WorldWideScience

Sample records for bubbleless gas transfer

  1. Production of surfactin and fengycin by Bacillus subtilis in a bubbleless membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutte, François; Lecouturier, Didier; Yahia, Saliha Ait; Leclère, Valérie; Béchet, Max; Jacques, Philippe; Dhulster, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Surfactin and fengycin are lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis. This work describes for the first time the use of bubbleless bioreactors for the production of these lipopeptides by B. subtilis ATCC 21332 with aeration by a hollow fiber membrane air-liquid contactor to prevent foam formation. Three different configurations were tested: external aeration module made from either polyethersulfone (reactor BB1) or polypropylene (reactor BB2) and a submerged module in polypropylene (reactor BB3). Bacterial growth, glucose consumption, lipopeptide production, and oxygen uptake rate were monitored during the culture in the bioreactors. For all the tested membranes, the bioreactors were of satisfactory bacterial growth and lipopeptide production. In the three configurations, surfactin production related to the culture volume was in the same range: 242, 230, and 188 mg l(-1) for BB1, BB2, and BB3, respectively. Interestingly, high differences were observed for fengycin production: 47 mg l(-1) for BB1, 207 mg l(-1) for BB2, and 393 mg l(-1) for BB3. A significant proportion of surfactin was adsorbed on the membranes and reduced the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The degree of adsorption depended on both the material and the structure of the membrane and was higher with the submerged polypropylene membrane.

  2. Novel Water Treatment Processes Based on Hybrid Membrane-Ozonation Systems: A Novel Ceramic Membrane Contactor for Bubbleless Ozonation of Emerging Micropollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos K. Stylianou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the presentation of novel water treatment systems based on ozonation combined with ceramic membranes for the treatment of refractory organic compounds found in natural water sources such as groundwater. This includes, firstly, a short review of possible membrane based hybrid processes for water treatment from various sources. Several practical and theoretical aspects for the application of hybrid membrane-ozonation systems are discussed, along with theoretical background regarding the transformation of target organic pollutants by ozone. Next, a novel ceramic membrane contactor, bringing into contact the gas phase (ozone and water phase without the creation of bubbles (bubbleless ozonation, is presented. Experimental data showing the membrane contactor efficiency for oxidation of atrazine, endosulfan, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE are shown and discussed. Almost complete endosulfan degradation was achieved with the use of the ceramic contactor, whereas atrazine degradation higher than 50% could not be achieved even after 60 min of reaction time. Single ozonation of water containing MTBE could not result in a significant MTBE degradation. MTBE mineralization by O3/H2O2 combination increased at higher pH values and O3/H2O2 molar ratio of 0.2 reaching a maximum of around 65%.

  3. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  4. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  5. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, O; Tapan, I; Ozmutlu, E N

    2010-01-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  6. MASS-TRANSFER IN GAS-LIQUID SLURRY REACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEENACKERS, AACM; VANSWAAIJ, WPM

    A critical review is presented on the mass transfer characteristics of gas-liquid slurry reactors. The recent findings on the influence of the presence of solid particles on the following mass transfer parameters in slurry reactors are discussed: volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients

  7. Mass transfer in gas-liquid slurry reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenackers, A.A.C.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1993-01-01

    A critical review is presented on the mass transfer characteristics of gas¿liquid slurry reactors. The recent findings on the influence of the presence of solid particles on the following mass transfer parameters in slurry reactors are discussed: volumetric gas¿liquid mass transfer coefficients

  8. Review of mass transfer aspects for biological gas treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraakman, N.J.R.; Rocha-Rios, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reviews the mass transfer aspects of biotechnological processes for gas treatment, with an emphasis on the underlying principles and technical feasible methods for mass transfer enhancements. Understanding of the mass transfer behavior in bioreactors for gas treatment will result

  9. Gas turbine heat transfer and cooling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin; Ekkad, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    FundamentalsNeed for Turbine Blade CoolingTurbine-Cooling TechnologyTurbine Heat Transfer and Cooling IssuesStructure of the BookReview Articles and Book Chapters on Turbine Cooling and Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 2010ReferencesTurbine Heat TransferIntroductionTurbine-Stage Heat TransferCascade Vane Heat-Transfer ExperimentsCascade Blade Heat TransferAirfoil Endwall Heat TransferTurbine Rotor Blade Tip Heat TransferLeading-Edge Region Heat TransferFlat-Surface Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 20102.10 ClosureReferencesTurbine Film CoolingIntroductionFilm Cooling on Rotat

  10. 75 FR 66046 - Capacity Transfers on Intrastate Natural Gas Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 284 Capacity Transfers on Intrastate Natural Gas Pipelines... capacity on intrastate natural gas pipelines providing interstate transportation and storage services under section 311 of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 and Hinshaw pipelines providing such services pursuant...

  11. Heat Transfer and Cooling in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    the detailed component internal heat transfer for a variety of families of cooling schemes, and (c) to choose from among and withir those families to...1965. 32. Metzger, D.E., and Grochowsky, 1.D., "Heat Transfer Between an Impinging Jet and a Rotating Dink ," J. Heat Tranafer, Trans. ASME, 99, pp. 663

  12. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  13. Diurnal Cycles of Trace Gas Transfer through Wetland Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. C.; Ho, D. T.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Natural and constructed wetlands are major sources of biogeochemical trace gases, and have recently gained attention as tools for passive remediation of discharging groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Wetland plants act as conduits for the volatilization of dissolved compounds from the interstitial pore waters of aquatic sediments to the atmosphere, so clarifying the mechanisms of this vegetation-mediated gas transport is essential to understanding the emissions of compounds including methane and VOCs. The conservative gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used to examine mechanisms of gas transport through the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia in greenhouse mesocosm experiments. The results provide novel experimental evidence for the enhancement by light of plant-mediated gas fluxes through S. acutus, a species with no previously documented light-activated gas transport mechanism. A nonlinear saturation model was fit to the tracer flux data using least-squares regression. The mechanism for this light-enhanced flux was investigated in additional experiments in which atmospheric humidity was deliberately manipulated. These results will be discussed with respect to the role of transpiration in enhancing plant-mediated gas transport. The SF6 flux data also quantify inter-species and seasonal variability in gas transfer rates, and capture the dynamics of pressurized gas flows in T. latifolia. A numerical model of gas transport mechanisms in the root and rhizosphere system was calibrated with experimental data and used to further examine mechanisms of gas exchange between saturated wetland sediments, vegetation, and the atmosphere.

  14. Gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient in stirred tank reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yawalkar, Archis A.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric gas—liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) data available in the literature for larger tanks (T = 0.39 m to 2.7 m) have been analyzed on the basis of relative dispersion parameter, N/Ncd. It was observed that at a given superficial gas velocity (VG), kLa values were approximately the same

  15. Stagnation Point Heat Transfer with Gas Injection Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancrayenest, B.; Tran, M. D.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with an experimental study of the stagnation-point heat transfer to a cooled copper surface with gas injection under subsonic conditions. Test were made with a probe that combined a steady-state water-cooled calorimeter that allows the capability to study convective blockage and to perform heat transfer measurements in presence of gas injection in the stagnation region. The copper probe was pierced by 52 holes, representing 2.4% of the total probe surface. The 1.2 MW high enthalpy plasma wind tunnel was operated at anode powers between 130 and 230 kW and a static pressures from 35 hPa up to 200 hPa. Air, carbon dioxide and argon were injected in the mass flow range 0-0.4 g/s in the boundary layer developed around the 50 mm diameter probe. The measured stagnation-point heat transfer rates are reported and discussed.

  16. Self-consistent liquid-to-gas mass transfer calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Simon A; Stöckle, Claudio O

    2010-12-01

    This work develops an alternative gas transfer calculation method to the two methods currently used in anaerobic digestion modelling. The current calculation methods are problematic because one is computationally stiff, while the other introduces an artificial overpressure. The new approach began by noting that the gas partial pressures are the same as the partial flows at the liquid/gas interface, and then used the self-consistency requirement to develop gas pressure equations which were used by a search algorithm. The new approach took about three iterations to achieve a flow precision better than 2x10(-7) mol h(-1) l(-1), and was self-consistent and stable even when working with eight gases. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  18. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  19. An inverse gas chromatographic methodology for studying gas-liquid mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloglou, A; Martakidis, K; Gavril, D

    2017-01-13

    A novel methodology of reversed flow inverse gas chromatography (RF-IGC) is presented. It permits the simultaneous determination of mass transfer coefficients across the gas liquid interface as well as the respective solubility parameters and thermodynamic functions of dissolution of gases into liquids. The standard deviation of the experimentally determined parameters is estimated for first time, which combined with the successful comparison of the values of the present parameters with other literature ones ascertain the reliability of the methodology. Another novelty of the present work is that the chromatographic sampling of the physicochemical phenomena is done without performing the usual flow reversals procedure. Vinyl chloride monomer's (VCM) interaction with various composition liquid foods: orange juice, milk and olive oil was used as model system. The present transfer rates are controlled by the gas film at lower temperatures, but at higher temperatures the resistances in both films tend to become equal. The found liquid diffusivity values express the total mass transfer from the gas phase into the liquid's bulk and they decrease with rising temperature, as the solubilities of gases in liquids do. Solubility, expressed by Henry's law constant and the mean values of interfacial thickness are of the same order of magnitude to literature ones. From the thermodynamic point of view, VCM dissolution in all liquids is accompanied by significant heat release and it is a slightly non-spontaneous process, near equilibrium, while the entropy change values are negative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of gas emission on heat transfer in porous ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambaryan-Roisman, T.; Shapiro, M.; Litovsky, E.; Shavit, A. [Laboratory of Transport Processes in Porous Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2003-01-01

    It is known that thermal diffusivity, a, of several types of porous ceramic and refractory materials decreases with decreasing gas pressure. However, a of several ceramics (e.g., magnesite refractories with porosity about 25%) measured in vacuum by the monotonous heating exceeds the comparable data registered at atmospheric pressure. A similar effect was found for thermal diffusivity of several insulating materials. However, for some porous ceramics this phenomenon is absent or less prominent. It had been known that several heterogeneous physico-chemical processes take place on pore surfaces of ceramic materials. These processes include heterogeneous chemical reactions accompanied by emission of gaseous products. It had been conjectured that these processes affect thermophysical properties of ceramic materials, especially during fast heating or cooling. In this paper we substantiate this conjecture. Namely, we develop a quantitative model for the apparent thermal diffusivity, as measured by the nonstationary monotonous heating method. It takes into account the emission and adsorption of the gas on the opposite pore sides along the temperature gradient, the diffusive gas motion inside the pores and its removal from the pores due to the material gas permeability. The effect of these processes is shown to produce an additional heat flux inside the pore or crack and, hence, to increase the measured thermal diffusivity. In the presence of the passive gas, the rates of gas emission and its transport within the pore are significantly reduced, which leads to diminution of the effect of gas emission-adsorption on the heat transfer across the pore. Consequently, we show that this leads to a situation (observed in experiment) where thermal diffusivity of a material measured at high temperature in vacuum may exceed the comparable property at atmospheric pressure. When the reaction terminates due to the full conversion of the available solid reactant, the additional heat flow

  1. Development and validation of mass transfer models for the design of agitated gas-liquid reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Laakkonen, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical agitation is used commonly in gas-liquid reactors to improve the homogeneity of dispersion and to enhance the transfer of reacting compounds between gas and liquid. The design and scaleup of gas-liquid reactors is problematic due to non-ideal mixing, heat and mass transfer limitations. In this work, phenomenological models were developed and validated against experiments to investigate local gas-liquid mass transfer in agitated tanks. The aim was to develop more generalized and rel...

  2. CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN CYCLONE DEVICE WITH EXTERNAL GAS RECIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Karpov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the convective heat transfer on the surface of a hollow cylinder or several billets in a cyclone device with the new principle of external gas recirculation. According to this principle, transport of coolant from the lateral surface of the chamber, where the temperature is the highest, in the axial region is being fulfilled due to the pressure drop between the wall and axial areas of cyclonic flow. Dependency analysis of average and local heat transfer coefficients from operational and geometrical parameters has been performed; the generalized similarity equations for the calculation of the latter have been suggested. It is demonstrated that in case of download of a cyclone chamber with several billets, the use of the considered scheme of the external recirculation due to the specific characteristics of aerodynamics practically does not lead to noticeable changes in the intensity of convective heat transfer. Both experimental data and the numerical simulation results obtained with the use of OpenFOAM platform were used in the work. The investigations fulfilled will expand the area of the use of cyclone heating devices.

  3. Gas diffusion electrodes improve hydrogen gas mass transfer for a hydrogen oxidizing bioanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas, Pau; Zhu, Fangqi; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Sleutels, Tom; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees

    2017-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are capable of recovery of metals at a cathode through oxidation of organic substrate at an anode. Recently, also hydrogen gas was used as an electron donor for recovery of copper in BESs. Oxidation of hydrogen gas produced a current density of 0.8 A m-2 and combined with Cu2+ reduction at the cathode, produced 0.25 W m-2. The main factor limiting current production was the mass transfer of hydrogen to the biofilm due to the low solubility of hydrogen in the anolyte. Here, the mass transfer of hydrogen gas to the bioanode was improved by use of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE). With the GDE, hydrogen was oxidized to produce a current density of 2.9 A m-2 at an anode potential of -0.2 V. Addition of bicarbonate to the influent led to production of acetate, in addition to current. At a bicarbonate concentration of 50 mmol L-1, current density increased to 10.7 A m-2 at an anode potential of -0.2 V. This increase in current density could be due to oxidation of formed acetate in addition to oxidation of hydrogen, or enhanced growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria due to the availability of acetate as carbon source. The effect of mass transfer was further assessed through enhanced mixing and in combination with the addition of bicarbonate (50 mmol L-1) current density increased further to 17.1 A m-2. Hydrogen gas may offer opportunities as electron donor for bioanodes, with acetate as potential intermediate, at locations where excess hydrogen and no organics are available. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  5. Parameterizing air-sea gas transfer velocity with dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Christensen, K. H.; Saltzman, E. S.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2017-04-01

    The air-sea gas transfer velocity k is frequently estimated as an empirical function of wind speed. However, it is widely recognized that k depends on processes other than wind speed alone. The small-eddy model, which describes periodic events of small eddies disturbing the sea surface with water from below, suggests a direct relation between k and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ at the air-sea interface. This relation has been proven both in laboratories and in the field in various freshwater and coastal environments, but to date has not been verified in open ocean conditions. Here, concurrent North Atlantic field observations of ɛ and eddy covariance measurements of DMS and CO2 air-sea gas flux are presented. Using ɛ measurements, we compare the small-eddy model at various depths to previously published observations. Extrapolating the measured ɛ profiles to the thickness of the viscous sublayer allows us to formulate a function of k that depends solely on the water side friction velocity u∗w, which can be inferred from direct eddy covariance measurements of the air-side friction velocity u∗a. These field observations are generally consistent with the theoretical small-eddy model. Utilizing a variable Schmidt number exponent in the model, rather than a constant value of 1/2 yields improved agreement between model and observations.

  6. Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: Approaches and organizational mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of this thesis has been to explore how experience transfer works in Norwegian oil and gas industry. This includes how the concept of experience transfer is defined, what the barriers to achieve experience transfer are, how the oil and gas companies address experience transfer, and how these approaches work. The thesis is organized in five papers: (1) describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer and then specifies the organizational and structural barriers that must be overcome to achieve efficient transfer. (2) discusses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. (3) describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. (4) explores how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. (5) compares organizational members` perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. 277 refs., 3 figs., 29 tabs.

  7. An automated gas exchange tank for determining gas transfer velocities in natural seawater samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider-Zapp

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to advance understanding of the role of seawater surfactants in the air–sea exchange of climatically active trace gases via suppression of the gas transfer velocity (kw, we constructed a fully automated, closed air–water gas exchange tank and coupled analytical system. The system allows water-side turbulence in the tank to be precisely controlled with an electronically operated baffle. Two coupled gas chromatographs and an integral equilibrator, connected to the tank in a continuous gas-tight system, allow temporal changes in the partial pressures of SF6, CH4 and N2O to be measured simultaneously in the tank water and headspace at multiple turbulence settings, during a typical experimental run of 3.25 h. PC software developed by the authors controls all operations and data acquisition, enabling the optimisation of experimental conditions with high reproducibility. The use of three gases allows three independent estimates of kw for each turbulence setting; these values are subsequently normalised to a constant Schmidt number for direct comparison. The normalised kw estimates show close agreement. Repeated experiments with Milli-Q water demonstrate a typical measurement accuracy of 4% for kw. Experiments with natural seawater show that the system clearly resolves the effects on kw of spatial and temporal trends in natural surfactant activity. The system is an effective tool with which to probe the relationships between kw, surfactant activity and biogeochemical indices of primary productivity, and should assist in providing valuable new insights into the air–sea gas exchange process.

  8. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  9. Particle size distribution effects on gas-particle mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Previous analyses have shown that the dominant mass transfer mechanism responsible for mercury capture within ESPs is gas-particle mass transfer during particulate collection. Whereas previous analyses assumed dispersions of uniform size, the present analysis reveals the effects of polydispersity on both gas-particle mass transfer and particle collection within an ESP. The analysis reveals that the idealized monodisperse particle size distribution provides the highest gas-particle mass transfer but results in the lowest particle collection efficiency (% mass). As the particle size distribution broadens, gas-particle mass transfer decreases and particle collection efficiency increases. The results suggest that more than just reporting mean particle diameter provided by the sorbent manufacturer, pilot- and field-tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control need to experimentally measure the particle size distribution of the sorbent as it is injected in order to facilitate interpretation of their results.

  10. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Menzel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung.

  11. Controls on gas transfer velocities in a large river

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emission of biogenic gases from large rivers can be an important component of regional greenhouse gas budgets. However, emission rate estimates are often poorly constrained due to uncertainties in the air-water gas exchange rate. We used the floating chamber method to estim...

  12. Modelling gas-liquid flow and local mass transfer in stirred tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Moilanen, Pasi

    2009-01-01

    This doctorial thesis offers a guideline for modelling gas-liquid flow in stirred tanks with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Particularly the effect of varying physical properties and industrial operating conditions is highlighted. The most important thing in modelling mass transfer in stirred vessels is the accurate prediction of local bubble size. Population balances for bubbles are needed for accurate description of the local mass transfer rate. There are many pitfalls in gas-liquid mo...

  13. Polyoxometalate-mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer oxidation of cellulose and hemicellulose to synthesis gas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we show that by using a polyoxometalate as an electron transfer-oxygen transfer catalyst, carbon monoxide is formed by cleavage of all the carbon-carbon bonds through dehydration of initially formed formic acid...

  14. Gas Turbine/Solar Parabolic Trough Hybrid Design Using Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C. S.; Ma, Z.

    2011-08-01

    Parabolic trough power plants can provide reliable power by incorporating either thermal energy storage (TES) or backup heat from fossil fuels. This paper describes a gas turbine / parabolic trough hybrid design that combines a solar contribution greater than 50% with gas heat rates that rival those of natural gas combined-cycle plants. Previous work illustrated benefits of integrating gas turbines with conventional oil heat-transfer-fluid (HTF) troughs running at 390?C. This work extends that analysis to examine the integration of gas turbines with salt-HTF troughs running at 450 degrees C and including TES. Using gas turbine waste heat to supplement the TES system provides greater operating flexibility while enhancing the efficiency of gas utilization. The analysis indicates that the hybrid plant design produces solar-derived electricity and gas-derived electricity at lower cost than either system operating alone.

  15. Communication: Charge transfer dominates over proton transfer in the reaction of nitric acid with gas-phase hydrated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Med, Jakub; Slavíček, Petr; Beyer, Martin K.

    2017-09-01

    The reaction of HNO3 with hydrated electrons (H2O)n- (n = 35-65) in the gas phase was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic analysis of the experimental data shows that OH-(H2O)m is formed primarily via a reaction of the hydrated electron with HNO3 inside the cluster, while proton transfer is not observed and NO3-(H2O)m is just a secondary product. The reaction enthalpy was determined using nanocalorimetry, revealing a quite exothermic charge transfer with -241 ± 69 kJ mol-1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that proton transfer is an allowed reaction pathway, but the overall thermochemistry favors charge transfer.

  16. Gas-liquid mass transfer in filamentous slurries in airlift bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisti, M.Y.; Moo-Young, M. (Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada))

    1988-01-01

    Biotechnology production processes are often critically dependent on oxygen transfer in gas-liquid-solid multiphase systems. Some of these biofluid slurries are composed of fibrous or filamentous, mycelial, solids suspended in a water-like medium. Examples are the broths of Aspergilli, Penicillia, Neurospora and Streptomyces, all of which are of commercial importance. This paper reports of the gas-liquid mass transfer behaviour of aqueous slurries of cellulose fibre solids (1-3 wt./vol. % solids in 0.15 kmol m/sup -3/ NaCl) which simulate the filamentous fermentation broths of interest. Fundamental investigations into the relationship between the mass transfer coefficient (k/sub L/) and bubble diameter (d/sub B/) are undertaken. The observations can be usefully employed for scale-up of bioreactors for gas-liquid mass transfer as demonstrated in the paper.

  17. Radiating heat transfer in the power boiler downtake gas duct when firing high-ash coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarev, A.V.; Antonovsky, V.I.; Kiselev, O.V.; Sivchikov, S.B. (VTUS-Leningrad Metal Plant-LMZ, Leningrad (USSR))

    1990-01-01

    The experimental study of radiation heat transfer in the downtake gas duct of the pulverized-coal fired steam boiler for 500 MW power unit when firing high-ash (40% ash content) coal from Ekibastuz coal field was carried out by means of the radiometer probe with rotary optical axis. The local values of the combustion product temperature were measured simultaneously in the down-take and the operation parameters for boiler gas and steam ducts were registered. The dependence of the extinction coefficient of combustion products on the radiating layer thickness was obtained. The radiating power, generated in the gas space, remote from the steam superheater and reaching the super heater boundaries, was measured. The heat release coefficients from radiation and heat transfer coefficients, were determined for definite operation conditions of the superheater working. The contribution of the gas space outside the steam superheater into the radiating heat transfer negligible.

  18. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real

  19. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Harvey, Karen [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  20. Liquid-gas mass transfer at drop structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Natércia; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José Saldanha

    2017-05-01

    Over the last decades, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the sulfur cycle in sewer systems. In spite of a wealth of experimental and field studies that have addressed the release of hydrogen sulfide from free surface flows in gravity sewers and the corresponding air-water mass transfer, little is known about hydrogen sulfide emission under highly turbulent conditions (e.g., drop structures, hydraulic jumps). In this study, experimental work was carried out to analyze the influence of characteristics of drops on reaeration. Physical models were built, mimicking typical sewer drop structures and allowing different types of drops, drop heights, tailwater depths and flow rates. In total, 125 tests were performed. Based on their results, empirical expressions translating the relationship between the mass transfer of oxygen and physical parameters of drop structures were established. Then, by applying the two-film theory with two-reference substances, the relation to hydrogen sulfide release was defined. The experiments confirmed that the choice of the type of drop structure is critical to determine the uptake/emission rates. By quantifying the air-water mass transfer rates between free-fall and backdrop types of drop, the latter resulted in considerably lower oxygen uptake rates.

  1. Modelling mass transfer during venting/soil vapour extraction: Non-aqueous phase liquid/gas mass transfer coefficient estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrael, D; Kacem, M; Benadda, B

    2017-07-01

    We investigate how the simulation of the venting/soil vapour extraction (SVE) process is affected by the mass transfer coefficient, using a model comprising five partial differential equations describing gas flow and mass conservation of phases and including an expression accounting for soil saturation conditions. In doing so, we test five previously reported quations for estimating the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)/gas initial mass transfer coefficient and evaluate an expression that uses a reference NAPL saturation. Four venting/SVE experiments utilizing a sand column are performed with dry and non-saturated sand at low and high flow rates, and the obtained experimental results are subsequently simulated, revealing that hydrodynamic dispersion cannot be neglected in the estimation of the mass transfer coefficient, particularly in the case of low velocities. Among the tested models, only the analytical solution of a convection-dispersion equation and the equation proposed herein are suitable for correctly modelling the experimental results, with the developed model representing the best choice for correctly simulating the experimental results and the tailing part of the extracted gas concentration curve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling mass transfer during venting/soil vapour extraction: Non-aqueous phase liquid/gas mass transfer coefficient estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrael, D.; Kacem, M.; Benadda, B.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate how the simulation of the venting/soil vapour extraction (SVE) process is affected by the mass transfer coefficient, using a model comprising five partial differential equations describing gas flow and mass conservation of phases and including an expression accounting for soil saturation conditions. In doing so, we test five previously reported quations for estimating the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)/gas initial mass transfer coefficient and evaluate an expression that uses a reference NAPL saturation. Four venting/SVE experiments utilizing a sand column are performed with dry and non-saturated sand at low and high flow rates, and the obtained experimental results are subsequently simulated, revealing that hydrodynamic dispersion cannot be neglected in the estimation of the mass transfer coefficient, particularly in the case of low velocities. Among the tested models, only the analytical solution of a convection-dispersion equation and the equation proposed herein are suitable for correctly modelling the experimental results, with the developed model representing the best choice for correctly simulating the experimental results and the tailing part of the extracted gas concentration curve.

  3. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  4. Experience Transfer in Norwegian Oil and Gas Industry: Approaches and Organizational Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-07-01

    The core aim of the study is to explore the concept of experience transfer in oil and gas industry, and how an oil company approaches this concept. The thesis consists of five papers which are combined in a general description entitled 'Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: approaches and organizational mechanisms'. The first paper describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer, and then specifies the many organizational and structural barriers that have to be overcome to achieve efficient experience transfer. The second paper elaborates and assesses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. The third paper describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. The fourth paper explores in more detail how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. And the fifth paper compares organizational members' perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. Some of the papers are based upon the same data material. Therefore there are reiterations in parts of the contents, especially in the methodological sections.

  5. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  6. High-precision gas gain and energy transfer measurements in Ar–CO{sub 2} mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şahin, Özkan, E-mail: osahin@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Kowalski, Tadeusz Z. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków (Poland); Veenhof, Rob [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); RD51 collaboration, CERN, Genève (Switzerland)

    2014-12-21

    Ar–CO{sub 2} is a Penning mixture since a fraction of the energy stored in Ar 3p{sup 5}3d and higher excited states can be transferred to ionize CO{sub 2} molecules. In the present work, concentration and pressure dependence of Penning transfer rate and photon feedback parameter in Ar–CO{sub 2} mixtures have been investigated with recent systematic high-precision gas gain measurements which cover the range 1–50% CO{sub 2} at 400, 800, 1200, 1800 hPa and gas gain from 1 to 5×10{sup 5}.

  7. Green's function solution to heat transfer of a transparent gas through a tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis of a transparent gas flowing through a circular tube of finite thickness is presented. This study includes the effects of wall conduction, internal radiative exchange, and convective heat transfer. The natural mathematical formulation produces a nonlinear, integrodifferential equation governing the wall temperature and an ordinary differential equation describing the gas temperature. This investigation proposes to convert the original system of equations into an equivalent system of integral equations. The Green's function method permits the conversion of an integrodifferential equation into a pure integral equation. The proposed integral formulation and subsequent computational procedure are shown to be stable and accurate.

  8. Influence of rotating magnetic field on gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakoczy Rafał

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of these experiments was to study the oxygen mass transfer rate through the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa for an experimental set-up equipped with a rotating magnetic field (RMF generator and various liquids. The experimental results indicated that kLa increased along the magnetic strength and the superficial gas velocity. Mathematical correlations defining the influence of the considered factors on kLa were proposed.

  9. Flow and heat transfer investigations in swirl tubes for gas turbine blade cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Biegger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A swirl tube is a very effective cooling technique for high thermal loaded components like gas turbine blades. Such a tube consists of one or more tangential inlet jets, which induce a highly 3D swirling flow. This swirling flow is characterized by large velocities near the wall and an enhanced turbulence in the tube which both increase the convective heat transfer. In the present work, the flow phenomena and the heat transfer in swirl tubes are studied experimentally and numerically. Therefo...

  10. Gas stream in Algol. [mass transfer in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugier, H.; Chen, K.-Y.

    1977-01-01

    Additional absorption features in the red wings of the Mg II resonance lines near 2800 A are found in observations of Algol made from the Copernicus satellite. The absorption features were clearly seen only during a part of the primary eclipse, in the phase interval 0.90-0.03. The observations are interpreted as being produced by a stream of matter flowing from Algol B in the direction of Algol A. The measured Doppler shifts of the features give the value of 150 km/s as the characteristic velocity of matter in the stream. The mass transfer connected with the stream is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the -13th power solar mass per year.

  11. Microporous hollow fibre membrane modules as gas-liquid contactors. Part 1. Physical mass transfer processes : A specific application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, H.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1993-01-01

    Gas-liquid mass transfer has been studied in a membrane module with non-wetted microporous fibres in the laminar flow regime. This new type of gas/liquid contactor can be operated stabily over a large range of gas and liquid flows because gas and liquid phase do not influence each other directly.

  12. Ultrasound in gas-liquid systems: effects on solubility and mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugier, F; Andriantsiferana, C; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2008-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the pseudo-solubility of nitrogen in water and on gas-liquid mass transfer kinetics has been investigated in an autoclave reactor equipped with a gas induced impeller. In order to use organic liquids and to investigate the effect of pressure, gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient was calculated from the evolution of autoclave pressure during gas absorption to avoid any side-effects of ultrasound on the concentrations measurements. Ultrasound effect on the apparent solubility is very low (below 12%). Conversely ultrasound greatly improves gas-liquid mass transfer, especially below gas induction speed, this improvement being boosted by pressure. In typical conditions of organic synthesis: 323 K, 1100 rpm, 10 bar, k(L).a is multiplied by 11 with ultrasound (20 kHz/62.6 W). The impact of sonication is much higher on gassing out than on gassing in. In the same conditions, this enhancement is at least five times higher for degassing.

  13. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  14. Control of interspecies electron transfer flow during anaerobic digestion: dynamic diffusion reaction models for hydrogen gas transfer in microbial flocs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, S S; Palsson, B O; Thiele, J H

    1989-02-05

    Dynamic reaction diffusion models were used to analyze the consequences of aggregation for syntrophic reactions in methanogenic ecosystems. Flocs from a whey digestor were used to measure all model parameters under the in situ conditions of a particular defined biological system. Fermentation simulations without adjustable parameters could precisely predict the kinetics of H(2) gas production of digestor flocs during syntrophic methanogenesis from ethanol. The results demonstrated a kinetic compartmentalization of H(2) metabolism inside the flocs. The interspecies electron transfer reaction was mildly diffusion controlled. The H(2) gas profiles across the flocs showed high H (2) concentrations inside the flocs at any time. Simulations of the syntrophic metabolism at low substrate concentrations such as in digestors or sediments showed that it is impossible to achieve high H(2) gas turnovers at simultaneously low steady-state H(2) concentrations. This showed a mechanistic contradiction in the concept of postulated low H(2) microenvironments for the anaerobic digestion process. The results of the computer experiments support the conclusion that syntrophic H(2) production may only be a side reaction of H(2) independent interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic ecosystems.

  15. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  16. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  17. Triple rotary gas lock seal system for transferring coal continuously into, or ash out of, a pressurized process vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enright, F.J.; Seidl, R.M.

    1981-01-13

    A multiple rotary gas lock apparatus using a buffer seal gas is disclosed to enable the transfer of solid materials into or out of a pressurized process containing high temperature, flammable or toxic gases. The buffer seal gas, has a pressure higher than the process pressure and is introduced between two series connected gas locks; this prevents process gas backflow to the feed system. Buffer seal leakage gas from the first pair of gas locks and air from a third gas lock are removed from an opening in a connection between the pair of gas locks and the third gas lock at subatmospheric pressure. This system enables control and usuage of toxic or flammable gases as a buffer for mixing compatibility with the process gas when a suitable inert gas is not available. It also prevents the flow of any toxic gas to the worker environment.

  18. Progress towards understanding and predicting convection heat transfer in the turbine gas path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Simon, Frederick F.

    1992-01-01

    A new era is drawing in the ability to predict convection heat transfer in the turbine gas path. We feel that the technical community now has the capability to mount a major assault on this problem, which has eluded significant progress for a long time. We hope to make a case for this bold statement by reviewing the state of the art in three major heat transfer, configuration-specific experiments, whose data have provided the big picture and guided both the fundamental modeling research and the code development. Following that, we review progress and directions in the development of computer codes to predict turbine gas path heat transfer. Finally, we cite examples and make observations on the more recent efforts to do all this work in a simultaneous, interactive, and more synergistic manner. We conclude with an assessment of progress, suggestions for how to use the current state of the art, and recommendations for the future.

  19. Transfer of CVD-grown graphene for room temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, F.; Maiti, R.; Baratto, C.; Donarelli, M.; MacLeod, J.; Gupta, B.; Lyu, M.; Ponzoni, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Motta, N.; Faglia, G.

    2017-10-01

    An easy transfer procedure to obtain graphene-based gas sensing devices operating at room temperature (RT) is presented. Starting from chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene on copper foil, we obtained single layer graphene which could be transferred onto arbitrary substrates. In particular, we placed single layer graphene on top of a SiO2/Si substrate with pre-patterned Pt electrodes to realize a chemiresistor gas sensor able to operate at RT. The responses to ammonia (10, 20, 30 ppm) and nitrogen dioxide (1, 2, 3 ppm) are shown at different values of relative humidity, in dark and under 254 nm UV light. In order to check the sensor selectivity, gas response has also been tested towards hydrogen, ethanol, acetone and carbon oxide. Finally, a model based on linear dispersion relation characteristic of graphene, which take into account humidity and UV light effects, has been proposed.

  20. Gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient of methane in bubble column reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaewon; Ha, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Jinwon; Kim, Choongik [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Chang, In Seop [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Yeol [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Biological conversion of methane gas has been attracting considerable recent interest. However, methanotropic bioreactor is limited by low solubility of methane gas in aqueous solution. Although a large mass transfer coefficient of methane in water could possibly overcome this limitation, no dissolved methane probe in aqueous environment is commercially available. We have developed a reactor enabling the measurement of aqueous phase methane concentration and mass transfer coefficient (k{sub L}a). The feasibility of the new reactor was demonstrated by measuring k{sub L}a values as a function of spinning rate of impeller and flow rate of methane gas. Especially, at spinning rate of 300 rpm and flow rate of 3.0 L/min, a large k{sub L}a value of 102.9 h{sup -1} was obtained.

  1. The influence of polymeric membrane gas spargers on hydrodynamics and mass transfer in bubble column bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirunehe, Gossaye; Norddahl, B

    2016-04-01

    Gas sparging performances of a flat sheet and tubular polymeric membranes were investigated in 3.1 m bubble column bioreactor operated in a semi batch mode. Air-water and air-CMC (Carboxymethyl cellulose) solutions of 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 % w/w were used as interacting gas-liquid mediums. CMC solutions were employed in the study to simulate rheological properties of bioreactor broth. Gas holdup, bubble size distribution, interfacial area and gas-liquid mass transfer were studied in the homogeneous bubbly flow hydrodynamic regime with superficial gas velocity (U(G)) range of 0.0004-0.0025 m/s. The study indicated that the tubular membrane sparger produced the highest gas holdup and densely populated fine bubbles with narrow size distribution. An increase in liquid viscosity promoted a shift in bubble size distribution to large stable bubbles and smaller specific interfacial area. The tubular membrane sparger achieved greater interfacial area and an enhanced overall mass transfer coefficient (K(L)a) by a factor of 1.2-1.9 compared to the flat sheet membrane.

  2. Influence of internal channel geometry of gas turbine blade on flow structure and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Telega, Janusz; Doerffer, Piotr

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the study of the influence of channel geometry on the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on all the walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on the heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of internal cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include a corner fillets, ribs with fillet radii and a special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which has very realistic features.

  3. Dispersed bubble reactor for enhanced gas-liquid-solids contact and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang; Bonsu, Alexander

    2016-01-26

    An apparatus to promote gas-liquid contact and facilitate enhanced mass transfer. The dispersed bubble reactor (DBR) operates in the dispersed bubble flow regime to selectively absorb gas phase constituents into the liquid phase. The dispersion is achieved by shearing the large inlet gas bubbles into fine bubbles with circulating liquid and additional pumped liquid solvent when necessary. The DBR is capable of handling precipitates that may form during absorption or fine catalysts that may be necessary to promote liquid phase reactions. The DBR can be configured with multistage counter current flow sections by inserting concentric cylindrical sections into the riser to facilitate annular flow. While the DBR can absorb CO.sub.2 in liquid solvents that may lead to precipitates at high loadings, it is equally capable of handling many different types of chemical processes involving solids (precipitates/catalysts) along with gas and liquid phases.

  4. Transfer of gas from the acinus during continuous flow and intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, F C; Randalls, P B; Barnas, G M; Hoff, B H; Oletsky, J; Mackenzie, C F

    1994-02-01

    We used a technique of measuring Xenon133 washout (XeW) from the alveolar space to evaluate transfer of gas from the acinus (Mackenzie et al., J. Appl. Physiol. 68: 2013-2018, 1990) during 2 min of apnea, 2 min of tracheal insufflation with oxygen (TRIO) and 90 sec of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) in 6 anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. Xenon133 dissolved in saline was injected into an occluded acinar region through a pulmonary artery catheter, and XeW was measured by gamma scintillation scanning. With this technique, XeW during apnea represents the contribution of cardiogenic oscillations in regional flow. The XeW rate constant (min-1 +/- SE) was 0.37 +/- 0.03 during apnea. This was not different (P > 0.05) with TRIO (0.29 +/- 0.04). With IPPV, the rate constant increased to 3.49 +/- 0.39, faster than with either apnea or TRIO (P < 0.001). We conclude that: (1) TRIO does not increase convective gas transfer from the acini compared to apnea; and (2) transfer of gas out of the acini due to cardiogenic oscillations is a very small portion of the total gas eliminated during IPPV.

  5. Oil and gas fields - transfer zone relationships, Thrace basin, NW Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coskun, B. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Geology Dept.

    1997-06-01

    In the Thrace basin, oil and gas are produced from carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Eocene and Oligocene age. Detailed geological and geophysical studies reveal that earlier and Eocene structures were influenced by basement paleotopography resulting from late Cretaceous movements between the Arabian and Anatolian plates while latest Miocene structures were generated by splays of the North Anatolian Fault in the Thrace basin. The Eocene structures, which contain the Hamitabat gas and Devecatagi and K. Osmancik oil fields, trend in a NE-SW direction. However, Miocene structures which are gas producers in the Karacaoglan and Umurca fields are oriented in a NW-SE direction, parallel to the strike of the main faults which accommodate the transfer zones in the Thrace basin. The transfer zones occur between faults that dip in opposite directions (conjugate) and in the same directions (synthetic). The formation of reservoir zones, improvement of reservoir characteristics and generation of oil and gas in the oil window zone were influenced by the timing of faulting and appearance of the transfer zones in the Thrace basin. (author)

  6. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozewicz, W. (Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-29

    Removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal- burning power plants can be achieved by duct spray drying using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) slurries. A primary objective of this research was to discover the aspects of mass transfer into Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries which limit SO{sub 2} absorption. A bench- scale stirred tank reactor with a flat gas/liquid interface was used to simulate SO{sub 2} absorption in a slurry droplet. The absorption rate of SO{sub 2} from gas concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppm was measured at 55{degrees}C in clear solutions and slurries of Ca(OH){sub 2} up to 1.0 M (7 wt percent). Results are reported in terms of the enhancement factor, {O}. This research will allow prediction of conditions where the absorption of SO{sub 2} in Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries can be enhanced by changes to liquid phase constituents (under which SO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by liquid film mass transfer). Experiments in the stirred tank have shown that SO{sub 2} absorption in a 1.0 M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry was completely dominated by gas film mass transfer with a large excess of Ca(OH){sub 2} but becomes controlled by liquid film resistance at greater than 50 percent Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization. (VC)

  7. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  8. Wall heat transfer in gas-fired furnaces: Effect of radiation modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vondál J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study heat transfer to cooled walls in a MW-scale laboratory furnace with a dominating thermal radiation component. Experiment is performed in a specially designed combustion chamber with segmental water-cooled walls and profile of absorbed heat flux is measured along the flame. Non-premixed natural gas flame is stabilized by a guide-vane swirler. The unsteady governing equations of turbulent flow are solved by a finite-volume code with a two-equation k-ε realizable turbulence model, a combination of first-order and second-order upwind schemes and implicit time integration. The coupling of pressure with velocity is treated by SIMPLE (semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations algorithm. Radiative heat transfer as the main heat transfer method is modelled with special care by discrete ordinates method and gas absorption coefficient is calculated by two alternatives of WSGGM (weighted sum of grey gases model. The predicted total heat transfer rate is found to depend strongly on method chosen for the computation of mean beam length. The results of numerical simulations show that overall heat transfer in a process furnace can be successfully predicted, while heat flux profile along the flame is more difficult to predict accurately. Good engineering accuracy is nevertheless achievable with reasonable computational resources. The trend of deviations is reported, which is useful for the interpretation of practical predictions of process furnaces (fired heaters.

  9. Is the gas hydrate film growth controlled by intrinsic kinetic or heat transfer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B.Z.; Chen, G.J.; Sun, C.Y.; Yang, L.Y.; Luo, H. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric crystalline inclusion compounds. They are composed of water molecules encaging guest gas molecules like natural gas components. When water contacts with a hydrate former in liquid or a gas state under suitable temperature and pressure conditions, hydrates usually form and grow in the form of a film at the interface between the two fluid phases. The growth behavior of this type of film is of significant importance with respect to the various components of hydrate production, such as the storage and transportation of natural gas and desalination. However, questions remain regarding the control steps of hydrate film growth. This paper discussed a study that systematically measured the lateral growth rates of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates film by suspending individual gas bubbles in water. In order to determine the correlation between the hydrate film growth rate and the driving force, modeling of hydrate film growth by intrinsic kinetics and heat transfer was conducted. The temperature difference between the moving hydrate film front and the bulk water was calculated to evaluate the contribution of heat transfer to hydrate film growth rate. The paper discussed the experiment, with reference to the equipment and material; experimental procedure; and data processing. A simulation of the hydrate film growth revealed that heat transfer had little contribution to hydrate film growth, and the intrinsic kinetic was the main control step for CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate film growth. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  10. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  11. Simulation of Heat Transfer to the Gas Coolant with Low Prandtl Number Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Kulikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns the simulating peculiarities of heat transfer to the gas coolants with low values of the Prandtl number, in particular, to the binary mixtures of inert gases.The paper presents simulation results of heat transfer to the fully established flow of a helium-xenon mixture in the round tube of 6 mm in diameter with the boundary condition of the second kind. It considers a flow of three helium-xenon mixtures with different helium content and molecular Prandtl numbers within the range 0.239–0.322 and with Reynolds numbers ranged from 10000 to 50000. During numerical simulation a temperature factor changed from 1.034 to 1.061. CFD-code STAR-CCM+ that is designed for solving a wide range of problems of hydrodynamics, heat transfer and stress was used as the primary software.The applicability of the five models for the turbulent Prandtl number is examined. It is shown that the choice of the model has a significant influence on the heat transfer coefficient. The paper presents structural characteristics of the flow in the wall region. It estimates a thermal stabilization section to be approximately as long as 30 diameters of tube.Simulation results are compared with the known data on heat transfer to gas coolants with low values of the Prandtl number. It is shown that V2F low-Reynolds number -ε turbulence model with an approximation for the turbulent Prandtl number used according Kays-CrawfordWeigand gives the best compliance with the results predicted by relationships of Kays W.M. and Petukhov B.S. The approximating correlation summarizes a set of simulation results.Application of the work results is reasonable when conducting the numerical simulation of heat transfer to binary gas mixtures in channels of different forms. The presented approximating correlation allows rapid estimate of heat transfer coefficients to the gas coolants with a low value of the molecular Prandl number within the investigated range with a flow through the

  12. Pulmonary Gas Transfer Related to Markers of Angiogenesis during the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farha, Samar; Asosingh, Kewal; Laskowski, Daniel; Licina, Lauren; Sekigushi, Haruki; Losordo, Douglas W.; Dweik, Raed A.; Wiedemann, Herbert P.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2010-01-01

    Gas transfer in the female lung varies over the menstrual cycle in parallel with the cyclic angiogenesis that occurs in the uterine endometrium. Given that vessels form and regress in the uterus under the control of hormones, angiogenic factors and pro-angiogenic circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, we tested the possibility that variation in pulmonary gas transfer over the menstrual cycle is related to a systemic cyclic pro-angiogenic state that influences lung vascularity. Women were evaluated over the menstrual cycle with weekly measures of lung diffusing capacity and its components, the pulmonary vascular capillary bed and membrane diffusing capacity, and their relation to circulating CD34+CD133+ progenitor cells, hemoglobin, factors affecting hemoglobin binding affinity, and pro-angiogenic factors. Lung diffusing capacity varied over the menstrual cycle, reaching a nadir during the follicular phase following menses. The decline in lung diffusing capacity was accounted for by ~25% decrease in pulmonary capillary blood volume. In parallel, circulating CD34+CD133+ progenitor cells decreased by ~24%, and were directly related to angiogenic factors, and to lung diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume. The finding of greater number of lung microvessels in ovariectomized female mice receiving estrogen as compared to placebo verified that pulmonary vascularity is influenced by hormonal changes. These findings suggest that angiogenesis in the lungs may participate in the cyclic changes in gas transfer that occur over the menstrual cycle. PMID:17717117

  13. Progress towards understanding and predicting heat transfer in the turbine gas path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Simon, Frederick F.

    1993-01-01

    A new era is dawning in the ability to predict convection heat transfer in the turbine gas path. We feel that the technical community now has the capability to mount a major assault on this problem, which has eluded significant progress for a long time. In this paper we hope to make a case for this bold statement by reviewing the state of the art in three major and related areas, which we believe are indispensable to the understanding and accurate prediction of turbine gas path heat transfer: configuration-specific experiments, fundamental physics and model development, and code development. We begin our review with the configuration-specific experiments, whose data have provided the big picture and guided both the fundamental modeling research and the code development. Following that, we examine key modeling efforts and comment on what will be needed to incorporate them into the codes. In this region we concentrate on bypass transition, 3D endwalls, and film cooling. We then review progress and directions in the development of computer codes to predict turbine gas path heat transfer. Finally, we cite examples and make observations on the more recent efforts to do all this work in a simultaneous, interactive, and more synergistic manner. We conclude with an assessment of progress, suggestions for how to use the current state of the art, and recommendations for the future.

  14. Heat and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding using argon and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, P.G.; Eagar, T.W.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a theoretical investigation on the arc parameters and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel using argon and helium shielding gases. Major differences in the predicted arc parameters were determined to be due to large differences in thermophysical properties. Various findings from the study include that an arc cannot be struck in a pure helium atmosphere without the assistance of metal vapor, that a strong electromagnetic cathode force affects the fluid flow and heat transfer in the helium arc, providing a possible explanation for the experimentally observed globular transfer mode and that the tapering of t electrode in an argon arc is caused by electron condensation on the side of the electrode.

  15. Heat and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding using argon and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, P. G.; Eagar, T. W.; Szekely, J.

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a theoretical investigation on the arc parameters and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel using argon and helium shielding gases. Major differences in the predicted arc parameters were determined to be due to large differences in thermophysical properties. Various findings from the study include that an arc cannot be struck in a pure helium atmosphere without the assistance of metal vapor, that a strong electromagnetic cathode force affects the fluid flow and heat transfer in the helium arc, providing a possible explanation for the experimentally observed globular transfer mode and that the tapering of the electrode in an argon arc is caused by electron condensation on the side of the electrode.

  16. The gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) in the gas-liquid Multi-stage Agitated Contactor (MAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breman, B.B; Beenackers, A.A C M; Bouma, M.J; VanderWerf, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Data on the volumetric liquid-side gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient, k(L)a, in a Multi-stage Agitated Contractor (MAC) are reported for three gas-liquid systems (air-water, helium-n-octane, and air-Monoethylene Glycol (MEG)). k(L)a (s(-1)) was determined using a dynamic method with moderately

  17. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-31

    Graphical abstract: Direct and humidity independent mass spectrometry analysis of gas phase chemicals could be achieved via ambient proton transfer ionization, ion intensity was found to be stable with humidity ranged from ∼10% to ∼100%. - Highlights: • A humidity independent mass spectrometric method for gas phase samples analysis. • A universal and good sensitivity method. • The method can real time identify plant released raw chemicals. - Abstract: In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m{sup −3}, ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  18. Application of the gas tracer method for measuring oxygen transfer rates in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyroller, Lina; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Santa, Santa; García, Joan

    2010-07-01

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) has a significant impact on the design, optimal operation and modelling of constructed wetlands treating wastewater. Oxygen consumption is very fast in wetlands and the OTR cannot be determined using an oxygen mass balance. This problem is circumvented in this study by applying the gas tracer method. Experiments were conducted in an unplanted gravel bed (dimensions L x W x d 125 x 50 x 35 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 10-11-mm gravel) and a planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) (L x W x d 110 x 70 x 38 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 3.5-mm gravel with Phragmites australis). Tap water saturated with propane as gas tracer (pure or commercial cooking gas, depending on the test) was used. The mass transfer ratio between oxygen and commercial propane gas was quite constant and averaged R = 1.03, which is slightly lower than the value of R = 1.39 that is usually reported for pure propane. The OTR ranged from 0.31 to 5.04 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted gravel bed and from 0.3 to 3.2 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the HSSFCW, depending on the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results of this study suggest that the OTR in HSSFCW is very low for the oxygen demand of standard wastewater and the OTR calculations based on mass balances and theoretical stoichiometric considerations overestimate OTR values by a factor that ranges from 10 to 100. The gas tracer method is a promising tool for determining OTR in constructed wetlands, with commercial gas proving to be a viable low-cost alternative for determining OTR. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  20. Gas transfer under breaking waves: experiments and an improved vorticity-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Tsoukala

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a modified vorticity-based model for gas transfer under breaking waves in the absence of significant wind forcing is presented. A theoretically valid and practically applicable mathematical expression is suggested for the assessment of the oxygen transfer coefficient in the area of wave-breaking. The proposed model is based on the theory of surface renewal that expresses the oxygen transfer coefficient as a function of both the wave vorticity and the Reynolds wave number for breaking waves. Experimental data were collected in wave flumes of various scales: a small-scale experiments were carried out using both a sloping beach and a rubble-mound breakwater in the wave flume of the Laboratory of Harbor Works, NTUA, Greece; b large-scale experiments were carried out with a sloping beach in the wind-wave flume of Delft Hydraulics, the Netherlands, and with a three-layer rubble mound breakwater in the Schneideberg Wave Flume of the Franzius Institute, University of Hannover, Germany. The experimental data acquired from both the small- and large-scale experiments were in good agreement with the proposed model. Although the apparent transfer coefficients from the large-scale experiments were lower than those determined from the small-scale experiments, the actual oxygen transfer coefficients, as calculated using a discretized form of the transport equation, are in the same order of magnitude for both the small- and large-scale experiments. The validity of the proposed model is compared to experimental results from other researchers. Although the results are encouraging, additional research is needed, to incorporate the influence of bubble mediated gas exchange, before these results are used for an environmental friendly design of harbor works, or for projects involving waste disposal at sea.

  1. Periodic venting of MABR lumen allows high removal rates and high gas-transfer efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Calleja, P; Aybar, M; Picioreanu, C; Esteban-Garcia, A L; Martin, K J; Nerenberg, R

    2017-09-15

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a novel treatment technology that employs gas-supplying membranes to deliver oxygen directly to a biofilm growing on the membrane surface. When operated with closed-end membranes, the MABR provides 100-percent oxygen transfer efficiencies (OTE), resulting in significant energy savings. However, closed-end MABRs are more sensitive to back-diffusion of inert gases, such as nitrogen. Back-diffusion reduces the average oxygen transfer rates (OTR), consequently decreasing the average contaminant removal fluxes (J). We hypothesized that venting the membrane lumen periodically would increase the OTR and J. Using an experimental flow cell and mathematical modeling, we showed that back-diffusion gas profiles developed over relatively long timescales. Thus, very short ventings could re-establish uniform gas profiles for relatively long time periods. Using modeling, we systematically explored the effect of the venting interval (time between ventings). At moderate venting intervals, opening the membrane for 20 s every 30 min, the venting significantly increased the average OTR and J without substantially impacting the OTEs. When the interval was short enough, in this case shorter than 20 min, the OTR was actually higher than for continuous open-end operation. Our results show that periodic venting is a promising strategy to combine the advantages of open-end and closed end operation, maximizing both the OTR and OTE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gas-liquid mass transfer in a cross-flow hollow fiber module : Analytical model and experimental validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dindore, V. Y.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The cross-flow operation of hollow fiber membrane contactors offers many advantages and is preferred over the parallel-flow contactors for gas-liquid mass transfer operations. However, the analysis of such a cross-flow membrane gas-liquid contactor is complicated due to the change in concentrations

  3. Sulfide emissions in sewer networks: focus on liquid to gas mass transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Lucie; Springer, Fanny; Lipeme-Kouyi, Gislain; Buffiere, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    H2S emission dynamics in sewers are conditioned by the mass transfer coefficient at the interface. This work aims at measuring the variation of the mass transfer coefficient with the hydraulic characteristics, with the objective of estimating H2S emission in gravity pipes, and collecting data to establish models independent of the system geometry. The ratio between the H2S and O2 mass transfer coefficient was assessed in an 8 L mixed reactor under different experimental conditions. Then, oxygen mass transfer measurements were performed in a 10 m long gravity pipe. The following ranges of experimental conditions were investigated: velocity flow [0-0.61 m.s-1], Reynolds number [0-23,333]. The hydrodynamic parameters at the liquid/gas interface were calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In the laboratory-scale reactor, the O2 mass transfer coefficient was found to depend on the stirring rate (rph) as follows: KL,O2 = 0.016 + 0.025 N3.85. A KL,H2S/KL,O2 ratio of 0.64 ± 0.24 was found, in accordance with previously published data. CFD results helped in refining this correlation: the mass transfer coefficient depends on the local interface velocity ui (m.h-1): KL,O2 = 0.016 + 1.02 × 10-5 ui3.85 In the gravity pipe device, KL,O2 also exponentially increased with the mean flow velocity. These trends were found to be consistent with the increasing level of turbulence.

  4. A high-power ultrasonic microreactor and its application in gas-liquid mass transfer intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhengya; Yao, Chaoqun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Jie; Chen, Guangwen; Zhao, Yuchao; Yuan, Quan

    2015-02-21

    The combination of ultrasound and microreactor is an emerging and promising area, but the report of designing high-power ultrasonic microreactor (USMR) is still limited. This work presents a robust, high-power and highly efficient USMR by directly coupling a microreactor plate with a Langevin-type transducer. The USMR is designed as a longitudinal half wavelength resonator, for which the antinode plane of the highest sound intensity is located at the microreactor. According to one dimension design theory, numerical simulation and impedance analysis, a USMR with a maximum power of 100 W and a resonance frequency of 20 kHz was built. The strong and uniform sound field in the USMR was then applied to intensify gas-liquid mass transfer of slug flow in a microfluidic channel. Non-inertial cavitation with multiple surface wave oscillation was excited on the slug bubbles, enhancing the overall mass transfer coefficient by 3.3-5.7 times.

  5. Mathematical Simulation of Convective Heat Transfer in the Low-Temperature Storage of Liquefied Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestakov Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in the low-temperature storage of liquefied natural gas. Regime of natural convection in an enclosure with different intensity of the heat flux at the external borders are investigated. Was examined two-dimensional nonstationary problem within the model of Navier-Stokes in dimensionless variables “vorticity - stream function - temperature”. Distributions of hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures that characterize the basic regularities of the processes are obtained. Circulating flows are determined and carried out the analysis of vortices formation mechanism and the temperature distribution in solution at conditions of natural convection when the Grashof number (Gr = 106. A significant influence of heat transfer rate on solutions boundary on flow structure and temperature field in LNG storage tanks.

  6. Unit operations for gas-liquid mass transfer in reduced gravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Allen, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Basic scaling rules are derived for converting Earth-based designs of mass transfer equipment into designs for a reduced gravity environment. Three types of gas-liquid mass transfer operations are considered: bubble columns, spray towers, and packed columns. Application of the scaling rules reveals that the height of a bubble column in lunar- and Mars-based operations would be lower than terrestrial designs by factors of 0.64 and 0.79 respectively. The reduced gravity columns would have greater cross-sectional areas, however, by factors of 2.4 and 1.6 for lunar and Martian settings. Similar results were obtained for spray towers. In contract, packed column height was found to be nearly independent of gravity.

  7. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  8. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-05-01

    During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  9. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-04-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

  10. Experimental Investigation on Acoustic Control Droplet Transfer in Ultrasonic-Wave-Assisted Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weifeng, Xie; Chenglei, Fan; Chunli, Yang; Sanbao, Lin

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasonic-wave-assisted gas metal arc welding (U-GMAW) is a new, advanced arc welding method that uses an ultrasonic wave emitted from an ultrasonic radiator above the arc. However, it remains unclear how the ultrasonic wave affects the metal droplet, hindering further application of U-GMAW. In this paper, an improved U-GMAW system was used and its superiority was experimentally demonstrated. Then a series of experiments were designed and performed to study how the ultrasonic wave affects droplet transfer, including droplet size, velocity, and motion trajectory. The behavior of droplet transfer was observed in high-speed images. The droplet transfer is closely related to the distribution of the acoustic field, determined by the ultrasonic current. Moreover, by analyzing the variably accelerated motion of the droplet, the acoustic control of the droplet transfer was intuitively demonstrated. Finally, U-GMAW was successfully used in vertical-up and overhead welding experiments, showing that U-GMAW is promising for use in welding in all positions.

  11. Computational prediction of heat transfer to gas turbine nozzle guide vanes with roughened surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.M.; Jones, T.V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Science; Lock, G.D. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dancer, S.N. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    The local Mach number and heat transfer coefficient over the aerofoil surfaces and endwalls of a transonic gas turbine nozzle guide vane have been calculated. the computations were performed by solving the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a fully three-dimensional computational code (CFDS), which is well established at Rolls-Royce. A model to predict the effects of roughness has been incorporated into CFDS and heat transfer levels have been calculated for both hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough surfaces. The roughness influences the calculations in two ways; first the mixing length at a certain height above the surface is increased; second the wall function used to reconcile the wall condition with the first grid point above the wall is also altered. The first involves a relatively straightforward shift of the origin in the van Driest damping function description, the second requires an integration of the momentum equation across the wall layer. A similar treatment applies to the energy equation. The calculations are compared with experimental contours of heat transfer coefficient obtained using both thin-film gages and the transient liquid crystal technique. Measurements were performed using both hydraulically smooth and roughened surfaces, and at engine-representative Mach and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer results are discussed and interpreted in terms of surface-shear flow visualization using oil and dye techniques.

  12. Electron loss and transfer for 20-110-keV iodine-rare-gas collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, B.; Orakzai, M. W.; Rahman, F.

    1989-05-01

    Atomic cross sections have been measured for the loss and transfer of an electron during a collision between a neutral iodine atom and a rare-gas atom. The neutral iodine beam, with energy between 20 to 110 keV, was unlikely to contain a significant mixture of metastable-state atoms because it was produced by neutralizing a negative-iodine-ion beam. The σ0+ cross section is largest for the argon and krypton targets, not for xenon, as might have been expected. The σ0- cross section is very small for the light targets and only becomes appreciable for xenon at the highest energy used.

  13. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of metal transfer modes and shielding gas composition on the emission of ultrafine particles in MAG steel welding

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, J. F.; Miranda, R. M.; Carvalho, P.A.; Quintino, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to characterize ultrafine particles emitted during gas metal arc welding of mild steel and stainless steel, using different shielding gas mixtures, and to evaluate the effect of metal transfer modes, controlled by both processing parameters and shielding gas composition, on the quantity and morphology of the ultrafine particles. It was found that the amount of emitted ultrafine particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly depen...

  15. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  16. Effects of PEEP on acinar gas transfer in healthy and lung-injured dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnas, G M; Donahue, P L; Kong, C S; Ryder, I G; Choi, D H; Hoff, B H; Mackenzie, C F

    1995-10-01

    We measured cardiorespiratory variables and 133xenon washout from a nonperfused lung region (XeW) in six anesthetized/paralyzed dogs, mechanically ventilated with 60% O2 at different positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP). XeW in this technique represents directly measured acinar gas transfer (3). Measurements were repeated after induction of lung injury by lavaging the lungs 11 to 13 times with 600 ml saline. In control dogs, lung compliance (CL), alveolar ventilation (Valv), and XeW all decreased with increasing PEEP from 0 to 25 cm H2O (p XeW below 15 cm H2O PEEP were all less than control values (p XeW increased, but CL did not change; RL decreased only from 0 to 5 cm H2O. At 20 cm H2O PEEP, Valv and CL were not different from control values (p > 0.05), and XeW was higher than control values (p XeW before and after lavage were similar. We conclude that, during severe lung injury: (1) increasing PEEP to moderate levels will increase acinar gas transfer but, after a certain lung volume is reached, further increases in PEEP will have effects similar to the healthy condition; (2) overall mechanical properties of the lung do not reflect the responses to PEEP of the lung periphery.

  17. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Injestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines featuring high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. A designer is concerned about the level of stresses in the turbine rotor disk and its durability, both of which are affected significantly by the disk temperature distribution. This distribution also plays a major role in the radial position of the blade tip and thus, in establishing the clearance between the tip and the shroud. To counteract mainstream gas ingestion as well as to cool the rotor and the stator disks, it is necessary to inject cooling air (bled from the compressor discharge) into the wheel space. Since this bleeding of compressor air imposes a penalty on the engine cycle performance, the designers of disk cavity cooling and sealing systems need to accomplish these tasks with the minimum possible amount of bleed air without risking disk failure. This requires detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics and convective heat transfer in the cavity. The flow in the wheel space between the rotor and stator disks is quite complex. It is usually turbulent and contains recirculation regions. Instabilities such as vortices oscillating in space have been observed in the flow. It becomes necessary to obtain both a qualitative understanding of the general pattern of the fluid motion as well as a quantitative map of the velocity and pressure fields.

  18. Features of the gas dynamics and local heat transfer in intake system of piston engine with supercharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, L. V.

    2017-09-01

    Comparison of experimental research results of gas dynamics and instantaneous local heat transfer in the intake pipes for piston internal combustion engines (ICE) without and with supercharging are presented in the article. Studies were conducted on full-scale experimental setups in terms of gas dynamic nonstationarity, which is characteristic of piston engines. It has been established that the turbocharger installation in a gas-air system of piston internal combustion engine leads to significant differences in the patterns of change in gas-dynamic and heat transfer characteristics of flows. These data can be used in a modernization of piston engines due to installation of a turbocharger or in a development of gas-air systems for piston ICE with supercharging.

  19. Heat transfer characteristics of a non-boiling pool with spatially uniform gas injection. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguli, A.; Luk, A.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1978-12-01

    It is possible to encounter molten fuel pools in the course of events during a hypothetical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor accident. In such cases it may be important to estimate correctly the rate of melting of the pool walls and bottom, which are governed by the rate of heat transfer to those materials. The heat transfer characteristics of internally heated two-phase pools are thus of interest. Heat transfer measurements were made in the horizontal and downward directions both in transient and in steady state. The transient study involved slow cooling or heating of the pool liquid, while in the steady state case heat was provided by electrical immersion heaters. A permanent gas was injected from a distributed hypodermic tubing network with two hole sizes. Void fraction measurements were also made by static pressure probes. The data is reported as plots of Nusselts number versus Reynolds number and surface evaporation and entrainment effects for a boiling pool were estimated for comparison purposes.

  20. A Radiative Transfer Modeling Methodology in Gas-Liquid Multiphase Flow Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Krishnamoorthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for performing radiative transfer calculations in computational fluid dynamic simulations of gas-liquid multiphase flows is presented. By considering an externally irradiated bubble column photoreactor as our model system, the bubble scattering coefficients were determined through add-on functions by employing as inputs the bubble volume fractions, number densities, and the fractional contribution of each bubble size to the bubble volume from four different multiphase modeling options. The scattering coefficient profiles resulting from the models were significantly different from one another and aligned closely with their predicted gas-phase volume fraction distributions. The impacts of the multiphase modeling option, initial bubble diameter, and gas flow rates on the radiation distribution patterns within the reactor were also examined. An increase in air inlet velocities resulted in an increase in the fraction of larger sized bubbles and their contribution to the scattering coefficient. However, the initial bubble sizes were found to have the strongest impact on the radiation field.

  1. Field synergy characteristics in condensation heat transfer with non-condensable gas over a horizontal tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Field synergy characteristics in condensation heat transfer with non-condensable gas (NCG over a horizontal tube were numerically simulated. Consequently, synergy angles between velocity and pressure or temperature gradient fields, gas film layer thickness, and induced velocity and shear stress on gas–liquid interface were obtained. Results show that synergy angles between velocity and temperature gradient fields are within 73.2°–88.7° and ascend slightly with the increment in mainstream velocity and that the synergy is poor. However, the synergy angle between velocity and pressure gradient fields decreases intensively with the increase in mainstream velocity at θ ≤ 30°, thereby improving the pressure loss. As NCG mass fraction increases, the gas film layer thickness enlarges and the induced velocity and shear stress on gas–liquid interface decreases. The synergy angles between velocity and temperature gradient fields increase, and the synergy angles between velocity and pressure gradient fields change at θ = 70°, decrease at θ 70°. When the horizontal tube circumference angle increases, the synergy angles between velocity and temperature or pressure gradient fields decrease, the synergy between velocity and pressure fields enhances, and the synergy between velocity and temperature fields degrades.

  2. Heat transfer to immersed horizontal tubes in gas fluidized bed dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, Ola

    1999-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to construct heat pump fluidized bed dryers of the FHT type with improved dewatering capacity for a given size of the dryer. The use of heat exchangers immersed in the fluidized bed drying chambers is an important part of the FHT (Fluidized Bed High Temperature Heat Pump Dryer) concept. A pilot plant FHT dryer was built and successfully tested on fish meal raw material and seaweed. The plant included two fluidized bed drying chambers with immersed heat exchangers. The gain in water vapor of the drying air through the chambers was increased up to four times that of adiabatic drying. The energy saving concept was retained as a SMER ratio of 3.5 to 4.7 was measured in the same tests. Therefore optimization of the immersed heat exchangers was considered the most important single objective for this work. The optimization study of the heat exchangers was confined to the actual operating conditions for the dryers using: (1) Bubbling gas fluidized beds were used, (2) air as the only type of fluidizing gas,(3) beds at atmospheric pressure, (4) bed temperatures below 100 {sup o}C, (5) fluidized particles of Geldart classes B and D, (6) horizontal tube banks for the immersed heat exchanger and the influence of radiation heat transfer was ignored. The heat transfer study was confined to the fluidized bed side of the heat exchanger surface. It was concluded early in this work that the bubbles play a major role in generating the particle circulation inside the bed and hence also in heat transfer. Publications describing the most important bubble induced mechanisms contributing to high rates of heat transfer were found to be limited. Therefore the first part of this study was aimed at establishing a method for locating and measuring the size and rise velocity of bubbles inside the bed. The method established through this work using differential pressure measurements from two static pressure probes was used later in the study of heat transfer

  3. Heat transfer to immersed horizontal tubes in gas fluidized bed dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, Ola

    1999-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to construct heat pump fluidized bed dryers of the FHT type with improved dewatering capacity for a given size of the dryer. The use of heat exchangers immersed in the fluidized bed drying chambers is an important part of the FHT (Fluidized Bed High Temperature Heat Pump Dryer) concept. A pilot plant FHT dryer was built and successfully tested on fish meal raw material and seaweed. The plant included two fluidized bed drying chambers with immersed heat exchangers. The gain in water vapor of the drying air through the chambers was increased up to four times that of adiabatic drying. The energy saving concept was retained as a SMER ratio of 3.5 to 4.7 was measured in the same tests. Therefore optimization of the immersed heat exchangers was considered the most important single objective for this work. The optimization study of the heat exchangers was confined to the actual operating conditions for the dryers using: (1) Bubbling gas fluidized beds were used, (2) air as the only type of fluidising gas, (3) beds at atmospheric pressure, (4) bed temperatures below 100 {sup o}C, (5) fluidized particles of Geldart classes B and D, (6) horizontal tube banks for the immersed heat exchanger, and the influence of radiation heat transfer was ignored. The heat transfer study was confined to the fluidized bed side of the heat exchanger surface. It was concluded early in this work that the bubbles play a major role in generating the particle circulation inside the bed and hence also in heat transfer. Publications describing the most important bubble induced mechanisms contributing to high rates of heat transfer were found to be limited. Therefore the first part of this study was aimed at establishing a method for locating and measuring the size and rise velocity of bubbles inside the bed. The method established through this work using differential pressure measurements from two static pressure probes was used later in the study of heat transfer

  4. Efficiency of gas transfer in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: analysis of 317 cases with four different ECMO systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehle, Karla; Philipp, Alois; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Zeman, Florian; Buchwald, Dirk; Schmid, Christof; Dornia, Christian; Lunz, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Lubnow, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Polymethylpentene membrane oxygenators used in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO) differ in their physical characteristics. The aim of the study was to analyze the gas transfer capability of different ECMO systems in clinical practice, as the choice of the appropriate system may be influenced by the needs of the patient. Retrospective study on prospectively collected data of adults with severe respiratory failure requiring vvECMO support (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009-2013). Oxygen (O2) transfer and carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination of four different ECMO systems (PLS system, n = 163; Cardiohelp system (CH), n = 59, Maquet Cardiopulmonary, Rastatt, Germany; Hilite 7000 LT system, n = 56, Medos Medizintechnik, Stolberg, Germany; ECC.05 system, n = 39, Sorin Group, Mirandola (MO), Italy) were analyzed. Gas transfer depended on type of ECMO system, blood flow, and gas flow (p ≤ 0.05, each). CO2 removal is dependent on sweep gas flow and blood flow, with higher blood flow and/or gas flow eliminating more CO2 (p ≤ 0.001). CO2 elimination capacity was highest with the PLS system (p ≤ 0.001). O2 transfer at blood flow rates below 3 l/min depended on blood flow, at higher blood flow rates on blood flow and gas flow. The system with the smallest gas exchange surface (ECC.05 system) was least effective in O2 transfer, but in terms of the gas exchange surface was the most effective. Our analysis suggests that patients with severe hypoxemia and need for high flow ECMO benefit more from the PLS/CH or Hilite 7000 LT system. The ECC.05 system is advisable for patients with moderate hypoxemia and/or hypercapnia.

  5. Wind Speed and Sea State Dependencies of Air-Sea Gas Transfer: Results From the High Wind Speed Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B. W.; Brumer, S. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Yang, M.; Bariteau, L.; Prytherch, J.; Hare, J. E.; Czerski, H.; Matei, A.; Pascal, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    A variety of physical mechanisms are jointly responsible for facilitating air-sea gas transfer through turbulent processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface. The nature and relative importance of these mechanisms evolves with increasing wind speed. Theoretical and modeling approaches are advancing, but the limited quantity of observational data at high wind speeds hinders the assessment of these efforts. The HiWinGS project successfully measured gas transfer coefficients (k660) with coincident wave statistics under conditions with hourly mean wind speeds up to 24 m s-1 and significant wave heights to 8 m. Measurements of k660 for carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) show an increasing trend with respect to 10 m neutral wind speed (U10N), following a power law relationship of the form: k660 CO2˜U10N1.68 and k660 dms˜U10N1.33. Among seven high wind speed events, CO2 transfer responded to the intensity of wave breaking, which depended on both wind speed and sea state in a complex manner, with k660 CO2 increasing as the wind sea approaches full development. A similar response is not observed for DMS. These results confirm the importance of breaking waves and bubble injection mechanisms in facilitating CO2 transfer. A modified version of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment Gas transfer algorithm (COAREG ver. 3.5), incorporating a sea state-dependent calculation of bubble-mediated transfer, successfully reproduces the mean trend in observed k660 with wind speed for both gases. Significant suppression of gas transfer by large waves was not observed during HiWinGS, in contrast to results from two prior field programs.

  6. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC

  7. Natural gas large volumes measurement: going for on-line custody transfer; Medicao de grandes volumes de gas natural: rumo a transferencia de custodia on-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercon, Eduardo G.; Frisoli, Caetano [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the structure of the natural gas flow measurement process in TRANSPETRO, and comments features and performance of existing or under-implantation equipment and systems, reviewing best practices and technology in use. This process runs through three interrelated segments: data flow measurement, strictly speaking; data transfer and acquisition; and data flow measurement certification (data consolidation to invoice). Initially, the work makes an approach to the data flow measurement segment, evaluating technical features of flow meters, and describing configurations and functions of the operating gas flow computers in TRANSPETRO's custody transfer stations. In this part it will also be presented the implantation of TRANSPETRO's system for gas chromatography data input on-line to flow computers. Further, in data transfer and acquisition, SCADA system technical aspects will be evaluated, considering communications protocols and programmable logic controllers functions in remote terminal units, and discussing their places in the measurement process. Additionally, TRANSPETRO's experience in data measurement certification tools is in discussion, as well as new upcoming tools and their potential features, from what new practices will be suggested. Finally, all the work has been conceived and carried out always aiming to the state-of-the-art technology in gas flow measurement: on-line custody transfer. (author)

  8. Proposal for data acquisition system of gas chromatograph and natural gas transfer custody via web; Proposta para um sistema de aquisicao de dados de cromatografia e medicao fiscal de gas natural via web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Jose Paulo C.; Guimaraes, Marcelo F.; Zeitoune, Rafael J. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, is presented a proposal of a Chromatograph and Transfer Custody Measurement Data Acquisition System through Web, complementary to the SCADA System, responsible for control and monitoring PETROBRAS Gas Pipelines, intended to comply with the requirements of the Gerencias de Qualidade e Medicao (MQD) and Planejamento Integrado da Logistica (PCL) from PETROBRAS Gas e Energia, regarding the evaluation of the quality of the natural gas that is being commercialized, as well as its billing. (author)

  9. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-05-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

  10. Experimental correlation of gas-liquid-solid mass transfer coefficient in a stirred tank using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Duan, Xili; Gao, Zhengming

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the three-phase (gas-liquid-solid) system in a stirred tank is experimentally studied. The response surface methodology (RSM) is used to analyze the three phase mass transfer coefficient under different conditions, i.e., rotation speeds (8, 10, and 12 s-1), volumetric solid content fractions (0, 6 and 12%), gas flow rates (6, 8, and 10 m3 h-1) and temperatures (40, 54, and 68 °C). With the RSM, it was found that all of these four operational parameters are significant in affecting the mass transfer coefficient, with the rotation speed being the most significant one. A new correlation is developed with a quadratic term for solid content fraction, indicating that there is a minimum value of mass transfer coefficient at a certain solid content fraction. Compared with traditional experimental design and correlation methods, the RSM in this study reduces experiment time and provides a better correlation to predict the mass transfer coefficient.

  11. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

  12. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Duttlinger

    2001-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization

  13. The Application of Discontinuous Galerkin Methods in Conjugate Heat Transfer Simulations of Gas Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Rong Hao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of modern heavy-duty gas turbines is greatly determined by the accurate numerical predictions of thermal loading on the hot-end components. The purpose of this paper is: (1 to present an approach applying a novel numerical technique—the discontinuous Galerkin (DG method—to conjugate heat transfer (CHT simulations, develop the engineering-oriented numerical platform, and validate the feasibility of the methodology and tool preliminarily; and (2 to utilize the constructed platform to investigate the aerothermodynamic features of a typical transonic turbine vane with convection cooling. Fluid dynamic and solid heat conductive equations are discretized into explicit DG formulations. A centroid-expanded Taylor basis is adopted for various types of elements. The Bassi-Rebay method is used in the computation of gradients. A coupled strategy based on a data exchange process via numerical flux on interface quadrature points is simply devised. Additionally, various turbulence Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS models and the local-variable-based transition model γ-Reθ are assimilated into the integral framework, combining sophisticated modelling with the innovative algorithm. Numerical tests exhibit good consistency between computational and analytical or experimental results, demonstrating that the presented approach and tool can handle well general CHT simulations. Application and analysis in the turbine vane, focusing on features around where there in cluster exist shock, separation and transition, illustrate the effects of Bradshaw’s shear stress limitation and separation-induced-transition modelling. The general overestimation of heat transfer intensity behind shock is conjectured to be associated with compressibility effects on transition modeling. This work presents an unconventional formulation in CHT problems and achieves its engineering applications in gas turbines.

  14. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yamoah; E.H.K. Akaho; Nana G.A. Ayensu; M. Asamoah

    2012-01-01

    The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as ther...

  15. Altered pulmonary gas transfer capacity and capillary blood volume in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Marie; Choukroun, Marie-Luce; Siao-Him Fa, Valerie; Fayon, Michael; Rebouissoux, Laurent; Enaud, Raphael; Lamireau, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    To describe diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and its components, that is, membrane diffusing capacity (DmCO) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) in children with Crohn's disease (CD), and to investigate the correlation between these parameters and disease activity. The most common lung function abnormalities are a reduced pulmonary DLCO and small airways disorders which are in many instances, clinically silent. No valid explanations have been proposed regarding the modifications in gas transfer capacity in active CD. DLCO, DmCO, and Vc were measured in 25 CD children by the simultaneous single breath lung diffusing capacity method using nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) transfer. These parameters were analyzed in relation to the CD disease activity index. DLCO (90.7 ± 4.5% vs 128.5 ± 4.7%; P capacity is impaired in children with active CD, mainly because of a decrease of the pulmonary capillary volume. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-05-31

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

  17. Membrane gas transfer of methane and carbon dioxide in submerged coal deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, T A; Johnson, D W; Urynowicz, A

    2009-01-01

    Membrane degassing technology may prove to be a viable alternative to current coal bed methane recovery. The proposed approach involves supplying a CO2 sweep gas to membrane fibres placed directly within a saturated coal seam to provide simultaneous CO2 sequestration and CH4 recovery. A system of ordinary differential equations derived from a mass balance on an infinitesimal fibre element enabled the calculation of lumen gas composition as a function of fibre length. The results were verified through the use of a bench-scale vessel. The model agreement appears reasonable for CH4 recovery; however, agreement for CO2 recovery declines as liquid flow decreases and lumen flow increases. To further evaluate the feasibility of the membrane degassing technology, model predictions were normalized to an average conventional CH4 recovery rate of 1.56 x 10(4) m3 d(-1). Assuming a hypothetical coal seam with a groundwater velocity of 100 cm d(-1), thickness of 36.6 m and an average depth of 107 m, 290,000 m2 or 7.73 km of fibre fabric is required, resulting in 4.11 x 10(5) m3 of CO2 transfer daily and an outlet gas composition of 95% CH4, 4.4% CO2 and 0.6% H2O vapour. Increasing groundwater velocities reduce the required membrane surface area with diminishing effect, stabilizing at 100 cm d(-1). Greater pore pressures also reduce required membrane areas, and predictions indicate that a deeper coal seam under 4.3 times greater pressure would require 98% fewer fibres as compared with the hypothetical coal seam and only 0.206 km of membrane fabric.

  18. A transfer function for the prediction of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marquardt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple prognostic tool for gas hydrate (GH quantification in marine sediments is presented based on a diagenetic transport-reaction model approach. One of the most crucial factors for the application of diagenetic models is the accurate formulation of microbial degradation rates of particulate organic carbon (POC and the coupled formation of biogenic methane. Wallmann et al. (2006 suggested a kinetic formulation considering the ageing effects of POC and accumulation of reaction products (CH4, CO2 in the pore water. This model is applied to data sets of several ODP sites in order to test its general validity. Based on a thorough parameter analysis considering a wide range of environmental conditions, the POC accumulation rate (POCar in g/m2/yr and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ in m were identified as the most important and independent controls for biogenic GH formation. Hence, depth-integrated GH inventories in marine sediments (GHI in g of CH4 per cm2 seafloor area can be estimated as:

    GHI = a · POCar · GHSZb · exp (– GHSZc/POCar/d + e

    with a = 0.00214, b = 1.234, c = –3.339,

            d = 0.3148, e = –10.265.

    The transfer function gives a realistic first order approximation of the minimum GH inventory in low gas flux (LGF systems. The overall advantage of the presented function is its simplicity compared to the application of complex numerical models, because only two easily accessible parameters need to be determined.

  19. Rarefied gas dynamic simulation of transfer and escape in the Pluto-Charon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoey, William A.; Yeoh, Seng Keat; Trafton, Laurence M.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    2017-05-01

    We apply the direct simulation Monte Carlo rarefied gas dynamic technique to simulations of Pluto's rarefied upper atmosphere motivated by the need to better understand New Horizons (NH) data. We present a novel three-dimensional DSMC model of the atmosphere that spans from several hundred km below the exobase - where continuum flow transitions to the rarefied regime - to fully free-molecular flow hundreds of thousands of km from Pluto's center. We find molecular collisions in Pluto's upper atmosphere to be significant in shaping the flowfield, both by promoting flux from the plutonian exobase to Charon and by increasing the proportion of that flux generated on the exobase's anti-Charon hemisphere. Our model accounts for the gravitational fields of both Pluto and Charon, the centripetal and Coriolis forces due to the rotation of Pluto in our reference frame, and the presence of Charon as a temporary sink for impacting particles. Using this model, we analyze the escape processes of N2 and CH4 from Pluto across different solar heating conditions, and evaluate the three-dimensional structure of the upper plutonian atmosphere, including gas transfer to and deposition on Charon. We find results consistent with the NH-determined escape rate, upper atmospheric temperature, and lack of a detectable Charon atmosphere. Gas-transfer structures are noted in a binary atmospheric configuration, including preferential deposition of material from Pluto's escaping atmosphere onto Charon's leading hemisphere that peaks at 315° E on the equator. As the moon gravitationally focuses incident flow, a high density structure forms in its wake. If molecules are permitted to escape from Charon in diffuse reflections from its surface, a returning flux forms to Pluto's exobase, preferentially directed toward its trailing hemisphere. Charon is capable of supporting a thin atmosphere at column densities as high as 1.5 × 1017 m-2 in simulations with a plutonian exobase condition similar to the

  20. Energy transfer model and its applications of ultrasonic gas flow-meter under static and dynamic flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Xu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Wen-Jiao; Shen, Zi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Most of the ultrasonic gas flow-meters measure the gas flow rate by calculating the ultrasonic transmission time difference between the downstream and upstream. Ultrasonic energy attenuation occurs in the processes of the ultrasonic generation, conversion, transmission, and reception. Additionally, at the same time, the gas flow will also affect the ultrasonic propagation during the measurement, which results in the ultrasonic energy attenuation and the offset of ultrasonic propagation path. Thus, the ultrasonic energy received by the transducer is weaker. When the gas flow rate increases, this effect becomes more apparent. It leads to the measurement accuracy reduced, and the measurement range narrowed. An energy transfer model, where the ultrasonic gas flow-meter under without/with the gas flow, is established by adopting the statistical analysis and curve fitting based on a large amount of experimental data. The static sub model without the gas flow expresses the energy conversion efficiency of ultrasonic gas transducers, and the dynamic sub model with the gas flow reflects the energy attenuation pattern following the flow rate variations. The mathematical model can be used to determine the minimum energy of the excitation signal for meeting the requirement of specific measurement range, and predict the maximum measurable flow rate in the case of fixed energy of excitation signal. Based on the above studies, a method to enhance the excitation signal energy is proposed under the output power of the transmitting circuit being a finite value so as to extend the measurement rage of ultrasonic gas flow-meter.

  1. The influence of pH on gas-liquid mass transfer in non-Newtonian fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Li Shaobai; Fan Jungeng; Xu Shuang; Li Rundong; Luan Jingde

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of pH on the mass transfer of oxygen bubble swarms in non-Newtonian fluids was experimentally studied. The volumetric liquid side mass transfer coefficient (kLa), liquid side mass transfer coefficient (kL), and specific interfacial area (a) were investigated. The pH was regulated by the addition of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). It was found that the kLa increased with the gas flow rate increasing and decreased with the apparent viscosity of the liqui...

  2. Gas transfer between the atmosphere and irrigated sugarcane plantation sites under different rainfall in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Crow, S. E.; Mudd, R. G.; Youkhana, A.; Nullet, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sugarcane plantation land cover is increasing in area in Brazil, South Asia and the Pacific Islands because of the growing demand for sugar and biofuel production. While a large portion of sugarcane cultivated in Brazil is rain-fed and experiences drought influences on gas exchange, sugarcane in Hawai'i is thought to be buffered from drought effects because it is drip irrigated. Knowledge about carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration rates is fundamental both for the prediction of sugar and biofuel production and for water resource management for the large plantations. To understand gas transfer under spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments, we investigated the leaf- soil- and stand-scale gas transfer processes at two irrigated sugarcane plantation study sites in Hawai'i with contrasting rainfall. Gas and energy transfers were monitored using eddy covariance systems for a full- and later half- crop cycle. Leaf ecophysiological traits were measured for stands of different ages to evaluate the effects of stand age on gas transfer. Carbon sequestration rates (Fc) showed a strong relationship with solar radiation with small differences between sites. Latent heat flux expressed as the evapotranspiration rates (ET) also had a strong relationship with solar radiation, but showed seasonality due to variations in biological control (surface conductance) and atmospheric evaporative demand. The difference in ET and its responses to environments was less clear partly buffered by the differences in the stand age and seasons. The stable Fc-solar radiation relationship despite the variation in surface conductance was partly due to the saturation of net photosynthetic rates with intercellular CO2 concentration and the low sensitivity of net photosynthesis to variations in surface conductance in sugarcane with the C4 photosynthesis pathway. The response of gas transfer to periodic irrigation, rainfall and age-related changes in leaf ecophysiological traits will be

  3. Gas transfer velocities of methane and carbon dioxide in a subtropical shallow pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shangbin

    2015-04-01

    Two diel field campaigns under different weather patterns were carried out in the summer and autumn of 2013 to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes and to probe the rates of gas exchange across the air-water interface in a subtropical eutrophic pond in China. Bubble emissions of CH4 accounted for 99.7% and 91.67% of the total CH4 emission measured at two sites in the summer; however, no bubble was observed in the autumn. The pond was supersaturated with CO2 and CH4 during the monitoring period, and the saturation ratios (i.e., observed concentration / equilibrium concentration) of CH4 were much higher than that of CO2. Although the concentration of dissolved CO2 in the surface water collected in the autumn was 1.24 times of that in the summer, the mean diffusive CO2 flux across the water-air interface measured in the summer is almost twice compared with that in the autumn. The mean concentration of dissolved CH4 in the surface water in the autumn was around half of that in the summer, but the mean diffusive CH4 flux in the summer is 4-5 times of that in the autumn. Our data showed that the variation in gas exchange rate was dominated by differences in weather patterns and primary production. Averaged k600-CO2 and k600-CH4 (the gas transfer velocity normalized to a Schmidt number of 600) were 0.65 and 0.55 cm/h in the autumn, and 2.83 and 1.64 cm/h in the summer respectively. No statistically significant correlation was found between k600 and U10 (wind speed at 10 m height) in the summer at low wind speeds in clear weather. Diffusive gas fluxes increased during the nights, which resulted from the nighttime cooling effect of water surface and stronger turbulent mixing in the water column. The chemical enhancements for CO2 was estimated up to 1.94-fold in the hot and clear summer with low wind speeds, which might have been resulted from the increasing hydration reactions in water due to the high water temperature and active metabolism in planktonic algae. However, both the air

  4. Gas transfer velocities of methane and carbon dioxide in a subtropical shallow pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangbin Xiao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two diel field campaigns under different weather patterns were carried out in the summer and autumn of 2013 to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes and to probe the rates of gas exchange across the air–water interface in a subtropical eutrophic pond in China. Bubble emissions of CH4 accounted for 99.7 and 91.67% of the total CH4 emission measured at two sites in the summer; however, no bubble was observed in the autumn. The pond was supersaturated with CO2 and CH4 during the monitoring period, and the saturation ratios (i.e. observed concentration/equilibrium concentration of CH4 were much higher than that of CO2. Although the concentration of dissolved CO2 in the surface water collected in the autumn was 1.24 times of that in the summer, the mean diffusive CO2 flux across the water–air interface measured in the summer is almost twice compared with that in the autumn. The mean concentration of dissolved CH4 in the surface water in the autumn was around half of that in the summer, but the mean diffusive CH4 flux in the summer is 4–5 times of that in the autumn. Our data showed that the variation in gas exchange rate was dominated by differences in weather patterns and primary production. Averaged k600-CO2 and k600-CH4 (the gas transfer velocity normalised to a Schmidt number of 600 were 0.65 and 0.55 cm/h in the autumn, and 2.83 and 1.64 cm/h in the summer, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was found between k600 and U10 (wind speed at 10 m height in the summer at low wind speeds in clear weather. Diffusive gas fluxes increased during the nights, which resulted from the nighttime cooling effect of water surface and stronger turbulent mixing in the water column. The chemical enhancements for CO2 were estimated up to 1.94-fold in the hot and clear summer with low wind speeds, which might have been resulted from the increasing hydration reactions in water due to the high water temperature and active metabolism in planktonic algae

  5. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  6. Application of the penetration theory for gas - Liquid mass transfer without liquid bulk : Differences with system with a bulk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elk, E. P.; Knaap, M. C.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2007-01-01

    Frequently applied micro models for gas-liquid mass transfer all assume the presence of a liquid bulk. However, some systems are characterized by the absence of a liquid bulk, a very thin layer of liquid flows over a solid surface. An example of such a process is absorption in a column equipped with

  7. Heat transfer during condensation of steam from steam-gas mixtures in the passive safety systems of nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnova, N. M.; Smirnov, Yu B.

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical model for calculation of heat transfer during condensation of multicomponent vapor-gas mixtures on vertical surfaces, based on film theory and heat and mass transfer analogy is proposed. Calculations were performed for the conditions implemented in experimental studies of heat transfer during condensation of steam-gas mixtures in the passive safety systems of PWR-type reactors of different designs. Calculated values of heat transfer coefficients for condensation of steam-air, steam-air-helium and steam-air-hydrogen mixtures at pressures of 0.2 to 0.6 MPa and of steam-nitrogen mixture at the pressures of 0.4 to 2.6 MPa were obtained. The composition of mixtures and vapor-to-surface temperature difference were varied within wide limits. Tube length ranged from 0.65 to 9.79m. The condensation of all steam-gas mixtures took place in a laminar-wave flow mode of condensate film and turbulent free convection in the diffusion boundary layer. The heat transfer coefficients obtained by calculation using the proposed model are in good agreement with the considered experimental data for both the binary and ternary mixtures.

  8. Determination of volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient of carbon monoxide in a batch cultivation system using kinetic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Nulee; Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Lovitt, Robert W; Chang, In Seop

    2017-09-01

    A mathematical model of microbial kinetics was introduced to predict the overall volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) of carbon monoxide (CO) in a batch cultivation system. The cell concentration (X), acetate concentration (Cace), headspace gas (Nco and [Formula: see text] ), dissolved CO concentration in the fermentation medium (Cco), and mass transfer rate (R) were simulated using a variety of kLa values. The simulated results showed excellent agreement with the experimental data for a kLa of 13/hr. The Cco values decreased with increase in cultivation times, whereas the maximum mass transfer rate was achieved at the mid-log phase due to vigorous microbial CO consumption rate higher than R. The model suggested in this study may be applied to a variety of microbial systems involving gaseous substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermocapillary convection around gas bubbles: an important natural effect for the enhancement of heat transfer in liquids under microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, J; Straub, J

    2002-10-01

    In the presence of a temperature gradient at a liquid-gas or liquid-liquid interface, thermocapillary or Marangoni convection develops. This convection is a special type of natural convection that was not paid much attention in heat transfer for a long time, although it is strong enough to drive liquids against the direction of buoyancy on Earth. In a microgravity environment, however, it is the remaining mode of natural convection and supports heat and mass transfer. During boiling in microgravity it was observed at subcooled liquid conditions. Therefore, the question arises about its contribution to heat transfer without phase change. Thermocapillary convection was quantitatively studied at single gas bubbles in various liquids, both experimentally and numerically. A two-dimensional mathematical model described in this article was developed. The coupled mechanism of heat transfer and fluid flow in pure liquids around a single gas bubble was simulated with a control-volume FE-method. The simulation was accompanied and compared with experiments on Earth. The numerical results are in good accordance with the experiments performed on Earth at various Marangoni numbers using various alcohols of varying chain length and Prandtl numbers. As well as calculations on Earth, the numerical method also allows simulations at stationary spherical gas bubbles in a microgravity environment. The results demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is a natural heat transfer mechanism that can partially replace the buoyancy in a microgravity environment, if extreme precautions are taken concerning the purity of the liquids, because impurities accumulate predominantly at the interface. Under Earth conditions, an enhancement of the heat transfer in a liquid volume is even found in the case where thermocapillary flow is counteracted by buoyancy. In particular, the obstructing influence of surface active substances could be observed during the experiments on Earth in water and also in

  10. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  11. Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Danesh K; He, Long; Nagendra, K

    2014-08-13

    Blade cooling technology will play a critical role in the next generation of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal temperature can avoid the use of excessive compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency and decreasing emissions. Large eddy simulation (LES) has been established to predict heat transfer coefficients with good accuracy under various non-canonical flows, but is still limited to relatively simple geometries and low Reynolds numbers. It is envisioned that the projected increase in computational power combined with a drop in price-to-performance ratio will make system-level simulations using LES in complex blade geometries at engine conditions accessible to the design process in the coming one to two decades. In making this possible, two key challenges are addressed in this paper: working with complex intricate blade geometries and simulating high-Reynolds-number (Re) flows. It is proposed to use the immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with LES wall functions. A ribbed duct at Re=20 000 is simulated using the IBM, and a two-pass ribbed duct is simulated at Re=100 000 with and without rotation (rotation number Ro=0.2) using LES with wall functions. The results validate that the IBM is a viable alternative to body-conforming grids and that LES with wall functions reproduces experimental results at a much lower computational cost. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Global evaluation of mass transfer effects: In-duct injection flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J.A.; Newton, G.H.; Kramlich, J.C.; Payne, R.

    1990-09-30

    Sorbent injection is a low capital cost, low operating cost approach to SO{sub 2} control targeted primarily at older boilers for which conventional fuel gas desulfurization is not economically viable. Duct injection is one variation of this concept in which the sorbent, either a dry powder or a slurry, is injected into the cooler regions of the boiler, generally downstream of the air heaters. The attractiveness of duct injection is tied to the fact that it avoids much of the boiler heat transfer equipment and thus has minimal impact of boiler performance. Both capital and operating cost are low. This program has as its objectives three performance related issues to address: (1) experimentally identify limits on sorbent performance. (2) identify and test sorbent performance enhancement strategies. (3) develop a compute model of the duct injection process. Two major tasks are described: a laboratory-scale global experiment and development of process model. Both are aimed at understanding and quantifying the rate-limiting processes which control SO{sub 2} capture by lime slurry during boiler duct injection. 29 refs., 35 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. A multidimensional unified gas-kinetic scheme for radiative transfer equations on unstructured mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2017-12-01

    In order to extend the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) to solve radiative transfer equations in a complex geometry, a multidimensional asymptotic preserving implicit method on unstructured mesh is constructed in this paper. With an implicit formulation, the CFL condition for the determination of the time step in UGKS can be much relaxed, and a large time step is used in simulations. Differently from previous direction-by-direction UGKS on orthogonal structured mesh, on unstructured mesh the interface flux transport takes into account multi-dimensional effect, where gradients of radiation intensity and material temperature in both normal and tangential directions of a cell interface are included in the flux evaluation. The multiple scale nature makes the UGKS be able to capture the solutions in both optically thin and thick regions seamlessly. In the optically thick region the condition of cell size being less than photon's mean free path is fully removed, and the UGKS recovers a solver for diffusion equation in such a limit on unstructured mesh. For a distorted quadrilateral mesh, the UGKS goes to a nine-point scheme for the diffusion equation, and it naturally reduces to the standard five-point scheme for a orthogonal quadrilateral mesh. Numerical computations covering a wide range of transport regimes on unstructured and distorted quadrilateral meshes will be presented to validate the current approach.

  14. Evaluation of radiation heat transfer in porous medial: Application for a pebble bed modular reactor cooled by CO2 gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi-Ali Kamel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the contribution of radiation heat transfer in the cooling of a pebble bed modular reactor. The mathematical model, developed for a porous medium, is based on a set of equations applied to an annular geometry. Previous major works dealing with the subject have considered the forced convection mode and often did not take into account the radiation heat transfer. In this work, only free convection and radiation heat transfer are considered. This can occur during the removal of residual heat after shutdown or during an emergency situation. In order to derive the governing equations of radiation heat transfer, a steady-state in an isotropic and emissive porous medium (CO2 is considered. The obtained system of equations is written in a dimensionless form and then solved. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation heat transfer on the total heat removed, an analytical method for solving the system of equations is used. The results allow quantifying both radiation and free convection heat transfer. For the studied situation, they show that, in a pebble bed modular reactor, more than 70% of heat is removed by radiation heat transfer when CO2 is used as the coolant gas.

  15. The effect of microbubbles on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient and degradation rate of COD in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kangning; Chi, Yong; Wang, Fei; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    A commonly used aeration device at present has the disadvantages of low mass transfer rate because the generated bubbles are several millimeters in diameter which are much bigger than microbubbles. Therefore, the effect of a microbubble on gas-liquid mass transfer and wastewater treatment process was investigated. To evaluate the effect of each bubble type, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients for microbubbles and conventional bubbles were determined. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was 0.02905 s(-1) and 0.02191 s(-1) at a gas flow rate of 0.67 L min(-1) in tap water for microbubbles and conventional bubbles, respectively. The degradation rate of simulated municipal wastewater was also investigated, using aerobic activated sludge and ozone. Compared with the conventional bubble generator, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 2.04, 5.9, 3.26 times higher than those of the conventional bubble contactor at the same initial COD concentration of COD 200 mg L(-1), 400 mg L(-1), and 600 mg L(-1), while aerobic activated sludge was used. For the ozonation process, the rate of COD removal using microbubble generator was 2.38, 2.51, 2.89 times of those of the conventional bubble generator. Based on the results, the effect of initial COD concentration on the specific COD degradation rate were discussed in different systems. Thus, the results revealed that microbubbles could enhance mass transfer in wastewater treatment and be an effective method to improve the degradation of wastewater.

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2003-12-15

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback

  17. Heat transfer in hybrid fibre reinforced concrete-steel composite column exposed to a gas-fired radiant heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefan, R.; Procházka, J.; Novák, J.; Fládr, J.; Wald, F.; Kohoutková, A.; Scheinherrová, L.; Čáchová, M.

    2017-09-01

    In the paper, a gas-fired radiant heater system for testing of structural elements and materials at elevated temperatures is described. The applicability of the system is illustrated on an example of the heat transfer experiment on a hybrid fibre reinforced concrete-steel composite column specimen. The results obtained during the test are closely analysed by common data visualization techniques. The experiment is simulated by a mathematical model of heat transfer, assuming the material data of the concrete determined by in-house measurements. The measured and calculated data are compared and discussed.

  18. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in tube under injection of gas through permeable walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, M. S.; Lushchik, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Using a differential turbulence model, a numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a tube is carried out and the dependences of the flow and heat transfer characteristics on the intensity of the coolant injection through permeable walls are obtained. It is shown that the coefficients of friction and heat transfer decrease with increasing of injection rate. The comparison of calculation results reflecting the main features of rather complicated processes of flow in tube under gas injection with well-known experimental data over a wide range of the Reynolds number and the intensity of injection show their satisfactory agreement.

  19. Mass Transfer in a closed stirred gas/liquid contactor: Part 1: The mass transfer rate kLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, W.T.; Thoenes, D.; Frankena, J.F.

    1973-01-01

    Liquid phase mass transfer rates kLS for the absorption of oxygen in tap water and in aqueous ionic solutions have been determined in two closed stirred tank contactors for a power input between 3 and 70 W/kg and (impeller diameter)f(tank diameter) ratios DifT of 0.3, 0.35 and 0.4. The contactors

  20. Measuring diffusion limitation with a perfusion-limited gas--hyperpolarized 129Xe gas-transfer spectroscopy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, S Sivaram; Freeman, Matthew S; Yoon, Suk W; Liljeroth, Maria G; Stiles, Jane V; Roos, Justus E; Foster, W Michael; Rackley, Craig R; McAdams, H P; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2014-09-15

    Although xenon is classically taught to be a "perfusion-limited" gas, (129)Xe in its hyperpolarized (HP) form, when detected by magnetic resonance (MR), can probe diffusion limitation. Inhaled HP (129)Xe diffuses across the pulmonary blood-gas barrier, and, depending on its tissue environment, shifts its resonant frequency relative to the gas-phase reference (0 ppm) by 198 ppm in tissue/plasma barrier and 217 ppm in red blood cells (RBCs). In this work, we hypothesized that in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the ratio of (129)Xe spectroscopic signal in the RBCs vs. barrier would diminish as diffusion-limitation delayed replenishment of (129)Xe magnetization in RBCs. To test this hypothesis, (129)Xe spectra were acquired in 6 IPF subjects as well as 11 healthy volunteers to establish a normal range. The RBC:barrier ratio was 0.55 ± 0.13 in healthy volunteers but was 3.3-fold lower in IPF subjects (0.16 ± 0.03, P = 0.0002). This was caused by a 52% reduction in the RBC signal (P = 0.02) and a 58% increase in the barrier signal (P = 0.01). Furthermore, the RBC:barrier ratio strongly correlated with lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (r = 0.89, P diffusion limitation and gas-transfer impairment and forms the basis for developing 3D MR imaging of gas exchange. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. A how-to approach for a 3D simulation of charge transfer characteristics in a gas electron multiplier (GEM)

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a detailed description of how to simulate charge transfer processes in a gaseous device is presented, taking the gas electron multiplier (GEM) as an example. A 3-dimensional simulation of the electric field and avalanche is performed. Results on charge transport are compared to experiment and agree within experimental errors; the avalanche mechanism and positive ion feedback are studied. The procedures used in the simulation are described in detail, and program scripts are appended. (15 refs).

  2. The effects of geometry and operational conditions on gas holdup, liquid circulation and mass transfer in an airlift reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouveia E.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In airlift reactors transport phenomena are achieved by pneumatic agitation and circulation occurs in a defined cyclic pattern through a loop. In the present work, the effect of geometrical relations on gas holdup and liquid velocity, and consequently on the gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient, was studied in a 6-liter airlift bioreactor with A D/A R = 0.63; A D, downcomer cross-sectional area, and A R, riser cross-sectional area. Measurements of the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa were taken in a water-air system using a modified sulfite oxidation method. Different conditions were examined by varying parameters such as superficial air velocity in the riser (U GR, bottom clearance (d1 and top clearance (d2. It was observed from the experimental results that d1 and d2 have a remarkable effect on kLa values. The effect is due to their influence on gas holdup and liquid velocity, consequently affecting kLa. Superficial air velocity in the riser (U GR ranged from 0.0126 to 0.0440 m.s-1 and kLa varied between 40 to 250 h-1, whereas gas holdup (e reached values up to 0.2. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa, gas holdup in the riser (eR and downcomer (eD and superficial liquid velocity in the riser (U LR for all the geometrical relations were successfully correlated with dimensionless numbers, namely, the Sherwood number (Sh and the Froude number (Fr as well as with geometrical relations such as the bottom space ratio (B = d1/D D and top space ratio (T = (d2 + D D/D D.

  3. The influence of pH on gas-liquid mass transfer in non-Newtonian fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shaobai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of pH on the mass transfer of oxygen bubble swarms in non-Newtonian fluids was experimentally studied. The volumetric liquid side mass transfer coefficient (kLa, liquid side mass transfer coefficient (kL, and specific interfacial area (a were investigated. The pH was regulated by the addition of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide (NaOH. It was found that the kLa increased with the gas flow rate increasing and decreased with the apparent viscosity of the liquid increasing. In the case of pH 7 was attributed to the decomposition of the Xanthan molecular structure by the hydroxyl of NaOH.

  4. Intramolecular Halogen Atom Coordinated H Transfer via Ion-Neutral Complex in the Gas Phase Dissociation of Protonated Dichlorvos Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Cheng, Shuai

    2017-10-01

    Intramolecular halogen atom coordinated H transfer reaction in the gas phase dissociation of protonated dichlorvos derivatives has been explored by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Upon collisional activation, protonated dichlorvos underwent dissociation reaction via cleavage of the P-O bond to give reactive ion-neutral complex (INC) intermediate, [dimethoxylphosphinoylium + dichloroacetaldehyde]. Besides direct dissociation of the complex, intramolecular chlorine atom coordinated H transfer reaction within the complex takes place, leading to the formation of protonated dimethyl chlorophosphate. To investigate the fragmentation mechanism, deuterium-labeled experiments and several other halogen-substituted (Br and F) analogs of dichlorvos were prepared and evaluated, which display a similar intramolecular halogen transfer. Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations were performed and the computational results also support the mechanism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Mechanism of kinetic energy transfer in homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow and its implications for segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2017-02-01

    Most gas-solid flows encountered in nature and industrial applications are polydisperse, and the segregation or mixing of particle classes in polydisperse gas-solid flows is a phenomenon of great practical importance. A statistically homogeneous gas-solid flow with a bidisperse distribution (in size or density) of particles is a canonical representation of polydisperse flows. A key feature that distinguishes the bidisperse flow from its monodisperse counterpart is the exchange of momentum and kinetic energy between the particle classes due to collisions, which are important for applications outside the very dilute regime. The average exchange of linear momentum between particle classes due to collisions occurs through the particle-particle drag term. The conservation equations for average momentum corresponding to each particle class can be used to deduce the average slip velocity between the particle size and density classes, which is the signature of particle segregation. In this canonical problem, the steady value of particle mean slip velocity results from a balance between three terms, each in turn involving the body force or the mean fluid pressure gradient, the gas-particle drag, and the particle-particle drag. The particle-particle drag depends on the particle velocity fluctuations in each class [Louge, M. Y. et al., "The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport," J. Fluid Mech. 231, 345-359 (1991)], thereby coupling the mean and second-moment equations. For monodisperse gas-solid flows the transfer of kinetic energy from the mean to second-moment equations was explained by Subramaniam and co-workers who proposed the conservation of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer principle [Xu, Y. and Subramaniam, S., "Consistent modeling of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer in particle-laden turbulent flows," Phys. Fluids 19(8), 085101 (2007)], and this was subsequently verified by particle-resolved direct numerical simulation [Mehrabadi

  6. Gas hold-up and oxygen mass transfer in three pneumatic bioreactors operating with sugarcane bagasse suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperança, M N; Cunha, F M; Cerri, M O; Zangirolami, T C; Farinas, C S; Badino, A C

    2014-05-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a low-cost and abundant by-product generated by the bioethanol industry, and is a potential substrate for cellulolytic enzyme production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of air flow rate (QAIR), solids loading (%S), sugarcane bagasse type, and particle size on the gas hold-up (εG) and volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) in three different pneumatic bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Concentric tube airlift (CTA), split-cylinder airlift (SCA), and bubble column (BC) bioreactor types were tested. QAIR and %S affected oxygen mass transfer positively and negatively, respectively, while sugarcane bagasse type and particle size (within the range studied) did not influence kLa. Using large particles of untreated sugarcane bagasse, the loop-type bioreactors (CTA and SCA) exhibited higher mass transfer, compared to the BC reactor. At higher %S, SCA presented a higher kLa value (0.0448 s−1) than CTA, and the best operational conditions in terms of oxygen mass transfer were achieved for %S 27.0 L min−1. These results demonstrated that pneumatic bioreactors can provide elevated oxygen transfer in the presence of vegetal biomass, making them an excellent option for use in three-phase systems for cellulolytic enzyme production by filamentous fungi.

  7. Numerical modelling of methane oxidation efficiency and coupled water-gas-heat reactive transfer in a sloping landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S; Ng, C W W; Leung, A K; Liu, H W

    2017-10-01

    Microbial aerobic methane oxidation in unsaturated landfill cover involves coupled water, gas and heat reactive transfer. The coupled process is complex and its influence on methane oxidation efficiency is not clear, especially in steep covers where spatial variations of water, gas and heat are significant. In this study, two-dimensional finite element numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the performance of unsaturated sloping cover. The numerical model was calibrated using a set of flume model test data, and was then subsequently used for parametric study. A new method that considers transient changes of methane concentration during the estimation of the methane oxidation efficiency was proposed and compared against existing methods. It was found that a steeper cover had a lower oxidation efficiency due to enhanced downslope water flow, during which desaturation of soil promoted gas transport and hence landfill gas emission. This effect was magnified as the cover angle and landfill gas generation rate at the bottom of the cover increased. Assuming the steady-state methane concentration in a cover would result in a non-conservative overestimation of oxidation efficiency, especially when a steep cover was subjected to rainfall infiltration. By considering the transient methane concentration, the newly-modified method can give a more accurate oxidation efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer deaeration of water on thermal power plants when used natural gas as a desorbing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The technology of low-temperature deaeration of water in thermal power plants was developed. It is proposed to use natural gas supplied to the furnace as desorbing agent in the deaerator instead steam or superheated water. Natural gas has low, often - negative temperature after reducing installs. At the same time, it contains virtually no corrosive gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide, thereby successfully may be used as a stripping agent in water deaeration. The calculation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical unit of CHP has shown that achieved a significant annual saving of fuel equivalent in the transition from the traditional method of deaeration of water in the low temperature deaeration. Hydrodynamic and mass transfer indicators were determined for the deaerator thermal power plants using as stripping medium natural gas supplied to the boiler burners. Theoretically required amount and the real specific consumption of natural gas were estimated for deaeration of water standard quality. The calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics was presented for jet-bubbling atmospheric deaerator with undescended perforated plate when operating on natural gas. The calculation shows the possibility of using commercially available atmospheric deaerators for the application of the new low-temperature water deaeration technology.

  9. Determination of the gas-to-membrane mass transfer coefficient in a catalytic membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A novel method to determine the external mass transfer coefficient in catalytic membrane reactors (Sloot et al., 1992a, b) was presented in this study. In a catalytically active membrane reactor, in which a very fast reaction occurs, the external transfer coefficient can conveniently be measured by

  10. Gas Temperature and Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-fuel Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas

    temperature than the suction pyrometer in the low velocity regions of the furnace, a difference which is likely to be an effect of the purge gas added in the optical probe. The measured temperature fluctuations were evaluated by modeling of the gas radiation. The influence from the measured fluctuations...

  11. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Agency FR Federal Register GHG greenhouse gas GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program GWP global warming... principle to including high global warming potential (GWP) HTFs in subpart I irrespective of their vapor... INFORMATION CONTACT: Carole Cook, Climate Change Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs (MC-6207J...

  12. Validation of ANSYS CFX for gas and liquid metal flows with conjugate heat transfer within the European project THINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papukchiev, A., E-mail: angel.papukchiev@grs.de; Buchholz, S.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • ANSYS CFX is validated for gas and liquid metal flows. • L-STAR and TALL-3D experiments are simulated. • Complex flow and heat transfer phenomena are modelled. • Conjugate heat transfer has to be considered in CFD analyses. - Abstract: Within the FP7 European project THINS (Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems), numerical tools for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulics of next generation rector systems were developed, applied and validated for innovative coolants. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH participated in THINS with activities related to the development and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and coupled System Thermal Hydraulics (STH) – CFD codes. High quality measurements from the L-STAR and TALL-3D experiments were used to assess the numerical results. Two-equation eddy viscosity and scale resolving turbulence models were used in the validation process of ANSYS CFX for gas and liquid metal flows with conjugate heat transfer. This paper provides a brief overview on the main results achieved at GRS within the project.

  13. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  14. Estimating of gas transfer velocity using triple isotopes of dissolved oxygen.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Abe, O.; Honda, M.; Saino, T.

    The atmosphere-ocean exchange of climatically important gases is determined by the transfer velocity (k) and concentration gradient across the interface. Based on observations in the northwestern subarctic Pacific and Sagami Bay, we report here...

  15. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  16. Resonant line transfer in a fog: using Lyman-alpha to probe tiny structures in atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; McCourt, Michael; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by observational and theoretical work that suggest very small-scale (≲ 1 pc) structure in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies and in other environments, we study Lyman-α (Lyα) radiative transfer in an extremely clumpy medium with many clouds of neutral gas along the line of sight. While previous studies have typically considered radiative transfer through sightlines intercepting ≲ 10 clumps, we explored the limit of a very large number of clumps per sightline (up to fc 1000). Our main finding is that, for covering factors greater than some critical threshold, a multiphase medium behaves similarly to a homogeneous medium in terms of the emergent Lyα spectrum. The value of this threshold depends on both the clump column density and the movement of the clumps. We estimated this threshold analytically and compare our findings to radiative transfer simulations with a range of covering factors, clump column densities, radii, and motions. Our results suggest that (I) the success in fitting observed Lyα spectra using homogeneous "shell models" (and the corresponding failure of multiphase models) hints at the presence of very small-scale structure in neutral gas, which is in agreement within a number of other observations; and (II) the recurrent problems of reproducing realistic line profiles from hydrodynamical simulations may be due to their inability to resolve small-scale structure, which causes simulations to underestimate the effective covering factor of neutral gas clouds. The movie associated to Fig. B.2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. A unified model for simulating liquid and gas phase, intermolecular energy transfer: N₂ + C₆F₆ collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Amit K; Kohale, Swapnil C; Pratihar, Subha; Sun, Rui; North, Simon W; Hase, William L

    2014-05-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study relaxation of a vibrationally excited C6F6* molecule in a N2 bath. Ab initio calculations were performed to develop N2-N2 and N2-C6F6 intermolecular potentials for the simulations. Energy transfer from "hot" C6F6 is studied versus the bath density (pressure) and number of bath molecules. For the large bath limit, there is no heating of the bath. As C6F6* is relaxed, the average energy of C6F6* is determined versus time, i.e., ⟨E(t)⟩, and for each bath density ⟨E(t)⟩ is energy dependent and cannot be fit by a single exponential. In the long-time limit C6F6 is fully equilibrated with the bath. For a large bath and low pressures, the simulations are in the fixed temperature, independent collision regime and the simulation results may be compared with gas phase experiments of collisional energy transfer. The derivative d[⟨E(t)⟩]/dt divided by the collision frequency ω of the N2 bath gives the average energy transferred from C6F6* per collision ⟨ΔE(c)⟩, which is in excellent agreement with experiment. For the ~100-300 ps simulations reported here, energy transfer from C6F6* is to N2 rotation and translation in accord with the equipartition model, with no energy transfer to N2 vibration. The energy transfer dynamics from C6F6* is not statistically sensitive to fine details of the N2-C6F6 intermolecular potential. Tests, with simulation ensembles of different sizes, show that a relatively modest ensemble of only 24 trajectories gives statistically meaningful results.

  18. Mass transfer and chemical reaction in gas-liquid-liquid systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    1998-01-01

    Gas-liquid-liquid reaction systems may be encountered in several important fields of application as e.g. hydroformylation, alkylation, carboxylation, polymerisation, hydrometallurgy, biochemical processes and fine chemicals manufacturing. However, the reaction engineering aspects of these systems

  19. Low-temperature fabrication of alkali metal-organic charge transfer complexes on cotton textile for optoelectronics and gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Walia, Sumeet; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Balendran, Sivacarendran; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Bansal, Vipul

    2015-02-03

    A generalized low-temperature approach for fabricating high aspect ratio nanorod arrays of alkali metal-TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) charge transfer complexes at 140 °C is demonstrated. This facile approach overcomes the current limitation associated with fabrication of alkali metal-TCNQ complexes that are based on physical vapor deposition processes and typically require an excess of 800 °C. The compatibility of soft substrates with the proposed low-temperature route allows direct fabrication of NaTCNQ and LiTCNQ nanoarrays on individual cotton threads interwoven within the 3D matrix of textiles. The applicability of these textile-supported TCNQ-based organic charge transfer complexes toward optoelectronics and gas sensing applications is established.

  20. Optimizing gas transfer to improve growth rate of Haematococcus pluvialis in a raceway pond with chute and oscillating baffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Li, Ke; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-01

    Up-down chute and oscillating (UCO) baffles were used to generate vortex and oscillating flow field to improve growth rate of Haematococcus pluvialis in a raceway pond. Effects of gas flow rate, solution velocity, and solution depth on solution mass transfer coefficient and mixing time were evaluated using online pH and dissolved oxygen probes. Mass transfer coefficient increased by 1.3 times and mixing time decreased by 33% when UCO baffles were used in the H. pluvialis solution, resulting in an 18% increase in biomass yield with 2% CO2. The H. pluvialis biomass yield further increased to 1.5g/L, and astaxanthin composition accumulated to 29.7mg/L under relatively higher light intensity and salinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. Phase 1 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Fridman, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States); Viskanta, R. [Purdue Univ. (United States); Neff, D. [Cumbustion Tec, Inc. (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Phase I of the project focused on acquiring the market needs, modeling, design, and test plan information for a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. All goals and objectives were achieved. The key component of the system is an innovative burner technology which combines high temperature natural gas preheating with soot formation and subsequent soot burnout in the flame, increases the system`s energy efficiency and furnace throughput, while minimizing the furnace air emissions, all without external parasitic systems. Work has included identifying industry`s needs and constraints, modeling the high luminosity burner system, designing the prototype burner for initial laboratory-scale testing, defining the test plan, adapting the burner technology to meet the industry`s needs and constraints, and outlining the Industrial Adoption Plan.

  2. Hydrogen transfer on USY zeolites during gas oil cracking: Influence of the adsorption characteristics of the zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corma, A.; Faraldos, M.; Martinez, A.; Mifsud, A. (CSIC, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-04-01

    In this work, the hydrogen transfer activity of two series of HY zeolites dealuminated by steam and by SiCl{sub 4} (24.47-24.24 {angstrom} unit cell) has been measured from the butene/butane ratio in the products obtained during the cracking of a vacuum gas oil at 756 K. With the steam-dealuminated zeolites, a sharp decrease in the ratio of hydrogen transfer to cracking is observed when the number of Al atoms per unit cell falls below 10. On the other hand, in samples dealuminated by SiCl{sub 4}, this ratio changes very little with dealumination. These results cannot be explained assuming the need for adjacent acid sites for the hydrogen transfer. The authors have found, by adsorption measurements of n-butane and 1-butene, that the changes in the relative rates of bimolecular (hydrogen transfer) to monomolecular (cracking) reactions, observed with dealuminated HY zeolites, can be explained by the changes in the adsorption capacity and adsorption selectivity which occur on zeolites dealuminated at different levels by different dealumination procedures, and which are due to changes in the electric fields inside the pores.

  3. Effect of Substrate and Process Parameters on the Gas-Substrate Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient During Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Amirhossein; McDonald, André

    2017-11-01

    The final quality of cold-sprayed coatings can be significantly influenced by gas-substrate heat exchange, due to the dependence of the deposition efficiency of the particles on the substrate temperature distribution. In this study, the effect of the air temperature and pressure, as process parameters, and surface roughness and thickness, as substrate parameters, on the convective heat transfer coefficient of the impinging air jet was investigated. A low-pressure cold spraying unit was used to generate a compressed air jet that impinged on a flat substrate. A comprehensive mathematical model was developed and coupled with experimental data to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and the surface temperature of the substrate. The effect of the air total temperature and pressure on the heat transfer coefficient was studied. It was found that increasing the total pressure would increase the Nusselt number of the impinging air jet, while total temperature of the air jet had negligible effect on the Nusslet number. It was further found that increasing the roughness of the substrate enhanced the heat exchange between the impinging air jet and the substrate. As a result, higher surface temperatures on the rough substrate were measured. The study of the effect of the substrate thickness on the heat transfer coefficient showed that the Nusselt number that was predicted by the model was independent of the thickness of the substrate. The surface temperature profile, however, decreased in increasing radial distances from the stagnation point of the impinging jet as the thickness of the substrate increased. The results of the current study were aimed to inform on the influence and effect of substrate and process parameters on the gas-substrate heat exchange and the surface temperature of the substrate on the final quality of cold-sprayed coatings.

  4. Wintertime Air-Sea Gas Transfer Rates and Air Injection Fluxes at Station Papa in the NE Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, C.; Steiner, N.; Vagle, S.

    2008-12-01

    In recent studies of air-sea fluxes of N2 and O2 in hurricanes, McNeil and D'Asaro (2007) used a simplified model formulation of air-sea gas flux to estimate simultaneous values of gas transfer rate, KT, and air injection flux, VT. The model assumes air-sea gas fluxes at high to extreme wind speeds can be explained by a combination of two processes: 1) air injection, by complete dissolution of small bubbles drawn down into the ocean boundary layer by turbulent currents, and 2) near-surface equilibration processes, such as occurs within whitecaps. This analysis technique relies on air-sea gas flux estimates for two gases, N2 and O2, to solve for the two model parameters, KT and VT. We present preliminary results of similar analysis of time series data collected during winter storms at Station Papa in the NE Pacific during 2003/2004. The data show a clear increase in KT and VT with increasing NCEP derived wind speeds and acoustically measured bubble penetration depth.

  5. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, H.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include

  7. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  8. TRACE assessment on local condensation heat transfer in presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Jin; Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kap; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    TRACE assessment was performed to investigate local condensation heat transfer coefficients in the presence of a noncondensable gas inside a vertical tube. The data obtained from pure steam and steam/nitrogen mixture condensation experiments were compared to study the effects of noncondensable nitrogen gas on the annular film condensation phenomena. The condenser tube had a small inner diameter of 13mm (about 1/2-in.) and this experiment had been performed to prove the effectiveness of the a Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), which is a small modular integral-type pressurized water reactor that is developed for the dual purposes of seawater desalination and small-scaled power generation. In the case of nitrogen presence, TRACE results show the converged results but the prediction is different from experimental data. The candidate reasons can be focused on several models, such as the film thickness calculation, surface area, and condensation heat transfer correlations, etc. In the case of pure steam condensation case, TRACE results shows large oscillations and do not converge. This should be investigated in detail to identify the reason. Until now, the oscillation in thermal hydraulic parameters results from the film thickness calculation and surface area calculation. For future works, the whole sets of the experiment will be assessed and the improvement of TRACE will be performed.

  9. Back and forth transfer and coherent coupling in a cold Rydberg dipole gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mudrich, M; Zahzam, N.; Vogt, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    . Dipole-dipole interaction is observed spectroscopically as avoided level crossing. The coherent character of the process is linked to back and forth transfer in the np+np ns+(n+1)s reaction. Decoherence in the ensemble has two different origins: the atom motion induced by dipole-dipole interaction...

  10. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  11. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: trace gas adsorption by sorbent-covered plate electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2006-06-01

    Varying degrees of mercury (Hg) capture have been reported within the electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) of coal-fired electric utility boilers. There has been some speculation that the adsorption takes place on the particulate-covered plate electrodes. This convective mass transfer analysis of laminar and turbulent channel flows provides the maximum potential for Hg adsorption by the plate electrodes within an ESP under those conditions. Mass transfer calculations, neglecting electrohydrodynamic (EHD) effects, reveal 65% removal of elemental Hg for a laminar flow within a 15-m-long channel of 0.2-m spacing and 42% removal for turbulent flow within a similar configuration. Both configurations represent specific collection areas (SCAs) that are significantly larger than conventional ESPs in use. Results reflecting more representative SCA values generally returned removal efficiencies of <20%. EHD effects, although potentially substantial at low Reynolds numbers, diminish rapidly with increasing Reynolds number and become negligible at typical ESP operating conditions. The present results indicate maximum Hg removal efficiencies for ESPs that are much less than those observed in practice for comparable ESP operating conditions. Considering Hg adsorption kinetics and finite sorbent capacity in addition to the present mass transfer analyses would yield even lower adsorption efficiencies than the present results. In a subsequent paper, the author addresses the mass transfer potential presented by the charged, suspended particulates during their collection within an ESP and the role they potentially play in Hg capture within ESPs.

  12. Air–Sea CO2 Gas Transfer Velocity in a Shallow Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    The air–sea transfer velocity of CO2(kCO2) was investigated in a shallow estuary in March to July 2012, using eddy-covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes and measured air–sea CO2 partial-pressure differences. A data evaluation method that eliminates data by nine rejection criteria in order to heig...

  13. HYDRODYNAMICS AND LOCAL MASS-TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF GAS-LIQUID EJECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CRAMERS, PHMR; SMIT, L; LEUTERITZ, GM; VANDIERENDONCK, LL; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1993-01-01

    The hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics of a straight tube ejector have been investigated. From the experiments it can be concluded that two different hydrodynamic zones exist in the ejector. In the first zone, the ''mixing shock'' region, extremely high k(L)a values are obtained. In the

  14. Mass transfer in a small scale post-combustion flue gas absorber, experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttenhuis, P. J. G.; van Elk, E. P.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide can be removed from flue gas streams with aqueous solutions of alkanolamines. In the absorber carbon dioxide is contacted with the solvent and due to several chemical reactions the carbon dioxide is converted into ionic species. These species are non-volatile and remain in the liquid

  15. Wind and Wave Characteristics Observed During the LUMINY Gas Transfer Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caulliez, G.; Jaouen, L.; Larsen, S.E.; Hansen, F.Aa.; Lund, S.; Leeuw, G. de; Woolf, D.K.; Bowyer, P.A.; Leifer, I.; Kunz, G.J.; Nightingale, P.D.; Rhee, T.S.; Liddicoat, M.I.; Baker, J.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Hassoun, S.; Cohen, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    The parameterization of the greenhouse gas fluxes between the atmosphere and oceans as function of wind and sea state parameters remains a challenging problem, of key importance for climate modelling. It is well-known that exchange across the air-water interface of gases of poor solubility as carbon

  16. The influence of polymeric membrane gas spargers on hydrodynamics and mass transfer in bubble column bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tirunehe, Gossay; Norddahl, B.

    2016-01-01

    Gas sparging performances of a flat sheet and tubular polymeric membranes were investigated in 3.1 m bubble column bioreactor operated in a semi batch mode. Air–water and air–CMC (Carboxymethyl cellulose) solutions of 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 % w/w were used as interacting gas–liquid mediums. CMC soluti...

  17. Extension of weighted sum of gray gas data to mathematical simulation of radiative heat transfer in a boiler with gas-soot media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehkhani, Samira; Nouri-Borujerdi, Ali; Kazi, Salim Newaz; Yarmand, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    In this study an expression for soot absorption coefficient is introduced to extend the weighted-sum-of-gray gases data to the furnace medium containing gas-soot mixture in a utility boiler 150 MWe. Heat transfer and temperature distribution of walls and within the furnace space are predicted by zone method technique. Analyses have been done considering both cases of presence and absence of soot particles at 100% load. To validate the proposed soot absorption coefficient, the expression is coupled with the Taylor and Foster's data as well as Truelove's data for CO2-H2O mixture and the total emissivities are calculated and compared with the Truelove's parameters for 3-term and 4-term gray gases plus two soot absorption coefficients. In addition, some experiments were conducted at 100% and 75% loads to measure furnace exit gas temperature as well as the rate of steam production. The predicted results show good agreement with the measured data at the power plant site.

  18. Extension of Weighted Sum of Gray Gas Data to Mathematical Simulation of Radiative Heat Transfer in a Boiler with Gas-Soot Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Gharehkhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study an expression for soot absorption coefficient is introduced to extend the weighted-sum-of-gray gases data to the furnace medium containing gas-soot mixture in a utility boiler 150 MWe. Heat transfer and temperature distribution of walls and within the furnace space are predicted by zone method technique. Analyses have been done considering both cases of presence and absence of soot particles at 100% load. To validate the proposed soot absorption coefficient, the expression is coupled with the Taylor and Foster's data as well as Truelove's data for CO2-H2O mixture and the total emissivities are calculated and compared with the Truelove's parameters for 3-term and 4-term gray gases plus two soot absorption coefficients. In addition, some experiments were conducted at 100% and 75% loads to measure furnace exit gas temperature as well as the rate of steam production. The predicted results show good agreement with the measured data at the power plant site.

  19. 3D modeling of heat transfer and gas flow in a grooved ring fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkett, Laura Ashley

    In the past, fuel elements with multiple axial coolant channels have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A novel fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved rings. Each fuel ring consists of a hole on the interior and grooves across the top face. Many grooved ring configurations have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel ring with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower and they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of fluid flow with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the hot, fissioning ring can be predicted. Models also show differences in velocities and temperatures after dense boundary nodes are applied. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the temperature distributions and pressure drops that result from the manipulation of various parameters, and the effects of model scaling was also investigated. The inverse Graetz numbers are plotted against Nusselt numbers, and the results of these values suggest that the gas quickly becomes fully developed, laminar flow, rather than constant turbulent conditions.

  20. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  1. Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel; Liu, Heping

    2017-02-01

    A large corpus of field and laboratory experiments support the finding that the water side transfer velocity kL of sparingly soluble gases near air-water interfaces scales as kL˜(νɛ)1/4, where ν is the kinematic water viscosity and ɛ is the mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Originally predicted from surface renewal theory, this scaling appears to hold for marine and coastal systems and across many environmental conditions. It is shown that multiple approaches to representing the effects of turbulence on kL lead to this expression when the Kolmogorov microscale is assumed to be the most efficient transporting eddy near the interface. The approaches considered range from simplified surface renewal schemes with distinct models for renewal durations, scaling and dimensional considerations, and a new structure function approach derived using analogies between scalar and momentum transfer. The work offers a new perspective as to why the aforementioned 1/4 scaling is robust.

  2. Simulating gas-liquid mass transfer in a spin filter bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Niño López, Lilibeth Caridad; Gelves Zambrano, Germán Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance model (PBM) model have been used to simulate hydrodynamics and mass transfer in a 0.014 m3 Spin Filter Bioreactor. The operating conditions chosen were defined by typical settings used for culturing plant cells. Turbulence, rotating flow, bubbles breakage and coalescence were simulated by using the k-e, MRF (Multiple Reference Frame) and PBM approaches, respectively. The numerical results from different operational conditions are compa...

  3. Air-sea gas transfer for two gases of different solubility (CO2 and O2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutgersson, A.; Andersson, A.; Sahlée, E.

    2016-05-01

    At the land-based marine measuring site Östergarnsholm in the Baltic Sea, the eddy covariance technique was used to measure air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. High- frequency measurements of oxygen were taken with a Microx TX3 optode using the luminescence lifetime technique. The system gives reasonable oxygen fluxes after the limited frequency response of the sensor was corrected for. For fluxes of carbon dioxide the LICOR-7500 instrument was used. Using flux data to estimate transfer velocities indicates higher transfer velocity for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide for winds above 5 m/s. There are too few data for any extensive conclusions, but a least-square fit of the data gives a cubic wind speed dependence of oxygen corresponding to k 660 = 0.074U 3 10. The more effective transfer for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide above 5 m/s is most likely due to enhanced efficiency of oxygen exchange across the surface. Oxygen has lower solubility compared with carbon dioxide and might be more influenced by near surface processes such as microscale wave breaking or sea spray.

  4. Computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) analysis of mixing and gas-liquid mass transfer in shake flasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu; Williams-Dalson, Wellae; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Shamlou, Parviz Ayazi

    2005-02-01

    CFD (computational fluid dynamics) techniques were used to predict mixing and gas-liquid mass transfer in a 250 ml shake flask operating over a range of shaking frequencies between 100 and 300 rev./min, shaking diameters between 20 and 60 mm, and fill volumes between 25 and 100 ml. Interfacial area, a, volumetric mass-transfer coeffcient, kLa, and the power input per unit volume, epsilonv, of the liquid were predicted to be 300bioreactors used in the fermentation of bacterial and fungal micro-organisms (100bioreactors. Bacterial and fungal micro-organisms require dissolved oxygen concentrations typically in the range 50-250 mmol of O2 . h(-1) . litre(-1), corresponding to volumetric mass-transfer coefficients, kLa, in the range of 250-400 h(-1). Poor mixing and dissolved-oxygen limitation in shake flasks may limit their use in process design and media optimization in fermentation. In contrast, mammalian cells have relatively low demand for oxygen and consequently require a lower specific power input, this being typically between 1 and 10 W . m(-3), allowing efficient operation in shake flasks. Experimental data presented as part of the present study showed that mammalian cell growth in shake flasks was essentially independent of the specific power input, the maximum specific cell growth rate being 0.056 h(-1). The corresponding maximum oxygen-uptake rate was 0.74 mmol of O2 . h(-1) . litre(-1) for a viable cell count of 1.3 x 10(6) cells . ml(-1). These values are comparable with reported values for laboratory and pilotscale bioreactors. This analysis suggests that growth of mammalian cells in shake flasks (and hence in laboratory bioreactors) is not limited by the gas-liquid mass-transfer rate. In mammalian cell cultures, the requirement for good mixing is driven by other considerations, including the need for good cell suspension and reduction in heterogeneity, for example, in pH, temperature, nutrient concentration, osmolality and lactate/glucose ratio.

  5. Photonic quantum state transfer between a cold atomic gas and a crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Nicolas; Farrera, Pau; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-11-22

    Interfacing fundamentally different quantum systems is key to building future hybrid quantum networks. Such heterogeneous networks offer capabilities superior to those of their homogeneous counterparts, as they merge the individual advantages of disparate quantum nodes in a single network architecture. However, few investigations of optical hybrid interconnections have been carried out, owing to fundamental and technological challenges such as wavelength and bandwidth matching of the interfacing photons. Here we report optical quantum interconnection of two disparate matter quantum systems with photon storage capabilities. We show that a quantum state can be transferred faithfully between a cold atomic ensemble and a rare-earth-doped crystal by means of a single photon at 1,552  nanometre telecommunication wavelength, using cascaded quantum frequency conversion. We demonstrate that quantum correlations between a photon and a single collective spin excitation in the cold atomic ensemble can be transferred to the solid-state system. We also show that single-photon time-bin qubits generated in the cold atomic ensemble can be converted, stored and retrieved from the crystal with a conditional qubit fidelity of more than 85 per cent. Our results open up the prospect of optically connecting quantum nodes with different capabilities and represent an important step towards the realization of large-scale hybrid quantum networks.

  6. Numerical Simulation on Flow and Heat Transfer Performance of Air-cooler for a Natural Gas Storage Compressor Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biyuan; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Zenghui; Zheng, Zilong; Feng, Jianmei

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer efficiency has been a key issue for large size air coolers with the noise reducers used in natural gas storage compressor unit, especially operated in summer with cooling air at a high temperature. The 3-D numerical simulation model of the whole air cooler was established to study the flow field characteristic with different inlet and outlet structures by CFD software. The system pressure loss distributions were calculated. The relationship was obtained among heat exchange efficiency, resistance loss, and the structure of air cooler, the results presented some methods to improve cooling air flow rate and heat exchange efficiency. Based on the results, some effective measures were proposed to improve heat exchanger efficiency and were implemented in the actual operation unit.

  7. Large volume injection in gas chromatography using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption interface operating under vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Álvaro; Toledano, Rosa M; Gea, Sara; Cortés, José M; Vázquez, Ana M; Villén, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The present work describes a modification of the Through Oven Transfer Adsorption Desorption (TOTAD) interface, consisting of coupling a vacuum system to reduce the consumption of the helium needed to totally remove the eluent for large volume injection (LVI) in gas chromatography (GC). Two different retention materials in the liner of the TOTAD interface were evaluated: Tenax TA, which was seen to be unsuitable for working under vacuum conditions, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which provided satisfactory repeatability as well as a good sensitivity. No variability was observed in the retention times in either case. Solutions containing organophosphorous pesticides in two different solvents, a polar (methanol/water) and a non-polar (hexane) solvent, were used to evaluate the modification. The vacuum system coupled to the TOTAD interface allowed up to 90% helium to be saved without affecting the performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  9. Influence of Mode of Metal Transfer on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded Modified Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-06-01

    This article describes in detail the effect of the modes of metal transfer on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas metal arc-welded modified ferritic stainless steel (SSP 409M) sheets (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared under three modes of metal transfer, i.e., short-circuit (SC), spray (S), transfer, and mix (M) mode transfer using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5 pct CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by means of microstructural, hardness, notched tensile strength, Charpy impact toughness, and high cycle fatigue. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on modes of metal transfer and filler wires has been determined by dilution calculation, WRC-1992 diagram, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as the tensile, Charpy impact, and high cycle fatigue of weld metal is significantly affected by the mode of metal transfer and filler wire used. However, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is affected only by the modes of metal transfer. The results have been correlated with the microstructures of weld and HAZ developed under different modes of metal transfer.

  10. Estimation of bubble-mediated air-sea gas exchange from concurrent DMS and CO2 transfer velocities at intermediate-high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas G.; Landwehr, Sebastian; Miller, Scott D.; de Bruyn, Warren J.; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Scanlon, Brian; Ward, Brian; Yang, Mingxi; Saltzman, Eric S.

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous air-sea fluxes and concentration differences of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured during a summertime North Atlantic cruise in 2011. This data set reveals significant differences between the gas transfer velocities of these two gases (Δkw) over a range of wind speeds up to 21 m s-1. These differences occur at and above the approximate wind speed threshold when waves begin breaking. Whitecap fraction (a proxy for bubbles) was also measured and has a positive relationship with Δkw, consistent with enhanced bubble-mediated transfer of the less soluble CO2 relative to that of the more soluble DMS. However, the correlation of Δkw with whitecap fraction is no stronger than with wind speed. Models used to estimate bubble-mediated transfer from in situ whitecap fraction underpredict the observations, particularly at intermediate wind speeds. Examining the differences between gas transfer velocities of gases with different solubilities is a useful way to detect the impact of bubble-mediated exchange. More simultaneous gas transfer measurements of different solubility gases across a wide range of oceanic conditions are needed to understand the factors controlling the magnitude and scaling of bubble-mediated gas exchange.

  11. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  12. Efficient transfer of positrons from a buffer-gas-cooled accumulator into an orthogonally oriented superconducting solenoid for antihydrogen studies

    CERN Document Server

    Comeau, D; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Mullers, A; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap used in antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9 m long magnetic guide that connects the central field lines of the 0.15 T field in the positron accumulator to the central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degrees upward bend and a 105 degrees downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the positron accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. A 7 m long 5 cm diameter stainless-steel tube and a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm diamet...

  13. Characterization of Gas-Phase Organics Using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Aircraft Turbine Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Brem, Benjamin T; Klein, Felix; El-Haddad, Imad; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Setyan, Ari; Huang, Rujin; Wang, Jing; Slowik, Jay G; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre S H

    2017-04-04

    Nonmethane organic gas emissions (NMOGs) from in-service aircraft turbine engines were investigated using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) at an engine test facility at Zurich Airport, Switzerland. Experiments consisted of 60 exhaust samples for seven engine types (used in commercial aviation) from two manufacturers at thrust levels ranging from idle to takeoff. Emission indices (EIs) for more than 200 NMOGs were quantified, and the functional group fractions (including acids, carbonyls, aromatics, and aliphatics) were calculated to characterize the exhaust chemical composition at different engine operation modes. Total NMOG emissions were highest at idling with an average EI of 7.8 g/kg fuel and were a factor of ∼40 lower at takeoff thrust. The relative contribution of pure hydrocarbons (particularly aromatics and aliphatics) of the engine exhaust decreased with increasing thrust while the fraction of oxidized compounds, for example, acids and carbonyls increased. Exhaust chemical composition at idle was also affected by engine technology. Older engines emitted a higher fraction of nonoxidized NMOGs compared to newer ones. Idling conditions dominated ground level organic gas emissions. Based on the EI determined here, we estimate that reducing idle emissions could substantially improve air quality near airports.

  14. Role of technology transfer in abating greenhouse gas emissions: the case of Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanalingam, K.; Siyambalapitiya, T. [Sri Lanka Energy Managers Association, Colombo (Sri Lanka)

    1994-12-31

    Measures introduced by the Sri Lanka government to reduce energy consumption are outlined. These include introduction of improved cookstoves, promotion of gas use in place of electricity, introduction of efficient lighting, energy management programs in industry, and research into more appropriate agricultural machinery. Self-reliance in energy planning is advocated. Foreign expertise may be needed to initiate a process but emphasis is put on eventual transition to national staffing. The article outlines Sri Lanka`s foreign investment policy. It then describes the efforts made so far to improve the efficiency of lighting systems in households, together with details of costs and benefits of a possible state sponsored or private sector funded popularization programme for efficient lighting systems. 1 fig.

  15. Retained gas sampler extractor mixing and mass transfer rate study: Experimental and simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recknagle, K.P.; Bates, J.M.; Shekarriz, A.

    1997-11-01

    Research staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted experimental testing and computer simulations of the impeller-stirred Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) gas extractor system. This work was performed to verify experimentally the effectiveness of the extractor at mixing viscous fluids of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology representative of Hanford single- and double-shell wastes, respectively. Developing the computational models and validating their results by comparing them with experimental results would enable simulations of the mixing process for a range of fluid properties and mixing speeds. Five tests were performed with a full-scale, optically transparent model extractor to provide the data needed to compare mixing times for fluid rheology, mixer rotational direction, and mixing speed variation. The computer model was developed and exercised to simulate the tests. The tests demonstrated that rotational direction of the pitched impeller blades was not as important as fluid rheology in determining mixing time. The Newtonian fluid required at least six hours to mix at the hot cell operating speed of 3 rpm, and the non-Newtonian fluid required at least 46 hours at 3 rpm to become significantly mixed. In the non-Newtonian fluid tests, stagnant regions within the fluid sometimes required days to be fully mixed. Higher-speed (30 rpm) testing showed that the laminar mixing time was correlated to mixing speed. The tests demonstrated that, using the RGS extractor and current procedures, complete mixing of the waste samples in the hot cell should not be expected. The computer simulation of Newtonian fluid mixing gave results comparable to the test while simulation of non-Newtonian fluid mixing would require further development. In light of the laboratory test results, detailed parametric analysis of the mixing process was not performed.

  16. Heat transfer in gas-cooled piles; Echanges thermiques dans les piles a gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Foll, J.; Gelin, P.; Robert, E. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Measurements under steady flow conditions gave the distribution of the local heat transfer coefficient along the cross section perimeter of a longitudinally finned can. The distribution is generally affected by strong irregularities which make the elementary theory of heat transfer along the fins inapplicable. We studied systematically the above mentioned distribution and established however that heat transfer properties were rendered similar to those of an annular channel cross-section with isotherms heat exchange perimeter by application of two non-dimensional parameters. These parameters may be calculated by integration on the specific channel cross section and will generally permit to reach a sufficient approximation. Although the computation is rather difficult the evaluation of the parameters is more easily done by electrical analogy measurements and there even exits a possibility to learn directly about the effect of slight changes of the can outer perimeter. Now, the channel as a whole is rated to such performances as are apt to keep the can temperature below a given limiting value, generally by making the assumption that the properties of the cross section remain identical through-out the channel. Usually, however, there are many separate fuel elements along the channel and consequently flux and heat transfer coefficient distribution and local temperature values on the can may be significantly disturbed compared to the simpler case above mentioned. We must therefore bear in mind to design the fuel elements to avoid end caps becoming in turn overheated. Moreover, fuel end caps may be more heavily stressed than the other parts of the can which results in a lower value of the temperature limit and it must be remembered they lie nearer fuel hotter parts on the rod axis, precisely where fuel discontinuity, to make matters worse, may cause the flux to show a rise. The flux rise was computed on an electronic machine and subsequently measured directly

  17. Keto-enol tautomerization and intermolecular proton transfer in photoionized cyclopentanone dimer in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arup K.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Chakraborty, Tapas, E-mail: pctc@iacs.res.in [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-28

    Time-of-flight mass spectra of cyclopentanone and its clusters cooled in a supersonic jet expansion have been measured following 4-, 3-, and 2-photon ionizations by the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic wavelengths, respectively, of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The mass spectra reveal signatures of energetically favored keto to enol tautomerization of the molecular ion leading to intermolecular proton transfer, and this observation is found sharply dependent on the ionization wavelengths used. Electronic structure calculation predicts that in spite of the energetic preference, keto-enol conversion barrier of isolated molecular ion is high. However, the barrier is significantly reduced in a CH⋯O hydrogen-bonded dimer of the molecule. The transition states associated with tautomeric conversion of both cyclopentanone monomer and dimer cations have been identified by means of intrinsic reaction co-ordinate calculation. In a supersonic jet expansion, although a weakly bound dimer is readily generated, the corresponding cation and also the protonated counterpart are observed only for ionization by 532 nm. For other two ionization wavelengths, these species do not register in the mass spectra, where the competing reaction channels via α-cleavage of the ring become dominant. In contrast to the report of a recent study, we notice that the intact molecular ion largely survives fragmentations when ionized from the 2-photon resonant 3p Rydberg state as intermediate using nanosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding resonant 3-photon ionization spectrum has been recorded probing the intact molecular ion.

  18. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  19. Highly sensitive and selective room-temperature NO{sub 2} gas sensor based on bilayer transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seekaew, Yotsarayuth [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Wisitsoraat, Anurat [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal, E-mail: chatchawal.w@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Simple and low-cost fabrication of bilayer graphene gas sensor was presented. • Layer effects of graphene on NO{sub 2} gas-sensing properties were investigated. • Bilayer graphene sensor exhibited a high linear NO{sub 2} sensitivity of 1.409 ppm{sup −1}. • The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanisms based on band diagram were highlighted. - Abstract: This work presents a highly sensitive room-temperature gas sensor based on bilayer graphene fabricated by an interfacial transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene onto nickel interdigitated electrodes. Scanning electron microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations confirm the presence of graphene on interdigitated nickel electrodes with varying numbers of graphene layers. The NO{sub 2} detection performances of bilayer graphene gas sensor have been investigated in comparison with those of monolayer and multilayer graphene gas sensors at room temperature. From results, the bilayer graphene gas sensor exhibits higher response, sensitivity and selectivity to NO{sub 2} than monolayer and multilayer graphene. The sensitivity of bilayer graphene gas sensor is 1.409 ppm{sup −1} towards NO{sub 2} over a concentration range of 1–25 ppm, which is more than twice higher than that of monolayer graphene. The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanism of graphene sensing film has been explained based on the direct charge transfer process due to the adsorption of NO{sub 2} molecules.

  20. Characterisation of the volatile profiles of infant formulas by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.; Floris, V.; Fayoux, S.

    2006-01-01

    The volatile profiles of 13 infant formulas were evaluated by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography¿mass spectrometry (GC¿MS). The infant formulas varied in brand (Aptamil, Cow & Gate, SMA), type (for different infant target groups) and physical form

  1. Submm Observations of Massive Star Formation in the Giant Molecular Cloud NGC 6334 : Gas Kinematics with Radiative Transfer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernickel, A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. How massive stars (M>8 Ms) form and how they accrete gas is still an open research field, but it is known that their influence on the interstellar medium (ISM) is immense. Star formation involves the gravitational collapse of gas from scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) down to dense hot molecular cores (HMCs). Thus, it is important to understand the mass flows and kinematics in the ISM. Aims. This dissertation focuses on the detailed study of the region NGC 6334, located in the Galaxy at a distance of 1.7 kpc. It is aimed to trace the gas velocities in the filamentary, massive star-forming region NGC 6334 at several scales and to explain its dynamics. For that purpose, different scales are examined from 0.01-10 pc to collect information about the density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity, and consequently to gain insights about the physio-chemical conditions of molecular clouds. The two embedded massive protostellar clusters NGC 6334I and I(N), which are at different stages of development, were selected to determine their infall velocities and mass accretion rates. Methods. This astronomical source was surveyed by a combination of different observatories, namely with the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the single-dish telescope Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), and the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO). It was mapped with APEX in carbon monoxide (13CO and C18O, J=2-1) at 220.4 GHz to study the filamentary structure and turbulent kinematics on the largest scales of 10 pc. The spectral line profiles are decomposed by Gaussian fitting and a dendrogram algorithm is applied to distinguish velocity-coherent structures and to derive statistical properties. The velocity gradient method is used to derive mass flow rates. The main filament was mapped with APEX in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and oxomethylium (HCO+, J=3-2) at 267.6 GHz to trace the dense gas. To reproduce the position- velocity diagram (PVD), a cylindrical model with the radiative transfer

  2. A combination of clinical parameters and blood-gas analysis identifies patients at risk of transfer to intensive care upon arrival to the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørn, Maria; Simonsen, Jakúp W; Mogensen, Christian B

    2016-08-01

    Identifying patients at risk of transfer to the ICU upon arrival to the Emergency Department (ED) might direct early therapy and optimize transfers. However, among the many ED patients, it is difficult to pinpoint the few who insidiously deteriorate to an ICU-requiring level. The aim of this study was to identify predictors in background information, vital values and blood-gas analysis for transfer to ICU 3-36 h after arrival among nontrauma ED patients. A case-control study of 10 007 acute adult patients admitted to ED within 1 year was carried out. The case group consisted of all ICU transfers 3-36 h after arrival who underwent blood-gas analysis and a similar control group not transferred to the ICU. Blood pressure, respiratory frequency, pulse rate, peripheral oxygen saturation and temperature, triage, height, weight, Glasgow Coma Score, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, age, sex, Charlson score and blood-gas results were analysed. A total of 49 medical and 33 surgical patients were transferred to the ICU. For medical cases, 2.3 and surgical cases 3.7 controls were included. For medical patients, low systolic blood pressure [odds ratio (OR) 14.4], elevated heart rate (OR 3.9), severe acidosis (OR 5.1) and hypercapnia (OR 8.4) and for surgical patients age 60-79 years (OR 6.3), low diastolic blood pressure (OR 2.7) and severe acidosis (OR 15.3) were associated significantly with later transfer to the ICU. The predictors identified could be used as part of ED triage to identify high-risk patients for ICU. These findings should be examined in a well-designed prospective cohort study.

  3. Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction in COPD: Improvements in Gas Transfer Capacity Are Associated With Improvements in Ventilation and Perfusion Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kelvin; Williamson, Jonathan P; Peters, Matthew J; Ing, Alvin J

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) has been shown to improve lung function, quality of life, and exercise tolerance in patients with severe heterogeneous emphysema. Our study aims to determine the effect of ELVR on gas transfer capacity corrected for alveolar volume (KCO) and investigate the relationship between KCO and ventilation and perfusion (VQ) matching. We speculate on possible mechanisms for the observed changes METHODS:: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were prospectively recruited and underwent unilateral upper lobe ELVR between 2012 and 2014. Each had respiratory function test and differential VQ scans at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 12-month post-ELVR. In total, 11 patients had 3 sets of respiratory function test (at baseline, 1, and 3 mo), whereas 7 had 4 sets (at baseline, 1, 3, and 12 mo). KCO improved by 10.3 (±7.5)% at 1 month (P=NS) and 39.8 (±15.4)% at 12 months (Plung increased by 12.8 (±5.6)% and 7.9 (±2.3)%, respectively at 1 month, whereas those of the targeted lung both decreased (Plung with improved VQ matching.

  4. Influence of forced internal air circulation on airflow distribution and heat transfer in a gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongzhang; Qin, Lanzhi; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-02-01

    Internal air circulation affects the temperature field distribution in a gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation bioreactor (GDSFB). To enhance heat transfer through strengthening internal air circulation in a GDSFB, we put an air distribution plate (ADP) into the bioreactor and studied the effects of forced internal air circulation on airflow, heat transfer, and cellulase activity of Trichoderma viride L3. Results showed that ADP could help form a steady and uniform airflow distribution, and with gas-guide tubes, air reversal was formed inside the bioreactor, thus resulting in a smaller temperature difference between medium and air by enhancing convective heat transfer inside the bioreactor. Using an ADP of 5.35 % aperture ratio caused a 1 °C decrease in the average temperature difference during the solid-state fermentation process of T. viride L3. Meanwhile, the cellulase activity of T. viride L3 increased by 13.5 %. The best heat-transfer effect was attained when using an ADP of 5.35 % aperture ratio and setting the fan power to 125 V (4.81 W) in the gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation (GDSF) process. An option of suitable aperture ratio and fan power may be conducive to ADPs' industrial amplification.

  5. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Volume 2, Duct spray drying: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozewicz, W. [Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Environmental Systems Div.; Rochelle, G.T. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1992-01-29

    Removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal- burning power plants can be achieved by duct spray drying using calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}] slurries. A primary objective of this research was to discover the aspects of mass transfer into Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries which limit SO{sub 2} absorption. A bench- scale stirred tank reactor with a flat gas/liquid interface was used to simulate SO{sub 2} absorption in a slurry droplet. The absorption rate of SO{sub 2} from gas concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppm was measured at 55{degrees}C in clear solutions and slurries of Ca(OH){sub 2} up to 1.0 M (7 wt percent). Results are reported in terms of the enhancement factor, {O}. This research will allow prediction of conditions where the absorption of SO{sub 2} in Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries can be enhanced by changes to liquid phase constituents (under which SO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by liquid film mass transfer). Experiments in the stirred tank have shown that SO{sub 2} absorption in a 1.0 M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry was completely dominated by gas film mass transfer with a large excess of Ca(OH){sub 2} but becomes controlled by liquid film resistance at greater than 50 percent Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization. (VC)

  6. Transient natural and surface-tension-driven convection in a two-layer gas-and-liquid enclosure with nonuniform radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramzon, B.; Edwards, D. K.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow in a cylindrical enclosure containing a two-layer gas-and-liquid system. The geometric configuration and the boundary conditions of the problem are relevant to the analysis of the preignition processes during the fire accident situation involving a pool of liquid fuel in the vicinity of an ignition source. It is demonstrated that the effects of the natural and thermocapillary convection, radiative transfer, thermal inertia and conduction of the walls bounding the enclosure, as well as, the magnitude of the gravity field play important roles in the development of the temperature and velocity fields in the container.

  7. Fast approximate technique for the cumulative wavenumber model to modeling radiative transfer in a mixture of real gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, Carlos T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Taubate, Rua Daniel Danelli s/n, Taubate (SP) 12060-440 (Brazil)], E-mail: csalinas_99@yahoo.com

    2008-07-15

    In the cumulative wavenumber (CW) model, the total range of the absorption cross-section C{eta} is subdivided into the supplementary absorption cross-section of gray gases C{sub j}, j=1,...,n, where n is the number of gray gases; and the wavenumber region is subdivided into intervals {delta}{sub i}=[{eta}{sub i-1}, {eta}{sub i}], i=1, 2,...,p, where p is the number of intervals. The intersection of the two spectral subdivisions is used to define the modeling of the fractional gray gas D{sub ij}. In the CW model, we solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) in every subinterval D{sub ij}; then it is necessary to solve n x p times the spectral form of the RTE for complete spectral integration. In this work, the CW model is used with a numerical approximation technique based on additive properties of radiative intensity to reduce the solution of RTE to n new fractional gray gas D{sub j} for complete spectral integration. The CW model was first coupled with the discrete ordinates method and the accuracy of the simplified technique and the algorithm was first examined for one-dimensional homogeneous media; results are compared with line-by-line calculations and it is found that the CW model with the simplified technique is exact for the homogeneous media examined. Also, the fast approach is tested in the diffuse reflecting boundaries case. The CW model is implemented in a bi-dimensional enclosure containing real gases in isothermal cases. Afterwards, this approximate technique is extended to non-isothermal and non-homogeneous cases; the results are compared with line-by-line calculations taken from literature and good agreement was found. The results obtained using the acceleration technique for the CW model agree with the results of original CW model. With this acceleration technique the CPU time decreases p times. Spectral database HITRAN and HITEMP are used to obtain the molecular absorption spectrum of the gases.

  8. Charge-tagged N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC): Direct transfer from ionic liquid solutions and long-lived nature in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thyago S.; Lesage, Denis; da Silva, Wender A.; Cole, Richard B.; Ebeling, Günter; Dupont, Jaïrton; de Oliveira, Heibbe C. B.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Neto, Brenno A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Negatively charge-tagged N-heterocyclic carbenes have been formed in solution via deprotonation of imidazolium ions bearing acid side groups and transferred to the gas phase via ESI(-)-MS. The structure of the putative and apparently stable gaseous carbenes formed in such conditions were then probed via reactions with carbon dioxide using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer particularly optimized for ion/molecule reactions of ESI-generated ions. Complete conversion to imidazolium carboxylates was achieved, which seems to demonstrate the efficiency of the transfer, the gas-phase stability, and the long-lived nature of these unprecedented charge-tagged carbenes and their predominance in the ionic population. Comprehensive studies on the intrinsic reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes with silent charge tags are therefore possible. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Estimating the gas transfer velocity: a prerequisite for more accurate and higher resolution GHG fluxes (lower Aare River, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, S.; Perez, K.; Schubert, C. J.; Eugster, W.; Wehrli, B.; Del Sontro, T.

    2013-12-01

    Currently, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from lakes, reservoirs and rivers are readily investigated due to the global warming potential of those gases and the role these inland waters play in the carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of high spatiotemporally-resolved emission estimates, and how to accurately assess the gas transfer velocity (K) remains controversial. In anthropogenically-impacted systems where run-of-river reservoirs disrupt the flow of sediments by increasing the erosion and load accumulation patterns, the resulting production of carbonic greenhouse gases (GH-C) is likely to be enhanced. The GH-C flux is thus counteracting the terrestrial carbon sink in these environments that act as net carbon emitters. The aim of this project was to determine the GH-C emissions from a medium-sized river heavily impacted by several impoundments and channelization through a densely-populated region of Switzerland. Estimating gas emission from rivers is not trivial and recently several models have been put forth to do so; therefore a second goal of this project was to compare the river emission models available with direct measurements. Finally, we further validated the modeled fluxes by using a combined approach with water sampling, chamber measurements, and highly temporal GH-C monitoring using an equilibrator. We conducted monthly surveys along the 120 km of the lower Aare River where we sampled for dissolved CH4 (';manual' sampling) at a 5-km sampling resolution, and measured gas emissions directly with chambers over a 35 km section. We calculated fluxes (F) via the boundary layer equation (F=K×(Cw-Ceq)) that uses the water-air GH-C concentration (C) gradient (Cw-Ceq) and K, which is the most sensitive parameter. K was estimated using 11 different models found in the literature with varying dependencies on: river hydrology (n=7), wind (2), heat exchange (1), and river width (1). We found that chamber fluxes were always higher than boundary

  10. Influence of fluid-mechanical characteristics of the system on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient and gas dispersion in three-phase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Milena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of gas bubbles and volumetric mass transfer coefficient, Kla, in a three phase system, with different types of solid particles at different operation conditions were studied in this paper. The ranges of superficial gas and liquid velocities used in this study were 0,03-0,09 m/s and 0-0,1 m/s, respectively. The three different types of solid particles were used as a bed in the column (glass dp=3 mm, dp=6 mm; ceramic dp=6 mm. The experiments were carried out in a 2D plexiglas column, 278 x 20,4 x 500 mm and in a cylindrical plexiglas column, with a diameter of 64 mm and a hight of 2000 mm. The Kla coefficient increased with gas and liquid velocities. Results showed that the volumetric mass transfer coefficient has a higher values in three phase system, with solid particles, compared with two phase system. The particles properties (diameter and density have a major impact on oxygen mass transfer in three phase systems.

  11. Experimental investigation of the liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient for upward gas-liquid two-phase flow in rectangular microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Ji

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The gas-liquid two-phase mass transfer process in microchannels is complicated due to the special dynamical characteristics. In this work, a novel method was explored to measure the liquid side volumetric mass transfer coefficient kLa. Pressure transducers were utilized to measure the pressure variation of upward gas-liquid two-phase flow in three vertical rectangular microchannels and the liquid side volumetric mass transfer coefficient kLa was calculated through the Pressure-Volume-Temperature correlation of the gas phase. Carbon dioxide-water, carbon dioxide-ethanol and carbon dioxide-n-propanol were used as working fluids, respectively. The dimensions of the microchannels were 40 µm×240 µm (depth×width, 100 µm×800 µm and 100 µm×2000 µm, respectively. Results showed that the channel diameter and the capillary number influence kLa remarkably and that the maximum value of kLa occurs in the annular flow regime. A new correlation of kLa was proposed based on the Sherwood number, Schmidt number and the capillary number. The predicted values of kLa agreed well with the experimental data.

  12. Numerical simulation of the heat transfer at cooling a high-temperature metal cylinder by a flow of a gas-liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, S. S.; Lipanov, A. M.; Karpov, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The numerical modeling results for the heat transfer during cooling a metal cylinder by a gas-liquid medium flow in an annular channel are presented. The results are obtained on the basis of the mathematical model of the conjugate heat transfer of the gas-liquid flow and the metal cylinder in a two-dimensional nonstationary formulation accounting for the axisymmetry of the cooling medium flow relative to the cylinder longitudinal axis. To solve the system of differential equations the control volume approach is used. The flow field parameters are calculated by the SIMPLE algorithm. To solve iteratively the systems of linear algebraic equations the Gauss-Seidel method with under-relaxation is used. The results of the numerical simulation are verified by comparing the results of the numerical simulation with the results of the field experiment. The calculation results for the heat transfer parameters at cooling the high-temperature metal cylinder by the gas-liquid flow are obtained with accounting for evaporation. The values of the rate of cooling the cylinder by the laminar flow of the cooling medium are determined. The temperature change intensity for the metal cylinder is analyzed depending on the initial velocity of the liquid flow and the time of the cooling process.

  13. Analysis of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop for a Gas Flowing Through a set of Multiple Parallel Flat Plates at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Thomas H.

    1961-01-01

    Equations were derived representing heat transfer and pressure drop for a gas flowing in the passages of a heater composed of a series of parallel flat plates. The plates generated heat which was transferred to the flowing gas by convection. The relatively high temperature level of this system necessitated the consideration of heat transfer between the plates by radiation. The equations were solved on an IBM 704 computer, and results were obtained for hydrogen as the working fluid for a series of cases with a gas inlet temperature of 200 R, an exit temperature of 5000 0 R, and exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to O.8. The length of the heater composed of the plates ranged from 2 to 4 feet, and the spacing between the plates was varied from 0.003 to 0.01 foot. Most of the results were for a five- plate heater, but results are also given for nine plates to show the effect of increasing the number of plates. The heat generation was assumed to be identical for each plate but was varied along the length of the plates. The axial variation of power used to obtain the results presented is the so-called "2/3-cosine variation." The boundaries surrounding the set of plates, and parallel to it, were assumed adiabatic, so that all the power generated in the plates went into heating the gas. The results are presented in plots of maximum plate and maximum adiabatic wall temperatures as functions of parameters proportional to f(L/D), for the case of both laminar and turbulent flow. Here f is the Fanning friction factor and (L/D) is the length to equivalent diameter ratio of the passages in the heater. The pressure drop through the heater is presented as a function of these same parameters, the exit Mach number, and the pressure at the exit of the heater.

  14. Electron Transfer Reduction of the Diazirine Ring in Gas-Phase Peptide Ions. On the Peculiar Loss of [NH4O] from Photoleucine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Aleš; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Pepin, Robert; Slováková, Kristina; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.; Tureček, František

    2015-03-01

    Electron transfer to gas-phase peptide ions with diazirine-containing amino acid residue photoleucine (L*) triggers diazirine ring reduction followed by cascades of residue-specific radical reactions. Upon electron transfer, substantial fractions of (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals undergo elimination of [NH4O] radicals and N2H2 molecules from the side chain. The side-chain dissociations are particularly prominent on collisional activation of long-lived (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals formed by electron transfer dissociation of noncovalent peptide-18-crown-6-ether ion complexes. The ion dissociation products were characterized by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) and ion mobility measurements. The elimination of [NH4O] was elucidated with the help of 2H, 15 N, and 18O-labeled peptide ions and found to specifically involve the amide oxygen of the N-terminal residue. The structures, energies, and electronic states of the peptide radical species were elucidated by a combination of near-UV photodissociation experiments and electron structure calculations combining ab initio and density functional theory methods. Electron transfer reaching the ground electronic states of charge reduced (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals was found to reduce the diazirine ring. In contrast, backbone N - Cα bond dissociations that represent a 60%-75% majority of all dissociations because of electron transfer are predicted to occur from excited electronic states.

  15. A comparison of fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interrelation between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB has been established based on a local furnace data. The furnace data have been measured in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation. In the present study, the bed temperature and suspension density were treated as experimental variables along the furnace height. The measured bed temperature and suspension density were varied in the range of 1131-1156 K and 1.93-6.32 kg/m3, respectively. Using the heat transfer coefficient for commercial CFB combustor, two empirical heat transfer correlation were developed in terms of important operating parameters including bed temperature and also suspension density. The fuzzy logic results were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental heat transfer data obtained based on cluster renewal approach. The predicted bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient covered a range of 109-241 W/(m2K and 111-240 W/(m2K, for fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach respectively. The divergence in calculated heat flux recovery along the furnace height between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach did not exceeded ±2%.

  16. Enhancement of Oxygen Mass Transfer and Gas Holdup Using Palm Oil in Stirred Tank Bioreactors with Xanthan Solutions as Simulated Viscous Fermentation Broths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaila Mohd Sauid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44 h−1. It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients.

  17. Enhancement of Oxygen Mass Transfer and Gas Holdup Using Palm Oil in Stirred Tank Bioreactors with Xanthan Solutions as Simulated Viscous Fermentation Broths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V. P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the k L a. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and k L a on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the k L a of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest k L a value of 84.44 h−1. It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The k L a values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients. PMID:24350269

  18. Enhancement of oxygen mass transfer and gas holdup using palm oil in stirred tank bioreactors with xanthan solutions as simulated viscous fermentation broths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V P S

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44 h(-1). It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients.

  19. Measuring diffusion limitation with a perfusion-limited gas—Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas-transfer spectroscopy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Yoon, Suk W.; Liljeroth, Maria G.; Stiles, Jane V.; Roos, Justus E.; Michael Foster, W. Sivaram; Rackley, Craig R.; McAdams, H. P.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2014-01-01

    Although xenon is classically taught to be a “perfusion-limited” gas, 129Xe in its hyperpolarized (HP) form, when detected by magnetic resonance (MR), can probe diffusion limitation. Inhaled HP 129Xe diffuses across the pulmonary blood-gas barrier, and, depending on its tissue environment, shifts its resonant frequency relative to the gas-phase reference (0 ppm) by 198 ppm in tissue/plasma barrier and 217 ppm in red blood cells (RBCs). In this work, we hypothesized that in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the ratio of 129Xe spectroscopic signal in the RBCs vs. barrier would diminish as diffusion-limitation delayed replenishment of 129Xe magnetization in RBCs. To test this hypothesis, 129Xe spectra were acquired in 6 IPF subjects as well as 11 healthy volunteers to establish a normal range. The RBC:barrier ratio was 0.55 ± 0.13 in healthy volunteers but was 3.3-fold lower in IPF subjects (0.16 ± 0.03, P = 0.0002). This was caused by a 52% reduction in the RBC signal (P = 0.02) and a 58% increase in the barrier signal (P = 0.01). Furthermore, the RBC:barrier ratio strongly correlated with lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (r = 0.89, P diffusion limitation and gas-transfer impairment and forms the basis for developing 3D MR imaging of gas exchange. PMID:25038105

  20. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  1. Net sea–air CO2 flux uncertainties in the Bay of Biscay based on the choice of wind speed products and gas transfer parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Otero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of sea–air CO2 fluxes is largely dependent on wind speed through the gas transfer velocity parameterization. In this paper, we quantify uncertainties in the estimation of the CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay resulting from the use of different sources of wind speed such as three different global reanalysis meteorological models (NCEP/NCAR 1, NCEP/DOE 2 and ERA-Interim, one high-resolution regional forecast model (HIRLAM-AEMet, winds derived under the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP project, and QuikSCAT winds in combination with some of the most widely used gas transfer velocity parameterizations. Results show that net CO2 flux estimations during an entire seasonal cycle (September 2002–September 2003 may vary by a factor of ~ 3 depending on the selected wind speed product and the gas exchange parameterization, with the highest impact due to the last one. The comparison of satellite- and model-derived winds with observations at buoys advises against the systematic overestimation of NCEP-2 and the underestimation of NCEP-1. In the coastal region, the presence of land and the time resolution are the main constraints of QuikSCAT, which turns CCMP and ERA-Interim in the preferred options.

  2. Transfer of preheat-treated SnO 2 via a sacrificial bridge-type ZnO layer for ethanol gas sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Da Hoon

    2017-08-05

    The progress in developing the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) heater-based SnO2 gas sensors was hindered by the subsequent heat treatment of the tin oxide (SnO2), nevertheless it is required to obtain excellent sensor characteristics. During the sintering process, the MEMS heater and the contact electrodes can be degraded at such a high temperature, which could reduce the sensor response and reliability. In this research, we presented a process of preheating the printed SnO2 sensing layer on top of a sacrificial bridge-type ZnO layer at such a high temperature, followed by transferring it onto the contact electrodes of sensor device by selective etching of the sacrificial ZnO layer. Therefore, the sensor device was not exposed to the high sintering temperature. The SnO2 gas sensor fabricated by the transfer process exhibited a rectangular sensing curve behavior with a rapid response of 52 s at 20 ppm ethanol concentration. In addition, reliable and repeatable sensing characteristics were obtained even at an ethanol gas concentration of 5 ppm.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of the potential of gas purging for investigating the air-water transfer of PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.W.; Andren, A.W. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Gas purging appears to be a viable technique for determining Henry's law constants for trace organic compounds. Values obtained for ten PCB congeners ranged from 0.3 - 3.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} atm-m3/mol, and generally followed the trends of data from other experimental and predictive studies. Field data are very preliminary, and further work is necessary before it can be determined that gas purging in the field can be used to determine fugacity differences. Current work on in-situ sampling, as well as laboratory studies on interfacial adsorption and particle entrainment in outflow gas may help determine the suitability of gas purging for determining aqueous phase fugacities.

  4. Submm Observations of Massive Star Formation in the Giant Molecular Cloud NGC 6334 : Gas Kinematics with Radiative Transfer Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zernickel, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Context. How massive stars (M>8 Ms) form and how they accrete gas is still an open research field, but it is known that their influence on the interstellar medium (ISM) is immense. Star formation involves the gravitational collapse of gas from scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) down to dense hot molecular cores (HMCs). Thus, it is important to understand the mass flows and kinematics in the ISM. Aims. This dissertation focuses on the detailed study of the region NGC 6334,...

  5. Flow and Heat Transfer in an L-shaped Cooling Passage with Ribs and Pin Fins for the Trailing Edge of a Gas-Turbine Vane and Blade

    OpenAIRE

    Pardeshi, Irsha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and effective cooling of the trailing edges of gas-turbine vanes and blades is challenging because there is very little space to work with. In this study, CFD simulations based on steady RANS closed by the shear-stress transport turbulence model were performed to study the flow and heat transfer in an L-shaped duct for the trailing edge under two operating conditions. One operating condition, referred to as the laboratory condition, where experimental measurements were made, has a R...

  6. Evaluation of the effects and interactions of mixing and oxygen transfer on the production of Fab' antibody fragments in Escherichia coli fermentation with gas blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arrazola, Roeb; Dawson, Pierre; Buchanan, Ian; Doyle, Billy; Fearn, Tom; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Baganz, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Fermentations carried out at 450-L and 20-L scale to produce Fab' antibody fragments indicated a serious problem to control levels of dissolved oxygen in the broth due to the large oxygen demand at high cell densities. Dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) dropped to zero during the induction phase and it was hypothesised that this could limit product formation due to inadequate oxygen supply. A gas blending system at 20-L scale was employed to address this problem and a factorial 2(2) experimental design was executed to evaluate independently the effects and interaction of two main engineering factors: agitation rate and DOT level (both related to mixing and oxygen transfer in the broth) on Fab' yields. By comparison to the non-gas blending system, results in the gas blending system at same scale showed an increase in the production of Fab' by 77% independent of the DOT level when using an agitation rate of 500 rpm level and by 50% at an agitation rate of 1,000 rpm with 30% DOT. Product localisation in the cell periplasm of >90% was obtained in all fermentations. Results obtained encourage further studies at 450-L scale initially, to evaluate the potential of gas blending for the industrial production of Fab' antibody fragments.

  7. Transference and natural gas distribution system analysis utilizing hybrid modelling; Analise de sistemas de transferencia e distribuicao de gas natural utilizando modelagem hibrida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Robson A.; Martinkoski, Ricardo [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Parana (CEFET), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Neves Junior, Flavio [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Parana (CEFET), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this article is to apply techniques of formal specification in modelling of natural gas transmission and distribution systems. In this case the formal models are characterized by using hybrid automata. Initially the existent components in the net are modeled and represented by independent hybrid automata. The global dynamics is obtained through the product hybrid automata. Languages representing the desirable states of the system are obtained from the hybrid automata, allowing a hybrid control procedure. An automatic tool as SHIFT must be used to modelling and simulation. (author)

  8. Gasification of coal-derived chars in synthesis gas mixtures under intraparticle mass-transfer-controlled conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, A.; Lont, J.C.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1986-01-01

    A model has been formulated to describe the quasi-steady-state gasification of coal-derived chars in gas mixtures where both the reactants carbon dioxide and steam, and the gasification products carbon monoxide and hydrogen are present. As such, these conditions reflect the situation found in most

  9. CFD Study of Full-Scale Aerobic Bioreactors: Evaluation of Dynamic O2 Distribution, Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer and Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbird, David; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Stickel, Jonathan; Sprague, Michael A.; McMillan, Jim

    2016-11-18

    If advanced biofuels are to measurably displace fossil fuels in the near term, they will have to operate at levels of scale, efficiency, and margin unprecedented in the current biotech industry. For aerobically-grown products in particular, scale-up is complex and the practical size, cost, and operability of extremely large reactors is not well understood. Put simply, the problem of how to attain fuel-class production scales comes down to cost-effective delivery of oxygen at high mass transfer rates and low capital and operating costs. To that end, very large reactor vessels (>500 m3) are proposed in order to achieve favorable economies of scale. Additionally, techno-economic evaluation indicates that bubble-column reactors are more cost-effective than stirred-tank reactors in many low-viscosity cultures. In order to advance the design of extremely large aerobic bioreactors, we have performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of bubble-column reactors. A multiphase Euler-Euler model is used to explicitly account for the spatial distribution of air (i.e., gas bubbles) in the reactor. Expanding on the existing bioreactor CFD literature (typically focused on the hydrodynamics of bubbly flows), our simulations include interphase mass transfer of oxygen and a simple phenomenological reaction representing the uptake and consumption of dissolved oxygen by submerged cells. The simulations reproduce the expected flow profiles, with net upward flow in the center of column and downward flow near the wall. At high simulated oxygen uptake rates (OUR), oxygen-depleted regions can be observed in the reactor. By increasing the gas flow to enhance mixing and eliminate depleted areas, a maximum oxygen transfer (OTR) rate is obtained as a function of superficial velocity. These insights regarding minimum superficial velocity and maximum reactor size are incorporated into NREL's larger techno-economic models to supplement standard reactor design equations.

  10. Study of the influence of surfactants on the activity coefficients and mass transfer coefficients of methanol in aqueous mixtures by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalos, Efthimios; Brezovska, Boryana; Sevastos, Dimitrios; Vagena, Artemis; Koliadima, Athanasia; Kapolos, John; Karaiskakis, George

    2017-11-17

    This work focuses on the influences of surfactants on the activity coefficients, γ, of methanol in binary mixtures with water, as well as on the mass transfer coefficients, kc, for the evaporation of methanol, which is a ubiquitous component in the troposphere, from mixtures of methanol with water at various surfactant's and methanol's concentrations. The technique used is the Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (R.F.G.C.), a version of Inverse Gas Chromatography, which allows determining both parameters by performing only one experiment for the kc parameter and two experiments for the γ parameter. The kc and γ values decrease in the presence of the three surfactants used (CTAB, SDS, TRITON X-100) at all methanol's and surfactant's concentrations. The decrease in the methanol's molar fraction, at constant number of surfactant films leads to a decrease in the kc and γ values, while the decrease in the surfactant's concentration, at constant methanol's molar fraction leads to an increase in both the kc and γ parameters. Mass transfer coefficients for the evaporation of methanol at the surfactant films, are also calculated which are approximately between 4 and 5 orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding mass transfer coefficients at the liquid films. Finally, thicknesses of the boundary layer of methanol in the mixtures of methanol with water were determined. The quantities found are compared with those given in the literature or calculated theoretically using various empirical equations. The precision of the R.F.G.C. method for measuring γ and kc parameters is approximately high (94.3-98.0%), showing that R.F.G.C. can be used with success not only for the thermodynamic study of solutions, but also for the interphase transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Power Consumption, Mixing Time, and Oxygen Mass Transfer in a Gas-Liquid Contactor Stirred with a Dual Impeller for Different Spacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Mohammed Issa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple or dual impellers are widely implemented in stirred contactors used in various biological processes like fermentation, water treatment, and pharmaceutical production. The spacing between impellers is considered as a crucial factor in designing of these types of contactors resulting in variation of oxygen mass transfer, mixing time, or power consumption for such biological system. A study of three parts was conducted to characterize the effect of the spacing between impellers on the most important parameters that related to biological contactor performance: oxygen mass transfer coefficient kla from the gas phase (air to the liquid phase (water, mixing time, and power consumption for different operating rotational speeds (1.67–3.33 rps and for three different spacing positions. The used impellers system in the study is a dual impeller system which consists of an inverted and bladed rotated cone (IBRC and a pitched-blade up-flow propeller (PBPU. The experimental results showed that the shorter spacing (the lower PBPU in a higher position is more convenient, as the achieved oxygen mass transfer coefficient has showed an improvement in its values with lower mixing time and with a slight alteration in power consumption.

  12. Modeling of gas-liquid mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor agitated by a Rushton turbine or a new pitched blade impeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelves, Ricardo; Dietrich, A; Takors, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    A combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance model (PBM) approach has been applied to simulate hydrodynamics and mass transfer in a 0.18 m(3) gas-liquid stirred bioreactor agitated by (1) a Rushton turbine, and (2) a new pitched blade geometry with rotating cartridges. The operating conditions chosen were motivated by typical settings used for culturing mammalian cells. The effects of turbulence, rotating flow, bubbles breakage and coalescence were simulated using the k-ε, multiple reference frame (MRF), Sliding mesh (SM) and PBM approaches, respectively. Considering the new pitched blade geometry with rotating aeration microspargers, [Formula: see text] mass transfer was estimated to be 34 times higher than the conventional Rushton turbine set-up. Notably, the impeller power consumption was modeled to be about 50 % lower. Independent [Formula: see text] measurements applying the same operational conditions confirmed this finding. Motivated by these simulated and experimental results, the new aeration and stirring device is qualified as a very promising tool especially useful for cell culture applications which are characterized by the challenging problem of achieving relatively high mass transfer conditions while inserting only low stirrer energy.

  13. Jet array impingement flow distributions and heat transfer characteristics. Effects of initial crossflow and nonuniform array geometry. [gas turbine engine component cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Su, C. C.; Isoda, Y.; Tseng, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of circular air jets impinging on a heat transfer surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are considered. The jet flow, after impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer surface. The configurations considered are intended to model those of interest in current and contemplated gas turbine airfoil midchord cooling applications. The effects of an initial crossflow which approaches the array through an upstream extension of the channel are considered. Flow distributions as well as heat transfer coefficients and adiabatic wall temperatures resolved to one streamwise hole spacing were measured as a function of the initial crossflow rate and temperature relative to the jet flow rate and temperature. Both Nusselt number profiles and dimensionless adiabatic wall temperature (effectiveness) profiles are presented and discussed. Special test results which show a significant reduction of jet orifice discharge coefficients owing to the effect of a confined crossflow are also presented, along with a flow distribution model which incorporates those effects. A nonuniform array flow distribution model is developed and validated.

  14. Flow and heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent mist gas-droplets stream over a flat plate

    CERN Document Server

    Terekhov, Victor I

    2014-01-01

    In this book the author presents selected challenges of thermal-hydraulics modeling of two-phase flows in minichannels with change of phase. These encompass the common modeling of flow boiling and flow condensation using the same expression. Approaches to model these two respective cases show, however, that experimental data show different results to those obtained by methods of calculation of heat transfer coefficient for respective cases. Partially that can be devoted to the fact that there are non-adiabatic effects present in both types of phase change phenomena which modify the pressure drop due to friction, responsible for appropriate modelling. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in case of annular flow structure may be considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter, which differentiates between these two modes of heat transfer. On the other hand, in case of bubbly flows, the generation of bubbles also modifies the friction pressur...

  15. Heat transfer characteristics in depressurized LOFC accidents with a failure of the RCCS in a modular gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyun; Ha, Sangjun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Tak, Namil; Lim, Hongsik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    A modular gas-cooled reactor has inherent safety characteristics with its large heat capacity and low power density of the core when compared with conventional light water reactors. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) serves as an ultimate heat sink in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor and is a system for the removal of the decay and residual heat from the uninsulated reactor vessel to ensure a plant safety. To understand the inherent safety features of the designed reactor, analyses for the RCCS performance in various severe accident conditions are required. A depressurized loss of forced circulation (LOFC) accident was considered as an initiating condition. To investigate the safety characteristics of a GCR under the one of the worst accidental scenarios, a simultaneous failure of the RCCS is considered in this study.

  16. Research and development of asymmetrical heat transfer augmentation method in radial channels of blades for high temperature gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Garanin, I. V.; Vegera, A. N.; Kindra, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The serpentine-like one and half-pass cooling channel systems are primarily used in blades fabricated by the lost-wax casting process. The heat transfer turbulators like cross-sectional or angled ribs used in channels of the midchord region failed to eliminate the temperature irregularity from the suction and pressure sides, which is reaching 200°C for a first stage blade of the high-pressure turbine for an aircraft engine. This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental test of an advanced heat transfer augmentation system in radial channels developed for alignment of the temperature field from the suction and pressure sides. A numerical simulation of three-dimensional coolant flow for a wide range of Reynolds numbers was carried out using ANSYS CFX software. Effect of geometrical parameters on the heat removal asymmetry was determined. The test results of a blade with the proposed intensification system conducted in a liquid-metal thermostat confirmed the accuracy of calculations. Based on the experimental data, the dependencies for calculation of heat transfer coefficients to the cooling air in the blade studied were obtained.

  17. Three-dimensional simulation of beam propagation and heat transfer in static gas Cs DPALs using wave optics and fluid dynamics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waichman, Karol; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2017-10-01

    Analysis of beam propagation, kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in Cs diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), using wave optics model and gasdynamic code, is reported. The analysis is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) model. The Navier-Stokes equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer are solved by a commercial Ansys FLUENT solver based on the finite volume discretization technique. The CFD code which solves the gas conservation equations includes effects of natural convection and temperature diffusion of the species in the DPAL mixture. The DPAL kinetic processes in the Cs/He/C2H6 gas mixture dealt with in this paper involve the three lowest energy levels of Cs, (1) 62S1/2, (2) 62P1/2 and (3) 62P3/2. The kinetic processes include absorption due to the 1->3 D2 transition followed by relaxation the 3 to 2 fine structure levels and stimulated emission due to the 2->1 D1 transition. Collisional quenching of levels 2 and 3 and spontaneous emission from these levels are also considered. The gas flow conservation equations are coupled to fast-Fourier-transform algorithm for transverse mode propagation to obtain a solution of the scalar paraxial propagation equation for the laser beam. The wave propagation equation is solved by the split-step beam propagation method where the gain and refractive index in the DPAL medium affect the wave amplitude and phase. Using the CFD and beam propagation models, the gas flow pattern and spatial distributions of the pump and laser intensities in the resonator were calculated for end-pumped Cs DPAL. The laser power, DPAL medium temperature and the laser beam quality were calculated as a function of pump power. The results of the theoretical model for laser power were compared to experimental results of Cs DPAL.

  18. Gas Phase Molecular Spectroscopy: Electronic Spectroscopy of Combustion Intermediates, Chlorine Azide kinetics, and Rovibrational Energy Transfer in Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Keith A.

    This dissertation is composed of three sections. The first deals with the electronic spectroscopy of combustion intermediates that are related to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Absorption spectra for phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and phenyl peroxy radicals were recorded using the technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. When possible, molecular constants, vibrational frequencies, and excited state lifetimes for these radicals were derived from these data. The results were supported by theoretical predictions. The second section presents a study of electron attachment to chlorine azide (ClN3) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Electron attachment rates were measured to be 3.5x10-8 and 4.5x10-8 cm3s-1 at 298 and 400 K respectively. The reactions of ClN3 with eighteen cations and seventeen anions were characterized. Rate constants were measured using a selected ion flow tube. The ionization energy (>9.6eV), proton affinity (713+/-41 kJ mol-1), and electron affinity (2.48+/-0.2 eV) for ClN 3 were determined from these data. The third section demonstrates the use of double resonance spectroscopy to observe state-selected rovibrational energy transfer from the first overtone asymmetric stretch of acetylene. The total population removal rate constants from various rotational levels of the (1,0,1,00,00) vibrational state were determined to be in the range of (9-17) x 10 -10 cm3s-1. Rotational energy transfer accounted for approximately 90% of the total removal rate from each state. Therefore, the upper limit of vibrational energy transfer from the (1,0,1,0 0,00) state was 10%.

  19. Convective heat-transfer rate distributions over a 140 deg blunt cone at hypersonic speeds in different gas environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Chen, Y. K.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in air, CO2, and CO2-argon gas mixtures to obtain heating distribution data over a 140 deg blunt cone with various corner radii. The effect of corner radius on the heating distribution over the forebody of the cone was included in the investigation. These experiments provide data for validation of two-dimensional axisymmetric and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solutions. Heating distribution data and measured bow shock wave stand-off distances for 0 deg angle of attack were compared with predicted values using a two-dimensional axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code.

  20. Very-large-volume sampling of water in gas chromatography using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption (TOTAD) interface for pesticide-residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J; Perez, M; Vazquez, A; Villén, J

    2001-02-01

    The Through Oven Transfer Adsorption Desorption (TOTAD) interface is used to directly introduce large volumes of water (1 mL or more) into a capillary gas chromatograph. The TOTAD interface is a greatly modified programmed temperature vaporizer injector incorporating changes that affect the pneumatics, sample introduction, solvent elimination, and operation mode. The system can easily be automated. The technique is applied to the analysis of pesticide residue in standard solutions and real water samples from the Ebro River (northeastern Spain). The speed of sample introduction was 1 mL/min, and the solvent elimination was almost complete. A nitrogen phosphorous detector is used, and the relative standard deviation varied from 5.7% to 11.7% for the absolute peak areas. The sensitivity achieved by introducing 1 mL of the sample is sufficient for most pesticide-residue analyses in water. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 8.1 ng/L.

  1. Resolution of volatile fuel compound profiles from Ascocoryne sarcoides: a comparison by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Volatile hydrocarbon production by Ascocoryne sacroides was studied over its growth cycle. Gas-phase compounds were measured continuously with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and at distinct time points with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using head space solid phase microextraction (SPME). The PTR-MS ion signal permitted temporal resolution of the volatile production while the SPME results revealed distinct compound identities. The quantitative PTR-MS results showed the volatile production was dominated by ethanol and acetaldehyde, while the concentration of the remainder of volatiles consistently reached 2,000 ppbv. The measurement of alcohols from the fungal culture by the two techniques correlated well. Notable compounds of fuel interest included nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-butanol, 3-methyl- and benzaldehyde. Abiotic comparison of the two techniques demonstrated SPME fiber bias toward higher molecular weight compounds, making quantitative efforts with SPME impractical. Together, PTR-MS and SPME GC-MS were shown as valuable tools for characterizing volatile fuel compound production from microbiological sources. PMID:22480438

  2. [Pulmonary gas exchange model: influence of the heterogeneity of distribution on the ventilation-perfusion and diffusion-perfusion ratios of oxygen transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroff, M J; Lelong, F; Cherruault, Y

    1978-07-01

    The purpose of this pulmonary gas exchange model is to study the effect produced by an inhomogeneous distribution of the ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q) and diffusion-perfusion (D/Q) ratios on the oxygen transfer. We calculate partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in venous blood, in capillary blood and alveolar gas of each element as the unique solution of a non-linear system, the parameters of which are the local values of ventilation, perfusion and diffusion. We show that an inhomogeneous distribution of any ratio leads to a decrease of the mixed arterial concentration of oxygen and that the greater the inhomogeneity, the greater the decrease. We show by numerical stimulation that if two inhomogeneities (V A/Q) and (D/Q) are associated, the oxygen arterial concentration decrease is rather less important if the diffusion-ventilation ratio has a distribution almost homogeneous, i.e. if the V A/Q and D/Q inhomogeneities are almost identical.

  3. Numerical Investigation on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Supercritical Liquefied Natural Gas in an Airfoil Fin Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongchao Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a new kind of highly compact and efficient micro-channel heat exchanger, the printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE is a promising candidate satisfying the heat exchange requirements of liquefied natural gas (LNG vaporization at low and high pressure. The effects of airfoil fin arrangement on heat transfer and flow resistance were numerically investigated using supercritical liquefied natural gas (LNG as working fluid. The thermal properties of supercritical LNG were tested by utilizing the REFPROF software database. Numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT. The inlet temperature of supercritical LNG was 121 K, and its pressure was 10.5 MPa. The reference mass flow rate of LNG was set as 1.22 g/s for the vertical pitch Lv = 1.67 mm and the staggered pitch Ls = 0 mm, with the Reynolds number of about 3750. The SST k-ω model was selected and verified by comparing with the experimental data using supercritical liquid nitrogen as cold fluid. The airfoil fin PCHE had better thermal-hydraulic performance than that of the straight channel PCHE. Moreover, the airfoil fins with staggered arrangement displayed better thermal performance than that of the fins with parallel arrangement. The thermal-hydraulic performance of airfoil fin PCHE was improved with increasing Ls and Lv. Moreover, Lv affected the Nusselt number and pressure drop of airfoil fin PCHE more obviously. In conclusion, a sparser staggered arrangement of fins showed a better thermal-hydraulic performance in airfoil fin PCHE.

  4. GCKP84-general chemical kinetics code for gas-phase flow and batch processes including heat transfer effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics code is described for complex, homogeneous ideal gas reactions in any chemical system. The main features of the GCKP84 code are flexibility, convenience, and speed of computation for many different reaction conditions. The code, which replaces the GCKP code published previously, solves numerically the differential equations for complex reaction in a batch system or one dimensional inviscid flow. It also solves numerically the nonlinear algebraic equations describing the well stirred reactor. A new state of the art numerical integration method is used for greatly increased speed in handling systems of stiff differential equations. The theory and the computer program, including details of input preparation and a guide to using the code are given.

  5. Advanced fingerprinting of high-quality cocoa: Challenges in transferring methods from thermal to differential-flow modulated comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magagna, Federico; Liberto, Erica; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Carretta, Andrea; Cobelli, Luigi; Giardina, Matthew; Bicchi, Carlo; Cordero, Chiara

    2017-07-08

    The possibility to transfer methods from thermal to differential-flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic (GC×GC) platforms opens interesting perspectives for routine analysis of complex samples. Flow modulated platforms avoid the use of cryogenics, thereby simplifying laboratory operations and analyst supervision during intensive analytical sessions. This study evaluates the feasibility of transferring a fingerprinting method capable of classifying and discriminating cocoa samples based on the volatiles fraction composition according to their origin and processing steps. Previously developed principles of GC×GC method translation are applied to an original fingerprinting method, developed for a loop-type thermal modulated GC×GC-MS system, to engineer a method for a reverse-injection differential flow modulated platform (GC×2GC-MS/FID) with a dual-parallel secondary column and dual detection. Effective method translation preserves analytes elution order, 1D resolution, and 2D pattern coherence. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of translating fingerprinting method conditions while preserving the informative power of 2D peak patterns for sample classification and discrimination. Correct translation enables effective transfer of metadata (e.g., compound names and MS fragmentation patterns) by automatic template transformation and matching from the original/reference method to its translated counterpart. Although the adoption of a narrow bore (i.e. 0.1mm dc) column in the first-dimension enabled operation under close-to-optimal conditions with the differential-flow modulation platform, due to the dual-parallel columns in the second-dimension, it resulted in lower overall method sensitivity. Nevertheless, fingerprinting accuracy was preserved and most of the key-aroma compounds and technological markers were effectively mapped, thus limiting the loss of fingerprinting information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Study of gas-phase reactions of NO2+ with aromatic compounds using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianquan; Du, Xubing; Guo, Teng; Peng, Zhen; Xu, Li; Dong, Junguo; Cheng, Ping; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-12-01

    The study of ion chemistry involving the NO2+ is currently the focus of considerable fundamental interest and is relevant in diverse fields ranging from mechanistic organic chemistry to atmospheric chemistry. A very intense source of NO2+ was generated by injecting the products from the dielectric barrier discharge of a nitrogen and oxygen mixture upstream into the drift tube of a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) apparatus with H3 O+ as the reagent ion. The NO2+ intensity is controllable and related to the dielectric barrier discharge operation conditions and ratio of oxygen to nitrogen. The purity of NO2+ can reach more than 99% after optimization. Using NO2+ as the chemical reagent ion, the gas-phase reactions of NO2+ with 11 aromatic compounds were studied by PTR-TOF-MS. The reaction rate coefficients for these reactions were measured, and the product ions and their formation mechanisms were analyzed. All the samples reacted with NO2+ rapidly with reaction rate coefficients being close to the corresponding capture ones. In addition to electron transfer producing [M]+ , oxygen ion transfer forming [MO]+ , and 3-body association forming [M·NO2 ]+ , a new product ion [M-C]+ was also formed owing to the loss of C═O from [MO]+ .This work not only developed a new chemical reagent ion NO2+ based on PTR-MS but also provided significant interesting fundamental data on reactions involving aromatic compounds, which will probably broaden the applications of PTR-MS to measure these compounds in the atmosphere in real time. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Analysis of conjugated heat transfer, in transient state of the first stage of a gas turbine; Analisis de transferencia de calor conjugada, en estado transitorio, de la primera etapa de una turbina de gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Amezcua, Alfonso; Mazur C, Zdzislaw [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Gallegos Munoz, Armando [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica, Electrica y Electronica (FIMEE), Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    This article presents an analysis of conjugated heat transfer in the first stage of movable blades during the starting of a gas turbine, covering a period of 1,012 seconds. The developed computer model is in 3D and uses as initial and border conditions typical starting curves for stack gases, the cooling air and the angular velocity of the blades. As a result of the numerical predictions, the temperature distributions in stack gases, the trowel of the blade and the cooling air are included, doing emphasis in the results obtained in the solid (body of the blade), since these are used for thermo-mechanical stress analysis and later estimation of the blade residual life. [Spanish] Este articulo presenta un analisis de transferencia de calor conjugada en la primera etapa de alabes moviles, durante el arranque de una turbina de gas, cubriendo un periodo de 1.012 segundos. El modelo computacional desarrollado es en tres dimensiones y utiliza como condiciones iniciales y de frontera curvas de arranque tipicas para los gases de combustion, el aire de enfriamiento y la velocidad angular de los alabes. Como resultado de las predicciones numericas, se incluyen las distribuciones de temperatura en los gases de combustion, la paleta del alabe y el aire de enfriamiento, haciendo enfasis en los resultados obtenidos en el solido (cuerpo del alabe), ya que estos se utilizan para analisis de esfuerzos termomecanicos y posterior estimacion de vida residual del alabe.

  8. MHD free convection flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshiniski type dusty gas through a semi infinite plate moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time and radiative heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the study of MHD free convective flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshinski type dusty gas through a porous medium induced by the motion of a semi-infinite flat plate under the influence of radiative heat transfer moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time. The expressions for velocity distribution of a dusty gas and dust particles, concentration profile and temperature field are obtained. The effect of Schmidt number (Sc, Magnetic field parameter (M and Radiation parameter (N on velocity distribution of dusty gas and dust particles, concentration and temperature distribution are discussed graphically.

  9. On the influence of waves on air-sea CO2 gas transfer in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía

    2017-04-01

    As part of the "Sea Surface Roughness as Air-Sea Interaction Control" project, we study the influence of wave-associated processes controlling turbulent CO2 fluxes through the air-sea interface in a coastal region, at the Northwest of Baja California, México. The conducted field campaign allowed us with a full year dataset (May 2014-April 2015) of high quality data of CO2 fluxes (FCO2) estimated through Eddy Covariance (EC). Ocean surface waves were also recorded using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) located at 10 m depth about 350 m away from the shore were the EC tower was located. The study area was found to be a sink of CO2 under moderate wind and wave conditions with a mean flux of -1.32 μmol/m2s [1]. The linear correlation between the wind speed and FCO2 was found rather weak, suggesting that other physical processes besides wind may also be important for the gas exchange modulation at coastal waters at these temporal scales. Recent results on the other hand, through quantile regression analysis computed between FCO2 and a) wind speed, b) significant wave height, c) wave steepness and d) water temperature, allowed us to identify the significant wave height as the best correlated variable. However, the correlation varied with the probability distribution characteristics of FCO2, with the regression slope presenting both positive and negative values. The latter implies that in the coastal areas, the presence of swell is the key factor that promotes the intensification of the fluxes into and from the ocean. In fact, making use of the water temperature as indicator of the CO2 concentration in the water phase, the behavior of the relationship between the FCO2 and the significant wave height might be partially explained. Further analysis showed that the characteristics of wind speed and water temperature determine the direction in which the FCO2 occur. This work is a contribution from RugDiSMar project (CONACYT

  10. Flue gas condensation in oxyfuel power plants. Heat- and mass transfer measurements and experimental validation of an efficient condensation concept; Rauchgaskondensation in Oxyfuel-Kraftwerken. Waerme- und Stoffuebergangsmessungen sowie experimentelle Validierung eines effizienten Kondensationskonzepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raindl, Markus

    2010-12-06

    Condensation of a steam-inert gas mixture in an Oxyfuel condenser differs significantly from condensation of pure steam: condenser pressure and rest gas content increase dramatically, heat- and mass transfer coefficients are lower and oversaturation of the steam-inert gas mixture yields to fog formation. In the context of this thesis, therefore, at first the optimal ranges of working parameters for Oxyfuel processes calculated. In the following some heat flux measurements were carried out on a horizontal, crossflow pipe to validate various heat- and mass transfer theories. Building on these results a new, efficient condensation concept was developed to reduce fog formation. The final results of the measurements with a laboratory model show great performance regarding fog reduction and condensation efficiency. (orig.)

  11. Effects of total pressure on non-grey gas radiation transfer in oxy-fuel combustion using the LBL, SNB, SNBCK, WSGG, and FSCK methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huaqiang; Gu, Mingyan; Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Liu, Fengshan; Zhou, Huaichun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of total pressure on gas radiation heat transfer are investigated in 1D parallel plate geometry containing isothermal and homogeneous media and an inhomogeneous and non-isothermal CO2-H2O mixture under conditions relevant to oxy-fuel combustion using the line-by-line (LBL), statistical narrow-band (SNB), statistical narrow-band correlated-k (SNBCK), weighted-sum-of-grey-gases (WSGG), and full-spectrum correlated-k (FSCK) models. The LBL calculations were conducted using the HITEMP2010 and CDSD-1000 databases and the LBL results serve as the benchmark solution to evaluate the accuracy of the other models. Calculations of the SNB, SNBCK, and FSCK were conducted using both the 1997 EM2C SNB parameters and their recently updated 2012 parameters to investigate how the SNB model parameters affect the results under oxy-fuel combustion conditions at high pressures. The WSGG model considered is the recently developed one by Bordbar et al. [19] for oxy-fuel combustion based on LBL calculations using HITEMP2010. The total pressure considered ranges from 1 up to 30 atm. The total pressure significantly affects gas radiation transfer primarily through the increase in molecule number density and only slightly through spectral line broadening. Using the 1997 EM2C SNB model parameters the accuracy of SNB and SNBCK is very good and remains essentially independent of the total pressure. When using the 2012 EM2C SNB model parameters the SNB and SNBCK results are less accurate and their error increases with increasing the total pressure. The WSGG model has the lowest accuracy and the best computational efficiency among the models investigated. The errors of both WSGG and FSCK using the 2012 EM2C SNB model parameters increase when the total pressure is increased from 1 to 10 atm, but remain nearly independent of the total pressure beyond 10 atm. When using the 1997 EM2C SNB model parameters the accuracy of FSCK only slightly decreases with increasing the total pressure.

  12. An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Endwall Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Gas Turbine Nozzle Guide Vane with Slot Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqefl, Mahmood Hasan

    In many regions of the high-pressure gas turbine, film cooling flows are used to protect the turbine components from the combustor exit hot gases. Endwalls are challenging to cool because of the complex system of secondary flows that disturb surface film coolant coverage. The secondary flow vortices wash the film coolant from the surface into the mainstream significantly decreasing cooling effectiveness. In addition to being effected by secondary flow structures, film cooling flow can also affect these structures by virtue of their momentum exchange. In addition, many studies in the literature have shown that endwall contouring affects the strength of passage secondary flows. Therefore, to develop better endwall cooling schemes, a good understanding of passage aerodynamics and heat transfer as affected by interactions of film cooling flows with secondary flows is required. This experimental and computational study presents results from a linear, stationary, two-passage cascade representing the first stage nozzle guide vane of a high-pressure gas turbine with an axisymmetrically contoured endwall. The sources of film cooling flows are upstream combustor liner coolant and endwall slot film coolant injected immediately upstream of the cascade passage inlet. The operating conditions simulate combustor exit flow features, with a high Reynolds number of 390,000 and approach flow turbulence intensity of 11% with an integral length scale of 21% of the chord length. Measurements are performed with varying slot film cooling mass flow to mainstream flow rate ratios (MFR). Aerodynamic effects are documented with five-hole probe measurements at the exit plane. Heat transfer is documented through recovery temperature measurements with a thermocouple. General secondary flow features are observed. Total pressure loss measurements show that varying the slot film cooling MFR has some effects on passage loss. Velocity vectors and vorticity distributions show a very thin, yet intense

  13. Method translation and full metadata transfer from thermal to differential flow modulated comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography: Profiling of suspected fragrance allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Carretta, Andrea; Cobelli, Luigi; Giardina, Matthew; Bicchi, Carlo

    2017-01-13

    The possibility to transfer methods from thermal to differential-flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic (GC×GC) platforms is of high interest to improve GC×GC flexibility and increase the compatibility of results from different platforms. The principles of method translation are here applied to an original method, developed for a loop-type thermal modulated GC×GC-MS/FID system, suitable for quali-quantitative screening of suspected fragrance allergens. The analysis conditions were translated to a reverse-injection differential flow modulated platform (GC×2GC-MS/FID) with a dual-parallel secondary column and dual detection. The experimental results, for a model mixture of suspected volatile allergens and for raw fragrance mixtures of different composition, confirmed the feasibility of translating methods by preserving 1 D elution order, as well as the relative alignment of resulting 2D peak patterns. A correct translation produced several benefits including an effective transfer of metadata (compound names, MS fragmentation pattern, response factors) by automatic template transformation and matching from the original/reference method to its translated counterpart. The correct translation provided: (a) 2D pattern repeatability, (b) MS fragmentation pattern reliability for identity confirmation, and (c) comparable response factors and quantitation accuracy within a concentration range of three orders of magnitude. The adoption of a narrow bore (i.e. 0.1mm d c ) first-dimension column to operate under close-to-optimal conditions with the differential-flow modulation GC×GC platform was also advantageous in halving the total analysis under the translated conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon-activated gas filtration during in vitro culture increased pregnancy rate following transfer of in vitro-produced bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merton, J S; Vermeulen, Z L; Otter, T; Mullaart, E; de Ruigh, L; Hasler, J F

    2007-04-15

    Many environmental conditions for in vitro embryo production (IVP) systems for cattle have been relatively standardised, e.g. media composition, temperature, pH, water quality, and atmospheric composition. However, little attention has been paid to the quality of ambient laboratory air and the gas environment in incubators. Although a few studies have examined the effects of chemical air contamination on IVP of human embryos, there are no published accounts for domestic animal embryos. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of an intra-incubator carbon-activated air filtration system (CODA) during in vitro culture (IVC) on embryonic development and subsequent pregnancy rate of bovine embryos. Immature cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) were obtained twice-weekly by ultrasonic-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. The COCs were matured in TCM199/FCS/LH/FSH, fertilized with frozen-thawed Percoll-separated semen, and subsequently cultured for 7 day in SOFaaBSA. Day 7 embryos were transferred either fresh or frozen/thawed. The experimental design was a 2 x 2 factorial; presumptive zygotes were placed either in a conventional CO(2)-O(2)-N(2) incubator (Control group) or in an identical CO(2)-O(2)-N(2) incubator with a CODA intra-incubator air purification unit (CODA group) for IVC. The embryo production rate at Day 7 was not affected by the CODA air purification unit (23.4 and 24.7% morulae and blastocysts per oocyte for control and CODA, respectively) nor was there any significant effect on embryo stage or quality. However, the pregnancy rate was improved (P=0.043) for both fresh (46.3% versus 41.0%) and frozen/thawed embryos (40.8% versus 35.6%). In conclusion, atmospheric purification by the CODA intra-incubator air purification unit significantly increased pregnancy rate following transfer of in vitro-produced bovine embryos.

  15. Rapid enrichment of (homo)acetogenic consortia from animal feces using a high mass-transfer gas-lift reactor fed with syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shinyoung; Yasin, Muhammad; Kim, Daehee; Park, Hee-Deung; Kang, Chang Min; Kim, Duk Jin; Chang, In Seop

    2013-09-01

    A gas-lift reactor having a high mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a = 80.28 h(-1)) for a relatively insoluble gas (carbon monoxide; CO) was used to enrich (homo)acetogens from animal feces. Samples of fecal matter from cow, rabbit, chicken, and goat were used as sources of inoculum for the enrichment of CO and H(2) utilizing microbial consortia. To confirm the successful enrichment, the Hungate roll tube technique was employed to count and then isolate putative CO utilizers. The results of this work showed that CO and H(2) utilizing consortia were established for each inoculum source after 8 days. The number of colony-forming units in cow, rabbit, chicken, and goat fecal samples were 3.83 × 10(9), 1.03 × 10(9), 8.3 × 10(8), and 3.25 × 10(8) cells/ml, respectively. Forty-two colonies from the animal fecal samples were screened for the ability to utilize CO/H(2). Ten of these 42 colonies were capable of utilizing CO/H(2). Five isolates from cow feces (samples 5, 6, 8, 16, and 22) were highly similar to previously unknown (homo)acetogen, while cow-7 has shown 99 % similarity with Acetobacterium sp. as acetogens. On the other hand, four isolates from chicken feces (samples 3, 8, 10, and 11) have also shown high CO/H(2) utilizing activity. Hence, it is expected that this research could be used as the basis for the rapid enrichment of (homo)acetogenic consortia from various environmental sources.

  16. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids

  17. The performance and microbial communities of biodegradation-electron transfer with sulfur metabolism integrated process for flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; He, Wenjie; Wei, Li; Ma, Jun; Li, Chunying

    2017-07-22

    The biodegradation-electron transfer with sulfur metabolism integrated (BESI(®)) process was used for the treatment of real flue gas desulfurization wastewater. The BESI(®) process consists of an anaerobic activated sludge reactor, an anoxic activated sludge reactor, and an aerobic bio-film reactor. The performance of the integrated process was evaluated by the removal efficiencies of organics and nitrogen pollutants. The sulfate in the wastewater was used as an abundant sulfur source to drive the integrated process. The removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen of the integrated process were 87.99, 87.04, 30.77, and 45.17%, respectively. High-throughput 454-pyrosequencing was applied for the analysis of microbial communities in the integrated process. From the anaerobic activated sludge (Sample 1), anoxic activated sludge (Sample 2), and aerobic bio-film (Sample 3), totals of 1701, 1181, and 857 operational taxonomic units were obtained, respectively. The sulfur cycle was associated with the removal of organics and nitrogen pollutants. The sulfate-reducing bacteria participated in the organics removal in the anaerobic reactor, and the sulfide oxidation was related with the denitrification in the anoxic reactor. A complete nitrogen degradation chain was built in the integrated process. Through the degradation chain, the nitrogenous organic pollutants, ammonia nitrogen, and nitrate could be removed. The participant functional bacteria were also detected by pyrosequencing.

  18. Trace gas detection from fermentation processes in apples; an intercomparison study between proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry and laser photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamfa, E. I.; Steeghs, M. M. L.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2004-12-01

    A custom-built proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument was used to monitor the emission of various compounds (aldehydes, alcohols, acids, acetates and C-6 compounds) related to fermentation, aroma and flavour, released by four apple cultivars (Elstar, Jonaglod, Granny Smith and Pink Lady) under short anaerobic (24 h) and post-anaerobic conditions. The novel feature of our instrument is the new design of the collisional dissociation chamber, which separates the high pressure in the drift tube (2 mbar) from the high vacuum pressure in the detection region (10-6 mbar). The geometry of this chamber was changed and a second turbo pump was added to reduce the influence of collisional loss of ions, background signals and cluster ions, which facilitates the interpretation of the mass spectra and increases the signal intensity at the mass of the original protonated compound. With this system, detection limits of similar magnitude to the ones reported in literature are reached. An intercomparison study between PTR-MS and a CO laser-based photoacoustic trace gas detector is presented. The alcoholic fermentation products (acetaldehyde and ethanol) from young rice plants were simultaneously monitored by both methods. A very good agreement was observed for acetaldehyde production. The photoacoustic detector showed about two times lower ethanol concentration as compared to PTR-MS, caused by memory effects due to sticking of compounds to the walls of the nylon tube used to transport the trace gases to the detector.

  19. Flue gas treatment with membrane gas absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane gas absorption is a new, efficient and flexible way to carry out gas-liquid contacting operations with hollow fibre membranes. Advantages of gas absorption membranes over conventional G-L contactors are: -High specific surface area and rapid mass transfer resulting in very compact and low

  20. On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Thomas; Robbat, Albert

    2008-02-15

    A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in "real-time", while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and atwhat concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment.

  1. Agreement between Autorita per l'energia elettrica e il gas and commission de regulation de l'electricite on transfer capacity allocation over the grid interconnecting Italy and France for the year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The present document contains the general outlines adopted by the Autorita per l'energia elettrica e il gas (hereafter AEEG) and the Commission de Regulation de l'Electricite (hereafter CRE) with respect to terms and conditions for allocating the transfer capacity over the interconnected grid between Italy, France and, with reference to a technically-coupled portion of the interconnection, Switzerland for the year 2002. Same conditions will be applied by AEEG, to a possible extent, to the transfer capacity allocation over the interconnected grid between Italy. Austria and Slovenia for the year 2002.

  2. A Secondary Flow Effect on the Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in the Finned Rod Bundles of Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Dunaitsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear power engineering a need to justify an operability of products and their components is of great importance. In high-temperature gas reactors, the critical element affecting the facility reliability is the fuel rod cladding, which in turn leads to the need to gain knowledge in the field of gas dynamics and heat transfer in the reactor core and to increase the detail of the calculation results. For the time being, calculations of reactor core are performed using the proven techniques of per-channel calculations, which show good representativeness and count rate. However, these techniques require additional experimental studies to describe correctly the inter-channel exchange, which, being taken into account, largely affects the pattern of the temperature fields in the region under consideration. Increasingly more relevant and demandable are numerical simulation methods of fluid and gas dynamics, as well as of heat exchange, which consist in the direct solution of the system of differential equations of mass balance, kinetic moment, and energy. Calculation of reactor cores or rod bundles according these techniques does not require additional experimental studies and allows us to obtain the local distributions of flow characteristics in the bundle and the flow characteristics that are hard to measure in the physical experiment.The article shows the calculation results and their analysis for an infinite rod lattice of the reactor core. The results were obtained by the technique of modelling one rod of a regular lattice using the periodic boundary conditions, followed by translating the results to the neighbouring rods. In channels of complex shape, there are secondary flows caused by changes in the channel geometry along the flow and directed across the main front of the flow. These secondary flows in the reactor cores with rods spaced by the winding wire lead to a redistribution of the coolant along the channel section, which in turn

  3. Oxygen transfer in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskal, J; Potůcek, F

    1985-04-01

    In the laboratory-type airlift tower reactor oxygen transfer from air in tap water and/or polyacrylamide solutions (Neuperm WF) was studied. In order to characterize the system, volumetric coefficient of oxygen transfer was determined by the gassing-out method. Two arrangements of the airlift tower reactor were compared, namely the reactor with and without motionless mixer. In addition, mean relative gas holdup and gas power output were determined for both arrangements.

  4. Study on the Principle Mechanisms of Heat Transfer for Cryogenic Insulations: Especially Accounting for the Temperature-Dependent Deposition-Evacuation of the Filling Gas (Self-Evacuating Systems)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matthias; Vidi, Stephan; Ebert, Hans-Peter

    2016-11-01

    This study concentrates on the principles of heat transfer within cryogenic insulation systems, especially accounting for self-evacuating systems (deposition-evacuation of the filling gas). These principles allow the extrapolation to other temperatures, gases and other materials with the input of only a few experimentally derived or carefully estimated material properties. The type of gas (e.g. air or CO2) within the porous insulation material dominates the behaviour of the effective thermal conductivity during the cooldown of the cryogenic application. This is due to the specific temperature-dependent saturation gas pressure which determines the contribution of the gas conductivity. The selected material classes include powders, fibrous insulations, foams, aerogels and multilayer insulations in the temperature range of 20 K to 300 K. Novel within this study is an analytical function for the total and the mean thermal conductivity with respect to the temperature, type of gas, external pressure and material class of the insulation. Furthermore, the integral mean value of the thermal conductivity, the so-called mean thermal conductivity, is calculated for a mechanically evacuated insulation material and an insulation material evacuated by deposition-evacuation of the filling gas, respectively. This enables a comparison of the total thermal conductivity of cryogenic insulation materials and their applicability for a self-evacuating cryogenic insulation system.

  5. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores; Homogeneisation de modeles de transferts thermiques et radiatifs: application au coeur des reacteurs a caloporteur gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ganaoui, K

    2006-09-15

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  6. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  7. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  8. Hydrodynamique, transfert de chaleur et combustion de gaz naturel en lit fluidisé circulant Hydrodynamics, Heat Transfer and Combustion of Natural Gas in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feugier A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'hydrodynamique, les transferts de chaleur et la combustion du gaz naturel ont été étudiés dans un réacteur à lit circulant de 15 cm de diamètre et de 7 m de haut. Ce réacteur peut opérer avec des vitesses de gaz allant jusqu'à 15 m/s, jusqu'à des températures de 880-900°C et avec des débits de solides compris entre 0 et 15t/h. Les charges utilisées sont des sables de granulométrie allant de 95 à 625 microns. Le profil de concentration en solides dans le réacteur est déterminé à partir du profil de pression. Une corrélation reliant la vitesse de glissement des particules aux principaux paramètres opératoires, rend compte de façon très satisfaisante de l'ensemble des résultats expérimentaux. La mise en place d'un échangeur en paroi dans la partie supérieure du réacteur a permis la détermination de coefficients d'échange thermique. Ces derniers sont essentiellement fonction de la, concentration en particules au droit de l'échangeur et de la granulométrie des particules. Des valeurs allant jusqu'à 200 W/m2 K peuvent, être obtenues. Enfin, la combustion du méthane s'avère très sensible à la présence de particules dans le réacteur. Ces particules ont un effet inhibiteur. Hydrodynamics, heat transfer and combustion of natural gas have been investigated in a circulating-bed reactor 15 cm in diameter and 7 m high. This reactor can operate with gas velocities up to 15 m/s, at temperature up to 880-900°C and with solids flow rates of between 0 and 15 t/h. The solids used are sands with a particle size ranging from 95 to 625 microns. The solids concentration profile in the reactor is determined from the pressure profile. A correlation linking the slippage velocity of particles to the principal operating parameters very satisfactorily takes into consideration the overall experimental results. The installation of a wall heat exchanger in the upper part of the reactor enabled the heat exchange coefficients to be

  9. Effects of temperature and gas-liquid mass transfer on the operation of small electrochemical cells for the quantitative evaluation of CO2 reduction electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobaccaro, Peter; Singh, Meenesh R; Clark, Ezra Lee; Kwon, Youngkook; Bell, Alexis T; Ager, Joel W

    2016-09-29

    In the last few years, there has been increased interest in electrochemical CO2 reduction (CO2R). Many experimental studies employ a membrane separated, electrochemical cell with a mini H-cell geometry to characterize CO2R catalysts in aqueous solution. This type of electrochemical cell is a mini-chemical reactor and it is important to monitor the reaction conditions within the reactor to ensure that they are constant throughout the study. We show that operating cells with high catalyst surface area to electrolyte volume ratios (S/V) at high current densities can have subtle consequences due to the complexity of the physical phenomena taking place on electrode surfaces during CO2R, particularly as they relate to the cell temperature and bulk electrolyte CO2 concentration. Both effects were evaluated quantitatively in high S/V cells using Cu electrodes and a bicarbonate buffer electrolyte. Electrolyte temperature is a function of the current/total voltage passed through the cell and the cell geometry. Even at a very high current density, 20 mA cm-2, the temperature increase was less than 4 °C and a decrease of CO2 concentration is predicted. In contrast, limits on the CO2 gas-liquid mass transfer into the cells produce much larger effects. By using the pH in the cell to measure the CO2 concentration, significant undersaturation of CO2 is observed in the bulk electrolyte, even at more modest current densities of 10 mA cm-2. Undersaturation of CO2 produces large changes in the faradaic efficiency observed on Cu electrodes, with H2 production becoming increasingly favored. We show that the size of the CO2 bubbles being introduced into the cell is critical for maintaining the equilibrium CO2 concentration in the electrolyte, and we have designed a high S/V cell that is able to maintain the near-equilibrium CO2 concentration at current densities up to 15 mA cm-2.

  10. Flow prediction and heat transfer in a cooling square duch of a gas turbine blade using CFD; Predicciones de flujo y transferencia de calor en un conductor de alabe enfriado de turbina de gas utilizando CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquiza B, Gustavo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Sierra E, Fernando [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Kubiak S, Janusz; Campos A, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-10-15

    A numerical investigation has been conducted to study the turbulent flow and the heat transfer in a blade turbine coolant passage involving a 180 degrees turn. The study provides a comparison test for two turbulence models. The numerical solution was conducted employing two models for turbulence, the renormalization Group Theory (RNG) and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM), using a refined grid to model with detail the recirculating flow. Computations are performed with a commercial finite volume code which solves three dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes and Energy equations. At the passage turn, significant secondary flows are present, formed by a pair of symmetrical vortices. Results have been compared against published experimental data for Re = 53 000. Very good agreement is achieved for the prediction of the local static pressure distribution along the passage. A strong effect of rotation has been observed mainly in the flow field as described in detail in the paper. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta una investigacion numerica para estudiar el flujo turbulento y la transferencia de calor en un conducto de enfriamiento de un alabes de turbina de gas con giro de 180 grados. El estudio proporciona una comparacion de resultados para dos modelos de turbulencia. La solucion numerica emplea dos modelos de turbulencia: el modelo de esfuerzos de Reynolds (RSM) y el modelo de la teoria del grupo de renormalizacion (RNG), utilizando una malla refinada para modelar con detalle el flujo de recirculacion. Los calculos fueron realizados con un codigo comercial de volumenes finitos el cual resuelve las ecuaciones tridimensionales de Navier-Stoke y de energia para flujo incompresible. En la seccion de giro del conductor, aparecen flujos secundarios significativos, formados por un par de celulas simetricas. Los resultados han sido comparados contra datos experimentales de la literatura para Re = 53 000. se obtuvo un buen acuerdo para la prediccion de la distribucion de

  11. Monthly dynamics of carbon dioxide exchange across the sea surface of the Arctic Ocean in response to changes in gas transfer velocity and partial pressure of CO2 in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Wrobel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Ocean (AO is an important basin for global oceanic carbon dioxide (CO2 uptake, but the mechanisms controlling air–sea gas fluxes are not fully understood, especially over short and long timescales. The oceanic sink of CO2 is an important part of the global carbon budget. Previous studies have shown that in the AO differences in the partial pressure of CO2 (ΔpCO2 and gas transfer velocity (k both contribute significantly to interannual air–sea CO2 flux variability, but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. This study combined Earth Observation (EO data collected in 2010 with the in situ pCO2 dataset from Takahashi et al. (2009 (T09 using a recently developed software toolbox called FluxEngine to determine the importance of k and ΔpCO2 on CO2 budgets in two regions of the AO – the Greenland Sea (GS and the Barents Sea (BS with their continental margins. Results from the study indicate that the variability in wind speed and, hence, the gas transfer velocity, generally play a major role in determining the temporal variability of CO2 uptake, while variability in monthly ΔpCO2 plays a major role spatially, with some exceptions.

  12. Generalized radiative transfer theory for scattering by particles in an absorbing gas: Addressing both spatial and spectral integration in multi-angle remote sensing of optically thin aerosol layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Xu, Feng; Diner, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate the computational advantage gained by introducing non-exponential transmission laws into radiative transfer theory for two specific situations. One is the problem of spatial integration over a large domain where the scattering particles cluster randomly in a medium uniformly filled with an absorbing gas, and only a probabilistic description of the variability is available. The increasingly important application here is passive atmospheric profiling using oxygen absorption in the visible/near-IR spectrum. The other scenario is spectral integration over a region where the absorption cross-section of a spatially uniform gas varies rapidly and widely and, moreover, there are scattering particles embedded in the gas that are distributed uniformly, or not. This comes up in many applications, O2 A-band profiling being just one instance. We bring a common framework to solve these problems both efficiently and accurately that is grounded in the recently developed theory of Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT). In GRT, the classic exponential law of transmission is replaced by one with a slower power-law decay that accounts for the unresolved spectral or spatial variability. Analytical results are derived in the single-scattering limit that applies to optically thin aerosol layers. In spectral integration, a modest gain in accuracy is obtained. As for spatial integration of near-monochromatic radiance, we find that, although both continuum and in-band radiances are affected by moderate levels of sub-pixel variability, only extreme variability will affect in-band/continuum ratios.

  13. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  14. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  15. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  16. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  17. A Fast Atmospheric Trace Gas Retrieval for Hyperspectral Instruments Approximating Multiple Scattering—Part 1: Radiative Transfer and a Potential OCO-2 XCO2 Retrieval Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Reuter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite retrievals of the atmospheric dry-air column-average mole fraction of CO 2 (XCO 2 based on hyperspectral measurements in appropriate near (NIR and short wave infrared (SWIR O 2 and CO 2 absorption bands can help to answer important questions about the carbon cycle but the precision and accuracy requirements for XCO 2 data products are demanding. Multiple scattering of light at aerosols and clouds can be a significant error source for XCO 2 retrievals. Therefore, so called full physics retrieval algorithms were developed aiming to minimize scattering related errors by explicitly fitting scattering related properties such as cloud water/ice content, aerosol optical thickness, cloud height, etc. However, the computational costs for multiple scattering radiative transfer (RT calculations can be immense. Processing all data of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2 can require up to thousands of CPU cores and the next generation of CO 2 monitoring satellites will produce at least an order of magnitude more data. Here we introduce the Fast atmOspheric traCe gAs retrievaL FOCAL including a scalar RT model which approximates multiple scattering effects with an analytic solution of the RT problem of an isotropic scattering layer and a Lambertian surface. The computational performance is similar to an absorption only model and currently determined by the convolution of the simulated spectra with the instrumental line shape function (ILS. We assess FOCAL’s quality by confronting it with accurate multiple scattering vector RT simulations using SCIATRAN. The simulated scenarios do not cover all possible geophysical conditions but represent, among others, some typical cloud and aerosol scattering scenarios with optical thicknesses of up to 0.7 which have the potential to survive the pre-processing of a XCO 2 algorithm for real OCO-2 measurements. Systematic errors of XCO 2 range from −2.5 ppm (−6.3‰ to 3.0 ppm (7.6‰ and are usually

  18. Energy-decomposition analysis of ion-neutral complexes along reaction coordinates of unimolecular proton-transfer reaction in gas phase: Comparison between 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Igarashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Reiko; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2017-10-01

    An energy-decomposition analysis clarified the physical origins that change in gas-phase unimolecular proton-transfer reactions via ion-neutral complexes of the 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion. In the bond cleavage and new bond-formation parts of the reaction coordinates, exchange and polarization energies provide a major source of the attraction. In the ion-neutral complex-formation part of the reaction coordinate, different major attractive sources, dispersion, and electrostatic energies were observed. The physical origins of weak interaction in the ion-neutral complexes were affected by the local charges and distances between the ion moieties and the neutral moieties.

  19. Report of study group 10.3 ''gas market development in developing countries: technology transfer and financing''; Rapport du groupe d'etudes 10.3 ''l'evolution du marche gazier dans les pays en voie de developpement. Transfert des tehnologies et financement''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okimi, H.

    2000-07-01

    The study of SG10.3 in this triennium focuses on the gas downstream in developing countries. Discussions on gas developments have flourished in the international gas community often with more emphasis on production and transmission. This may be because that gas distribution is an every day activity for gas enterprises in many member countries and is thought not new. When we look at developments in developing countries, however, the gas downstream development is more important than we normally think. Upstream gas cannot be developed without confidence in gas market; then this affects the whole gas development which may not be achieved without a guaranteed market. A gas market is not simply there but has to be developed. When a gas field is found, people may simply think that there is a market for the gas somewhere. But gas is not a commodity in the countries where there is no distribution networks. Market development is an infrastructure development there, and it often requires complicated processes including financing, technology transfer, implementation of gas networks, marketing, and operation and maintenance. (author)

  20. Natural Gas Market Hubs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A hub is a physical transfer point for natural gas where several pipelines are connected. A market center is a hub where the operator offers services that facilitate...

  1. Efeito do gás de proteção e do modo de transferência na aplicação da liga 625 em aço carbono Effect of shielding gas and transfer mode on the application of 625 alloy in carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Iconomos Baixo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram analisados os efeitos do gás de proteção (Ar, Ar/CO2, Ar/O2 e Ar/He/O2 e do modo de transferência (curto-circuito e corrente pulsada utilizando o processo MIG/ MAG com arame ER-NiCrMo-3 para produzir depósitos sobre chapa assim como o passe de raiz em juntas em V produzidas em aço ABNT 1020. Os resultados mais favoráveis na soldagem do passe de raiz foram obtidos na soldagem com corrente pulsada, empregando uma junta em V com abertura de 90º e atmosfera de Ar + 25% CO2. A utilização de atmosferas de proteção com 20% Hélio e baixo percentual de gás ativo não produziu os resultados esperados, sendo eficaz somente na soldagem com deposição sobre chapa, porém tímida em produzir resultados satisfatórios na solda do passe de raiz. Resultados ruins foram obtidos na soldagem com transferência por curto-circuito, independente do gás de proteção, e quando utilizada atmosfera composta por Argônio puro, independente do modo de transferência ajustado.In this study the effect of shielding gas (Ar, Ar/CO2, Ar/O2 and Ar/He/O2 and transfer mode (short-circuit and pulsed current in MIG/MAG welding with ER-NiCrMo-3 wire to produce bead-on-plate deposits and root passes in "V" joints of ABNT 1020 steel were analyzed. The most favorable results in root pass welding were obtained with pulsed current, employing a "V" joint with a 90º aperture and Ar+25%CO2 atmosphere. The use of shielding atmospheres with 20% helium and a low percentage of active gas did not produce the expected results, being effective only in bead-on-plate weld deposition. However, it was not very effective to produce satisfactory results in root pass welding. Poor results were obtained in the welding with short-circuit transfer regardless of the used shielding gas, and when an atmosphere of pure argon was used, regardless of the mode of transfer.

  2. Combining Experiments and Simulation of Gas Absorption for Teaching Mass Transfer Fundamentals: Removing CO2 from Air Using Water and NaOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William M.; Jackson, Yaminah Z.; Morin, Michael T.; Ferraro, Giacomo P.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and computer models for studying the mass transfer process of removing CO2 from air using water or dilute NaOH solution as absorbent are presented. Models tie experiment to theory and give a visual representation of concentration profiles and also illustrate the two-film theory and the relative importance of various…

  3. 75 FR 39680 - Houston Pipe Line Company LP, Worsham-Steed Gas Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP, Mid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP, Mid Continent Market Center, L.L.C., Oasis Pipeline, LP (Not... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-44-000; Docket No. PR10-46-000; Docket No. PR10-48...

  4. Validation of a numerical method for interface-resolving simulation of multicomponent gas-liquid mass transfer and evaluation of multicomponent diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Mino; Wörner, Martin; Tischer, Steffen; Deutschmann, Olaf

    2017-09-01

    The multicomponent model and the effective diffusivity model are well established diffusion models for numerical simulation of single-phase flows consisting of several components but are seldom used for two-phase flows so far. In this paper, a specific numerical model for interfacial mass transfer by means of a continuous single-field concentration formulation is combined with the multicomponent model and effective diffusivity model and is validated for multicomponent mass transfer. For this purpose, several test cases for one-dimensional physical or reactive mass transfer of ternary mixtures are considered. The numerical results are compared with analytical or numerical solutions of the Maxell-Stefan equations and/or experimental data. The composition-dependent elements of the diffusivity matrix of the multicomponent and effective diffusivity model are found to substantially differ for non-dilute conditions. The species mole fraction or concentration profiles computed with both diffusion models are, however, for all test cases very similar and in good agreement with the analytical/numerical solutions or measurements. For practical computations, the effective diffusivity model is recommended due to its simplicity and lower computational costs.

  5. Transfer of charges and substances in a gas-discharge plasma from the liquid electrolyte cathode containing salts of alkali metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazmeev, Kh K.; Timerkaev, B. A.; Tazmeev, G. K.

    2017-11-01

    A gas discharge in the air between the flowing liquid cathode and a solid anode was studied experimentally. Aqueous solution of sodium chloride was used as the liquid cathode electrolyte. Mass loss due to evaporating and sputtering was compensated by adding distilled water in a continuous mode. It was found that the specific electric conductivity of the aqueous solution is almost unchanged. The regularities of changes in the composition of an anionic solution were discovered.

  6. Analytical determination of the heat transfer coefficient for gas, liquid and liquid metal flows in the tube based on stochastic equations and equivalence of measures for continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrenko, Artur V.

    2017-05-01

    The stochastic equations of continuum are used for determining the heat transfer coefficients. As a result, the formulas for Nusselt (Nu) number dependent on the turbulence intensity and scale instead of only on the Reynolds (Peclet) number are proposed for the classic flows of a nonisothermal fluid in a round smooth tube. It is shown that the new expressions for the classical heat transfer coefficient Nu, which depend only on the Reynolds number, should be obtained from these new general formulas if to use the well-known experimental data for the initial turbulence. It is found that the limitations of classical empirical and semiempirical formulas for heat transfer coefficients and their deviation from the experimental data depend on different parameters of initial fluctuations in the flow for different experiments in a wide range of Reynolds or Peclet numbers. Based on these new dependences, it is possible to explain that the differences between the experimental results for the fixed Reynolds or Peclet numbers are caused by the difference in values of flow fluctuations for each experiment instead of only due to the systematic error in the experiment processing. Accordingly, the obtained general dependences of Nu for a smooth round tube can serve as the basis for clarifying the experimental results and empirical formulas used for continuum flows in various power devices. Obtained results show that both for isothermal and for nonisothermal flows, the reason for the process of transition from a deterministic state into a turbulent one is determined by the physical law of equivalence of measures between them. Also the theory of stochastic equations and the law of equivalence of measures could determine mechanics which is basis in different phenomena of self-organization and chaos theory.

  7. Analytical determination of the heat transfer coefficient for gas, liquid and liquid metal flows in the tube based on stochastic equations and equivalence of measures for continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrenko, Artur V.

    2017-11-01

    The stochastic equations of continuum are used for determining the heat transfer coefficients. As a result, the formulas for Nusselt (Nu) number dependent on the turbulence intensity and scale instead of only on the Reynolds (Peclet) number are proposed for the classic flows of a nonisothermal fluid in a round smooth tube. It is shown that the new expressions for the classical heat transfer coefficient Nu, which depend only on the Reynolds number, should be obtained from these new general formulas if to use the well-known experimental data for the initial turbulence. It is found that the limitations of classical empirical and semiempirical formulas for heat transfer coefficients and their deviation from the experimental data depend on different parameters of initial fluctuations in the flow for different experiments in a wide range of Reynolds or Peclet numbers. Based on these new dependences, it is possible to explain that the differences between the experimental results for the fixed Reynolds or Peclet numbers are caused by the difference in values of flow fluctuations for each experiment instead of only due to the systematic error in the experiment processing. Accordingly, the obtained general dependences of Nu for a smooth round tube can serve as the basis for clarifying the experimental results and empirical formulas used for continuum flows in various power devices. Obtained results show that both for isothermal and for nonisothermal flows, the reason for the process of transition from a deterministic state into a turbulent one is determined by the physical law of equivalence of measures between them. Also the theory of stochastic equations and the law of equivalence of measures could determine mechanics which is basis in different phenomena of self-organization and chaos theory.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Liquid Film Moving Over a Heated Horizontal Surface Under the Action of a Gas Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartashevich Maria V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer during desorption on a horizontal film of lithium bromide water solution flowing on a heated wall under the action of shear stress is numerically investigated in this paper. The shear stress on the film surface is set by the motion of surrounding saturated water vapor. It is shown that at low values of heat flux the film temperature and vapor concentration in the solution downstream decreases due to desorption. However, with an increase in heat flux, general film heating and desorption slowing down are observed.

  9. CONVECTIVE HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN THE COMBUSTION OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER ON A POROUS SURFACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COOLING, *POROUS MATERIALS), (*HEAT TRANSFER, *COMBUSTION), (* MASS TRANSFER , COMBUSTION), CONVECTION(HEAT TRANSFER), GAS FLOW, INJECTION, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER, TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER, THERMAL INSULATION, USSR

  10. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gas and gas pains Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  11. Energy transfer dynamics and kinetics of elementary processes (promoted) by gas-phase CO2 -N2 collisions: Selectivity control by the anisotropy of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Pirani, Fernando; Laganà, Antonio; Bartolomei, Massimiliano

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we exploit a new formulation of the potential energy and of the related computational procedures, which embodies the coupling between the intra and intermolecular components, to characterize possible propensities of the collision dynamics in energy transfer processes of interest for simulation and control of phenomena occurring in a variety of equilibrium and nonequilibrium environments. The investigation reported in the paper focuses on the prototype CO2 -N2 system, whose intramolecular component of the interaction is modeled in terms of a many body expansion while the intermolecular component is modeled in terms of a recently developed bonds-as-interacting-molecular-centers' approach. The main advantage of this formulation of the potential energy surface is that of being (a) truly full dimensional (i.e., all the variations of the coordinates associated with the molecular vibrations and rotations on the geometrical and electronic structure of the monomers, are explicitly taken into account without freezing any bonds or angles), (b) more flexible than other usual formulations of the interaction and (c) well suited for fitting procedures better adhering to accurate ab initio data and sensitive to experimental arrangement dependent information. Specific attention has been given to the fact that a variation of vibrational and rotational energy has a higher (both qualitative and quantitative) impact on the energy transfer when a more accurate formulation of the intermolecular interaction (with respect to that obtained when using rigid monomers) is adopted. This makes the potential energy surface better suited for the kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures in plasma, combustion and atmospheric chemistry computational applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A three-dimensional analysis of the effect of anisotropic gas diffusion layer(GDL) thermal conductivity on the heat transfer and two-phase behavior in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangli; Yamazaki, Yohtaro; Abudula, Abuliti

    A three-dimensional and two-phase model was employed to investigate the effect of the anisotropic GDL thermal conductivity on the heat transfer and liquid water removal in the PEMFCs with serpentine flow field and semi-counter flow operation. The GDL with different anisotropic thermal conductivity in the three directions (x, y, z) was simulated for four cases. As a result, the water saturation, temperature, species, current, potential distribution and proton conductivity were obtained. According to the comparison between the results of each case, some new conclusions are obtained and listed as below: (1) The anisotropic GDL produces the high temperature difference than that of isotropic case, and the in-plane thermal conductivity perpendicular to the gas channels is more important than that of along channels, which may produce the larger temperature difference. (2) Water saturation decreases due to the large temperature difference in the anisotropic case, but some water vapor may condense in the area neighbor to the channel ribs due to the cool function of the current collector and the great temperature difference. (3) The anisotropic thermal conductivity in the through-plane direction and the in-plane direction perpendicular to the gas channels can lead to the decrease of the membrane conductivity. (4) The isotropic GDL is better than that of anisotropic one for the uniform current density. Also, in-plane thermal conductivity perpendicular to the channels has more negative effect on the current density distribution in the membrane than that of the along channels one.

  13. Condensation heat transfer of pure steam and steam from gas-steam mixture in tubes of AES-2006 PHRS SG heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunov, B. F.; Il'in, V. A.; Shcheglov, A. A.; Lychakov, V. D.; Alekseev, S. B.; Kuhtevich, V. O.; Svetlov, S. V.; Sidorov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental determination of the average heat transfer coefficient upon condensation of pure steam αc and steam from air-steam mixture αas.m in tubes of a large-scale model of the emergency cooling heat exchanger in the system of passive heat removal through steam generators of AES-2006 project at Leningrad II NPP are presented. The model contained 16 parallel tubes with a diameter of 16 × 2 mm and a length of 2.9 m connected to the upper steam distributing and lower condensate gathering horizontal collectors; the distance between their axes was 2.28 m. The tube segments were vertical, horizontal, or inclined. The internal diameter of the collectors was 40 or 60 mm. The model was placed in the lower part of a tank with a height of 6.5 m and a volume of 5.85 m3 filled with boiling water at atmospheric pressure. The experimental parameters were as follows: pressure range 0.43-7.77 MPa, condensate Reynolds number Ref = (0.87-9.3) × 103, and average air volume fraction at the segment with air-steam mixture 0.18-0.85. The studies showed that nonuniformity of static pressure distribution along the steam-distributing collector strongly influences the reduction of αc value (ejecting effect). The agreement between experimental and calculated according to statutory guidelines values of αc for vertical tubes is achieved if the dynamic head of the steam flow at the input of the steam-distributing collector does not exceed 1 kPa. Equations for calculation of the diffusion heat transfer coefficient at steam condensation from the air-steam mixture αas.m on the internal tube surface are proposed. In the considered conditions, air is completely displaced by steam flow from the upper to the lower part of the tubes. The boundary between these regions is characterized by an average reduced steam velocity through this cross section of 1.6 ± 0.4 m/s. Above the boundary cross section, it is recommended to calculate αc. according to [1].

  14. Controlled Environment Specimen Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2014-01-01

    an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3...... transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ......Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking...

  15. Characterization of gas-phase organics using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry: fresh and aged residential wood combustion emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Emily A.; Slowik, Jay G.; El Haddad, Imad; Kilic, Dogushan; Klein, Felix; Dommen, Josef; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic gases emitted during the flaming phase of residential wood combustion are characterized individually and by functionality using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The evolution of the organic gases is monitored during photochemical aging. Primary gaseous emissions are dominated by oxygenated species (e.g., acetic acid, acetaldehyde, phenol and methanol), many of which have deleterious health effects and play an important role in atmospheric processes such as secondary organic aerosol formation and ozone production. Residential wood combustion emissions differ considerably from open biomass burning in both absolute magnitude and relative composition. Ratios of acetonitrile, a potential biomass burning marker, to CO are considerably lower ( ˜ 0.09 pptv ppbv-1) than those observed in air masses influenced by open burning ( ˜ 1-2 pptv ppbv-1), which may make differentiation from background levels difficult, even in regions heavily impacted by residential wood burning. A considerable amount of formic acid forms during aging ( ˜ 200-600 mg kg-1 at an OH exposure of (4.5-5.5) × 107 molec cm-3 h), indicating residential wood combustion can be an important local source for this acid, the quantities of which are currently underestimated in models. Phthalic anhydride, a naphthalene oxidation product, is also formed in considerable quantities with aging ( ˜ 55-75 mg kg-1 at an OH exposure of (4.5-5.5) × 107 molec cm-3 h). Although total NMOG emissions vary by up to a factor of ˜ 9 between burns, SOA formation potential does not scale with total NMOG emissions and is similar in all experiments. This study is the first thorough characterization of both primary and aged organic gases from residential wood combustion and provides a benchmark for comparison of emissions generated under different burn parameters.

  16. Wintertime CO2 fluxes in an Arctic polynya using eddy covariance: Evidence for enhanced air-sea gas transfer during ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else, B. G. T.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Galley, R. J.; Drennan, W. M.; Miller, L. A.; Thomas, H.

    2011-09-01

    Between Nov. 1 2007 and Jan. 31 2008, we calculated the air-sea flux of CO2, sensible heat, and water vapor in an Arctic polynya system (Amundsen Gulf, Canada) using eddy covariance equipment deployed on the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen. During this time period, Amundsen Gulf was a dynamic sea ice environment composed primarily of first year ice with open water coverage varying between 1-14%. In all cases where measurements were influenced by open water we measured CO2 fluxes that were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those expected under similar conditions in the open ocean. Fluxes were typically directed toward the water surface with a mean flux of -4.88 μmol m-2 s-1 and a maximum of -27.95 μmol m-2 s-1. One case of rapid outgassing (mean value +2.10 μmol m-2 s-1) was also observed. The consistent patten of enhanced gas exchange over open water allows us to hypothesize that high water-side turbulence is the main cause of these events. Modification of the physical and chemical properties of the surface seawater by cooling and brine rejection may also play a role. A rough calculation using an estimate of open water coverage suggests that the contribution of these events to the annual regional air-sea CO2 exchange budget may make the winter months as important as the open water months. Although high, the uptake of CO2 fits within mixed layer dissolved inorganic carbon budgets derived for the region by other investigators.

  17. On the deposition of volatiles and semivolatiles from cigarette smoke aerosols: relative rates of transfer of nicotine and ammonia from particles to the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Jeffrey I; Lipowicz, Peter J; Piadé, Jean-Jacques; Poget, Laurent; Sanders, Edward B; Snyder, James P; Trowbridge, Clarence G

    2004-08-01

    The hypothesis that elevated levels of ammonia-releasing compounds in tobacco and ammonia in mainstream (MS) smoke increase the rate and amount of nicotine evaporation from the particles of MS smoke aerosol was examined by kinetic modeling and experiments with MS cigarette smoke. Computational simulation of a kinetic mechanism describing volatile loss of nicotine, ammonia, and acetic acid from an aqueous solution was used to compute the time-dependent concentration of all species in the model. Because of the high volatility of ammonia relative to that of nicotine, variation over a wide range of initial ammonia concentration had no significant effect upon the rate of loss of nicotine from the model system. The effects of a variation in the volatile loss rate constant for ammonia and for the acid were examined. The simulations show that ammonia is lost from the model solution at a greater rate than nicotine and acid, and the loss of volatile acid has a significant role in the rate and amount of nicotine loss. Simulations with a model system undergoing a continuous steady addition of ammonia showed that high rates of ammonia addition could significantly increase the rate of nicotine volatile loss from the model solution. A series of smoking experiments was performed using blended cigarettes connected to a denuder tube. Deposition of smoke constituents can occur directly from the gas phase and by the deposition of smoke aerosol particles themselves. As nicotine exists >99% in the particle phase of MS smoke, in the absence of particle deposition, denuder tube deposition of nicotine occurs via the evaporation-deposition pathway. Solanesol, a nonvolatile tobacco and smoke terpene, was used to quantify the amount of particle deposition onto the denuder tube. The amount of ammonia deposited on the denuder tube was an order of magnitude greater than that of nicotine, showing that ammonia evaporates from the MS smoke particles much faster than does nicotine. The experimental

  18. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  19. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  20. Mesure et modélisation multidimensionnelle des transferts thermiques gaz-paroi dans le cas des moteurs à allumage commandé Measurement and Multidimensional Modeling of Gas-Wall Heat Transfers in Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilaber P.

    2006-11-01

    formulation k-epsilon de la turbulence a été adoptée. La sensibilité du modèle aux effets de densité et de turbulence a été testée par l'intermédiaire de variations de l'avance à l'allumage et du régime. La comparaison entre mesure et simulation a montré un bon accord, tant en termes de flux thermiques locaux et instantanés, qu'en termes de bilan global. The computational fluid dynamics codes, which help to predict the behaviour of combusting gas in reciprocating engines, need, as boundary conditions for the momentum and energy equations, to approximate wall frictions and heat transfer between gas and walls. The purpose of this work is to validate a heat transfer model for spark ignited engines. Two steps of research have been worked on to meet this objective: an experimental phase and a computational phase. In the experimental phase, measurements were made on a test-engine instrumented with fast-response surface heat flux gages. Each gage consisted of a steel cylinder, containing two thermocouples. To analyze the influence of fluid dynamics on heat transfer, a Laser Doppler Velocimeter was used, by means of a spacer placed between the engine head and cylinder. The spacer was equiped with two windows and two heat-flux gages permitting simultaneous measurements of the heat flux and of the fluid dynamics outside the boundary layer. Two other gages were present in the head of the engine and up to ten data inputs could be simultaneously recorded at each crank-angle, including two velocity components and the cylinder pressure. A parametric analysis was carried out revealing the following trends:- the global heat transfer rate for a thermodynamic cycle of the engine decreases as the speed of the engine is increased, but the peak value of the wall heat-flux increases because of the increase of the turbulence level. - the volumetric efficiency appeared to have little effect on the turbulence level, and its influence on the heat transfer is mainly due to the increase of

  1. Mechanistic Study of the Gas-Phase In-Source Hofmann Elimination of Doubly Quaternized Cinchona-Alkaloid Based Phase-Transfer Catalysts by (+)-Electrospray Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Sheng; Sheng, Huaming; Lexa, Katrina W.; Sherer, Edward C.; Zhang, Li-Kang; Xiang, Bangping; Helmy, Roy; Mao, Bing

    2017-03-01

    An unusual in-source fragmentation pattern observed for 14 doubly quaternized cinchona alkaloid-based phase-transfer catalysts (PTC) was studied using (+)-ESI high resolution mass spectrometry. Loss of the substituted benzyl cation (R1 or R2) was found to be the major product ion [M2+ - R1 + or R2 +]+ in MS spectra of all PTC compounds. A Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H]+ was also observed. Only a small amount of the doubly charged M2+ ions were observed in the MS spectra, likely due to strong Columbic repulsion between the two quaternary ammonium cations in the gas phase. The positive voltage in the MS inlet but not the ESI probe was found to induce this extensive fragmentation for all PTC diboromo-salts. Compound 1 was used as an example to illustrate the proposed in-source fragmentation mechanism. The mechanism of formation of the Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H]+ was further investigated using HRMS/MS, H/D exchange, and DFT calculations. The proposed formation of 2b as the major Hofmann elimination product ion was supported both by HRMS/MS and DFT calculations. Formation of product ion 2b through a concerted unimolecular Ei elimination pathway is proposed rather than a bimolecular E2 elimination pathway for common solution Hofmann eliminations.

  2. Isobaric Inert Gas Counterdiffusion,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    500 and 600 feet include: (a) Use of Trimix to reduce the nitrogen gradient upon transfer- ring from the bell to air in the deck decompression chamber...Another isobaric gas switch occurs when, in an experimental situati6n, there is trimix in the chamber and the physiologist wants to study the effects of

  3. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  4. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...

  5. Nonlinear analysis of thermal stresses of a of first stage nozzle of a gas turbine at full load from the results of an analysis of conjugated heat transference; Analisis no lineal de esfuerzos termicos de una tobera de primera etapa de turbina de gas a plena carga a partir de resultados de un analisis de transferencia de calor conjugado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Hernandez, Efrain [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico (Cenidet), Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Mazur C, Zdzislaw; Garcia Illescas, R; Hernandez Rossette, Alejandro [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    The gas turbines operate at extremely high temperatures, at high thermal and mechanical stresses, causing that the useful life of the involved components be reduced. In the present article the results realized by previous investigations of temperatures obtained from analysis of heat transfer and flow of fluids of the nozzle by means of the Star-CD program based on finite volumes is presented. Later, the NISA program of finite elements was used to realize the analysis of thermal stresses considering the material plasticity. The methodology employed to determine the material properties variable with the temperature of the super-alloy FSX-414 and the plasticity model used in the structural analysis in the finite element program. The result will be later used in the fatigue analysis for the useful life assessment. [Spanish] Las turbinas de gas operan a temperatura extremadamente altas, a elevados esfuerzos termicos y mecanicos, ocasionando que la vida de los componentes involucrados se reduzca. En el presente articulo se presentan los resultados realizados por previas investigaciones de temperaturas obtenidas a partir de analisis de transferencia de calor y flujo de fluidos de la tobera mediante el programa Star-CD basado en volumenes finitos. Posteriormente, se utilizo el programa NISA de elementos finitos para realizar el analisis de esfuerzos termicos considerando plasticidad del material. Se muestra la metodologia empleada para determinar las propiedades del material variables con la temperatura de la superaleacion FSX-414 y el modelo de plasticidad utilizado en el analisis estructural en el programa de elemento finito. Los resultados seran empleados posteriormente en el analisis de fatiga para la estimacion de vida util.

  6. 微通道内气-液弹状流动及传质特性研究进展 (Review on flow and mass transfer characteristics of gas-liquid slug flow in microchannels)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Chaoqun; Yue, Jun; Zhao, Yuchao; Chen, Guangwen; Yuan, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Gas-liquid slug flow (also termed as Taylor flow) is a flow pattern characterized by the alternate movement of elongated bubbles and liquid slugs. Gas-liquid slug flow operation in microchannels has been found important implications in the enhancement of gas-liquid reactions due to its advantages

  7. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  8. Simple setup for gas-phase h/d exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistarz, Ulrik Hvid; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2014-01-01

    with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility......Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX...... gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3...

  9. Oxygen transfer rates and requirements in oxidative biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Rehn, Gustav; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions offer several important benefits such as regio- and stereoselectivity, avoiding the use of toxic metal based catalysts and replacing oxidizing reagents by allowing the use of oxygen. In this contribution the oxygen requirements are analysed for different process s...... without oxygen supply being limiting. Also, membrane contactors can provide a feasible oxygen supply method when bubble-less aeration is desired. However, in order to support high productivity the oxygen flux using air may be insufficient, thus requiring the use of oxygen....... scenarios, considering different biocatalyst formats and variation of the desired productivity. Also, the applicability of two different oxygen supply methods (bubbling and membrane aeration) is considered. The results indicate that growing cells could be used to reach productivities up to 3.5 g L-1h-1...

  10. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  11. Mass Transfer Method and Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    .g. polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon $m(3)) membranes, in the form of hollow fibres having gas-containing pores and contacting the second fluid with the inner surface of the membranes. Useful membranes are characterized in that they e.g. have a porosity ($g(e)) of at least 0.50, a mass transfer coefficient of e...

  12. The performance of a new gas to gas heat exchanger with strip fin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Hirs, Gerard; Rollmann, P.

    1999-01-01

    A compact gas to gas heat exchanger needs large heat transfer areas on both fluid sides. This can be realised by adding secondary surfaces. The secondary surfaces are plate fin, strip fin, and louvered fin, etc. The fins extend the heat transfer surfaces and promote turbulence. This paper presents a

  13. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  14. Fundamentals of gas particle flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rudinger, G

    1980-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas-Particle Flow is an edited, updated, and expanded version of a number of lectures presented on the "Gas-Solid Suspensions” course organized by the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Materials presented in this book are mostly analytical in nature, but some experimental techniques are included. The book focuses on relaxation processes, including the viscous drag of single particles, drag in gas-particles flow, gas-particle heat transfer, equilibrium, and frozen flow. It also discusses the dynamics of single particles, such as particles in an arbitrary flow, in a r

  15. Elements of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2012-01-01

    1 Basic Concepts and Definitions1.1 Introduction1.1.1 Driving Potential1.2 Dimensions and Units1.2.1 Dimensional Homogeneity1.3 Closed and Open Systems1.3.1 Closed System (ControlMass)1.3.2 Isolated System1.3.3 Open System (ControlVolume)1.4 Forms of Energy1.4.1 Internal Energy1.5 Properties of a System1.5.1 Intensive and Extensive Properties1.6 State and Equilibrium1.7 Thermal and Calorical Properties1.7.1 Specific Heat of an Incompressible Substance1.7.2 Thermally Perfect Gas 1.8 The Perfect Gas1.9 Summary1.10 Exercise ProblemsConduction Heat Transfer2.1 Introduction2.2 Conduction Heat Trans

  16. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  17. TRANSFERENCE LOVE

    OpenAIRE

    Deneanu, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    It is the psychoanalysis’ merit to have discovered one of most common phenomenon that happens in almost all kind of human relations, and that is transference. Psychoanalytic framework did not produce it, but stimulate it. Transference love—one of the most powerful tool used by the analyst to get to understand a pacient’s pattern of falling in love—is an emotional relationship (a conglomeration of affection, tenderness, friendship, erotic and sexual feelings) developed by a pacient for his/her...

  18. Modeling microscale heat transfer using Calore.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Bainbridge, Bruce L.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2005-09-01

    Modeling microscale heat transfer with the computational-heat-transfer code Calore is discussed. Microscale heat transfer problems differ from their macroscopic counterparts in that conductive heat transfer in both solid and gaseous materials may have important noncontinuum effects. In a solid material, three noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of phonons across a thin film, scattering of phonons from surface roughness at a gas-solid interface, and scattering of phonons from grain boundaries within the solid material. These processes are modeled for polycrystalline silicon, and the thermal-conductivity values predicted by these models are compared to experimental data. In a gaseous material, two noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of gas molecules across a thin gap and accommodation of gas molecules to solid conditions when reflecting from a solid surface. These processes are modeled for arbitrary gases by allowing the gas and solid temperatures across a gas-solid interface to differ: a finite heat transfer coefficient (contact conductance) is imposed at the gas-solid interface so that the temperature difference is proportional to the normal heat flux. In this approach, the behavior of gas in the bulk is not changed from behavior observed under macroscopic conditions. These models are implemented in Calore as user subroutines. The user subroutines reside within Sandia's Source Forge server, where they undergo version control and regression testing and are available to analysts needing these capabilities. A Calore simulation is presented that exercises these models for a heated microbeam separated from an ambient-temperature substrate by a thin gas-filled gap. Failure to use the noncontinuum heat transfer models for the solid and the gas causes the maximum temperature of the microbeam to be significantly underpredicted.

  19. 17 CFR 229.1204 - (Item 1204) Oil and gas production, production prices and production costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... price (including transfers) per unit of oil, gas and other products produced; and (2) The average... conversion to synthetic oil or gas, the product's production, transfer prices, and production costs should be disclosed separately from all other products. Instruction 4 to Item 1204: The transfer price of oil and gas...

  20. Transfer Timing

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim present Simulation Presentation Interactive Media Element This IME is used in the Computer Communications and Networks class offered in the Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences. This introductory computer networking course provides the theory and principles of networking and communications protocols. This IME is used to help students understand data transfer options. CS3502 Computer Communications and Networks

  1. Seamless Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, approximately 7.3 million undergraduate students (42 percent) were enrolled in community colleges in the US, the latest statistic offered by the Community College Research Center. At some schools, like Cleveland State University (OH), more transfer students graduated in 2014 with a bachelor's degree than students who entered four-year…

  2. Carbon monoxide transfer in pig lungs during mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C.A.M. te Nijenhuis (Frances)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis comprises studies of gas transfer in the lungs during mechanical ventilation, which have been obtained in healthy pigs. The objectives of this thesis were: I) to adapt the breath-holding teclmique, as used during spontaneous breathing for estimation of gas transfer, to

  3. Gas gangrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue infection - Clostridial; Gangrene - gas; Myonecrosis; Clostridial infection of tissues; Necrotizing soft tissue infection ... Gas gangrene is most often caused by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens. It also can be caused by ...

  4. Gas treating absorption theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Eimer, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Gas Treating: Absorption Theory and Practice provides an introduction to the treatment of natural gas, synthesis gas and flue gas, addressing why it is necessary and the challenges involved.  The book concentrates in particular on the absorption-desorption process and mass transfer coupled with chemical reaction. Following a general introduction to gas treatment, the chemistry of CO2, H2S and amine systems is described, and selected topics from physical chemistry with relevance to gas treating are presented. Thereafter the absorption process is discussed in detail, column hardware is explain

  5. Ruslands Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to obtain some political power. Russia owns 32,1 % of the world gas reserves, and The European Union is getting 50 % of its gas import from Russia. I will use John Mearsheimer’s theory ”The Tragedy of Great Power Politics” to explain how Russia can use its big reserves of gas on The European Union to get political influence.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  7. Theoretical study of the mechanism of proton transfer in tautomeric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4 ... Proton transfers; tautomerism; dissociative process; direct proton transfer. Abstract. Semiempirical SCF-MO studies of tautomerism in alloxan preclude the possibility of direct proton transfer in the gas phase due to the strain in the four-centred transition ...

  8. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  9. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blount, Gerald C.; Gorensek, Maximilian Boris; Hamm, Luther L.

    2018-01-16

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  10. Requirements for gas quality and gas appliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; Kiewiet, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The gas transmission network in the Netherlands transports two different qualities of gas, low-calorific gas known as G-gas or L-gas and, high calorific gas (H-gas). These two gas qualities are transported in separate networks, and are connected by means of five blending and conversion

  11. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  12. Hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas capture: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansourizadeh, A; Ismail, A F

    2009-11-15

    Membrane contactors using microporous membranes for acid gas removal have been extensively reviewed and discussed. The microporous membrane acts as a fixed interface between the gas and the liquid phase without dispersing one phase into another that offers a flexible modular and energy efficient device. The gas absorption process can offer a high selectivity and a high driving force for transport even at low concentrations. Using hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors is a promising alternative to conventional gas absorption systems for acid gas capture from gas streams. Important aspects of membrane contactor as an efficient energy devise for acid gas removal including liquid absorbents, membrane characteristics, combination of membrane and absorbent, mass transfer, membrane modules, model development, advantages and disadvantages were critically discussed. In addition, current status and future potential in research and development of gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas removal were also briefly discussed.

  13. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  14. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  15. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGRSR) program are described in the quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  16. Research of the influence of intensification of heat transfer on distribution of temperature in the active core of the gas cooled nuclear reactor of the «GT-MHR» project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzevanov, V. S.; Podgorny, S. K.

    2017-11-01

    The maximum wall temperature of a cooling channel of a nuclear reactor is one of the factors that affects directly of the safety and reliability of the nuclear reactor. In this paper suggested an equation, which allows calculating the maximum wall temperature of the cooling channel of the nuclear reactor with heat transfer enhancer installed, without enormous calculations.

  17. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    to specific logics of temporalisation and spatial expansion of a diverse set of social processes in relation to, for example, the economy, politics, science and the mass media. On this background, the paper will more concretely develop a conceptual framework for classifying different contextual orders......The concept of governance has mutated into an all‐embracing buzz‐word characterised by a low degree of conceptual precision and empirical focus. This paper therefore suggests a narrower and more precise understanding of governance and the regulatory function it fulfils by advancing the argument...... that the essential functional and normative purpose of regulatory governance is to facilitate, stabilise and justify the transfer of condensed social components (such as economic capital and products, political decisions, legal judgements, religious beliefs and scientific knowledge) from one social contexts...

  18. Landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnell, Gaynor [Landfill Gas Association (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    Following the UK Government's initiative for stimulating renewable energy through the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO), the UK landfill gas industry has more than trebled in size in just 4 years. As a result, UK companies are now in a strong position to offer their skills and services overseas. Ireland, Greece and Spain also resort heavily to disposal to landfill. Particularly rapid growth of the landfill gas market is expected in the OECD-Pacific and NAFTA areas. The article explains that landfill gas is a methane-rich mixture produced by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes in landfills: under optimum conditions, up to 500 cubic meters of gas can be obtained from 1 tonne of biodegradable waste. Data on the number and capacity of sites in the UK are given. The Landfill Gas Association runs courses to counteract the skills shortage in the UK, and tailored courses for overseas visitors are planned.

  19. Modeling ozone mass transfer in reclaimed wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pan; Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Babcock, Roger W; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2009-01-01

    Ozone mass transfer in reclaimed water was evaluated at pilot scale to determine mass-transfer characteristics and reaction kinetics and to assess the use of oxygen as a surrogate to measure this process. Tests were conducted in a 40-L/min pilot plant over a 3-year period. Nonsteady-state mass-transfer analyses for both oxygen and ozone were performed for superficial gas flow rates ranging from 0.13m/min to 0.40m/min. The psi factor, which is the ratio of volumetric mass-transfer coefficients of ozone to oxygen, was determined. The decrease in oxygen transfer rate caused by contaminants in reclaimed water was only 10 to 15% compared to tap water. A simple mathematical model was developed to describe transfer rate and steady state ozone concentration. Ozone decay was modeled accurately as a pseudo first-order reaction between ozone and ozone-demanding materials.

  20. High performance data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, R.; Fang, C.; Hanushevsky, A.; Kreuger, W.; Yang, W.

    2017-10-01

    The exponentially increasing need for high speed data transfer is driven by big data, and cloud computing together with the needs of data intensive science, High Performance Computing (HPC), defense, the oil and gas industry etc. We report on the Zettar ZX software. This has been developed since 2013 to meet these growing needs by providing high performance data transfer and encryption in a scalable, balanced, easy to deploy and use way while minimizing power and space utilization. In collaboration with several commercial vendors, Proofs of Concept (PoC) consisting of clusters have been put together using off-the- shelf components to test the ZX scalability and ability to balance services using multiple cores, and links. The PoCs are based on SSD flash storage that is managed by a parallel file system. Each cluster occupies 4 rack units. Using the PoCs, between clusters we have achieved almost 200Gbps memory to memory over two 100Gbps links, and 70Gbps parallel file to parallel file with encryption over a 5000 mile 100Gbps link.

  1. Gas turbine cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancalari, Eduardo E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  2. Mass transfer in asymptotic-giant-branch binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Binary stars can interact via mass transfer when one member (the primary) ascends onto a giant branch. The amount of gas ejected by the binary and the amount of gas accreted by the secondary over the lifetime of the primary influence the subsequent binary phenomenology. Some of the gas ejected by the binary will remain gravitationally bound and its distribution will be closely related to the formation of planetary nebulae. We investigate the nature of mass transfer in binary systems containing an AGB star by adding radiative transfer to the AstroBEAR AMR Hydro/MHD code.

  3. Gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahan, E.; Eudaly, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This evaluation provides performance and cost data for commercially available simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. Intercooled, reheat, and compound cycles are discussed from theoretical basis only, because actual units are not currently available, except on a special-order basis. Performance characteristics investigated include unit efficiency at full-load and off-design conditions, and at rated capacity. Costs are tabulated for both simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. The output capacity of the gas turbines investigated ranges from 80 to 134,000 hp for simple units and from 12,000 to 50,000 hp for regenerative units.

  4. Low gas permeability of particulate films slows down the aging of gas marbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Ou, Even; Lorenceau, Elise; Rouyer, Florence

    2017-10-06

    Introducing solid particles into liquid films drastically changes their properties: "gas marbles" can resist overpressure and underpressure ten times larger than their pure liquid counterparts - also known as soap bubbles - before deforming. Such gas marbles can therefore prove to be useful as gas containers able to support stresses. Yet, as their liquid counterparts, they can undergo gas transfer, which can reduce the scope of their applications. However, their permeability has never been characterized. In this paper, we measure the gas permeability of gas marbles through dedicated experiments. Our results show that particulate films are less permeable to gas than their pure liquid counterparts. We attribute this limited overall gas flux to the particles that reduce the surface area through which gas diffuses.

  5. Development of a cryogenic flexible pipe for the transfer of liquefied natural gas; Mise au point d'un flexible cryogenique pour le transfert du gaz naturel liquefie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigaud, J.; Gerez, J.M.; Dieumegard, C. [Coflexip Stena Offshore, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    For historical reasons, the liquefaction of natural gas is performed with onshore equipments and LNG tanker-ships are loaded and unloaded using rigid articulated arms. When these operations are performed in harbors, the movement of the ship with respect to the pier are relatively limited. Today, several companies aim at liquefying natural gas using floating facilities. The loading of tanker-ships is performed offshore, and thus movements between the ship and the floating facility are enhanced. The use of a flexible pipe can be an interesting alternative solution to the articulated arm. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the LNG flexible technology developed by Coflexip Stena Offshore and the progress of the program of development of a cryogenic flexible: structure, fittings, safety (leaks detection), thermal calculations, optimization of the corrugated hose profile, pressure drops, fatigue tests and service life, materials development, prototype and real tests. (J.S.)

  6. Delaminated Transfer of CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, Alexis; Mao, Jinhai; Tilak, Nikhil; Altvater, Michael; Andrei, Eva

    Single layer graphene is commonly synthesized by dissociation of a carbonaceous gas at high temperatures in the presence of a metallic catalyst in a process known as Chemical Vapor Deposition or CVD. Although it is possible to achieve high quality graphene by CVD, the standard transfer technique of etching away the metallic catalyst is wasteful and jeopardizes the quality of the graphene film by contamination from etchants. Thus, development of a clean transfer technique and preservation of the parent substrate remain prominent hurdles to overcome. In this study, we employ a copper pretreatment technique and optimized parameters for growth of high quality single layer graphene at atmospheric pressure. We address the transfer challenge by utilizing the adhesive properties between a polymer film and graphene to achieve etchant-free transfer of graphene films from a copper substrate. Based on this concept we developed a technique for dry delamination and transferring of graphene to hexagonal boron nitride substrates, which produced high quality graphene films while at the same time preserving the integrity of the copper catalyst for reuse. DOE-FG02-99ER45742, Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program.

  7. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    {sub 2}O and gasification gas. Operation conditions free of external or internal mass transfer limitations were used. Apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for all the studied gas mixtures. In addition, for the CO{sub 2} reaction, a mechanistic model of Langmuir-Hinshelwood type was derived and tested. The best mode was based on benzene single site adsorption as the rate determining step and non-dissociable adsorption of CO{sub 2}. To be active in gasification gas carbonate rocks have to be in a calcined state. When the catalyst was carbonated and water was present, the activity of the catalysts was lost almost completely. This decline of activity closely followed the equilibrium decomposition pressure and temperature of CaCO{sub 3}. (orig.) 56 refs.

  8. Bioconversion of synthesis gas into liquid or gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Ackerson, M.D.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. (Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This review presents data for the production of ethanol, hydrogen, and methane from coal synthesis gas. Various bioreactor schemes for synthesis gas fermentations have been investigated, and mathematical models that define intrinsic kinetics and mass transfer relationships are developed. Methods to predict reactor performance and gas retention times for the CSTR and packed columns are presented. (author).

  9. Tolley's industrial and commercial gas installation practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hazlehurst, John

    2010-01-01

    This is the third of three essential reference volumes for those concerned with the installation and servicing of domestic and industrial gas equipment. This volume explains the basic principles underlying the practical and theoretical aspects of installing and servicing gas appliances and associated equipment, from the basics of combustion, to burners, pressure and flow, transfer of heat, controls, as well as materials and processes, electrical aspects, and metering and measuring devices. Covering both Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas, the many illustrations and worked examples include

  10. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . faulting and fluid migration, and 4. trapping of free gas beneath a hydrate seal. Experiments are being conducted to assess the impact of gas hydrate on sediment behavior, particularly with respect to slope failure and other potential geohazards....K. Paull, R. Matsumoto, P.J. Wallace, and W.P. Dillon (Eds.), Proceedings ODP, Scientific Results, v. 164 College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), pp. 179-191. Dallimore, S. R., T. Uchida, and T. S. Collett, 1999, Summary, in S. R. Dallimore, T...

  11. Influence on Heat Transfer Coefficient of Heat Exchanger by Velocity and Heat Transfer Temperature Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to insufficient heat transfer of heat exchanger, research the influence on the heat transfer coefficient impacted by velocity and heat transfer temperature difference of tube heat exchanger. According to the different heat transfer temperature difference and gas velocity,the experimental data were divided into group. Using the control variable method,the above two factors were analyzed separately. K一△T and k一:fitting curve were clone to obtain empirical function. The entire heat exchanger is as the study object,using numerical simulation methods,porous media,k一£model,second order upwind mode,and pressure一velocity coupling with SIMPLE algorithm,the entire heat exchanger temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient distribution were given. Finally the trend of the heat transfer coefficient effected by the above two factors was gotten.

  12. Selective mass transfer in a membrane absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. Yu.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical study of selective mass transfer in a plane-frame membrane absorber (contactor) has been made. A mathematical model of the process has been developed and the process of purification of a gas mixture depending on the flow parameters, the membrane, and the feeding-mixture composition has been studied with its help.

  13. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer-particularly in configurations other than fixed beds-has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likelyto be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limitthan in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data.

  14. Volcanic Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often escape continuously into the atmosphere from the soil, volcanic vents , fumaroles , and hydrothermal systems. By far the ... after falling into a snow depression surrounding a volcanic fumarole and filled ... of CO 2 gas in soils can also damage or destroy vegetation, as is ...

  15. Gas Gangrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening infection that occurs when these bacteria multiple and produce toxins, causing tissue injury. This condition is frequently associated with a recent surgical wound or trauma. Signs and Symptoms If gas gangrene develops in your child, it will probably begin with pain at the ...

  16. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  17. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  18. Transference, transference interpretations, and transference-focused psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Kenneth N; Scala, J Wesley

    2012-09-01

    The concept of transference and the use of transference interpretations in psychotherapy have been highly controversial topics garnering frequent attention both within psychoanalysis and across multiple orientations of psychotherapy. In this article, we review the empirical evidence as it bears on this controversy and discuss the implications of the evidence for psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and therapy in general. We provide a brief historical and contextual overview, followed by a discussion of the development of the concept of transference. We then discuss the evidence for the concept of transference from basic psychological research and contend that these findings are not only consistent with a social-cognitive and information processing model, but that they may also indicate conflict and defensive processes suggestive of a dynamic transference process model. We continue with a discussion of the evidence for the concept of transference from psychotherapy research and examine process findings relating to the use of transference interpretations and transference-focused psychotherapies. Finally, we present the implications of this emerging evidence for clinical practice. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. The porosity in a fluidized bed heat transfer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Visser, G.; Valk, M.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of heat transfer between a fluidized bed and an immersed surface and a model of gas flow and porosity, both recently published, were combined and further modified in the area of low velocities where the particle convective component of heat transfer is low or neglectable.

  20. Mass transfer in rolling rotary kilns: a novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenrych, M.D.; Greeff, P.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach to modeling mass transfer in rotary kilns or rotating cylinders is explored. The movement of gas in the interparticle voids in the bed of the kiln is considered, where particles move concentrically with the geometry of the kiln and gas is entrained by these particles. The approach

  1. Quantification of the effect of CO transfer on titrimetric techniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... Keywords: bioprocess monitoring, sensors, titration, gas-liquid mass transfer, hydrogen ion production, aerobic processes. Nomenclature ... from the continuous interaction between carbon dioxide in the gas and liquid phases: (1) ... HPR prior to substrate addition or immediately after substrate removal.

  2. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  3. Natural Gas Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Correa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the present and future on natural gas transportation options, from oil and gas fields to markets, including liquefied natural gas, gas pipeline, compressed natural gas, natural gas hydrates, and gas to liquids and the perspectives of using them in Colombia, since this is the main fuel alternative to supply the world in at least the next 50 years.

  4. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  5. Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor for Acid Gas Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiqotul Himma, Nurul; Gede Wenten, I.

    2017-07-01

    Gas-liquid membrane contactor has gained a great attention as an alternative to conventional absorption columns in acid gas removal from natural gas or post-combustion. The membrane contactor offers high mass transfer area and excellent operational flexibility. However, hydrophobic microporous membranes commonly used are still susceptible to wetting by liquid absorbents, leading to the deterioration of absorption performance in long-term operation. Therefore, many studies were recently directed to improve the membrane wetting resistant by endowing superhydrophobicity. This article then presents a review on superhydrophobic membrane development and its application for acid gas removal using membrane contactor. An overview of gas-liquid membrane contactor is firstly presented, followed by the preparation of superhydrophobic membranes. The performances of superhydrophobic membranes in acid gas absorption are then discussed, and the recommendation for future research is finally outlined. This review may provide an insight into the further development of superhydrophobic membrane contactor.

  6. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Siegel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Further expanding on the changes made to the fifth edition, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 6th Edition continues to highlight the relevance of thermal radiative transfer and focus on concepts that develop the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The book explains the fundamentals of radiative transfer, introduces the energy and radiative transfer equations, covers a variety of approaches used to gauge radiative heat exchange between different surfaces and structures, and provides solution techniques for solving the RTE.

  7. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  8. Influence of surfactant on gas bubble stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanwright, Jennifer; Zhou, James; Evans, Geoffrey M; Galvin, Kevin P

    2005-05-24

    Gas-bubble stability is achieved either by a reduction in the Laplace pressure or by a reduction in the permeability of the gas-liquid interface. Although insoluble surfactants have been shown definitively in many studies to lower the permeability of the gas-liquid interface and hence increase the resistance to interfacial mass transfer, remarkably little work has been done on the effects of soluble surfactants. An experimental system was developed to measure the effect of the soluble surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide on the desorption and absorption of carbon dioxide gas through a quiescent planar interface. The desorption experiments conformed to the model of non-steady-state molecular diffusion. The absorption experiments, however, produced an unexpected mass transfer mechanism, with surface renewal, probably because of instability in the density gradient formed by the carbon dioxide. In general, the soluble surfactant produced no measurable reduction in the rate of interfacial mass transfer for desorption or absorption. This finding is consistent with the conclusion of Caskey and Barlage that soluble surfactants produce a significantly lower resistance to interfacial mass transfer than do insoluble surfactants. The dynamic adsorption and desorption of the surfactant molecules at the gas-liquid interface creates short-term vacancies, which presumably permit the unrestricted transfer of the gas molecules through the interface. This surfactant exchange does not occur for insoluble surfactants. Gas bubbles formed in the presence of a high concentration of soluble surfactant were observed to dissolve completely, while those formed in the presence of the insoluble surfactant stearic acid did not dissolve easily, and persisted for very long periods. The interfacial concentration of stearic acid rises during bubble dissolution, as it is insoluble, and must eventually achieve full monolayer coverage and a state of compression, lowering the permeability of the

  9. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in non-reactive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Kersten, Sascha R. A.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid phase mass transfer coefficients have been measured in a controlled environment during gas absorption into a liquid and gas desorption from a liquid in a batch operated stirred tank reactor over a wide range of operating conditions. At identical operating conditions, the mass transfer

  10. Gas without grid; Gas ohne Netz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzing, Bernward

    2009-07-15

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the increasing use of liquid gas in the energy supply for a house (liquid petroleum gas) and for motor vehicles (autogas). The composition of liquid gas, its characteristics and storage are described. The quality requirements at liquid gas are in accordance with DIN 51622 (heating gas) and DIN EN 589 (autogas). At present, nearly 600,000 households in the Federal Republic of Germany use liquid gas because their plot of land is not attached to the natural gas grid. Within the range of camping different mixtures of gases are offered as liquid gas depending upon the range of application.

  11. Gas in Protoplanetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Peter; GAP Consortium

    The Herschel open time key programme GASPS is the first large survey of gas in 250 disks around young stars in the critical age range between 1 and 30 Myrs. It uses PACS line scans to detect atomic finestructure lines of [OI] and [CII], and molecular lines of CO, OH and H2O, altogether 450 hours of Herschel observing time. In a large modelling effort, a grid of 300000 thermo-chemical disk models with detailed con-tinuum and line transfer has been computed to interpret the results. In my talk, I will show how the first results fit into the models, and I will discuss how this new atomic and molecular inventory can be used to improve our understanding of disk evolution and planet formation. —

  12. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  13. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  14. Mixing and mass transfer in a pilot scale U-loop bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Leander Adrian Haaning; Villadsen, John; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2017-01-01

    A system capable of handling a large volumetric gas fraction while providing a high gas to liquid mass transfer is a necessity if the metanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus is to be used in single cell protein (SCP) production. In this study mixing time and mass transfer coefficients we...... equipped with static mixers at modest volumetric liquid and gas flow rates. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved...

  15. An electrothermal carbon nanotube gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Takeshi; Chiamori, Heather C; Suter, Marcel; Zhou, Qin; Sosnowchik, Brian D; Lin, Liwei

    2007-12-01

    We show both gas pressure and species sensing capabilities based on the electrothermal effect of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Upon exposure to gaseous environments, the resistance of a heated MWCNT is found to change following the conductive heat-transfer variances of gas molecules. To realize this mechanism, a suspended MWCNT is constructed by synthesis and assembly in localized chemical vapor deposition that is accomplished within seconds via real-time electrical feedback control. Vacuum pressure sensitivity and gas species differentiability are observed and analyzed. Such MWCNT electrothermal sensors are compact, fast and reversible in responses, and fully integratable with microelectronics.

  16. Introduction to heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    SUNDÉN, B

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the basic mechanisms for transfer of heat, Introduction to Heat Transfer gives a deeper and more comprehensive view than existing titles on the subject. Derivation and presentation of analytical and empirical methods are provided for calculation of heat transfer rates and temperature fields as well as pressure drop. The book covers thermal conduction, forced and natural laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer, thermal radiation including participating media, condensation, evaporation and heat exchangers.

  17. 30 CFR 220.015 - Pricing of materiel purchases, transfers, and dispositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pricing of materiel purchases, transfers, and... CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS LEASES § 220.015 Pricing of materiel purchases, transfers, and dispositions. (a... § 220.011(c)(3). (2) Transferred and disposal materiel. An item of materiel, which is acquired by the...

  18. Transfer of gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteling, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    An overview is provided of the activities and results op GATE WP 4.4 entiteld Transfer of Gaming (ToG). This work package has produced the principles and methodologies concerning optimalization and measurement of transfer of training in serious gaming. In addition, true transfer of job-specific

  19. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  20. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I. J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    2011-01-01

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...

  1. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I.J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...

  2. Report on the fifth gas turbine education symposium; Dai 5 kai gas turbine kyoiku symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-20

    This paper reports the fifth gas turbine education symposium held by the Gas Turbine Society of Japan. The symposium was held at the IHI Mizuho factory on July 15 and 16, 1999. Its objective is to have young men, who will bear the future of Japan's technologies, get interested in gas turbines. It is a project held once a year to make visits to gas turbine manufacturing factories in operation, together with lectures given by experts actively at work in their respective fields. The symposium was attended as many as 35 students and 70 young engineers, 105 persons in total. In the first day, after lectures have been given on an outline of gas turbines, and gas turbines and fluid engineering, visits were made to the factory manufacturing aircraft gas turbines, the assembly factory, the engine performance testing facilities, and the power generation facility LM6000 (output of 41200 kW) using gas turbines diverted from aircraft use. Furthermore, tours were made to items of equipment constituting a space station, and turbo pumps for Japanese made robots. The second day was used for lectures on gas turbines and heat transfer engineering, gas turbines and combustion engineering, and gas turbines and material engineering. (NEDO)

  3. [Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing]. Semiannual technical progress report, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this proposed program is to evaluate the potential of rotating gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing by expanding the currently available database. This expansion will focus on application of this technology to environments representative of those typically encountered in natural gas processing plants. Operational and reliability concerns will be addressed while generating pertinent engineering data relating to the mass-transfer process. This report presents results on fluid dynamics and mass transfer coefficient studies.

  4. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Hollow fiber membrane contactor as a gas-liquid model contactor

    OpenAIRE

    Dindore, V. Y.; Brilman, D. W. F.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Microporous hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors have a fixed and well-defined gas-liquid interfacial area. The liquid flow through the hollow fiber is laminar, thus the liquid side hydrodynamics are well known. This allows the accurate calculation of the fiber side physical mass transfer coefficient from first principles. Moreover, in the case of gas-liquid membrane contactor, the gas-liquid exposure time can be varied easily and independently without disturbing the gas-liquid interfa...

  6. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  7. Fuel transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  8. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  9. Heat Transfer in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent

    Heat transfer between the cylinder gas and the piston surface during combustion in large two-stroke uniflow scavenged marine diesel engines has been investigated in the present work. The piston surface experiences a severe thermal load during combustion due to the close proximity of the combustion...... is thus important for the engine manufactures. The piston surface heat transfer was studied in the event of impingement of hot combustion products on the piston during combustion, and an estimate was obtained of the peak heat flux level experienced on the piston surface. The investigation was carried out...... numerically by performing simulations with a CFD code of the heat transfer between gas and wall in a jet impingement configuration where a hot round turbulent gas jet impinged normally onto a wall under conditions approximating the in-cylinder conditions in the engine during combustion. A jet impingement...

  10. Global climate change, technology transfer and trade with complete specialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, V. [Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India). Dept. of Economics; Ruebbelke, D.T.G. [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (Germany). Dept. of Economics

    2007-07-01

    The paper develops a model in which a country with better technology for abatement of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (the North) commits to an international protocol to keep the global GHG emission with a specified limit while it helps the mitigation effort in the other country (the South) with unconditional transfer of abatement technology. It finds out in the autarkic ('no trade') equilibrium that the technology transfer offer from the North is always accepted by the South. The North may offer either a partial or a complete technology transfer. If partial technology transfer is offered it finds out the determinants of the extent of technology transfer. Then it compares the autarkic equilibrium with the equilibrium where tradw with complete specialization occurs and finds out that trade limits the scope of technology transfer as an instrument for mitigation of global GHG emission.

  11. Anaesthesia gas supply: gas cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-09-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  12. Anaesthesia gas supply: Gas cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  13. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  14. Nonparametric Transfer Function Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun M.; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qiwei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a class of nonparametric transfer function models is proposed to model nonlinear relationships between ‘input’ and ‘output’ time series. The transfer function is smooth with unknown functional forms, and the noise is assumed to be a stationary autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) process. The nonparametric transfer function is estimated jointly with the ARMA parameters. By modeling the correlation in the noise, the transfer function can be estimated more efficiently. The parsimonious ARMA structure improves the estimation efficiency in finite samples. The asymptotic properties of the estimators are investigated. The finite-sample properties are illustrated through simulations and one empirical example. PMID:20628584

  15. Design of Solid-Gas Interfaces for Enhanced Thermal Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    and additional qualifiers separated by commas , e.g. Smith, Richard, J, Jr. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES). Self-explanatory. 8...Determination (Clarendon Press, Oxford , 1981). [16] V. R. Cervellera, M. Alberti, and F. Huarte-Larranaga, A molecular dynamics simulation of air

  16. Vibrational energy transfer in gas phase water and ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovis, F.E. Jr.

    1979-09-01

    The V ..-->.. T, R relaxation rate for NH/sub 3/ (..nu../sub 2/) was studied from 198/sup 0/K to 398/sup 0/K by the method of laser-excited vibrational fluorescence. The self-deactivation rate constant decreases from 2.4 ..mu..sec torr/sup -1/ at 198/sup 0/K to 0.65 ..mu..sec/sup -1/ torr/sup -1/ at 398/sup 0/K. The rate constants for deactivation by He, Ar, N/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/ are much smaller and show a weak temperature dependence in the opposite direction. The vibrational relaxation rates of the coupled ..nu../sub 1/, ..nu../sub 3/ stretching level manifold and of the 2..nu../sub 2/ bending level in H/sub 2//sup 18/O was studied from 250/sup 0/K to 400/sup 0/K using th same method as for NH/sub 3/. The ..nu../sub 1/, ..nu../sub 3/ self-deactivation rate goes from 1.4 ..mu..sec/sup -1/ torr/sup -1/ at 250/sup 0/K to 0.48 ..mu..sec-/sup 1/ torr-/sup 1/ at 400/sup 0/K. For 2..nu../sub 2/ it goes from 4.5 ..mu..sec-/sup 1/ torr to 1.9 ..mu..sec/sup -1/ torr/sup -1/. The temperature dependence of the deactivation of both levels by He and Ar is much weaker and the rates are several hundred times slower. Deactivation of ..nu../sub 1/, ..nu../sub 3/ by N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ is measured only at 293/sup 0/K. N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ deactivate ..nu../sub 1/, ..nu../sub 3/ about 5 and CO/sub 2/ about 50 times faster than He or Ar.

  17. Transfer factors: identification of conserved sequences in transfer factor molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, C H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfer factors are small proteins that "transfer" the ability to express cell-mediated immunity from immune donors to non-immune recipients. We developed a process for purifying specific transfer factors to apparent homogeneity. This allowed us to separate individual transfer factors from mixtures containing several transfer factors and to demonstrate the antigen-specificity of transfer factors. Transfer factors have been shown to be an effective means for correction of deficien...

  18. 26 CFR 1.367(a)-4T - Special rules applicable to specified transfers of property (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... depreciation upon the transfer abroad of property previously used in the United States. Paragraphs (c) through... other than in the ordinary course of business. (e) Oil and gas working interests—(1) In general. A working interest in oil and gas properties shall be considered to be transferred for use in the active...

  19. Heat transfer in a recirculatio zone at steady-state and oscillating conditions - the back facing step test case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Panara, D.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.; A.A. van Steenh G.G.M. Stoffels, T.H. van der Meer

    2008-01-01

    Steady state and transient heat transfer is a very important aspect of any combustion process. To properly simulate gas to wall heat transfer in a turbulent flow, an accurate prediction of the flow and the thermal boundary layer is required. A typical gas turbine combustion chamber flow presents

  20. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  1. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  2. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER. VOLUME 2, 1968 (COLLECTION OF ARTICLES),

    Science.gov (United States)

    are quite thoroughly investigated. Also treated are such problems as internal heat and mass transfer during filtration of gases through a porous...boundary layer of a multi-component gas, critical heat fluxes during the boiling of organic heat carriers, the intensification of heat and mass ... transfer , entropy during the melting of polymers, the thermodynamics of plasma flows, process of sublimation by various methods of energy supply, and others

  3. Bubble Impingement and the Mechanisms of Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Anthony; ALBADAWI, ABDULALEEM; MURRAY, DARINA

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED Heat transfer augmentation resulting from the effects of two phase flow can play a significant role in convective cooling applications. To date, the interaction between a rising gas bubble impinging on a heated horizontal surface has received limited attention. Available research has focused on bubble dynamics and the associated heat transfer has not been reported. To address this, this study investigates the effect of a single bubble impinging on a heated horizontal surface. Loc...

  4. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  5. OMEGA Supersonic Gas-Jet Target Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.; Haberberger, D.; Shaw, J. L.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    A supersonic gas-jet target system has been characterized using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, allowing for the study of the gas dynamics during the opening and closing of the valve. Gas-jet targets provide uniform plasmas with flexibility in size and density while also offering excellent diagnostic access to the plasma. The gas jet is the first component in the development of a new laser-plasma interaction platform to be implemented on the OMEGA Laser System. The platform will use a tunable UV laser from OMEGA EP, known as the tunable OMEGA port 9 beam, to facilitate the study of cross-beam energy transfer and the associated mitigation strategies. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. 46 CFR 112.20-10 - Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source. 112... Power Source § 112.20-10 Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source. Simultaneously with the operation of the transfer means under § 112.20-5, the diesel engine or gas turbine driving the final...

  7. Radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of Radiative Heat Transfer describes the basic physics of radiation heat transfer. The book provides models, methodologies, and calculations essential in solving research problems in a variety of industries, including solar and nuclear energy, nanotechnology, biomedical, and environmental. Every chapter of Radiative Heat Transfer offers uncluttered nomenclature, numerous worked examples, and a large number of problems-many based on real world situations-making it ideal for classroom use as well as for self-study. The book's 24 chapters cover the four major areas in the field: surface properties; surface transport; properties of participating media; and transfer through participating media. Within each chapter, all analytical methods are developed in substantial detail, and a number of examples show how the developed relations may be applied to practical problems. It is an extensive solution manual for adopting instructors. Features: most complete text in the field of radiative heat transfer;...

  8. Oxygen transfer and axial dispersion in an aeration tower containing static mixers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, G T; Erickson, L E; Hsu, K H; Fan, L T

    1977-04-01

    Oxygen transfer from gas to liquid under steady-state cocurrent flow conditions was modeled using the dispersion model, and the oxygen transfer coefficients were estimated from available data for a column with Koch motionless mixers. The dispersion in the column was estimated for several different gas and liquid flow rates using steady-state tracer experiments. The estimated oxygen transfer coefficients were compared with those estimated using complete mixing and plug flow models. The results indicate that the dispersion model is the most appropriate model for estimating the mass transfer coefficient from the available data.

  9. Psychoanalytic peregrinations I: Transference and transference neurosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, Richard D

    2002-01-01

    The various meanings of transference and transference neurosis are reviewed with special attention to the various roles transference plays in the psychoanalytic process. A study of the provenance of transference is offered with some remarks on the crucial emphasis on understanding and interpreting the transference in psychoanalytic treatment. The danger of using other types of interventions as being manifestations of countertransference is suggested.

  10. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz G P; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T

    2013-10-29

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  11. CAN A MODEL TRANSFERABILITY FRAMEWORK IMPROVE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budget constraints and policies that limit primary data collection have fueled a practice of transferring estimates (or models to generate estimates) of ecological endpoints from sites where primary data exists to sites where little to no primary data were collected. Whereas benefit transfer has been well studied; there is no comparable framework for evaluating whether model transfer between sites is justifiable. We developed and applied a transferability assessment framework to a case study involving forest carbon sequestration for soils in Tillamook Bay, Oregon. The carbon sequestration capacity of forested watersheds is an important ecosystem service in the effort to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. We used our framework, incorporating three basic steps (model selection, defining context variables, assessing logistical constraints) for evaluating model transferability, to compare estimates of carbon storage capacity derived from two models, COMET-Farm and Yasso. We applied each model to Tillamook Bay and compared results to data extracted from the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) using ArcGIS. Context variables considered were: geographic proximity to Tillamook, dominant tree species, climate and soil type. Preliminary analyses showed that estimates from COMET-Farm were more similar to SSURGO data, likely because model context variables (e.g. proximity to Tillamook and dominant tree species) were identical to those in Tillamook. In contras

  12. Conjugate heat transfer characterization in cooling channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukurel, Beni; Arts, Tony; Selcan, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Cooling technology of gas turbine blades, primarily ensured via internal forced convection, is aimed towards withdrawing thermal energy from the airfoil. To promote heat exchange, the walls of internal cooling passages are lined with repeated geometrical flow disturbance elements and surface non-uniformities. Raising the heat transfer at the expense of increased pressure loss; the goal is to obtain the highest possible cooling effectiveness at the lowest possible pressure drop penalty. The cooling channel heat transfer problem involves convection in the fluid domain and conduction in the solid. This coupled behavior is known as conjugate heat transfer. This experimental study models the effects of conduction coupling on convective heat transfer by applying iso-heat-flux boundary condition at the external side of a scaled serpentine passage. Investigations involve local temperature measurements performed by Infrared Thermography over flat and ribbed slab configurations. Nusselt number distributions along the wetted surface are obtained by means of heat flux distributions, computed from an energy balance within the metal domain. For the flat plate experiments, the effect of conjugate boundary condition on heat transfer is estimated to be in the order of 3%. In the ribbed channel case, the normalized Nusselt number distributions are compared with the basic flow features. Contrasting the findings with other conjugate and convective iso-heat-flux literature, a high degree of overall correlation is evident.

  13. Transfer payments in global climate policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Florian; Bernauer, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Many scientists and policymakers agree that large financial flows from richer to poorer countries will be necessary to reach an agreement on reducing greenhouse-gas emissions enough to keep global warming below 2°C. But the required amounts of transfer payments and justifications for them remain contested. We contribute to this debate by developing an argument for transfer payments that derives from the differences between carbon prices that different countries may set in light of two distinct criteria for appropriate levels of emission reductions. If, for reasons of cost efficiency, a globally uniform carbon price was installed, transfer payments would be required to offset these differences. We combine global climate modelling with regional welfare analysis to estimate regional carbon prices under various climate change, emissions and economic scenarios. The estimated ratios between regional carbon prices are surprisingly robust to different modelling assumptions. To the extent that burden-sharing choices in global climate policy are motivated by regional carbon prices, our analysis allows for a quantification of required transfer payments. Assuming a global carbon price of US$35 per tCO2, for example, our estimates would justify transfer payments of the order of US$15-48 billion per year.

  14. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.); Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University); DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC)

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  15. Technology transfer 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  16. Tendon lengthening and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, F; Bachy, M

    2015-02-01

    Tendon lengthening and transfer are usually indicated for certain neuromuscular disorders, peripheral or central nerve injury, congenital disorder or direct traumatic or degenerative musculotendinous lesion. In musculotendinous lengthening, technique depends on muscle anatomy, degree of correction required, and the need to avoid excessive loss of force. Lengthening within the muscle or aponeurosis is stable. In the tendon, however, it may provide greater gain but is not stable and requires postoperative immobilization to avoid excessive lengthening. Tendon transfer consists in displacing a muscle's tendon insertion in order to restore function. The muscle to be transferred is chosen according to strength, architecture and course, contraction timing, intended direction, synergy and the joint moment arm to be restored. Functions to be restored have to be prioritized, and alternatives to transfer should be identified. The principles of tendon transfer require preoperative assessment of the quality of the tissue through which the transfer is to pass and of the suppleness of the joints concerned. During the procedure, transfer tension should be optimized and the neurovascular bundle should be protected. The method of fixation, whether tendon-to-bone or tendon-to-tendon suture, should be planned according to local conditions and the surgeon's experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural gas monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  18. Development of Sic Gas Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Okojie, R. S.; Beheim, G. M.; Thomas, V.; Chen, L.; Lukco, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have significant potential to address the gas sensing needs of aerospace applications such as emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, and fire detection. However, in order to reach that potential, a range of technical challenges must be overcome. These challenges go beyond the development of the basic sensor itself and include the need for viable enabling technologies to make a complete gas sensor system: electrical contacts, packaging, and transfer of information from the sensor to the outside world. This paper reviews the status at NASA Glenn Research Center of SiC Schottky diode gas sensor development as well as that of enabling technologies supporting SiC gas sensor system implementation. A vision of a complete high temperature microfabricated SiC gas sensor system is proposed. In the long-term, it is believed that improvements in the SiC semiconductor material itself could have a dramatic effect on the performance of SiC gas sensor systems.

  19. A heat transfer textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lienhard, John H

    2011-01-01

    This introduction to heat transfer offers advanced undergraduate and graduate engineering students a solid foundation in the subjects of conduction, convection, radiation, and phase-change, in addition to the related topic of mass transfer. A staple of engineering courses around the world for more than three decades, it has been revised and updated regularly by the authors, a pair of recognized experts in the field. The text addresses the implications, limitations, and meanings of many aspects of heat transfer, connecting the subject to its real-world applications and developing students' ins

  20. Emergency gas pipeline transportation with computer documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    Methods developed by the staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in cooperation with the natural gas industry to expedite the emergency transfer of natural gas are described. The majority of the United States' natural gas fields are concentrated in the south central region, comprised of Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas together with adjacent areas offshore in the Gulf of Mexico. This is the major source area for gas consumed in the northern, northeastern, southeastern, and far western population/industrial centers. The geographic pattern of gas flow through interstate pipelines emanates in gas producing areas and terminates in gas consuming areas. There are many other areas in the United States which produce gas but the amounts are comparatively small compared with Texas, Louisiana, and offshore Louisiana production. The various interconnections associated with a given pipeline for both receipts and deliveries are defined. The maximum volume capability in MMCFD and the volume being delivered in MMCFD are to be considered as estimated volumes. These volumes do not represent absolute volumes that are available but rather volumes for general planning purposes to define the magnitude of each interconnection. If an actual transportation route is desired, a routing may be derived from this report which then must be checked for actual volumes at a particular point in time. It is always possible that at the time of interest, there is no available capacity or deliveries.The data and information are arranged by pipeline company name followed by which companies supply gas to the named pipeline and to which companies the named pipeline delivers gas. Each receipt or delivery location is defined by the county and state.

  1. BASIC program calculates flue gas energy balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Engineers always seek cost-cutting, energy-efficient ways to operate boilers and waste-heat recovery systems. The starting point in the design or performance evaluation of any heat transfer equipment is an energy balance calculation. This easy-to-use BASIC program tackles this problem. Using the gas stream analysis as percent weight or volume, the program calculates inlet and exit temperatures, heat duty, the gas stream's molecular weight, etc. This program is a definite must for the plant engineering notebook.

  2. Mathematical modeling of radiant heating of a closed rectangular area under conditions of convective heat transfer at the external boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nee Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of radiant heating of a closed rectangular area under conditions of convective heat transfer at the external boundaries is passed. The fields of temperature and stream function, illustrating the unsteady nature of the heat transfer were obtained. The extent influence of convective heat transfer at the external boundaries on the circulating flows formation in the gas cavity are shown.

  3. The gas electron multiplier (GEM)

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Labbé, J C; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe operating priciples and results obtained with a new detector component: the Gas Electrons Multiplier (GEM). Consisting of a thin composite sheet with two metal layers separated by a thin insulator, and pierced by a regular matrix of open channels, the GEM electrode, inserted on the path of electrons in a gas detector, allows to transfer the charge with an amplification factor approaching ten. Uniform response and high rate capability are demonstrated. Coupled to another device, multiwire or micro-strip chamber, the GEM electrode permit to obtain higher gains or less critical operation; separation of the sensitive (conversion) volume and the detection volume has other advantages, as a built-in delay (useful for triggering purposes) and the possibility of applying high fields on the photo-cathode of ring imaging detectors to improve efficiency. Multiple GEM grids in the same gas volume allow to obtain large amplification factors in a succession of steps, leading to the realization of an effective ga...

  4. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  5. TRANSFER PRICING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Kirova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses methods of transfer pricing as a set of methods and operations on the justification of compliance rates in a transaction between related parties market level.

  6. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  7. Analytical heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin

    2012-01-01

    … it will complete my library … [and] complement the existing literature on heat transfer. It will be of value for both graduate students and faculty members.-Bengt Sunden, Lund University, Sweden

  8. Theories Supporting Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews theories about factors affecting the transfer of training, including theories on motivation (expectancy, equity, goal setting), training transfer design (identical elements, principle, near and far), and transfer climate (organizational). (Contains 36 references.) (SK)

  9. Gas Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Yunusa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a review of different technologies for gas sensors is presented. The different types of gas sensors technologies including catalytic gas sensor, electrochemical gas sensors, thermal conductivity gas sensor, optical gas sensor and acoustic gas sensor are discussed together with their principle of operation. The Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensor technology is discussed in greater detail. The advantages and disadvantages of each sensor technology are also highlighted. All these technologies have been used for several decades for the development of highly sensitive and responsive gas sensors for the detection of flammable and hazardous gases. However, for improved sensitivity and selectivity for these sensors, future trends and outlook for researchers are suggested in the conclusion of this article.

  10. Heat transfer II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1988-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Heat Transfer II reviews correlations for forced convection, free convection, heat exchangers, radiation heat transfer, and boiling and condensation.

  11. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Advances in heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer is the exchange of heat energy between a system and its surrounding environment, which results from a temperature difference and takes place by means of a process of thermal conduction, mechanical convection, or electromagnetic radiation. Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university-level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than is allowable in either journals or texts.

  13. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  14. Wave-Related Reynolds Number Parameterizations of CO2 and DMS Transfer Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumer, Sophia E.; Zappa, Christopher J.; Blomquist, Byron W.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, Alejandro; Edson, James B.; Brooks, Ian M.; Huebert, Barry J.

    2017-10-01

    Predicting future climate hinges on our understanding of and ability to quantify air-sea gas transfer. The latter relies on parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity k, which represents physical mass transfer mechanisms and is usually parameterized as a nonlinear function of wind forcing. In an attempt to reduce uncertainties in k, this study explores empirical parameterizations that incorporate both wind speed and sea state dependence via wave-wind and breaking Reynolds numbers, RH and RB. Analysis of concurrent eddy covariance gas transfer and measured wavefield statistics supplemented by wave model hindcasts shows for the first time that wave-related Reynolds numbers collapse four open ocean data sets that have a wind speed dependence of CO2 transfer velocity ranging from lower than quadratic to cubic. Wave-related Reynolds number and wind speed show comparable performance for parametrizing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) which, because of its higher solubility, is less affected by bubble-mediated exchange associated with wave breaking.

  15. Influence of radiation heat transfer during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazares R, R. I.; Epinosa P, G.; Varela H, J. R.; Vazquez R, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Polo L, M. A., E-mail: ricardo-cazares@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work is to determine the influence of the radiation heat transfer on an average fuel channel during a severe accident of a BWR nuclear power plant. The analysis considers the radiation heat transfer in a participating medium, where the gases inside the system participate in the radiation heat transfer. We consider the steam-water mixture as an isothermal gray gas, and the boundaries of the system as a gray diffuse isothermal surface for the clad and refractory surfaces for the rest, and consider the average fuel channel as an enclosure system. During a severe accident, generation and diffusion of hydrogen begin at high temperature range (1,273 to 2,100 K), and the fuel rod cladding oxidation, but the hydrogen generated do not participate in the radiation heat transfer because it does not have any radiation properties. The heat transfer process in the fuel assembly is considered with a reduced order model, and from this, the convection and the radiation heat transfer is introduced in the system. In this paper, a system with and without the radiation heat transfer term was calculated and analyzed in order to obtain the influence of the radiation heat transfer on the average fuel channel. We show the behavior of radiation heat transfer effects on the temporal evolution of the hydrogen concentration and temperature profiles in a fuel assembly, where a stream of steam is flowing. Finally, this study is a practical complement for more accurate modeling of a severe accident analysis. (Author)

  16. Ultrasound in gas–liquid systems: Effects on solubility and mass transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Laugier, Frédéric; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri

    2008-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the pseudo-solubility of nitrogen in water and on gas–liquid mass transfer kinetics has been investigated in an autoclave reactor equipped with a gas induced impeller. In order to use organic liquids and to investigate the effect of pressure, gas–liquid mass transfer coefficient was calculated from the evolution of autoclave pressure during gas absorption to avoid any side-effects of ultrasound on the concentrations measurements. Ultrasound effect on the apparent s...

  17. A study of heat-transfer processes in a countercurrent cyclone heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.G. Abuov; P.A. Kovgan [TOO Gornoe Byuro (Mining Bureau), Alma Aty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-07-01

    Heat-transfer processes in a countercurrent cyclone heat exchanger are investigated on a pilot installation. Volumetric coefficients of heat transfer from gases to a flow of solid particles are determined during operation with tangentially swirled flow of gas suspension, separation of solid particles on the heat-exchanger walls, and deceleration of flue gas flows as they collide with the charge mixture fed to the apparatus.

  18. Gas purification using membrane gas absorption processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dindore, V.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the increasing energy demand and the abundance of low quality natural gas reservoirs containing high percentages of CO2, considerable attention is given to the bulk removal of CO2 and upgrading of low quality natural gas. The main goal in doing so is to increase the heating value of natural

  19. Knowledge transfer isn’t simply transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li; Napier, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines micro dynamic aspects of knowledge sharing and learning in international joint venture settings. Learning of expatriate and local managers appears far more complex and mutually dependent than conventionally speculated in existing literature. The paper proposes that the effect...... and outcome of knowledge transfer from joint venture parents and learning in IJVs are dependent on how individual managers (including both expatriate and local) learn, perceive their learning roles, and enact a learning agenda. Empirical evidence is drawn from two cases of international joint ventures between...

  20. Fixing or Transferring Environmental Problems in the Transport Sector?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walnum, Hans Jakob

    energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector. The thesis fosters an in depth discussion of how geographical transfer effects, trade off effects and rebound effects are present in energy and climatic mitigation strategies in the transport sector. A better understanding of this could...

  1. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the

  2. CVD transfer-free graphene for sensing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiattarella, Chiara; Vollebregt, S.; Polichetti, T.; Alfano, B.; Massera, E.; Miglietta, Maria L.; Di Francia, Girolamo; Sarro, P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The sp2 carbon-based allotropes have been extensively exploited for the realization of gas sensors in the recent years because of their high conductivity and large specific surface area. A study on graphene that was synthetized by means of a novel transfer-free fabrication approach and

  3. Gas–Liquid Mass Transfer Coefficient in Stirred Tank Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yawalkar, Archis A.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2002-01-01

    Volumetric gas–liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) data available in the literature for larger tanks (T = 0.39 m to 2.7 m) have been analyzed on the basis of relative dispersion parameter, N/Ncd. It was observed that at a given superficial gas velocity (VG), kLa values were approximately the same

  4. Quantification of the effect of CO transfer on titrimetric techniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... Keywords: bioprocess monitoring, sensors, titration, gas-liquid mass transfer, hydrogen ion production, aerobic processes. Nomenclature ... tration is altered, which again results in a change to the hydrogen ion concentration: ... (2002a; b) applied the method to aerobic car- bon oxidation processes.

  5. GAS MOVEMENT IN ROTARY TILTING FURNACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of gas movement and heat and mass transfer processes in the rotary tilting furnace (RTF at the heat treatment of disperse materials. The study was performed through computer modeling using software packages ANSYS CFX and Solid Works Flow Simulation. The results were used to design RTF with different capacity and application and helped to improve their technical and economic characteristics.

  6. Lysogenic Transfer of Group A Streptococcus Superantigen Gene among Streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtek, Ivo; Pirzada, Zaid A.; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Mastny, Markus; Janapatla, Rajendra P.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    A group A Streptococcus(GAS) isolate,serotypeM12,recovered from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was analyzed for superantigen-carrying prophages, revealing 149, which encodes superantigen SSA. Sequence analysis of the att-L proximal region of 149 showed that the phage had a mosaic nature. Remarkably, we successfully obtained lysogenic conversion of GAS clinical isolates of various M serotypes (M1, M3, M5, M12, M19, M28, and M94), as well as of group C Streptococcus equisimilis (GCSE) clinical isolates, via transfer of a recombinant phage 149::Kmr. Phage149::Kmr from selected lysogenized GAS and GCSE strains could be transferred back to M12 GAS strains. Our data indicate that horizontal transfer of lysogenic phages among GAS can occur across the M-type barrier; these data also provide further support for the hypothesis that toxigenic conversion can occur via lysogeny between species. Streptococci might employ this mechanism specifically to allow more efficient adaptation to changing host challenges, potentially leading to fitter and more virulent clones. PMID:18179387

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  8. Effects of superficial gas velocity on process dynamics in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, B.

    2014-06-01

    Present work analyzes the flow hydrodynamics and mass transfer mechanisms in double Rushton and CD-6 impeller on wide range (0.0075-0.25 m/s) of superficial gas velocity ( v g) in a gas-liquid phase bioreactor by employing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The volume averaged velocity magnitude and dissipation rate are found higher with increasing superficial gas velocity. Higher relative power draw ( P g/ P 0) is predicted in CD-6 than the Rushton impeller but no significant difference in volume averaged mass transfer coefficient ( k L a) observed between these two types of impeller. The ratio of power draw with mass transfer coefficient has been found higher in CD-6 impeller (25-50 %) than the Rushton impeller.

  9. A versatile gas interface for routine radiocarbon analysis with a gas ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: wacker@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Fahrni, S.M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Hajdas, I. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Molnar, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Synal, H.-A. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Szidat, S. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Zhang, Y.L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, 3012 Berne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    In 2010 more than 600 radiocarbon samples were measured with the gas ion source at the MIni CArbon DAting System (MICADAS) at ETH Zurich and the number of measurements is rising quickly. While most samples contain less than 50 {mu}g C at present, the gas ion source is attractive as well for larger samples because the time-consuming graphitization is omitted. Additionally, modern samples are now measured down to 5 per-mill counting statistics in less than 30 min with the recently improved gas ion source. In the versatile gas handling system, a stepping-motor-driven syringe presses a mixture of helium and sample CO{sub 2} into the gas ion source, allowing continuous and stable measurements of different kinds of samples. CO{sub 2} can be provided in four different ways to the versatile gas interface. As a primary method, CO{sub 2} is delivered in glass or quartz ampoules. In this case, the CO{sub 2} is released in an automated ampoule cracker with 8 positions for individual samples. Secondly, OX-1 and blank gas in helium can be provided to the syringe by directly connecting gas bottles to the gas interface at the stage of the cracker. Thirdly, solid samples can be combusted in an elemental analyzer or in a thermo-optical OC/EC aerosol analyzer where the produced CO{sub 2} is transferred to the syringe via a zeolite trap for gas concentration. As a fourth method, CO{sub 2} is released from carbonates with phosphoric acid in septum-sealed vials and loaded onto the same trap used for the elemental analyzer. All four methods allow complete automation of the measurement, even though minor user input is presently still required. Details on the setup, versatility and applications of the gas handling system are given.

  10. Mobile Measurements of Gas and Particle Emissions from Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Goetz, J. D.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Fortner, E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Knighton, W. B.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Production of natural gas in the Marcellus shale is increasing rapidly due to the vast quantities of natural gas stored in the formation. Transient and long-term activities have associated emissions to the atmosphere of methane, volatile organic compounds, NOx, particulates and other species from gas production and transport infrastructure. In the summer of 2012, a team of researchers from Drexel University and Aerodyne Research deployed the Aerodyne mobile laboratory (AML) and measured in-situ concentrations of gas-phase and aerosol chemical components in the main gas producing regions of Pennsylvania, with the overall goal of understanding the impacts to regional ozone and particulate matter (PM) concentrations. State-of-the-art instruments including quantum cascade laser systems, proton transfer mass spectrometry, tunable diode lasers and a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer, were used quantify concentrations of pollutants of interest. Chemical species measured include methane, ethane, NO, NO2, CO, CO2, SO2, and many volatile organic compounds, and aerosol size and chemical composition. Tracer-release techniques were employed to link sources with emissions and to quantify emission rates from gas facilities, in order to understand the regional burden of these chemical species from oil and gas development in the Marcellus. Measurements were conducted in two regions of Pennsylvania: the NE region that is predominantly dry gas (95% + methane), and the SW region where wet gas (containing greater than 5% higher hydrocarbons) is found. Regional scale measurements of current levels of air pollutants will be shown and will put into context how further development of the gas resource in one of the largest natural gas fields in the world impacts air quality in a region upwind of the highly urbanized east coast corridor.

  11. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  12. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  13. Gas gangrene (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas gangrene is a severe form of gangrene (tissue death) caused by the bacterium Clostridium perfringens. Patients ... vascular diseases are more prone to spontaneously develop gas gangrene, which is rapidly progressive and often fatal.

  14. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  15. Natural Gas STAR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Voluntary Methane Programs encourage oil and natural gas companies to adopt cost-effective technologies and practices that improve operational efficiency and reduce emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  16. Sulphur hexafluoride gas detection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stolper, R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This poster describes the development process of an electro-optical based solution for detecting and locating SF6 gas leaks at gas insulated switch gear. The principal technologies that were researched are explained with their advantages...

  17. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  19. Effects of fouling in heat transfer equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States))

    1993-03-04

    Fouling between the hot and cold streams in heat transfer equipment is a major reason boilers, heaters, and heat exchangers do not perform according to original specifications. Commonly used fluids such as water and air have well-established fouling factors. However, the factors for some industrial effluents, particularly for flue gas streams resulting from the combustion or incineration of solid or liquid fuels, can be determined only through operating experience. The paper discusses the signs of fouling, and how expensive fouling can be illustrating the second with three example problems.

  20. Natural Gas Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    Natural gas powers about 150,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly 22 million vehicles worldwide. Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are a good choice for high-mileage fleets -- such as buses, taxis, and refuse vehicles -- that are centrally fueled or operate within a limited area or along a route with natural gas fueling stations. This brochure highlights the advantages of natural gas as an alternative fuel, including its domestic availability, established distribution network, relatively low cost, and emissions benefits.

  1. Natural Gas Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-08

    Natural gas powers about 150,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly 22 million vehicles worldwide. Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are a good choice for high-mileage fleets -- such as buses, taxis, and refuse vehicles -- that are centrally fueled or operate within a limited area or along a route with natural gas fueling stations. This brochure highlights the advantages of natural gas as an alternative fuel, including its domestic availability, established distribution network, relatively low cost, and emissions benefits.

  2. Natural gas annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Radial Gas Dispersion Coefficients in a Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Štefanica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a fluidized bed boiler, the combustion efficiency, the NOX formation rate, flue gas desulphurization and fluidized bed heat transfer are all ruled by the gas distribution. In this investigation, the tracer gas method is used for evaluating the radial gas dispersion coefficient. CO2 is used as a tracer gas, and the experiment is carried out in a bubbling fluidized bed cold model. Ceramic balls are used as the bed material. The effect of gas velocity, radial position and bed height is investigated.

  4. Study on direct measurement of diesel exhaust gas flow rate. Development of ultrasonic exhaust gas flowmeter; Diesel hai gas ryuryo no chokusetsu sokuteiho ni kansuru kenkyu. Choonpa hai gas ryuryokeino kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, A.; Takamoto, M.; Yamzaki, H. [National Research Laboratory of Meteology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hosoi, K. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan); Arai, S.; Shimizu, K. [Kaijo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-25

    The partial flow dilution method is one of the typical measurement methods for particulate matter emission from diesel engines. In this method, exhaust gas at a transient flow rate should be transferred to a dilution tunnel at a constant ratio of exhaust gas. The present partial flow dilution method is used under steady-state engine operating conditions in lieu of direct flow rate measurement of exhaust gas. A more practical control of exhaust emission is, however, required world widely; therefore development of an exhaust gas flowmeter is indispensable in the partial flow dilution method for transient engine operating conditions. An ultrasonic exhaust gas flowmeter has been developed and been demonstrated to be capable of measuring the exhaust gas flow rate with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  5. Investigation of gas flow in SAGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canas, C.; Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Edmunds, N. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Non-condensable gases play an important role in the thermal efficiency of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) processes. The accurate characterization of gas flow in SAGD is needed in order to predicts its potential impact on process performance. This study used flow equations to describe viscous drag in a gas-water-oil system. A 3-phase flow analysis was used to predict the amount of gas produced by viscous drag in 2 geometries: (1) flow in a capillary tube; and (2) the flow of a descending film on a plate. The functionality analysis described the response of the dragged gas to changes in operating and reservoir conditions. A 12.6{sup 3} oil draining zone volume was modelled as a bundle of capillaries with a porosity of 0.35. Capillary length was 2 meters. Results of the study showed that a portion of the gas in the steam chamber flows downwards, and was caused by the viscous drag of the falling liquids. Momentum transfer was highly dependent on operational and reservoir conditions. It was concluded that amounts of gas that flow downwards will increase when operating temperatures increase in the SAGD chamber. 17 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  6. Gas Between the Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interstellar gas in galaxies is heated by stellar radiation and cosmic rays and it also cools through radiation. We take a detailed look at these processes in order to understand the thermal state of equilibrium of the interstellar gas. This gas also manifests itself in different 'phases'– molecular, neutral atomic and ionized ...

  7. NREL + Southern California Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdahl, Sonja E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-09

    NREL and Southern California Gas Company are evaluating a new 'power-to-gas' approach - one that produces methane through a biological pathway and uses the expansive natural gas infrastructure to store it. This approach has the potential to change how the power industry approaches renewable generation and energy storage.

  8. Analysis of Combustion and Heat Transfer in a Porous Graphite Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    dom- inates, the mean free path of the gas (in this case, oxygen), must be calculated. Using the expression given by Treybal (181 , w = (3.21j/P) (RT/2...Myers, J.E., Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1974. 18. Treybal , R.E., Mass Transfer Operations, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York

  9. 78 FR 11638 - Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice of Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice... Docket Nos. PR13-29-000, and PR13-30-000 (not consolidated), Michigan Consolidated Gas Company (MichCon) and DTE Gas Company (DTE Gas) filed to institute a name change to both itself from MichCon to DTE Gas...

  10. 33 CFR 127.105 - Layout and spacing of marine transfer area for LNG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Layout and spacing of marine transfer area for LNG. 127.105 Section 127.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.105 Layout and...

  11. Neutron signal transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pleinert, H; Lehmann, E

    1999-01-01

    A new method called neutron signal transfer analysis has been developed for quantitative determination of hydrogenous distributions from neutron radiographic measurements. The technique is based on a model which describes the detector signal obtained in the measurement as a result of the action of three different mechanisms expressed by signal transfer functions. The explicit forms of the signal transfer functions are determined by Monte Carlo computer simulations and contain only the distribution as a variable. Therefore an unknown distribution can be determined from the detector signal by recursive iteration. This technique provides a simple and efficient tool for analysis of this type while also taking into account complex effects due to the energy dependency of neutron interaction and single and multiple scattering. Therefore this method provides an efficient tool for precise quantitative analysis using neutron radiography, as for example quantitative determination of moisture distributions in porous buil...

  12. Tech transfer outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, S. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. Tech Transfer Outreach '' was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  13. Diffusion and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vrentas, James S

    2013-01-01

    The book first covers the five elements necessary to formulate and solve mass transfer problems, that is, conservation laws and field equations, boundary conditions, constitutive equations, parameters in constitutive equations, and mathematical methods that can be used to solve the partial differential equations commonly encountered in mass transfer problems. Jump balances, Green’s function solution methods, and the free-volume theory for the prediction of self-diffusion coefficients for polymer–solvent systems are among the topics covered. The authors then use those elements to analyze a wide variety of mass transfer problems, including bubble dissolution, polymer sorption and desorption, dispersion, impurity migration in plastic containers, and utilization of polymers in drug delivery. The text offers detailed solutions, along with some theoretical aspects, for numerous processes including viscoelastic diffusion, moving boundary problems, diffusion and reaction, membrane transport, wave behavior, sedime...

  14. Heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Karwa, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents the classical treatment of the problems of heat transfer in an exhaustive manner with due emphasis on understanding of the physics of the problems. This emphasis is especially visible in the chapters on convective heat transfer. Emphasis is laid on the solution of steady and unsteady two-dimensional heat conduction problems. Another special feature of the book is a chapter on introduction to design of heat exchangers and their illustrative design problems. A simple and understandable treatment of gaseous radiation has been presented. A special chapter on flat plate solar air heater has been incorporated that covers thermo-hydraulic modeling and simulation. The chapter on mass transfer has been written looking specifically at the needs of the students of mechanical engineering. The book includes a large number and variety of solved problems with supporting line diagrams. The author has avoided duplicating similar problems, while incorporating more application-based examples. All the end-...

  15. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Mengüç, M Pinar

    2011-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of the radiative behavior and properties of materials, the fifth edition of this classic textbook describes the physics of radiative heat transfer, development of relevant analysis methods, and associated mathematical and numerical techniques. Retaining the salient features and fundamental coverage that have made it popular, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, Fifth Edition has been carefully streamlined to omit superfluous material, yet enhanced to update information with extensive references. Includes four new chapters on Inverse Methods, Electromagnetic Theory, Scattering and Absorption by Particles, and Near-Field Radiative Transfer Keeping pace with significant developments, this book begins by addressing the radiative properties of blackbody and opaque materials, and how they are predicted using electromagnetic theory and obtained through measurements. It discusses radiative exchange in enclosures without any radiating medium between the surfaces-and where heat conduction...

  16. Heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baehr, Hans Dieter

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook provides a solid foundation of knowledge on the principles of heat and mass transfer and shows how to solve problems by applying modern methods. The basic theory is developed systematically, exploring in detail the solution methods to all important problems.   The thoroughly revised 3rd edition includes an introduction to the numerical solution of Finite Elements. A new section on heat and mass transfer in porous media has also been added.   The book will be useful not only to upper-level and graduate students, but also to practicing scientists and engineers, offering a firm understanding of the principles of heat and mass transfer, and showing how to solve problems by applying modern methods. Many completed examples and numerous exercises with solutions facilitate learning and understanding, and an appendix includes data on key properties of important substances.

  17. Panel discussion: Gas emissions with diesel efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The second of three papers in the panel discussion outlined the characteristics of spark-ignited natural gas (SING) engines. Currently, the SING engine is considered less efficient than a diesel engine because of the reduced compression ratio, the use of air-throttles, retarded ignition for low NOx, and increased heat transfer. To improve upon these characteristics and to make the SING engine equal to, or even surpass the diesel engine in efficiency, more research work needs to be done on advanced controls. These include (knock, misfire, humidity detection), various ignition enhancements (variable energy/gap plug, long-life plug, laser ignition), and possibly camless operation (cylinder deactivation, throttleless operation). The late-cycle High Pressure Gas Injection (LaCHIP) as an alternate means of improving the efficiency of natural gas engines was also described.

  18. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers.

  19. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Lackowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers.

  20. A gas-surface interaction kernel for diatomic rarefied gas flows based on the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Gorji, M.; Jenny, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a kinetic wall boundary model for diatomic gas molecules. The model is derived by generalizing the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord gas-surface interaction kernel in order to account for the gas internal degrees of freedom. Here, opposed to the extensions by Lord ["Some extensions to the Cercignani-Lampis gas-surface scattering kernel," Phys. Fluids 3, 706-710 (1991)], energy exchange between different molecular modes is honored and thus, different physical phenomena arising from inelastic gas-surface collisions can be described. For practical implementations of the model, a Monte-Carlo algorithm was devised, which significantly reduces the computational cost associated with sampling. Comparisons of model predictions with experimental and molecular dynamics data exhibit good agreement. Moreover, simulation studies are performed to demonstrate how energy transfers between different modes due to wall collisions can be exploited for gas separation.

  1. Influence of pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F68 is one of the most used shear protecting additives in cell culture cultivations. It is well known from literature that such surface-active surfactants lower the surface tension at the gas-liquid interface, which influences the mass transfer. In this study, the effect of Pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer in aqueous solutions was examined. Therefore, the gassing in/gassing out method and bubble size measurements were used. At low concentrations of 0.02 g/L, a 50% reduction on mass transfer was observed for all tested spargers and working conditions. An explanation of the observed effects by means of Higbie's penetration or Dankwerts surface renewal theory was applied. It could be demonstrated that the suppressed movement of the bubble surface layer is the main cause for the significant drop down of the kL a-values. For Pluronic F68 concentrations above 0.1 g/L, it was observed that it comes to changes in bubble appearance and bubble size strongly dependent on the sparger type. By using the bubble size measurement data, it could be shown that only small changes in mass transfer coefficient (kL ) take place above the critical micelle concentration. Further changes on overall mass transfer at higher Pluronic F68 concentrations are mainly based on increasing of gas holdup and, more importantly, by increasing of the surface area available for mass transfer. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Heat Transfer Modeling for Rigid High-Temperature Fibrous Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through a high-temperature, high-porosity, rigid multiple-fiber fibrous insulation was modeled using a thermal model previously used to model heat transfer in flexible single-fiber fibrous insulation. The rigid insulation studied was alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) at densities between 130 and 260 kilograms per cubic meter. The model consists of using the diffusion approximation for radiation heat transfer, a semi-empirical solid conduction model, and a standard gas conduction model. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were estimated from steady-state thermal measurements in nitrogen gas at various temperatures and environmental pressures. The heat transfer modeling methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard thermal conductivity measurements, and steady-state thermal measurements in helium and carbon dioxide gases. The heat transfer model is applicable over the temperature range of 300 to 1360 K, pressure range of 0.133 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa, and over the insulation density range of 130 to 260 kilograms per cubic meter in various gaseous environments.

  3. Elementary heat transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Stephen; Hartnett, James P

    1976-01-01

    Elementary Heat Transfer Analysis provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of the nature of transient heat conduction. This book presents a thorough understanding of the thermal energy equation and its application to boundary layer flows and confined and unconfined turbulent flows. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the use of heat transfer coefficients in formulating the flux condition at phase interface. This text then explains the specification as well as application of flux boundary conditions. Other chapters consider a derivation of the tra

  4. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ariane transfer vehicle scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Norbert; Cougnet, Claude

    1990-10-01

    ESA's Ariane Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is a vehicle design concept for the transfer of payloads from Ariane 5 launch vehicle orbit insertion to a space station, on the basis of the Ariane 5 program-developed Upper Stage Propulsion Module and Vehicle Equipment Bay. The ATV is conceived as a complement to the Hermes manned vehicle for lower cost unmanned carriage of logistics modules and other large structural elements, as well as waste disposal. It is also anticipated that the ATV will have an essential role in the building block transportation logistics of any prospective European space station.

  6. Knowledge Transfers following Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2001-01-01

    study of 54 Danish acquisitions taking place abroad from 1994 to 1998 demonstrated that when there was a high level of trust between the acquiring firm and the target firm before the take-over, then medium and strong tie-binding knowledge transfer mechanisms, such as project groups and job rotation......Prior relations between the acquiring firm and the target company pave the way for knowledge transfers subsequent to the acquisitions. One major reason is that through the market-based relations the two actors build up mutual trust and simultaneously they learn how to communicate. An empirical...

  7. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyan, James; Baccus, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) have been designed such that they can serve the same purpose as a Cargo Transfer Bag, the suitcase-shaped common logistics carrying bag for Shuttle and the International Space Station. After use as a cargo carrier, a regular CTB becomes trash, whereas the MCTB can be unzipped, unsnapped, and unfolded to be reused. Reuse ideas that have been investigated include partitions, crew quarters, solar radiation storm shelters, acoustic blankets, and forward osmosis water processing.

  8. Transfer Pricing Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dennis Ramsdahl

    Konferencebidraget indeholder en kritisk analyse af transfer pricing reglerne på henholdsvis moms og indkomstskatterettens område med henblik på en diskussion af, det er hensigtsmæssigt med en harmonisering af reglerne på tværs af de to retsområder......Konferencebidraget indeholder en kritisk analyse af transfer pricing reglerne på henholdsvis moms og indkomstskatterettens område med henblik på en diskussion af, det er hensigtsmæssigt med en harmonisering af reglerne på tværs af de to retsområder...

  9. Incremental Identification of Reaction and Mass-Transfer Kinetics Using the Concept of Extents

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt, Nirav; Amrhein, Michael; Bonvin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a variation of the incremental approach to identify reaction and mass-transfer kinetics (rate expressions and the corresponding rate parameters) from concentration measurements for both homogeneous and gas-liquid reaction systems. This incremental approach proceeds in two steps: (i) computation of the extents of reaction and mass transfer from concentration measurements without explicit knowledge of the reaction and mass-transfer rate expressions, and (ii) estimation of ...

  10. Proceedings of the natural gas research and development contractors review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R.D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to present results of the research in the DOE-sponsored Natural Gas Program, and simultaneously to provide a forum for real-time technology transfer, to the active research community, to the interested public, and to the natural gas industry, who are the primary users of this technology. The current research focus is to expand the base of near-term and mid-term economic gas resources through research activities in Eastern Tight Gas, Western Tight Gas, Secondary Gas Recovery (increased recovery of gas from mature fields); to enhance utilization, particularly of remote gas resources through research in Natural Gas to Liquids Conversion; and to develop additional, long term, potential gas resources through research in Gas Hydrates and Deep Gas. With the increased national emphasis on the use of natural gas, this forum has been expanded to include summaries of DOE-sponsored research in energy-related programs and perspectives on the importance of gas to future world energy. Thirty-two papers and fourteen poster presentations were given in seven formal, and one informal, sessions: Three general sessions (4 papers); Western Tight Gas (6 papers); Eastern Tight Gas (8 papers); Conventional/Speculative Resources (8 papers); and Gas to Liquids (6 papers). Individual reports are processed separately on the data bases.

  11. Kissing heat transfer between the wraps of a scroll pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunder, S.; Smith, J.L. Jr. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Conductances associated with the various modes of internal heat transfer in a scroll pump are estimated. Heat transfer through transient contact between scroll wraps (kissing heat transfer) is found to be a dominant mode of heat transfer between discharge and suction sides of the pump. Such heat transfer is characterized by significant steady-state heat fluxes across the wraps of a scroll pump. Experiments on a specially instrumented scroll compressor provide evidence of significant heat fluxes across the wraps of the scroll pump. Estimation of the contact angle between wraps based on Hertzian stresses, as well as an oil film demonstrate that kissing heat transfer is a plausible mechanism of heat transfer in these pumps. Contact angles inferred from experimental data are also shown to be of the same order of magnitude as those predicted by Hertzian stress calculations. It is shown that the heat fluxes observed in the kissing heat transfer experiment are too large to be explained by convection between gas and wall in the scroll pump.

  12. Flue gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kwan H.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    1985-01-01

    A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

  13. Natural gas leak mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A [Livermore, CA; Luong, Amy Khai [Dublin, CA; Kulp, Thomas J [Livermore, CA; Devdas, Sanjay [Albany, CA

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  14. Beyond unidirectional knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Neergaard, Helle; Bjerregaard, Toke

    2012-01-01

    Using theory on technology transfer and on trust and an indepth study of nine university departments and nineteen science-based small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the authors explore the nature and direction of knowledge flows during university-industry R&D collaboration. More specifically...

  15. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, P. P. [Molecular Physics Research, 6547 Kristina Ursula Court, Falls Church, Virginia 22044 (United States)

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  16. Investigating Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Stuart A.

    Understanding Physics is a great end in itself, but is also crucial to keep pace with developments in modern technology. Wireless power transfer, known to many only as a means to charge electric toothbrushes, will soon be commonplace in charging phones, electric cars and implanted medical devices. This article outlines how to produce and use a…

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  18. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while th...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  19. Investigating Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Stuart A.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding Physics is a great end in itself, but is also crucial to keep pace with developments in modern technology. Wireless power transfer, known to many only as a means to charge electric toothbrushes, will soon be commonplace in charging phones, electric cars and implanted medical devices. This article outlines how to produce and use a…

  20. Interface transfer of equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, I.J.

    1989-04-01

    This article details the interface transfer of heavy-duty face equipment from 5's to 6's face in the Great Row Seam at Silverdale Colliery, British Coal, Western Area. The salvaged face was roofbolted using leg-mounted Wombat drilling rigs. All heavy-duty equipment was transported by FSV's. 5 figs.