases. Paradoxically, localities where such models could yield the greatest benefits, such as tropical regions where morbidity and mortality caused by vector-borne diseases is greatest, often lack high-quality in situ local meteorological data. Satellite- and model-based gridded climate datasets can be used to approximate local meteorological conditions in data-sparse regions, however their accuracy varies. Here we investigate how the selection of a particular dataset can influence the outcomes of disease forecasting models. Our model system focuses on plague (Yersinia pestis infection in the West Nile region of Uganda. The majority of recent human cases have been reported from East Africa and Madagascar, where meteorological observations are sparse and topography yields complex weather patterns. Using an ensemble of meteorological datasets and model-averaging techniques we find that the number of suspected cases in the West Nile region was negatively associated with dry season rainfall (December-February and positively with rainfall prior to the plague season. We demonstrate that ensembles of available meteorological datasets can be used to quantify climatic uncertainty and minimize its impacts on infectious disease models. These methods are particularly valuable in regions with sparse observational networks and high morbidity and mortality from vector-borne diseases.

  18. [The spread of the plague: A sciento-historiographic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrada, Coral

    2015-01-01

    There is still uncertainty about the diagnosis and nature of the plague; some scholars have been forced to abandon certainties and be filled with doubts: from believing that the mediaeval Black Plague was, in reality, the bubonic plague (although with unusual characteristics) to stating that there is very little evidence to support a retro-diagnosis. This article looks at this in depth, not only reviewing the historiography but also giving new interpretations which question previous hypotheses through research on images of the time, comparing them to the most recent investigative data. Two primary sources are analysed: Renaissance treaties written by four Italian doctors: Michele Savonarola, Marsilio Ficino, Leonardo Fioravanti and Gioseffo Daciano; and iconography: an illustrated manuscript of the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio and a Hebrew Haggadah from the XIVth century. The results are compared to the most recent research on DNA and in micropaleontology. PMID:26399143

  19. [Anti-plague vaccination: past and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, M

    1999-12-01

    The impact of the three historic plague pandemics will remain engraved forever in the collective memory. During the first half of the XXth century, the development of vaccines inducing protection against bubonic plague, the first production of antibiotics, insecticides and raticides, could have lead some people to think that eradication was possible. But according to the data of epidemiological surveillance, far from disappearing, plague is remaining or so increasing that it is considered, in some places, as a reemerging disease. Yersinia pestis is highly variable, and a multidrug resistant strain has been isolated in 1995 in the Ambalavo district of Madagascar. This high-level of resistance includes the drugs recommended for plague prophylaxis and therapy, and this observation pointed the fact that Yersinia pestis is able to acquire the plasmid carrying the resistance genes, under natural conditions. Consequently, it is not unreasonable to think that clinically ominous events could occur again. Moreover, currently available vaccines do not induce protection against the pneumonic form of plague, and are reactogenic. Lastly, according to some accurate sources, one cannot turn down the assumption of a genetically engineered strain of Yersinia pestis used as a biological weapon by a terrorist organization. So, the surveillance of plague remains a topical activity, as the development of none reactogenic live and/or inactivated new vaccines, inducing protection against the pneumonic form of the disease. PMID:11000956

  20. Modeling the ecologic niche of plague in sylvan and domestic animal hosts to delineate sources of human exposure in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Haseeb, M A

    2015-01-01

    Plague has been established in the western United States (US) since 1900 following the West Coast introduction of commensal rodents infected with Yersinia pestis via early industrial shipping. Over the last century, plague ecology has transitioned through cycles of widespread human transmission, urban domestic transmission among commensal rodents, and ultimately settled into the predominantly sylvan foci that remain today where it is maintained alternatively by enzootic and epizootic transmission. While zoonotic transmission to humans is much less common in modern times, significant plague risk remains in parts of the western US. Moreover, risk to some threatened species that are part of the epizootic cycle can be quite substantive. This investigation attempted to predict the risk of plague across the western US by modeling the ecologic niche of plague in sylvan and domestic animals identified between 2000 and 2015. A Maxent machine learning algorithm was used to predict this niche based on climate, altitude, land cover, and the presence of an important enzootic species, Peromyscus maniculatus. This model demonstrated good predictive ability (AUC = 86%) and identified areas of high risk in central Colorado, north-central New Mexico, and southwestern and northeastern California. The presence of P. maniculatus, altitude, precipitation during the driest and wettest quarters, and distance to artificial surfaces, all contributed substantively to maximizing the gain function. These findings add to the known landscape epidemiology and infection ecology of plague in the western US and may suggest locations of particular risk to be targeted for wild and domestic animal intervention. PMID:26713244

  1. Seroepidemiology of human plague in the Madagascar highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsitorahina, M; Rabarijaona, L; Chanteau, S; Boisier, P

    2000-02-01

    We conducted a seroepidemiological survey of human plague in the general population using random sampling in the area of Ambositra, the main focus of plague in the central highlands of Madagascar (520 confirmed and presumptive cases notified during the past 10 years). Sera were tested using an ELISA IgG F1 assay. Considering the internal validity of the assay and the sampling method, the overall corrected prevalence of F1 antibodies was 0.6% (95% CI: 0.2%-1.8%). Being nearly 0 up to the age of 40, the corrected prevalence increased markedly after 45 years to 6.2%. Six of 20 individuals who declared to have been treated for clinical suspicion of bubonic plague in the past had F1 antibodies. The seroprevalence did not differ according to gender except in individuals > 60, where antibodies were significantly more frequent in males. This study suggests that the number of clinically suspected cases of plague provided by the surveillance network was plausible, despite some true cases being missed and a significant number of false positives. We also confirm that Yersinia pestis infections may occur without marked clinical manifestations and patients may recover without treatment, in accordance with old observations of pestis minor. PMID:10747268

  2. Modeling the epidemiological history of plague in Central Asia: Palaeoclimatic forcing on a disease system over the past millennium

    OpenAIRE

    Kausrud Kyrre; Begon Mike; Ari Tamara; Viljugrein Hildegunn; Esper Jan; Büntgen Ulf; Leirs Herwig; Junge Claudia; Yang Bao; Yang Meixue; Xu Lei; Stenseth Nils

    2010-01-01

    Background Human cases of plague (Yersinia pestis) infection originate, ultimately, in the bacterium's wildlife host populations. The epidemiological dynamics of the wildlife reservoir therefore determine the abundance, distribution and evolution of the pathogen, which in turn shape the frequency, distribution and virulence of human cases. Earlier studies have shown clear evidence of climatic forcing on contemporary plague abundance in rodents and humans. ...

  3. The biblical plague of the Philistines now has a name, tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanato, Siro Igino

    2007-01-01

    An epidemic thought to have been the first instance of bubonic plague in the Mediterranean reveals to have been an episode of tularemia. The deadly epidemic took place in the aftermath of the removal of a wooden box from an isolated Hebrew sanctuary. Death, tumors, and rodents thereafter plagued Philistine country. Unlike earlier explanations proposed, tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis exhaustively explains the outbreak. Tularemia fits all the requirements indicated in the biblical text: it is carried by animals, is transmitted to humans, results in the development of ulceroglandular formations, often misdiagnosed for bubonic plague, and is fatal. Moreover, there is the evidence from the box and rodents: mice, which are known carrier for F. tularensis and can communicate it to humans, were credited by the very Philistines to be linked to the outbreak, and are small enough to nest in the box. Mice also explain the otherwise odd statement in the biblical text of a small Philistine idol repeatedly falling on the floor at night in the building where the Philistines had stored the box as mice exiting the box would easily have tipped over the statuette. Tularemia scores yet another point: an episode of the disease is known to have originated in Canaan and spread to Egypt around 1715 BC, indicating recurrence for the disease, and suggesting Canaan was a reservoir for F. tularensis in the 2nd millennium BC. PMID:17467189

  4. Enzootic plague foci, Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Malek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Algeria, PCR sequencing of pla, glpD and rpoB genes found Yersinia pestis in 18/237 (8% rodents of five species, including Apodemus sylvaticus, previously undescribed as pestiferous; and disclosed three new plague foci. Multiple spacer typing confirmed a new Orientalis variant. Rodent survey should be reinforced in this country hosting reemerging plague.

  5. Enzootic plague foci, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Malek, M.A.; Hammani, A.; Beneldjouzi, A.; Bitam, I.

    2014-01-01

    In Algeria, PCR sequencing of pla, glpD and rpoB genes found Yersinia pestis in 18/237 (8%) rodents of five species, including Apodemus sylvaticus, previously undescribed as pestiferous; and disclosed three new plague foci. Multiple spacer typing confirmed a new Orientalis variant. Rodent survey should be reinforced in this country hosting reemerging plague.

  6. Protect Yourself from Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the groin, armpit or neck. Other symptoms include fever, chills, headache, and extreme exhaustion. A person usually becomes ... plague bacteria infect the lungs. Symptoms include high fever, chills, cough, difficulty breathing, and coughing up bloody mucus. ...

  7. [Resurgence of the plague in the Ikongo district of Madagascar in 1998. 2. Reservoirs and vectors implicated].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantier, J M; Duchemin, J B; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Chanteau, S

    2001-05-01

    Our survey of mammals and fleas arose as a result of an outbreak of bubonic plague at an usually low altitude in the Ikongo district (Madagascar), while a previous study had found anti-F1 antibodies in an endemic hedgehog. Animals were sampled with live traps in two hamlets (Antanambao-Vohidrotra, 540 m alt. and Ambalagoavy, 265 m alt.) and with pitfall traps in a neighbouring forest (750 m alt.). Rat fleas were collected by brushing the fur and free-living fleas by use of light traps. The introduced shrew Suncus murinus was found only in the village of Ambalagoavy while the black rat (Rattus rattus) was found in all three sites and the only seropositive rat was caught at Antanambao-Vohidrotra. In contrast, among the Tenrecidae (endemic shrews and hedgehogs) found in the forest near the first village, four animals were found seropositive for anti-F1 antibodies. One of them was carrying the endemic flea Paractenopsyllus pauliani, not yet reported as a vector of plague. The endemic vector of plague, Synopsyllus fonquerniei, was found only in the first village of Antanambao-Vohidrotra, and the cosmopolite flea Xenopsylla cheopis only in Ambalagoavy. Although no Yersinia pestis could be isolated and no F1-antigen could be detected in these animals, we found evidence of the recent transmission of plague in Antanambao-Vohidrotra and the nearby forest, but not in Ambalagoavy. These data corroborate with the sylvatic plague cycle hypothesis in Madagascar and its involvement in the outcome of the bubonic plague outbreak in this district. PMID:11475029

  8. Improvement of Disease Prediction and Modeling through the Use of Meteorological Ensembles: Human Plague in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Sean M.; Monaghan, Andrew; Griffith, Kevin S.; Apangu, Titus; Mead, Paul S.; EISEN, REBECCA J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate and weather influence the occurrence, distribution, and incidence of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by vector-borne or zoonotic pathogens. Thus, models based on meteorological data have helped predict when and where human cases are most likely to occur. Such knowledge aids in targeting limited prevention and control resources and may ultimately reduce the burden of diseases. Paradoxically, localities where such models could yield the greatest benefits, such as tropical...

  9. Plague in Central Java, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.E.; Hudson, B. W.; Turner, R W; Saroso, J. Sulianti; Cavanaugh, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Plague in man occurred from 1968 to 1970 in mountain villages of the Boyolali Regency in Central Java. Infected fleas, infected rats, and seropositive rats were collected in villages with human plague cases. Subsequent isolations of Yersinia pestis and seropositive rodents, detected during investigations of rodent plague undertaken by the Government of Indonesia and the WHO, attested to the persistence of plague in the region from 1972 to 1974.

  10. Human plague occurrences in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon; Bertherat, Eric; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, but particularly in Africa. Despite the long-standing history of human plague, it is difficult to get a historical and recent overview of the general situation. We searched and screened available information sources on human plague occurrences in ...

  11. Study on the Basic Plague Pattern of Jianchuan Plague Natural Focus, Yunnan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jie

    2001-01-01

    Since the plague natural focus of Jianchuan was found in 1974, it had broken the disputation whether Yunnan has plague natural focus among Chinese and foreign scholars for long. Because the focus locates the middle part of transversal mountains with higher biological diversity and complex landscape, many problems raised at beginning in distinguishing the major hosts and vectors, modeling the structure of the focus, and resolving the contradiction between theory and excitation. In review of that, according to the principle of unified of biological structure and function, the basic plague pattern has been systematically studied on through the generalized information concept in this paper. It suggests that the focus takes the community of Apodemus chevrieri + Rattus norvegicus : Neopsylla specialis + Frontopsylla. spadix + Menopsyllus anisus + Loptopsylla segnis as maintenance subsystem, the community of E. miletus:Ctenophthalmus quadratus + Neopsylla specialis as epidematic (amplifying) subsystem, the communities of squirrel rodent-flea as alternate subsystem. The relationship between subsystems is nonlinear. No human plague case is determined by the systematicness of the plague ecosystem. The possibility of human plague will remain in systemic changing or coming into chaos. Although most researches try to analysis of plague as system by means of experiments with many quantitative criterion, these measures are difficult to comprehension the systemic essence without application of the concept of systemic theory. They are often direct, discursive and paradoxical description of appearance rather than the analysis and generalization of interaction relationship between elements, thus reversing the basic ecological concept of Y.pestis as a living thing and agent of plague.

  12. [Resurgence of the plague in the Ikongo district of Madagascar in 1998. 1. Epidemiological aspects in the human population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliani, R; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Rakotoarivony, I; Duchemin, J B; Duplantier, J M; Rakotonomenjanahary, J; Chanteau, S

    2001-05-01

    Between the 20th October and the 18th November 1998, an outbreak of bubonic plague was declared in a hamlet in the Ikongo district of Madagascar. We conducted an epidemiological survey because of the re-emergence of the disease in this area (the last cases had been notified in 1965) and because of the low altitude compared to the classical Malagasy foci. The outbreak had been preceded by an important rat epizootics during September. A total of 21 cases were registered with an attack rate of 16.7% (21/126) and a lethality rate of 33% (7/21). The disease was more prevalent in males (66% of cases) and children aged plague bacillus among this species. The small mammals and vectors possibly involved in these new foci were investigated in May 1999. PMID:11475028

  13. Plague and climate: scales matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ari, Tamara; Neerinckx, Simon; Gage, Kenneth L.; Kreppel, Katharina; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2011-01-01

    Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts) of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large sc...

  14. Plague and climate: scales matter.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Ben-Ari; Simon Neerinckx; Gage, Kenneth L.; Katharina Kreppel; Anne Laudisoit; Herwig Leirs; Nils Chr. Stenseth

    2011-01-01

    Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts) of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large sc...

  15. Protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Claire; Quenee, Lauriane; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Plague, an infectious disease that reached catastrophic proportions during three pandemics, continues to be a legitimate public health concern worldwide. Although antibiotic therapy for the causative agent Yersinia pestis is available, pharmaceutical supply limitations, multi-drug resistance from natural selection as well as malicious bioengineering are a reality. Consequently, plague vaccinology is a priority for biodefense research. Development of a multi-subunit vaccine with Fraction 1 and LcrV as protective antigens seems to be receiving the most attention. However, LcrV has been shown to cause immune suppression and Y. pestis mutants lacking F1 expression are thought to be fully virulent in nature and in animal experiments. The LcrV variant, rV10, retains the well documented protective antigenic properties of LcrV but with diminished inhibitory effects on the immune system. More research is required to examine the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection afforded by surface protein antigens and to decipher the host mechanisms responsible for vaccine success. PMID:17966437

  16. The Formula of Plague Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Riber

    2015-01-01

    fictional, of epidemics. The samples include: Exodus, History of the Peloponnesian War, Samuel Pepys’ Diary, A Journal of the Plague Year, The Last Man, The Plague in Bergamo, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, Doomsday, The Dead Zone, World War Z. An Oral History of the Zombie War, Pandemic...

  17. [The Justinian plague (part two). Influence of the epidemic on the rise of the Islamic Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Manfredi, Roberto; Fiorino, Sirio

    2012-09-01

    The Islamic Empire started its tumultuous and rapid expansion from the year 622 A.D. (the year of Mohammed's Egira). This rapid growth coincided with the epidemic spread of the bubonic plague in the Middle East. Although a first epidemic event had been documented in the year 570 A.D. (pre-Islamic phase), in the Arabic peninsula, classically according to M.W. Dols five severe episodes of plague sub-epidemics are considered in the middle-eastern geographic area: the first occurred in 627 and 628 A.D., the fifth in 716 A.D.. Anyway, we may state that at the onset of Islam the geographic region including Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Iraq, and Iran was involved by endemic plague. In their work, on the ground of a literature review, the Authors describe the characteristics of the epidemic phenomenon, and analyze the how the plague affected the interpretation of Prophet's Koran and Hadits. The passive attitude demonstrated by many Muslims during early Islam was not shared by all believers, since others moved towards a more soft approach, which included the behaviour of the so called moving aside , when the contagion was of concern. The epidemic plague significantly contributed to the weakening of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the rapid decline of the Persian Empire, while during the early expansion phases of Islam, it indirectly favoured the nomadic Arab tribes which, moving on desert or semi-desert territories, succeeded in escaping the contagion more easily. Subsequently, when the Arab population became sedentary, after occupying the conquered cities, this initial advantage was significantly reduced. PMID:22992565

  18. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  19. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  20. Modeling the ecologic niche of plague in sylvan and domestic animal hosts to delineate sources of human exposure in the western United States

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Michael; Haseeb, MA

    2015-01-01

    Plague has been established in the western United States (US) since 1900 following the West Coast introduction of commensal rodents infected with Yersinia pestis via early industrial shipping. Over the last century, plague ecology has transitioned through cycles of widespread human transmission, urban domestic transmission among commensal rodents, and ultimately settled into the predominantly sylvan foci that remain today where it is maintained alternatively by enzootic and epizootic transmis...

  1. Abortion: the hidden plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, S

    1974-05-01

    Abortion is called the invisible plague of all countries and cultures in the twentieth century. It is by far the most important method of birth control in the world today. For every 200 babies born there are at least 100 abortions. In the rich world, a woman who wants to end her pregnancy goes to an abortionist, but for millions of poor women, abortion happens spontaneously in their own homes induced by poor nutrition, sheer physical weakness, and too many pregnancies too close together. In countries where abortion is illegal, millions of women die each year as a result of severe illness or the botched handiwork of backyard operators. The most common complications are massive hemorrhaging, perforation of the uterus, laceration, sepsis, and renal failure. The experience of a great many countries shows that simply legalizing abortion can lead to a dramatic drop in death and illness. Relaxation of abortion laws can save lives, money, and misery for mothers and children. Illegal abortion has become a major problem in Africa there are 3 main types of women who enter hospitals with complications after abortions: 1) the teenager who is away from home; 2) the young woman, often educated, working, and with financial responsibilities, who is ambitious for herself, her husband, or her family; and 3) the woman in her thirties, illiterate, a rural worker, married most of her reproductive life, and pregnant most years. The third type of woman may abort because her system is utterly depleted. Such women must be shown that there is a good chance of survival for her children so that she will not have so many. PMID:12307249

  2. The threatened plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, P

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses changes in disease patterns affecting human health that may be related to environmental and social changes in the world. The World Health Report reveals that 30 new diseases emerged in the past 20 years. Old diseases are becoming resistant to new drugs. Infectious diseases that were in decline are spreading: diphtheria, whooping cough, and measles. Illnesses such as malaria, fevers, cholera, and rodent-borne viruses are becoming more frequent. Diseases that are transmitted by animals or water are related to environmental and social changes. Degraded environments are susceptible to the appearance of opportunistic species, such as weeds, rodents, insects, and microorganisms. Stable environments support the welfare of large predators and control opportunistic species. Owls, coyotes, and snakes eat rodents that carry Lyme disease ticks and a variety of viruses, plague, and bacteria. Reptiles, birds, spiders, ladybugs, bats, and fish consume larvae and mosquitoes that cause malaria and fevers. Habitat loss and fragmentation, monocultures, excessive use of toxic chemicals, climate change, and weather instability are widespread global changes that reduce the predator population. Small wilderness habitats favor pests. Monocultures reduce genetic diversity and increase vulnerability. Excessive use of pesticides harms birds and helpful insects. A sign of a failing ecosystem is the population explosion of pests and disequilibrium. The Environmental Distress Syndrome is characterized as: 1) emerging infectious diseases, 2) loss of biodiversity, 3) increased generalist species and decreased specialist species, 4) declines in specific specialists, such as pollinators responsible for preservation of flowering plants, and 5) increased coastal algal blooms. The impacts of disease mean considerable costs to humans, agriculture, and livestock. Loss of resources is also costly. PMID:12321043

  3. Geographic distribution and ecological niche of plague in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulinck Hubert

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plague is a rapidly progressing, serious illness in humans that is likely to be fatal if not treated. It remains a public health threat, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In spite of plague's highly focal nature, a thorough ecological understanding of the general distribution pattern of plague across sub-Saharan Africa has not been established to date. In this study, we used human plague data from sub-Saharan Africa for 1970–2007 in an ecological niche modeling framework to explore the potential geographic distribution of plague and its ecological requirements across Africa. Results We predict a broad potential distributional area of plague occurrences across sub-Saharan Africa. General tests of model's transferability suggest that our model can anticipate the potential distribution of plague occurrences in Madagascar and northern Africa. However, generality and predictive ability tests using regional subsets of occurrence points demonstrate the models to be unable to predict independent occurrence points outside the training region accurately. Visualizations show plague to occur in diverse landscapes under wide ranges of environmental conditions. Conclusion We conclude that the typical focality of plague, observed in sub-Saharan Africa, is not related to fragmented and insular environmental conditions manifested at a coarse continental scale. However, our approach provides a foundation for testing hypotheses concerning focal distribution areas of plague and their links with historical and environmental factors.

  4. Geographic distribution and ecological niche of plague in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon B; Peterson, Andrew T; Gulinck, Hubert;

    2008-01-01

    of plague across sub-Saharan Africa has not been established to date. In this study, we used human plague data from sub-Saharan Africa for 1970-2007 in an ecological niche modeling framework to explore the potential geographic distribution of plague and its ecological requirements across Africa. Results We...... predict a broad potential distributional area of plague occurrences across sub-Saharan Africa. General tests of model's transferability suggest that our model can anticipate the potential distribution of plague occurrences in Madagascar and northern Africa. However, generality and predictive ability tests...... using regional subsets of occurrence points demonstrate the models to be unable to predict independent occurrence points outside the training region accurately. Visualizations show plague to occur in diverse landscapes under wide ranges of environmental conditions. Conclusion We conclude...

  5. Predicting Potential Risk Areas of Human Plague for the Western Usambara Mountains, Lushoto District, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon; Peterson, A Townsend; Gulinck, Hubert;

    2010-01-01

    A natural focus of plague exists in the Western Usambara Mountains of Tanzania. Despite intense research, questions remain as to why and how plague emerges repeatedly in the same suite of villages. We used human plague incidence data for 1986-2003 in an ecological-niche modeling framework...... environmental variables contribute significantly to these models, the most important are elevation and Enhanced Vegetation Index derivatives. Projections of these models across broader regions predict only 15.5% (under a majority-rule threshold) or 31,997 km2 of East Africa as suitable for plague transmission...

  6. Plague Bacteria Target Immune Cells During Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Marketon, Melanie M.; DePaolo, R. William; DeBord, Kristin L.; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Plague bacteria are thought to inject effector Yop proteins into host cells via the type III pathway. The identity of the host cells targeted for injection during plague infection is unknown. We found, using Yop β-lactamase hybrids and fluorescent staining of live cells from plague-infected animals, that Y. pestis selected immune cells for injection. In vivo, dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were injected most frequently, whe...

  7. [The plague: disease and vaccine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Rasoamanana, B; Rasolofonirina, N; Roux, J

    1992-01-01

    Plague has existed in Madagascar since 1896, with epidemic control achieved by GIRARD with an EV vaccine in 1937. Plague persists in Madagascar, however, due to the large animal reservoir. With a predilection for nodal tissues, Yersinia pestis is a virulent bacteria that is potent inducer of antibody synthesis. Immunity mechanisms stimulated by infection were studied: 1. In human by immunoenzymatic methods 2. In mice by seroprotection and vaccinating tests. Induced immunity for people in endemic and endemic-epidemic areas, is significant, affecting approximately 70% of these populations. In non endemic areas, immunity is found in only 33% of the population, perhaps this explains the persistence of epidemic? In all cases, this immunity is a quick onset (6 days), is persistent (> 2 years), and has demonstrable serious recognition of YOP (Yersinia Outer Proteins) by Western Blot method. Human antibodies were shown to be protective for mice. Animals vaccinated by YOP were protected equally well, when compared to animals infected with Yersinia pestis and subsequently treated with antibiotics. Finally, YOP aerosols were also shown to induce antibodies. In conclusion, plague is a vaccinatable bacterial disease and YOP can be used as an animal vaccine to permit plague control in the rat reservoir. PMID:1345094

  8. Zoonotic Focus of Plague, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Bitam, Idir; Baziz, Belkacem; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Belkaid, Miloud; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    After an outbreak of human plague, 95 Xenopsylla cheopis fleas from Algeria were tested for Yersinia pestis with PCR methods. Nine fleas were definitively confirmed to be infected with Y. pestis biovar orientalis. Our results demonstrate the persistence of a zoonotic focus of Y. pestis in Algeria.

  9. On Plague in a Time of Ebola

    OpenAIRE

    Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    Ebola and plague share several characteristics, even though the second and third plague epidemics dwarfed the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in terms of mortality. This essay reviews the mortality due to the two diseases and their lethality; the spatial and socioeconomic dimensions of plague mortality; the role of public action in containing the two diseases; and their economic impact. non-peer-reviewed

  10. Geographic distribution and ecological niche of plague in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Gulinck Hubert; Peterson Andrew T; Neerinckx Simon B; Deckers Jozef; Leirs Herwig

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plague is a rapidly progressing, serious illness in humans that is likely to be fatal if not treated. It remains a public health threat, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In spite of plague's highly focal nature, a thorough ecological understanding of the general distribution pattern of plague across sub-Saharan Africa has not been established to date. In this study, we used human plague data from sub-Saharan Africa for 1970–2007 in an ecological niche modeling framework t...

  11. Pneumonic Plague Outbreak, Northern Madagascar, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Vincent; Riehm, Julia M; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Ratsitoharina, Maherisoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Andrianalimanana, Samuel; Holger C. Scholz; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to Madagascar, particularly to the central highlands. Although plague has not been previously reported in northern Madagascar, an outbreak of pneumonic plague occurred in this remote area in 2011. Over a 27-day period, 17 suspected, 2 presumptive, and 3 confirmed human cases were identified, and all 15 untreated 20 patients died. Molecular typing of Y. pestis isolated from 2 survivors and 5 Rattus rattus rat samples identified the Mad...

  12. Spread of plague among black-tailed prairie dogs is associated with colony spatial characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.L.; Cully, J.F., Jr.; Collinge, S.K.; Ray, C.; Frey, C.M.; Sandercock, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) is an exotic pathogen that is highly virulent in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and causes widespread colony losses and individual mortality rates >95%. We investigated colony spatial characteristics that may influence inter-colony transmission of plague at 3 prairie dog colony complexes in the Great Plains. The 4 spatial characteristics we considered include: colony size, Euclidean distance to nearest neighboring colony, colony proximity index, and distance to nearest drainage (dispersal) corridor. We used multi-state mark-recapture models to determine the relationship between these colony characteristics and probability of plague transmission among prairie dog colonies. Annual mapping of colonies and mark-recapture analyses of disease dynamics in natural colonies led to 4 main results: 1) plague outbreaks exhibited high spatial and temporal variation, 2) the site of initiation of epizootic plague may have substantially influenced the subsequent inter-colony spread of plague, 3) the long-term effect of plague on individual colonies differed among sites because of how individuals and colonies were distributed, and 4) colony spatial characteristics were related to the probability of infection at all sites although the relative importance and direction of relationships varied among sites. Our findings suggest that conventional prairie dog conservation management strategies, including promoting large, highly connected colonies, may need to be altered in the presence of plague. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  13. Levofloxacin cures experimental pneumonic plague in African green monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colby Layton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is considered a potential bioweapon due to rapid lethality when delivered as an aerosol. Levofloxacin was tested for primary pneumonic plague treatment in a nonhuman primate model mimicking human disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-four African Green monkeys (AGMs, Chlorocebus aethiops were challenged via head-only aerosol inhalation with 3-145 (mean = 65 50% lethal (LD(50 doses of Y. pestis strain CO92. Telemetered body temperature >39 °C initiated intravenous infusions to seven 5% dextrose controls or 17 levofloxacin treated animals. Levofloxacin was administered as a "humanized" dose regimen of alternating 8 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg 30-min infusions every 24-h, continuing until animal death or 20 total infusions, followed by 14 days of observation. Fever appeared at 53-165 h and radiographs found multilobar pneumonia in all exposed animals. All control animals died of severe pneumonic plague within five days of aerosol exposure. All 16 animals infused with levofloxacin for 10 days survived. Levofloxacin treatment abolished bacteremia within 24 h in animals with confirmed pre-infusion bacteremia, and reduced tachypnea and leukocytosis but not fever during the first 2 days of infusions. CONCLUSION: Levofloxacin cures established pneumonic plague when treatment is initiated after the onset of fever in the lethal aerosol-challenged AGM nonhuman primate model, and can be considered for treatment of other forms of plague. Levofloxacin may also be considered for primary presumptive-use, multi-agent antibiotic in bioterrorism events prior to identification of the pathogen.

  14. Plague, a reemerging disease in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteau, S; Ratsifasoamanana, L; Rasoamanana, B; Rahalison, L; Randriambelosoa, J; Roux, J; Rabeson, D

    1998-01-01

    Human cases of plague, which had virtually disappeared in Madagascar after the 1930s, reappeared in 1990 with more than 200 confirmed or presumptive cases reported each year since. In the port of Mahajanga, plague has been reintroduced, and epidemics occur every year. In Antananarivo, the capital, the number of new cases has increased, and many rodents are infected with Yersinia pestis. Despite surveillance for the sensitivity of Y. pestis and fleas to drugs and insecticides and control measures to prevent the spread of sporadic cases, the elimination of plague has been difficult because the host and reservoir of the bacillus, Rattus rattus, is both a domestic and a sylvatic rat. PMID:9452403

  15. A Decade of Plague in Mahajanga, Madagascar: Insights into the Global Maritime Spread of Pandemic Plague

    OpenAIRE

    Vogler, Amy J.; Chan, Fabien; Nottingham, Roxanne; Andersen, Genevieve; Drees, Kevin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Wagner, David M.; Chanteau, Suzanne; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A cluster of human plague cases occurred in the seaport city of Mahajanga, Madagascar, from 1991 to 1999 following 62 years with no evidence of plague, which offered insights into plague pathogen dynamics in an urban environment. We analyzed a set of 44 Mahajanga isolates from this 9-year outbreak, as well as an additional 218 Malagasy isolates from the highland foci. We sequenced the genomes of four Mahajanga strains, performed whole-genome sequence single-nucleotide polymorphism (S...

  16. Pneumonic plague outbreak, Northern Madagascar, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Vincent; Riehm, Julia M; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Ratsitoharina, Maherisoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Andrianalimanana, Samuel; Scholz, Holger C; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to Madagascar, particularly to the central highlands. Although plague has not been previously reported in northern Madagascar, an outbreak of pneumonic plague occurred in this remote area in 2011. Over a 27-day period, 17 suspected, 2 presumptive, and 3 confirmed human cases were identified, and all 15 untreated 20 patients died. Molecular typing of Y. pestis isolated from 2 survivors and 5 Rattus rattus rat samples identified the Madagascar-specific 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype and 4 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat patterns. This outbreak had a case-fatality rate of 100% for nontreated patients. The Y. pestis 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype might cause larger epidemics. Multidrug-resistant strains and persistence of the pathogen in natural foci near human settlements pose severe risks to populations in plague-endemic regions and require outbreak response strategies. PMID:25530466

  17. The trophic responses of two different rodent–vector–plague systems to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Schmid, Boris V.; Liu, Jun; Si, Xiaoyan; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    Plague, the causative agent of three devastating pandemics in history, is currently a re-emerging disease, probably due to climate change and other anthropogenic changes. Without understanding the response of plague systems to anthropogenic or climate changes in their trophic web, it is unfeasible to effectively predict years with high risks of plague outbreak, hampering our ability for effective prevention and control of the disease. Here, by using surveillance data, we apply structural equation modelling to reveal the drivers of plague prevalence in two very different rodent systems: those of the solitary Daurian ground squirrel and the social Mongolian gerbil. We show that plague prevalence in the Daurian ground squirrel is not detectably related to its trophic web, and that therefore surveillance efforts should focus on detecting plague directly in this ecosystem. On the other hand, plague in the Mongolian gerbil is strongly embedded in a complex, yet understandable trophic web of climate, vegetation, and rodent and flea densities, making the ecosystem suitable for more sophisticated low-cost surveillance practices, such as remote sensing. As for the trophic webs of the two rodent species, we find that increased vegetation is positively associated with higher temperatures and precipitation for both ecosystems. We furthermore find a positive association between vegetation and ground squirrel density, yet a negative association between vegetation and gerbil density. Our study thus shows how past surveillance records can be used to design and improve existing plague prevention and control measures, by tailoring them to individual plague foci. Such measures are indeed highly needed under present conditions with prevailing climate change. PMID:25540277

  18. [Epidemiological data on the plague in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsitorahina, M; Chanteau, S; Rosso, M L; Randriambelosoa, J; Ratsifasoamanana, L; Rabarijaona, L P; Mauclère, P; Migliani, R

    2002-01-01

    The first case of plague was introduced in Madagascar in 1898 in the east coast by way of boat from India. In 1921, plague reach the highlands and a large epidemic over the next twenty years. Until the beginning of the 80's, only of few case were identified, notified mostly in rural setting. However gradually it has re-emerged as a public health problem. Urban plague is located in the city of Antananarivo (resurgence in 1978 after 28 years of apparent silence) and in Mahajanga port (resurgence in 1991 after 63 years of silence). The reactivation of the Plague National Control Program from 1994 will allow better surveillance. The aim of this analysis is to update the epidemiological data on human plague in Madagascar based on reported cases obtained from the Central Lab of the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1980 to 2001 (16,928 suspected cases of which 3,500 are likely positives or confirmed positives). The Plague season runs from October to March on the central highlands and July to November on the north-western coast. Sex-ratio male/female is 1.3/1, and the age-group of 5 to 25 years is more affected. The case fatality rate was 40% in the beginning of the 1980's, and decreased to 20% by the end of the 1990's. The percentage of case with pulmonary plague decrease from 15% to less than 5%. However, geographical extension is demonstrated: 4 districts in 1980, 30 districts in 1999 and 21 districts in 2001. In 2002, the diffusion of a new rapid test (reagent strip) in the primary health centres (CSB) in 42 endemic districts may help to decrease the morbidity and the letality due to plague and improve its control at the national level. PMID:12643093

  19. Plague, a reemerging disease in Madagascar.

    OpenAIRE

    Chanteau, S.; Ratsifasoamanana, L.; Rasoamanana, B; Rahalison, L.; Randriambelosoa, J.; Roux, J.; Rabeson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Human cases of plague, which had virtually disappeared in Madagascar after the 1930s, reappeared in 1990 with more than 200 confirmed or presumptive cases reported each year since. In the port of Mahajanga, plague has been reintroduced, and epidemics occur every year. In Antananarivo, the capital, the number of new cases has increased, and many rodents are infected with Yersinia pestis. Despite surveillance for the sensitivity of Y. pestis and fleas to drugs and insecticides and control measu...

  20. [Seroepidemiologic study of human plague in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, F

    1997-01-01

    An IgG anti-F1 Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) has been developed for plague diagnosis in the Malagasy republic. The sensitivity of the test was 91.4% and the specificity 98.5%. This technique is cheap and the cross reaction with other infections diseases prevalent in Madagascar is very limited. During the urban plague outbreak (Mahajanga city, 1995), the positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 95.2% and 97% respectively. During this outbreak, the usefulness of the Elisa test for retrospective individual serodiagnosis was confirmed. Furthermore, the test confirmed plague among suspect patients without bacteriological diagnosis. The test was used for a sero-epidemiological study. Eight villages in the endemic area were investigated and 900 persons were studied. The overall seroprevalence was 6 times the officially prevalence of plague, notified at the Central Plague Laboratory. A large disparity of the seroprevalence was observed in the endemic area, with variation from < 1.5% to 15.5%. A high incidence of asymptomatic infections due to Yersinia pestis was found. PMID:9309233

  1. Burrowing Owls, Pulex irritans, and Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belthoff, James R; Bernhardt, Scott A; Ball, Christopher L; Gregg, Michael; Johnson, David H; Ketterling, Rachel; Price, Emily; Tinker, Juliette K

    2015-09-01

    Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) are small, ground-dwelling owls of western North America that frequent prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) towns and other grasslands. Because they rely on rodent prey and occupy burrows once or concurrently inhabited by fossorial mammals, the owls often harbor fleas. We examined the potential role of fleas found on burrowing owls in plague dynamics by evaluating prevalence of Yersinia pestis in fleas collected from burrowing owls and in owl blood. During 2012-2013, fleas and blood were collected from burrowing owls in portions of five states with endemic plague-Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, and South Dakota. Fleas were enumerated, taxonomically identified, pooled by nest, and assayed for Y. pestis using culturing and molecular (PCR) approaches. Owl blood underwent serological analysis for plague antibodies and nested PCR for detection of Y. pestis. Of more than 4750 fleas collected from owls, Pulex irritans, a known plague vector in portions of its range, comprised more than 99.4%. However, diagnostic tests for Y. pestis of flea pools (culturing and PCR) and owl blood (PCR and serology) were negative. Thus, even though fleas were prevalent on burrowing owls and the potential for a relationship with burrowing owls as a phoretic host of infected fleas exists, we found no evidence of Y. pestis in sampled fleas or in owls that harbored them. We suggest that studies similar to those reported here during plague epizootics will be especially useful for confirming these results. PMID:26367482

  2. Current challenges in the development of vaccines for pneumonic plague

    OpenAIRE

    Smiley, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of Yersinia pestis bacilli causes pneumonic plague, a rapidly progressing and exceptionally virulent disease. Extensively antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains exist and we currently lack a safe and effective pneumonic plague vaccine. These facts raise concern that Y. pestis may be exploited as a bioweapon. Here, I review the history and status of plague vaccine research and advocate that pneumonic plague vaccines should strive to prime both humoral and cellular immunity.

  3. Plague metapopulation dynamics in a natural reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, S; Klassovskiy, N; Ageyev, V;

    2007-01-01

    The ecology of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in its ancient foci in Central Asia remains poorly understood. We present field data from two sites in Kazakhstan where the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) is the major natural host. Family groups inhabit and defend burrow systems spaced throughou...

  4. Plague virulence antigens from Yersinia enterocolitica.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, P B; Zahorchak, R J; Brubaker, R R

    1980-01-01

    The virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica, biotype 2, serotype O:8, in mice is related to its ability to produce plague V and W antigens. V and W antigens in Y. enterocolitica are shown to be immunologically identical to the previously described V and W antigens of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

  5. [The plague in Finland in 1710].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, N G

    1994-01-01

    In the autumn of 1710 Helsinki was struck by the so-called oriental plague during four months. The infection was transferred by black rats which harboured fleas. The flea-bites caused boils. It was believed that the plague was air-borne, and the air was very humid that autumn. Big fires were lit in order to reduce the humidity, the purpose being to make it easier for the infected to breathe. Attempts were also made to dissect the boils. The carriers of the contamination came as refugees from Estland over the Gulf of Finland. The infection had spread from Turkey to Poland and Balticum after the defeat of the Finnish-Swedish army in the summer of 1709 at Poltava in Ucraine. Helsingfors (Helsinki) was struck extremely hard. About two-thirds of the inhabitants died of the pestilence. Some escaped by fleeing to the countryside. The plague spread through the country as far north as to Uleåborg (Oulu) and Cajana (Kajaani). Marketplaces became important centres of infection. With the advent of the frost in December the plague dwindled. At that time Helsinki was practically a dead town. PMID:11640321

  6. Saving Resources with Plagues in Genetic Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vega, F F; Cantu-Paz, E; Lopez, J I; Manzano, T

    2004-06-15

    The population size of genetic algorithms (GAs) affects the quality of the solutions and the time required to find them. While progress has been made in estimating the population sizes required to reach a desired solution quality for certain problems, in practice the sizing of populations is still usually performed by trial and error. These trials might lead to find a population that is large enough to reach a satisfactory solution, but there may still be opportunities to optimize the computational cost by reducing the size of the population. This paper presents a technique called plague that periodically removes a number of individuals from the population as the GA executes. Recently, the usefulness of the plague has been demonstrated for genetic programming. The objective of this paper is to extend the study of plagues to genetic algorithms. We experiment with deceptive trap functions, a tunable difficult problem for GAs, and the experiments show that plagues can save computational time while maintaining solution quality and reliability.

  7. Evaluation of Yersinia pestis transmission pathways for sylvatic plague in prairie dog populations in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Russell, Robin E.; Bron, Gebbiena; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2016-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is periodically responsible for large die-offs in rodent populations that can spillover and cause human mortalities. In the western US, prairie dog populations experience nearly 100% mortality during plague outbreaks, suggesting that multiple transmission pathways combine to amplify plague dynamics. Several alternate pathways in addition to flea vectors have been proposed, such as transmission via direct contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, consumption of carcasses, and environmental sources of plague bacteria, such as contaminated soil. However, evidence supporting the ability of these proposed alternate pathways to trigger large-scale epizootics remains elusive. Here we present a short review of potential plague transmission pathways and use an ordinary differential equation model to assess the contribution of each pathway to resulting plague dynamics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and their fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta). Using our model, we found little evidence to suggest that soil contamination was capable of producing plague epizootics in prairie dogs. However, in the absence of flea transmission, direct transmission, i.e., contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, could produce enzootic dynamics, and transmission via contact with or consumption of carcasses could produce epizootics. This suggests that these pathways warrant further investigation.

  8. Assessing human risk of exposure to plague bacteria in northwestern Uganda based on remotely sensed predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Griffith, Kevin S; Borchert, Jeff N; MacMillan, Katherine; Apangu, Titus; Owor, Nicholas; Acayo, Sara; Acidri, Rogers; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Winters, Anna M; Enscore, Russell E; Schriefer, Martin E; Beard, Charles B; Gage, Kenneth L; Mead, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    Plague, a life-threatening flea-borne zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, has most commonly been reported from eastern Africa and Madagascar in recent decades. In these regions and elsewhere, prevention and control efforts are typically targeted at fine spatial scales, yet risk maps for the disease are often presented at coarse spatial resolutions that are of limited value in allocating scarce prevention and control resources. In our study, we sought to identify sub-village level remotely sensed correlates of elevated risk of human exposure to plague bacteria and to project the model across the plague-endemic West Nile region of Uganda and into neighboring regions of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our model yielded an overall accuracy of 81%, with sensitivities and specificities of 89% and 71%, respectively. Risk was higher above 1,300 meters than below, and the remotely sensed covariates that were included in the model implied that localities that are wetter, with less vegetative growth and more bare soil during the dry month of January (when agricultural plots are typically fallow) pose an increased risk of plague case occurrence. Our results suggest that environmental and landscape features play a large part in classifying an area as ecologically conducive to plague activity. However, it is clear that future studies aimed at identifying behavioral and fine-scale ecological risk factors in the West Nile region are required to fully assess the risk of human exposure to Y. pestis. PMID:20439974

  9. Epidemiological analysis of the Eyam plague outbreak of 1665–1666

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittles, Lilith K.

    2016-01-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in human history, and still causes worrying outbreaks in Africa and South America. Despite the historical and current importance of plague, several questions remain unanswered concerning its transmission routes and infection risk factors. The plague outbreak that started in September 1665 in the Derbyshire village of Eyam claimed 257 lives over 14 months, wiping out entire families. Since previous attempts at modelling the Eyam plague, new data have been unearthed from parish records revealing a much more complete record of the disease. Using a stochastic compartmental model and Bayesian analytical methods, we found that both rodent-to-human and human-to-human transmission played an important role in spreading the infection, and that they accounted, respectively, for a quarter and three-quarters of all infections, with a statistically significant seasonality effect. We also found that the force of infection was stronger for infectious individuals living in the same household compared with the rest of the village. Poverty significantly increased the risk of disease, whereas adulthood decreased the risk. These results on the Eyam outbreak contribute to the current debate on the relative importance of plague transmission routes. PMID:27170724

  10. Epidemiological analysis of the Eyam plague outbreak of 1665-1666.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittles, Lilith K; Didelot, Xavier

    2016-05-11

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in human history, and still causes worrying outbreaks in Africa and South America. Despite the historical and current importance of plague, several questions remain unanswered concerning its transmission routes and infection risk factors. The plague outbreak that started in September 1665 in the Derbyshire village of Eyam claimed 257 lives over 14 months, wiping out entire families. Since previous attempts at modelling the Eyam plague, new data have been unearthed from parish records revealing a much more complete record of the disease. Using a stochastic compartmental model and Bayesian analytical methods, we found that both rodent-to-human and human-to-human transmission played an important role in spreading the infection, and that they accounted, respectively, for a quarter and three-quarters of all infections, with a statistically significant seasonality effect. We also found that the force of infection was stronger for infectious individuals living in the same household compared with the rest of the village. Poverty significantly increased the risk of disease, whereas adulthood decreased the risk. These results on the Eyam outbreak contribute to the current debate on the relative importance of plague transmission routes. PMID:27170724

  11. Burrowing owls, Pulex irritans and plague

    OpenAIRE

    Belthoff, James R.; Bernhardt, Scott A; Ball, Christopher; Gregg, Michael; Johnson, David H.; Ketterling, Rachel; Price, Emily; Tinker, Juliette K.

    2015-01-01

    Western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) are small, ground-dwelling owls ofwestern North America that frequent prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) towns and other grasslands.As they rely on rodent prey and occupy burrows once or concurrently inhabited by fossorialmammals, the owls often harbor fleas. We examined the potential role of fleas found onburrowing owls in plague dynamics by evaluating prevalence of Yersinia pestis in fleas and inowl blood. During 2012-2013 fleas and blood were ...

  12. Dog-associated risk factors for human plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L Hannah; Pape, J; Ettestad, P; Griffith, K S; Mead, P S

    2008-10-01

    Plague is a rare but often fatal zoonosis endemic to the western United States. Previous studies have identified contact with pets as a potential risk factor for infection. We conducted a matched case-control study to better define the risks associated with pets at both the household and individual levels. Using a written questionnaire, we surveyed nine surviving plague patients, 12 household members of these patients, and 30 age- and neighbourhood-matched controls about household and individual exposures. Overall, 79% of households had at least one dog, 59% had at least one cat and 33% used flea control, with no significant differences between case and control households. Four (44%) case households reported having a sick dog versus no (0%) control households [matched odds ratio, (mOR) 18.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-infinity], and four (44%) patients reported sleeping in the same bed with a pet dog versus three (10%) controls (mOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.0-31.6). Within case households with multiple members, two (40%) of five patients slept with their dogs versus none (0%) of 12 healthy family members (P=0.13). The exposures to cats were not significant. Sleeping in the same bed as a pet dog remained significantly associated with infection in a multivariate logistic regression model (P=0.046). Our findings suggest that dogs may facilitate the transfer of fleas into the home and that activities with close extended contacts with dogs may increase the risk of plague infection. PMID:18489541

  13. War, plague and exploitation in DR Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimčevska Antoaneta K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Late in autumn 2006 one of the headlines in world media was the first democratic elections in DR Congo. They took place after 30 years of Mobutu Sese Seko’s dictatorship and bloody civil wars in the period 1996-2002. These conflicts, which took approximately 4 million human lives, are called "The First African World War". Elections were held but they did not guarantee the end of trouble for the divided and tormented people in the northeast of Congo, the real scene of bloodshed. The area is still turbulent because it abounds in mineral wealth - gold, diamonds and raw materials for nuclear technology. For a whole decade, unscrupulous actors of the African crisis were fighting there, for illegal profits (achievable in the chaos of bloodshed rather than for democracy, defense of tribal interests, security, etc. as they claimed. In the mines of Eastern Congo unprecedented exploitation of people is still going on, especially of children, victims of conflicts, who suffer in great numbers from violence, starvation and diseases. These slaves of the crisis make local "warlords" and their mentors rich. The looting of the mines has stabilized the crisis because it makes possible enormous accumulation of wealth among armed decision-makers - which also includes availability of countless slaves-miners who have lost everything except their bare lives. Eastern Congo is, however, one of world’s three old focuses of plague; wild exploitation of ores in the area of this endemic disease has activated a sleepy focus and added pneumonic plague to the burdens suffered by the population of the rich but ill-fated region. This was to be expected because endemic plague in the gold-bearing evil circumstances impedes safe mining - and this will be the crucial challenge in the future of Congo. This article is an anthropological outline of the area where gold, plague, weapons and incomparable suffering of people merge together just because of cynic greed producing abuse

  14. The Grape Phylloxera Plague as a Natural Experiment: the Upkeep of Vineyards in Catalonia (Spain), 1858-1935

    OpenAIRE

    Badia-Miró, Marc; Tello, Enric; Valls Junyent, Francesc, 1966-; Garrabou, Ramon,

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact in Catalonia of the grape Phylloxera plague in Europe (1865-90). A statistical model is used to analyse the economic resilience of 35 districts in Catalonia to this external ecological and economic shock, and to explain why districts in the provinces of Barcelona and Tarragona resumed growing wine grapes after the plague, in contrast to districts in Girona and Lleida provinces. The opportunity cost of labour, the demand pull of Barcelona's commercial growth, and...

  15. Spatial prediction and analysis of Himalayan marmot plague natural epidemic foci in China based on HJ-1 satellite data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plague,caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis,is a serious and rapidly progressing illness in humans that can be fatal if not treated effectively.The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is the largest area of natural Himalayan marmot(Marmota himalayana) plague foci in China and covers more than 630000 km2.Akesai County in Gansu Province is a part of this natural focus of plague and was chosen as a study area.Our study used an ecological niche modeling(ENM) approach to predict the potential distribution of the Himalayan marmot.Environment and Disaster Monitor Satellite(HJ-1) data was used to investigate environment factors that affect plague host animal activity.Host animal point data from active surveillance was combined with environmental variables from the HJ-1 satellite and other databases,and the models of the potential distribution of Himalayan marmot were produced with the Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Production(GARP).The probability of marmot presence was divided into 0-5%,5%-20%,20%-40%,40%-80%,and 80%-100% subgroups.Areas with 80%-100% probability exhibited the greatest potential for the presence of Himalayan marmot.According to the predicted potential distribution of Himalayan marmot in the study area,active surveillance of plague hosts and plague control and prevention could be more efficient.

  16. Plague year 1680 in Central Europe: using Czech plague registers to monitor epidemic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirková, Pavla

    Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2015 - (Brown, A.; Burn, A.; Doherty, R.), s. 213-234 ISBN 978-1-78327-042-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-35304S Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : Czech plague registers * Czech Republic * financial crises Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  17. A review of plague persistence with special emphasis on fleas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean E. Biggins

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sylvatic plague is highly prevalent during infrequent epizootics that ravage the landscape of western North America. During these periods, plague dissemination is very efficient. Epizootics end when rodent and flea populations are decimated and vectored transmission declines. A second phase (enzootic plague ensues when plague is difficult to detect from fleas, hosts or the environment, and presents less of a threat to public health. Recently, researchers have hypothesized that the bacterium (Yersinia pestis responsible for plague maintains a continuous state of high virulence and thus only changes in transmission efficiency explain the shift between alternating enzootic and epizootic phases. However, if virulent transmission becomes too inefficient, strong selection might favor an alternate survival strategy. Another plausible non-exclusive hypothesis, best supported from Asian field studies, is that Y. pestis persists (locally at foci by maintaining a more benign relationship within adapted rodents during the long expanses of time between outbreaks. From this vantage, it can revert to the epizootic (transmission efficient form. Similarly, in the United States (US, enzootic plague persistence has been proposed to develop sequestered within New World rodent carriers. However, the absence of clear support for rodent carriers in North America has encouraged a broader search for alternative explanations. A telluric plague existence has been proposed. However, the availability of flea life stages and their hosts could critically supplement environmental plague sources, or fleas might directly represent a lowlevel plague reservoir. Here, we note a potentially pivotal role for fleas. These epizootic plague vectors should be closely studied with newer more exacting methods to determine their potential to serve as participants in or accomplices to a plague persistence reservoir.

  18. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahelinirina, S.; Telfer, S; Brouat, Carine

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altit...

  19. Hong Kong Junk: Plague and the Economy of Chinese Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Histories of the Third Plague Pandemic, which diffused globally from China in the 1890s, have tended to focus on colonial efforts to regulate the movement of infected populations, on the state's draconian public health measures, and on the development of novel bacteriological theories of disease causation. In contrast, this article focuses on the plague epidemic in Hong Kong and examines colonial preoccupations with Chinese "things" as sources of likely contagion. In the 1890s, laboratory science invested plague with a new identity as an object to be collected, cultivated, and depicted in journals. At the same time, in the increasingly vociferous anti-opium discourse, opium was conceived as a contagious Chinese commodity: a plague. The article argues that rethinking responses to the plague through the history of material culture can further our understanding of the political consequences of disease's entanglement with economic and racial categories, while demonstrating the extent to which colonial agents "thought through things." PMID:27040025

  20. Influence of human recombinant interleukin-1beta on protective and immunogenic efficacy of live plague vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Deryabin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against plague is an important element of control over this exceptionally virulent infection. To be effective against virulent Yersinia pestis strains live plague vaccine produced from Yersinia pestis EV strain (EV vaccine requires annual revaccinations. Use of EV vaccine for revaccination is limited due to the initially developed immune response that suppresses the live vaccine culture. Earlier studies showed that the use of immunomodulators activates immune response to vaccination. In our study we assessed the influence of human recombinant interleukin-1beta (Betaleukin on immunogenic and protective efficacy of live plague vaccine in controlled experiments on animal models (rabbits and guinea pigs. In a long experiment (261 days on rabbits we assessed indicators of antigen specific immune response to F1 antigen of Yersinia pestis. The early antigen specific response was evaluated based on the appearance of different avidity lymphocytes with F1 receptors. Effector phase of the immune response was asses based on the activity of antigen-specific antibodies. Results showed that the use of betaleukin as an immunoadjuvant increases vaccination efficacy by strengthening the effector phase of the immune response and promotion of the early stage of antigen-specific immune response to EV vaccine. Protective efficacy of betaleukin and EV vaccine combination was assessed in an experiment with guinea pigs. This experiment showed that injections of betaleukin facilitates the production of antibodies following vaccination and significantly increases the rates of survival after the challenge with virulent plague strain. At the same time single injections of betaleukin alone did not protect guinea pigs from death after injections of virulent plague strains.

  1. The nature of plague in late eighteenth-century Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Alan

    2008-01-01

    This article uses an examination of the 1791 plague in Egypt to explore the relationships among disease, famine, flood, drought, and death in late eighteenth-century Egypt. It analyzes how plague functioned as part of a regular biophysical pathology of the environment in which the disease came and went as one iteration in a cycle that included famine, wind, flood, drought, price inflation, and revolt. Using the works of Egyptian chroniclers, archival materials, secondary studies, and traveler accounts, this article integrates plague into the study of the Egyptian environment by showing how it was a regular and expected part of life in Egypt. PMID:18622069

  2. [Molecular mechanisms of the plague pathogenic agent interaction with invertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, V V; Eroshenko, G A; Popov, N V; Vidiaeva, N A; Konnov, N P

    2009-01-01

    Microbe Russian Anti-Plague Research Institute, Saratov, Russia The literature data and experimental results of the authors on the molecular basis of plague agent interaction with invertebrates are discussed. The details of the plague agent life cycle, its genome organization, and molecular genetic mechanisms of its survival in flea vector and on the nematode cuticule are discussed. The experimental data about the ability to form biofilms at abiotic and biotic surfaces in the Yersinia pestis strains of the main and non-main subspecies are presented. Mechanisms of horizontal and vertical transmission of plague agent are considered. The suggestion about participation of the new member in the complex parasitic biocenosis (nematode, vector parasite) is put forward. PMID:20050160

  3. Plague in Arab Maghreb, 1940-2015: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliya Alia Malek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the epidemiology of 49 plague outbreaks which resulted in about 7,612 cases in 30 localities in the Arabic Maghreb (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt over 75 years. Between 1940 and 1950, most cases recorded in Morocco (75% and Egypt (20%, resulted from plague imported to Mediterranean harbours and transmitted by rat ectoparasites. In contrast, the re-emergence of plague in the southern part of Western Sahara in 1953 and in northeast Libya in 1976, was traced to direct contact between nomadic populations and infected goats and camels in natural foci, including the consumption of contaminated meat, illustrating this neglected oral route of contamination. Further familial outbreaks were traced to human ectoparasite transmission. Efforts to identify the factors contributing to natural foci may guide where to focus the surveillance of sentinel animals in order to eradicate human plague, if not Y. pestis from the Arab Maghreb.

  4. Plague in Arab Maghreb, 1940-2015: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Maliya Alia; Bitam, Idir; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the epidemiology of 49 plague outbreaks that resulted in about 7,612 cases in 30 localities in the Arabic Maghreb (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt) over 75 years. Between 1940 and 1950, most cases recorded in Morocco (75%) and Egypt (20%), resulted from plague imported to Mediterranean harbors and transmitted by rat ectoparasites. By contrast, the re-emergence of plague in the southern part of Western Sahara in 1953 and in northeast Libya in 1976 was traced to direct contact between nomadic populations and infected goats and camels in natural foci, including the consumption of contaminated meat, illustrating this neglected oral route of contamination. Further familial outbreaks were traced to human ectoparasite transmission. Efforts to identify the factors contributing to natural foci may guide where to focus the surveillance of sentinel animals in order to eradicate human plague, if not Yersinia pestis from the Arab Maghreb. PMID:27376053

  5. Plague in Arab Maghreb, 1940–2015: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Maliya Alia; Bitam, Idir; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the epidemiology of 49 plague outbreaks that resulted in about 7,612 cases in 30 localities in the Arabic Maghreb (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt) over 75 years. Between 1940 and 1950, most cases recorded in Morocco (75%) and Egypt (20%), resulted from plague imported to Mediterranean harbors and transmitted by rat ectoparasites. By contrast, the re-emergence of plague in the southern part of Western Sahara in 1953 and in northeast Libya in 1976 was traced to direct contact between nomadic populations and infected goats and camels in natural foci, including the consumption of contaminated meat, illustrating this neglected oral route of contamination. Further familial outbreaks were traced to human ectoparasite transmission. Efforts to identify the factors contributing to natural foci may guide where to focus the surveillance of sentinel animals in order to eradicate human plague, if not Yersinia pestis from the Arab Maghreb. PMID:27376053

  6. Understanding the persistence of plague foci in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Kreppel, Katharina; Elissa, Nohal; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Carniel, Elisabeth; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Jambou, Ronan

    2013-11-01

    Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is still found in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Madagascar reports almost one third of the cases worldwide. Y. pestis can be encountered in three very different types of foci: urban, rural, and sylvatic. Flea vector and wild rodent host population dynamics are tightly correlated with modulation of climatic conditions, an association that could be crucial for both the maintenance of foci and human plague epidemics. The black rat Rattus rattus, the main host of Y. pestis in Madagascar, is found to exhibit high resistance to plague in endemic areas, opposing the concept of high mortality rates among rats exposed to the infection. Also, endemic fleas could play an essential role in maintenance of the foci. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of these factors as well as human behavior in the persistence of plague in Madagascar. PMID:24244760

  7. Understanding the persistence of plague foci in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Kreppel, Katharina; Elissa, Nohal; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Carniel, Elisabeth; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Jambou, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is still found in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Madagascar reports almost one third of the cases worldwide. Y. pestis can be encountered in three very different types of foci: urban, rural, and sylvatic. Flea vector and wild rodent host population dynamics are tightly correlated with modulation of climatic conditions, an association that could be crucial for both the maintenance of foci and human plague epidemics. The black rat Rattus rattus, th...

  8. Current perspectives on the spread of plague in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    WM Lotfy

    2015-01-01

    Wael Mohamed Lotfy Parasitology Department, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Abstract: Plague is a zoonotic disease which has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout the recorded human history. This review was carried out with the aim of evaluating the current situation of human plague in Africa. The disease was reported from at least 28 countries in the continent, among them eight countries are currently with active human foci...

  9. Plagued by kindness: contagious sympathy in Shakespearean drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Eric

    2011-12-01

    This article considers Shakespeare's metaphors of transmission, contagion and infection in the light of period plague tracts, medical treatises and plague time literature. The author demonstrates how period conceptions of disease are predicated upon a notion of sympathetic transference and, consequently, how kindness, likeness and communication between characters in Shakespearean drama are complicated and fraught with period specific anxiety. This article situates Shakespearean literary texts within a precise historical and medical moment, considering how scientific conceptions contaminate dramatic text. PMID:21890861

  10. Evaluation of a Yersinia pestis mutant impaired in a thermoregulated type VI-like secretion system in flea, macrophage and murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennilee B; Telepnev, Maxim V; Zudina, Irina V; Bouyer, Donald; Montenieri, John A; Bearden, Scott W; Gage, Kenneth L; Agar, Stacy L; Foltz, Sheri M; Chauhan, Sadhana; Chopra, Ashok K; Motin, Vladimir L

    2009-11-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) have been identified recently in several Gram-negative organisms and have been shown to be associated with virulence in some bacterial pathogens. A T6SS of Yersinia pestis CO92 (locus YPO0499-YPO0516) was deleted followed by investigation of the phenotype of this mutation. We observed that this T6SS locus of Y. pestis was preferentially expressed at 26 degrees C in comparison to 37 degrees C suggesting a possible role in the flea cycle. However, we found that the deletion of T6SS locus YPO0499-YPO0516 in Y. pestis CO92 had no effect on the ability of this strain to infect the oriental rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopis. Nevertheless, this mutant displayed increased intracellular numbers in macrophage-like J774.A1 cells after 20 h post-infection for bacterial cells pre-grown at 26 degrees C indicating that expression of this T6SS locus limited intracellular replication in macrophages. In addition, deletion of the YPO0499-YPO0516 locus reduced the uptake by macrophages of the Y. pestis mutant pre-grown at 37 degrees C, suggesting that this T6SS locus has phagocytosis-promoting activity. Further study of the virulence of the T6SS mutant in murine bubonic and inhalation plague models revealed no attenuation in comparison with the parental CO92 strain. PMID:19716410

  11. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Rahelinirina, S.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Brouat, Carine

    2008-01-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a fu...

  12. A Taxonomic Update of Small Mammal Plague Reservoirs in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicino, Cibele R; Oliveira, João A; Cordeiro-Estrela, Pedro; D'andrea, Paulo S; Almeida, Alzira M P

    2015-10-01

    Plague is a disease of epidemic potential that may emerge with discontinuous outbreaks. In South America, 50 wild rodent species have been identified as plague reservoirs, in addition to one lagomorph and two marsupials. To review the nomenclature of plague reservoirs, we examined specimens collected in plague foci, carried out new surveys in Brazilian plague regions, and re-evaluated the nomenclature of South American reservoirs on the basis of the current literature. Five of the 15 species involved with plague in Argentina, three of 10 species involved with plague in Bolivia, three of the seven species involved with plague in Peru, five of the nine species involved with plague in Ecuador, and six of the nine species involved with plague in Brazil have undergone taxonomic changes. In the last 20 years, plague cases were recorded in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Peru. These four countries have a high rodent species richness in plague foci, a fact that may be decisive for the maintenance of plague in the wild. PMID:26393822

  13. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Rahelinirina, S; Duplantier, J-M; Brouat, C

    2008-12-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a functionally important region of the gene. We then compared (i) CCR5 genotypes of dying and surviving plague-challenged rats and (ii) CCR5 allelic frequencies in plague focus and plague-free populations. Our results suggested a higher prevalence of the substitution in resistant animals compared to susceptible individuals, and a tendency for higher frequencies in plague focus areas compared to plague-free areas. Therefore, the CCR5 polymorphism may be involved in Malagasy black rat plague resistance. CCR5 and other undetermined plague resistance markers may provide useful biological information about host evolution and disease dynamics. PMID:18703167

  14. Current perspectives on the spread of plague in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfy WM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wael Mohamed Lotfy Parasitology Department, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Abstract: Plague is a zoonotic disease which has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout the recorded human history. This review was carried out with the aim of evaluating the current situation of human plague in Africa. The disease was reported from at least 28 countries in the continent, among them eight countries are currently with active human foci. The Democratic Republic of the Congo and Madagascar are the countries with the highest endemicity in the world. A unique gathering of factors involved in the disease re-emergence in other parts of the world is present in Madagascar. The risk factors affecting persistence and spread of plague in the country were briefly reviewed. Based on the data presented, it was concluded that all African countries should be concerned by the possible emergence/re-emergence of the disease. It is crucial to implement some preventive measures in these countries. These measures include surveillance of suspected natural foci, rodent and insect eradication campaigns, and public health education. Keywords: emergence, re-emergence, disease, plague, Africa, public health

  15. Plague: Infections of Companion Animals and Opportunities for Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra C.F. Oyston

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonotic disease, normally circulating in rodent populations, transmitted to humans most commonly through the bite of an infected flea vector. Secondary infection of the lungs results in generation of infectious aerosols, which pose a significant hazard to close contacts. In enzootic areas, plague infections have been reported in owners and veterinarians who come into contact with infected pets. Dogs are relatively resistant, but can import infected fleas into the home. Cats are acutely susceptible, and can present a direct hazard to health. Reducing roaming and hunting behaviours, combined with flea control measures go some way to reducing the risk to humans. Various vaccine formulations have been developed which may be suitable to protect companion animals from contracting plague, and thus preventing onward transmission to man. Since transmission has resulted in a number of fatal cases of plague, the vaccination of domestic animals such as cats would seem a low cost strategy for reducing the risk of infection by this serious disease in enzootic regions.

  16. [Advance to the research of the climate factor effect on the distribution of plague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A P; Wei, R J; Xiong, H M; Wang, Z Y

    2016-05-01

    Plague is an anthropozoonotic disease caused by the Yersinia pestis ,which developed by many factors including local climate factors. In recent years, more and more studies on the effects of climate on plague were conducted. According to the researches, climate factors (mainly the rainfall and temperature) affected the development and distribution of plague by influencing the abundance of plague host animals and fleas index. The climate also affected the epidemic dynamics and the scope of plague. There were significant differences existing in the influence of climate on the palgue developed in the north and south China. In the two different plague epidemic systems, the solitary Daurian ground squirrel-flea-plague and the social Mongolian gerbil-flea-plague, the obvious population differences existed among the responses of the host animal to the climate changes. Although the internal relationship between the rainfall, the flea index, the density of rodents and the plague supported the nutritional cascade hypothesis, it can not prove that there is a clear causality between the occurrence of plague and rainfall. So the influence of climate factors on plague distribution can only be used for early forecasting and warning of the plague. PMID:27141906

  17. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Duplantier, J-M; Rahelinirina, S; Telfer, S; Brouat, C

    2010-06-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altitude area) was confirmed to be a widespread phenomenon. In rats from the plague focus, we observed that sex influenced plague susceptibility, with males slightly more resistant than females. Other individual factors investigated (weight and habitat of sampling) did not affect plague resistance. When infected at high bacterial dose (more than 10⁵ bacteria injected), rats from the plague focus died mainly within 3-5 days and produced specific antibodies, whereas after low-dose infection (plague resistance level and the course of infection in the black rat would contribute to a better understanding of plague circulation in Madagascar. PMID:20443044

  18. [The plague reviewed by way of molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, E

    1999-12-01

    The aetiology of plague was first discovered during the third pandemic of the disease occurring in Hong Kong in 1894. After Alexandre Yersin had identified the causal agent (Y. Pestis), Paul-Louis Simond proved the flea's role as vector. These discoveries were of prime importance for the subsequent development of efficient means for fighting plague as well as for preventive and curative treatments and vaccines. Vaccination brought about a sharp decrease in plague mortality and morbidity. However, the disease has never been eradicated. It is still prevalent in various Asian, African and American countries and is among the re-emerging diseases at the present time. The genetic basis of transmission mechanisms and pathogenicity of the bacillus are only beginning to be understood. We now know that the attenuation of the EV76 strain used by Girard and Robic as an anti-plague vaccine in Madagascar is due to the spontaneous excision of a large chromosomal DNA fragment of 102 kb, a part of which contains a group of genes implicated in the pathogenicity and appropriately called high pathogenicity island. These mechanisms of flea bacillus transmission are also beginning to be known. Two bacterial loci participating in the blocking of the ectoparasite's proventriculus have been identified. One is situated next to the high pathogenicity island on the unstable 102 kb chromosomal fragment, the other--on the large 95 kb plasmid specific to Y. pestis. The molecular basis of the bacillus' acquisition of multi-resistance to antibiotics have likewise recently been characterised. However, although Y. pestis is one of the most pathogenic micro-organisms of the bacterial world, the mechanisms responsible for this high level of pathogenecity have still not been identified. This is well worth noting, since a certain number of genes acting as pathogenicity factors in other species are present but altered in Y. pestis. Plague still withholds many secrets. PMID:11000953

  19. Eighteenth century Yersinia pestis genomes reveal the long-term persistence of an historical plague focus

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, K.; Herbig, A.; Sahl, J; Waglechner, N.; Fourment, M.; Forrest, S; Klunk, J.; Schuenemann, V; Poinar, D.; Kuch, M.; Golding, G.; Dutour, O.; Keim, P; Wagner, D.; Holmes, E

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest A bacterium called Yersina pestis is responsible for numerous human outbreaks of plague throughout history. It is carried by rats and other rodents and can spread to humans causing what we conventionally refer to as plague. The most notorious of these plague outbreaks – the Black Death – claimed millions of lives in Europe in the mid-14th century. Several other plague outbreaks emerged in Europe over the next 400 years. Then, there was a large gap before the plague re-emerged as ...

  20. [The Antonine Plague and the decline of the Roman Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, S; Fiorino, S

    2009-12-01

    The Antonine Plague, which flared up during the reign of Marcus Aurelius from 165 AD and continued under the rule of his son Commodus, played such a major role that the pathocenosis in the Ancient World was changed. The spread of the epidemic was favoured by the occurrence of two military episodes in which Marcus Aurelius himself took part: the Parthian War in Mesopotamia and the wars against the Marcomanni in northeastern Italy, in Noricum and in Pannonia. Accounts of the clinical features of the epidemic are scant and disjointed, with the main source being Galen, who witnessed the plague. Unfortunately, the great physician provides us with only a brief presentation of the disease, his aim being to supply therapeutic approaches, thus passing over the accurate description of the disease symptoms. Although the reports of some clinical cases treated by Galen lead us to think that the Antonine plague was caused by smallpox, palaeopathological confirmation is lacking. Some archaeological evidence (such as terracotta finds) from Italy might reinforce this opinion. In these finds, some details can be observed, suggesting the artist's purpose to represent the classic smallpox pustules, typical signs of the disease. The extent of the epidemic has been extensively debated: the majority of authors agree that the impact of the plague was severe, influencing military conscription, the agricultural and urban economy, and depleting the coffers of the State. The Antonine plague affected ancient Roman traditions, also leaving a mark on artistic expression; a renewal of spirituality and religiousness was recorded. These events created the conditions for the spread of monotheistic religions, such as Mithraism and Christianity. This period, characterized by health, social and economic crises, paved the way for the entry into the Empire of neighbouring barbarian tribes and the recruitment of barbarian troops into the Roman army; these events particularly favoured the cultural and

  1. AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus) from Madagascar: detecting genetic markers undergoing plague-mediated selection.

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Duplantier, J.-M.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Brouat, C.

    2011-01-01

    The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar's rural zones. Black rats are highly resistant to plague within the plague focus (central highland), whereas they are susceptible where the disease is absent (low altitude zone). To better understand plague wildlife circulation and host evolution in response to a highly virulent pathogen, we attempted to determine genetic markers associated with plague resistance in this species. To this pu...

  2. [Monitoring the Microtus fuscus plague epidemic in Sichuan province during 2000 - 2008.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Li-Mao; Song, Xiao-Yu; Zhu, Xiao-Ping;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the epidemic tendency of Microtus fuscus plague during 2000 - 2008 in Sichuan province. METHODS: To investigate the plague each year according to "overall Plan of the Plague in the Whole Nation" and "Surveillance Program of Sichuan Province Plague". RESULTS: There were plague...... epidemic from 2000 to 2008, with the average density as 312.41/ha. 42.57% of the Microtus fuscus were infected by body Fleas. The Fleas Index was 0.88 and the Index for nest Fleas of Microtus fuscus was 55.89. Six kinds of animals were infected by not only the Microtus fuscus but also herd-dog, sand fox...... fleas, Callopsylla sparsilis, Amphipsylla tutua tutua and Rhadinopsylla dahurica vicina, with the overall infection rate as 0.054%. CONCLUSION: Plague among Microtus fuscus showed a continuous epidemic in Sichuan province during 2000 - 2008....

  3. Study on the movement of Rattus rattus and evaluation of the plague dispersion in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Duplantier, Jean Marc; Ratovonjato, Jocelyn; Ramilijaona, Olga; Ratsimba, Mamy; Rahalison, Lila

    2010-01-01

    Plague affects mainly the rural areas in the central highlands of Madagascar. Rattus rattus is the main rodent host of Yersinia pestis in these localities. Since the introduction of plague, endemic foci have continued to expand, and spatiotemporal variability in the distribution of human plague has been observed. To assess the movements of R. rattus and evaluate the risk of dispersion of the disease, a field study at the scale of the habitats (houses, hedges of sisals, and rice fields) in the plague villages was carried out during high and low seasons of plague transmission to humans. The systemic oral marker Rhodamine B was used to follow rats' movements. Baits were placed in different habitats, and trapping success was carried out once a month for 3 months after the bait distribution. Plague indicators (reservoirs' abundance, flea index, Y. pestis prevalence in fleas, and Y. pestis antibody prevalence in rats) were determined. The highest abundance of rats and marking efficiency were observed in the sisal hedges and the rice fields. Marked rats were captured most commonly near the points where baits were initially placed. The main movements of rats were observed between the houses and sisal hedges. Major differences were observed between the seasons of high and low plague transmission. During the season of low plague transmission, rats were more abundant in the sisal hedges and rice fields, with rats moving from the houses to the rice fields. During the high plague transmission season, rats moved from the hedges of sisal to the rice fields. Important indicators of vector abundance and plague transmission were higher during the high plague transmission season. The three study habitats were the risk areas for plague transmission, but the risk appeared highest in the houses and sisals. Rats' movements according to the season were likely directed by the availability of food. PMID:20158335

  4. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with ...

  5. Study on the movement of Rattus rattus and evaluation of the plague dispersion in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Rahelinirina, S.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Ratovonjato, J.; Ramilijaona, O.; Ratsimba, M.; Rahalison, L.

    2010-01-01

    Plague affects mainly the rural areas in the central highlands of Madagascar. Rattus rattus is the main rodent host of Yersinia pestis in these localities. Since the introduction of plague, endemic foci have continued to expand, and spatiotemporal variability in the distribution of human plague has been observed. To assess the movements of R. rattus and evaluate the risk of dispersion of the disease, a field study at the scale of the habitats ( houses, hedges of sisals, and rice fields) in th...

  6. Identification of a Yersinia pestis-specific DNA probe with potential for use in plague surveillance.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonough, K A; Schwan, T G; Thomas, R.E.; Falkow, S

    1988-01-01

    A 900-base-pair DNA fragment derived from a 9.5-kilobase plasmid in Yersinia pestis hybridized specifically with Y. pestis DNA. We demonstrated the feasibility of using this DNA fragment to detect plague bacilli directly in fleas, suggesting that this Y. pestis-specific DNA probe may be used for plague surveillance in the field. Additional applications for this DNA probe may include plague diagnosis and pathogenesis research.

  7. Epidemiological analysis of the Eyam plague outbreak of 1665–1666

    OpenAIRE

    Whittles, Lilith K.; Didelot, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in human history, and still causes worrying outbreaks in Africa and South America. Despite the historical and current importance of plague, several questions remain unanswered concerning its transmission routes and infection risk factors. The plague outbreak that started in September 1665 in the Derbyshire village of Eyam claimed 257 lives over 14 months, wiping out entire families. Since previous att...

  8. [The prevention measures of plague in Hebei from 1946 to 1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ge

    2010-05-01

    The plague was seriously occurred in Hebei from 1946 to 1948, which had a great impact on the local social economy and people's life. The public health system was established by the government, and people were instructed about the knowledge of health consciousness and life habits for controlling effectively the plague. The measures of giving medicine freely and social assistance were taken for preventing the plague in the folk. Thus, the plague was controlled in a short time. However, the effect of prevention was limited by the objective conditions. The color of western medicine was showed from these measures, and the "modernity" of the system at that time was indicated. PMID:21029708

  9. AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus) from Madagascar: detecting genetic markers undergoing plague-mediated selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Duplantier, J-M; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Brouat, C

    2011-03-01

    The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar's rural zones. Black rats are highly resistant to plague within the plague focus (central highland), whereas they are susceptible where the disease is absent (low altitude zone). To better understand plague wildlife circulation and host evolution in response to a highly virulent pathogen, we attempted to determine genetic markers associated with plague resistance in this species. To this purpose, we combined a population genomics approach and an association study, both performed on 249 AFLP markers, in Malagasy R. rattus. Simulated distributions of genetic differentiation were compared to observed data in four independent pairs, each consisting of one population from the plague focus and one from the plague-free zone. We found 22 loci (9% of 249) with higher differentiation in at least two independent population pairs or with combining P-values over the four pairs significant. Among the 22 outlier loci, 16 presented significant association with plague zone (plague focus vs. plague-free zone). Population genetic structure inferred from outlier loci was structured by plague zone, whereas the neutral loci dataset revealed structure by geography (eastern vs. western populations). A phenotype association study revealed that two of the 22 loci were significantly associated with differentiation between dying and surviving rats following experimental plague challenge. The 22 outlier loci identified in this study may undergo plague selective pressure either directly or more probably indirectly due to hitchhiking with selected loci. PMID:20444082

  10. The use of high-resolution remote sensing for plague surveillance in Kazakhstan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addink, E A; De Jong, S M; Davis, S A;

    2010-01-01

    Kazakhstan the great gerbil is the major host of plague, a social rodent well-adapted to desert environments. Intensive monitoring and prevention of plague in gerbils started in 1947, reducing the number of human cases and mortalities drastically. However, the monitoring is labour-intensive and hence...

  11. Climate-driven introduction of the Black Death and successive plague reintroductions into Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Boris V; Büntgen, Ulf; Easterday, W Ryan; Ginzler, Christian; Walløe, Lars; Bramanti, Barbara; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2015-03-10

    The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular introduction of Yersinia pestis, after which the disease established itself in European rodents over four centuries. To locate these putative plague reservoirs, we studied the climate fluctuations that preceded regional plague epidemics, based on a dataset of 7,711 georeferenced historical plague outbreaks and 15 annually resolved tree-ring records from Europe and Asia. We provide evidence for repeated climate-driven reintroductions of the bacterium into European harbors from reservoirs in Asia, with a delay of 15 ± 1 y. Our analysis finds no support for the existence of permanent plague reservoirs in medieval Europe. PMID:25713390

  12. Cellulose acetate as solid phase in ELISA for plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa AD

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigen from Yersinia pestis was adsorbed on cellulose acetate discs (0.5 cm of diameter which were obtained from dialysis membrane by using a paper punch. ELISA for human plague diagnosis was carried out employing this matrix and was capable to detect amount of 1.3 µg of antigen, 3,200 times diluted positive serum using human anti-IgG conjugate diluted 1:4,000. No relevant antigen lixiviation from the cellulose acetate was observed even after washing the discs 15 times. The discs were impregnated by the coloured products from the ELISA development allowing its use in dot-ELISA. Furthermore, cellulose acetate showed a better performance than the conventional PVC plates.

  13. [Transylvanian refugees and the plague in 1708-1709].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, D

    1993-01-01

    Owing to the overwhelming military power of the Habsburg forces Transylvanian sympathizers fled twice to Hungary during the Rákóczi uprising (1704-1711): first in 1704-1706 and then in 1707-1711. In the autumn of 1707 they numbered as much as ten thousand people, and according to the decrees of the diet at Kisvárda, they were settled down in smaller units in around Szabolcs, Szatmár, Bereg, Ung, Ugocsa and Máramaros counties. Though always short of money, the leaders of the ukprising created a system that satisfied the basic needs of these refugees. By the end of the rebellion, nevertheless, as the territory controlled by Rákóczi's armies decreased considerably, the refugees were forced to move on and on, which certainly led to a corruption of their food supplies, accommodation and hygienic conditions. The worst among all came with the plague. The author examines the effects of the epidemic and the counter-measures taken by the individual and the authorities of the uprising. Kis has consulted the main Hungarian books of that age that referred to black death (among others Anna Zay's Herbarium [1719], Samuel Köleséri's Pestis Daicae, György Komáromi Csipkés's Pestis pestise, Ferenc Pápai Páriz's Pax Corporis and A [estos betegség etc., and Máté Tsanaki's A Döghalálról, etc.), as well as many archival papers (the correspondence of Count Sándor Károlyi with his wife Krisztina Barkóczy, thos of General Bercsényi to his wife and Prince Rákóczi, and some doctors' reports, etc.). His main source, however, is Zsigmond Szaniszló's diary. Szaniszló was a former fobiró (chief-sheriff) of the Transsylvanian Torda city, an Anti-Trinitarian stronghold, and remained a leader of his people during the emigration. According to his notes, which the author has compared with the data given by the others, there were hardly any measures taken against plague in this community. Although Szaniszló gives detailed descriptions about the everyday life of the

  14. A bibliography of literature pertaining to plague (Yersinia pestis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Laura E.; Frank, Megan K. Eberhardt

    2011-01-01

    Plague is an acute and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mainly cycles between small mammals and their fleas; however, it has the potential to infect humans and frequently causes fatalities if left untreated. It is often considered a disease of the past; however, since the late 1800s, plagueis geographic range has expanded greatly, posing new threats in previously unaffected regions of the world, including the Western United States. A literature search was conducted using Internet resources and databases. The keywords chosen for the searches included plague, Yersinia pestis, management, control, wildlife, prairie dogs, fleas, North America, and mammals. Keywords were used alone or in combination with the other terms. Although this search pertains mostly to North America, citations were included from the international research community, as well. Databases and search engines used included Google (http://www.google.com), Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com), SciVerse Scopus (http://www.scopus.com), ISI Web of Knowledge (http://apps.isiknowledge.com), and the USGS Library's Digital Desktop (http://library.usgs.gov). The literature-cited sections of manuscripts obtained from keyword searches were cross-referenced to identify additional citations or gray literature that was missed by the Internet search engines. This Open-File Report, published as an Internet-accessible bibliography, is intended to be periodically updated with new citations or older references that may have been missed during this compilation. Hence, the authors would be grateful to receive notice of any new or old papers that the audience (users) think need to be included.

  15. [PLAGUE IN PALERMO IN 1575 AND SOCIAL CONTROL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Renato; Salerno, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The work moves from the low mortality of the plague of Palermo in 1575 - 1576 in comparison to similar outbreaks and contemporary analysis of the activity of Ingrassia, a man that the city government had wanted at his side. The extraordinary health interventions, including those to favor of the predisposition of health building to isolation, gears for a more wide-ranging than the traditional one. The isolation adopted by Ingrassia wasn't a novelty because it was already in use half a century earlier, as the Previdelli wrote. We assume that the population in crisis, hungry and out of work for the huge military expenditure of king Philip II, would have prompted the City government to use the outbreak for the purposes of control>. At the same goal always answered in the sixteenth century the establishment of the parish, created to divide the territory in order to guide and control the practice of the faith of the people. Ingrassia, a man next to political power, which in turn welded with the spiritual power in order to implement the Catholic Counter-Reformation, justified the coercive initiatives towards the population. The practice of medicine, as still happens today, is affected by the conditions of the policy, raising one of the fundamental principles of bioethics, the question ofthe independence ofthe doctor: a physician divided by the duty to represent the legitimate interests of the patient and those of political power, perhaps not always shared. It is a new interpretation of the activity of Ingrassia and his results than the plague. PMID:26946814

  16. Human plague occurrences in Africa: an overview from 1877 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerinckx, Simon; Bertherat, Eric; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-02-01

    Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, but particularly in Africa. Despite the long-standing history of human plague, it is difficult to get a historical and recent overview of the general situation. We searched and screened available information sources on human plague occurrences in African countries and compiled information on when, where and how many cases occurred in a centralised database. We found records that plague was probably already present before the third pandemic and that hundreds of thousands of human infections have been reported in 26 countries since 1877. In the first 30 years of the 20th century, the number of human cases steadily increased to reach a maximum in 1929. From then on the number decreased and fell below 250 after 1945. Since the 1980s, again increasingly more human infections have been reported with the vast majority of cases notified in East Africa and Madagascar. We show that public health concerns regarding the current plague situation are justified and that the disease should not be neglected, despite the sometimes questionability of the numbers of cases. We conclude that improving plague surveillance strategies is absolutely necessary to obtain a clear picture of the plague situation in endemic regions. PMID:19716148

  17. New alternatives on the control of plagues in the handling of the residuals in agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recount of the historical evolution of the agriculture is made in the country and the use of agricultural inputs with tendency to the mono cultivations that drove to a biological imbalance and the escalation of the plagues in the main cultivations, that which forced to the integrated handling of plagues. The strategies are described using in the control integrated as they are: the use of the adverse environmental factors to the plagues, the use of the natural enemies, the cultural practices, the use of traps, the employment of resistant varieties and measures of legal type

  18. Plague in Egypt: Disease biology, history and contemporary analysis: A minireview

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfy, Wael M.

    2013-01-01

    Plague is a zoonotic disease with a high mortality rate in humans. Unfortunately, it is still endemic in some parts of the world. Also, natural foci of the disease are still found in some countries. Thus, there may be a risk of global plague re-emergence. This work reviews plague biology, history of major outbreaks, and threats of disease re-emergence in Egypt. Based on the suspected presence of potential natural foci in the country, the global climate change, and the threat posed by some nei...

  19. [The Antonine plague: A global pestilence in the II century d.C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    The Antonine plague was the first plague affecting globally the Western world. It affected all aspects of life of mankind in the Roman Empire: economics, politics, religion and the culture. The especialists set the mortality rate in the 10% of the population. On the other hand the existence of unified Roman Empire from culturally and territorially helped to spreading the plague as it could similarly occur in our society in a similar pandemic. In conclusion, it is argued that the epidemic was global in a sense of the geographical extension and the effects this had on the population. PMID:27314999

  20. Epidemiology of Human Plague in the United States, 1900–2012

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-23

    Dr. Kiersten Kugeler discusses the Epidemiology of Human Plague in the United States.  Created: 2/23/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/23/2015.

  1. Poor Vision and Dangerous Falls Plague Many U.S. Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158679.html Poor Vision and Dangerous Falls Plague Many U.S. Seniors Year- ... HealthDay News) -- Millions of American seniors have severe vision impairment, and with it comes the risk of ...

  2. Molecular characterization of Duck Plague virus isolated from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mostakin Ahamed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Duck plague (DP is the most feared duck disease in the world. For isolation, identification, molecular detection and characterization of DP virus (DPV, a total of 94 samples were collected from commercial farms (n=6 and households (n=13 from Rajshahi (n=37, Netrokona (n=35 and Mymensingh (n=22 districts of Bangladesh. The samples were processed and inoculated into 11-13 days old embryonated duck eggs for virus propagation. Virus was identified using agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIT and passive hemagglutination (PHA test, and was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting DNA polymerase and gC genes, followed by sequencing. Pathogenicity tests were performed using duck embryos, ducklings and ducks. Among the 94 samples, 17 isolates were confirmed as DPV by PCR amplification of partial DNA polymerase (446-bp and gC genes (78-bp, respectively. One of the isolates (Anatid herpes 1 BAU DMH was sequenced and found to be closely related with a Chinese variant of DPV (GenBank: JQ647509.1. Thus, we assume that both Bangladeshi and Chinese isolates of DPV may have a common ancestor. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 296-303

  3. Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Yersinia pestis Infection in Long-Term Recovered Plague Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bei; Du, Chunhong; Zhou, Lei; Bi, Yujing; Wang, Xiaoyi; Wen, Li; Guo, Zhaobiao; Song, Zhizhong; Yang, Ruifu

    2012-01-01

    Plague is one of the most dangerous diseases and is caused by Yersinia pestis. Effective vaccine development requires understanding of immune protective mechanisms against the bacterium in humans. In this study, the humoral and memory cellular immune responses in plague patients (n = 65) recovered from Y. pestis infection during the past 16 years were investigated using a protein microarray and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot). The seroprevalence to the F1 antigen in all re...

  4. [The North African plague and Charles Nicolle's theory of infectious diseases].

    OpenAIRE

    Ben, Néfissa Kmar; Moulin, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Many infectious diseases were described in North Africa in 18th-19th centuries by European travellers. Most of them were allegedly imported by new migrant populations coming from sub-Saharan, European or Middle East countries. Plague outbreaks have been described since the Black Death as diseases of the Mediterranean harbours. Charles Nicolle and his collaborators at the Pasteur Institute were witnesses to the extinction of plague and typhus fever in Tunisia. Both could be considered as endem...

  5. Genetic structure of black rat populations in a rural plague focus in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert, Aude; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahelinirina, S.; Rahalison, L.; Chanteau, S.; Brouat, Carine

    2007-01-01

    The genetic structure of reservoir populations is a key characteristic in understanding the persistence of infectious diseases in natural systems. In the Highlands of Madagascar, where plague has persisted since 1920, the black rat, Rattus rattus (L., 1758), is the sole species acting as a reservoir of the disease. Ecological surveys have shown a clear correlation between the locations of the plague-persistence area in Madagascar (above 800 m elevation) and the distribution area of one endemi...

  6. Diverse Genotypes of Yersinia pestis Caused Plague in Madagascar in 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Riehm, Julia M; Projahn, Michaela; Vogler, Amy J.; Rajerison, Minoaerisoa; Andersen, Genevieve; Hall, Carina M.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M.; Holger C. Scholz

    2015-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of human plague and is endemic in various African, Asian and American countries. In Madagascar, the disease represents a significant public health problem with hundreds of human cases a year. Unfortunately, poor infrastructure makes outbreak investigations challenging. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA was extracted directly from 93 clinical samples from patients with a clinical diagnosis of plague in Madagascar in 2007. The extracted DNAs we...

  7. Immune Responses to Plague Infection in Wild Rattus rattus, in Madagascar: A Role in Foci Persistence?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Ranjalahy, Michel A; Andriamiarimanana, Fehivola; Rahaingosoamamitiana, Corinne; Rahalison, Lila; Jambou, Ronan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plague is endemic within the central highlands of Madagascar, where its main reservoir is the black rat, Rattus rattus. Typically this species is considered susceptible to plague, rapidly dying after infection inducing the spread of infected fleas and, therefore, dissemination of the disease to humans. However, persistence of transmission foci in the same area from year to year, supposes mechanisms of maintenance among which rat immune responses could play a major role. Immunity a...

  8. Controlling Ebola: what we can learn from China's 1911 battle against the pneumonic plague in Manchuria

    OpenAIRE

    He Liu; Mingli Jiao; Siqi Zhao; Kai Xing; Ye Li; Ning Ning; Libo Liang; Qunhong Wu; Yanhua Hao

    2015-01-01

    The pneumonic plague, which spread across Northeast China during the winter of 1910 and spring of 1911, caused numerous deaths and brought about severe social turmoil. After compulsory quarantine and other epidemic prevention measures were enforced by Dr Wu Lien-teh, the epidemic was brought to an end within 4 months. This article reviews the ways in which the plague was dealt with from a historical perspective, based on factors such as clinical manifestations, duration of illness, case fatal...

  9. [Epizootological assessment of the possibilities of importing plague from Vietnam to Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, L P; Maramovich, A S; Nikitin, A Ia; Okunev, L P; Innokent'eva, T I; Kosilko, S A; Voronova, G A

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether the plague microbe with vectors or carriers can be imported from Vietnam to Russia, the authors consider the specific features of pathogen circulation in this country's biotopes varying in anthropogenic transformation. The idea that there were natural foci of plague in Vietnam dominated until the late 1990s. The small rat Rattus exulans that inhabits open stations and ensures a parasitic contact with the synanthropic representatives of the fauna was considered to be a major carrier. The recent years have provided conclusive proofs that plague foci are absent in Vietnam wild nature. Anthropurgic foci develop in the network of localities whose conditions are favorable to the existence of synanthropic rodents and the fleas Xenopsylla cheopis. Cases of the plague pathogen, FI antigen and its antibodies being detected in wild mammals are due to their parasitic contacts with synanthropic rats in the agrocultural area around the localities with running epizootias. These contacts are provided by X.cheopis only. Since 2003, there have been no reports on the incidence of human plague or its pathogen isolation from environmental objects in Vietnam. However, all conditions and prerequisites for the formation ofanthropurgic plague foci remain in this country. Further epizootological monitoring is required for appropriate services to rapidly and adequately respond if the epizootological or epidemiological situation of this infection changes. PMID:21797070

  10. Age at vaccination may influence response to sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) in Gunnison’s prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Tripp, Daniel W.; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Susan; Williamson, Judy L.; Abbott, Rachel C.

    2015-01-01

    Gunnison’s prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) have been considered at greater risk from Yersinia pestis (plague) infection in the montane portion of their range compared to populations at lower elevations, possibly due to factors related to flea transmission of the bacteria or greater host susceptibility. To test the latter hypothesis and determine whether vaccination against plague with an oral sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) improved survival, we captured prairie dogs from a C. g. gunnisoni or “montane” population and a C. g. zuniensis or “prairie” population for vaccine efficacy and challenge studies. No differences (P = 0.63) were found in plague susceptibility in non-vaccinated animals between these two populations; however, vaccinates from the prairie population survived plague challenge at significantly higher rates (P SPV could be a useful plague management tool for this species, particularly if targeted at younger cohorts.

  11. Age at Vaccination May Influence Response to Sylvatic Plague Vaccine (SPV) in Gunnison's Prairie Dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Tripp, Dan; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Falendysz, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan; Williamson, Judy; Abbott, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) have been considered at greater risk from Yersinia pestis (plague) infection in the montane portion of their range compared to populations at lower elevations, possibly due to factors related to flea transmission of the bacteria or greater host susceptibility. To test the latter hypothesis and determine whether vaccination against plague with an oral sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) improved survival, we captured prairie dogs from a C. g. gunnisoni or "montane" population and a C. g. zuniensis or "prairie" population for vaccine efficacy and challenge studies. No differences (P = 0.63) were found in plague susceptibility in non-vaccinated animals between these two populations; however, vaccinates from the prairie population survived plague challenge at significantly higher rates (P SPV could be a useful plague management tool for this species, particularly if targeted at younger cohorts. PMID:25589000

  12. A plague on five of your houses - statistical re-assessment of three pneumonic plague outbreaks that occurred in Suffolk, England, between 1906 and 1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egan Joseph R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plague is a re-emerging disease and its pneumonic form is a high priority bio-terrorist threat. Epidemiologists have previously analysed historical outbreaks of pneumonic plague to better understand the dynamics of infection, transmission and control. This study examines 3 relatively unknown outbreaks of pneumonic plague that occurred in Suffolk, England, during the first 2 decades of the twentieth century. Methods The Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test is used to compare the symptomatic period and the length of time between successive cases (i.e. the serial interval with previously reported values. Consideration is also given to the case fatality ratio, the average number of secondary cases resulting from each primary case in the observed minor outbreaks (termed Rminor, and the proportion of individuals living within an affected household that succumb to pneumonic plague via the index case (i.e. the household secondary attack rate (SAR. Results 2 of the 14 cases survived giving a case fatality ratio of 86% (95% confidence interval (CI = {57%, 98%}. For the 12 fatal cases, the average symptomatic period was 3.3 days (standard deviation (SD = 1.2 days and, for the 11 non index cases, the average serial interval was 5.8 days (SD = 2.0 days. Rminor was calculated to be 0.9 (SD = 1.0 and, in 2 households, the SAR was approximately 14% (95% CI = {0%, 58%} and 20% (95% CI = {1%, 72%}, respectively. Conclusions The symptomatic period was approximately 1 day longer on average than in an earlier study but the serial interval was in close agreement with 2 previously reported values. 2 of the 3 outbreaks ended without explicit public health interventions; however, non-professional caregivers were particularly vulnerable - an important public health consideration for any future outbreak of pneumonic plague.

  13. The innate immune response may be important for surviving plague in wild Gunnison's prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Joseph D.; Van Andel, Roger; Stone, Nathan E.; Cobble, Kacy R.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Lee, Judy; VerSteeg, Michael; Corcoran, Jeff; Cordova, Jennifer; Van Pelt, William E.; Shuey, Megan M.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Keim, Paul; Smith, Susan; Rodriguez-Ramos, Julia; Williamson, Judy L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Wagner, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis, with ≥99% mortality reported from multiple studies of plague epizootics. A colony of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) in the Aubrey Valley (AV) of northern Arizona appears to have survived several regional epizootics of plague, whereas nearby colonies have been severely affected by Y. pestis. To examine potential mechanisms accounting for survival in the AV colony, we conducted a laboratory Y. pestis challenge experiment on 60 wild-caught prairie dogs from AV and from a nearby, large colony with frequent past outbreaks of plague, Espee (n = 30 per colony). Test animals were challenged subcutaneously with the fully virulent Y. pestis strain CO92 at three doses: 50, 5,000, and 50,000 colony-forming units (cfu); this range is lethal in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Contrary to our expectations, only 40% of the animals died. Although mortality trended higher in the Espee colony (50%) compared with AV (30%), the differences among infectious doses were not statistically significant. Only 39% of the survivors developed moderate to high antibody levels to Y. pestis, indicating that mechanisms other than humoral immunity are important in resistance to plague. The ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes was not correlated with plague survival in this study. However, several immune proteins with roles in innate immunity (VCAM-1, CXCL-1, and vWF) were upregulated during plague infection and warrant further inquiry into their role for protection against this disease. These results suggest plague resistance exists in wild populations of the Gunnison's prairie dog and provide important directions for future studies.

  14. Contrasted patterns of selection on MHC-linked microsatellites in natural populations of the Malagasy plague reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, Charlotte; Ivanova, Svilena; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Loiseau, Anne; Rahalison, Lila; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina

    2012-01-01

    Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a highly virulent rodent disease that persists in many natural ecosystems. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main host involved in the plague focus of the central highlands of Madagascar. Black rat populations from this area are highly resistant to plague, whereas those from areas in which the disease is absent (low altitude zones of Madagascar) are susceptible. Various lines of evidence suggest a role for the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) in ...

  15. Are local plague endemicity and ecological characteristics of vectors and reservoirs related? A case study in north-east Tanzania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne LAUDISOIT; Simon NEERINCKX; Rhodes H.MAKUNDI; Herwig LEIRS; Boris R.KRASNOV

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of plague endemicity in Tanzania is characterized by continuous re-appearance of the disease in some locations, while in other neighbouring villages the disease has never or seldom been observed. To understand the reasons for this pattern, we studied small mammal and flea species composition, diversity and relative abundances in two plague-endemic and two plague-free locations. We asked (a) whether fleas more abundant in plague-endemic locations differ in their characteristic abundance and the degree of their host specificity from fleas more abundant in plague-free locations and (b) whether hosts most abundant in plagne-endemic locations differ in the diversity of their flea assemblages from hosts most abundant in plague-free locations. We characterized (a) each host species by species richness and degree of taxonomic relatedness of its flea assemblages and (b) each flea species by its mean abundance and size, and degree of taxonomic relatedness of its host spectrum and compared their relative abundances between locations. No significant difference between plague-endemic and plague-free locations in either host density or any variable related to flea abundance or diversity was found. However, there was marginally significant effect of taxonomic distinctness of a flea assemblage harboured by a host on its probability to be more abundant in either plague-endemic or plague-free locations. Furthermore, hosts more abundant in plague-endemic locations tended to harbeur closely-related fleas. Finally, while opportunistic and specialist fleas were equally distributed in both sets of locations, fleas exploiting distantly-related hosts were found mainly in plague-free locations during the rainy season. We suggest that the observed patterns might arise due to seasonal and spatial differences in local microclimatic conditions and landscape connectivity.

  16. From the recent lessons of the Malagasy foci towards a global understanding of the factors involved in plague reemergence

    OpenAIRE

    Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Chanteau, Suzanne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    Re-emergence of human cases of plague after decades of silence does not necessarily mean that plague foci are re-emerging. Most often, Yersinia pestis bacteria have been maintained and circulating at low levels in the rodent populations. It seems therefore more appropriate to speak in terms of expansion or regression phases for sylvatic rodent plague foci and to reserve the term re-emergence for human cases. From the analysis of well-documented human plague cases in Madagascar, we underline t...

  17. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  18. Gene flow in a Yersinia pestis vector, Oropsylla hirsuta, during a plague epizootic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Jones , Leigh R. Washburn & Hugh B. Britten

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Appreciating how Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, spreads amongblack-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus colonies (BTPD, is vital to wildlife conservation programsin North American grasslands. A little-studied aspect of the system is the role of Y. pestis vectors, i.e. fleas,play in the spreading of plague in natural settings. We investigated the genetic structure and variability of acommon prairie dog flea (Oropsylla hirsuta in BTPD colonies in order to examine dispersal patterns. Giventhat this research took place during a widespread plague epizootic, there was the added advantage of gaininginformation on the dynamics of sylvatic plague.Methods & Results: Oropsylla hirsuta were collected from BTPD burrows in nine colonies from May 2005 toJuly 2005, and eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to generate genotypic data from them.Gene flow estimates revealed low genetic differentiation among fleas sampled from different colonies. NestedPCR plague assays confirmed the presence of Y. pestis with the average Y. pestis prevalence across all ninecolonies at 12%. No significant correlations were found between the genetic variability and gene flow of O.hirsuta and Y. pestis prevalence on a per-colony basis.Conclusion: Oropsylla hirsuta dispersal among BTPD colonies was high, potentially explaining the rapidspread of Y. pestis in our study area in 2005 and 2006.

  19. Evidence of Yersinia pestis DNA from fleas in an endemic plague area of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang'ombe Bernard M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a bacterium that causes plague which infects a variety of mammals throughout the world. The disease is usually transmitted among wild rodents through a flea vector. The sources and routes of transmission of plague are poorly researched in Africa, yet remains a concern in several sub-Saharan countries. In Zambia, the disease has been reported on annual basis with up to 20 cases per year, without investigating animal reservoirs or vectors that may be responsible in the maintenance and propagation of the bacterium. In this study, we undertook plague surveillance by using PCR amplification of the plasminogen activator gene in fleas. Findings Xenopsylla species of fleas were collected from 83 rodents trapped in a plague endemic area of Zambia. Of these rodents 5 had fleas positive (6.02% for Y. pestis plasminogen activator gene. All the Y. pestis positive rodents were gerbils. Conclusions We conclude that fleas may be responsible in the transmission of Y. pestis and that PCR may provide means of plague surveillance in the endemic areas of Zambia.

  20. Diagnosis of plague and identification of virulence markers in Yersinia pestis by multiplex-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEAL Nilma C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a procedure for the rapid diagnosis of plague that also allows the identification of prominent virulence markers of Y. pestis strains. This procedure is based upon the use of a single polymerase chain reaction with multiple pairs of primers directed at genes present in the three virulence plasmids as well as in the chromosomal pathogenicity island of the bacterium. The technique allowed the discrimination of strains which lacked one or more of the known pathogenic loci, using as template total DNA obtained from bacterial cultures and from simulated blood cultures containing diluted concentration of bacteria. It also proved effective in confirming the disease in a blood culture from a plague suspected patient. As the results are obtained in a few hours this technique will be useful in the methodology of the Plague Control Program.

  1. The plague of Thebes, a historical epidemic in Sophocles' Oedipus Rex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulis, Antonis A; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Androutsos, George; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2012-01-01

    Sophocles, one of the most noted playwrights of the ancient world, wrote the tragedy Oedipus Rex in the first half of the decade 430-420 bc. A lethal plague is described in this drama. We adopted a critical approach to Oedipus Rex in analyzing the literary description of the disease, unraveling its clinical features, and defining a possible underlying cause. Our goals were to clarify whether the plague described in Oedipus Rex reflects an actual historical event; to compare it with the plague of Athens, which was described by Thucydides as occurring around the same time Sophocles wrote; and to propose a likely causative pathogen. A critical reading of Oedipus Rex and a comparison with Thucydides' history, as well as a systematic review of historical data, strongly suggests that this epidemic was an actual event, possibly caused by Brucella abortus. PMID:22261081

  2. The Plague of Thebes, a Historical Epidemic in Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economopoulos, Konstantinos P.; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Androutsos, George; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2012-01-01

    Sophocles, one of the most noted playwrights of the ancient world, wrote the tragedy Oedipus Rex in the first half of the decade 430–420 bc. A lethal plague is described in this drama. We adopted a critical approach to Oedipus Rex in analyzing the literary description of the disease, unraveling its clinical features, and defining a possible underlying cause. Our goals were to clarify whether the plague described in Oedipus Rex reflects an actual historical event; to compare it with the plague of Athens, which was described by Thucydides as occurring around the same time Sophocles wrote; and to propose a likely causative pathogen. A critical reading of Oedipus Rex and a comparison with Thucydides’ history, as well as a systematic review of historical data, strongly suggests that this epidemic was an actual event, possibly caused by Brucella abortus. PMID:22261081

  3. Findings of bacterial microflora in piglets infected with conventional swine plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanov Jasna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Piglets infected with the conventional swine plague virus as a result of secondary bacterial infections sometimes show an insufficiently clear clinical and pathoanatomical picture, which is why the very procedure of diagnosis is complex and the final diagnosis unreliable. That is why these investigations were aimed at examining the presence of bacterial microflora in diseased and dead pilgets which were found to have the viral antigen for CSP using the fluorescent antibody technique, in cases where the pathomorphological finding was not characteristic for conventional swine plague. Autopsies of dead piglets most often showed changes in the digestive tract and lungs, with resulting technopathy and diseases of infective nature. Such findings on knowledge of a present bacterial microflora are especially important in cases when conventional swine plague is controlled on farms and an announcement that the disease has been contained is in the offing.

  4. Seroprevalence of hantavirus and Yersinia pestis antibodies in professionals from the Plague Control Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika de Cassia Vieira da Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Professionals who handle rodents in the field and in the laboratory are at risk of infection by the microorganisms harbored by these animals. Methods Serum samples from professionals involved in rodent and Yersinia pestis handling in field or laboratory work were analyzed to determine hantavirus and plague seroprevalence and to establish a relationship between these activities and reports of illnesses. Results Two individuals had antibodies against hantavirus, and two harbored antibodies against the plague; none of the individuals had experienced an illness related to their duties. Conclusions These results confirm the risks of hantavirus- and plague-related field and laboratory activities and the importance of protective measures for such work.

  5. 圣经中的鼠疫及纪年%Plague and Its Time in Bible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马学博

    2015-01-01

    圣经记载了最早一次鼠疫流行,西方学者为此长期争论不休,主要集中在临床症状的译名、宿主动物黑鼠是否存在等,而发生鼠疫流行的年代则语焉不详。现据文献研究及考古发掘证据,试图阐释“非利士人鼠疫”的可信性,提出相对准确的纪年约为公元前1050年,并且涉及了旧约时代中东鼠疫自然疫源地及鼠疫流行史研究与鼠疫实验科学研究关系问题。%The first plague epidemic was recorded in the Bible. Western scholars debated about it for a long time, focusing mainly in the translation of clinical symptoms, the presence of host animal rattus, and so on. However, the time of plague epidemic was vague. According to the evidence of literature research and archaeological excavations, the article attempted to explain the credibility of 'Philistine plague', and proposed that the relatively accurate time of plague epidemic is 1050 BC. At the same time, the article involved in the Old Testament times' natural foci of plague in the Near East, and the relation of study of the history of the plague epidemic and experimental scientific research.

  6. A Non-Stationary Relationship between Global Climate Phenomena and Human Plague Incidence in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Kreppel, Katharina S.; Caminade, Cyril; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarison; Rahalison, Lila; Morse, Andy; Baylis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is found in Asia and the Americas, but predominantly in Africa, with the island of Madagascar reporting almost one third of human cases worldwide. Plague's occurrence is affected by local climate factors which in turn are influenced by large-scale climate phenomena such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The effects of ENSO on regional climate are often enhanced or reduced by a second large-scale climate phenomenon, the Indian ...

  7. Assessment of Rhodamine B for labelling the plague reservoir Rattus rattus in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Rahelinirina, S.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Ratsimba, M.; Ratovonjato, J.; Ramilijaona, O.; Papillon, Yves; Rahalison, L.

    2010-01-01

    The black rat is the main plague reservoir in rural foci in Madagascar, inside the villages as well as in the cultivated areas around. We have evaluated the potentialities of mass-marking of rats, using baits containing Rhodamine B (RB) in order to get a tool to study the movements of rats and to understand the spread of plague. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that: (i) rats were more attracted by the rodent granules and peanut butter; (ii) incorporation of RB in baits did not reduce thei...

  8. Spatial analysis and identification of high risk plague regions in Pakistan based on associated rodent species distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Madiha; Aleem, Maha; Javed, Sundus; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akbar Shah; Bokhari, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Plague, caused by Yersinia pestitis, is an infectious bacterial disease that has a high fatality rate if untreated. Rodents are plague reservoirs and play an important role in disease spread. Plague cases have been reported extensively since the second pandemic from the 14th century in countries sharing borders with Pakistan, such as China and India, as well as nearby countries including Russia and central Asia. Despite being centrally located in a plague-infested geographical zone, there has been no plague incidence reported from Pakistan. This study aims to pinpoint some of the potentially important aspects of the disease, which have to be considered when assessing potential risk associated with a plague outbreak in Pakistan. In this context, the occurrence and distribution of plague-associated rodent reservoirs in different regions of Pakistan in relation to those found in the neighboring countries were mapped. In addition, the climatic factors that may also influence disease spread by affecting the growth of the bacteria are also discussed. The combined epidemiological and ecological surveillance studies suggest a prevalence of several potential rodent carriers in certain districts with the possibility of a plague outbreak in Pakistan. PMID:27482799

  9. Temporal Progression of Pneumonic Plague in Blood of Nonhuman Primate: A Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Hammamieh

    Full Text Available Early identification of impending illness during widespread exposure to a pathogenic agent offers a potential means to initiate treatment during a timeframe when it would be most likely to be effective and has the potential to identify novel therapeutic strategies. The latter could be critical, especially as antibiotic resistance is becoming widespread. In order to examine pre-symptomatic illness, African green monkeys were challenged intranasally with aerosolized Yersinia pestis strain CO92 and blood samples were collected in short intervals from 45 m till 42 h post-exposure. Presenting one of the first genomic investigations of a NHP model challenged by pneumonic plague, whole genome analysis was annotated in silico and validated by qPCR assay. Transcriptomic profiles of blood showed early perturbation with the number of differentially expressed genes increasing until 24 h. By then, Y. pestis had paralyzed the host defense, as suggested by the functional analyses. Early activation of the apoptotic networks possibly facilitated the pathogen to overwhelm the defense mechanisms, despite the activation of the pro-inflammatory mechanism, toll-like receptors and microtubules at the port-of-entry. The overexpressed transcripts encoding an early pro-inflammatory response particularly manifested in active lymphocytes and ubiquitin networks were a potential deviation from the rodent models, which needs further verification. In summary, the present study recognized a pattern of Y. pestis pathogenesis potentially more applicable to the human system. Independent validation using the complementary omics approach with comprehensive evaluation of the organs, such as lungs which showed early bacterial infection, is essential.

  10. Contrasted patterns of selection on MHC-linked microsatellites in natural populations of the Malagasy plague reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, Charlotte; Ivanova, Svilena; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Loiseau, Anne; Rahalison, Lila; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Brouat, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a highly virulent rodent disease that persists in many natural ecosystems. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main host involved in the plague focus of the central highlands of Madagascar. Black rat populations from this area are highly resistant to plague, whereas those from areas in which the disease is absent (low altitude zones of Madagascar) are susceptible. Various lines of evidence suggest a role for the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) in plague resistance. We therefore used the MHC region as a candidate for detecting signatures of plague-mediated selection in Malagasy black rats, by comparing population genetic structures for five MHC-linked microsatellites and neutral markers in two sampling designs. We first compared four pairs of populations, each pair including one population from the plague focus and one from the disease-free zone. Plague-mediated selection was expected to result in greater genetic differentiation between the two zones than expected under neutrality and this was observed for one MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Img2). For this marker as well as for four other MHC-linked loci, a geographic pattern of genetic structure was found at local scale within the plague focus. This pattern would be expected if plague selection pressures were spatially variable. Finally, another MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Rat21) showed evidences of balancing selection, but it seems more likely that this selection would be related to unknown pathogens more widely distributed in Madagascar than plague. PMID:22403713

  11. Plague Circulation and Population Genetics of the Reservoir Rattus rattus: The Influence of Topographic Relief on the Distribution of the Disease within the Madagascan Focus.

    OpenAIRE

    Brouat, Carine; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Loiseau, Anne; Rahalison, Lila; Rajerison, Minoariso; Dominique LAFFLY; Handschumacher, Pascal; Duplantier, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background: Landscape may affect the distribution of infectious diseases by influencing the population density and dispersal of hosts and vectors. Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a highly virulent, re-emerging disease, the ecology of which has been scarcely studied in Africa. Human seroprevalence data for the major plague focus of Madagascar suggest that plague spreads heterogeneously across the landscape as a function of the relief. Plague is primarily a disease of rodents. We therefor...

  12. Lessons from the History of Quarantine, from Plague to Influenza A

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-08

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ Historical Review, Lessons from the History of Quarantine, from Plague to Influenza A.  Created: 5/8/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/15/2013.

  13. Quinto Tiberio Angelerio and New Measures for Controlling Plague in 16th-Centruy Alghero, Sardinia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-10-28

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ historical Review, Quinto Tiberio Angelerio and New Measures for Controlling Plague in 16th -Centruy Alghero, Sardinia.  Created: 10/28/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/30/2013.

  14. Spatially Distinct Neutrophil Responses within the Inflammatory Lesions of Pneumonic Plague

    OpenAIRE

    Stasulli, Nikolas M.; Eichelberger, Kara R.; Price, Paul A; Pechous, Roger D.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Parker, Joel S.; Goldman, William E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During pneumonic plague, the bacterium Yersinia pestis elicits the development of inflammatory lung lesions that continue to expand throughout infection. This lesion development and persistence are poorly understood. Here, we examine spatially distinct regions of lung lesions using laser capture microdissection and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis to identify transcriptional differences between lesion microenvironments. We show that cellular pathways involved in leukocyte ...

  15. Evaluation of systemic insecticides mixed in rodenticide baits for plague vector control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Søholt; Lodal, Jens

    1997-01-01

    Rodenticide baits containing systemic insecticides were evaluated in the laboratory for their palatability to the house rat Rattus rattus and for their toxicity against the oriental rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis - both animals are important Vectors of plague in Africa. The test bait and a non...

  16. Transverse--Harris--lines in a skeletal population from the 1711 Danish plague site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiscella, Gabriela N; Bennike, Pia; Lynnerup, Niels

    2008-01-01

    present in the subadult category. This paper addresses the pattern of transverse line occurrence and cohort-specific distribution in a plague sample in light of the multiple factors influencing line formation and resorption and discusses the significance of transverse lines as measures of non...

  17. Pandemic Fear and Literature: Observations from Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-18

    Sarah Gregory reads an abridged version of the essay, Pandemic Fear and Literature: Observations from Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague.  Created: 11/18/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/20/2014.

  18. Detections of Yersinia pestis East of the Known Distribution of Active Plague in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Erica L; Britten, Hugh B

    2016-02-01

    We examined fleas collected from black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) burrows from 2009 through 2011 in five national park units east of the known distribution of active plague across the northern Great Plains for the presence of Yersinia pestis. Across all national park units, Oropsylla tuberculata and Oropsylla hirsuta were the most common fleas collected from prairie dog burrows, 42.4% and 56.9%, respectively, of the 3964 fleas collected from burrow swabbing. Using a nested PCR assay, we detected 200 Y. pestis-positive fleas from 3117 assays. In total, 6.4% of assayed fleas were Y. pestis positive and 13.9% of prairie dog burrows swabbed contained Y. pestis-positive fleas. Evidence of the presence of Y. pestis was observed at all national park units except Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming. We detected the presence of Y. pestis without large die-offs, i.e., enzootic sylvatic plague, east of the known distribution of active plague and near the eastern edge of the present distribution of black-tailed prairie dogs. This study, in combination with previous work suggests that sylvatic plague likely occurs across the range of black-tailed prairie dogs and should now be treated as endemic across this range. PMID:26771845

  19. REINTRODUCTION OF NOBLE CRAYFISH ASTACUS ASTACUS AFTER CRAYFISH PLAGUE IN NORWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAUGBØL T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glomma and Halden watercourses in Norway were hit by crayfish plague in 1987 and 1989. Reintroduction of the noble crayfish started in 1989 in the Glomma and in 1995 in the Halden watercourse. Norway has especially good conditions for reintroduction of the native crayfish after crayfish plague, as there is no alien plague-carrying crayfish species in the country. In the Glomma watercourse, approx. 15 000 adult crayfish and 10 000 juveniles have been stocked while in the Halden watercourse the figures are 19 000 adults and 26 500 juveniles. All stocking sites were previously regarded as very good crayfish localities. Four years after stocking, natural recruitment was recorded at all adult crayfish stocking sites in the Glomma watercourse and at most sites in the Halden watercourse. Current crayfish density is, however, much lower than pre-plague densities even at the sites where population development has been in progress for more than 10 years. Extensive post-stocking movements were recorded among adult crayfish. Some sites seemed more suitable for settling, resulting in a great variation in CPUE between the different test-fishing sites. Juveniles seem more appropriate as stocking material if the goal is to re-establish a population in a particular area, due to their stationary behaviour, which seems to remain as they grow larger.

  20. [The plague at the Tsenabe Isotry market in Antananarivo: a complex epidemiologic situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharimanga, V; Ratsitorahina, M; Migliani, R; Rosso, M L; Rahalison, L; Chanteau, S

    2001-01-01

    The transmission of Yersinia pestis is intense among rats in the wholesale market Tsenabe Isotry in the capital Antananarivo (anti-F1 sero-prevalence 80%, flea index 8.4 for a cut-off risk index of > 1). However, the number of plague-suspected (not laboratory confirmed) human cases has only been 3 in this district during a four years period from 1995 to 1999. A seroepidemiological survey among the market vendors was undertaken in June 1999 to test the hypothesis that the low incidence of human plague is due to acquired immunity. In addition, surveillance of the rat and the flea populations in the market was carried out. Only 3 (3.2%) of 95 screened vendors were anti-F1 IgG positive, whereas the markers of plague transmission among rodents and fleas were still high. This result suggests that the low incidence of human plague was not due to acquired immunity but to other factors such as the limited contact between humans and the rat fleas because of the abundance of rats, the absence of epizootic due to the resistance of rats in the capital and a particular behaviour of the predominant rat Rattus norvegicus. PMID:12471741

  1. Demographic and spatio-temporal variation in human plague at a persistent focus in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, S; Makundi, R H; Machang'u, R S;

    2006-01-01

    and hospital records kept since 1986 to describe the temporal, spatial and demographic variation in human plague. A seasonal peak in cases occurs from December to February with the numbers of cases during this peak varying between 0 and 1150. Variation in incidence, calculated for each village as the mean...

  2. Identification of the plague reservoir in an endemic area of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M. Hang’ombe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, is primarily a parasite of wild rodents that persists in permanent, discrete enzootic foci throughout the world. The disease is transmitted in humans by bites from fleas of wildlife rodent species. Therefore surveillance is the ultimate public health solution through plague detection in domestic dogs, other carnivores and wild rodents. The investigations of die-offs amongst plague-susceptible colonial rodents are also significant to determine the presence of Y. pestis in a susceptible population.This study details the identification of the plague reservoir in a suspected endemic area of Zambia. The study was undertaken through rodent investigation for the presence of Y. pestis. A total of 105 rodents were sampled routinely and during a suspected plague period. On dissection 4 (3.81%, 95% CI: 1.23−10.0 rodents sampled during an outbreak showed signs of spleen enlargement. The blood, liver, lymph nodes and spleen of each rodent were subjected to culture on 6% sheep blood agar and MaCconkey agar. Colonies obtained were identified as Y. pestis by colony morphologic features, biochemical profiles, mouse inoculation assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The PCR primers used targeted the Y. pestis plasminogen activator gene, chromosomal ferric iron uptake regulation gene and the outer membrane protein B gene.The isolates were also subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests using the disk diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar with sensitivity being observed with ampicillin, amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The findings, identifies a natural reservoir of Y. pestis in Zambia providing the public health officials with a definite host for the control strategy.

  3. [Plague in the port of Mahajanga: 6 inhabitants out of 1000 carry the anti-F1 antibody in 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliani, R; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Rabarijaona, L; Rasolomaharo, M; Razafymahefa, M; Jeanne, I; Chan, T H; Chanteau, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors report the results of a randomized epidemiological survey aiming to assess the sero-prevalence of plague in the general population > or = 2-year-old in Mahajanga. In 656 sera tested (by ELISA), the prevalence of anti-F1 antibodies was found to be 6.1%@1000 inhabitants, close to the expected prevalence in the area, where plague reappeared in 1991 after 62 years of absence. The study also demonstrated that the shrew, Suncus murinus, is an important reservoir in the plague transmission in Mahajanga. PMID:12463025

  4. Plague as a mortality factor in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) reintroduced to Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Margaret A; Shenk, Tanya M; Spraker, Terry R

    2006-07-01

    As part of a species recovery program, 129 Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) originating from British Columbia, the Yukon, Manitoba, and Quebec, Canada, and Alaska, USA, were reintroduced to southwestern Colorado, USA, from 1999 to 2003. Of 52 lynx mortalities documented by October 2003, six lynx, including a female and her 5-mo-old kitten, had evidence of Yersinia pestis infection as determined by fluorescent antibody test and/or culture. Postmortem findings in these lynx were characterized by pneumonia, ranging from acute suppurative pneumonia, to multifocal necrotizing pneumonia, to fibrinous bronchopneumonia. Histopathologic examination of lung revealed multiple areas of inflammation and consolidation, areas of edema and hemorrhage, and bacteria surrounded by extensive inflammation. Spleens had severe lymphoid depletion and hypocellular red pulp. Lymphadenomegaly was observed in only one plague-affected lynx. We hypothesize that these Canada lynx were exposed to Y. pestis by infected prey, and these are the first reports of plague in this species. PMID:17092896

  5. Level of damages and economical threshold, decisive aspects in the integrated management of plagues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Meneses

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The establishment and application of economical levels demand a procedure to find with precision the insects population in a given moment. In the integrated management of plagues is not allowed the idea that any insect which is feeding from a part of plants requires a control action, that is why it is very important to determine the real effect that this insect population causes to the cultivation. Any decrease in the crop, constitutes a real waste of time; but when the economical level is defined, it is included an additional factor which is the measure cost of the plagues control. The determination of damages of levels is very important for economists, farming experts and specialists; while for producers is very significant its implementation with the objective to count with a sustainable and beneficial agriculture.

  6. High throughput, multiplexed pathogen detection authenticates plague waves in medieval Venice, Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Nguyen-Ny Tran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historical records suggest that multiple burial sites from the 14th-16th centuries in Venice, Italy, were used during the Black Death and subsequent plague epidemics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High throughput, multiplexed real-time PCR detected DNA of seven highly transmissible pathogens in 173 dental pulp specimens collected from 46 graves. Bartonella quintana DNA was identified in five (2.9% samples, including three from the 16th century and two from the 15th century, and Yersinia pestis DNA was detected in three (1.7% samples, including two from the 14th century and one from the 16th century. Partial glpD gene sequencing indicated that the detected Y. pestis was the Orientalis biotype. CONCLUSIONS: These data document for the first time successive plague epidemics in the medieval European city where quarantine was first instituted in the 14th century.

  7. Death − between sanitary regulations and folk customs: Plague in Srem in 1795 and 1796

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasin Goran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of human civilization has been accompanied by attempts to eradicate contagious diseases, such as plague, which had a significantly high lethality throughout history. In that respect, in the 18th century the Habsburg Monarchy introduced, at first, various regulations, and afterwards comprehensive public health legislation. This way, many questions were resolved, first and foremost how to prevent the spread of an epidemic. These regulations greatly contrasted the folk customs and religious practice related to burying the dead. This paper presents two contrasting phenomena at the time of the plague epidemic in Srem in the years of 1795 and 1796. On the one hand, measures were taken to fight the epidemic, and on the other hand, there were folk customs related to burial procedures which had a negative effect on the spread of the disease.

  8. A survey of North American migratory waterfowl for duck plague (duck virus enteritis) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christopher J.; Docherty, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of migratory waterfowl for duck plague (DP) virus was conducted in the Mississippi and Central flyways during 1982 and in the Atlantic and Pacific flyways during 1983. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 3,169 migratory waterfowl in these four flyways, principally mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), black ducks (Anas rubripes Brewster), and pintails (Anas acuta L). In addition 1,033 birds were sampled from areas of recurrent DP outbreaks among nonmigratory and captive waterfowl, and 590 from Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, the site of the only known major DP outbreak in migratory waterfowl. Duck plague virus was not found in any of the samples. Results support the hypothesis that DP is not established in North American migratory waterfowl as an enzootic disease.

  9. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct. PMID:27281573

  10. Findings of bacterial microflora in piglets infected with conventional swine plague

    OpenAIRE

    Prodanov Jasna; Došen Radoslav

    2002-01-01

    Piglets infected with the conventional swine plague virus as a result of secondary bacterial infections sometimes show an insufficiently clear clinical and pathoanatomical picture, which is why the very procedure of diagnosis is complex and the final diagnosis unreliable. That is why these investigations were aimed at examining the presence of bacterial microflora in diseased and dead pilgets which were found to have the viral antigen for CSP using the fluorescent antibody technique, in cases...

  11. SAP R/3 An IT-plague or the answer to the Tailors dream?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The IT-market of ERP-systems have significantly changed over the last 10 years. At least in Denmark manufacturing enterprises used to close "partner like" collaboration with their IT-supplier, now face mass produced packaged software. This challenges the skills of technology managers, can they co...... with the IT-plague, do they suffer from the "power of default",i.e. the use of standard settings of parameters?- or can they tailor anything to anybody?...

  12. Assessing Human Risk of Exposure to Plague Bacteria in Northwestern Uganda Based on Remotely Sensed Predictors

    OpenAIRE

    EISEN, REBECCA J.; Griffith, Kevin S.; Borchert, Jeff N.; MacMillan, Katherine; Apangu, Titus; Owor, Nicholas; Acayo, Sara; Acidri, Rogers; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Winters, Anna M.; Enscore, Russell E.; Schriefer, Martin E.; Beard, Charles B.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Mead, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Plague, a life-threatening flea-borne zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, has most commonly been reported from eastern Africa and Madagascar in recent decades. In these regions and elsewhere, prevention and control efforts are typically targeted at fine spatial scales, yet risk maps for the disease are often presented at coarse spatial resolutions that are of limited value in allocating scarce prevention and control resources. In our study, we sought to identify sub-village level remotely sen...

  13. Local Knowledge on Ecosystem Management Practices and Human Plague Problems in West Usambaras, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Shemdoe, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    The human impact on natural landscapes has been steadily increasing during the last few decades and the current decline of biodiversity is largely the result of human activity. Many of these activities have resulted in a wide range of environmental changes that accelerate and interact with other environmental changes at local, regional and global scales. Ecosystem degradation in many areas of the world has been associated with the increase in the distribution of human plague cases, both land...

  14. Plague Gives Surprises in the First Decade of the 21st Century in the United States and Worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Plague is an ancient disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted by rodent flea bites that continues to surprise us with first-ever events. This review documents plague in human cases in the 1st decade of the 21st century and updates our knowledge of clinical manifestations, transmission during outbreaks, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial treatment, and vaccine development. In the United States, 57 persons were reported to have the disease, of which seven died. Worldwide, ...

  15. Beyond an AFLP genome scan towards the identification of immune genes involved in plague resistance in Rattus rattus from Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Jacquet, S.; Ivanova, S.; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Streiff, R; Brouat, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Genome scans using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers became popular in nonmodel species within the last 10 years, but few studies have tried to characterize the anonymous outliers identified. This study follows on from an AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus), the reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar. We successfully sequenced 17 of the 22 markers previously shown to be potentially affected by plague-mediated selection and associated wi...

  16. Immunization of black-tailed prairie dog against plague through consumption of vaccine-laden baits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and, along with other wild rodents, are significant reservoirs of plague for other wildlife and humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to three groups (n = 18, 19, and 20) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption, either one, two, or three times, at roughly 3-wk intervals. A control group (n = 19) received baits containing raccoon poxvirus without the inserted antigen. Mean antibody titers to Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly in all groups ingesting the vaccine-laden baits, whereas the control group remained negative. Upon challenge with virulent Y. pestis, immunized groups had higher survival rates (38%) than the unimmunized control group (11%). The mean survival time of groups ingesting vaccine-laden baits either two or three times was significantly higher than that of animals ingesting vaccine-laden baits just one time and of animals in the control group. These results show that oral immunization of prairie dogs against plague provides some protection against challenge at dosages that simulate simultaneous delivery of the plague bacterium by numerous (3-10) flea bites. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  17. Plague, guilt and sin in the culture and in western literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Di Veroli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Each time, apparently destroyed , the plague back then regenerate over time, again strong and prolific. But this metaphor of the evil that lurks in the hearts of men, western, religious and literary figures , what is the point ? In many have wondered if many have tried, flattened by a false consciousness generated by a common creed, to find a valid reason for it or at least a form of explanation that can satisfy the human question. But the question remains, the mystery persists, perhaps the plague does not make sense, or maybe it is the hope of starting again, the rebirth of man saved, nothing and everything. This study goes, who you approach it, to follow the thinking of the western christian man and the works of some of the greatest Italian writers and thinkers who, as these questions are found in the tragic story of the plague the opportunity to produce valuable thoughts turned into masterpieces that have interesting sociological implications.

  18. [Plague in China. Threat of transmission to regions of Siberia and Far East].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramovich, A S; Kosilko, S A; Innokent'eva, T I; Voronova, G A; Bazanova, L P; Nikitin, A Ia; Okunev, L P

    2008-01-01

    In China plague has been officially registered from 1754 (638 epidemics with total number of cases 2.5 millions and case-fatality rate 87.5%). Endemic areas started to form on the south of the country and then the disease gradually spread on seaside provinces, where to the end of the 19th century, due to reach of island territories and large international seaports, was characterized by pandemic spread. Epidemic manifestations of plague in China were observed during more than 200 years in 23 out of 36 administrative areas affecting continental and North-Eastern regions of the country, which are immediately adjacent to border of Russia. Pneumonic plague in Manchuria clearly demonstrated the role of transport communications in transmission of this deadly infection and possibility of its spread on border regions of Siberia and Far East. Lengthy country's border, intensive migration flows, large-scale international integration, developing of near-border trade, simplification of policy for transboundary traveling are the reasons for differentiated number of sanitary protective measures on administrative borders of Siberia and Far East. PMID:18368762

  19. [Recrudescence and geographic extension of the plague in Madagascar from 1980 to 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsitorahina, M; Migliani, R; Ratsifasoamanana, L; Ratsimba, M; Chan Ho Thin, F; Rahalison, L; Chanteau, S

    2001-01-01

    Plague was introduced to Madagascar in 1898, and it has been characterized by a predominant distribution to the central highlands in the following decades. An increase of plague cases has been observed in the past 20 years, in particular in the capital, Antananarivo, and in the coastal town, Mahajanga, after long periods of silence in 28 and 63 years, respectively. A total of 2,982 confirmed or presumptive cases were reviewed in order to describe the changes in the epidemiological pattern of the disease from 1980 through 1999. The mean annual number of plague cases has increased from 33 during the 1980-1984 period to 298 during the 1995-1999 period. A similar trend of distribution has been observed from the first period to the second by an increase of endemic districts above 800 m altitude from 17 to 37. However, the lethality rate has in the same 20 years observation period decreased from 41.6% to 20.7%, probably due to re-enforcing measures as part of the national control program. PMID:12471740

  20. Multiple mechanisms of transmission of the Caribbean coral disease white plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, E.; Brandt, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    White plague is one of the most devastating coral diseases in the Caribbean, and yet important aspects of its epidemiology, including how the disease transmits, remain unknown. This study tested potential mechanisms and rates of transmission of white plague in a laboratory setting. Transmission mechanisms including the transport of water, contact with macroalgae, and predation via corallivorous worms and snails were tested on the host species Orbicella annularis. Two of the tested mechanisms were shown to transmit disease: water transport and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. Between these transmission mechanisms, transport of water between a diseased coral and a healthy coral resulted in disease incidence significantly more frequently in exposed healthy corals. Transmission via water transport also occurred more quickly and was associated with higher rates of tissue loss (up to 3.5 cm d-1) than with the corallivorous snail treatment. In addition, water that was in contact with diseased corals but was filtered with a 0.22-μm filter prior to being introduced to apparently healthy corals also resulted in the transmission of disease signs, but at a much lower rate than when water was not filtered. This study has provided important information on the transmission potential of Caribbean white plague disease and highlights the need for a greater understanding of how these processes operate in the natural environment.

  1. Controlling Ebola: what we can learn from China's 1911 battle against the pneumonic plague in Manchuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pneumonic plague, which spread across Northeast China during the winter of 1910 and spring of 1911, caused numerous deaths and brought about severe social turmoil. After compulsory quarantine and other epidemic prevention measures were enforced by Dr Wu Lien-teh, the epidemic was brought to an end within 4 months. This article reviews the ways in which the plague was dealt with from a historical perspective, based on factors such as clinical manifestations, duration of illness, case fatality rate, degree of transmissibility, poverty, inadequate healthcare infrastructure, and the region's recent strife-filled history. Similarities were sought between the pneumonic plague in Northeast China in the twentieth century and the Ebola virus outbreak that is currently ravaging Africa, and an effort made to summarize the ways in which specific measures were applied successfully to fight the earlier epidemic. Our efforts highlight valuable experiences that are of potential benefit in helping to fight the current rampant Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  2. Controlling Ebola: what we can learn from China's 1911 battle against the pneumonic plague in Manchuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Jiao, Mingli; Zhao, Siqi; Xing, Kai; Li, Ye; Ning, Ning; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong; Hao, Yanhua

    2015-04-01

    The pneumonic plague, which spread across Northeast China during the winter of 1910 and spring of 1911, caused numerous deaths and brought about severe social turmoil. After compulsory quarantine and other epidemic prevention measures were enforced by Dr Wu Lien-teh, the epidemic was brought to an end within 4 months. This article reviews the ways in which the plague was dealt with from a historical perspective, based on factors such as clinical manifestations, duration of illness, case fatality rate, degree of transmissibility, poverty, inadequate healthcare infrastructure, and the region's recent strife-filled history. Similarities were sought between the pneumonic plague in Northeast China in the twentieth century and the Ebola virus outbreak that is currently ravaging Africa, and an effort made to summarize the ways in which specific measures were applied successfully to fight the earlier epidemic. Our efforts highlight valuable experiences that are of potential benefit in helping to fight the current rampant Ebola epidemic in West Africa. PMID:25722280

  3. First evidence of crayfish plague agent in populations of the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax forma virginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of non-indigenous species and associated diseases can cause declines in indigenous flora and fauna and threaten local biodiversity. The crayfish plague pathogen (Aphanomyces astaci, carried and transmitted by latent infected North American crayfish, can lead to high mortalities in indigenous European crayfish populations. Although the parthenogenetic marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax (Hagen, 1870  forma virginalis is common in the aquarium trade and has established wild populations in Europe, its carrier status is still unknown. This study investigated one captive and three established wild-living marbled crayfish populations for an infection with the crayfish plague pathogen applying real-time PCR. We demonstrate that captive, as well as two wild marbled crayfish populations were infected by A. astaci. Although infection status in laboratory kept specimens reached high levels, marbled crayfish showed no obviously plague-related mortality. Furthermore, sequence analysis revealed that captive crayfish carried the A. astaci genotype Pc, which has earlier been isolated from the North American red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii. The results indicate that due to its positive carrier status marbled crayfish poses a greater threat to local biodiversity in Europe than considered until now.

  4. Immuno-PCR--a new tool for paleomicrobiology: the plague paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Malou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cause of past plague pandemics was controversial but several research teams used PCR techniques and dental pulp as the primary material to reveal that they were caused by Yersinia pestis. However, the degradation of DNA limits the ability to detect ancient infections. METHODS: We used for the first time immuno-PCR to detect Yersinia pestis antigens; it can detect protein concentrations 70 times lower than the standard ELISA. After determining the cut-off value, we tested 34 teeth that were obtained from mass graves of plague, and compared previous PCR results with ELISA and immuno-PCR results. RESULTS: The immuno-PCR technique was the most sensitive (14 out of 34 followed by the PCR technique (10 out of 34 and ELISA (3 out of 34. The combination of these three methods identified 18 out of 34 (53% teeth as presumably being from people with the plague. CONCLUSION: Immuno-PCR is specific (no false-positive samples were found and more sensitive than the currently used method to detect antigens of ancient infections in dental pulp. The combination of three methods, ELISA, PCR and immuno-PCR, increased the capacity to identify ancient pathogens in dental pulp.

  5. A rapid field test for sylvatic plague exposure in wild animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rachel C.; Hudak, Robert; Mondesire, Roy; Baeten, Laurie A.; Russell, Robin E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2014-01-01

    Plague surveillance is routinely conducted to predict future epizootics in wildlife and exposure risk for humans. The most common surveillance method for sylvatic plague is detection of antibodies to Yersinia pestis F1 capsular antigen in sentinel animals, such as coyotes (Canis latrans). Current serologic tests for Y. pestis, hemagglutination (HA) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are expensive and labor intensive. To address this need, we developed a complete lateral flow device for the detection of specific antibodies to Y. pestis F1 and V antigens. Our test detected anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies in serum and Nobuto filter paper samples from coyotes, and in serum samples from prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), lynx (Lynx canadensis), and black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes). Comparison of cassette results for anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies with results of ELISA or HA tests showed correlations ranging from 0.68 to 0.98. This device provides an affordable, user-friendly tool that may be useful in plague surveillance programs and as a research tool.

  6. Vector control improves survival of three species of prairie dogs (Cynomys) in areas considered enzootic for plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggins, Dean E.; Godbey, Jerry L.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Carter, Leon G.; Montenieri, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Plague causes periodic epizootics that decimate populations of prairie dogs (PDs) (Cynomys), but the means by which the causative bacterium (Yersinia pestis) persists between epizootics are poorly understood. Plague epizootics in PDs might arise as the result of introductions of Y. pestis from sources outside PD colonies. However, it remains possible that plague persists in PDs during interepizootic periods and is transmitted at low rates among highly susceptible individuals within and between their colonies. If this is true, application of vector control to reduce flea numbers might reduce mortality among PDs. To test whether vector control enhances PD survival in the absence of obvious plague epizootics, we reduced the numbers of fleas (vectors for Y. pestis) 96–98% (1 month posttreatment) on 15 areas involving three species of PDs (Cynomys leucurus, Cynomys parvidens in Utah, and Cynomys ludovicianus in Montana) during 2000–2004 using deltamethrin dust delivered into burrows as a pulicide. Even during years without epizootic plague, PD survival rates at dusted sites were 31–45% higher for adults and 2–34% higher for juveniles compared to survival rates at nondusted sites. Y. pestis was cultured from 49 of the 851 flea pools tested (6882 total fleas) and antibodies against Y. pestis were identified in serum samples from 40 of 2631 PDs. Although other explanations are possible, including transmission of other potentially fatal pathogens by fleas, ticks, or other ectoparasites, our results suggest that plague might be maintained indefinitely in PD populations in the absence of free epizootics and widespread mortality among these animals. If PDs and their fleas support enzootic cycles of plague transmission, there would be important implications for the conservation of these animals and other species.

  7. Plague Meningitis—A Retrospective Analysis of Cases Reported in the United States, 1970-1979

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Thomas M.; Poland, Jack D.; Quan, Thomas J.; White, Mark E.; Mann, Jonathan M.; Barnes, Allan M.

    1987-01-01

    Meningitis caused by Yersinia pestis developed in 6 (6%) of a total of 105 patients with plague reported to the Centers for Disease Control from 1970 to 1979. Five of the six cases occurred in children aged 10 to 15 years. All six patients received antibiotic therapy before meningitis developed, which appeared between the 9th and 14th days after the onset of acute illness in five of the six patients. There were no neurologic sequelae. The antigenic and biochemical profiles of the Y pestis str...

  8. [Seroepidemiologic survey on plague in an endemic zone: cumulative results: 1987-1990].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Rasoamanana, B; Raharison Vololoarisoa, H; Randriamahefa, J G; Coulanges, P

    1990-01-01

    Plague is a bacterial disease, induced by Yersinia pestis growth in rodents, with human transmission by fleas. In numerous cases, lymph node reaction is important. This survey (329 patients and contacts) is the most extensive ever realised, associating plasmidic virulence and immunity studies. From the results, we can retain that: All the strains were 47 Plasmid+. The immunity was precocious, specific, of high titer and persistent. In conclusion, in plaque endemic zone, high bacillus circulation induced a high and perhaps (to prove) protective immunity. PMID:2078084

  9. Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

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  10. [A contribution to the history of understanding the epidemiology of plague in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchy, S

    1995-01-01

    Plague appeared in Madagascar in 1898, the pandemic coinciding with the French conquest. Until 1921, harbor epidemics occurred in Tamatave, Majunga, Diégo-Suarez, Fort-Dauphin, Vatomandry. In 1921, probably favored by the building of roads and railways, plague takes root on the High Lands where it becomes endemic above 800 meters. The vaccine achievement by Girard and Robic with the EV strain, and its mass application from 1935 by Estrade, Milliau, Brault, Seyberlich and Jan Keguistel, allowed to control the disease. The D.D.T. and sulfamids discovery makes the urban epidemics almost disappear, allowing it to subsist as only rural sporadic or familial cases with a low mortality. The mass vaccination can be stopped in 1959. Since 1988 the diseases incidence has been increasing, probably in relation with the quasi disappearance of deinsectisation and antibiotics. Nevertheless, urban epidemics are still rare and limited in a parallel direction to the substitution, in the city, of Rattus rattus, main reservoir and victim of the disease, by Rattus norvegicus, less sensitive to the infection. PMID:11625936

  11. [Historical review of the plague in South America: a little-known disease in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Sotomayor, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    The plague is an infectious disease that has transcended through history and has been responsible for three pandemics with high mortality rates. During the third pandemic that started in Hong Kong (1894), the disease spread through maritime routes to different regions in the world, including South America. In this region, approximately 16 million people are thought to be at risk in relation to this disease due to specific situations like human-rodent coexistence inside houses in rural areas, homes built with inadequate materials that are vulnerable to invasion by these animals, inappropriate storage of crops and an increase in rainfall and deforestation, which allows for the displacement of wild fauna and man invasion of the natural foci of the disease. Between 1994 and 1999, five countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and the United States of America, reported approximately 1,700 cases with 79 related deaths. In Colombia we have historical data about an "infectious pneumonia" with high mortality rates that occurred during the same months, for three consecutive years (1913 to 1915) in the departments of Magdalena, Atlántico and Bolívar, located in the Colombian Atlantic coast, which suggested plague, but could not be confirmed. PMID:23715302

  12. Blood Meal Identification in Off-Host Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from a Plague-Endemic Region of Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Christine B.; Borchert, Jeff N.; Black, William C.; ATIKU, LINDA A.; Mpanga, Joseph T; Boegler, Karen A.; Moore, Sean M.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is an inefficient vector of the plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) and is the predominant off-host flea species in human habitations in the West Nile region, an established plague focus in northwest Uganda. To determine if C. felis might serve as a Y. pestis bridging vector in the West Nile region, we collected on- and off-host fleas from human habitations and used a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assay to estimate the proportion of off-host C. ...

  13. THE MYTHE NOVEL PLAGUE OF ALBERT CAMUS, ITS INSPIRATION SOURCES AND ITS EVOCATIVE SYMBOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat BOYACIOĞLU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In different periods, some writers made new comments on the antique classics mhytes by readapting them in accordance with the their period. In the XVIIth the french classic playwriters such as Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine took up again the antique myths treated by the antique writers. These playwriters readapted the antique myths in their works according to the conception of their period. In the XXth the french writers such as Jean Giraudoux, André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus interpreted again the antique mythes in their works by making evocations to the events occured in their epoch. Treating and displaying the antique mythes in the theater works is a well known fact, but it is an uncommon fact in the novels. The russian novelist Dostoïevsky, the czeche Franz Kafka, the american novelists Herman Melville and William Faulkner interpreted again some mythes under different aspects in their novels. This style of myth roman caused that the american critic Stock asked the following question: Is it possible to reconcile the symbolism and the naturalism, what is the principal and formal problem? The myth roman gives answer to the question : Do the realism and naturalism giving importance the exterior appearance of the matter and things and the symbolism giving importance to the the invisible aspect of the matter and things come together in the same plane? The novel of Albert Camus, The Plague (La Peste containing both realist –naturalist and symbolist elements constitutes an typical exemple of this myth roman. In this novel, Camus relates how the epidemic disease pestilence not occured in reality according to the historical documents, but fabricated fictively by the writer, besieges the algerian city Oran and causes a chaotic situation to the inhabitants as the enemy army did, in a given date, this is to say, in1940’s and a given space. This pestilence event as epidemic disease evokes symbolically the occupation of France by the

  14. [Marcus Aurelius Antonius (121-180AD), philosopher and Roman emperor, and Galen's plague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín

    2012-11-01

    The study of the aetiologies of diseases in Ancient Times is usually a speculative intellectual exercise. When some authors attribute a specific aetiology to an old disease, there is a great risk of committing a methodological error, known as presentism by the modern historiography. The authority of the investigator, more than the weight of the scientific truth, is usually the reason why the diagnosis has remained over the years. The great epidemic of the years 164-165AD and afterwards, could have been smallpox (haemorrhagic form). Claude Galen, the famous doctor, described the symptoms in several books of his great Opera Omnia. For this reason, it is currently known among the scholars as Galen's plague. The epidemic was described for the first time in Seleucia (Mesopotamia). Until now, the actual geographic origin is unknown. We propose here that the beginning might be the kingdom of the old Han dynasty (now the Chinese Popular Republic). The epidemic swept the Roman Empire, from the east to the west, and from the southern to the northern borders. An immediate consequence of the infection was a high morbidity and mortality. In this sense, Galen's epidemic was one of the many factors that caused the fall and destruction of the Roman Empire. On the other hand, there is a general agreement among historians, biographers and researchers that the philosopher emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180AD was affected by the infection in the epidemic wave of 164-165AD. The death of Marcus Aurelius occurred on March 17 in the year 180AD, in Vindobonne, or perhaps Sirminium (near to Vienna). Many authors propose that the cause of the emperor's death was the same epidemic. We consider that it is not possible to demonstrate any of those speculative diagnoses. Finally, the epidemic of 189-190AD, that we have named of Commodus, was probably a different disease to the Galen's plague. There were several kinds of animals affected (anthropozoonoses). In this sense, this infection

  15. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  16. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  17. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonie E. Rocke

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307—a truncated version of the V protein provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  18. Temporal variation in the prevalence of the crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, in three Czech spiny-cheek crayfish populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matasová, K.; Kozubíková, E.; Svoboda, J.; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Petrusek, A.

    -, č. 401 (2011), s. 1-9. ISSN 1961-9502 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : crayfish plague * molecular methosd * dominance Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2011

  19. The use of polyvinyl alcohol glutaraldehyde as solid-phase in ELISA for plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureci Maria Araujo

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Discs of polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked with glutaraldehyde were synthesized under acid catalysis (H2SO4. Then, the antigen F1 purified from Yersinia pestis was covalently linked to this modified polymer. Afterwards, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was established for the diagnosis of plague in rabbit and human. The best conditions for the method were achieved by using 1.3 ¼g of F1 prepared in 0.067 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.2, containing 1 M NaCl (PBS; anti-IgG peroxidase conjugate diluted 6,000 times and as a blocking agent 3% w/v skim milk in PBS. The titration of positive rabbit serum according to this procedure detected antibody concentrations up to 1:12,800 times. The present method, the conventional ELISA and passive haemagglutination assay are compared.

  20. Temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus: isolation and genetic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-nine temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus (FPV) strain Rostock and four ts mutants of FPV-strain Dobson were isolated by utilizing two methods of plaque screening, after either spontaneous or chemically induced mutagenesis. Twenty-nine of the FPV-Rostock mutants were further characterized by genetic recombination studies and were found to fall into six high frequency recombination groups. The genome segment carrying the ts mutation in each group was identified by analyzing the gene composition of ts+ recombinants generated from crosses between representatives of each group and ts mutants of FPV-Dobson. It was concluded that the six groups correspond to mutations in six different genome segments, namely, those coding for the P1, P2, P3, HA, NP, and NS proteins

  1. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E

    2015-08-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research. PMID:25817984

  2. INVESTIGATING A MURDER THE CASE OF THE JUSTINIANIC PLAGUE IN SCYTHIA MINOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Mitrofan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study beforehand applies a logical scheme of analysis over a possible presence of the Justinianic plague in the province of Scythia Minor. Following a logic borrowed from the criminalistics, we tried to apply this scheme in order to see if the theory of presence of the epidemic is viable in the given region. Although we have not come with decisive pieces of evidence, a great deal of research is still necessary in order to confirm or infirm this theory. We therefore aim to open a discussion, considering the problem plausible, for the disease had the means and opportunity to affect the province. As previously stated this study is merely a plan of study that shall be developed in a forthcoming work.

  3. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Vagima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF. In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the

  4. [Plague control in Madagascar: evaluation of the efficacy of Kartman baitboxes in urban areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratovonjato, J; Duchemin, J B; Duplantier, J M; Rahelinirina, S; Soares, J L; Rahalison, L; Robert, V

    2003-01-01

    A method associating an anticoagulant rodenticide and an insecticide called Kartman bait-box aimed both at fighting reservoir and vectors of plague. It was evaluated in two neighbourhoods of Antananarivo (Madagascar) from October 2002 to May 2003. It involved the local community in the control. The study was carried out in Ambodirano-Ampefiloha refered as treated neighbourhood in which the Kartman bait box were laid out with an anticoagulant rodenticide and an insecticide with a rapid action versus a "pilot neighbourhood", Ankorondrano-Andranomahery in which the boxes were provided with non poisoning bait and non insecticidal white powder. The rodenticide used was Baraki (difethialone 25 ppm) and the insecticide was a powder of Propoxur 3%. The evaluation of effectiveness of this method was based on the four following parameters: (1) the number of dead rats collected daily inside and in the vicinity of the houses, (2) the daily number of baits non consumed in the Kartman bait box, (3) the cheopis index of the rats trapped using the BTS trap, and (4) the flea carrier index of the rats captured monthly with BTS trap. The cheopis index and the flea carrier index of the rats were calculated monthly. The number of rats that died in the treated neighbourhood was of 968 versus 3 in the pilot neighbourhood. The other parameters reached a stable level after 3 months. Between days 120 and 180, the mean number of unconsumed baits was 2.79 in the treated neighbourhood versus 0.14 in the pilot neighbourhood, the flea carriage (percentage of parasitized hosts) was 0% versus 61% in the pilot neighbourhood, and the cheopis index was 0.0 versus 5.0 in the pilot neighbourhood. This study demonstrates that Kartman bait-boxes reached the rat borne and the vectors of plague found in urban area. We propose to use this method extensively both during epidemic and inter-epidemic contexts. PMID:15678815

  5. Plague gives surprises in the first decade of the 21st century in the United States and worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Plague is an ancient disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted by rodent flea bites that continues to surprise us with first-ever events. This review documents plague in human cases in the 1st decade of the 21st century and updates our knowledge of clinical manifestations, transmission during outbreaks, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial treatment, and vaccine development. In the United States, 57 persons were reported to have the disease, of which seven died. Worldwide, 21,725 persons were affected with 1,612 deaths, for a case-fatality rate of 7.4%. The Congo reported more cases than any other country, including two large outbreaks of pneumonic plague, surpassing Madagascar, which had the most cases in the previous decade. Two United States scientists suffered fatal accidental exposures: a wildlife biologist, who carried out an autopsy on a mountain lion in Arizona in 2007, and a geneticist with subclinical hemochromatosis in Chicago, who was handling an avirulent strain of Y. pestis in 2009. Antimicrobial drugs given early after the onset of symptoms prevented many deaths; those recommended for treatment and prophylaxis included gentamicin, doxycycline, and fluoroquinolones, although fluoroquinolones have not been adequately tested in humans. Fleas that do not have their guts blocked by clotted blood meals were shown to be better transmitters of plague than blocked fleas. Under development for protection against bioterrorist use, a subunit vaccine containing F1 and V antigens of Y. pestis was administered to human volunteers eliciting antibodies without any serious side effects. These events, although showing progress, suggest that plague will persist in rodent reservoirs mostly in African countries burdened by poverty and civil unrest, causing death when patients fail to receive prompt antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24043686

  6. From the recent lessons of the Malagasy foci towards a global understanding of the factors involved in plague reemergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Chanteau, Suzanne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    Re-emergence of human cases of plague after decades of silence does not necessarily mean that plague foci are re-emerging. Most often, Yersinia pestis bacteria have been maintained and circulating at low levels in the rodent populations. It seems therefore more appropriate to speak in terms of expansion or regression phases for sylvatic rodent plague foci and to reserve the term re-emergence for human cases. From the analysis of well-documented human plague cases in Madagascar, we underline the causes of re-emergence that can be generalized to most world foci, and can help define environments at risk where the threat of new emergence lurks. In all recent plague outbreaks, usually more than one risk factor was at the origin of the re-emergence. The reduction or discontinuance of surveillance and control, as well as poverty and insalubrity are the main factors in the re-emergence of human cases, allowing increased contacts with infected rodents and fleas. Environment changes (i.e. climatic changes, deforestation, urbanization) induce changes in flea and rodent populations by (i) extension of rodent habitats (for example by replacing forests by steppes or farmlands); (ii) modifications in population dynamics (possible outbreaks due to an increase of available food resources); but also, (iii) emergence of new vectors, reservoirs and new Y. pestis genotypes. Numerous and spontaneous genomic rearrangements occur at high frequencies in Y. pestis, which may confer selective advantages, enhancing the ability of Y. pestis to survive, to be transmitted to new hosts, and to colonize new environments. Therefore, any environmental change should be taken as a warning signal and active surveillance programs should be initiated. PMID:15845233

  7. Beyond an AFLP genome scan towards the identification of immune genes involved in plague resistance in Rattus rattus from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Jacquet, S; Ivanova, S; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, J-M; Streiff, R; Brouat, C

    2013-01-01

    Genome scans using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers became popular in nonmodel species within the last 10 years, but few studies have tried to characterize the anonymous outliers identified. This study follows on from an AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus), the reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar. We successfully sequenced 17 of the 22 markers previously shown to be potentially affected by plague-mediated selection and associated with a plague resistance phenotype. Searching these sequences in the genome of the closely related species Rattus norvegicus assigned them to 14 genomic regions, revealing a random distribution of outliers in the genome (no clustering). We compared these results with those of an in silico AFLP study of the R. norvegicus genome, which showed that outlier sequences could not have been inferred by this method in R. rattus (only four of the 15 sequences were predicted). However, in silico analysis allowed the prediction of AFLP markers distribution and the estimation of homoplasy rates, confirming its potential utility for designing AFLP studies in nonmodel species. The 14 genomic regions surrounding AFLP outliers (less than 300 kb from the marker) contained 75 genes encoding proteins of known function, including nine involved in immune function and pathogen defence. We identified the two interleukin 1 genes (Il1a and Il1b) that share homology with an antigen of Y. pestis, as the best candidates for genes subject to plague-mediated natural selection. At least six other genes known to be involved in proinflammatory pathways may also be affected by plague-mediated selection. PMID:23237097

  8. The Perfect Burrow, but for What? Identifying Local Habitat Conditions Promoting the Presence of the Host and Vector Species in the Kazakh Plague System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Levick

    Full Text Available The wildlife plague system in the Pre-Balkhash desert of Kazakhstan has been a subject of study for many years. Much progress has been made in generating a method of predicting outbreaks of the disease (infection by the gram negative bacterium Yersinia pestis but existing methods are not yet accurate enough to inform public health planning. The present study aimed to identify characteristics of individual mammalian host (Rhombomys opimus burrows related to and potentially predictive of the presence of R.opimus and the dominant flea vectors (Xenopsylla spp..Over four seasons, burrow characteristics, their current occupancy status, and flea and tick burden of the occupants were recorded in the field. A second data set was generated of long term occupancy trends by recording the occupancy status of specific burrows over multiple occasions. Generalised linear mixed models were constructed to identify potential burrow properties predictive of either occupancy or flea burden.At the burrow level, it was identified that a burrow being occupied by Rhombomys, and remaining occupied, were both related to the characteristics of the sediment in which the burrow was constructed. The flea burden of Rhombomys in a burrow was found to be related to the tick burden. Further larger scale properties were also identified as being related to both Rhombomys and flea presence, including latitudinal position and the season.Therefore, in advancing our current predictions of plague in Kazakhstan, we must consider the landscape at this local level to increase our accuracy in predicting the dynamics of gerbil and flea populations. Furthermore this demonstrates that in other zoonotic systems, it may be useful to consider the distribution and location of suitable habitat for both host and vector species at this fine scale to accurately predict future epizootics.

  9. White plague-like coral disease in remote reefs of the Western Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Sánchez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The health of coral reef communities has been decreasing over the last 50 years, due the negative effects of human activities combined with other natural processes. We present documentation of a White Plague Disease (WPD outbreak in the Serrana Bank, an isolated Western Caribbean atoll with presumably inexistent pollutant inputs from local human settlements. In addition, this study summarizes seven years of observations on diseased corals in the nearby island of San Andrés, which in contrast is one of the most populated islands of the Caribbean. There was a massive coral mortality in the atoll lagoon (14°27’53.24", 80°14’22.27" W, and 12m depth due to WPD on May 4 of 2003. Seventeen species were found dead or largely affected by the disease. The information resulting from GPS and manta-tow transects revealed that approximately 5.8ha of reticulate Montastraea spp. patch reefs were lethally affected by the disease in the atoll. On May 8 of the same year we observed and calculated a mean coral cover of 7.03% (SD± 2.44, a mean diseased coral tissue cover of 5.5% (SD± 1.1 and a 13.4% (SD± 8.05 of recently dead coral covered with a thin filamentous algae layer; approximately 73% of mortalities caused by the disease occurred before the end of the outbreak. A rough estimate of 18.9% in recent coral cover reduction can be attributed to WPD. This represents about 82% of the total coral cover decline since 1995. Semi-enclosed environments such as atoll lagoons and the reticulate patch-reefs of Montastraea spp. seem to be particularly vulnerable to this kind of coral disease, which constitute an alert to increase the monitoring of the same kind of atoll environments. The WPD has been present in the area of the nearby island of San Andrés at a low prevalence level, with sporadic increasing peaks of disease proliferation. The peaks observed during 1999 and 2004 comprised increases of 266% and 355% respectively, suggesting an alarming progression of

  10. Handling of vegetable biodiversity and the biological control of insect-plague: Case of an organic vineyard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the handling of plagues it is feasible to increase natural enemies, populations diversifying the habitat. In the agro ecosystems the importance of the marginal vegetation is recognized for the parasitoids survival and predators. In commercial cultivations of vineyards, managed organically, was ahead this work, corridors of 65 different species from plants with flowers were settled down. The covering cultivations were sowed in array for half every year. The vineyards received 2 tons of compost on average for hectare. For the control of illnesses it was used sulfur preventively. It sought to be necessary if the corridor 200 meters long could increase the biological control of insect's plague in the vineyard. It was evaluated the contribution of the corridor like supplier of alternative nutritious resources, consistent, abundant and well distributed of natural enemies. It was proven the utility of the corridor to increase the populational levels of beneficent insects

  11. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Roder, Cornelia; Arif, Chatchanit; Daniels, Camille; Weil, Ernesto; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Coral diseases are characterized by microbial community shifts in coral mucus and tissue, but causes and consequences of these changes are vaguely understood due to the complexity and dynamics of coral-associated bacteria. We used 16S rRNA gene microarrays to assay differences in bacterial assemblages of healthy and diseased colonies displaying White Plague Disease (WPD) signs from two closely related Caribbean coral species, Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi. Analysis of differential...

  12. Transmission potential of primary pneumonic plague: time inhomogeneous evaluation based on historical documents of the transmission network

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiura, Hiroshi; Schwehm, Markus; Kakehashi, Masayuki; Eichner, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background: The transmission potential of primary pneumonic plague, caused by Yersinia pestis, is one of the key epidemiological determinants of a potential biological weapon, and requires clarification and time dependent interpretation. Method: This study estimated the reproduction number and its time dependent change through investigations of outbreaks in Mukden, China (1946), and Madagascar (1957). Reconstruction of an epidemic tree, which shows who infected whom, from the observed dates o...

  13. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework.

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studies over species, regions, or diseases are scarce. Here, we compare bacterial assemblages of samples from healthy (HH) colonies and such displaying signs of White Plague Disease (WPD) of two different coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) from the same reef in Koh Tao, Thailand, using 16S rRNA gene microarrays. In line with other studies, we found an increase of bacterial diversity in diseased (DD) corals, and a higher abundance of taxa from the families that include known coral pathogens (Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Vibrionaceae). In our comparative framework analysis, we found differences in microbial assemblages between coral species and coral health states. Notably, patterns of bacterial community structures from HH and DD corals were maintained over species boundaries. Moreover, microbes that differentiated the two coral species did not overlap with microbes that were indicative of HH and DD corals. This suggests that while corals harbor distinct species-specific microbial assemblages, disease-specific bacterial abundance patterns exist that are maintained over coral species boundaries.

  14. Profiles in medical courage: Joseph Goldberger, the sharecropper’s plague, science and prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. “You must accept the truth from whatever source it comes”. -MaimonidesThe Sharecropper’s PlagueIn the early half of the twentieth century a mysterious disease, “the sharecropper’s plague”, reached epidemic proportions in the Southern US (1. Each state decided whether it would recognize and publicly admit the existence of what was then considered an embarrassment. The total number of new annual cases was estimated as about 75,000 in 1915 and about 100,000 throughout the 1920s (2. The disease had a 40% mortality rate, and many survivors with dementia were confined to mental institutions (3. Patients initially presented with symmetrically reddened skin, similar to that produced by a sunburn or poison oak. Later, the dermatitis turned rough and scaly in one or more locations, such as the hands, the tops of the feet, or the ankles, or in a butterfly-shaped distribution across the nose. Disturbances of the digestive tract and the …

  15. Cloning of Thymidine Kinase Gene of Duck Plague Virus Using Degenerate PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xian-jie; WANG Jun-wei

    2005-01-01

    The DNA of duck plague virus (DPV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene was cloned and sequenced from a vaccine virus in the study. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers for the consensus site of herpesvirus UL24, TK, and glycoprotein H(gH) gene were used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify DNA product with 3 741-base-pairs (bp) in size. DNA sequence analysis revealed a 1 077-base-pairs (bp) open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 amino acid polypeptide homologous to herpesvirus TK proteins. The predicted TK protein shared 31.2, 41.3, 35.7, 37.4, and 28.4% identity with herpes simplex virus typel, equine herpesvirus type 4, Marek's disease virus 2, herpesvirus turkey, and infectious laryngotracheitis virus, respectively. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of other herpesvirus TK proteins showed that these proteins were not conserved on the whole, otherwise the portion of the TK proteins corresponding to the nucleotide binding domain and the nucleoside binding site were highly conserved among herpesvirus. Comparison with the amino acid sequences of the conserved nucleotide and nucleoside binding domains of other eleven herpesvirus TK proteins to the predicted DPV peptide confirmed its identity as the DPV TK protein.

  16. Crayfish plague Aphanomyces astaci detected in redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Yu; Huang, Chen-Wei; Pan, Yi-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Between December 2013 and January 2014, five outbreaks of an unknown disease with moderate to high cumulative mortality were observed among the freshwater redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) populations at four crayfish farms in Miaoli and Changhua counties (northern Taiwan) and at one crayfish farm in Pingtung County (southern Taiwan). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis allowed the detection of Aphanomyces astaci DNA in dead crayfish. Histopathological examination revealed an infection of host tissue by fungal hyphae that presented as typical non-septate hyphae within the soft abdominal cuticle from the first to second segment and in the tail fan. In PCR assays completed for the detection of crayfish plague, an expected 568-bp product, specific for the A. astaci ITS gene, was obtained from all sub-adults and adults examined. In a comparison of our strains with the known strains of A. astaci in Europe, nucleotide sequence identities were very similar, with 99.8-100% sequence similarity in that gene region. Positive reactions to in situ hybridization, using a digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled DNA probe, further confirmed A. astaci as the causative agent. This is the first report concerning natural infection of A. astaci in freshwater redclaw crayfish in Asia. PMID:27039156

  17. Sir Charles James Martin MB FRS: Australian serpents and Indian plague, one-hundred years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, B J

    1997-07-01

    In 1891 as Demonstrator in Physiology at the University of Sydney, Charles Martin began the first systematic study of the chemical and physiological properties of the venoms of the Australian elapid species, Pseudechis porphyriacus and Notechis scutatus. Two major constituents were detected: a large coagulable protein which was associated with intravascular clotting, and a small proteinaceous molecule, an albumose, associated with neurotoxicity. Martin designed and constructed a high-pressure gelatin membrane ultrafilter for fractionation of venom. His studies indicated that certain physiological actions and clinical symptoms were related to the faster rate of diffusion within the tissue space of a neurotoxic constituent relative to a clotting constituent. Extending this work to toxin-antitoxin relationships, Martin provided evidence that antitoxin was a large molecule with slow diffusibility in tissue and advised the administration of curative serum (including diphtheria antitoxin) by intravenous injection. In 1903, Martin returned to London as Director of the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine. He was soon involved in the planning of scientific work to be undertaken by the Commission for Investigation of Plague in India as the disease continued to ravage the subcontinent. Detailed epidemiological studies of possible factors involved in the spread of Pasteurella pestis showed, unequivocally, that infected rat fleas were the vector of transmission from rats to humans. PMID:9247999

  18. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Cornelia; Arif, Chatchanit; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Daniels, Camille; Shibl, Ahmed; Chavanich, Suchana; Voolstra, Christian R

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studies over species, regions, or diseases are scarce. Here, we compare bacterial assemblages of samples from healthy (HH) colonies and such displaying signs of White Plague Disease (WPD) of two different coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) from the same reef in Koh Tao, Thailand, using 16S rRNA gene microarrays. In line with other studies, we found an increase of bacterial diversity in diseased (DD) corals, and a higher abundance of taxa from the families that include known coral pathogens (Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Vibrionaceae). In our comparative framework analysis, we found differences in microbial assemblages between coral species and coral health states. Notably, patterns of bacterial community structures from HH and DD corals were maintained over species boundaries. Moreover, microbes that differentiated the two coral species did not overlap with microbes that were indicative of HH and DD corals. This suggests that while corals harbor distinct species-specific microbial assemblages, disease-specific bacterial abundance patterns exist that are maintained over coral species boundaries. PMID:23924783

  19. Periodic temperature-associated drought/flood drives locust plagues in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Cazelles, Bernard; Tian, Huidong; Stige, Leif Christian; Bräuning, Achim; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2009-03-01

    Global warming is currently of great concern. Yet the ecological effects of low-frequency climate variations remain largely unknown. Recent analyses of interdecadal variability in population abundance of the Oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) in China have revealed negative associations with temperature and positive associations with Yangtze drought and flood frequencies during the past millennium (AD 957-1956). In order to shed new light on the causal relationships between locust abundance, floods, droughts and temperature in ancient China, we used wavelet analysis to explore how the coherencies between the different variables at different frequencies have been changed during the past millennium. We find consistent in-phase coherencies between locusts and drought/flood frequencies, and out-of-phase coherencies between locusts and temperature and between drought/flood and temperature at period components of 160-170 years. Similar results are obtained when historical data of drought/flood frequencies of the Yangtze Delta region are used, despite flood data showing a weak and somewhat inconsistent association with other factors. We suggest that previously unreported periodic cooling of 160-170-year intervals dominate climatic variability in China through the past millennium, the cooling events promoting locust plagues by enhancing temperature-associated drought/flood events. Our results signify a rare example of possible benign effects of global warming on the regional risk of natural disasters such as flood/drought events and outbreaks of pest insects. PMID:19033144

  20. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the development times and survival of Synopsyllus fonquerniei and Xenopsylla cheopis, the flea vectors of plague in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Kreppel, Katharina S.; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Morse, Andy; Baylis, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is found in Asia, the Americas but mainly in Africa, with the island of Madagascar reporting almost one third of human cases worldwide. In the highlands of Madagascar, plague is transmitted predominantly by two flea species which coexist on the island, but differ in their distribution. The endemic flea, Synopsyllus fonquerniei, dominates flea communities on rats caught outdoors, while the cosmopolitan flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, is found ...

  1. Spatial distribution and ecological environment analysis of great gerbil in Xinjiang Plague epidemic foci based on remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yersinia pestis (Plague bacterium) from great gerbil was isolated in 2005 in Xinjiang Dzungarian Basin, which confirmed the presence of the plague epidemic foci. This study analysed the spatial distribution and suitable habitat of great gerbil based on the monitoring data of great gerbil from Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as the ecological environment elements obtained from remote sensing products. The results showed that: (1) 88.5% (277/313) of great gerbil distributed in the area of elevation between 200 and 600 meters. (2) All the positive points located in the area with a slope of 0–3 degree, and the sunny tendency on aspect was not obvious. (3) All 313 positive points of great gerbil distributed in the area with an average annual temperature from 5 to 11 °C, and 165 points with an average annual temperature from 7 to 9 °C. (4) 72.8% (228/313) of great gerbil survived in the area with an annual precipitation of 120–200mm. (5) The positive points of great gerbil increased correspondingly with the increasing of NDVI value, but there is no positive point when NDVI is higher than 0.521, indicating the suitability of vegetation for great gerbil. This study explored a broad and important application for the monitoring and prevention of plague using remote sensing and geographic information system

  2. Resistance to the crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, in two freshwater shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, J; Mrugała, A; Kozubíková-Balcarová, E; Kouba, A; Diéguez-Uribeondo, J; Petrusek, A

    2014-09-01

    Aphanomyces astaci, the causal agent of the crayfish plague, has recently been confirmed to infect also freshwater-inhabiting crabs. We experimentally tested the resistance of freshwater shrimps, another important decapod group inhabiting freshwaters, to this pathogen. We exposed individuals of two Asian shrimp species, Macrobrachium dayanum and Neocaridina davidi, to zoospores of the pathogen strain isolated from Procambarus clarkii, a known A. astaci carrier likely to get into contact with shrimps. The shrimps were kept in separate vessels up to seven weeks; exuviae and randomly chosen individuals were sampled throughout the experiment. Shrimp bodies and exuviae were tested for A. astaci presence by a species-specific quantitative PCR. The results were compared with amounts of A. astaci DNA in an inert substrate to distinguish potential pathogen growth in live specimens from persisting spores or environmental DNA attached to their surface. In contrast to susceptible crayfish Astacus astacus, we did not observe mortality of shrimps. The amount of detected pathogen DNA was decreasing steadily in the inert substrate, but it was still detectable several weeks after zoospore addition, which should be considered in studies relying on molecular detection of A. astaci. Probably due to moulting, the amount of A. astaci DNA was decreasing in N. davidi even faster than in the inert substrate. In contrast, high pathogen DNA levels were detected in some non-moulting individuals of M. dayanum, suggesting that A. astaci growth may be possible in tissues of this species. Further experiments are needed to test for the potential of long-term A. astaci persistence in freshwater shrimp populations. PMID:25064254

  3. Rapid and sensitive detection of Yersinia pestis using amplification of plague diagnostic bacteriophages monitored by real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill V Sergueev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, has caused many millions of human deaths and still poses a serious threat to global public health. Timely and reliable detection of such a dangerous pathogen is of critical importance. Lysis by specific bacteriophages remains an essential method of Y. pestis detection and plague diagnostics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this work was to develop an alternative to conventional phage lysis tests--a rapid and highly sensitive method of indirect detection of live Y. pestis cells based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR monitoring of amplification of reporter Y. pestis-specific bacteriophages. Plague diagnostic phages phiA1122 and L-413C were shown to be highly effective diagnostic tools for the detection and identification of Y. pestis by using qPCR with primers specific for phage DNA. The template DNA extraction step that usually precedes qPCR was omitted. phiA1122-specific qPCR enabled the detection of an initial bacterial concentration of 10(3 CFU/ml (equivalent to as few as one Y. pestis cell per 1-microl sample in four hours. L-413C-mediated detection of Y. pestis was less sensitive (up to 100 bacteria per sample but more specific, and thus we propose parallel qPCR for the two phages as a rapid and reliable method of Y. pestis identification. Importantly, phiA1122 propagated in simulated clinical blood specimens containing EDTA and its titer rise was detected by both a standard plating test and qPCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, we developed a novel assay for detection and identification of Y. pestis using amplification of specific phages monitored by qPCR. The method is simple, rapid, highly sensitive, and specific and allows the detection of only live bacteria.

  4. Serodiagnosis of human plague by an anti-F1 capsular antigen specific IgG/IgM ELISA and immunoblot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, H; Rahalison, L; Brooks, T J; Aleksic, S; Chanteau, S; Splettstösser, W D

    2000-12-01

    Plague is a re-emerging disease endemic in at least 24 countries. Non-endemic countries should be able to confirm plague to prevent outbreaks due to imported cases. We established a combination of a IgG/IgM screening ELISA and a confirmation immunoblot employing F1 capsular antigen (CA) for the serodiagnosis of plague in countries where yersiniosis is present. The ELISA and the immunoblot assay showed a specificity of 96.1% and 100% among sera from healthy German blood donors. This group had a seroprevalence of 39% of anti-yersinia outer protein (YOP) antibodies obviously caused by previous Y. enterocolitica infection. The ELISA detected anti-F1 CA antibodies in 22 and the immunoblot in 20 out of 26 sera of plague vaccinees. Five control sera from bacteriologically confirmed plague cases from Madagascar reacted positively. It can be concluded that anti-YOP antibodies do not affect assays based on purified F1 CA. PMID:11218210

  5. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-01

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27060051

  6. Dose-dependent mortality of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) to different strains of the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Jenny; Kokko, Harri; Vainikka, Anssi; Kortet, Raine; Jussila, Japo

    2014-01-01

    Several reports of the European crayfish species carrying a latent infection of the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci) have emerged and the discussion has focused especially on the lowered virulence of As-genotypes behind decreased mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the killing rate of different A. astaci strains in controlled infection experiments. Two separate infection experiments with three A. astaci strains (UEFT2B (As), Evira6462/06 (As) and UEF8866-2 (PsI)) were made to compare the noble crayfish populations from the Lake Viitajärvi, Tervo, (Expt I) and the Lake Mikitänjärvi, Hyrynsalmi (Expt II). In the Expt III, the Lake Koivujärvi population noble crayfish were infected with A. astaci strains UEF8866-2 (PsI) and Evira6462/06 (As) using different dosages (1, 10, 100 and 1000sporesml(-1)) of A. astaci zoospores. The results confirmed that PsI-genotype strain is highly virulent and kills all the crayfish within a few days. The tested two As-genotype strains caused the mortalities more slowly, and part of the challenged crayfish survived until the end of the follow-up period. Our results also confirmed the variance of virulence among A. astaci strains within the As-genotype and demonstrated that the mortality is dependent on the number of zoospores used in the infections. It also appeared, that some noble crayfish populations show increased resistance towards the crayfish plague, especially against the As-genotype of A. astaci. PMID:24184185

  7. Monitoring of white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes population during a crayfish plague outbreak followed by rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collas M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass mortality was detected in the downstream section of one of the most extensive French populations of the endangered white-clawed crayfish, Austropotamobius pallipes, on June 26, 2013. This population occupied a 12 km stretch of the La Lucelle brook, with an estimated size of around 150 000 individuals. The presence of the crayfish plague pathogen was quickly diagnosed as the cause of the mortality, and monitoring was carried out to follow the spread of the disease from 15 July 2013 for one year. Results showed that after a fast spread between 15 and 25 July 2013 (upstream progression of mortality for about 4 km, the mortality front was limited to a stretch of a few hundred meters from August until December 2013. During winter, mortality was always observed, confirming that disease remained active. In April 2014, the mortality front was halted by a large dam in the brook (2 m high, 0.56 km from brook source. Two months later, 30 live crayfish were observed above the dam. On the 30 August 2014, no crayfish were found above the dam. Infected individuals analysed for microsatellite markers confirmed the Pacifastacus leniusculus strain of Aphanomyces astaci at the origin of this outbreak. Before the crayfish plague spread upstream of the large dam, a sample of 576 individuals was collected from upstream of the dam and translocated to another stream in the same French department. In July 2014, observations by night confirmed the presence of translocated white-clawed crayfish in the receiving brook.

  8. Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Yersinia pestis, strain 91001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navid, A; Almaas, E

    2009-01-13

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, the aetiological agent of bubonic plague, is one the deadliest pathogens known to man. Despite its historical reputation, plague is a modern disease which annually afflicts thousands of people. Public safety considerations greatly limit clinical experimentation on this organism and thus development of theoretical tools to analyze the capabilities of this pathogen is of utmost importance. Here, we report the first genome-scale metabolic model of Yersinia pestis biovar Mediaevalis based both on its recently annotated genome, and physiological and biochemical data from literature. Our model demonstrates excellent agreement with Y. pestis known metabolic needs and capabilities. Since Y. pestis is a meiotrophic organism, we have developed CryptFind, a systematic approach to identify all candidate cryptic genes responsible for known and theoretical meiotrophic phenomena. In addition to uncovering every known cryptic gene for Y. pestis, our analysis of the rhamnose fermentation pathway suggests that betB is the responsible cryptic gene. Despite all of our medical advances, we still do not have a vaccine for bubonic plague. Recent discoveries of antibiotic resistant strains of Yersinia pestis coupled with the threat of plague being used as a bioterrorism weapon compel us to develop new tools for studying the physiology of this deadly pathogen. Using our theoretical model, we can study the cell's phenotypic behavior under different circumstances and identify metabolic weaknesses which may be harnessed for the development of therapeutics. Additionally, the automatic identification of cryptic genes expands the usage of genomic data for pharmaceutical purposes.

  9. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) Susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Sebastien; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility...

  10. New alternatives in the control of plagues and projections of the ICA in the handling of the residuals in agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategies are described indicated by the ICA for the control of plagues and of toxic residuals of agro-chemicals in the agricultural products, with emphasis in the implementation of mechanisms like the integrated control of plagues. It stands out the paper of the bio-insecticides as alternative to the agro-chemicals use and enter these stable products they are mentioned with the help of Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana, Nomuraea rileyi, Metarhizium anisoplidae and Verticilium lecanni. Some implications of the presence of toxic residuals are mentioned in Colombian export fruits and the measures that have been adopted to avoid them, as well as some mechanisms adopted in the international environment with the same end. The effective legislation is indicated as for prohibition and restriction of plaguicides use

  11. Inadequate burials as an important factor in plague epidemic amongst Serbs in the Habsburg Monarchy by the end of the 18th century: A historical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasin Goran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the archaic customs of burying the deceased in Srem, primarily amongst Serbs, in the second half of the 18th century is the essential part of the paper that aims at clarifying the consequences of this negative habit onto the spreading of plague epidemic. The Austrian Empire tried to stop and prevent the epidemic with an array of legal norms, but in practice, these orders were often not upheld. Serbian Metropolitans Pavle Nenadović and Stefan Stratimirović insisted on eradicating superstition and retrograde, often uncivilized actions in burial rituals, and they partially succeeded. The example of plague in Irig and the surroundings in 1795-1796 explicitly shows the hazardous effects of the inadequate attitude towards the deceased as one of the factors in spreading the epidemic. Using primary archives, and published sources, with adequate literature, authors depict this complex historical process.

  12. [Inadequate burials as an important factor in plague epidemic amongst Serbs in the Habsburg monarchy by the end of the 18th century: a historical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasin, Goran; Božanić, Snežana; Božić, Milica Kisić

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the archaic customs of burying the deceased in Srem, primarily amongst Serbs, in the second half of the 18th century is the essential part of the paper that aims at clarifying the consequences of this negative habit onto the spreading of plague epidemic. The Austrian Empire tried to stop and prevent the epidemic with an array of legal norms, but in practice, these orders were often not upheld. Serbian Metropolitans Pavle Nenadović and Stefan Stratimirović insisted on eradicating superstition and retrograde, often uncivilized actions in burial rituals, and they partially succeeded. The example of plague in Irig and the surroundings in 1795-1796 explicitly shows the hazardous effects of the inadequate attitude towards the deceased as one of the factors in spreading the epidemic. Using primary archives, and published sources, with adequate literature, authors depict this complex historical process. PMID:25731012

  13. Fowl plague virus replication in mammalian cell-avian erythrocyte heterokaryons: studies concerning the actinomycin D and ultra-violet lig sensitive phase in influenza virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replication of fowl plague virus in BHK and L cells specifically blocked prior to infection with inhibitors of influenza virus replication (actinomycin D and ultraviolet light irradiation) has been studied by the introduction of a metabolically dormant avian erythrocyte nucleus. This permits the synthesis of just the influenza virus nucleoprotein in actinomycin D (but not ultraviolet light) blocked cells. The NP antigen is first detected in the avian erythrocyte nucleus and subsequently in the heterokaryon cytoplasm

  14. Field evaluation of an immunoglobulin G anti-F1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of human plague in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoamanana, B; Leroy, F; Boisier, P; Rasolomaharo, M; Buchy, P; Carniel, E; Chanteau, S

    1997-09-01

    Bacteriological isolation of Yersinia pestis is the reference test for confirming plague infection, but recovery of the pathogen from human samples is usually very poor. When the etiology of the disease cannot be bacteriologically confirmed, it may be useful to possess alternative tests such as detection of specific circulating antibodies to help guide the diagnosis. In the present study, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-F1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been applied to various human sera to evaluate its large-scale applicability in the high-endemicity plague foci of Madagascar. The sensitivity of the test was found to be 91.4%, and its specificity was 98.5%. The positive and negative predictive values were 96 and 96.6%, respectively. Seroconversion was observed on day 7 after onset of the disease. Patients with a positive ELISA result could be separated into high (82%) and low (18%) IgG anti-F1 responders. Cross-reactions with eight other infectious diseases prevalent in Madagascar were scarce and were found in 1 of 27 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-, 3 of 34 Schistosoma haematobium-, and 1 of 41 Salmonella-infected patients. Finally, the efficiency of the IgG anti-F1 ELISA was evaluated during the Mahajanga, Madagascar, plague outbreak of 1995. When the number of ELISA-positive patients was added to the number of bacteriologically confirmed and probable cases, the number of positive patients was increased by 35%. In conclusion, although it does not replace bacteriology, IgG anti-F1 ELISA is a useful and powerful tool for retrospective diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of plague outbreaks. PMID:9302210

  15. Field evaluation of an immunoglobulin G anti-F1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of human plague in Madagascar.

    OpenAIRE

    Rasoamanana, B; Leroy, F.; Boisier, P.; Rasolomaharo, M; Buchy, P.; Carniel, E; Chanteau, S.

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriological isolation of Yersinia pestis is the reference test for confirming plague infection, but recovery of the pathogen from human samples is usually very poor. When the etiology of the disease cannot be bacteriologically confirmed, it may be useful to possess alternative tests such as detection of specific circulating antibodies to help guide the diagnosis. In the present study, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-F1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been applied to various ...

  16. The prevention measures of plague in Hebei from 1946 to 1948%1946-1948年河北疫病防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾鸽

    2010-01-01

    The plague was seriously occurred in Hebei from 1946 to 1948,which had a great impact on the local social economy and people's life.The public health system was established by the government,and people were instructed about the knowledge of health consciousness and life habits for controlling effectively the plague.The measures of giving medicine freely and social assistance were taken for preventing the plague in the folk.Thus,the plague was controlled in a short time.However,the effect of prevention was limited by the objective conditions.The color of western medicine was showed from these measures,and the "modernity" of the system at that time was indicated.%1946-1948,河北发生严重疫情,对当地社会经济与民众生活产生了较大影响.政府建立公共卫生制度,并对民众进行卫生思想和生活习惯等方面知识的普及和教育,以有效防治疫病.民间则主要采用施医送药、社会救助等措施防治疫病.政府和民间社会的措施,使疫情在较短时间内得到有效遏制,但客观条件限制了防疫的成效.这一时期防治疫病的措施较多地呈现出西方防疫色彩,体现了当时卫生防疫体系的"现代性".

  17. Temporal variation in the prevalence of the crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, in three Czech spiny-cheek crayfish populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matasová K.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available North American crayfish species are natural hosts of the crayfish plague pathogen Aphanomyces astaci. The spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, widespread in Central Europe, is the main reservoir of A. astaci in Czech Republic. We tested if there are temporal changes in the prevalence of infected individuals (i.e., the proportion of individuals in which the pathogen is detected in spiny-cheek crayfish populations. Crayfish from three populations shown previously to be infected to different extents (high, intermediate and low, were repeatedly sampled in different years (2004–2010 and seasons. The presence of A. astaci in the soft abdominal crayfish cuticle was tested by specific amplification of the pathogen DNA. There was no substantial temporal variation in pathogen prevalence in the highly and very lowly infected populations. However, a significant long-term as well as seasonal decrease was found in the intermediately infected population. This decline could be related to a decrease in population density over the studied years, and to crayfish seasonal moulting, respectively. A reliable estimate of pathogen prevalence in American crayfish populations thus requires repeated monitoring over years, preferably during the same season before the main period of crayfish moulting.

  18. Recognition and characterization of migratory movements of Australian plague locusts, Chortoicetes terminifera, with an insect monitoring radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, V. Alistair; Wang, Haikou

    2013-01-01

    Two special purpose insect-detecting radar units have operated in inland eastern Australia, in the region where nocturnal migratory movements of Australian plague locusts Chortoicetes terminifera occur, for over 10 years. The fully automatic radars detect individual insects as they fly directly overhead and "interrogate" them to obtain information about their characters (size, shape, and wing beating) and trajectory (speed, direction, and orientation). The character data allow locusts to be distinguished from most other migrant species. A locust index, calculated from the total count of locust-like targets for a night, provides a simple indication of migration intensity. For nights of heavy migration, the variation of numbers, directions, and speeds with both height and time can be examined. Emigration and immigration events can be distinguished, as can "transmigration," the passage overhead of populations originating elsewhere. Movement distances can be inferred, and broad source and (more tentatively) destination regions are identified. Movements were typically over distances of up to 400 km. Interpretation of radar observations requires judgment, and the present two units provide only partial coverage of the locust infestation area, but their capacity to detect major population movements promptly, and to provide information between necessarily infrequent surveys, has proved valuable.

  19. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Streich, Sean P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Miller, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  20. “Pitiful times” – plague in Cracow in 1707–1710. A Contribution to the research into the collapse of the royal city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Karpacz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the XVIIIth century has been recorded in history of the city of Cracow as a time of war and famine. “Pitiful times” – such term was used in the chronicle of the Norbertine Sisters Convent. This cataclysms was followed by the last one and the most dangerous of them – an epidemic. The plague was a deathblow to the city on the verge of falling into ruin. One of the most important goals of the article is pointing the connections between physical, economical or spiritual state of the municipal community and enormous proportions as well as consequences of the plague. Considerations are started from describing the situation in Cracow and nearest vicinity the day before cataclysm. Subsequently Authoress characterized preventive measures, basing on municipal bills and regulations. The main part of the article presents the drama of the ordinary cracovians. To throw light on the depth of demographical, cultural and spiritual crisis in the city, the view of situation is completed by statistics based on ecclesiastical sources – records and acts of the chapters of The Dominican Order. Authoress refers also to the texts publicized in Cracow at the begging of the XVIIIth century – from medical treatises to panegyric written by Marcin Ksawery Szumliński to venerate the authorities of the city fighting against the plague.

  1. Plague history: Yersin's discovery of the causative bacterium in 1894 enabled, in the subsequent century, scientific progress in understanding the disease and the development of treatments and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T

    2014-03-01

    The causative bacterium of plague was described and cultured by Alexandre Yersin in Hong Kong in 1894, after which transmission of bacteria from rodents by flea bites was discovered by Jean-Paul Simond in 1898. Effective treatment with antiserum was initiated in 1896, but this therapy was supplanted by sulphonamides in the 1930s and by streptomycin starting in 1947. India suffered an estimated 6 million deaths in 1900-1909, and Vietnam, during its war in 1965-1975, accounted for approximately 80% of the world's cases; since then, African countries have dominated, with >90% of the world's cases in the 1990s and early 21st century. Serological diagnosis with fraction 1 antigen to detect anti-plague antibodies was developed in the 1950s. Vaccine development started in 1897 with killed whole bacterial cells, and this was followed by a live attenuated bacterial vaccine, leading to millions of persons receiving injections, but the benefits of these vaccines remain clouded by controversy. Plasmid-mediated virulence was established in 1981, and this was followed by specific DNA methods that have allowed detection of plague genes in skeletal specimens from European graves of the sixth to 17th centuries. PMID:24438235

  2. Monitoreo of the feromonas traps in the control of the plague Lasioderma serricorne (F. in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rosa Rodríguez Valero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their inigualable quality, the Cuban tobacco is one of the cultivations that bigger quantity of foreign currencies contributes to the country, but it is attacked by different plagues, in the different stages for those that it passes until its commercialization in leaves or as elaborated product. In the warehouses the most destructive plague is the Lasioderma serricorne (F. and to combat it in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito of Cabaiguán, the fosfamina, toxic product with high price is used in foreign currencies, the same one is applied with a bimonthly frequency, that is to say, every 60 days, for which the present work had as objective to lengthen the date of application of the fosfamina by means of the use of the feromonas traps to achieve a saving to the Unit and to improve the environmental conditions in the same one. The obtained results allowed to diminish the quantity of necessary fosfamina significantly to control the plague, the Unit saved during 4 months in those that it was carried out this work. $869.40 in national currency and $343.55 in CUC a positive impact also took place about the health of the workers and the one intones.

  3. Vaccination with F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague upon oral challenge with Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.; Marinari, P.; Kreeger, J.; Enama, J.T.; Powell, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have established that vaccination of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) with F1-V fusion protein by subcutaneous (SC) injection protects the animals against plague upon injection of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This study demonstrates that the F1-V antigen can also protect ferrets against plague contracted via ingestion of a Y. pestis-infected mouse, a probable route for natural infection. Eight black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated with F1-V protein by SC injection at approximately 60 days-of-age. A booster vaccination was administered 3 mo later via SC injection. Four additional ferret kits received placebos. The animals were challenged 6 wk after the boost by feeding each one a Y. pestis-infected mouse. All eight vaccinates survived challenge, while the four controls succumbed to plague within 3 days after exposure. To determine the duration of antibody postvaccination, 18 additional black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated and boosted with F1-V by SC injection at 60 and 120 days-of-age. High titers to both F1 and V (mean reciprocal titers of 18,552 and 99,862, respectively) were found in all vaccinates up to 2 yr postvaccination, whereas seven control animals remained antibody negative throughout the same time period. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  4. Genetic variation at the MHC DRB1 locus is similar across Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colonies regardless of plague history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobble, Kacy R; Califf, Katy J; Stone, Nathan E; Shuey, Megan M; Birdsell, Dawn N; Colman, Rebecca E; Schupp, James M; Aziz, Maliha; Van Andel, Roger; Rocke, Tonie E; Wagner, David M; Busch, Joseph D

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis was introduced to North America around 1900 and leads to nearly 100% mortality in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) colonies during epizootic events, which suggests this pathogen may exert a strong selective force. We characterized genetic diversity at an MHC class II locus (DRB1) in Gunnison's prairie dog (C. gunnisoni) and quantified population genetic structure at the DRB1 versus 12 microsatellite loci in three large Arizona colonies. Two colonies, Seligman (SE) and Espee Ranch (ES), have experienced multiple plague-related die-offs in recent years, whereas plague has never been documented at Aubrey Valley (AV). We found fairly low allelic diversity at the DRB1 locus, with one allele (DRB1*01) at high frequency (0.67-0.87) in all colonies. Two other DRB1 alleles appear to be trans-species polymorphisms shared with the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), indicating that these alleles have been maintained across evolutionary time frames. Estimates of genetic differentiation were generally lower at the MHC locus (F ST = 0.033) than at microsatellite markers (F ST = 0.098). The reduced differentiation at DRB1 may indicate that selection has been important for shaping variation at MHC loci, regardless of the presence or absence of plague in recent decades. However, genetic drift has probably also influenced the DRB1 locus because its level of differentiation was not different from that of microsatellites in an F ST outlier analysis. We then compared specific MHC alleles to plague survivorship in 60 C. gunnisoni that had been experimentally infected with Y. pestis. We found that survival was greater in individuals that carried at least one copy of the most common allele (DRB1*01) compared to those that did not (60% vs. 20%). Although the sample sizes of these two groups were unbalanced, this result suggests the possibility that this MHC class II locus, or a nearby linked gene, could play a role in plague survival. PMID:27066243

  5. The Piano Plague: The Nineteenth-Century Medical Critique of Female Musical Education*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, James

    2014-01-01

    The role of music in nineteenth-century female education has been seen primarily in the context of the middle class cult of domesticity, and the relationship of music to medicine in the period has generally been viewed in terms of music therapy. Nevertheless, for much of the century there was serious medical discussion about the dangers of excessive music in girls’ education. Many of the leading psychiatrists and gynaecologists of the nineteenth century argued that music could over-stimulate the nervous system, playing havoc with vulnerable female nerves and reproductive organs, and warned of the consequences of music lessons on the developing bodies of teenage girls. Two rival models of music’s effects competed and were combined. One suggested that music led to illness by provoking sensuality, imagination and sexuality; the other argued that it was a source of neurasthenic fatigue because of intellectual strain. PMID:22303771

  6. The piano plague: the nineteenth-century medical critique of female musical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, James

    2011-01-01

    The role of music in nineteenth-century female education has been seen primarily in the context of the middle class cult of domesticity, and the relationship of music to medicine in the period has generally been viewed in terms of music therapy. Nevertheless, for much of the century there was serious medical discussion about the dangers of excessive music in girls' education. Many of the leading psychiatrists and gynaecologists of the nineteenth century argued that music could over-stimulate the nervous system, playing havoc with vulnerable female nerves and reproductive organs, and warned of the consequences of music lessons on the developing bodies of teenage girls. Two rival models of music's effects competed and were combined. One suggested that music led to illness by provoking sensuality, imagination and sexuality; the other argued that it was a source of neurasthenic fatigue because of intellectual strain. PMID:22303771

  7. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, C.

    2014-01-29

    Coral diseases are characterized by microbial community shifts in coral mucus and tissue, but causes and consequences of these changes are vaguely understood due to the complexity and dynamics of coral-associated bacteria. We used 16S rRNA gene microarrays to assay differences in bacterial assemblages of healthy and diseased colonies displaying White Plague Disease (WPD) signs from two closely related Caribbean coral species, Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi. Analysis of differentially abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed strong differences between healthy and diseased specimens, but not between coral species. A subsequent comparison to data from two Indo-Pacific coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) revealed distinct microbial community patterns associated with ocean basin, coral species and health state. Coral species were clearly separated by site, but also, the relatedness of the underlying bacterial community structures resembled the phylogenetic relationship of the coral hosts. In diseased samples, bacterial richness increased and putatively opportunistic bacteria were consistently more abundant highlighting the role of opportunistic conditions in structuring microbial community patterns during disease. Our comparative analysis shows that it is possible to derive conserved bacterial footprints of diseased coral holobionts that might help in identifying key bacterial species related to the underlying etiopathology. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that similar-appearing disease phenotypes produce microbial community patterns that are consistent over coral species and oceans, irrespective of the putative underlying pathogen. Consequently, profiling coral diseases by microbial community structure over multiple coral species might allow the development of a comparative disease framework that can inform on cause and relatedness of coral diseases. 2013 The Authors Molecular Ecology John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease across corals and oceans indicates a conserved and distinct disease microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Cornelia; Arif, Chatchanit; Daniels, Camille; Weil, Ernesto; Voolstra, Christian R

    2014-02-01

    Coral diseases are characterized by microbial community shifts in coral mucus and tissue, but causes and consequences of these changes are vaguely understood due to the complexity and dynamics of coral-associated bacteria. We used 16S rRNA gene microarrays to assay differences in bacterial assemblages of healthy and diseased colonies displaying White Plague Disease (WPD) signs from two closely related Caribbean coral species, Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella franksi. Analysis of differentially abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed strong differences between healthy and diseased specimens, but not between coral species. A subsequent comparison to data from two Indo-Pacific coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) revealed distinct microbial community patterns associated with ocean basin, coral species and health state. Coral species were clearly separated by site, but also, the relatedness of the underlying bacterial community structures resembled the phylogenetic relationship of the coral hosts. In diseased samples, bacterial richness increased and putatively opportunistic bacteria were consistently more abundant highlighting the role of opportunistic conditions in structuring microbial community patterns during disease. Our comparative analysis shows that it is possible to derive conserved bacterial footprints of diseased coral holobionts that might help in identifying key bacterial species related to the underlying etiopathology. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that similar-appearing disease phenotypes produce microbial community patterns that are consistent over coral species and oceans, irrespective of the putative underlying pathogen. Consequently, profiling coral diseases by microbial community structure over multiple coral species might allow the development of a comparative disease framework that can inform on cause and relatedness of coral diseases. PMID:24350609

  9. The Key Solution Algorithm of Linear Programming Model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jun; Zhao Chuan Cheng; Ren Zhi Guo; Feng Zhong Yi; Zhu Zheng Ping

    2016-01-01

    Linear programming problem is a common problem, and to solve the linear model is more plagued. The paper generating algorithm is based on mathematical theory and composition. The design of feasible solution algorithm illustrates key linear programming model, then we can find a better way to solve the linear programming model solutions.

  10. Tendência secular da peste no Estado do Ceará, Brasil Secular plague trend in Ceará State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Ivoneida Aragão

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Após a sua introdução no Ceará, Brasil, em 1900, a peste focalizou-se em sete complexos ecológicos: Chapada do Araripe e Serras da Ibiapaba, do Baturité, do Machado, das Matas, da Pedra Branca e de Uruburetama. As atividades de vigilância nesses focos no período de 1935/2004 foram desenvolvidas sucessivamente pelo Departamento Nacional de Saúde, Serviço Nacional de Peste, Departamento Nacional de Endemias Rurais, Superintendência de Campanhas de Saúde Pública, Fundação Nacional de Saúde e finalmente pela Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. A análise dos dados levantados sobre a ocorrência de casos humanos nesses 70 anos permite identificar diferentes padrões de circulação da enfermidade na população humana, caracterizados pela alternância de momentos de elevadas incidências e de silêncio, possibilitando estabelecer uma periodização cronológica com características epidemiológicas próprias. Conclui-se desses resultados que a peste ainda deve ser considerada uma ameaça potencial, o que justifica revitalizar as ações de vigilância epidemiológica, o que só ocorrerá com o fortalecimento de todas as instâncias do Sistema Único de Saúde.After its introduction into the State of Ceará, Brazil, in 1900, the plague was established in seven ecological complexes: Chapada do Araripe and the Ibiapaba, Baturité, Machado, Matas, Pedra Branca, and Uruburetama mountains. These natural foci were monitored successively from 1935 to 2004 by the National Health Department, National Plague Service, National Department of Rural Endemics, Superintendency of Public Health Campaigns, National Health Foundation, and finally by the National Health Surveillance Secretariat. Data analysis on human cases during these 70 years allowing identifying different plague circulation patterns in the human population, alternating high incidence with silent periods and characterizing a chronological periodicity with unique epidemiological

  11. A Plague of Bailouts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOH; SU; HSING

    2011-01-01

    The EU starts to worry about a possible domino effect from bailouts dragging down the entire euro zone While there has l o n g b e e n anticipation of Portugal’s need for an economic bailout,the country’s formal request on April 6 still dealt a sobering blow to the current crisis in the EU.Portuguese

  12. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  13. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieslaw Swietnicki

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  14. 青海省2006~2010年鼠疫的流行病学特征分析%Epidemical analysis of plague in Qinghai from 2006-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛有全; 王祖郧; 魏柏青; 戴瑞霞; 赵海红; 熊浩民; 张青雯; 杨晓艳; 任玲玲; 赵子婧

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨青海省2006~2010年间青海省鼠疫流行势态,为今后鼠疫防治提供科学依据.方法 应用Excel 2003软件分析2006~2010年青海省地方病预防控制所人间鼠疫病例数据库、鼠疫监测和鼠疫疫源地调查资料.结果 5年间青海省从各种染疫动物和媒介昆虫体内分离鼠疫菌57株,主要分布在乌兰县、天峻县、格尔木等青藏铁路沿线,共检菌39株,其次为玉树县、治多县、称多县青南地区12株,环湖地区的兴海县6株.5年间累计发生人间鼠疫2起,病例13例,死亡3例,病死率为23.07%.结论 青海省鼠疫疫情仍然严峻,动物鼠疫连年不断,人间鼠疫局部地区暴发流行,应加强重点地区鼠疫监测和预警,落实各项综合防控措施,以减少鼠疫的发生和流行.%OBJECTIVE To explore the plague epidemical trend of the nearly 5 years in Qinghai province to provide basis for making the prevention and control measures. METHODS The materials of the human plague, plague monitoring and the plague foci survey in Qinghai from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed with the Excel software. RESULTS 57 strains of Yersinia peso's were isolated from the infected animals and insects in Qinghai from the recent 5 years. The Yersinia pestis was mainly distributed in Wulan, Tianjun, Ge'ermu, with a total of 39 strains, which were along the Qinghai-Xinzang railway. Another 12 strains were distributed in Yushu, Zhiduo and Chenduo. The rest 6 strains were distributed in Xinhai. Human plague was occurred every year from 2006 to 2010. In the 5 years, there were 13 plague cases and 3 of these cases died, the mortality was 23.07%. CONCLUSION The plague epidemic situation in Qinghai province is still severe, the animal plague occurs yearly, the human plague outbreaks occasionally. So as to reduce the plague occurrence, the plague monitoring and early warning in the key areas should be strengthened, and the comprehensive measures for plague prevention and control

  15. Epidémies de peste urbaine à Majunga, côte ouest de Madagascar : résumé

    OpenAIRE

    Laventure, S.; Rasoamanana, B; Boisier, P.; Rasolomaharo, M; Rahilison, L.; Randriantsoa, J.; Andrianirina, Z.; Chanteau, S.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rakoto, L.; Eppel, G.; Andriamahefazafy, B.; Randriantsimaniry, D.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    In August 1991, an epidemic of urban plague broke out in Majunga, a port on the western coast of Madagascar. As the first resurgence of the disease in this area in 70 years, the episode was a dramatic reminder of the ubiquity of the disease and layed low the falsely reassuring idea that plague was confined to well known centers of high altitude. After the epidemic had claimed 12 victims, 21 patients suffering from bubonic plague and 7 cases of pneumonic plague, it was brought under control by...

  16. Inactivation of avirulent pgm+ and delta pgm Yersinia pestis by ultraviolet light (UV-C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of bubonic plague. Though not considered a foodborne pathogen, Y. pestis can survive, and even grow, in some foods, and the foodborne route of transmission is not without precedent. As such, concerns exist over the possible intentional contamination of foods wi...

  17. Mapping the distribution of the main host for plague in a complex landscape in Kazakhstan with an object-based approach using SPOT-5 XS, Landsat 7 ETM+, SRTM and multiple Random Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, L.I.; Addink, E.A.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Davis, S.A.; Laudisoit, A.; Begon, M.; Atshabar, B.B.; Jong, S.M. de; Burdelov, L.A.; Dubyanskiy, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Plague is a zoonotic infectious disease present in great gerbil populations in Kazakhstan. Infectious disease dynamics are influenced by the spatial distribution of the carriers (hosts) of the disease. The great gerbil, the main host in our study area, lives in burrows, which can be recognized on hi

  18. 航海类学生心理问题成因及对策研究%The Causes and Countermeasures of Psychological Problems Plaguing Maritime Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭慧萍

    2012-01-01

      Based on an analysis of psychological problems plaguing maritime majors, this article, in combination with the influence of network on their mind, makes an attempt to analyze the causes of the psychological problems and put forward countermeasures to bring students through them, which is expected to contribute to the formation of harmonious and peaceful mind.%  文章在分析了学生心理健康问题的基础上,结合网络对学生心理的影响,分析了形成心理健康问题的原因并提出了对应的解决对策,以帮助学生克服心理问题,提高其心理健康水平。

  19. The Pioneer of Cholera Vaccine and Plague Vaccine-Haffkine%霍乱疫苗鼠疫疫苗研制的先驱哈夫金

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨微

    2010-01-01

    沃尔德马·莫迪凯·哈夫金(1860-1930),犹太细菌学家,生于乌克兰敖德萨.1884年获得敖德萨大学科学博士学位,1889年进入巴黎巴斯德研究所工作.曾先后致力于研制霍乱疫苗与鼠疫疫苗,经自身试验后,在英属印度推行大规模的人群试验,证明相对安全有效并推广使用,挽救了众多生命.1902年,因马考魏事件,哈夫金被误判承担污染鼠疫疫苗之责,在1907年得到澄清,被誉称为"犹太人的琴纳".%Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine(1860-1930), a Jewish bacteriologist , was born in Odessa, Ukraine. He got the doctor's degree of science of Odessa University in 1884 and entered the Pasteur Institute in 1889. Then he successively committed himself to developing cholera vaccine and plague vaccine. After testing them to himself, he set up extensive field trials in British India to prove the safety and efficacy. Further inoculation saved many lives. Later he was accused for the contamination of plague vaccine in Mulkowal Disaster in 1902, and finally exonerated in 1907. Haffkine was hailed as "Jewish Jenner"

  20. Predictors for presence and abundance of small mammals in households of villages endemic for commensal rodent plague in Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong You-Hong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ninety-one rodent plague epidemics have occurred in Lianghe county, Yunnan Province, China, between 1990 and 2006. This study aimed to identify predictors for the presence and abundance of small mammals in households of villages endemic for rodent plague in Lianghe county. Results Rattus flavipectus and Suncus murinus were the two species captured in 110 households. Keeping cats decreased the number of captures of R. flavipectus by one to two thirds and the chance of reported small mammal sightings in houses by 60 to 80%. Food availability was associated with fewer captures. Keeping food in sacks decreased the small mammal captures, especially of S. murinus 4- to 8-fold. Vegetables grown around house and maize grown in the village reduced the captures of S. murinus and R. flavipectus by 73 and 45%, respectively. An outside toilet and garbage piles near the house each reduced R. flavipectus captures by 39 and 37%, respectively, while raising dogs and the presence of communal latrines in the village increased R. flavipectus captures by 76 and 110% but were without detectable effect on small mammal sightings. Location adjacent to other houses increased captures 2-fold but reduced the chance of sightings to about half. In addition, raising ducks increased the chance of sighting small mammals 2.7-fold. Even after adjusting for these variables, households of the Dai had higher captures than those of the Han and other ethnic groups. Conclusion Both species captures were reduced by availability of species-specific foods in the environment, whereas other predictors for capture of the two species differed. Other than the beneficial effect of cats, there were also discrepancies between the effects on small mammal captures and those on sightings. These differences should be considered during the implementation and interpretation of small mammal surveys.

  1. Monitoring results and epidemic analysis of gerbil plague in northern Ningxia in 2009%2009年宁夏北部沙鼠鼠疫监测结果及疫情分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鸿毅; 白学礼

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析宁夏北部沙鼠鼠疫监测结果,掌握鼠疫疫情动态,为制订防治对策提供依据.方法 收集2009年宁夏北部沙鼠鼠疫疫源地监测结果资料,统计主要宿主密度、染蚤率、蚤体指数及细菌学、血清学检查,分析该疫源地鼠疫疫情流行态势.结果 主要宿主平均密度为1.74只/hm2,平均染蚤率为28.60%,平均鼠体蚤指数为0.76.监测发现4起鼠间鼠疫疫情,共检出鼠疫菌16株,其中长爪沙鼠检菌10株、子午沙鼠2株、同型客蚤2株、秃病蚤2株.间接血凝检测(1HA)529份,发现阳性材料2份,血凝阳性率为0.38%;反向间接血凝检测(RIHA)8份,发现阳性材料7份,血凝阳性率为87.50%.结论 近年宁夏沙鼠鼠疫疫源地动物间疫情活跃,鼠密度较高,局部发生了鼠间鼠疫疫情,应加强监测力度,扩大监测范围,密切注视疫情动态,严控动物疫情的流行和蔓延,防止发生人间鼠疫.%Objective To analyze gerbil plague in northern Ningxia and the monitoring results,to master the plague epidemic dynamics,and to provide the basis for developmenting countermeasures.Methods Monitoring data of gerbil plague focus in northern Ningxia were collect in 2009,counted main host density,rate of dye fleas,flea body index and bacteriology,serology detect and analyzed the epidemic situation.Results An average density of main host was 1.74/hm2,the average rate of infected fleas was 28.60%,and the average rat body flea index was 0.76.Monitoring found 4 plagues from rat plague epidemic,plague bacteria were found in 16 strains,of which gerbils inspection bacteria 10 strains,Meriones unguiculatus 2 strains,the same type cheopis 2 strains,and bald disease fleas 2 strains.Indirect hemagglutination (IHA) was used to test 529 copies of samples,2 copies were found positive,and hemagglutination-positive rate was 0.38%; eight copies were examined by reverse indirect hemagglutination(RIHA),7 material were found positive

  2. The tale of a modern animal plague: Tracing the evolutionary history and determining the time-scale for foot and mouth disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite significant advances made in the understanding of its epidemiology, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is among the most unexpected agricultural devastating plagues. While the disease manifests itself as seven immunologically distinct strains their origin, population dynamics, migration patterns and divergence times remain unknown. Herein we have assembled a comprehensive data set of gene sequences representing the global diversity of the disease and inferred the time-scale and evolutionary history for FMDV. Serotype-specific rates of evolution and divergence times were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent framework. We report that an ancient precursor FMDV gave rise to two major diversification events spanning a relatively short interval of time. This radiation event is estimated to have taken place towards the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century giving us the present circulating Euro-Asiatic and South African viral strains. Furthermore our results hint that Europe acted as a possible hub for the disease from where it successfully dispersed elsewhere via exploration and trading routes

  3. A case study of the Australian Plague Locust Commission and environmental due diligence: why mere legislative compliance is no longer sufficient for environmentally responsible locust control in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Paul G; Walker, Paul W; McRae, Heath; Hamilton, John G

    2005-07-01

    The Australian Plague Locust Commission (APLC) manages locust populations across 2 million square kilometers of eastern Australia using the aerial application of chemical and biological control agents to protect agricultural production. This occurs via a preventative control strategy involving ultralow-volume spray equipment to distribute small droplets of control agent over a target area. The economic costs of, and potential gains stemming from, locust control are well documented. The application of insecticides, however, to fragile arid and semiarid ecosystems is a task that brings with it both real and perceived environmental issues. The APLC is proactive in addressing these issues through a combination of targeted environmental operational research, an ISO-14001-aligned Environmental Management System (EMS), and links with environmental regulatory and research institutions. Increasing due diligence components within Australian environmental legislation dictate that mere legislative compliance is no longer sufficient for industries to ensure that they meet their environmental obligations. The development of external research links and the formulation of an EMS for locust control have enabled the APLC to identify environmental issues and trends, quantify objective environmental targets and strategies, and facilitate continuous improvement in its environmental performance, while maintaining stakeholder support. This article outlines the environmental issues faced by the APLC, the research programs in place to address these issues, and the procedures in place to incorporate research findings into the organization's operational structure. PMID:16639885

  4. Preliminary Empirical Model of Crucial Determinants of Best Practice for Peer Tutoring on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kim Chau

    2015-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses of the effects of peer tutoring on academic achievement have been plagued with theoretical and methodological flaws. Specifically, these studies have not adopted both fixed and mixed effects models for analyzing the effect size; they have not evaluated the moderating effect of some commonly used parameters, such as comparing…

  5. Epidemic Modelling by Ripple-Spreading Network and Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Qin Liao; Xiao-Bing Hu; Ming Wang; Mark S. Leeson

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical analysis and modelling is central to infectious disease epidemiology. This paper, inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, proposes a novel ripple-spreading network model for the study of infectious disease transmission. The new epidemic model naturally has good potential for capturing many spatial and temporal features observed in the outbreak of plagues. In particular, using a stochastic ripple-spreading process simulates the effect of random contacts and movements ...

  6. A Novel Material Modulus Function for Modeling Viscoelastic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Luke Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Accurately modeling damping in engineering structures has plagued scientist and engineers for decades. The integration of viscoelastic materials into engineering structures can reduce undesired vibrations and serve as an effective passive control mechanism. Various techniques have been developed to model viscoelastic materials. The growing popularity of finite element analysis in the 1980s and 1990s spawned new techniques for modeling damping in complex structures. The technique defined in th...

  7. Protective Immunity in Mice Achieved with Dry Powder Formulation and Alternative Delivery of Plague F1-V Vaccine▿

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Joanne; D'Souza, Ajit J.; Alarcon, Jason B.; Mikszta, John A.; Ford, Brandi M.; Ferriter, Matthew S.; Evans, Michelle; Stewart, Todd; Amemiya, Kei; Ulrich, Robert G.; Sullivan, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    The potential use of Yersinia pestis as a bioterror agent is a great concern. Development of a stable powder vaccine against Y. pestis and administration of the vaccine by minimally invasive methods could provide an alternative to the traditional liquid formulation and intramuscular injection. We evaluated a spray-freeze-dried powder vaccine containing a recombinant F1-V fusion protein of Y. pestis for vaccination against plaque in a mouse model. Mice were immunized with reconstituted spray-f...

  8. Plague, Politics, and Pogroms: The Black Death, Rule of Law, and the persecution of Jews in the Holy Roman Empire

    OpenAIRE

    Finley, Theresa; Koyama, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the institutional determinants of persecution by studying the intensity of the Black Death pogroms in the Holy Roman Empire. Political fragmentation exacerbated competition for the rents generated by Jewish moneylending. This competition made Jewish communities vulnerable during periods of crisis. We test this hypothesis using data on the intensity of pogroms. In line with our model, we find that communities governed by Archbishoprics, Bishoprics, and Imperial Free Cities ...

  9. [Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Xenopsyllinae), fleas in rural plague areas of high altitude Madagascar: level of sensitivity to DDT, pyrethroids and carbamates after 50 years of chemical vector control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratovonjato, J; Duchemin, J B; Duplantier, J M; Chanteau, S

    2000-01-01

    The resistance of Xenopsylla cheopis from urban area to pyrethroids, to DDT, and their susceptibility to carbamate are known. We have evaluated the susceptibility of X. cheopis collected from three rural localities: Ambodisiarivo (district of Antananarivo Avaradrano), Mandoto (district of Betafo), Analaroa (district of Anjozorobe) in the province of Antananarivo and in Besoa (district of Ambalavao) in the province of Fianarantsoa. The standard WHO protocol was used and four insecticides were tested: deltamethrin 0.025%, cyfluthrin 0.15% (pyrethroids), DDT 4% (organochlorine), propoxur 1% and bendiocarb 0.1% (carbamate). X. cheopis has been shown resistance to DDT 4%, to deltamethrin 0.025% but was susceptible in the rural area around Antananarivo City. They were tolerant to deltamethrin 0.025% and cyfluthrin 0.15% but susceptible to propoxur 0.1% and bendiocarbe 1% in the districts of Betafo and Anjozorobe. In Besoa, X. cheopis was resistant to DDT 4%, tolerant to deltamethrin 0.025% and cyfluthrin 0.15% but susceptible to propoxur 0.1% and bendiocarbe 1%. These results indicate that DDT and pyrethroids can not be recommended any more for the vector control in the rural area around the capital. The use of pyrethroids in the other districts of the central highland must be joined with a X. cheopis susceptibility control. In case of resistance to pyrethroids, carbamates would be proposed to control plague vector in the rural area. The high level of resistance to DDT and pyrethroid in the rural area around the capital confirms the importance of studying the flea population in different area of Madagascar and the possibility of the gene resistance propagation. PMID:12463026

  10. 2007年宁夏西吉县鼠疫自然疫源地调查%Survey of natural foci of plague in Xiji county, Ningxia in 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伏卫程; 乔富贵; 朱良俊; 王兴虎; 李忠社

    2010-01-01

    Objective To learn the plague's host animals and parasitic flea composition, and to investigate the natural foci of plague in Xiji county in order to provide basic information for plague prevention and control. Methods The Citellus alaschanicus density, nocturnal rodents, the body flea, the burrow track flea, the nest flea were investigated in 8 townships (town) of Xiji county from June 11 2007 to July 25 2007. Specimens of small mammalian, fleas were collected for bacteriological and serological testing. Results The average density of the main host Citellus alaschanicus was 0.85 per hectare. The nocturnal mouse capture rate was 0.80%(24/2987).The survey found 16 species of small mammals that belonging to 3 orders, 9 families and 16 species with Citellus alaschanicus the dominant species. The Citellus alaschanicus had 2.84 fleas per body. Four families and 16 species of fleas were identified in the areas. The Citellus alaschanicus and Citellophilus Tesquorum Mongolicus were the dominant species. Plague bacteriology and serology tests were negative. Conclusions The study shows that the area is suitable for the formation of natural foci of Citellus alaschanicus plague. Surveillance is an important measure for prevention and control of the plague.%目的 了解西吉县鼠疫宿主动物及其寄生蚤的种类构成,调查西吉县鼠疫疫源情况,为预防控制鼠疫流行提供科学依据.方法 2007年6月11日至7月25日,对西吉县8个乡(镇)进行了黄鼠密度、夜行鼠、体蚤、洞干蚤、窝巢蚤调查,同时采集标本进行细菌学和血清学检验.结果主要宿主阿拉善黄鼠平均密度为0.85只/hm2,夜行鼠捕获率为0.80%(24/2987),调查发现小型兽类16种,隶属3目9科16种,以黄鼠为优势种.鼠体蚤指数为2.84,发现蚤类4科16种,以方形黄鼠蚤蒙古亚种为优势种.鼠疫细菌学、血清学检验均为阴性.结论该调查地区具备形成阿拉善黄鼠鼠疫自然疫源地的条件,开展鼠疫监

  11. 'Salamander plague' on Britain's doorstep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Georgina

    2015-01-24

    Chytridiomycosis can cause mass declines in amphibians, and the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is the classic cause of this disease. However, recently, a second strain of chytrid fungus has emerged in Europe, resulting in major declines in fire salamanders. The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) discussed this, and the implications for the UK, at a meeting in December in London. Georgina Mills reports. PMID:25614547

  12. Technical problems plague new planes

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Läti lennuameti kontrolli käigus selgus, et airBalticu uute Bombardier Q400 NextGen lennukite uksed ei sulge piisavalt hästi, et tagada õiget õhurõhku kabiinis. Lennukite omanik on Nordic Aviation Capital

  13. 河北省康保牧场鼠疫自然疫源地植物种类调查%Retrospective investigation on plant species of plague natural focus of Kangbao pasture in Hebei province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冠纯; 李玉贵; 崔耀仁; 史献明; 乔永明; 郝存江; 任风歧; 闫东; 陈永明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate plant species in the plague natural focus of Kangbao pasture in Hebei province so as to provide basis for the study on plauge on and cotrolplauge prevention and control. Methods The plant specimens were collated , photographed and recorded which were collected from 1978 to 1984 in Kangbao pasture, and established database of plant specimens. Results One hundred and ninety species, 143 genera and 52 families of the plant in Kangbao pasture before 1984 are defined. Conclusions Now we have the first understanding of the plant species in the plague natural focus of Kangbao pasture in Hebei province, which will provide foundationon for the further investigation on plant.%目的 调查河北省康保牧场的鼠疫自然疫源地植物种类,为鼠疫防治的研究提供理论依据.方法 对康保牧场1978 ~1984年采集制作的植物标本进行整理、拍照、记录,建立植物标本库.结果 1984年以前,康保牧场共有植物52科143属190种.结论 了解并掌握了该地区的植物种类及分类,为下一步对植物的调查提供研究依据.

  14. Peste neumónica primaria con transmisión intrahospitalaria en La Libertad, Perú 2010 Primary pneumonic plague with nosocomial transmission in La Libertad, Peru 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Donaires

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La peste neumónica es una forma clínica de peste, de baja frecuencia y alta letalidad, transmitida por la inhalación directa de Yersinia pestis proveniente de un animal o de persona a persona. Objetivo. Describir las características clínicas y epidemiológicas de los casos de un brote de peste neumónica primaria humana en el norte de Perú. Materiales y métodos. Se revisaron las historias clínicas de los casos confirmados de peste neumónica primaria presentados en un brote ocurrido en la región de La Libertad, en el mes de julio de 2010, asimismo, se efectuó la búsqueda e investigación de contactos. Resultados. Se identificó el caso índice y tres casos adicionales, de estos últimos, dos fueron infecciones intrahospitalarias relacionadas con el caso índice. La presentación clínica inicial se caracterizó por fiebre de inicio súbito, escalofríos, mialgias y dolor torácico y evolución en menos de 24 horas a hipotensión arterial y cianosis. El inicio del tratamiento específico varió de 2 a 12 días, observándose que los casos con inicio precoz de tratamiento tuvieron un mejor resultado clínico. La letalidad fue de 50% (2/4. Conclusión. Se evidenció la transmisión intrahospitalaria de peste neumónica en el Perú con manifestaciones graves y alta letalidad.Pneumonic plague is one of the clinical forms of plague, of low frequency and high mortality, transmitted by direct inhalation of Yersinia pestis coming from an animal or from person to person. Objective. To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the cases of primary pneumonic plague in an outbreak in the north of Peru. Materials and methods. The clinical records of the confirmed cases of primary pneumonic plague presenting in an outbreak occurring in La Libertad, in July 2010, were reviewed, also the search and contact investigation was performed. Results. The index case was identified, as well as three additional cases, out of these, two were

  15. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo J. Gonzalez; M Chelsea Lane; Wagner, Nikki J.; Weening, Eric H.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2015-01-01

    The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specificall...

  16. Dissemination of a Highly Virulent Pathogen: Tracking The Early Events That Define Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo J. Gonzalez; Lane, M. Chelsea; Wagner, Nikki J.; Weening, Eric H.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2015-01-01

    The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specificall...

  17. Transferable plasmid-mediated resistance to streptomycin in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis.

    OpenAIRE

    Guiyoule, A; Gerbaud, G; Buchrieser, C.; Galimand, M.; Rahalison, L.; Chanteau, S.; Courvalin, P; Carniel, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics was reported in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar in 1997. We describe a second Y. pestis strain with high-level resistance to streptomycin, isolated from a human case of bubonic plague in Madagascar. The resistance determinants were carried by a self-transferable plasmid that could conjugate at high frequencies to other Y. pestis isolates. The plasmid and the host bacterium were different from those previously a...

  18. Derivatives of Salicylic Acid as Inhibitors of YopH in Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Zunnan; He, Yantao; Zhang, Xian; Gunawan, Andrea; Li WU; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Wong, Chung F.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis causes diseases ranging from gastrointestinal syndromes to bubonic plague and could be misused as a biological weapon. As its protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH has already been demonstrated as a potential drug target, we have developed two series of forty salicylic acid derivatives and found sixteen to have micromolar inhibitory activity. We designed these ligands to have two chemical moieties connected by a flexible hydrocarbon linker to target two pockets in the active site ...

  19. Fleas and flea control

    OpenAIRE

    Dautović Živomir; Knežević Dragan L.; Zdravković Danilo; Katić Sofija

    2002-01-01

    Fleas as hemeatophagous arthropodes take part in the spreading of certain diseases such as bubonic plague, murine typhus, tick-borne typhus tularaemia, or can be transitory hosts for certain species of cestodes for dogs and cats. Depending on the type of host on which fleas persist and the habitat, measures that can be taken to control them can be only sanitary-hygiene, individual, or treatment of the habitat. Sanitary-hygiene measures mostly consist of regular cleaning. Individual protection...

  20. Viability of Arctan Model of f(R) Gravity for Late-time Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Koushik; Patel, Avani

    2016-01-01

    $f(R)$ modifications of Einstein's gravity is an interesting possibility to explain the late time acceleration of the Universe. In this work we explore the cosmological viability of one such $f(R)$ modification proposed in (Kruglov:2013). We show that the model violates fifth-force constraints. The model is also plagued with the issue of curvature singularity in a spherically collapsing object, where the effective scalar field reaches to the point of diverging scalar curvature.

  1. Stationary configurations of the Standard Model Higgs potential: electroweak stability and rising inflection point

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobellis, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We study the gauge-independent observables associated with two interesting stationary configurations of the Standard Model Higgs potential (extrapolated to high energy according to the present state of the art, namely the NNLO): i) the value of the top mass ensuring stability of the SM electroweak minimum, and ii) the value of the Higgs potential at a rising inflection point. We examine in detail and reappraise the experimental and theoretical uncertainties which plague their determination, finding that: i) stability of the SM is compatible with the present data at the 1.5 sigma level; ii) despite the large theoretical error plaguing the value of the Higgs potential at a rising inflection point, application of such configuration to models of primordial inflation displays a 3 sigma tension with the recent bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of cosmological perturbations.

  2. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Sebastien; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar. PMID:25369291

  3. Comparison of biological characteristics of Yersinia pestis strains in two rodent plague cases isolated from Shanxi province%陕西省两起鼠间鼠疫流行鼠疫菌生物学特性比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安翠红; 李伟华; 陈宝宝; 孙养信

    2013-01-01

    Objective To know etiological characteristics of plague in animals of Shanxi province by comparing the biological characteristics of Yersinia pestis strains in two rodent plague cases. Methods To compare and analyze biological characteristics, virulence, virulent factors and plasmids isolated from Yersinia pestis strains from 2000 to 2001 and in 2006. Results All identified strains had the same biological characteristics with fermenting arabinose, decomposing glycerides, not fermenting rham-nose, Maltose and not removing nitrogen. All tested strains had Fland Pstl. Only one strain lost Pgm factor and other eighteen had four virulent factors in the strains isolated from 2000 to 2001 , however, five tested strains had lost VW factor and two lost Pgm factor in 2006. The results showed that strains LD50 were 41 to l80 in 2000 to 2001 and strains LD50 werelO to 1. 25 billion in 2006. Plasmids testing were not carried out in 2000 to 2001 ; three plasmids of 6, 45 and 65MD were tested out in 2006. Conclusion All biological characteristics of strains were identified to be in coincidence with Ordos Plateau gerbil jird ecotype. However, the virulence and virulent factors which caused the two plague cases were different. Yersinia pestis strains isolated from 2000 to 2001 were much stronger than that of 2006 and three of five strains tested had high virulence and two had low virulence.%目的 通过对两起鼠间鼠疫流行鼠疫菌生物学特性进行比较,了解陕西省动物间鼠疫流行的病原特点.方法 对2000~2001年、2006年动物鼠疫流行期间所分离菌株的生化、毒力、毒力因子及质粒进行比较分析.结果 被鉴定菌株发酵阿胶糖,分解甘油,不发酵鼠李糖、麦芽糖,脱氮阴性.所有测试菌株含有F1和Pstl因子,2000~2001年19株鼠疫菌除1株Pgm±外,均含有4种毒力因子,2006年5株测试鼠疫菌均不含VW因子,2株不含Pgm因子.2000~2001年5株测试菌LD50在41 ~ 180个菌之间,2006年5

  4. Analysis of the monitor results of Marmota sibirica plague foci from 2004 to 2008%2004-2008年蒙古旱獭鼠疫疫源地监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范蒙光; 赵天飙

    2011-01-01

    Objective To master of the characteristics of development and variation in plague natural foci of Marmota sibirica, and to analyze the plague monitoring results from 2004 to 2008. Methods From May to September every year, we monitored plague in Manzhouli, Chenbaerhuqi, Xinbaerhuzuoqi, Xinbaerhuyouqi,Ewenkeqi and Yakeshi city. The monitored area was 20 000 - 40 000 hm2 in every county. The density of Marmota,ground squirrel and moonlighting rats was surveyed by path method, one-day bow-clip method and a clamp was placed every five meters, respectively. The classification and identification of ectoparasite fleas were done by using low power lens. The fleas in the ground squirrel hole were collected by flannel rubber stick, then classified and identified. According to "National Standard of Plague Diagnostic Criteria"(GB 15991-1995), the collected rats and fleas were detected by isolation and cultured Yersinia pestis, the serums of collected rats were tested by indirect hemagglutination test. Results In five years, the density of Marmota and ground squirrel was 0.010/hm2 and 0.602/hm2, respectively. The capture rate of moonlighting rats was 2.69% (258/9600). The flea infection rate of Marmota was 17.54%(10/57) and the fleas index was 2.54. The fleas infection rate of ground squirrel was 28.40%(213/750) and the fleas index was 1.01. Flea infection rat of ground squirrel hole was 5.60%(46/822) and the fleas index was 0.17. The total number of various hosts of Yersinia pestis detected was 1351, the groups number of the variety of cultured fleas was 127, and the pathogen test results were negative. The number of serum tested was 1064, positive number was 43, and the detection rate was 4.04%(43/1064). The highest positive titer was 1 : 1280. Other than 2006, the remaining four years were found positive for blood clotting material; positive serum was found in a total of three regions, they were Manzhouli, Xinbaerhuzuoqi, and Xinbaerhuyouqi; and 30, 12 and 1 copies

  5. [Yersinia pestis as a dangerous biological weapon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygorczuk, Sambor; Hermanowska-Szpakowicz, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Plague is an infectious disease caused by the Yersinia pestis microorganism, which is transmitted to the human host from a natural reservoir (different rodent species) by a flea bite. Plague is still encountered in humans in the areas of its enzootic prevalence in local rodent populations. Infection by flea bite results in a bubonic or septicemic plague, possibly complicated by secondary pneumonia. The person with pneumonic symptoms may be a source of a droplet-borne inhalatory infection for other people who consequently develop primary pneumonic plague. Despite a clinical form, plague is a severe infection characterized by a short incubation period, rapid onset and quick progress with mortality exceeding 50% if not treated properly. The pneumonic plague is associated with a particularly rapid progress and the mortality rate of almost 100% if not treated properly. As Yersinia pestis can be easily obtained and cultured and is highly pathogenic for humans, it poses a serious threat of being used for bioterrorism purposes. Artificially created aerosol containing plague bacilli can cause numerous and almost simultaneous cases of primary pulmonic plague in an exposed population. Persons exposed would most likely develop severe pneumonia with rapidly progressing respiratory and circulatory failure. The use of the Yersinia pestis strains resistant to antibiotics typically applied cannot be excluded. PMID:12474416

  6. Protection Afforded by Fluoroquinolones in Animal Models of Respiratory Infections with Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W; Moen, Scott T; Healy, Daniel; Pawlik, Jennifer E; Taormina, Joanna; Hardcastle, Jason; Thomas, John M; Lawrence, William S; Ponce, Cindy; Chatuev, Bagram M; Gnade, Bryan T; Foltz, Sheri M; Agar, Stacy L; Sha, Jian; Klimpel, Gary R; Kirtley, Michelle L; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Successful treatment of inhalation anthrax, pneumonic plague and tularemia can be achieved with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and initiation of treatment is most effective when administered as soon as possible following exposure. Bacillus anthracis Ames, Yersinia pestis CO92, and Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 have equivalent susceptibility in vitro to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration is 0.03 μg/ml); however, limited information is available regarding in vivo susceptibility of these infectious agents to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in small animal models. Mice, guinea pig, and rabbit models have been developed to evaluate the protective efficacy of antibiotic therapy against these life-threatening infections. Our results indicated that doses of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin required to protect mice against inhalation anthrax were approximately 18-fold higher than the doses of levofloxacin required to protect against pneumonic plague and tularemia. Further, the critical period following aerosol exposure of mice to either B. anthracis spores or Y. pestis was 24 h, while mice challenged with F. tularensis could be effectively protected when treatment was delayed for as long as 72 h postchallenge. In addition, it was apparent that prolonged antibiotic treatment was important in the effective treatment of inhalation anthrax in mice, but short-term treatment of mice with pneumonic plague or tularemia infections were usually successful. These results provide effective antibiotic dosages in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits and lay the foundation for the development and evaluation of combinational treatment modalities. PMID:21127743

  7. Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Beibei; Chen, Chang; Fua, Cheng-Heng; Lee, Tong Heng

    2012-01-01

    Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems provides a comprehensive treatment of helicopter systems, ranging from related nonlinear flight dynamic modeling and stability analysis to advanced control design for single helicopter systems, and also covers issues related to the coordination and formation control of multiple helicopter systems to achieve high performance tasks. Ensuring stability in helicopter flight is a challenging problem for nonlinear control design and development. This book is a valuable reference on modeling, control and coordination of helicopter systems,providing readers with practical solutions for the problems that still plague helicopter system design and implementation. Readers will gain a complete picture of helicopters at the systems level, as well as a better understanding of the technical intricacies involved. This book also: Presents a complete picture of modeling, control and coordination for helicopter systems Provides a modeling platform for a general class of ro...

  8. Analysis and Surveillance on Major Host Animal Species and Vectors of Plague in Shenzhen City%深圳市鼠疫宿主动物及媒介监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敬忠; 李怀昕; 谢旭; 梅树江; 林一曼; 李迎慧; 马汉武; 程锦泉

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过对深圳市鼠疫宿主动物及媒介的监测和分析,为鼠疫防治工作提供依据.方法 采用笼日法;采集全部活鼠体表蚤鉴定后分类;采用鼠疫间接血球凝集试验(IHA)查鼠血清F1抗体,脏器压印法分离鼠疫耶尔森氏菌.结果 2005年共捕获鼠形动物472只,捕获率8.25%,隶属于2目2科3属4种,褐家鼠占87.50%;2010年共捕获鼠形动物320只,捕获率7.52%,隶属于2目2科4属5种,褐家鼠占94.06%;两次监测均显示褐家鼠为本市优势鼠种.南山区鼠密度下降趋势明显,二者差异有统计学意义(x2= 48.7,P<0.001).2005年发现129只鼠形动物寄生565匹印鼠客蚤,染蚤率为27.33%,总蚤指数为1.20;2010年发现35只鼠形动物寄生79匹印鼠客蚤,染蚤率为10.93%,总蚤指数为0.25.染蚤率(x2=31.2,P<0.001)和总蚤指数(x2=1 130.0,P<0.001)呈下降趋势.2005年获鼠血清458份,2010年获鼠血清315份,鼠疫F1抗体检测均为阴性.2005年鼠脏器压印培养407份,2010年鼠脏器压印培养320份,均未分离出鼠疫杆菌.结论 深圳市未发现鼠间鼠疫疫情,鼠疫媒介生物密度呈下降趋势,南山区鼠密度下降趋势明显.%Objective To investigate and analyze the species of the hosts and the vectors of plague in Shenzhen, and to provide the scientific evidence for prevention and treatment of plague. Methods Host animals were captured by daily cage- caught. Fleas were classified after being identified. Yersinia pestis F1 antibodies were detected by IHA and Yersinia pestis was separated by organ impression. Results A total of 472 rat- like animals were captured in 2005, belonging to 2 orders, 3 genera, and 4 species. The capture rate was 8.25%. R. Norvegicus constituted 87.50% of the total number. A total of 320 rat- like animals were captured in 2010, belonging to 2 orders, 4 genera, and 5 species. The capture rate was 7.52%. R. Norvegicus, constituted 94.06% of the total number. R. Norvegicus was

  9. Manipulation of Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-18 Production by Yersinia pestis Effectors YopJ and YopM and Redundant Impact on Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Dmitry; Orning, M Pontus A; Starheim, Kristian K; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Proulx, Megan K; Goguen, Jon D; Lien, Egil

    2016-05-01

    Innate immunity plays a central role in resolving infections by pathogens. Host survival during plague, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, is favored by a robust early innate immune response initiated by IL-1β and IL-18. These cytokines are produced by a two-step mechanism involving NF-κB-mediated pro-cytokine production and inflammasome-driven maturation into bioactive inflammatory mediators. Because of the anti-microbial effects induced by IL-1β/IL-18, it may be desirable for pathogens to manipulate their production. Y. pestis type III secretion system effectors YopJ and YopM can interfere with different parts of this process. Both effectors have been reported to influence inflammasome caspase-1 activity; YopJ promotes caspase-8-dependent cell death and caspase-1 cleavage, whereas YopM inhibits caspase-1 activity via an incompletely understood mechanism. However, neither effector appears essential for full virulence in vivo Here we report that the sum of influences by YopJ and YopM on IL-1β/IL-18 release is suppressive. In the absence of YopM, YopJ minimally affects caspase-1 cleavage but suppresses IL-1β, IL-18, and other cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, we find that Y. pestis containing combined deletions of YopJ and YopM induces elevated levels of IL-1β/IL-18 in vitro and in vivo and is significantly attenuated in a mouse model of bubonic plague. The reduced virulence of the YopJ-YopM mutant is dependent on the presence of IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1. Thus, we conclude that Y. pestis YopJ and YopM can both exert a tight control of host IL-1β/IL-18 production to benefit the bacteria, resulting in a redundant impact on virulence. PMID:26884330

  10. High-Speed Shaft Bearing Loads Testing and Modeling in the NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiff, B.; Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Sethuraman, L.

    2014-12-01

    Bearing failures in the high speed output stage of the gearbox are plaguing the wind turbine industry. Accordingly, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has performed an experimental and theoretical investigation of loads within these bearings. The purpose of this paper is to describe the instrumentation, calibrations, data post-processing and initial results from this testing and modeling effort. Measured HSS torque, bending, and bearing loads are related to model predictions. Of additional interest is examining if the shaft measurements can be simply related to bearing load measurements, eliminating the need for invasive modifications of the bearing races for such instrumentation.

  11. Seasonal prevalence of white plague like disease on the endemic Brazilian reef coral Mussismilia braziliensis Prevalencia estacional de la enfermedad de la plaga blanca en el coral endémico de Brasil Mussismilia braziliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Francini-Filho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reef coral Mussismilia braziliensis Verril, 1968 is endemic to the eastern Brazilian coast, representing a major reef-building species in the region. This coral is threatened by extinction due to the recent proliferation of a white-plague like (WPL disease. Despite its severe impacts, the environmental factors leading to outbreaks of WPL disease are still poorly understood. This study describes the seasonal prevalence of WPL disease on M. braziliensis in the Abrolhos Bank, on the southern coast of Bahia Brazil. In situ estimates showed that WPL disease was about 4.5 times more prevalent in summer (January 2007, mean sea surface temperature 27.4°C than in winter (July 2007, 25.0°C. This result suggests that the prevalence of WPL disease in M. braziliensis is temperature-dependent, supporting the hypothesis that warmer oceans are facilitating the proliferation of coral diseases worldwide.El coral Mussismilia braziliensis Verril, 1968 es endémico de la costa este de Brasil y representa una de las principales especies constructoras de arrecifes coralinos en dicha region. Este coral se encuentra bajo la amenaza de extincion debido la reciente propagacion de la enfermedad llamada la plaga blanca (PB. Pese los fuertes impactos, los factores ambientales responsables por epidemias de la PB aún son poco conocidos. En este estudio se describe la prevalencia estacional de la PB en M. braziliensis en el Banco de Abrolhos, ubicado en la costa sur de Bahia, Brasil. Estimaciones in situ comprueban que la prevalencia de esta molestia ha sido cerca de 4,5 veces mayor en verano (enero de 2007, temperatura media del agua superficial del mar 27,4°C, que en invierno (julio de 2007; 25,0°C. Este resultado sugiere que la prevalencia de la enfermedad PB en M. braziliensis es dependiente de la temperatura, reforzando la hipótesis de que los océanos mas cálidos estén facilitando la propagacion de enfermedades coralígenas en todo el mundo.

  12. Transparency issues still plague business in Latvia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Läti Kaubanduskoja teatel ei ole investorid rahul korruptsiooni ja läbipaistvusega Läti ärikeskkonnas. Läti valitsuselt oodatakse tõhusamaid samme majandus- ja investeerimistingimuste parandamiseks

  13. Clostridium difficile – an emerging plague

    OpenAIRE

    D. Spînu; Ovidiu Bratu; Popescu, R.; Marcu, D; A. Rădulescu; Dan Mischianu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clostridium difficile infection stands nowadays as one of the major emerging health problems still underestimated. Only in 2009 the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) was able to publish guidelines for this serious disease. Actually the guidelines were updated in 2013 so we can speak of a united action towards the resolution of this healthcare problem. Methods: This is a review article aiming to shed light in various aspects of clostridium dif...

  14. Acid rain still plaguing lakes and loons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid rain monitoring began more than two decades ago by Environment Canada and recent numbers indicate that acid levels in the inland waters barely respond to the reductions in sulphur dioxide (SO2). Under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement, both countries have committed to reduce SO2 emissions by 50 per cent over 1980 levels and to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions. Although Canada's goal for SO2 reductions was achieved in 1994, the nitrogen oxide emissions remained relatively constant. A study of 152 lakes in southeastern Canada indicated that the lakes are only 41 per cent less acidic than they were 20 years ago. The area studied is more vulnerable since it received more acid rain than any other part of the country and the granite bedrock of the Canadian Shield shows a weakness in neutralizing ability. The acidification has caused declines in the populations of fish and invertebrate which loons rely on to survive. A volunteer-based program called Canadian Lakes Loon Survey supported by Environment Canada and other partners began annual monitoring of the breeding success of loons on about 800 lakes. The results showed a decline in the proportion of successful breeding between 1981 and 1997. The decline was more pronounced where the acid level was greatest. Near Sudbury, Ontario, where the emissions of SO2 declined dramatically, invertebrates started reappearing and fish populations were successfully re-established

  15. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last updated April ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  16. Identification of rodent residues by DNA barcoding technology in plague areas%DNA条形码技术在鼠疫疫区啮齿动物残体鉴定中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安翠红; 陈宝宝; 孙养信; 范锁平; 霍丽霞

    2014-01-01

    目的 应用DNA条形码技术对陕西省鼠疫疫区啮齿动物残体进行宿主分类鉴定,分析DNA条形码技术鉴定方法的可行性.方法 收集外形经形态学鉴定的7个鼠种8个不同部位62份残体样本,提取组织中DNA,经PCR、电泳、测序及结果比对等步骤,分析线粒体细胞色素C氧化酶Ⅰ亚基(COI)基因序列.将COI基因序列利用美国国家生物技术信息中心(NCBI)运行BLAST程序进行序列同源性比较;利用邻接(NJ)法构建COI基因序列的NJ系统树.结果 除3份毛发外,足部、尾巴、皮毛、肌肉、肋骨、耳朵、眼球均扩增出COI基因,扩增产物片段的大小与预期片段的大小相近(700 bp),且条带单一.DNA测序获得了59份残体标本的COI基因,其中长爪沙鼠、黑线仓鼠、子午沙鼠、三趾跳鼠、小毛足鼠、褐家鼠、五趾跳鼠序列同源性比较显示,COI基因与对应宿主所对应的基因均具有高度的同源性(99.0%,98.1%,99.8%,98.9%,99.5%,99.1%,98.3%).NJ法显示,59份残体标本的COI基因构建出7个序列的NJ系统树,同鼠种不同标本聚为一类.结论 DNA条形码技术能够对鼠疫疫区啮齿动物残体进行物种分类鉴定,鉴定结果可靠.%Objective To identify rodent residues using DNA barcoding technology in plague areas of Shaanxi and to analyze the feasibility of DNA barcoding method.Methods DNA extraction,PCR,electrophoresis and sequence determination and alignment were used to determine the cytochrome C oxidase Ⅰ (COI) gene sequence from 62 residues of 7 species identified by morphology in 8 different parts.COI gene sequence was analyzed using BLAST software of American National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) for sequence homology comparison and the phylogenetic tree was constructed by using the neighbor joining(NJ)method of COI gene sequence.Results In addition to the hair,CO I genes of the feet,the tail,the fur,the muscle,the ribs,the ear,and the eye were

  17. 北京市土地覆盖遥感和鼠疫鼠情调查%Remote sensing of land coverage and investigation of plague risk among small mammals in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦相峰; 孙玉兰; 黎新宇; 王全意; 阿孜古丽·加帕; 李阳桦; 关增智; 王小梅; 吕燕宁; 田丽丽; 李旭; 张秀春

    2013-01-01

    Objective To map the land coverage by remote sensing, and to investigate the relationship between land coverage and the species diversity and density of small mammals in Beijing. Methods The 2009 land coverage for Beijing was provided by the M0DIS Land Cover Type product (MCD12Q1) from NASA. Small beasts were captured using the trap-at-night method during 2009-2011 for species identification and density calculation. Results According to plant functional type (PFT) scheme, the proportion of urban and construction land was 12.19%, and the proportion of cropland was 39.24%. Natural vegetation accounted for 48.27%, of which 31.28% was covered by broadleaf forests, 10.91% by shrubs, and 3.68% by coniferous forests. The area of grass was relatively small, making up only 2.40% of the total area. Eight hundred and eighty one small mammals belonging to 10 species were captured with trap-at-night method. Of which 871 (98.86%) belonged to nine species of rodents and 10 belonged to one species of insectivores. The species compositions were statistically different in three different habitats including broadleaf forest, shrub, and cropland. The dominant rodents in broadleaf forest and cropland were Niviventer confucianus and Apodemus peninsulae, whereas N. Confucianus and Rattus norvegicus were dominant in shrub. Conclusion The major hosts of plague confirmed in China could not adapt to the vegetation landscape with high proportion of trees and shrubs and low proportion of grasses in Beijing. Although the dominant rodents could be infected by Yersinia pestis, there is a small chance of natural foci of plague emerging in Beijing.%目的 了解北京市土地覆盖分类及分布,并分析土地覆盖类型与北京市鼠种和鼠密度的关系.方法 使用美国国家航空航天局(NASA)2009年中分辨率成像光谱仪(MODIS)陆地标准产品(MCD12Q1)提取北京市土地覆盖类型和比例,并在2009-2011年用夹夜法捕捉小型兽类鉴

  18. A study to investigate the prevalence of animal plague in Horqin Right Wing Front County, Inner Mongolia,2012%2012年内蒙古科尔沁右翼前旗动物鼠疫监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛双全; 郭长山; 海岩; 白乌云; 王振强

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence of animal plague in Horqin Right Front County and provide scientific bases for prevention and treatment of the disease.Methods Plague surveillance was carried out according to the requirements of National Plague Monitoring Programme at 3 monitoring points in Horqin Right Front County in 2012.Squirrel density,the number of small rats,rat fleas,pathogenic and serological surveillance of Yersinia pestis were included in the study.Results A total of 356 dauricus were captured,the average density was 0.88 rats/hm2; female and male ratio was 1 ∶ 1.31 and the female embryo rate was 96.46%.The captured 13 small nocturnal mice belonged to 2 species,which included 10 cricetulus barabensis and 3 cricetulus longicaudatus,and the capture rate of small nocturnal mouse was 4.33% (13/300).A total of 98 rat fleas were collected from 25 rats; rat flea carrying rate was 100%(25/25) and flea index was 3.92.Eighty rat burrows were detected,and flea index was 0.188.Pathogen test results were negative.Indirect hemagglutination test was used to examine 356 rat sera and 1 serum was positive.Conclusions Detection of positive rat sera has proved the existence of plague epidemic in Horqin Right Front County.Therefore,the work on plague prevention and control has a long way to go.%目的 掌握内蒙古科尔沁右翼前旗动物间鼠疫疫情,为预防控制鼠疫发生与流行提供科学依据.方法 2012年,按照《全国鼠疫监测方案》要求,在科尔沁右翼前旗3个鼠疫监测点开展鼠疫监测,包括黄鼠密度监测、野外小型鼠数量监测、鼠体寄生蚤检查、鼠疫菌病原学及血清学监测.结果 共捕获黄鼠356只,平均密度为0.88只/hm2,雌雄比例为1∶1.31,剖检雌性鼠胚胎率为96.46%.共捕获野外小型鼠2种,13只,捕获率为4.33%(13/300).其中,黑线仓鼠10只,仓鼠3只.捕获的25只活鼠均带蚤,染蚤率为100% (25/25).共检出98匹蚤,蚤指数为3.92.

  19. O controle de pragas urbanas na qualidade do alimento sob a visão da legislação federal Urban plague control in food quality according to brazilian federal legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Soares Matias

    2007-08-01

    Ordinance Law 209 that establishes the Brazilian Code of Foods. The Brazilian Governmental Decree 1428 of 26 November, 1993 from the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MS innovates the relationship of the contributory factors for food contamination presenting in the guidelines the establishment of good manufacturing practices and services rendered in the area of foods, the de-infestation that includes the sanitization plan used by an establishment. A new vision of the decisive factors of food contamination has been created, which is the control of mice and insects. This procedure integrates all the legal documents that were produced by the MS and Brazilian Ministry for Agriculture, Livestock and Supply (MAPA concerning the control of food. Even the publication of the Brazilian Governmental Decree 275/2002-MS, the control of urban plagues could be done by trained teams of establishments that carried out: production / industrialization, division, storage and transporting of industrialized food, handling, preparation, storage, distribution, transport, sale display and the delivery of food prepared for consumption, such as restaurants, buffets, sweet shops, industrial kitchens, institutional kitchens, delicatessens, snack bars, bakeries, pastry shops, restaurants, among others. Regarding its publication, the chemical control is only carried out by the PCO in accordance with the Brazilian Governmental Decree 18/2000-MS. However, this does not mean the legal responsibility of food companies has been taken away that should include in the SOP (Standardized Operational Procedure the control of pests, whether it be physical and/or chemical.

  20. [Madagascar: public health situation on the "Big Island" at the beginning of the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianarisoa, A C E; Rakotoson, J; Randretsa, M; Rakotondravelo, S; Rakotoarimanana, R D; Rakotomizao, J; Aubry, P

    2007-02-01

    The main public health issue in Madagascar at the beginning of the 21st century still involves transmissible infectious diseases including re-emerging diseases such as bubonic plague and emerging diseases such as HIV/AIDS, dengue fever and Chikungunya virus infection. Health and hygiene especially access to clean water is still poor especially in rural areas. No improvement in the public health situation with regard to malaria, schistomosomiais or cysticercosis as well as non-infectious diseases such as protein-energy malnutrition is expected within the next decade. PMID:17506269

  1. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Nanson, Jeffrey D.; Zainab Himiari; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II f...

  2. 云南省野鼠疫源地鼠疫指示动物血清F1抗体流行病学调查%Seroepidemiological survey of F1 antibody of indicator animals in wild rodents loci of plague in YunnanProvince

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁云; 陈志军; 宋志忠; 郭英; 杨智明; 吴爱国; 张福新; 张正飞; 和映天; 和伟

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study on the effect of indicator animals in plague surveillance throngh detecting F1 antibody against Yersiniapestis(Y.pestis)in indicator animals in wild rat plague foci,provide scientific evidence for plague control and determining the range of epidemic area.Methods According to investigation scheme of wild rodents plagne foci in Yunnan Province,indicator animals Canis familiarils and Felis catu(C.familiarils and F.catus)related to the plague were investigated in 75 villages,14 township and 10 counties around Yulong County,and living rodents were captured by cage,sera of indicator animals and rodents relevant to plague were simultaneously collected and detected for F1 antibody against Y.pestis using indirect hemagglutination(IHA).Results Seropositivity rate of indicator animals were 6.76%(202/2987),being 24.69% in C.familiaris and 24.69% in F.catus,there were statistical significance(X2=87.32,P<0.01)between C familiaris and F catus,the latter beingmore than the former.But F1 antibody of rodents sera were not detected,its seropositivity rate was zero.there was a statistical significance(P<0.01)between indicator animals and rodents.Conclusions Through serocpidemiological survey of indicator animals,new wild rat plague natural focus has been confirmed in YuLong County and Gucheng District in LiJiang City,therefore,serocpidemiological surveillance of indicator animals is very important for plague control and prevention.%目的 通过对云南省野鼠疫源地指示动物血清鼠疫F1抗体阳性率的调查,探讨鼠疫指示动物在鼠疫监测中的作用,为鼠疫防治和确定疫区范围提供科学依据.方法 按,在玉龙县及其周围地区共10个县所属14个乡(镇)的75个自然村,对鼠疫指示动物(犬和猫)进行调查,同时采用5 m布笼野外捕捉活鼠.取指示动物和活鼠血清,间接血凝试验OHA)法检测动物血清中的鼠疫F1抗体.结果 共采集鼠疫指示动物血清2897份,F1抗体阳性血清202

  3. Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter......Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter...

  4. Aïllament, identificació i caracterització de nematodes entomopatògens en sòls de cultius del Baix Llobregat i les muntanyes de Prades i possible utilització per al control de plagues

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Cano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Durant els últims anys s'estan realitzant nombrosos estudis sobre l'ús de nematodes com a mètode de control biològic. Mitjançant el present treball s'ha pretès realitzar un aïllament de nematodes entomopatògens en les zones de Prades i del Baix Llobregat i un cop aïllats i identificats realitzar diferents proves d'eficàcia d'aquests aïllats com mètodes de control de diferents plagues. Per dur a terme aquests assajos s'han realitzat diferents sistemes pel manteniment i producció de les pob...

  5. Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  6. Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This last volume in the series of textbooks on environmental isotopes in the hydrological cycle provides an overview of the basic principles of existing conceptual formulations of modelling approaches. While some of the concepts provided in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 are of general validity for quantitative interpretation of isotope data; the modelling methodologies commonly employed for incorporating isotope data into evaluations specifically related to groundwater systems are given in this volume together with some illustrative examples. Development of conceptual models for quantitative interpretations of isotope data in hydrogeology and the assessment of their limitations and field verification has been given priority in the research and development efforts of the IAEA during the last decade. Several Co-ordinated Research Projects on this specific topic were implemented and results published by the IAEA. Based on these efforts and contributions made by a number of scientists involved in this specific field, the IAEA has published two Technical Documents entitled ''Mathematical models and their applications to isotope studies in groundwater studies -- IAEA TECDOC-777, 1994'' and ''Manual on Mathematical models in isotope hydrogeology -- IAEA TECDOC-910, 1996''. Results of a recently completed Co-ordinated Research Project by the IAEA entitled ''Use of isotopes for analysis of flow and transport dynamics in groundwater systems'' will also soon be published by the IAEA. This is the reason why the IAEA was involved in the co-ordination required for preparation of this volume; the material presented is a condensed overview prepared by some of the scientists that were involved in the above cited IAEA activities. This volume VI providing such an overview was included into the series to make this series self-sufficient in its coverage of the field of Isotope Hydrology. A special chapter on the methodologies and concepts related to geochemical modelling in groundwater

  7. A Statistical Model Of A Heavy Quark Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A L

    1999-01-01

    An effective field approximation, similar to the Thomas- Fermi model of an atom, is proposed for studying the thermodynamic properties of a heavy quark meson within a quark-gluon plasma. The approximation for the case of an SU(2) gauge theory with central monopole and dipole point charges is shown to be plagued with singularities. For the case of SU(3) with a central core, to which the quark is confined, an approximation is developed for a high density low temperature system. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as functions of of environmental parameters and the heavy quark meson is shown to be unstable. Instability is shown to increase with increased density. QCD corrections to the model are expected to render the configuration stable for sufficiently low density and temperature.

  8. Transferable plasmid-mediated resistance to streptomycin in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiyoule, A; Gerbaud, G; Buchrieser, C; Galimand, M; Rahalison, L; Chanteau, S; Courvalin, P; Carniel, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics was reported in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar in 1997. We describe a second Y. pestis strain with high-level resistance to streptomycin, isolated from a human case of bubonic plague in Madagascar. The resistance determinants were carried by a self-transferable plasmid that could conjugate at high frequencies to other Y. pestis isolates. The plasmid and the host bacterium were different from those previously associated with multiple-drug resistance, indicating that acquisition of resistance plasmids is occurring in this bacterial species. Emergence of resistance to streptomycin in Y. pestis represents a critical public health problem since this antibiotic is used as the first-line treatment against plague in many countries. PMID:11266293

  9. Investigating the ?Trojan Horse? Mechanism of Yersinia pestis Virulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Fitch, J P

    2005-02-08

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is a Gram-negative, highly communicable, enteric bacterium that has been responsible for three historic plague pandemics. Currently, several thousand cases of plague are reported worldwide annually, and Y. pestis remains a considerable threat from a biodefense perspective. Y. pestis infection can manifest in three forms: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. Of these three forms, pneumonic plague has the highest fatality rate ({approx}100% if left untreated), the shortest intervention time ({approx}24 hours), and is highly contagious. Currently, there are no rapid, widely available vaccines for plague and though plague may be treated with antibiotics, the emergence of both naturally occurring and potentially engineered antibiotic resistant strains makes the search for more effective therapies and vaccines for plague of pressing concern. The virulence mechanism of this deadly bacterium involves induction of a Type III secretion system, a syringe-like apparatus that facilitates the injection of virulence factors, termed Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), into the host cell. These virulence factors inhibit phagocytosis and cytokine secretion, and trigger apoptosis of the host cell. Y. pestis virulence factors and the Type III secretion system are induced thermally, when the bacterium enters the mammalian host from the flea vector, and through host cell contact (or conditions of low Ca{sup 2+} in vitro). Apart from the temperature increase from 26 C to 37 C and host cell contact (or low Ca{sup 2+} conditions), other molecular mechanisms that influence virulence induction in Y. pestis are largely uncharacterized. This project focused on characterizing two novel mechanisms that regulate virulence factor induction in Y. pestis, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding and quorum sensing, using a real-time reporter system to monitor induction of virulence. Incorporating a better understanding of the mechanisms of virulence

  10. Instability in interacting dark sector: An appropriate Holographic Ricci dark energy model

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Ramon; Videla, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the consequences of phantom crossing considering the perturbative dynamics in models with interaction in their dark sector. By mean of a general study of gauge-invariant variables in comoving gauge, we relate the sources of instabilities in the structure formation process with the phantom crossing. In order to illustrate these relations and its consequences in more detail, we consider a specific case of an holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter. We find that in spite of the model is in excellent agreement with observational data at background level, however it is plagued of instabilities in its perturbative dynamics. We reconstruct the model in order to avoid these undesirable instabilities, and we show that this implies a modification of the concordance model at background. Also we find drastic changes on the parameters space in our model when instabilities are avoided.

  11. Practical Use of Computationally Frugal Model Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mary C; Kavetski, Dmitri; Clark, Martyn; Ye, Ming; Arabi, Mazdak; Lu, Dan; Foglia, Laura; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Three challenges compromise the utility of mathematical models of groundwater and other environmental systems: (1) a dizzying array of model analysis methods and metrics make it difficult to compare evaluations of model adequacy, sensitivity, and uncertainty; (2) the high computational demands of many popular model analysis methods (requiring 1000's, 10,000 s, or more model runs) make them difficult to apply to complex models; and (3) many models are plagued by unrealistic nonlinearities arising from the numerical model formulation and implementation. This study proposes a strategy to address these challenges through a careful combination of model analysis and implementation methods. In this strategy, computationally frugal model analysis methods (often requiring a few dozen parallelizable model runs) play a major role, and computationally demanding methods are used for problems where (relatively) inexpensive diagnostics suggest the frugal methods are unreliable. We also argue in favor of detecting and, where possible, eliminating unrealistic model nonlinearities-this increases the realism of the model itself and facilitates the application of frugal methods. Literature examples are used to demonstrate the use of frugal methods and associated diagnostics. We suggest that the strategy proposed in this paper would allow the environmental sciences community to achieve greater transparency and falsifiability of environmental models, and obtain greater scientific insight from ongoing and future modeling efforts. PMID:25810333

  12. Analysis of monitoring results on plague's host animal and its medium insects in Quanzhou city of Fujian province between 2000 and 2009%2000-2009年福建省泉州市鼠疫宿主动物及媒介昆虫监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锋平; 王伟明; 杨德林; 张庆虎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the composition and distribution of animal reservoir of plague in Quanzhou city, Fujian province, and so as to accumulate basic data for making the plague prevention and control measures. Methods Rodents were captured by cages in six monitoring spots of Quanzhou city between 2000 and 2009. Then rodents and flea species were identified. Rats liver and spleen homogenates were detected of plague F1 antigen by reverse indirect hemagglutination test (RIHA); rats serum were detected of plague F1 antibody by indirect hemagglutination test (IHA). Results A total of 26 264 rodents were captured between 2000 and 2009.Rattus norvegicus and Rattus flavipectus were dominant species, which were accounted for 45.97% (12 074/26 264)and 32.01%(8407/26 264), respectively. The account of Rattus flavipectus captured between 2005 and 2009 was (26.99 ± 2.46)% and (37.03 ± 3.79)% between 2000 and 2004. The difference was statistically significant (t =4.97, P < 0.05). Total rodent densities was (6.86 ± 1.44)%, including(5.36 ± 1.83)% in mountains and (6.81 ±1.66)% in coastal areas, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant(t =1.01, P > 0.05). Total flea index and flea infection rate of rodents were 1.39 ± 0.34 and (35.90 ± 5.34)%, respectively. Xenopsylla Cheopis index was 1.20 and free flea index was 0.009. Flea infection rate was (32.36 ± 0.96)% between 2005 and 2009, which was lower than (39.44 ± 0.39)% between 2000 and 2004(t =2.76, P < 0.05). Conclusions The major rodent species found in Quanzhou city is Rattus norvegicus. Xenopsylla Cheopis is the dominant flea species.Spreading of plague among Rattus is not found.%目的 了解福建省泉州市鼠疫宿主动物及媒介的种群构成及数量分布情况,为鼠疫防治工作积累基础资料。方法 2000 - 2009年在泉州市6个监测点采用笼日法捕鼠,并对捕获鼠类及检获蚤类进行鉴定;取鼠肝和脾匀浆,采用反

  13. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo J Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specifically, we addressed two fundamental questions: (1 do the bacteria encounter barriers in disseminating to draining lymph nodes (LN, and (2 what mechanism does this nonmotile bacterium use to reach the LN compartment, as the prevailing model predicts trafficking in association with host cells. Infection was followed through microscopy imaging in addition to assessing bacterial population dynamics during dissemination from the skin. We found and characterized an unexpected bottleneck that severely restricts bacterial dissemination to LNs. The bacteria that do not pass through this bottleneck are confined to the skin, where large numbers of neutrophils arrive and efficiently control bacterial proliferation. Notably, bottleneck formation is route dependent, as it is abrogated after subcutaneous inoculation. Using a combination of approaches, including microscopy imaging, we tested the prevailing model of bacterial dissemination from the skin into LNs and found no evidence of involvement of migrating phagocytes in dissemination. Thus, early stages of infection are defined by a bottleneck that restricts bacterial dissemination and by neutrophil-dependent control of bacterial proliferation in the skin. Furthermore, and as opposed to current models, our data indicate an intracellular stage is not required by Y. pestis to disseminate from the skin to draining LNs. Because our findings address events that occur during early encounters of pathogen with the immune response

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of a supersymmetric matrix model of dynamical compactification in non perturbative string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, K.; Azuma, T.; Nishimura, J.

    The IKKT or IIB matrix model has been postulated to be a non perturbative definition of superstring theory. It has the attractive feature that spacetime is dynamically generated, which makes possible the scenario of dynamical compactification of extra dimensions, which in the Euclidean model manifests by spontaneously breaking the SO(10) rotational invariance (SSB). In this work we study using Monte Carlo simulations the 6 dimensional version of the Euclidean IIB matrix model. Simulations are found to be plagued by a strong complex action problem and the factorization method is used for effective sampling and computing expectation values of the extent of spacetime in various dimensions. Our results are consistent with calculations using the Gaussian Expansion method which predict SSB to SO(3) symmetric vacua, a finite universal extent of the compactified dimensions and finite spacetime volume.

  15. Modeling Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Pierre-Alain; Fondement, Frédéric; Baudry, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Model-driven engineering and model-based approaches have permeated all branches of software engineering; to the point that it seems that we are using models, as Molière's Monsieur Jourdain was using prose, without knowing it. At the heart of modeling, there is a relation that we establish to represent something by something else. In this paper we review various definitions of models and relations between them. Then, we define a canonical set of relations that can be used to express various ki...

  16. 鼠疫、布氏菌、炭疽活疫苗浓度测定通用参考品的研制%Preparation of universal national reference materials for determining the concentrations of plague, brucellosis and anthrax vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏东; 尤明强; 裴明玉; 庄新海; 翟雷; 魏然; 王国治; 李恪梅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish a universal national reference materials for determining the concentrations of plague, brucellosis and anthrax vaccine. Methods Firstly, absorbance of universal national reference materials were established. Secondly, correlation between absorbance of universal national reference materials and concentrations ofthreekinds of vaccine was studied using respective national reference material. The universal references were prepared. The stability of the references was tested by measuring absorbance. Finally, the universal reference materials were compared with old reference materials by three professional laboratories. Results Absorbance of universal national reference materials were 0.350, 0.494 and 0.665. The relationship between absorbance of universal national reference materials and the concentrations ofthreekinds of vaccine was determined. Reference materials were successfully established. The reference materials stored at 4℃ were stable. By measuring three batches of each vaccine with two kinds of reference materials, the result errors were less than 2.0%. Conclusion A set of universal national reference materials for determining the concentrations of plague, brucellosis and anthrax vaccine is established.%目的将现用鼠疫、布氏菌、炭疽活疫苗3套浓度测定参考品整合成一套通用参考品。  方法确定通用参考品吸光度值,从3套鼠疫、布氏菌及炭疽疫苗浓度测定用参考品共9个浓度中选取代表性3个浓度参考品;利用现用3种活疫苗浓度测定用参考品的线性方程,计算通用参考品所代表各种疫苗的浓度;制备参考品并进行质量控制;观察参考品的长期稳定性;组织3个实验室进行协作验证。  结果确定通用参考品吸光度值为0.350、0.494、0.665;确定通用参考品所代表各种疫苗浓度;完成通用参考品的制备,各项检定符合规定;对4℃冷藏保存参考品进

  17. Epidemic Modelling by Ripple-Spreading Network and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical analysis and modelling is central to infectious disease epidemiology. This paper, inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, proposes a novel ripple-spreading network model for the study of infectious disease transmission. The new epidemic model naturally has good potential for capturing many spatial and temporal features observed in the outbreak of plagues. In particular, using a stochastic ripple-spreading process simulates the effect of random contacts and movements of individuals on the probability of infection well, which is usually a challenging issue in epidemic modeling. Some ripple-spreading related parameters such as threshold and amplifying factor of nodes are ideal to describe the importance of individuals’ physical fitness and immunity. The new model is rich in parameters to incorporate many real factors such as public health service and policies, and it is highly flexible to modifications. A genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of the model by referring to historic data of an epidemic. The well-tuned model can then be used for analyzing and forecasting purposes. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by simulation results.

  18. Modeling Modeling Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Pierre-Alain; Fondement, Frédéric; Baudry, Benoit; Combemale, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Model-driven engineering and model-based approaches have permeated all branches of software engineering to the point that it seems that we are using models, as Molière's Monsieur Jourdain was using prose, without knowing it. At the heart of modeling, there is a relation that we establish to represent something by something else. In this paper we review various definitions of models and relations between them. Then, we define a canonical set of relations that can be used to express various kin...

  19. Surface Vacuum Energy in Cutoff Models: Pressure Anomaly and Distributional Gravitational Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ricardo; Mera, Fernando D

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum-energy calculations with ideal reflecting boundaries are plagued by boundary divergences, which presumably correspond to real (but finite) physical effects occurring near the boundary. Our working hypothesis is that the stress tensor for idealized boundary conditions with some finite cutoff should be a reasonable ad hoc model for the true situation. The theory will have a sensible renormalized limit when the cutoff is taken away; this requires making sense of the Einstein equation with a distributional source. Calculations with the standard ultraviolet cutoff reveal an inconsistency between energy and pressure similar to the one that arises in noncovariant regularizations of cosmological vacuum energy. The problem disappears, however, if the cutoff is a spatial point separation in a "neutral" direction parallel to the boundary. Here we demonstrate these claims in detail, first for a single flat reflecting wall intersected by a test boundary, then more rigorously for a region of finite cross section sur...

  20. NASA and USGS invest in invasive species modeling to evaluate habitat for Africanized Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Invasive non-native species, such as plants, animals, and pathogens, have long been an interest to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA. Invasive species cause harm to our economy (around $120 B/year), the environment (e.g., replacing native biodiversity, forest pathogens negatively affecting carbon storage), and human health (e.g., plague, West Nile virus). Five years ago, the USGS and NASA formed a partnership to improve ecological forecasting capabilities for the early detection and containment of the highest priority invasive species. Scientists from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Fort Collins Science Center developed a longterm strategy to integrate remote sensing capabilities, high-performance computing capabilities and new spatial modeling techniques to advance the science of ecological invasions [Schnase et al., 2002].

  1. Plasmid composition and virulence-associated factors of Yersinia pestis isolates from a plague outbreak at the Paraíba State, Brazil Composição plasmidial e fatores associados à virulência em cepas de Yersinia pestis de um surto de peste no Estado da Paraíba, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilma Cintra Leal

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Yersinia pestis isolates were collected during a plague outbreak at the Paraiba State in 1986. The Y. pestis isolates were investigated for the presence of virulence-associated factors and plasmid content. All strains analysed were proficient in the expression of the VW and fraction 1 antigens, pigment adsorption and pesticin-fibronolysin-coagulase production. A similar plasmid profile composed by four plasmid with molecular weight of 60, 44, 14.9, and 6.4 Megadaltons (MD was found in all strains. DNA cleavage with EcoRI restriction enzyme further demonstrated the uniform plasmid content of the Y. pestis isolates. Seven additional Y. pestis strains, previously isolated in the same region but in an endemic state, showed the same plasmid fingerprint. The lack of any detectable difference between epidemic and endemic isolates as well as the value of plasmid fingerprints in epidemiology of Y. pestis is discussed.Cepas patogênicas de Yersinia pestis foram coletadas durante um surto de peste no Estado da Paraíba em 1986. Os isolados de Y. pestis foram analisados quanto a presença de fatores associados à virulência e conteúdo plasmidial. Todas as linhagens analisadas foram proficientes na expressão dos antígenos VW e fração 1, além de possuírem capacidade de adsorção de pigmentos e produção de pesticina-fibrinolisina-coagulase. Um perfil plasmidial semelhante composto por quatro plasmídeos com peso molecular de 60, 44, 14.9, e 6.4 MD foi encontrado em todas as linhagens. A clivagem do DNA plasmidial com a enzima de restrição EcoRI demonstrou o conteúdo plasmidial uniforme dos isolados de Y. pestis. Sete outras linhagens de Y. pestis, isoladas previamente no mesmo local mas em condição endêmica, mostraram o mesmo perfil plasmidial. A falta de diferenças entre os isolados epidêmicos e endêmicos assim como o uso do perfil plasmidial na epidemiologic de Y. pestis e discutida.

  2. Discussion of shanghanlun Chapter Han at Critical Disease Plague,Medical Star was Born Informed Opinion——Shanghan Zabing Lun Birth%伤寒评论话:第1章 汉祚岌岌病疫疠,医星冉冉诞宏论——《伤寒杂病论》的诞生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁华龙

    2012-01-01

    目的:用普通人也能读懂的白话文阐述《伤寒论》成书的历史文化背景、学术渊源风貌、版本流传情况.方法:从东汉末年的社会、自然条件和张仲景家族兴衰及其个人习医、诊治经历等方面入手,参阅《汉书》及《伤寒论序》,以通俗的语言概述《伤寒论》的诞生过程.结果:《黄帝内经》《难经》《汤液经》《易经》等先哲们的理论成果、特殊的时代背景和疫疠流行等严峻现实、张仲景丰厚的临证经验及高尚的道德观念促成了《伤寒论》的诞生.结论:《伤寒论》是一部集理、法、方、药、护为一体的中医学经典著作,对中医理论发展和临证诊治有着重要指导作用.%Objective:Ordinary people can understand the historical and cultural background academic style vernacular the book of version of the spread of treatise on Febrile Diseases. Methods; From the late Eastern Han Dynasty society, natural condition and the Zhang Zhongjing family prosperity and individual to study medicine, diagnosis and treatment experience of aspects, refer to the "Han" and "Treatise on order" ,with Popular Language Overview "Treatise on the" birth process. Results;Huangdineijing Nanjing,tangyijing, yi-jing philosophers theories,special time background and plague epidemic and grim reality,Zhang Zhongjing rich clinical experience and high moral values contributed to the birth of treatise on Febrile. Conclusion-.Treatise on Febrile is a collection of science, law, medicine, nursing,as one of the traditional Chinese Medicine Classics,on the development of TCM theory and clinical treatment has an important role in guiding.

  3. A curve of thresholds governs plague epizootics in Central Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijniers, Jonas; Davis, Stephen; Begon, Mike;

    2012-01-01

    A core concept of infectious disease epidemiology is the abundance threshold, below which an infection is unable to invade or persist. There have been contrasting theoretical predictions regarding the nature of this threshold for vector-borne diseases, but for infections with an invertebrate vector...

  4. In Russia, Corruption Plagues the Higher-Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    From the top down, says the writer, Russia's universities are impoverished by bribery and insider deals large and small. A new president's dorm at Nizhniy Novgorod is one example of what anti-corruption watchdogs say is widespread mismanagement, and in some cases outright corruption, throughout the country's higher-education system. Presidents use…

  5. Does MFN Free Riding Plague the Information Technology Agreement?

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Information Technology Agreement (ITA), enacted in 1997 as one of a few World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements realized after the Uruguay Round, lifted tariffs on a broad range of IT products such as telecommunication equipment and computers. As part of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/WTO system, the ITA is built on the most-favored nation (MFN) principle. However, since participation is not mandatory, any WTO member country can potentially free ride on the agreement....

  6. Can we protect ourselves from the virus plague?

    OpenAIRE

    Abba, Laura; Buzzi, Marina

    2002-01-01

    Network communications represent an easy means for the soread viruses. Internet uses are constantly threatened by the spread of new viruses hidden in applealing objects such as jokes, games, chats, and e-mails ostensibly sent by friends. Although e-mail and www systems represent the main "open doors", floppy and CD disk are still minor "contributors". The damage provoked by infections can be very costrly for an organization's time and resources and can become critical when it affects sensitiv...

  7. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H;

    2008-01-01

    is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious......-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in badgers (Meles meles)....

  8. SARS plague: duty of care or medical heroism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Dessmon Y H

    2006-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new infectious disease that emerged in mid- November 2002 in Guangdong, southern China. The global pandemic began in late February 2003 in Hong Kong. By the time SARS was declared contained on 5 July 2003 by the World Health Organization (WHO), it had afflicted 8096 patients in 29 countries. No other disease had had such a phenomenal impact on healthcare workers (HCWs), who formed about 21% of SARS patients. In Vietnam, Canada and Singapore, HCWs accounted for 57%, 43% and 41% of SAR patients, respectively. At the beginning of the outbreak, there was practically no information on this disease, which did not even have a name until 16 March 2003, except that it was infectious and could result in potentially fatal respiratory failure. Indeed, HCWs had lost their lives to SARS. Understandably, some HCWs refused to look after SARS patients or even resigned. Initially, much negative publicity was given to such HCWs. It was a very trying time for HCWs as many were also ostracised by the society which they served. They were perceived to be a potential source of infection in the community because of their contact with SARS patients, whom they risked their lives looking after. Subsequently, as we learnt more about the disease and educated the public about the plight of the frontline HCWs, the public gave the frontline HCWs tremendous support and even honoured them as heroes. Being in the medical profession, caring for patients is one of our expected responsibilities. On the other hand, as public citizens, HCWs have the right to resign when they feel that their responsibility to their families should take priority over that to their patients. As a result of this scourge, each HCW learnt to decide if caring for patients is their chosen profession and vocation. Many chose to live up the Hippocratic oath. PMID:16830007

  9. Torture--a plague to the world-society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genefke, I; Marcussen, H; Rasmussen, O V

    2000-06-01

    In this article the authors discussed about government-sanctioned torture, methods of torture, diagnosis of torture along with its modern history, the effect of torture, post-traumatic stress disorder in torture survivors, prevention of torture, impunity and entered into their conclusion based upon more than 20 years of professional medical and psychological work against torture. PMID:11002638

  10. Workaholism: Praised or the Plague of School Administrators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Workaholism is defined as an obsessive-compulsive disorder that manifests itself through self-imposed demands, an inability to regulate work habits and an over indulgence in work to the exclusion of normal life activities. The term is similar to alcoholism because the two addictions are believed to have common behavior patterns. The subject of…

  11. Beyond simple linear mixing models: process-based isotope partitioning of ecological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Kiona; Tucker, Colin; Cable, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes are valuable tools for partitioning the components contributing to ecological processes of interest, such as animal diets and trophic interactions, plant resource use, ecosystem gas fluxes, streamflow, and many more. Stable isotope data are often analyzed with simple linear mixing (SLM) models to partition the contributions of different sources, but SLM models cannot incorporate a mechanistic understanding of the underlying processes and do not accommodate additional data associated with these processes (e.g., environmental covariates, flux data, gut contents). Thus, SLM models lack predictive ability. We describe a process-based mixing (PBM) model approach for integrating stable isotopes, other data sources, and process models to partition different sources or process components. This is accomplished via a hierarchical Bayesian framework that quantifies multiple sources of uncertainty and enables the incorporation of process models and prior information to help constrain the source-specific proportional contributions, thereby potentially avoiding identifiability issues that plague SLM models applied to "too many" sources. We discuss the application of the PBM model framework to three diverse examples: temporal and spatial partitioning of streamflow, estimation of plant rooting profiles and water uptake profiles (or water sources) with extension to partitioning soil and ecosystem CO2 fluxes, and reconstructing animal diets. These examples illustrate the advantages of the PBM modeling approach, which facilitates incorporation of ecological theory and diverse sources of information into the mixing model framework, thus enabling one to partition key process components across time and space. PMID:24640543

  12. Plane answers to complex questions the theory of linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    This book was written to rigorously illustrate the practical application of the projective approach to linear models. To some, this may seem contradictory. I contend that it is possible to be both rigorous and illustrative and that it is possible to use the projective approach in practical applications. Therefore, unlike many other books on linear models, the use of projections and sub­ spaces does not stop after the general theory. They are used wherever I could figure out how to do it. Solving normal equations and using calculus (outside of maximum likelihood theory) are anathema to me. This is because I do not believe that they contribute to the understanding of linear models. I have similar feelings about the use of side conditions. Such topics are mentioned when appropriate and thenceforward avoided like the plague. On the other side of the coin, I just as strenuously reject teaching linear models with a coordinate free approach. Although Joe Eaton assures me that the issues in complicated problems freq...

  13. Understanding the Effects of Sampling on Healthcare Risk Modeling for the Prediction of Future High-Cost Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moturu, Sai T.; Liu, Huan; Johnson, William G.

    Rapidly rising healthcare costs represent one of the major issues plaguing the healthcare system. Data from the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, Arizona's Medicaid program provide a unique opportunity to exploit state-of-the-art machine learning and data mining algorithms to analyze data and provide actionable findings that can aid cost containment. Our work addresses specific challenges in this real-life healthcare application with respect to data imbalance in the process of building predictive risk models for forecasting high-cost patients. We survey the literature and propose novel data mining approaches customized for this compelling application with specific focus on non-random sampling. Our empirical study indicates that the proposed approach is highly effective and can benefit further research on cost containment in the healthcare industry.

  14. A History of Urban Planning and Infectious Diseases: Colonial Senegal in the Early Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liora Bigon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the spatial implications of the French sanitary policies in early colonial urban Senegal. It focuses on the French politics of residential segregation following the outbreak of the bubonic plague in Dakar in 1914, and their precedents in Saint Louis. These policies can be conceived as most dramatic, resulting in a displacement of a considerable portion of the indigenous population, who did not want or could not afford to build à l’européen, to the margins of the colonial city. Aspects of residential segregation are analysed here through the perspective of cultural history and history of colonial planning and architecture, in contrast to the existing literature on this topic. The latter dilates on the statutory policies of the colonial authorities facing the 1914 plague in Dakar, the plague's sociopolitical implications, and the colonial politics of public health there. In the light of relevant historiography, and a variety of secondary and primary sources, this paper exposes the contradictions that were inherent in the French colonial regime in West Africa. These contradictions were wisely used by the African agency, so that such a seemingly urgent segregationist project was actually never accomplished.

  15. [Indigenous medical assistance in Madagascar (1898-1950)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, J; Mafart, B; Triaud, J L

    2003-01-01

    The foundations of local health services in Madagascar were laid when the island was taken over by the French in 1896. Medical care was a major priority for the first colonial governor named General Galliéni. Local health services expanded greatly from 1896 to 1950 thanks notably to institutions such as the Tananarive Medical School and Pasteur Institute. These services played a crucial role in the fight against smallpox and bubonic plague. However they were also used for political purposes by both colonial and independent governments. In sum the history of local health services in Madagascar can be described as a battle between political power and scientific knowledge. The overall result is positive for some and controversial for others. PMID:12891743

  16. Las sombras de la política sanitaria durante el peronismo: Los brotes epidémicos en Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramacciotti, Karina Inés

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the social and political consequences brought on by the emergence of bubonic plague, smallpox, and poliomyelitis in the city of Buenos Aires during the Peronist decade. The different strategies used to limit the political impact of these diseases changed the direction of public health policy and modified the governmental agendas.

    Este artículo revisará las consecuencias sociales y políticas que trajo el surgimiento de la peste bubónica, la viruela y la poliomielitis en la ciudad de Buenos Aires durante la década peronista. Las diferentes estrategias utilizadas para limitar el impacto político de estas enfermedades generaron cambios de rumbos en la política sanitaria y modificaciones en las agendas gubernamentales.

  17. Remote sensing and geographic information systems in the spatial temporal dynamics modeling of infectious diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG; Peng

    2006-01-01

    Similar to species immigration or exotic species invasion, infectious disease transmission is strengthened due to the globalization of human activities. Using schistosomiasis as an example, we propose a conceptual model simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases. We base the model on the knowledge of the interrelationship among the source, media, and the hosts of the disease. With the endemics data of schistosomiasis in Xichang, China, we demonstrate that the conceptual model is feasible; we introduce how remote sensing and geographic information systems techniques can be used in support of spatio-temporal modeling; we compare the different effects caused to the entire population when selecting different groups of people for schistosomiasis control. Our work illustrates the importance of such a modeling tool in supporting spatial decisions. Our modeling method can be directly applied to such infectious diseases as the plague, lyme disease, and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The application of remote sensing and geographic information systems can shed light on the modeling of other infectious disease and invasive species studies.

  18. Adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian transport models: Theory and idealised test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Hyder Ali Muttaqi; Heemink, Arnold Willem; Gräwe, Ulf; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2013-08-01

    Random walk simulations have an excellent potential in marine and oceanic modelling. This is essentially due to their relative simplicity and their ability to represent advective transport without being plagued by the deficiencies of the Eulerian methods. The physical and mathematical foundations of random walk modelling of turbulent diffusion have become solid over the years. Random walk models rest on the theory of stochastic differential equations. Unfortunately, the latter and the related numerical aspects have not attracted much attention in the oceanic modelling community. The main goal of this paper is to help bridge the gap by developing an efficient adaptive time stepping algorithm for random walk models. Its performance is examined on two idealised test cases of turbulent dispersion; (i) pycnocline crossing and (ii) non-flat isopycnal diffusion, which are inspired by shallow-sea dynamics and large-scale ocean transport processes, respectively. The numerical results of the adaptive time stepping algorithm are compared with the fixed-time increment Milstein scheme, showing that the adaptive time stepping algorithm for Lagrangian random walk models is more efficient than its fixed step-size counterpart without any loss in accuracy.

  19. Incidência de pragas e doenças em agroecossistemas de café orgânico de agricultores familiares em Poço Fundo-MG Incidence of plagues and diseases in agroecossystems of organic coffee of familiar farmers in Poço Fundo-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Martins

    2004-12-01

    2002, de 2.010 Kg ha-1.Having as an aim the determination of insect plagues, Leucoptera coffeella (GUÉRIN-MENÉVILLE, 1842 and Hypothenemus hampei (FERRARI, 1867 and diseases incidence Hemileia vastatrix (BERK e BROOME, 1869 and Cercospora coffeicola (BERK e CURTIS, 1880 during the period from January of 2001 to December of 2002, three agroecosystems with production of organic coffee conducted by familiar farmers of the city of Poço Fundo-MG were selected. The agroecosystem I possesses 2.200 plants of the cultivar 'Red Catuai' spaced 2,5 x 1,3 m (0,72 ha. The agroecosystem II has 2.000 plants ('Red Catuai' spaced 2,8 x 1,0 m (0,56 ha. The agroecosystem III possesses 1.100 feet ('Yellow Icatu' spaced 3,0 x 0,9 m (0,36 ha. The determination of the incidence of L. coffeella, C. coffeicola and H. vastatrix was accomplished starting from monthly surveys. The determination of the infection for C. coffeicola in fruits was accomplished in the months of April, May and June of 2001 and 2002. The survey of the infestation by H. hampei was accomplished from January to June/July of each year. It was determined that the infestation by L. coffeella has reached over 20% in the upper third (mainly during the dry period. The infestation by H. hampei has reached the damage level only in the agroecosystem I on 2001 and agroecosystem III on 2002. The infection by H. vastatrix in the agroecosystem III did not reach the damage level due to the tolerance of the cultivar ('Yellow Icatu' to the infection by this fungus, however, the agroecosystem I and II ('Red Catuai' the infection in the field exceeded 10% (dry period. The infection by C. coffeicola in leaves and fruits reached high levels (dry period. The productivity of the agroecosystem I was 510 Kg ha-1 on 2001 and 2.340 Kg ha-1 on 2002, in the agroecosystem II, it was 420 Kg ha-1 on 2001 and 1.290 Kg ha-1 on 2002, and in the agroecosystem III, it was practically zero on 2001 and 2.010 Kg ha-1 on 2002.

  20. Towards Complete, Geo-Referenced 3d Models from Crowd-Sourced Amateur Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W.; Havlena, M.; Schindler, K.

    2016-06-01

    Despite a lot of recent research, photogrammetric reconstruction from crowd-sourced imagery is plagued by a number of recurrent problems. (i) The resulting models are chronically incomplete, because even touristic landmarks are photographed mostly from a few "canonical" viewpoints. (ii) Man-made constructions tend to exhibit repetitive structure and rotational symmetries, which lead to gross errors in the 3D reconstruction and aggravate the problem of incomplete reconstruction. (iii) The models are normally not geo-referenced. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using sparse GNSS geo-tags from digital cameras to address these issues and push the boundaries of crowd-sourced photogrammetry. A small proportion of the images in Internet collections (≍ 10 %) do possess geo-tags. While the individual geo-tags are very inaccurate, they nevertheless can help to address the problems above. By providing approximate geo-reference for partial reconstructions they make it possible to fuse those pieces into more complete models; the capability to fuse partial reconstruction opens up the possibility to be more restrictive in the matching phase and avoid errors due to repetitive structure; and collectively, the redundant set of low-quality geo-tags can provide reasonably accurate absolute geo-reference. We show that even few, noisy geo-tags can help to improve architectural models, compared to puristic structure-from-motion only based on image correspondence.

  1. About the Properties of a Modified Generalized Beverton-Holt Equation in Ecology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. De La Sen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of a generalized modified version of the well-known Beverton-Holt equation in ecology. The proposed model describes the population evolution of some species in a certain habitat driven by six parametrical sequences, namely, the intrinsic growth rate (associated with the reproduction capability, the degree of sympathy of the species with the habitat (described by a so-called environment carrying capacity, a penalty term to deal with overpopulation levels, the harvesting (fishing or hunting regulatory quota, or related to use of pesticides when fighting damaging plagues, and the independent consumption which basically quantifies predation. The independent consumption is considered as a part of a more general additive disturbance which also potentially includes another extra additive disturbance term which might be attributed to net migration from or to the habitat or modeling measuring errors. Both potential contributions are included for generalization purposes in the proposed modified generalized Beverton-Holt equation. The properties of stability and boundedness of the solution sequences, equilibrium points of the stationary model, and the existence of oscillatory solution sequences are investigated. A numerical example for a population of aphids is investigated with the theoretical tools developed in the paper.

  2. Modeling Model Slicers

    OpenAIRE

    Blouin A.; Combemale B.; Baudry B.; Beaudoux O.

    2011-01-01

    International audience Among model comprehension tools, model slicers are tools that extract a subset from a model, for a specific purpose. Model slicers are tools that let modelers rapidly gather relevant knowledge from large models. However, existing slicers are dedicated to one modeling language. This is an issue when we observe that new domain specific modeling languages (DSMLs), for which we want slicing abilities, are created almost on a daily basis. This paper proposes the Kompren l...

  3. Emulating Multiple Inheritance in Fortran 2003/2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Morris

    2015-01-01

    in Fortran 2003. The design unleashes the power of the associated class relationships for modeling complicated data structures yet avoids the ambiguities that plague some multiple inheritance scenarios.

  4. Deriving a model for influenza epidemics from historical data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia

    2011-09-01

    In this report we describe how we create a model for influenza epidemics from historical data collected from both civilian and military societies. We derive the model when the population of the society is unknown but the size of the epidemic is known. Our interest lies in estimating a time-dependent infection rate to within a multiplicative constant. The model form fitted is chosen for its similarity to published models for HIV and plague, enabling application of Bayesian techniques to discriminate among infectious agents during an emerging epidemic. We have developed models for the progression of influenza in human populations. The model is framed as a integral, and predicts the number of people who exhibit symptoms and seek care over a given time-period. The start and end of the time period form the limits of integration. The disease progression model, in turn, contains parameterized models for the incubation period and a time-dependent infection rate. The incubation period model is obtained from literature, and the parameters of the infection rate are fitted from historical data including both military and civilian populations. The calibrated infection rate models display a marked difference in which the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic differed from the influenza seasons in the US between 2001-2008 and the progression of H1N1 in Catalunya, Spain. The data for the 1918 pandemic was obtained from military populations, while the rest are country-wide or province-wide data from the twenty-first century. We see that the initial growth of infection in all cases were about the same; however, military populations were able to control the epidemic much faster i.e., the decay of the infection-rate curve is much higher. It is not clear whether this was because of the much higher level of organization present in a military society or the seriousness with which the 1918 pandemic was addressed. Each outbreak to which the influenza model was fitted yields a separate set of

  5. [History of human epidemic and endemic diseases in the southwest Indian Ocean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaüzère, B-A; Aubry, P

    2013-05-01

    Smallpox has been known in the Mascarene Islands since 1729, and in 1898, the vaccinogenic and anti-rabies Institute of Tananarive, the future Pasteur Institute of Madagascar, was created to combat it. Cholera first arrived in the Mascarenes in 1819, but did not affect the Comoros Islands and Madagascar until the current pandemic. Bubonic plague has beset the ports of Madagascar and the Mascarenes since 1898. Girard and Robic developed the anti-plague vaccine in 1931 at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar. The Mascarenes lost their reputation as Eden when malaria arrived in 1841, and this disease remains prominent in Madagascar and Comoros. Leprosy has been known in La Réunion since 1726 and is still very present in Mayotte, Anjouan, and Madagascar. Leptospirosis is a public health problem, except in Madagascar and the Comoros. Dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever are also present. HIV/AIDS is not a major concern, except in Mauritius, where it was spread by injection drug use, in the Seychelles and in Madagascar's largest cities. Madagascar is the principal site worldwide of chromoblastomycosis, first described there in 1914. PMID:23797833

  6. Bayesian Fundamentalism or Enlightenment? On the explanatory status and theoretical contributions of Bayesian models of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matt; Love, Bradley C

    2011-08-01

    The prominence of Bayesian modeling of cognition has increased recently largely because of mathematical advances in specifying and deriving predictions from complex probabilistic models. Much of this research aims to demonstrate that cognitive behavior can be explained from rational principles alone, without recourse to psychological or neurological processes and representations. We note commonalities between this rational approach and other movements in psychology - namely, Behaviorism and evolutionary psychology - that set aside mechanistic explanations or make use of optimality assumptions. Through these comparisons, we identify a number of challenges that limit the rational program's potential contribution to psychological theory. Specifically, rational Bayesian models are significantly unconstrained, both because they are uninformed by a wide range of process-level data and because their assumptions about the environment are generally not grounded in empirical measurement. The psychological implications of most Bayesian models are also unclear. Bayesian inference itself is conceptually trivial, but strong assumptions are often embedded in the hypothesis sets and the approximation algorithms used to derive model predictions, without a clear delineation between psychological commitments and implementational details. Comparing multiple Bayesian models of the same task is rare, as is the realization that many Bayesian models recapitulate existing (mechanistic level) theories. Despite the expressive power of current Bayesian models, we argue they must be developed in conjunction with mechanistic considerations to offer substantive explanations of cognition. We lay out several means for such an integration, which take into account the representations on which Bayesian inference operates, as well as the algorithms and heuristics that carry it out. We argue this unification will better facilitate lasting contributions to psychological theory, avoiding the pitfalls

  7. Modeling Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Onatski, Alexei; Williams, Noah

    2003-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in studying monetary policy under model uncertainty. We develop methods to analyze different sources of uncertainty in one coherent structure useful for policy decisions. We show how to estimate the size of the uncertainty based on time series data, and incorporate this uncertainty in policy optimization. We propose two different approaches to modeling model uncertainty. The first is model error modeling, which imposes additional structure on the errors o...

  8. Characterization of errors in a coupled snow hydrology-microwave emission model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, K.M.; Liang, D.; Tsang, L.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the direct estimation of snow properties from passive microwave remote sensing have been plagued by limitations such as the tendency of estimates to saturate for moderately deep snowpacks and the effects of mixed land cover within remotely sensed pixels. An alternative approach is to assimilate satellite microwave emission observations directly, which requires embedding an accurate microwave emissions model into a hydrologic prediction scheme, as well as quantitative information of model and observation errors. In this study a coupled snow hydrology [Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC)] and microwave emission [Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT)] model are evaluated using multiscale brightness temperature (TB) measurements from the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). The ability of VIC to reproduce snowpack properties is shown with the use of snow pit measurements, while TB model predictions are evaluated through comparison with Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR), air-craft [Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)], and satellite [Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E)] TB measurements. Limitations of the model at the point scale were not as evident when comparing areal estimates. The coupled model was able to reproduce the TB spatial patterns observed by PSR in two of three sites. However, this was mostly due to the presence of relatively dense forest cover. An interesting result occurs when examining the spatial scaling behavior of the higher-resolution errors; the satellite-scale error is well approximated by the mode of the (spatial) histogram of errors at the smaller scale. In addition, TB prediction errors were almost invariant when aggregated to the satellite scale, while forest-cover fractions greater than 30% had a significant effect on TB predictions. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  9. A Model for Spam Prevention in IP Telephony Networks using Anonymous Verifying Authorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Shukla

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Unsolicited emails, more commonly known as spam, have plagued the use and efficiency of email since its inception. With the introduction of ungoverned cheap voice communications, such as IP telephony, spam over telephony (SPIT and its prevention is set to dominate and drive whether the technology is widely adopted or not. A possible example of voice spam schemes includes the use of Interactive Voice Response (IVR systems in conjunction with automated telemarketing sales to repeatedly initiate call setups and fill voicemail boxes. The problem faced is to design a system that allows legitimate voice call establishment while anonymously blocking unwelcome ones. An anonymous approach prevents voice spam by prohibiting spammers from establishing call and do not call lists. In this paper we propose a new model as an extension to a call signalling phase (or call setup phase as a means to prevent unwanted voice spam. In doing so we define a IP telephony “call me back” scheme using an Anonymous Verifying Authority (AVA and Mediator in blocking unsolicited voice calls. We illustrate the use of a “call me back” request in allowing the callee to accept or reject the call. Verification may be based on the callee’s personal call policy thus filtering unsolicited voice spam.

  10. Climate change induced transformations of agricultural systems: insights from a global model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change might impact crop yields considerably and anticipated transformations of agricultural systems are needed in the coming decades to sustain affordable food provision. However, decision-making on transformational shifts in agricultural systems is plagued by uncertainties concerning the nature and geography of climate change, its impacts, and adequate responses. Locking agricultural systems into inadequate transformations costly to adjust is a significant risk and this acts as an incentive to delay action. It is crucial to gain insight into how much transformation is required from agricultural systems, how robust such strategies are, and how we can defuse the associated challenge for decision-making. While implementing a definition related to large changes in resource use into a global impact assessment modelling framework, we find transformational adaptations to be required of agricultural systems in most regions by 2050s in order to cope with climate change. However, these transformations widely differ across climate change scenarios: uncertainties in large-scale development of irrigation span in all continents from 2030s on, and affect two-thirds of regions by 2050s. Meanwhile, significant but uncertain reduction of major agricultural areas affects the Northern Hemisphere’s temperate latitudes, while increases to non-agricultural zones could be large but uncertain in one-third of regions. To help reducing the associated challenge for decision-making, we propose a methodology exploring which, when, where and why transformations could be required and uncertain, by means of scenario analysis. (letter)

  11. Mass-Boom Versus Big-Bang: An Alternative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    In an effort to advance a first step in the long journey to harmonize Einstein's General Relativity with Quantum Mechanics, we interpret the gravitational field as a sea of gravity quanta. We calculate the value of the mass of these quanta by imposing the condition that their energy cannot be localized in the Universe (a General Relativity property of the gravitational field energy). These quanta have negative energy that is emitted in each quantum, one by one, from every fundamental particle with gravitational properties. It follows that the emitting positive masses increase their value linearly with cosmological time (this effect is what we call the Mass-Boom and is present in the entire Universe). In particular, it turns out that the mass of the Universe M is equivalent to its age t, and to its gravitational entropy S, (i.e. M = t = S), in a certain system of units that convert many fundamental laws to very simple relations. This is the Mass- Boom cosmological model, which we have published elsewhere under various points of view (all giving the same result). The Mass-Boom cosmological model is identical to the one that Einstein initially proposed: a static, finite, curved and unlimited model, that today we know is stable. The Hubble observation of the red shifts, as a possible indication of an expanding Universe, is here interpreted in a very different way: we consider our LAB systems not to be rigid, fixed in size. If the Universe is the static (rigid) general reference, as Einstein first saw, then the Hubble observations must be interpreted as a proof of a local shrinkage of the quantum world. Instead of an expanding Universe we get the picture of a contracting quantum world. This new view is very well justified because it explains many of the problems that have plagued the standard model (the big-bang). It also eliminates the need for additions/corrections to the standard model, like the addition of ``inflation'', to solve the inconsistencies of the model

  12. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Meshkat

    Full Text Available Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate

  13. Evaluating the role of green infrastructures on near-road pollutant dispersion and removal: Modelling and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakinyo, Tobi Eniolu; Lam, Yun Fat; Hao, Song

    2016-11-01

    To enhance the quality of human life in a rapidly urbanized world plagued with high transportation, the masterful contribution of improved urban and local air quality cannot be overemphasized. In order to reduce human exposure to near-road air pollution, several approaches including the installation of roadside structural barriers especially in open street areas, such as city entrances are being applied. In the present study, the air quality around real world and idealized green infrastructures was investigated by means of numerical simulation and a short field measurement campaign. Fair agreement was found between ENVI-met modelled and measured particulate matter's concentration data around a realistic vegetation barrier indicating a fair representation of reality in the model. Several numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of barrier type (vegetation/hedge and green wall) and dimensions on near-road air quality. The results show different horizontal/vertical patterns and magnitudes of upwind and downwind relative concentration (with and without a barrier) depending on wind condition, barrier type and dimension. Furthermore, an integrated dispersion-deposition approach was employed to assess the impact on air quality of near-road vegetation barrier. At last, recommendations to city and urban planners on the implementation of roadside structural barriers were made. PMID:27544646

  14. Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Knopf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare coupled nonlinear climate models and their simplified forced counterparts with respect to predictability and phase space topology. Various types of uncertainty plague climate change simulation, which is, in turn, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the currently preferred strategy for simulating the climate system, or the Earth System at large, is the coupling of sub-system modules (representing, e.g. atmosphere, oceans, global vegetation, this paper explicitly addresses the errors and indeterminacies generated by the coupling procedure. The focus is on a comparison of forced dynamics as opposed to fully, i.e. intrinsically, coupled dynamics. The former represents a particular type of simulation, where the time behaviour of one complex systems component is prescribed by data or some other external information source. Such a simplifying technique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources, in particular when massive model inter-comparisons need to be carried out. Our contribution to the debate is based on the investigation of two representative model examples, namely (i a low-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean simulator, and (ii a replica-like simulator embracing corresponding components.Whereas in general the forced version (ii is able to mimic its fully coupled counterpart (i, we show in this paper that for a considerable fraction of parameter- and state-space, the two approaches qualitatively differ. Here we take up a phenomenon concerning the predictability of coupled versus forced models that was reported earlier in this journal: the observation that the time series of the forced version display artificial predictive skill. We present an explanation in terms of nonlinear dynamical theory. In particular we observe an intermittent version of artificial predictive skill, which we call on-off synchronization, and trace it back to the appearance of unstable periodic orbits. We also

  15. Business Models as Models

    OpenAIRE

    Baden-Fuller, C.; Morgan, M S

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on research undertaken in the history and philosophy of science, with particular reference to the extensive literature which discusses the use of models in biology and economics, we explore the question ‘Are Business Models useful?’ We point out that they act as various forms of model: to provide means to describe and classify businesses; to operate as sites for scientific investigation; and to act as recipes for creative managers. We argue that studying business models as models is r...

  16. Plague - pandemic - panic: information needs and communication strategies for infectious diseases emergencies : lessons learned from anthrax, SARS, pneumonic plague and influenza pandemic

    OpenAIRE

    Dickmann, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Information and communication is critical to the successful management of infectious diseases because an effective communication strategy prevents the surge of anxious patients who have not been genuinely exposed to the pathogen ('low risk patients') affecting medical infrastructures (1) and the future transmission of the infectious agent (2). Surge of low risk patients: The arrival of large numbers of low risk patients at hospitals following an infectious diseases emergency would be...

  17. Model Validation and Model Error Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ljung, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    To validate an estimated model and to have a good understanding of its reliability is a central aspect of System Identification. This contribution discusses these aspects in the light of model error models that are explicit descriptions of the model error. A model error model is implicitly present in most model validation methods, so the concept is more of a representation form than a set of new techniques. Traditional model validation is essentially a test of whether the confidence region of...

  18. Developing a test for random number generators using a simulation of the hierarchical Potts diamond model at the critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberty, Joshua W.

    This dissertation uses the hierarchical q-state Potts model at the critical point to develop a new random number generator test. We start with an exposition of renormalization group approach by means of which one can numerically exactly compute the free energy, specific heat and susceptibility of large, but finite lattices. We then show that generalization of these standard techniques allows one to also compute probability distributions related to the energy and the order parameter. The various computed quantities can be compared with Monte Carlo estimates of the same quantities. We demonstrate that the structure of the hierarchical lattices used allows one to perform the Monte Carlo calculations by direct sampling. This avoids the usual critical slowing down that plagues Monte Carlo calculations at the critical point. As is well known, critical behavior is highly susceptible to perturbations. We expect that flaws of the pseudo random number generator, such as correlations, will cause statistically significant discrepancies between the results of the simulations and the numerically exactly computed results. Details of the computer code generated for these tests are included.

  19. SELCO: A model for solar rural electrification in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, H. Harish

    1999-11-01

    The following thesis presents the concept of a Rural Energy Service Company in India, known as SELCO. The model is being set up as a sustainable proposition for the implementation of solar photovoltaics as a viable alternative to provide reliable home lighting in the rural areas of India. The SELCO approach has already achieved noteworthy social and commercial results. Institutional, policy and operational problems have long plagued the rural electrification programs in India, resulting in thousands of villages without access to electricity. SELCO is a solar energy service company operating in Southern India since 1995, focusing on the enormous untapped market for home lighting where thousands of households have no access to electricity and severe power shortages face those already connected to the electric grid. The Company has installed nearly 2,000 solar home lighting systems. From a modest two employees company in 1995, it has grown to 35 in 1997 and from one office to eight. The hypothesis to be tested in this study is that in rural India, in a market not subsidized by the government, a solar service company with available loans from local banks and cooperatives and with sales, installation, and maintenance personnel in the villages can be successful in introducing photovoltaic systems to provide basic amenities such as lighting and water pumping for the improvement of the quality of life, public health, and the environment. The initial success of SELCO lends considerable evidence to the acceptance of the hypothesis. To accomplish its mission, SELCO works with commercial, retail, and rural development banks with large rural branch networks to stimulate loans to SELCO's customers based on a standard set of attractive financing terms. SELCO through its successful model has convinced the policy makers that a way to increase rural families' access to consumer financing for solar home lighting systems is through the existing financial network available in the

  20. [Alexandre Yersin (1863-1943), explorer and a founding scientist of the Pasteur Institutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleliri, J M

    2014-01-01

    2013 was the year to celebrate Yersin: the 150th anniversary of his birth and the 70th anniversary of his death. Beyond the images usually attached to the memory of this doctor who discovered the bubonic plague bacillus (in Hong Kong in 1894), the author seeks to introduce Yersin, the man, as an explorer curious about his environment rather than a scientist concerned with honors and public recognition. Alexandre Yersin is an atypical figure in the universe of Pasteur, his collaborators, students, and followers. Although he began his career working with Louis Pasteur following the development of the vaccine against rabies, in 1885, the call of the sea led him to quit the laboratory on rue Ulm to, he said, "explore new lands". He worked for the Messageries maritimes merchant shipping company. In Saigon, he met Albert Calmette, who convinced him to join the newly created Colonial Army Medical Corps. In 1892 in Nha-Trang, Yersin set up a bacteriology laboratory in a straw hut; it subsequently became the first Pasteur Institute in Indochina, the starting point of a network of research laboratories. During the bubonic plague epidemic that raged in Hong Kong, Yersin succeeded in isolating its causal agent, surprising even himself by the ease with which he did so. He was 30 years old then, but what could have been the start of a prestigious career, crowned with honors, was spent instead at the service of the local populations. His exploration of the Vietnam highlands gave Yersin the occasion to cultivate and reveal a prodigious eclecticism and his profound humanism. He led three explorations in unknown regions of Annam and contributed to the development of this country by his social, educational, medical, and economic approach, entirely dedicated to aiding the indigenous populations. Yersin never left Vietnam again. He worked as an astronomer and agronomist (introducing the cultivation of cinchona (source of quinine) and rubber trees in the country) - always close to the

  1. Actant Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Helle

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants.......This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants....

  2. Modelling the models

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  3. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...... years of experience is providing in directing the reader in their activities.Traps and pitfalls are discussed and strategies also given to improve model development towards “fit-for-purpose” models. The emphasis in this chapter is the adoption and exercise of a modelling methodology that has proven very...

  4. Model misinterpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    2012-01-01

    Models of myriad forms are rapidly becoming central to biology. This ranges from statistical models that are fundamental to the interpretation of experimental results to ODE models that attempt to describe the results in a mechanistic format. Models will be more and more essential to biologists but this growing importance requires all model users to become more sophisticated about what is in a model and how that limits the usability of the model. This review attempts to relay the potential pi...

  5. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  6. The Origin of Plagues : A Research Agenda for the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria, and parasites emerge in both new and old forms to cause epidemics. Old microbes can produce new epidemics because of changes in the life style (including increased international travel) of people and societies. But epidemics occur also as a consequence of new genetic variations in microbes. These various epidemics connect the future with the past, offering lessons for guarding the health of generations to come-lessons learned from diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, inf...

  7. Tales of plagues and carnivals: Samuel R. Delany, AIDS, and the grammar of dissent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Thomas Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While even today lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people might have cause to distrust the healthcare establishment, how much more fragile was the relationship between sexual minorities and health professionals in the first decade of the AIDS epidemic. Dissent from consensus healthcare and health research then was a question of survival in the face of political and medical intransigence. This article focuses on one version of AIDS dissent: The narrative representations of AIDS in fiction by the gay African-American fantasy writer Samuel R. Delany, which rejected the rigid binarism of "safe" and "unsafe" sex practices, Delany's evidence-based dissent. He also engaged in a related form of cultural dissent: speaking the unspeakably obscene, at a time when Silence = Death. Delany called into question both the inferential leaps based on limited epidemiological research that were represented in safer sex guidelines and the widespread public reticence about sexual behavior. PMID:23443247

  8. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework

    OpenAIRE

    Roder, Cornelia; Arif, Chatchanit; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Daniels, Camille; Shibl, Ahmed; Chavanich, Suchana; VOOLSTRA, CHRISTIAN R.

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studie...

  9. An outbreak of duck virus enteritis (duck plague) in a captive flock of mixed waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R.D.; Stein, G., Jr.; Novilla, M.N.; Hurley, Sarah S.; Fink, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An outbreak of duck virus enteritis occurred in a flock of captive waterfowl composed of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), black ducks (Anas rubripes), and Canada geese (Branta canadensis). Although all three species were housed together, morbidity and mortality were confined to the 227 black ducks and Canada geese, of which 180 died and the rest were left in a weakened condition. Lesions are given for 20 black ducks and 4 Canada geese dying from DVE. In addition, both horizontal and vertical transmission are discussed as possible sources of the virus that caused this outbreak.

  10. An End to Cattle Plague: Laboratory Capacity Building to Support the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established in 1957 as the world's 'Atoms for Peace' organization within the United Nations system. It currently has 151 Member States (March 2011) and works with partners worldwide to ensure the peaceful, safe and secure use of nuclear technologies. In 1964, IAEA and FAO established the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, to help countries apply nuclear science and related technologies for sustainable agricultural development. Through the concerted efforts of IAEA's Department of Technical Cooperation, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division and cooperation with FAO, IAEA helps Member States to develop sustainable capacities in nuclear science and related technologies, including by providing the training and analytical laboratory services necessary for the efficient and safe use of these technologies. Building on this experience, about 25 years ago, IAEA started to collaborate with FAO, OIE, OAU (now AU) and other regional organizations in Africa and Asia to support initernational efforts to diagnose, control and eradicate rinderpest. For centuries, rinderpest was one of the most dreaded livestock diseases. Its devastating effect on European cattle populations in the eighteenth century resulted in the first veterinary school, established in 1761 in France to educate veterinarians on the control of rinderpest and other animal diseases. Some 250 years later, the veterinary profession is set to declare the global eradication of rinderpest. During the nineteenth century, the application of quarantines helped keep rinderpest at bay, resulting in its eradication in Europe. In parallel with this, the development of vaccination strategies enabled containment of the disease in other regions, but it took until the early twentieth century to develop a standardized goat-adapted rinderpest vaccine. This vaccine was widely used for the control of rinderpest in Asia and Africa in the 1950s and 1960s, until it was replaced by the tissue culture-adapted vaccine, which was both more efficient and easier to produce.

  11. [The hygienist Adrien Proust, his universe, plague and his ideas on international health policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségal, Alain; Hillemand, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Adrien Proust, Marcel's father, was a remarkable specialist of hygiens. He felt very responsible for the fight against epidemics, and his part was decisive at the Venice conference in 1896. In Marseilles and nearby islands quarantines were sill useful afterwards, especially in 1901. PMID:21598578

  12. THE 2002 EUROPEAN SEAL PLAGUE: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND POPULATION CONSEQUENCES. (R829089)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. Moving Words / Words that Move: An Analysis of Discursive Practices Plaguing U.S. Servicewomen

    OpenAIRE

    Grohowski, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Through a rhetorical analysis of three terms commonly used in military culture to describe servicewomen, this paper aims to inform instructors of the influence repeated exposure to visual/verbal practices (Fleckenstein; Sheridan-Rabideau) can have on female student veterans. The three terms focused on in this paper are: 1) "trou" used to refer to West Point female cadets' body shape; 2) the phrase "Queen for a Year," which is the "default status" all women are ascribed in the Armed Forces; an...

  14. Advances in the mechanisms of atherosclerosis vulnerable plague and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Zhang; Ruo-Lan Huang; Ru Mo; Ling Wang; Xiao Chang; Mu-Juan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease occupy the first two place of world health economic burden, atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque rupture as the common factor of these diseases, is thought to be a key target of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease control. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is one of the classical pathway of cell apoptosis. More and more studies have indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway was involved in the development of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In this paper, the three main signal pathways of endoplasmic reticulum stress, including Protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and Inositol-requiring protein 1αα(IRE1α) were reviewed. The relationship between the risk factors of atherosclerosis (including hyperlipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia) and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the relationship between major cellular components (macrophages, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular smooth muscle cells) of vulnerable plaque and endoplasmic reticulum stress were reviewed.

  15. The Vague Plague -The continual innovation and spread of BPR and IT in Enterprise Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The empirical point of departure of this article is the erosion of enterprise boundaries, which create new conditions for enterprise actors, i.e. they are to an increasing extent forced to operate in networks. They are confronted with a number of unstable and developing change drivers. The focus......-concepts and IT in Denmark are the central interest. It is accompanied by a parallel analysis of the American and international development. In Denmark a public discourse on BPR emerged in 1992, and there continues to be parallel and disparate processes of development going on. The account is thus multiple...... societal closure of the meaning of BPR doesn't occur and the different concepts reflect different networks of actors -in particular enterprises and consultants. The interpretation is further that the accompanying IT- implementation does not lead to a closure of the enterprise impacts. Even standard systems...

  16. Development of Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres vaccine against plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang SS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Shih-shiung Huang,1 I-Hsun Li,2,3 Po-da Hong,1 Ming-kung Yeh1,2,41Biomedical Engineering Program, Graduate Institute of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide/polyethylene glycol (PEG (PLGA/PEG microspheres were produced using a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique and assayed for their percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro release properties, and in vivo animal protect efficacy. The Y. pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres (mean particle size 3.8 µm exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w, yield (85.2%, and entrapment efficiency (38.1%, and presented a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%, then continued to release Y. pestis F1 antigen over 70 days. The distribution (% of Y. pestis F1 on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core was 3.1%, 28.9%, and 60.7%, respectively. A steady release rate was noticed to be 0.55 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres/day of Y. pestis F1 antigen release maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at the 1st, 28th, and 42nd days was 8.2, 26.7, and 31.0 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres, respectively. The 100 times median lethal dose 50% (LD50 of Y. pestis Yokohama-R strain by intraperitoneal injection challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 40 µg F1 antigen content of PLGA/PEG microspheres, F1 antigen in Al(OH3, and in comparison with F1 antigen in Al(OH3 vaccine in two doses, was evaluated after given by subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with one dose of F1 antigen-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres, and two doses of F1 antigen in Al(OH3 vaccine (100%. In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that F1 vaccines microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state IgG immune protection in mice plasma dramatic increased from 2 weeks (18,764±3,124 to 7 weeks (126,468±19,176 after vaccination. These findings strongly suggest that F1-antigen loaded microspheres vaccine offer a new therapeutic strategy in optimizing the vaccine incorporation and delivery properties of these potential vaccine targeting carriers.Keywords: PLGA, immunological, protective responses

  17. Rein Tammik : Pidu katku ajal = Feast during the plague / Anneli Porri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Epner, Eero, 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Rein Tammiku fotorealistlik pildimaailm on iseseisev organism, mis ajuti genereerib ootamatuid tähenduslikke lühiühendusi. Erinevalt loodusmaalijatest, portreemaalijatest, meremaalijatest ja teistest maalib Rein Tammik pilte. Ta on pildimaalija. Tammikut huvitavad eelkõige visuaalsed paradoksid. Tammik asus juba 1970. aastail ajastuid ühte pilti kokku keevitama. Rembrandti grupiportreele «Kangrute gildi eesistujaist» ilmusid «Visarite» näod, Manet’ «Eine murul» leidis järsku aseme punaruudulisel linal jne. Historitsistlik eklektika - postmodernismi peamisi strateegiaid - on Tammiku loomingus täiesti selgelt loetav, teda on nimetatud esimeseks nõukogude postmodernistiks. Teatav nõukogude ajastu traumaatiline tajumine ilmneb tema töödes suuresti igatsusest kestvuse, jätkuvuse ja üldkehtivuse järele, mida 1970-1980-ndad aastad ei võimaldanud. 1992. aastast resideerub Prantsusmaal

  18. Euro Feast for Estonia - Feast in Time of Plague? / Andres Arrak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arrak, Andres, 1958-

    2010-01-01

    Autor leiab, et Eesti Pank ja valitsus peaksid selgitama rahvale euroga liitumise vajadust ajal, mil terve maailm kannatab majanduskriisi all ja euroala riigid ei suuda täita Maastrichti kriteeriume ning euro jaoks on saabunud rasked ajad. Kreeka majandusnäitajatest

  19. Periodic temperature-associated drought/flood drives locust plagues in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhibin; Cazelles, Bernard; Tian, Huidong; Christian Stige, Leif; Bräuning, Achim; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2008-01-01

    Global warming is currently of great concern. Yet the ecological effects of low-frequency climate variations remain largely unknown. Recent analyses of interdecadal variability in population abundance of the Oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) in China have revealed negative associations with temperature and positive associations with Yangtze drought and flood frequencies during the past millennium (AD 957-1956). In order to shed new light on the causal relationships bet...

  20. Models within models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anyone who worries that physicists are running out of interesting challenges to tackle and important problems to solve should read the two, very different feature articles in this issue. In 'Climate change: complexity in action', Klaus Hasselmann and colleagues write about the challenges of including economic and political dimensions in computer simulations of climate change. It is hard to imagine a physics-based topic that has a greater impact on the world at large. In 'Quarks, diquarks and pentaquarks', Robert Jaffe and Frank Wilczek describe our current understanding of quantum chromodynamics and the strong nuclear force. In this case it is hard to think of many more difficult problems in fundamental physics. Traditional climate modelling is difficult enough because a whole range of effects in the atmosphere and the oceans have to be taken into account. It typically takes weeks for a state-of-the-art supercomputer to simulate 100 years of climate change with a horizontal resolution of 100 km. But climate change is about much more than solving difficult differential equations - there are crucial social, political and economic influences as well. Some researchers, including a significant number of physicists, have started to look at this integrated-assessment approach. The first challenge is to develop climate models that take minutes to run on a laptop. The next challenge is to develop analogous models that work in the social, political and economic arenas - which is not a trivial task - and then integrate all these different models and explore all the possible global-warming scenarios. Physicists also hope to integrate quantum chromodynamics (QCD) into the larger framework of a so-called theory of everything. Like climate modellers, particle theorists working on QCD require enormous computational resources for their calculations, and even then there are limits to what can be achieved (e.g. the mass of the proton has yet to be calculated from first principles

  1. Model Warehouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new conception:model warehouse,analyzes the reason why model warehouse appears and introduces the characteristics and architecture of model warehouse.Last,this paper points out that model warehouse is an important part of WebGIS.

  2. Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Piccolo, Chiara; Heitzig, Martina;

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents various types of constitutive models and their applications. There are 3 aspects dealt with in this chapter, namely: creation and solution of property models, the application of parameter estimation and finally application examples of constitutive models. A systematic...... procedure is introduced for the analysis and solution of property models. Models that capture and represent the temperature dependent behaviour of physical properties are introduced, as well as equation of state models (EOS) such as the SRK EOS. Modelling of liquid phase activity coefficients are also...... covered, illustrating several models such as the Wilson equation and NRTL equation, along with their solution strategies. A section shows how to use experimental data to regress the property model parameters using a least squares approach. A full model analysis is applied in each example that discusses...

  3. Model error

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Simons

    1997-01-01

    Modern finance would not have been possible without models. Increasingly complex quantitative models drive financial innovation and the growth of derivatives markets. Models are necessary to value financial instruments and to measure the risks of individual positions and portfolios. Yet when used inappropriately, the models themselves can become an important source of risk. Recently, several well-publicized instances occurred of institutions suffering significant losses attributed to model er...

  4. Model cities

    OpenAIRE

    M Batty

    2007-01-01

    The term ?model? is now central to our thinking about how weunderstand and design cities. We suggest a variety of ways inwhich we use ?models?, linking these ideas to Abercrombie?sexposition of Town and Country Planning which represented thestate of the art fifty years ago. Here we focus on using models asphysical representations of the city, tracing the development ofsymbolic models where the focus is on simulating how functiongenerates form, to iconic models where the focus is on representi...

  5. Recent emergence of new variants of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiyoule, A; Rasoamanana, B; Buchrieser, C; Michel, P; Chanteau, S; Carniel, E

    1997-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has been responsible for at least three pandemics. During the last pandemic, which started in Hong Kong in 1894, the microorganism colonized new, previously unscathed geographical areas where it has become well established. The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the genetic stability of Y. pestis strains introduced into a new environment just under a century ago and to follow the epidemiology of any new genetic variant detected. In the present study, 187 strains of Y. pestis isolated between 1939 and 1996 from different regions of Madagascar and responsible mainly for human cases of bubonic and pneumonic plague were studied. Our principal genotyping method was rRNA gene profiling (ribotyping), which has previously been shown to be an effective scheme for typing Y. pestis strains of different geographical origins. We report that all studied Y. pestis strains isolated in Madagascar before 1982 were of classical ribotype B, the ribotype attributed to the Y. pestis clone that spread around the world during the third pandemic. In 1982, 1983, and 1994, strains with new ribotypes, designated R, Q, and T, respectively, were isolated on the high-plateau region of the island. Analysis of other genotypic traits such as the NotI genomic restriction profiles and the EcoRV plasmid restriction profiles revealed that the new variants could also be distinguished by specific genomic and/or plasmid profiles. A follow-up of these new variants indicated that strains of ribotypes Q and R have become well established in their ecosystem and have a tendency to spread to new geographical areas and supplant the original classical strain. PMID:9350742

  6. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  7. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardis C Sabeti

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen at CCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  8. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen atCCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  9. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanson, Jeffrey D; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Forwood, Jade K

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) system, to synthesise components of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and lipopolysaccharides essential for bacterial growth and survival. As such, these enzymes are promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents. We have determined the crystal structures of the Y. pestis β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases FabF and FabH, and compared these with the unpublished, deposited structure of Y. pestis FabB. Comparison of FabB, FabF, and FabH provides insights into the substrate specificities of these enzymes, and investigation of possible interactions with known β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors suggests FabB, FabF and FabH may be targeted simultaneously to prevent synthesis of the fatty acids necessary for growth and survival. PMID:26469877

  10. The Fleas of Endemic and Introduced Small Mammals in Central Highland Forests of Madagascar: Faunistics, Species Diversity, and Absence of Host Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven M; Randrenjarison Andriniaina, H Rico; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Data are presented on the flea species of the genera Paractenopsyllus (Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllinae) and Synopsyllus (Pulicidae, Xenopsyllinae) obtained from small mammals during two 2014 seasonal surveys at a montane humid forest site (Ambohitantely) in the Central Highlands of Madagascar. The mammal groups included the endemic family Tenrecidae (tenrecs) and subfamily Nesomyinae (rodents) and two introduced families Muridae (rodents) and Soricidae (shrews); no fleas were recovered from the latter family. The surveys were conducted at the end of the wet and dry seasons with 288 individual small mammals captured, including 12 endemic and four introduced species. These animals yielded 344 fleas, representing nine species endemic to Madagascar; no introduced species was collected. Some seasonal variation was found in the number of trapped small mammals, but no marked difference was found in species richness. For flea species represented by sufficient samples, no parasite-host specificity was found, and there is evidence for considerable lateral exchange in the local flea fauna between species of tenrecs and the two rodent families (endemic and introduced). The implications of these results are discussed with regards to small mammal species richness and community structure, as well as a possible mechanism for the maintenance of sylvatic cycles of bubonic plague in the montane forests of Madagascar. PMID:26336252

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Yersinia pestis Strains Antiqua andNepal516: Evidence of Gene Reduction in an Emerging Pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S.G.; Hu, Ping; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Radnedge,Lyndsay; Larimer, Frank; Vergez, Lisa M.; Worsham, Patricia; Chu, May C.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-01-16

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic andpneumonicplague, has undergone detailed study at the molecular level. Tofurther investigate the genomic diversity among this group and to helpcharacterize lineages of the plague organism that have no sequencedmembers, we present here the genomes of two isolates of the "classical"Antiqua biovar, strains Antiqua and Nepal516. The genomes of Antiqua andNepal516 are 4.7 Mb and 4.5 Mb and encode 4,138 and 3,956 open readingframes respectively. Though both strains belong to one of the threeclassical biovars, they represent separate lineages defined by recentphylogenetic studies. We compare all five currently sequenced Y. pestisgenomes and the corresponding features in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Thereare strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, singlenucleotide polymorphisms and a unique distribution of insertionsequences. We found 453 single nucleotide polymorphisms in protein codingregions, which were used to assess evolutionary relationships of these Y.pestis strains. Gene reduction analysis revealed that the gene deletionprocesses are under selective pressure and many of the inactivations areprobably related to the organism s interaction with its host environment.The results presented here clearly demonstrate the differences betweenthe two Antiqua lineages and support the notion that grouping Y. pestisstrains based strictly on the classical definition of biovars (predicatedupon two biochemical assays) does not accurately reflect the phylogeneticrelationships within this species. Comparison of four virulent Y. pestisstrains with the human-avirulent strain 91001 provides further insightinto the genetic basis of virulence to humans.

  12. [Goethe's philosophical-medical masks, in Faust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Peredo, Hugo Fernandez

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XXI century the health profession is engaged in a medical ethical and moral crisis and society, hurt by the pandemic of violence and impunity, feels the effect of a state of legal crisis unable to find a viable scientific or humanistic answer. This manuscript, is the result of an investigation into the Johann Wolfgang Goethe's tragedy of the nineteenth century, Faust. It demonstrates the coincidence of real life subjects and objects with literary subjects and objects represented, by means of the interpretation of the paradigms, problems, dilemmas and identified cases of medical ethical-morals: dáimon, reflection-solitude, free will, good-evil, Eros, learned ignorance, genes, epistemology, medical etiquette, paternalism, anatomy of the personality, Hyppocratism, will, good sense of humor, bubonic plague. Faust can be construed as a new path for change--towards the common good--of the physician if traced by their will and recovering the represented real objects, decides to meditate free and lonely on its professional exercise, medical knowledge and the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:17201118

  13. Infectious diseases -- new and ancient threats to world health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S J; Carnes, B; Rogers, R G; Smith, L

    1997-07-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases remain a leading cause of death and disability in developing countries and are re-emerging as a serious health problem in developed countries. Outbreaks of Ebola, dengue hemorrhagic fever, cholera, and bubonic plague have occurred in low-income countries and multidrug-resistant organisms have surfaced throughout the world. Since 1973, over 28 new disease-causing microbes have been identified. This issue of "Population Bulletin" analyzes the impact of factors such as population growth, urbanization, migration, poverty, travel, agricultural practices, climate changes, natural disasters, and medical technology on the resurgence of infectious and parasitic diseases as well as the influence of diseases such as AIDS on population dynamics and socioeconomic development. Most of these diseases could be prevented, cured, or eradicated with known public health measures. National governments can help reduce poverty, step up immunization programs, and lessen the chances of introducing new diseases. Nongovernmental organizations can disseminate preventive knowledge and monitor disease outbreaks. The medical profession can strengthen infection control precautions and institute surveillance of the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. Since the geographic isolation that used to contain disease outbreaks has been replaced by permeable international borders, the campaign against infectious and parasitic diseases must be global. PMID:12292663

  14. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (Rwork = 16.2, Rfree = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh

  15. Fleas and flea control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dautović Živomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fleas as hemeatophagous arthropodes take part in the spreading of certain diseases such as bubonic plague, murine typhus, tick-borne typhus tularaemia, or can be transitory hosts for certain species of cestodes for dogs and cats. Depending on the type of host on which fleas persist and the habitat, measures that can be taken to control them can be only sanitary-hygiene, individual, or treatment of the habitat. Sanitary-hygiene measures mostly consist of regular cleaning. Individual protection implies the use of insecticides for re-impregnating clothing, spraying clothing and the use of repellents. Treatment of habitats comprises the use of insecticides of the group of organophosphates, metyl-carbamates, pyrethroids and organo-chlorine compounds, instruments for dusting and spraying. In addition to these compounds, preparations based on imidaclopride, fipronyl and inhibitors of insect growth (IGRs and development (IDIs are also used. Flea control in household pets is implemented using measures of individual protection and treatment of their habitats.

  16. Palaeopathology and genes: investigating the genetics of infectious diseases in excavated human skeletal remains and mummies from past populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Evilena; Mitchell, Piers D

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the use of genetics in palaeomicrobiology, and to highlight the importance of understanding past diseases. Palaeomicrobiology is the study of disease pathogens in skeletal and mummified remains from archaeological contexts. It has revolutionarised our understanding of health in the past by enabling a deeper knowledge of the origins and evolution of many diseases that have shaped us as a species. Bacterial diseases explored include tuberculosis, leprosy, bubonic plague, typhoid, syphilis, endemic and epidemic typhus, trench fever, and Helicobacter pylori. Viral diseases discussed include influenza, hepatitis B, human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotrophic virus (HTLV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Parasitic diseases investigated include malaria, leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease, roundworm, whipworm, pinworm, Chinese liver fluke, fleas and lice. Through a better understanding of disease origins and their evolution, we can place into context how many infectious diseases are changing over time, and so help us estimate how they may change in the future. PMID:23792062

  17. Supermatrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    Radom matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  18. Modelling Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan

    This report provides an overview of the existing models of global manufacturing, describes the required modelling views and associated methods and identifies tools, which can provide support for this modelling activity.The model adopted for global manufacturing is that of an extended enterprise....... One or more units from beyond the network may complement the extended enterprise. The common reference model for this extended enterprise will utilise GERAM (Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology) to provide an architectural framework for the modelling carried out within the...

  19. Geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contributions to the workshop 'Geochemical modeling' from 19 to 20 September 1990 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The report contains the programme and a selection of the lectures held at the workshop 'Geochemical modeling'. (BBR)

  20. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  1. Would You Like Fries with That? The Dangers of the Customer Service Model of Reading Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Molly K.; Osborn, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Reading teacher education, as is true with much of higher education, is plagued with pressures of providing "here and now" answers to very complex, entangled issues. The reading methods course becomes the site of many of these pressures, despite considerable insights provided by scholars such as Kumaravadivelu (2001) that "methods" may be more of…

  2. Jet Noise Modeling for Coannular Nozzles Including the Effects of Chevrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Development of good predictive models for jet noise has always been plagued by the difficulty in obtaining good quality data over a wide range of conditions in different facilities.We consider such issues very carefully in selecting data to be used in developing our model. Flight effects are of critical importance, and none of the means of determining them are without significant problems. Free-jet flight simulation facilities are very useful, and can provide meaningful data so long as they can be analytically transformed to the flight frame of reference. In this report we show that different methodologies used by NASA and industry to perform this transformation produce very different results, especially in the rear quadrant; this compels us to rely largely on static data to develop our model, but we show reasonable agreement with simulated flight data when these transformation issues are considered. A persistent problem in obtaining good quality data is noise generated in the experimental facility upstream of the test nozzle: valves, elbows, obstructions, and especially the combustor can contribute significant noise, and much of this noise is of a broadband nature, easily confused with jet noise. Muffling of these sources is costly in terms of size as well as expense, and it is particularly difficult in flight simulation facilities, where compactness of hardware is very important, as discussed by Viswanathan (Ref. 13). We feel that the effects of jet density on jet mixing noise may have been somewhat obscured by these problems, leading to the variable density exponent used in most jet noise prediction procedures including our own. We investigate this issue, applying Occam s razor, (e.g., Ref. 14), in a search for the simplest physically meaningful model that adequately describes the observed phenomena. In a similar vein, we see no reason to reject the Lighthill approach; it provides a very solid basis upon which to build a predictive procedure, as we believe we

  3. Enterprise Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark S.; Gruninger, Michael

    1998-01-01

    To remain competitive, enterprises must become increasingly agile and integrated across their functions. Enterprise models play a critical role in this integration, enabling better designs for enterprises, analysis of their performance, and management of their operations. This article motivates the need for enterprise models and introduces the concepts of generic and deductive enterprise models. It reviews research to date on enterprise modeling and considers in detail the Toronto virtual ent...

  4. Battery Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the capacity of the employed batteries. The battery lifetime determines how long one can use a device. Battery modeling can help to predict, and possibly extend this lifetime. Many different battery models have been developed over the years. However, with these models one can only compute lifetimes for specific discharge profiles, and not for workloads in general. In this paper, we give an overview of the different battery models that are availabl...

  5. Computable models

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Computational models can be found everywhere in present day science and engineering. In providing a logical framework and foundation for the specification and design of specification languages, Raymond Turner uses this framework to introduce and study computable models. In doing so he presents the first systematic attempt to provide computational models with a logical foundation. Computable models have wide-ranging applications from programming language semantics and specification languages, through to knowledge representation languages and formalism for natural language semantics. They are al

  6. Model Building

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly...

  7. Magnetosphere models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the most recent magnetospheric models are reviewed. After a short overview of the particle environment, a synthetic survey of the problem is given. For each feature of magnetospheric modelling (boundary, current sheet, ring-current) the approaches used by different authors are described. In the second part a description is given of the magnetospheric models, divided into four groups. In the last part, the different uses of magnetospheric models are illustrated by means of examples

  8. Phoenix model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix (formerly referred to as the Second Generation Model or SGM) is a global general equilibrium model designed to analyze energy-economy-climate related questions and policy implications in the medium- to long-term. This model disaggregates the global economy into 26 industr...

  9. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sclütter, Flemming; Frigaard, Peter; Liu, Zhou

    This report presents the model test results on wave run-up on the Zeebrugge breakwater under the simulated prototype storms. The model test was performed in January 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The detailed description of the model is given in...

  10. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  11. Hydrological models are mediating models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  12. Model Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Selén, Yngve

    2004-01-01

    Before using a parametric model one has to be sure that it offers a reasonable description of the system to be modeled. If a bad model structure is employed, the obtained model will also be bad, no matter how good is the parameter estimation method. There exist many possible ways of validating candidate models. This thesis focuses on one of the most common ways, i.e., the use of information criteria. First, some common information criteria are presented, and in the later chapters, various ext...

  13. Cadastral Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Modeling is a term that refers to a variety of efforts, including data and process modeling. The domain to be modeled may be a department, an organization, or even an industrial sector. E-business presupposes the modeling of an industrial sector, a substantial task. Cadastral modeling compares...... to the modeling of an industrial sector, as it aims at rendering the basic concepts that relate to the domain of real estate and the pertinent human activities. The palpable objects are pieces of land and buildings, documents, data stores and archives, as well as persons in their diverse roles as owners, holders...... to land. The paper advances the position that cadastral modeling has to include not only the physical objects, agents, and information sets of the domain, but also the objectives or requirements of cadastral systems....

  14. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  15. ICRF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs

  16. Model choice versus model criticism

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Christian P.; Mengersen, Kerrie; Chen, Carla

    2009-01-01

    The new perspectives on ABC and Bayesian model criticisms presented in Ratmann et al.(2009) are challenging standard approaches to Bayesian model choice. We discuss here some issues arising from the authors' approach, including prior influence, model assessment and criticism, and the meaning of error in ABC.

  17. Ventilation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  18. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...... temporarily from bookcases to borrowers. When we characterize events as change agents we focus on concepts like transactions, entity processes, and workflow processes....

  19. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...... temporarily from bookcases to borrowers. When we characterize events as change agents we focus on concepts like transactions, entity processes, and workflow processes....

  20. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  1. Phenomenological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braby, L.A.

    1990-09-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. A range of models covering different endpoints and phenomena has developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  3. Mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Developing competences for setting up, analysing and criticising mathematical models are normally seen as relevant only from and above upper secondary level. The general belief among teachers is that modelling activities presuppose conceptual understanding of the mathematics involved. Mathematical...... modelling, however, can be seen as a practice of teaching that place the relation between real life and mathematics into the centre of teaching and learning mathematics, and this is relevant at all levels. Modelling activities may motivate the learning process and help the learner to establish cognitive...... roots for the construction of important mathematical concepts. In addition competences for setting up, analysing and criticising modelling processes and the possible use of models is a formative aim in this own right for mathematics teaching in general education. The paper presents a theoretical...

  4. Mathematical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough introduction to the challenge of applying mathematics in real-world scenarios. Modelling tasks rarely involve well-defined categories, and they often require multidisciplinary input from mathematics, physics, computer sciences, or engineering. In keeping with this spirit of modelling, the book includes a wealth of cross-references between the chapters and frequently points to the real-world context. The book combines classical approaches to modelling with novel areas such as soft computing methods, inverse problems, and model uncertainty. Attention is also paid to the interaction between models, data and the use of mathematical software. The reader will find a broad selection of theoretical tools for practicing industrial mathematics, including the analysis of continuum models, probabilistic and discrete phenomena, and asymptotic and sensitivity analysis.

  5. Logistic models

    OpenAIRE

    Sochůrková, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the compilation of an inventory management methods, describe their principles and assess the appropriateness of their use. In the introductory part of the work, "The nature and importance of inventory management" are briefly described the inventory management, the main objectives of inventory control models, the basic division of inventory species and costs of supply. The following chapter "Overview of inventory control models" includes a breakdown of models from dif...

  6. Why Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Joshua M.

    2008-01-01

    This address treats some enduring misconceptions about modeling. One of these is that the goal is always prediction. The lecture distinguishes between explanation and prediction as modeling goals, and offers sixteen reasons other than prediction to build a model. It also challenges the common assumption that scientific theories arise from and 'summarize' data, when often, theories precede and guide data collection; without theory, in other words, it is not clear what data to collect. Among ot...

  7. Mental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Moreira

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The mental models subject is presented particularly in the light of Johnson-Laird’s theory. Views from different authors are also presented but the emphasis lies in Johson-Laird’s approach, proposing mental models as a third path in the images x propositions debate. In this perspective, the nature, content, and typology of mental models are discussed, as well as the issue of conciousness and computability. In addition, the methodology of research studies are provided. Essentially, the aim of the paper is to provide an introduction to the mental models topic, having science education research in mind.

  8. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Frigaard, Peter

    This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University.......This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University....

  9. Stream Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Kristian

    engineers, but as the scale and the complexity of the hydraulic works increased, the mathematical models became so complex that a mathematical solution could not be obtained. This created a demand for new methods and again the experimental investigation became popular, but this time as measurements on small......-scale models. But still the scale and complexity of hydraulic works were increasing, and soon even small-scale models reached a natural limit for some applications. In the mean time the modern computer was developed, and it became possible to solve complex mathematical models by use of computer-based numerical...

  10. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  11. Modeling Documents with Event Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhui Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently deep learning has made great breakthroughs in visual and speech processing, mainly because it draws lessons from the hierarchical mode that brain deals with images and speech. In the field of NLP, a topic model is one of the important ways for modeling documents. Topic models are built on a generative model that clearly does not match the way humans write. In this paper, we propose Event Model, which is unsupervised and based on the language processing mechanism of neurolinguistics, to model documents. In Event Model, documents are descriptions of concrete or abstract events seen, heard, or sensed by people and words are objects in the events. Event Model has two stages: word learning and dimensionality reduction. Word learning is to learn semantics of words based on deep learning. Dimensionality reduction is the process that representing a document as a low dimensional vector by a linear mode that is completely different from topic models. Event Model achieves state-of-the-art results on document retrieval tasks.

  12. Education models

    OpenAIRE

    Poortman, Sybilla; Sloep, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Educational models describes a case study on a complex learning object. Possibilities are investigated for using this learning object, which is based on a particular educational model, outside of its original context. Furthermore, this study provides advice that might lead to an increase in teachers’ motivation for using and sharing learning objects. This document is aimed at teachers and educational designers.

  13. Didactical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas; Hansen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Didactical Modelling as a research methodology in mathematics education. We compare the methodology with other approaches and argue that Didactical Modelling has its own specificity. We discuss the methodological “why” and explain why we find it useful to...

  14. Neurofuzzy Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    A neural network can approximate a function, but it is impossible to interpret the result in terms of natural language. The fusion of neural networks and fuzzy logic in neurofuzzy models provide learning as well as readability. Control engineers find this useful, because the models can be...

  15. Martingale Model

    OpenAIRE

    Giandomenico, Rossano

    2006-01-01

    The model determines a stochastic continuous process as continuous limit of a stochastic discrete process so to show that the stochastic continuous process converges to the stochastic discrete process such that we can integrate it. Furthermore, the model determines the expected volatility and the expected mean so to show that the volatility and the mean are increasing function of the time.

  16. Scribe modeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssing, Ulrik

    1986-01-01

    Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells.......Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells....

  17. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  18. Modelling Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts, these...... notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add...

  19. Building Models and Building Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn; Skauge, Jørn

    teoretiske basis for de kapitler, der har et mere teoretisk indhold. De følgende appendikser B-D indeholder nærmere karakteristika om de to modellerings CAD-programmer ArchiCAD og Architectural Desktop tillige med en sammenligning mellem de to værktøjer. I de resterende to appendikser beskrives de specielle...... problemstillinger vedrørende modellering af de to "Sorthøjparken"-modeller og de resul­terende modeller bliver præsenteret og evalueret. Den samlede rapport er udgivet på projektets hjemmeside: www.iprod.aau.dk/bygit/Web3B/ under Technical Reports....

  20. OSPREY Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to

  1. Graphical Rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Svend; Christensen, Karl Bang

    Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models......Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models...

  2. Stereometric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-07-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : - the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); - the shot visualization in two distinct windows - the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  3. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Wilfrid

    1993-01-01

    An up-to-date and integrated introduction to model theory, designed to be used for graduate courses (for students who are familiar with first-order logic), and as a reference for more experienced logicians and mathematicians.

  4. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  5. Paleoclimate Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Computer simulations of past climate. Variables provided as model output are described by parameter keyword. In some cases the parameter keywords are a subset of...

  6. MHD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's goal is to provide a physical understanding of the ideal MHD model which includes: (1) a basic description of the model, (2) a derivation starting from a more fundamental kinetic model, and (3) a discussion of its range of validity. The ideal MHD model is a single-fluid model that describes the effects of magnetic geometry on the macroscopic equilibrium and stability properties of fusion plasmas. The model is derived in a straight forward manner by forming the mass, momentum, and energy moments of the Boltzmann equation. The moment equations reduce to ideal MHD with the introduction of three critical assumptions: high collisionality, small ion gyro radius, and small resistivity. An analysis of the validity conditions shows that the collision-dominated assumption is never satisfied in plasmas of fusion interest. The remaining two conditions are satisfied by a wide margin. A careful examination of the collision-dominated assumption shows that those particular parts of ideal MHD treated inaccurately (i.e., the parallel momentum and energy equations), play little, if any practical role in MHD equilibrium and stability. These equations primarily describe compression and expansion of a plasma whereas most MHD instabilities involve incompressible motions. The model is incorrect only where it does not matter. This realization leads to the introduction of a modified MHD model known as collisionless MHD which makes predictions nearly identical to collision-dominated assumption. It is thus valid for plasmas of fusion interest. The derivation follows from an analysis of single-particle guiding center motion in a collisionless plasma and the subsequent closure of the system by the heuristic assumption that the motions of interest are incompressible

  7. Accelerated life models modeling and statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bagdonavicius, Vilijandas

    2001-01-01

    Failure Time DistributionsIntroductionParametric Classes of Failure Time DistributionsAccelerated Life ModelsIntroductionGeneralized Sedyakin's ModelAccelerated Failure Time ModelProportional Hazards ModelGeneralized Proportional Hazards ModelsGeneralized Additive and Additive-Multiplicative Hazards ModelsChanging Shape and Scale ModelsGeneralizationsModels Including Switch-Up and Cycling EffectsHeredity HypothesisSummaryAccelerated Degradation ModelsIntroductionDegradation ModelsModeling the Influence of Explanatory Varia

  8. A short note on integrated assessment modeling approaches : Rejoinder to the review of "Making or breaking climate targets - The AMPERE study on staged accession scenarios for climate policy"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Bauer, Nico; Schwanitz, Valeria Jana; Petermann, Nils; Bosetti, Valentina; Marcucci, Adriana; Otto, Sander; Paroussos, Leonidas; Rao-Skirbekk, Shilpa; Currás, Tabaré Arroyo; Ashina, Shuichi; Bollen, Johannes; Eom, Jiyong; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Longden, Thomas; Kitous, Alban; Méjean, Aurélie; Sano, Fuminori; Schaeffer, Michiel; Wada, Kenichi; Capros, Pantelis; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Edenhofer, Ottmar; Bertram, Christoph; Bibas, Ruben; Edmonds, Jae; Johnson, Nils; Krey, Volker; Luderer, Gunnar; McCollum, David; Jiang, Kejun

    2015-01-01

    We provide a rejoinder to a review (Rosen, 2015) of our original article "Making or breaking climate targets - the AMPERE study on staged accession scenarios for climate policy" (Kriegler et al., 2015a). We have a substantial disagreement with the content of the review, and feel that it is plagued b

  9. A Model for Spam Prevention in IP Telephony Networks using Anonymous Verifying Authorities

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Shukla; Kranti Deo Singh; Ashutosh Pradhan; Pankaj Singh

    2013-01-01

    Unsolicited emails, more commonly known as spam, have plagued the use and efficiency of email since its inception. With the introduction of ungoverned cheap voice communications, such as IP telephony, spam over telephony (SPIT) and its prevention is set to dominate and drive whether the technology is widely adopted or not. A possible example of voice spam schemes includes the use of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems in conjunction with automated telemarketing sales to repeatedly initia...

  10. Modeling Heterogeneity in Consumer Preferences for Select Food Safety Attributes in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, David L.; Wang, H. Holly; Wu, Laping; Olynk, Nicole J.

    2010-01-01

    Food safety issues often arise from problems of asymmetric information between consumers and suppliers with regards to product-specific attributes. Severe food safety scandals were observed recently in China that not only caused direct economic and life loss but also created distrust in the Chinese food system domestically as well as internationally. While much attention has focused on the problems plaguing the Chinese government’s food inspection system, little research has been dedicated to...

  11. Development of a fuzzy qualitative risk assessment model applied to construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Abel Fernando do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is plagued by occupational risky situations and poor working conditions. Risk Assessment for Occupational Safety (RAOS) is the first and key step to achieve adequate safety levels, particularly to support decision-making in safety programs. Most construction safety efforts are applied informally under the premise that simply allocating more resources to safety management will improve safety on site. Moreover, there are many traditional methods to address RAOS, but...

  12. Model fit and model selection

    OpenAIRE

    Kocherlakota, Narayana R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses an example to show that a model that fits the available data perfectly may provide worse answers to policy questions than an alternative, imperfectly fitting model. The author argues that, in the context of Bayesian estimation, this result can be interpreted as being due to the use of an inappropriate prior over the parameters of shock processes. He urges the use of priors that are obtained from explicit auxiliary information, not from the desire to obtain identification.

  13. Model composition in model checking

    OpenAIRE

    Felscher, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Model-checking allows one to formally check properties of systems: these properties are modeled as logic formulas and the systems as structures like transition systems. These transition systems are often composed, i.e., they arise in form of products or sums. The composition technique allows us to deduce the truth of a formula in the composed system from "interface information": the truth of formulas for the component systems and information in which components which of these formulas hold. W...

  14. Analog model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to devices for modelling the space-dependent kinetics of a nuclear reactor. It can be advantageously used in studying the dynamics of the neutron field in the core to determine the effect of the control rods on the power distribution in the core, for training purposes. The proposed analog model of a nuclear reactor comprises operational amplifiers and a grid of resistors simulating neutron diffusion. Connected to the grid nodes are supply resistors modelling absorption and multiplication of neutrons. This is achieved by that, in the proposed model, all resistors through which power is supplied to the grid nodes are interconnected by their other leads and coupled to the output of the amplifier unit common for all nodes. Therewith, the amlifier unit models the transfer function of a ''point'' reactor. Connected to the input of this unit which includes two to four amplifiers are resistors for addition of signals with a grid node. Coupled to the grid nodes via additional resistors are voltage sources simulating reactivity

  15. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of probabil......Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of...... probabilistic functionalism, and concerns the environment and the mind, and adaptation by the latter to the former. This entry is about the lens model, and probabilistic functionalism more broadly. Focus will mostly be on firms and their employees, but, to fully appreciate the scope, we have to keep in mind the...

  16. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident...... characteristic of architectural practice. But the persistence in persistent modelling can also be understood to apply in other ways, reflecting and anticipating extended roles for representation. This book identifies three principle areas in which these extensions are becoming apparent within contemporary....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....

  17. Modelling Defiguration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork Petersen, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    focus centres on how the catwalk scenography evokes a ‘defiguration’ of the walking models and to what effect. Vibskov’s mobile catwalk draws attention to the walk, which is a key element of models’ performance but which usually functions in fashion shows merely to present clothes in the most...... advantageous manner. Stepping on the catwalk’s sloping, moving surfaces decelerates the models’ walk and makes it cautious, hesitant and shaky: suddenly the models lack exactly the affirmative, staccato, striving quality of motion, and the condescending expression that they perform on most contemporary...... determines the models’ walk. Furthermore, letting the models set off sound through triggers with attached sound samples gives them an implied agency. This calls into question the designer’s unrestricted authorship....

  18. Inflatable Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Vasily Volkov

    2006-01-01

    A physically-based model is presented for the simulation of a new type of deformable objects-inflatable objects, such as shaped balloons, which consist of pressurized air enclosed by an elastic surface. These objects have properties inherent in both 3D and 2D elastic bodies, as they demonstrate the behaviour of 3D shapes using 2D formulations. As there is no internal structure in them, their behaviour is substantially different from the behaviour of deformable solid objects. We use one of the few available models for deformable surfaces, and enhance it to include the forces of internal and external pressure. These pressure forces may also incorporate buoyancy forces, to allow objects filled with a low density gas to float in denser media. The obtained models demonstrate rich dynamic behaviour, such as bouncing, floating, deflation and inflation.

  19. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the 56Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed

  20. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  1. Cheating models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnoldi, Jakob

    The article discusses the use of algorithmic models for so-called High Frequency Trading (HFT) in finance. HFT is controversial yet widespread in modern financial markets. It is a form of automated trading technology which critics among other things claim can lead to market manipulation. Drawing on...... two cases, this article shows that manipulation more likely happens in the reverse way, meaning that human traders attempt to make algorithms ‘make mistakes’ or ‘mislead’ algos. Thus, it is algorithmic models, not humans, that are manipulated. Such manipulation poses challenges for security exchanges...

  2. Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When you submit the form on this page, which includes your email address

  3. Modelling language

    CERN Document Server

    Cardey, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    In response to the need for reliable results from natural language processing, this book presents an original way of decomposing a language(s) in a microscopic manner by means of intra/inter‑language norms and divergences, going progressively from languages as systems to the linguistic, mathematical and computational models, which being based on a constructive approach are inherently traceable. Languages are described with their elements aggregating or repelling each other to form viable interrelated micro‑systems. The abstract model, which contrary to the current state of the art works in int

  4. Smashnova Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaram, C.

    2007-01-01

    An alternate model for gamma ray bursts is suggested. For a white dwarf (WD) and neutron star (NS) very close binary system, the WD (close to Mch) can detonate due to tidal heating, leading to a SN. Material falling on to the NS at relativistic velocities can cause its collapse to a magnetar or quark star or black hole leading to a GRB. As the material smashes on to the NS, it is dubbed the Smashnova model. Here the SN is followed by a GRB. NS impacting a RG (or RSG) (like in Thorne-Zytkow ob...

  5. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  6. Modeling Minds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John

    others' minds. Then (2), in order to bring to light some possible justifications, as well as hazards and criticisms of the methodology of looking time tests, I will take a closer look at the concept of folk psychology and will focus on the idea that folk psychology involves using oneself as a model of...

  7. Why Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eWolkenhauer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a renaissance of mining approaches. A comprehensive picture of the genetic landscape of an individual patient will be useful, for example, to identify groups of patients that do or do not respond to certain therapies. The high expectations may however not be satisfied if the number of patient groups with similar characteristics is going to be very large. I therefore doubt that mining sequence data will give us an understanding of why and when therapies work. For understanding the mechanisms underlying diseases, an alternative approach is to model small networks in quantitative mechanistic detail, to elucidate the role of gene and proteins in dynamically changing the functioning of cells. Here an obvious critique is that these models consider too few components, compared to what might be relevant for any particular cell function. I show here that mining approaches and dynamical systems theory are two ends of a spectrum of methodologies to choose from. Drawing upon personal experience in numerous interdisciplinary collaborations, I provide guidance on how to model by discussing the question Why model?

  8. Painting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  9. Logic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NSPCC/University of Edinburgh Child Protection Research Centre. It highlights the Centre's work, approach, progress to date and direction of travel. The document includes the Centre's Logic Model which details types of research and outcomes.

  10. Transport modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ There has been remarkable progress during the past decade in understanding and modeling turbulent transport in tokamaks. With some exceptions the progress is derived from the huge increases in computational power and the ability to simulate tokamak turbulence with ever more fundamental and physically realistic dynamical equations, e.g.

  11. Model CAPM

    OpenAIRE

    Burianová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Cílem první části této bakalářské práce je - pomocí analýzy výchozích textů - teoretické shrnutí ekonomických modelů a teorií, na kterých model CAPM stojí: Markowitzův model teorie portfolia (analýza maximalizace očekávaného užitku a na něm založený model výběru optimálního portfolia), Tobina (rozšíření Markowitzova modelu ? rozdělení výběru optimálního portfolia do dvou fází; nejprve určení optimální kombinace rizikových instrumentů a následná alokace dostupného kapitálu mezi tuto optimální ...

  12. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten S.; Frigaard, Peter

    In the following, results from model tests with Zeebrugge breakwater are presented. The objective with these tests is partly to investigate the influence on wave run-up due to a changing waterlevel during a storm. Finally, the influence on wave run-up due to an introduced longshore current is...

  13. Modelling Entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bosma (Niels); G. de Wit (Gerrit); M.A. Carree (Martin)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTwo approaches can be distinguished with respect to modelling entrepreneurship: (i) the approach focusing on the net development of the number of entrepreneurs in an equilibrium framework and (ii) the approach focusing on the entries and exits of entrepreneurs. In this paper we unify the

  14. Criticality Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  15. Criticality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of

  16. Information Model for Product Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦国方; 刘慎权

    1992-01-01

    The Key problems in product modeling for integrated CAD ∥CAM systems are the information structures and representations of products.They are taking more and more important roles in engineering applications.With the investigation on engineering product information and from the viewpoint of industrial process,in this paper,the information models are proposed and the definitions of the framework of product information are given.And then,the integration and the consistence of product information are discussed by introucing the entity and its instance.As a summary,the information structures described in this paper have many advantage and natures helpful in engineering design.

  17. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  18. Leadership model

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Leandro S.; José Fernando A. Cruz; Ferreira, Helena Isabel dos Santos Ribeiro; Pinto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior studies the decision-making mechanisms of individuals. We propose the Nash Equilibria as one, of many, possible mechanisms of transforming human intentions in behavior. This process corresponds to the best strategic individual decision taking in account the collective response. We built a game theoretical model to understand the role of leaders in decision-making of individuals or groups. We study the characteristics of the leaders that can have a...

  19. Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Merlise; George, Edward I.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of Bayesian approaches for model uncertainty over the past decade has been remarkable. Catalyzed by advances in methods and technology for posterior computation, the scope of these methods has widened substantially. Major thrusts of these developments have included new methods for semiautomatic prior specification and posterior exploration. To illustrate key aspects of this evolution, the highlights of some of these developments are described.

  20. Supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture was given at the KEK Summer School on August 3-6, 1993 by Professor N. Sakai. All the available experimental data at low energy can be adequately described by the standard model with SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) gauge group. The three different gauge coupling constants originate from the three different interactions, namely, strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions. The three interactions described by the three different gauge groups can be truly unified into a single gauge group if a simple gauge group to describe all three interactions is chosen. Even if the grand unified theory is not accepted, the existence of gravitational interaction is sure. There are only two options to explain the gauge hierarchy, that is, technicolor model and supersymmetry. As the introduction to supersymmetry, Spinors and Grassmann number, Supertransformation, unitary representation, chiral scalar superfield and supersymmetric Lagrangian field theory are explained. Regarding the supersymmetric SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model, Yukawa coupling and particle content are described. It should be noted that the Higgsino (chiral fermions associated with Higgs scalar) in general introduces anomaly in gauge currents. The simplest way out of such anomaly problem is to introduce Higgsino doublet in pair. (K.I.)