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Sample records for bubble model compared

  1. Extended Rayleigh model of bubble evolution with material strength compared to detailed dynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinsky, M.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Bailey, D.S.; London, R.A.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Strauss, M. [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1997-03-04

    The validity of an extended Rayleigh model for laser generated bubbles in soft tissue is examined. This model includes surface tension, viscosity, a realistic water equation of state, material strength and failure, stress wave emission, and linear growth of interface instabilities. It is compared to dynamic simulations using LATIS, which include stress wave propagation, water equation of state, material strength and failure, and viscosity. The model and the simulations are compared using 1-D spherical geometry with bubble in center and a 2-D cylindrical geometry of a laser fiber in water with a bubble formed at the end of the fiber. The model executes over 300x faster on computer than the dynamic simulations.

  2. Modeling of flow in microchannel with bubbles layer on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gluzdov Dmitriy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of 2D numerical solution of liquid flow in microchannel with bubbles layers on surface are presented. Bubbles layers are modeled by setting of bubble size and Navier slip condition. Calculations have been done using OpenFoam PISO method. The results of modeling compared with analytical solution.

  3. Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    A goal of our ongoing research stream is to develop a multidisciplinary metatheory of bubbles. In this viewpoint paper we put forward a typology of bubbles by comparing four types of assets – entertainment, commodities, financial securities (stocks), and housing properties – where bubbles could a...

  4. Dirac bubble potential for He-He and inadequacies in the continuum: Comparing an analytic model with elastic collision experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysos, Michael

    2017-01-14

    We focus on the long-pending issue of the inadequacy of the Dirac bubble potential model in the description of He-He interactions in the continuum [L. L. Lohr and S. M. Blinder, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 53, 413 (1995)]. We attribute this failure to the lack of a potential wall to mimic the onset of the repulsive interaction at close range separations. This observation offers the explanation to why this excessively simple model proves incapable of quantitatively reproducing previous experimental findings of glory scattering in He-He, although being notorious for its capability of reproducing several distinctive features of the atomic and isotopic helium dimers and trimers [L. L. Lohr and S. M. Blinder, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 90, 419 (2002)]. Here, we show that an infinitely high, energy-dependent potential wall of properly calculated thickness rc(E) taken as a supplement to the Dirac bubble potential suffices for agreement with variable-energy elastic collision cross section experiments for 4He-4He, 3He-4He, and 3He-3He [R. Feltgen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 76, 2360 (1982)]. In the very low energy regime, consistency is found between the Dirac bubble potential (to which our extended model is shown to reduce) and cold collision experiments [J. C. Mester et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 1343 (1993)]; this consistency, which in this regime lends credence to the Dirac bubble potential, was never noticed by its authors. The revised model being still analytic is of high didactical value while expected to increase in predictive power relative to other appraisals.

  5. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  6. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  7. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  8. Modeling of bubble dynamics in relation to medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Strauss, M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)]|[Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev] [and others

    1997-03-12

    In various pulsed-laser medical applications, strong stress transients can be generated in advance of vapor bubble formation. To better understand the evolution of stress transients and subsequent formation of vapor bubbles, two-dimensional simulations are presented in channel or cylindrical geometry with the LATIS (LAser TISsue) computer code. Differences with one-dimensional modeling are explored, and simulated experimental conditions for vapor bubble generation are presented and compared with data. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Constraining hadronic models of the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2018-01-01

    The origin of sub-TeV gamma rays detected by Fermi-LAT from the Fermi bubbles at the Galactic center is unknown. In a hadronic model, acceleration of protons and/or nuclei and their subsequent interactions with gas in the bubble volume can produce observed gamma ray. Such interactions naturally produce high-energy neutrinos, and detection of those can discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic origin of gamma rays. Additional constraints on the Fermi bubbles gamma-ray flux in the PeV range from recent HAWC observations restrict hadronic model parameters, which in turn disfavor Fermi bubbles as the origin of a large fraction of neutrino events detected by IceCube along the bubble directions. We revisit our hadronic model and discuss future constraints on parameters from observations in very high-energy gamma rays by CTA and in neutrinos.

  10. Modeling and simulation of bubbles and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Andrew James

    negligible (in terms of particle concentration predictions) when terminal velocity was oriented in the wall-normal direction. The history force was shown to damp particle diffusion and have some minor impacts on particle concentration. This effect was augmented by using the creeping flow Basset expression and shows that the creeping flow expression should not be used in finite-Reynolds number conditions. The effects due to the finite-size extensions are also considered as are effects due to spatial reconstruction of the fluid properties. In general, little effect of the finite-size model or choice of spatial interpolation was observed in terms of particle concentration. However, Lagrangian statistics show some interesting sensitivities. Finally, the new equation of motion was applied to air bubbles and sand particles of several different diameters. Particle-fluid interactions observed through flow-visualization, particle concentration, particle-wall interactions, and Lagrangian statistics were all considered. These results were interpreted and compared to heavy-particle results where appropriate. Particle deposition was found to be well-described by the heavy-particle model of Young & Leeming and root-mean-square relative velocities were found to also agree with previous heavy-particle work. A model for the latter is suggested for heavy-particles and found to work similarly well for low-density particles. Non-tracer behavior was observed for bubbles with small Stokes numbers, a result not expected based on heavy-particle expectations. Local clustering of particles was observed in certain fluid structures which may indicate the importance of modeling particle collisions in future studies.

  11. CFD Modeling of Gas-Liquid Bubbly Flow in Horizontal Pipes: Influence of Bubble Coalescence and Breakup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ekambara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of gas-liquid bubbly flows is achieved by coupling a population balance equation with the three-dimensional, two-fluid, hydrodynamic model. For gas-liquid bubbly flows, an average bubble number density transport equation has been incorporated in the CFD code CFX 5.7 to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of the gas bubbles population. The coalescence and breakage effects of the gas bubbles are modeled. The coalescence by the random collision driven by turbulence and wake entrainment is considered, while for bubble breakage, the impact of turbulent eddies is considered. Local spatial variations of the gas volume fraction, interfacial area concentration, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and liquid velocity are compared against experimental data in a horizontal pipe, covering a range of gas (0.25 to 1.34 m/s and liquid (3.74 to 5.1 m/s superficial velocities and average volume fractions (4% to 21%. The predicted local variations are in good agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Furthermore, the development of the flow pattern was examined at three different axial locations of L/D = 25, 148, and 253. The first location is close to the entrance region where the flow is still developing, while the second and the third represent nearly fully developed bubbly flow patterns.

  12. Stochastic modelling for financial bubbles and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we draw upon the close relationship between statistical physics and mathematical finance to develop a suite of models for financial bubbles and crashes. By modifying previous approaches, we are able to derive novel analytical formulae for evaluation problems and for the expected timing of future change points. In particular, we help to explain why previous approaches have systematically overstated the timing of changes in market regime. The list of potential empirical applications is deep and wide ranging, and includes contemporary housing bubbles, the Eurozone crisis and the Crash of 2008.

  13. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  14. Bubble Coalescence and Breakup Modeling for Computing Mass Transfer Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    There exist several different numerical models for predicting bubble coalescence and breakup using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Various combinations of these models will be employed to model a bioreactor process in a stirred reactor tank. A mass transfer coefficient, Kla, has been calculated and compared to those found experimentally by Thermo-Fisher Scientific, to validate the accuracy of currently available mathematical models for population balance equations. These include various c...

  15. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  16. Detailed modeling of hydrodynamics mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas¿liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  17. Stochastic modelling for financial bubbles and policy

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, John

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we draw upon the close relationship between statistical physics and mathematical finance to develop a suite of models for financial bubbles and crashes. By modifying previous approaches, we are able to derive novel analytical formulae for evaluation problems and for the expected timing of future change points. In particular, we help to explain why previous approaches have systematically overstated the timing of changes in market regime. The list of potential empirical applicati...

  18. A Review of Population Balance Modelling for Isothermal Bubbly Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman C.P. Cheung

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a review of the state-of-the-art population balance modelling techniques that have been adopted to describe the phenomenological nature of isothermal bubbly flows. The main focus of the review can be broadly classified into three categories: (i Numerical approaches or solution algorithms of the PBE; (ii Applications of the PBE in practical gas-liquid multiphase problems and (iii Possible aspects of the future development in population balance modelling. For the first category, details of solution algorithms based on both method of moment (MOM and discrete class method (CM that have been proposed in the literature are provided. Advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are also discussed from the theoretical and practical viewpoints. For the second category, applications of existing population balance models in practical multiphase problems that have been proposed in the literature are summarized. Selected existing mathematical closures for modelling the “birth” and “death” rate of bubbles in gas-liquid bubbly flows are introduced. Particular attention is devoted to assess the capability of some selected models in predicting bubbly flow conditions through detail validation studies against experimental data. These studies demonstrate that good agreement can be achieved by the present model by comparing the predicted results against measured data with regards to the radial distribution of void fraction and sauter mean bubble diameter. Finally, weaknesses and limitations of the existing models are revealed are suggestions for further development are discussed. Emerging topics for future population balance studies are provided as to complete the aspect of population balance modelling.

  19. Modelling of Air Bubble Rising in Water and Polymeric Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, N. M. S.; Khan, M. M. K.; Rasul, M. G.; Subaschandar, N.

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for a single air bubble rising in water and xanthan gum solution. The bubble rise characteristics through the stagnant water and 0.05% xanthan gum solution in a vertical cylindrical column is modelled using the CFD code Fluent. Single air bubble rise dispersed into the continuous liquid phase has been considered and modelled for two different bubble sizes. Bubble velocity and vorticity magnitudes were captured through a surface-tracking technique i.e. Volume of Fluid (VOF) method by solving a single set of momentum equations and tracking the volume fraction of each fluid throughout the domain. The simulated results of the bubble flow contours at two different heights of the cylindrical column were validated by the experimental results and literature data. The model developed is capable of predicting the entire flow characteristics of different sizes of bubble inside the liquid column.

  20. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A biophysical vascular bubble model for devising decompression procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    Vascular bubble models, which present a realistic biophysical approach, hold great promise for devising suitable diver decompression procedures. Nanobubbles were found to nucleate on a flat hydrophobic surface, expanding to form bubbles after decompression. Such active hydrophobic spots (AHS) were formed from lung surfactants on the luminal aspect of ovine blood vessels. Many of the phenomena observed in these bubbling vessels correlated with those known to occur in diving. On the basis of our previous studies, which proposed a new model for the formation of arterial bubbles, we now suggest the biophysical model presented herein. There are two phases of bubble expansion after decompression. The first is an extended initiation phase, during which nanobubbles are transformed into gas micronuclei and begin to expand. The second, shorter phase is one of simple diffusion-driven growth, the inert gas tension in the blood remaining almost constant during bubble expansion. Detachment of the bubble occurs when its buoyancy exceeds the intermembrane force. Three mechanisms underlying the appearance of arterial bubbles should be considered: patent foramen ovale, intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses, and the evolution of bubbles in the distal arteries with preference for the spinal cord. Other parameters that may be quantified include age, acclimation, distribution of bubble volume, AHS, individual sensitivity, and frequency of bubble formation. We believe that the vascular bubble model we propose adheres more closely to proven physiological processes. Its predictability may therefore be higher than other models, with appropriate adjustments for decompression illness (DCI) data. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  2. THE SEMIEMPIRICAL MODEL OF THE MULTICOMPONENT BUBBLE BEHAVIOUR IN GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBOMÍR NĚMEC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical model of the bubble growth and dissolution in glasses with a fining agent has been derived. This model applies the experimental data from bubble observation at melting and fining temperatures. The experimental data needed for the model involved the temperature dependences of the average growth rate of the bubble radius and the average concentration of the fining gas in the bubbles. Both sets of values were measured in the laboratory in the glass of the float type and applied in the model. The measurements of the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the gases present in the glass – needed for the analytical model of multicomponent bubbles – were thus avoided. The course of the partial bubble absorption with the temperature decreasing was simulated by means of two factors modifying the experimental values of the bubble growth rates at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of the resulting bubble growth rate qualitatively corresponded to the experimental observations in the soda-lime-silica glass, but a more detailed experimental and comparative study has yet to be performed. Such a study is being prepared.

  3. Model for bubble pulsation in liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Todd A.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    A model is presented for a pulsating spherical bubble positioned at a fixed location in a viscous, compressible liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers of finite thickness. The Green’s function for particle displacement is found and utilized to derive an expression for the radiation load imposed on the bubble by the layers. Although the radiation load is derived for linear harmonic motion it may be incorporated into an equation for the nonlinear radial dynamics of the bubble. This expression is valid if the strain magnitudes in the viscoelastic layer remain small. Dependence of bubble pulsation on the viscoelastic and geometric parameters of the layers is demonstrated through numerical simulations. PMID:22779461

  4. Modelling of Break-up and Coalescence in Bubbly Two-Phase Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of gas-liquid two-phase flow with high superficial velocity in a vertical pipe were conducted with the use of the commercial software package STAR-CD 3.27. The change in bubble size due to breakup and coalescence was modelled by the Sγ model. The applicability and performance of the Sγ model in modelling of gasliquid bubbly flow were studied. The sensitivity of the Sγ model to the distribution moment γ, and the drainage mode were investigated. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data of Hibiki et al., (2001. Good agreement was achieved for axial velocities and void fraction for all tested cases. It was found in this work that the Sγ model is capable of predicting with reasonable accuracy the bubble size and its distribution even in high void fraction. Except in the near wall region, the simulated bubble size and therefore the interfacial area density fit well with the experiment measurements. It was observed that the predicted bubble size and interfacial area density obtained from both the S0 and S2 models are more or less the same, indicating that the numerical results are independent of the distribution moment γ. It was further found that, the drainage mode greatly affects the bubble size: an increase in mobility of the bubble surface enhances the coalescence and leads to an over-prediction of the bubble size in the pipe centre. The bubble size increases with the increase of the gas phase superficial velocity while the variation of the interfacial area density is smaller as it is a combined function of the bubble size and local gas hold-up.

  5. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model describing the mass and momentum exchange in bubble columns is proposed that is based on the observations that the gas distribution in a bubble column is not uniform across the column and that as a consequence large liquid...

  6. Fluid dynamics in bubble stirred ladles: Part II. Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, S. T.; Boysan, F.

    1988-10-01

    A mathematical model which describes the fluid flow in a bubble stirred ladle is presented. The model predicts mean flow, turbulent characteristics, bubble dispersion, and gas-liquid interaction from fundamental principles. Numerical predictions for a water model of a ladle show very satisfactory quantitative agreement with experimental results for all regions of the ladle. The model is applied to the study of refractory wear and yields results that are in qualitative agreement with practical experience.

  7. A siphon well model for hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Hui, E-mail: fuhui_iwhr@126.com; Ji, Ping; Xia, Qingfu; Guo, Xinlei

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new method was proposed to improve the hydraulic performance and bubble elimination. • The diversion pier and diversion grid were used to stabilize the flow pattern. • Double multi-hole orifices were arranged after the weir. • The new method has a simpler construction and greater bubble elimination. - Abstract: In coastal nuclear power plants, bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump in the siphon well causes foam pollution and salt fog erosion near the outfall of the siphon well. Thus, bubble elimination in siphon wells has been a topic of considerable interest. This study presents a new hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination method based on model experiments. Compared to previous methods, the new method has a simple structure, is effective in eliminating bubbles and is well adapted to different tide levels. The method mainly uses a diversion pier, diversion grid and multi-hole orifices to improve the hydraulic performance, thus reducing bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump and shortening the bubble movement length in the siphon well. This study provides a valuable reference for the future siphon well design of coastal power plants.

  8. Classification images and bubbles images in the generalized linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Richard F

    2012-07-09

    Classification images and bubbles images are psychophysical tools that use stimulus noise to investigate what features people use to make perceptual decisions. Previous work has shown that classification images can be estimated using the generalized linear model (GLM), and here I show that this is true for bubbles images as well. Expressing the two approaches in terms of a single statistical model clarifies their relationship to one another, makes it possible to measure classification images and bubbles images simultaneously, and allows improvements developed for one method to be used with the other.

  9. Investigation of Bubble-Slag Layer Behaviors with Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling and Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-08-01

    In ladle metallurgy, bubble-liquid interaction leads to complex phase structures. Gas bubble behavior, as well as the induced slag layer behavior, plays a significant role in the refining process and the steel quality. In the present work, a mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed to investigate the bubble transport and slag layer behavior in a water model of an argon-stirred ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid model is adopted to track the liquid steel-slag-air free surfaces while the Lagrangian discrete phase model is used for tracking and handling the dynamics of discrete bubbles. The bubble coalescence is considered using O'Rourke's algorithm to solve the bubble diameter redistribution and bubbles are removed after leaving the air-liquid interface. The turbulent liquid flow that is induced by bubble-liquid interaction is solved by LES. The slag layer fluactuation, slag droplet entrainment and spout eye open-close phenomenon are well revealed. The bubble diameter distribution and the spout eye size are compared with the experiment. The results show that the hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian-LES model provides a valid modeling framework to predict the unsteady gas bubble-slag layer coupled behaviors.

  10. Bubble Size Models for the Prediction of Bubbly Flow with CMFD Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, Jin-yeong; Yun, Byong-jo; Jeong, Jae-jun [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, the use of computational multi-fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes has been extended to the analysis of multi-dimensional two-phase flow for the operation and safety analysis of nuclear power plants (NPP). In these applications, an accurate prediction of bubble behaviors is one of major concerns. Yao and Morel and Yeoh and Tu respectively applied interfacial area concentration transport (IACT) equation and bubble number density transport equation into CMFD code. Recently Lo and Zhang tried to apply the generalized S{sub γ} model to the predictions of not only droplet size in the oil-water flow but also bubble size in the air-water flow. In this paper, three-dimensional numerical simulations for the gas-liquid two-phase flow were conducted to validate and confirm the performance of S{sub γ} bubble size model for the further application to the narrow rectangular boiling channel for the research reactor core, using the commercial CFD code STAR CCM''+ ver. 9.06. For this, S{sub γ} model was evaluated against air-water data of DEDALE and Hibiki et al.'s experiment. These experimental data were obtained in a vertically arranged pipe under upwards air-water flow condition. Detailed descriptions on the S{sub γ} with its breakup and coalescence model are presented in the present manuscript.

  11. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  12. Modeling of isothermal bubbly flow with interfacial area transport equation and bubble number density approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Salih [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Erguen, Sule [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: se@nuke.hacettepe.edu.tr; Barik, Muhammet; Kocar, Cemil; Soekmen, Cemal Niyazi [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, isothermal turbulent bubbly flow is mechanistically modeled. For the modeling, Fluent version 6.3.26 is used as the computational fluid dynamics solver. First, the mechanistic models that simulate the interphase momentum transfer between the gas (bubbles) and liquid (continuous) phases are investigated, and proper models for the known flow conditions are selected. Second, an interfacial area transport equation (IATE) solution is added to Fluent's solution scheme in order to model the interphase momentum transfer mechanisms. In addition to solving IATE, bubble number density (BND) approach is also added to Fluent and this approach is also used in the simulations. Different source/sink models derived for the IATE and BND models are also investigated. The simulations of experiments based on the available data in literature are performed by using IATE and BND models in two and three-dimensions. The results show that the simulations performed by using IATE and BND models agree with each other and with the experimental data. The simulations performed in three-dimensions give better agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Bubble video experiments in the marine waters off Panarea Island (Italy): real-world data for modelling CO2 bubble dissolution and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, Stan; De Vittor, Cinzia; McGinnis, Dan; Bigi, Sabina; Comici, Cinzia; Ingrosso, Gianmarco; Lombardi, Salvatore; Ruggiero, Livio

    2014-05-01

    , and dissolved gases. An in-house developed GasPro sensor was also mounted on the structure to monitor pCO2 over the entire 2.5 hour duration of the experiment. The obtained data were used as input into the Discrete Bubble Model (DBM) (e.g., McGinnis et al., 2011, doi:10.1029/2010JC006557). The DBM uses mass balance to predict the gas flux across the bubble surface, whereby gas flux direction depends on internal bubble gas concentration and ambient concentration, and considering the Henry's coefficient and partial pressure of the gas. The model uses bubble-size dependent relationships for the mass transfer rate and the bubble rise velocity. Important model input parameters include: bubble size; depth; ambient dissolved gas concentrations, temperature and salinity; and initial bubble gas concentrations. Measured and modelled results are compared, showing good general agreement. Based on the concentrations measured at the lowest level, the modelled and measured bubble concentrations match very closely. Bubble size values do not match as well if this initial concentration is used, however they improve as a value closer to 100% CO2 is applied. This preliminary study has shown promising results and highlight areas where experimental design and data quality should be improved in the next phase of the study.

  14. Comparison of selected theoretical models of bubble formation and experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rząsa Mariusz R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Designers of all types of equipment applied in oxygenation and aeration need to get to know the mechanism behind the gas bubble formation. This paper presents a measurement method used for determination of parameters of bubbles forming at jet attachment from which the bubles are displaced upward. The measuring system is based on an optical tomograph containing five projections. An image from the tomograph contains shapes of the forming bubbles and determine their volumes and formation rate. Additionally, this paper presents selected theoretical models known from literature. The measurement results have been compared with simple theoretical models predictions. The paper also contains a study of the potential to apply the presented method for determination of bubble structures and observation of intermediate states.

  15. Explosive Bubble Modelling by Noncausal Process

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Gouriéroux; Jean-Michel Zakoian

    2013-01-01

    The linear mixed causal and noncausal autoregressive processes provide often a better fit to economic and financial time series than the standard causal linear autoregressive processes. By considering the example of the noncausal Cauchy autoregressive process, we show that it might be explained by the special associated nonlinear causal dynamics. Indeed, this causal dynamics can include unit root, bubble phenomena, or asymmetric cycles often observed on financial markets. The noncausal Cauchy...

  16. A Bubble-Based Drag Model at the Local-Grid Level for Eulerian Simulation of Bubbling Fluidized Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A bubble-based drag model at the local-grid level is proposed to simulate gas-solid flows in bubbling fluidized beds of Geldart A particles. In this model, five balance equations are derived from the mass and the momentum conservation. This set of equations along with necessary correlations for bubble diameter and voidage of emulsion phase is solved to obtain seven local structural parameters (uge, upe, εe, δb, ub, db, and ab which describe heterogeneous flows of bubbling fluidized beds. The modified drag coefficient obtained from the above-mentioned structural parameters is then incorporated into the two-fluid model to simulate the hydrodynamics of Geldart A particles in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed. The comparison between experimental and simulation results for the axial and radial solids concentration profiles is promising.

  17. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  18. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  19. Algebraic model for bubble tracking in horizontal gas-liquid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Felipe G.C. de; Tisserant, Hendy R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morales, Rigoberto E.M. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Mazza, Ricardo A.; Rosa, Eugenio S. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2008-07-01

    The current work extends the concept of unit-cell applied in gas-liquid slug flow models to predict the evolution of the gas and liquid flow properties along a horizontal pipe. The motivation of this model is its simplicity, easiness of application and low computational cost. It is a useful tool of reference data generation in order to check the consistency of numerical slug tracking models. The potential of the model is accessed by comparing the gas bubbles and liquid slug sizes, the translational bubble velocity and the pressure drop against experimental data. (author)

  20. Comparing the effect of biosurfactant and chemical surfactant on bubble hydrodynamics in a flotation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanran; Yang, Jingjing; Lei, Shaomin; Wang, Xinbing

    2013-01-01

    Bubble hydrodynamics is fundamental to the performance of the flotation process widely used in the separation industry. To compare the effect of biosurfactants and chemical synthetic surfactants on bubble hydrodynamics in the flotation process, the motion of a single bubble and the size distribution of bubble swarms in various surfactants (rhamnolipid, tea saponin and Triton X-100) solutions were observed directly using a high-speed video camera in a laboratory scale flotation column. Bubble trajectory, dimensions, velocity and size distribution were then determined through image analysis. The results indicated that the addition of biosurfactants had the same significant effects on bubble motion and size distribution as chemosynthetic surfactants. The biosurfactant effect on bubble behavior was also found to depend on their type and concentration. In general, the effect of tea saponin was stronger than another biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) used in the present study. The present findings implied that some biosurfactants like tea saponin can replace chemosynthetic surfactants in controlling bubble behavior in flotation operation. This will contribute to promoting the use of green environmentally friendly flotation agents in the separation industry.

  1. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  2. On the One-Dimensional Modeling of Vertical Upward Bubbly Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peña-Monferrer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional two-fluid model approach has been traditionally used in thermal-hydraulics codes for the analysis of transients and accidents in water–cooled nuclear power plants. This paper investigates the performance of RELAP5/MOD3 predicting vertical upward bubbly flow at low velocity conditions. For bubbly flow and vertical pipes, this code applies the drift-velocity approach, showing important discrepancies with the experiments compared. Then, we use a classical formulation of the drag coefficient approach to evaluate the performance of both approaches. This is based on the critical Weber criteria and includes several assumptions for the calculation of the interfacial area and bubble size that are evaluated in this work. A more accurate drag coefficient approach is proposed and implemented in RELAP5/MOD3. Instead of using the Weber criteria, the bubble size distribution is directly considered. This allows the calculation of the interfacial area directly from the definition of Sauter mean diameter of a distribution. The results show that only the proposed approach was able to predict all the flow characteristics, in particular the bubble size and interfacial area concentration. Finally, the computational results are analyzed and validated with cross-section area average measurements of void fraction, dispersed phase velocity, bubble size, and interfacial area concentration.

  3. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethloff, Christian, E-mail: christian.dethloff@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gaganidze, Ermile [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str. 42, 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different {sup 10}B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  4. A polydisperse two-fluid model for surf zone bubble simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2011-05-01

    Wave breaking in the surf zone entrains large volumes of air bubbles into the water column, forming a two-phase bubbly flow field. Numerical study of bubbly flow is largely restricted by the lack of robust and comprehensive bubble entrainment models. In this paper, we propose a new model that connects bubble entrainment with turbulent dissipation rate at the air-water interface. The entrainment model as well as a polydisperse two-fluid model are incorporated into a 3-D volume of fluid code TRUCHAS. The bubbly flow model is first tested against laboratory experimental data for an oscillatory bubble plume. The calculated time-averaged liquid velocities and their fluctuations agree well with measurements, indicating that the model correctly reproduces dynamic interactions between the liquid phase and the continuum representation of the gas phase. Then, it is employed to study the bubbly flow under a laboratory surf zone breaking wave. Through the comparisons with experimental data, it is demonstrated that the model describes bubble entrainment and void fraction evolution reasonably well. The exponential decay of void fraction observed in the laboratory experiments is captured by the model. The kinematics of bubble plume as well as the vertical evolution of bubble size spectrum at any depth are investigated. Studies of bubble effects on liquid phase turbulence show that the presence of bubbles could suppress a large amount of turbulence under breaking waves.

  5. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, N M S [Process Engineering and Light Metals (PELM) Centre, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health, CQUniversity, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia); Khan, M M K; Rasul, M G, E-mail: m.rasul@cqu.edu.a [School of Engineering and Built Environment, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health, CQUniversity, Rockhampton, QLD 4702 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path

  6. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, N. M. S.; Khan, M. M. K.; Rasul, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path transition.

  7. Cluster Dynamics Modeling with Bubble Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blondel, Sophie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The topic of this communication pertains to defect formation in irradiated solids such as plasma-facing tungsten submitted to helium implantation in fusion reactor com- ponents, and nuclear fuel (metal and oxides) submitted to volatile ssion product generation in nuclear reactors. The purpose of this progress report is to describe ef- forts towards addressing the prediction of long-time evolution of defects via continuum cluster dynamics simulation. The di culties are twofold. First, realistic, long-time dynamics in reactor conditions leads to a non-dilute di usion regime which is not accommodated by the prevailing dilute, stressless cluster dynamics theory. Second, long-time dynamics calls for a large set of species (ideally an in nite set) to capture all possible emerging defects, and this represents a computational bottleneck. Extensions beyond the dilute limit is a signi cant undertaking since no model has been advanced to extend cluster dynamics to non-dilute, deformable conditions. Here our proposed approach to model the non-dilute limit is to monitor the appearance of a spatially localized void volume fraction in the solid matrix with a bell shape pro le and insert an explicit geometrical bubble onto the support of the bell function. The newly cre- ated internal moving boundary provides the means to account for the interfacial ux of mobile species into the bubble, and the growth of bubbles allows for coalescence phenomena which captures highly non-dilute interactions. We present a preliminary interfacial kinematic model with associated interfacial di usion transport to follow the evolution of the bubble in any number of spatial dimensions and any number of bubbles, which can be further extended to include a deformation theory. Finally we comment on a computational front-tracking method to be used in conjunction with conventional cluster dynamics simulations in the non-dilute model proposed.

  8. Evolutionary thinking in microeconomic models: prestige bias and market bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adrian Viliami

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary models broadly support a number of social learning strategies likely important in economic behavior. Using a simple model of price dynamics, I show how prestige bias, or copying of famed (and likely successful) individuals, influences price equilibria and investor disposition in a way that exacerbates or creates market bubbles. I discuss how integrating the social learning and demographic forces important in cultural evolution with economic models provides a fruitful line of inquiry into real-world behavior.

  9. Eulerian simulations of bubble behaviour in a two-dimensional gas-solid bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Huilin; Liu Wentie; Zhao Guangbo; He Yurong [Harbin Institute of Technology (China). Dept. of Power Engineering; Li Feng [Jiangxi Boiler Co. Ltd., Nanchang (China)

    2002-07-01

    In the present study, the CFD model is based on a two-fluid model extended with the kinetic theory of granular flow. The simulation results of bubble diameter and bubble rise velocity are compared to the Darton equation and the Davidson model in a free bubbling fluidized bed. The predicted values are in reasonable agreement with the values from the Darton bubble size equation and the Davidson model for isolated bubbles. It is shown that the break-up and direct wall interaction effects influence the dynamic bubble behavior in the free bubbling fluidized beds. (author)

  10. Modeling and comparative assessment of bubbling fluidized bed gasification system for syngas production - a gateway for a cleaner future in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehzad, Areeb; Bashir, Mohammed J K; Horttanainen, Mika; Manttari, Mika; Havukainen, Jouni; Abbas, Ghulam

    2017-06-19

    The present study explores the potential of MSW gasification for exergy analysis and has been recently given a premier attention in a region like Pakistan where the urbanization is rapidly growing and resources are few. The plant capacity was set at 50 MW based on reference data available and the total exergetic efficiency was recorded to be 31.5 MW. The largest irreversibility distribution appears in the gasifier followed by methanation unit and CO 2 capture. The effect of process temperature, equivalence ratio and MSW moisture content was explored for inspecting the variations in syngas composition, lower heating value, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency. Special attention of the paper is paid to the comparative assessment of MSW gasification products in four regions, namely Pakistan, USA, UAE and Thailand. This extended study gave an insight into the spectrum of socioeconomic conditions with varying MSW compositions in order to explain the effect of MSW composition variance on the gasification products.

  11. CFD study on rise and deformation characteristics of buoyancy-driven spheroid bubbles in stagnant Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollakota, Anjani R. K.; Kishore, Nanda

    2017-06-01

    The bubbles are almost ubiquitous in many chemical and processing industries; and many of the polymeric solutions obey non-Newtonian rheological characteristics. Therefore, in this work the rise and deformation characteristics of spheroid bubbles in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids are numerically investigated using a level set method. To demonstrate the validity of the moving bubble interface, the present simulations are compared with existing numerical and experimental results available in the literature; and for these comparisons, the computational geometries are considered same as reported in corresponding literatures. The present bubble deformation characteristics are satisfactorily agreeing with their literature counterparts. After establishing the validity of the numerical solution procedure, the same method is applied to obtain the deformation characteristics of an air bubble in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids. Further, the results in terms of the volume fraction images, streamlines, and viscosity profiles around the deforming bubbles are presented as function of the bubble rise time.

  12. New JLS-Factor Model versus the Standard JLS Model: A Case Study on Chinese Stock Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyi Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we extend the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS model by introducing fundamental economic factors in China (including the interest rate and deposit reserve rate and the historical volatilities of targeted and US equity indices into the original model, which is a flexible tool to detect bubbles and predict regime changes in financial markets. We then derive a general method to incorporate these selected factors in addition to the log-periodic power law signature of herding and compare the prediction accuracy of the critical time between the original and the new JLS models (termed the JLS-factor model by applying these two models to fit two well-known Chinese stock indices in three bubble periods. The results show that the JLS-factor model with Chinese characteristics successfully depicts the evolutions of bubbles and “antibubbles” and constructs efficient end-of-bubble signals for all bubbles in Chinese stock markets. In addition, the results of standard statistical tests demonstrate the excellent explanatory power of these additive factors and confirm that the new JLS model provides useful improvements over the standard JLS model.

  13. Some Econometric Results for the Blanchard-Watson Bubble Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Soren; Lange, Theis

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse a simple bubble model suggested by Blanchard and Watson. The model is defined by y(t) =s(t)¿y(t-1)+e(t), t=1,…,n, where s(t) is an i.i.d. binary variable with p=P(s(t)=1), independent of e(t) i.i.d. with mean zero and finite variance. We take ¿>1 so...

  14. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  15. Integral bubble and jet models with pressure forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfson, A. N.; Nikolaev, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Modifications of integral bubble and jet models including the pressure force are proposed. Exact solutions are found for the modified model of a stationary convective jet from a point source of buoyancy and momentum. The exact solutions are compared against analytical solutions of the integral models for a stationary jet that are based on the approximation of the vertical boundary layer. It is found that the modified integral models of convective jets retain the power-law dependences on the altitude for the vertical velocity and buoyancy obtained in classical models. For a buoyant jet in a neutrally stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force increases the amplitude of buoyancy and decreases the amplitude of vertical velocity. The total amplitude change is about 10%. It is shown that in this model there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. For a spontaneous jet rising in an unstably stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force retains the amplitude of buoyancy and increases the amplitude of vertical velocity by about 15%. It is shown that in the model of a spontaneous jet there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the available potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. The results are of interest for the problems of anthropogenic pollution diffusion in the air and water environments and the formulation of models for statistical and stochastic ensembles of thermals in a mass-flux parameterization of turbulent moments.

  16. Modelling of the Bubble Size Distribution in an Aerated Stirred Tank: Theoretical and Numerical Comparison of Different Breakup Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kálal Zbyněk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this study is the mathematical modelling of bubble size distributions in an aerated stirred tank using the population balance method. The air-water system consisted of a fully baffled vessel with a diameter of 0.29 m, which was equipped with a six-bladed Rushton turbine. The secondary phase was introduced through a ring sparger situated under the impeller. Calculations were performed with the CFD software CFX 14.5. The turbulent quantities were predicted using the standard k-ε turbulence model. Coalescence and breakup of bubbles were modelled using the MUSIG method with 24 bubble size groups. For the bubble size distribution modelling, the breakup model by Luo and Svendsen (1996 typically has been used in the past. However, this breakup model was thoroughly reviewed and its practical applicability was questioned. Therefore, three different breakup models by Martínez-Bazán et al. (1999a, b, Lehr et al. (2002 and Alopaeus et al. (2002 were implemented in the CFD solver and applied to the system. The resulting Sauter mean diameters and local bubble size distributions were compared with experimental data.

  17. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezo A, E. [University of Caribe, Department of Basics Sciences and Engineering, Lote 1, Manzana 1, Region 78, esq. Fracc. Tabachines, 77500 Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico)]. E-mail: ecerezo@unicaribe.edu.mx; Munoz C, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank.

  18. Metaphors and models: the ASR bubble in the Floridan aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, H L; Hutchings, William C; Budd, David A

    2006-01-01

    Studies at the intersection of cognitive science and linguistics have revealed the crucial role that metaphors play in shaping our thoughts about phenomena we cannot see. According to the domains interaction theory of cognition, a metaphoric expression sets up mappings between a target domain that we wish to understand and a familiar source domain. The source domain contains elements ("commonplaces") that we manipulate mentally, like parts of an analogue model, to illuminate the target domain. This paper applies the structure of domains interaction theory to analyze the dynamics of a metaphor in hydrogeology: the so-called bubble formed by water injected into an aquifer during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). Of the four commonplaces of bubbles--(1) they are discrete; (2) they are geometrically simple; (3) they rise; and (4) they burst--we focus on the first two using both displacement and dispersion (tracer) models for both homogeneous and heterogeneous storage zones patterned from geological studies of the Suwannee Limestone of Sarasota County, Florida. The displacement model easily shows that "bottle brush" better represents the geometric complexity predicted from the known and inferred heterogeneity. There is virtually no difference, however, in the prediction of recovery efficiency using the dispersion model for a bubble (homogeneous flow zone) vs. bottle brush (heterogeneous flow zone). On the other hand, only the bottle brush reveals that unrecovered tracer is located preferentially in the low-permeability layers that lie adjacent to high-permeability channels in the flow zones.

  19. Modelling of gas flux through bubbles at the air-water interface

    OpenAIRE

    Memery, Laurent; Merlivat, Liliane

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical approach to gas transfer by bubbles created by breaking waves at the air-waterinterface is undertaken. Based on a simple model, this study affords a basic understanding of thephysical mechanisms. The behaviour of a single bubble is examined. Similarities and differencesbetween the formulation of gas fluxes across a “flat” air-water interface and through bubbles areshown. The gas flux through bubbles is not strictly proportional to the solubility and to thedifference of concentra...

  20. Bubbly flow model for the dynamic characteristics of cavitating pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, C.

    1978-01-01

    The recent experimental transfer matrices obtained by Ng and Brennen (1978) for some axial flow pumps revealed some dynamic characteristics which were unaccounted for by any existing theoretical analysis; their visual observations suggested that the bubbly cavitating flow in the blade passages could be responsible for these effects. A theoretical model of the dynamic response of this bubbly blade-passage flow is described in the present paper. Void-fraction fluctuations in this flow result not only from pressure fluctuations but also because the fluctuating angle of attack causes fluctuations in the rate of production of bubbles near the leading edge. The latter causes kinematic waves which interact through the boundary conditions with the dynamic waves caused by pressure fluctuation. The resulting theoretical transfer functions which results are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments; with appropriate choices of two parameters good quantitative agreement is also obtained. The theoretical model also provides one possible explanation of the observation that the pump changes from an essentially passive dynamic element in the absence of cavitation to a progressively more active element as the extent of cavitation increases.

  1. a Comprehensive Model for Capillary Pressure Difference across a Drop/bubble Flowing Through a Constricted Capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingchao; Wei, Junhong; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Chengguo; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    The capillary pressure is one of the crucial parameters in many science and engineering applications such as composite materials, interface science, chemical engineering, oil exploration, etc. The drop/bubble formation and its mechanisms that affect the permeability of porous media have steadily attracted much attention in the past. When a drop/bubble moves from a larger capillary to a smaller one, it is often obstructed by an additional pressure difference caused by the capillary force. In this paper, a comprehensive model is derived for the capillary pressure difference when a drop/bubble flows through a constricted capillary, i.e. a geometrically constricted passage with an abrupt change in radius. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the smaller capillary radius, pore-throat ratio, contact angle, surface tension and length of the drop/bubble in the smaller capillary. The model predictions are compared with the available experimental data, and good agreement is found between them.

  2. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  3. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-06

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  4. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  5. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Senor, David J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Setyawan, Wahyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Zhijie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the for- mation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was devel- oped. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along $\\langle$110$\\rangle$ directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along $\\langle$110$\\rangle$ directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  6. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang, E-mail: shenyang.hu@pnnl.gov; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-15

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along 〈110〉 directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along 〈110〉 directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  7. A Lagrangian-Lagrangian Model for Two-Phase Bubbly Flow around Circular Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shademan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A Lagrangian-Lagrangian model is developed using an in-house code to simulate bubble trajectory in two-phase bubbly flow around circular cylinder. Random Vortex Method (RVM which is a Lagrangian approach is used for solving the liquid phase. The significance of RVM relative to other RANS/LES methods is its capability in directly modelling the turbulence. In RVM, turbulence is modeled by solving the vorticity transport equation and there is no need to use turbulence closure models. Another advantage of RVM relative to other CFD approaches is its independence from mesh generation. For the bubbles trajectory, equation of motion of bubbles which takes into account effect of different forces are coupled with the RVM. Comparison of the results obtained from current model with the experimental data confirms the validity of the model. Effect of different parameters including flow Reynolds number, bubble diameter and injection point on the bubbles' trajectory are investigated. Results show that increase in the Reynolds number reduces the rising velocity of the bubbles. Similar behavior is observed for the bubbles when their diameter was decreased. According to the analysis carried out, present Lagrangian-Lagrangian model solves the issues of mesh generation and turbulence modelling which exist in common two phase flow modelling schemes.

  8. Dynamic simulation of dispersed gas-liquid two-phase flow using a discrete bubble model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, E.; Lammers, F.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a detailed hydrodynamic model for gas-liquid two-phase flow will be presented. The model is based on a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and describes the time-dependent two-dimensional motion of small, spherical gas bubbles in a bubble column operating in the homogeneous regime. The

  9. It takes three to tango: 2. Bubble dynamics in basaltic volcanoes and ramifications for modeling normal Strombolian activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, Jenny; Hager, Bradford H.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2010-07-01

    This is the second paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In the first paper, we demonstrated that a combination of three numerical tools, an extended ghost fluid type method, the level set approach, and the extension velocity technique, accurately simulates complex interface dynamics in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In this paper, we use this threefold numerical method to investigate bubble dynamics in the conduits of basaltic volcanos with a focus on normal Strombolian eruptions. Strombolian type activity, named after the famously episodic eruptions at Stromboli volcano, is characterized by temporally discrete fountains of incandescent clasts. The mildly explosive nature of normal Strombolian activity, as compared to more effusive variants of basaltic volcanism, is related to the presence of dissolved gas in the magma, yielding a complex two-phase flow problem. We present a detailed scaling analysis allowing identification of the pertinent regime for a given flow problem. The dynamic interactions between gas and magma can be classified into three nondimensional regimes on the basis of bubble sizes and magma viscosity. Resolving the fluid dynamics at the scale of individual bubbles is not equally important in all three regimes: As long as bubbles remain small enough to be spherical, their dynamic interactions are limited compared to the rich spectrum of coalescence and breakup processes observed for deformable bubbles, in particular, once inertia ceases to be negligible. One key finding in our simulations is that both large gas bubbles and large conduit-filling gas pockets ("slugs") are prone to dynamic instabilities that lead to their rapid breakup during buoyancy-driven ascent. We provide upper bound estimates for the maximum stable bubble size in a given magmatic system and discuss the ramifications of our results for two commonly used models of normal Strombolian type

  10. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV

  11. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2000-09-01

    The objective if this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with PIV measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. This phase of the work was presented at the Chemical Reaction Engineering VIII: Computational Fluid Dynamics, August 6-11, 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. The results together with simulations will be presented at the annual meeting of AIChE in November 2000.

  12. Bubble generation in a twisted and bent DNA-like model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Ulrik Vingaard; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The DNA molecule is modeled by a parabola embedded chain with long-range interactions between twisted base pair dipoles. A mechanism for bubble generation is presented and investigated in two different configurations. Using random normally distributed initial conditions to simulate thermal fluctu...... fluctuations, a relationship between bubble generation, twist and curvature is established. An analytical approach supports the numerical results....

  13. Bubble Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    , a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  14. Nonlinear interaction between underwater explosion bubble and structure based on fully coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A. M.; Wu, W. B.; Liu, Y. L.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between an underwater explosion bubble and an elastic-plastic structure is a complex transient process, accompanying violent bubble collapsing, jet impact, penetration through the bubble, and large structural deformation. In the present study, the bubble dynamics are modeled using the boundary element method and the nonlinear transient structural response is modeled using the explicit finite element method. A new fully coupled 3D model is established through coupling the equations for the state variables of the fluid and structure and solving them as a set of coupled linear algebra equations. Based on the acceleration potential theory, the mutual dependence between the hydrodynamic load and the structural motion is decoupled. The pressure distribution in the flow field is calculated with the Bernoulli equation, where the partial derivative of the velocity potential in time is calculated using the boundary integral method to avoid numerical instabilities. To validate the present fully coupled model, the experiments of small-scale underwater explosion near a stiffened plate are carried out. High-speed imaging is used to capture the bubble behaviors and strain gauges are used to measure the strain response. The numerical results correspond well with the experimental data, in terms of bubble shapes and structural strain response. By both the loosely coupled model and the fully coupled model, the interaction between a bubble and a hollow spherical shell is studied. The bubble patterns vary with different parameters. When the fully coupled model and the loosely coupled model are advanced with the same time step, the error caused by the loosely coupled model becomes larger with the coupling effect becoming stronger. The fully coupled model is more stable than the loosely coupled model. Besides, the influences of the internal fluid on the dynamic response of the spherical shell are studied. At last, the case that the bubble interacts with an air

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  16. Experiment and modeling of translational dynamics of an oscillating bubble cluster in a stationary sound field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Naohiro; Ando, Keita; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    Translational motion of an oscillating bubble cluster under sound irradiation is studied experimentally and is modeled in the framework of the classical approach of Bjerknes. An experimental technique is proposed to observe bubble cluster formation and its translational dynamics interacting with wall boundaries due to the secondary Bjerknes force. The translational motion observed in the experiment is modeled by extending the classical theory of Bjerknes on a single bubble; a bubble cluster is treated as a single bubble. The extended Bjerknes theory is shown to allow us to predict the overall trajectory of the cluster translating toward a wall of finite acoustic impedance by tuning acoustic energy loss at the wall. The drag force turns out to be unimportant for the translation of a millimeter-sized cluster that we observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bubble Number-density Data and Modeled Paleoclimates, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes bubble number-density measured at depths from 120 meters to 560 meters at 20-meter intervals in both horizontal and vertical samples. The data...

  18. Modelling Xanthomonas campestris batch fermentations in a bubble column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, A; Dussap, C G; Gros, J B

    1989-01-20

    Rate and yield expressions relating to biomass and xanthan formation and to nitrogen, glucose, and oxygen consumption were established for Xanthomonas campestris batch fermentations in a bubble column. Microbial growth was described by the logistic rate equation, characterized by a maximum specific growth rate mu(M) = 0.5 h(-1) and a maximum attainable cell concentration provided by nitrogenous compounds. With regard to carbon metabolism, the decrease with time in experimental yields and in the experimental specific rates of xanthan production and glucose assimilation demonstrated the inadequacy of the Luedeking-Piret model. These decreases were connected to the simultaneous drop in dissolved-oxygen tension observed during xanthan synthesis. The knowledge of metabolic pathways and energetic balance were used to establish the relationships between substrate utilization, ATP generation, and xanthan production. The model was structured by assuming the oxygen limitation of both the respiration rate and the efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation mechanism (P/O ratio). Consequently, the specific rates and yield expressions became dependent on the dissolved-oxygen tension, i.e., of the volumetric oxygen transfer in the fermentor.

  19. Modelling single- and tandem-bubble dynamics between two parallel plates for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C.-T.; Choi, J.-K.; Singh, S.; Chahine, G. L.; Hay, T. A.; Ilinskii, Yu. A.; Zabolotskaya, E. A.; Hamilton, M. F.; Sankin, G.; Yuan, F.; Zhong, P.

    2013-01-01

    Carefully timed tandem microbubbles have been shown to produce directional and targeted membrane poration of individual cells in microfluidic systems, which could be of use in ultrasound-mediated drug and gene delivery. This study aims at contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms at play in such an interaction. The dynamics of single and tandem microbubbles between two parallel plates is studied numerically and analytically. Comparisons are then made between the numerical results and the available experimental results. Numerically, assuming a potential flow, a three-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) is used to describe complex bubble deformations, jet formation, and bubble splitting. Analytically, compressibility and viscous boundary layer effects along the channel walls, neglected in the BEM model, are considered while shape of the bubble is not considered. Comparisons show that energy losses modify the bubble dynamics when the two approaches use identical initial conditions. The initial conditions in the boundary element method can be adjusted to recover the bubble period and maximum bubble volume when in an infinite medium. Using the same conditions enables the method to recover the full dynamics of single and tandem bubbles, including large deformations and fast re-entering jet formation. This method can be used as a design tool for future tandem-bubble sonoporation experiments. PMID:24293683

  20. Impact of bubble size in a rat model of cerebral air microembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral air microembolization (CAM) is a frequent side effect of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Besides reduction of the amount of bubbles, filter systems in the clinical setting may also lead to a dispersion of large gas bubbles and therefore to an increase of the gas–liquid-endothelium interface. We evaluated the production and application of different strictly defined bubble diameters in a rat model of CAM and assessed functional outcome and infarct volumes in relation to the bubble diameter. Methods Gas emboli of defined number and diameter were injected into the carotid artery of rats. Group I (n = 7) received 1800 air bubbles with a diameter of 45 μm, group II (n = 7) 40 bubbles of 160 μm, controls (n = 6) saline without gas bubbles; group I and II yielded the same total injection volume of air with 86 nl. Functional outcome was assessed at baseline, after 4 h and 24 h following cerebral MR imaging and infarct size calculation. Results Computer-aided evaluation of bubble diameters showed high constancy (group I: 45.83 μm ± 2.79; group II: 159 μm ± 1.26). Animals in group I and II suffered cerebral ischemia and clinical deterioration without significant difference. Infarct sizes did not differ significantly between the two groups (p = 0.931 u-test). Conclusions We present further development of a new method, which allows reliable and controlled CAM with different bubble diameters, producing neurological deficits due to unilateral cerebral damage. Our findings could not display a strong dependency of stroke frequency and severity on bubble diameter. PMID:24139539

  1. An improved model of H II bubbles during the epoch of reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Choudhury, T. Roy

    2014-08-01

    The size distribution of ionized regions during the epoch of reionization - a key ingredient in understanding the H I power spectrum observable by 21 cm experiments - can be modelled analytically using the excursion set formalism of random walks in the smoothed initial density field. To date, such calculations have been based on simplifying assumptions carried forward from the earliest excursion set models of two decades ago. In particular, these models assume that the random walks have uncorrelated steps and that haloes can form at arbitrary locations in the initial density field. We extend these calculations by incorporating recent technical developments that allow us to (a) include the effect of correlations in the steps of the walks induced by a realistic smoothing filter and (b) more importantly, account for the fact that dark matter haloes preferentially form near peaks in the initial density. A comparison with previous calculations shows that including these features, particularly the peaks constraint on halo locations, has large effects on the size distribution of the H II bubbles surrounding these haloes. For example, when comparing models at the same value of the globally averaged ionized volume fraction, the typical bubble sizes predicted by our model are more than a factor of 2 larger than earlier calculations. Our results can potentially have a significant impact on estimates of the observable H I power spectrum.

  2. Modified big-bubble technique compared to manual dissection deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty in the treatment of keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Karl Anders; Rama, Paolo; Paganoni, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical findings and results of manual dissection deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) compared to a modified big-bubble DALK technique in eyes affected by keratoconus. Sixty eyes of 60 patients with keratoconus were treated with one of the two surgical techniques manual DALK (n = 30); big-bubble DALK (n = 30). The main outcomes measured were visual acuity, corneal topographic parameters, thickness of residual stroma and endothelial cell density (ECD). Patients were examined postoperatively at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 1 month after suture removal. Final best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) measured 1 month after suture removal was 0.11 ± 0.08 LogMAR in the big-bubble group compared to 0.13 ± 0.08 in the manual DALK group (p = 0.227). In patients treated with the big-bubble technique without complications (Descemet's membrane completely bared), the stromal residue was not measureable. Mean stromal residual thickness in the manual DALK group was 30.50 ± 27.60 μm. Data analysis of the manual DALK group demonstrated a significant correlation between BSCVA and residual stromal thickness; lower residual stromal thickness correlated with better BSCVA values (Spearman ρ = 0.509, p = 0.018). Postoperative ECD was similar in both groups at all intervals, with no statistically significant differences. In both groups, ECD loss was only significant during the 1- to 6-month interval (p = 0.001 and p big-bubble DALK and manual DALK groups, respectively). Manual DALK provides comparable results to big-bubble DALK. Big-bubble DALK permits faster visual recovery and is a surgical technique, which can be easily converted to manual DALK in cases of unsuccessful 'big-bubble' formation. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  4. Bubble-raft model for a paraboloidal crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark J; Giomi, Luca; Shin, Homin; Thomas, Creighton K

    2008-02-01

    We investigate crystalline order on a two-dimensional paraboloid of revolution by assembling a single layer of millimeter-sized soap bubbles on the surface of a rotating liquid, thus extending the classic work of Bragg and Nye on planar soap bubble rafts. Topological constraints require crystalline configurations to contain a certain minimum number of topological defects such as disclinations or grain boundary scars whose structure is analyzed as a function of the aspect ratio of the paraboloid. We find the defect structure to agree with theoretical predictions and propose a mechanism for scar nucleation in the presence of large Gaussian curvature.

  5. Measuring and modeling the bubble population produced by an underwater explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Fred D; Lee Culver, R

    2011-11-01

    Underwater explosions have been studied intensively in the United States since 1941 [e.g., R. H. Cole, Underwater Explosions (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1945), pp. 3-13]. Research to date has primarily focused on the initial shock and subsequent pressure waves caused by the oscillations of the "gas-globe" resulting from charge detonation. These phenomena have relatively short timescales (typically less than 2 s). However, after the gas-globe rises through the water column and breaks the surface, there remains behind a cloud of bubbles and perhaps debris from the explosion container which has been markedly less studied. A recent experiment measured the spatial and temporal acoustic response of the bubble cloud resulting from a 13.6 kg PBXN-111 charge detonated at 15.2 m (50 ft) depth. A directional projector was used to propagate linear frequency-modulated (5-65 kHz) and 40 kHz tonal pulses through the bubble cloud. Two hydrophone arrays were positioned so as to measure the energy lost in propagating through the bubble cloud. Three methods have been utilized to invert measurements and estimate the bubble population. The bubble population estimates have been used to develop a model for the bubble population resulting from an underwater explosion.

  6. Sound synchronization of bubble trains in a viscous fluid: experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Felipe Augusto Cardoso; Baptista, Murilo da Silva; Sartorelli, José Carlos

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of formation of air bubbles expelled from a nozzle immersed in a viscous fluid under the influence of sound waves. We have obtained bifurcation diagrams by measuring the time between successive bubbles, having the air flow (Q) as a parameter control for many values of the sound wave amplitude (A), the height (H) of the solution above the top of the nozzle, and three values of the sound frequency (fs). Our parameter spaces (Q,A) revealed a scenario for the onset of synchronization dominated by Arnold tongues (frequency locking) which gives place to chaotic phase synchronization for sufficiently large A. The experimental results were accurately reproduced by numerical simulations of a model combining a simple bubble growth model for the bubble train and a coupling term with the sound wave added to the equilibrium pressure.

  7. CFD modelling and validation of upward bubbly flow in an adiabatic vertical pipe using the quadrature method of moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña-Monferrer, C., E-mail: cmonfer@upv.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Passalacqua, A., E-mail: albertop@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, 12080 Castelló de la Plana (Spain); Muñoz-Cobo, J.L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A population balance equation solved with QMOM approximation is implemented in OpenFOAM. • Available models for interfacial forces and bubble induced turbulence are analyzed. • A vertical pipe flow is simulated for different bubbly flow conditions. • Two-phase flow characteristics in vertical pipes are properly predicted. - Abstract: An Eulerian–Eulerian approach was investigated to model adiabatic bubbly flow with CFD techniques. In the framework of the OpenFOAM{sup ®} software, a two-fluid model solver was modified to include a population balance equation, solved with the quadrature method of moments approximation to predict upward bubbly flow in vertical pipes considering the polydisperse nature of two-phase flow. Some progress have been made recently solving population balance equations in OpenFOAM{sup ®} and this research aims to extend its application to the case of vertical pipes under different conditions of liquid and gas velocities. In order to test the solver for nuclear applications, interfacial forces and bubble induced turbulence models were included to provide to this solver the capability to correctly predict the behavior of the continuous and disperse phases. Two-phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and liquid are used to validate the model and its implementation. Radial profiles of void fraction, gas and liquid velocities, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity are compared to the computational results. These results are in satisfactory agreement with the experiments, showing the capability of the solver to predict two-phase flow characteristics.

  8. Volume Oscillations Delivered to a Lung Model Using 4 Different Bubble CPAP Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Jonathan A; Richardson, C Peter; DiBlasi, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    High-frequency pressure oscillations created by gas bubbling through an underwater seal during bubble CPAP may enhance ventilation and aid in lung recruitment in premature infants. We hypothesized that there are no differences in the magnitude of oscillations in lung volume (ΔV) in a preterm neonatal lung model when different bubble CPAP systems are used. An anatomically realistic replica of an infant nasal airway model was attached to a Silastic test lung sealed within a calibrated plethysmograph. Nasal prongs were affixed to the simulated neonate and supported using bubble CPAP systems set at 6 cm H2O. ΔV was calculated using pressure measurements obtained from the plethysmograph. The Fisher & Paykel Healthcare bubble CPAP system provided greater ΔV than any of the other devices at all of the respective bias flows (P bubble CPAP systems. The magnitude of ΔV increased at bias flows of > 4 L/min in the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Airways Development, and homemade systems, but appeared to decrease as bias flow increased with the Babi.Plus system. The major finding of this study is that bubble CPAP can provide measureable ventilation effects in an infant lung model. We speculate that the differences noted in ΔV between the different devices are a combination of the circuit/nasal prong configuration, bubbler configuration, and frequency of oscillations. Additional testing is needed in spontaneously breathing infants to determine whether a physiologic benefit exists when using the different bubble CPAP systems. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Modeling nanoparticle-alveolar epithelial cell interactions under breathing conditions using captive bubble surfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, David; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Clift, Martin J D; Raemy, David; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Parak, Wolfgang J; Gehr, Peter; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2014-05-06

    Many advances have been made in recent years in cell culture models of the epithelial barrier of the lung from simple monolayers to complex 3-D systems employing different cell types. However, the vast majority of these models still present a static air-liquid interface which is unrealistic given the dynamic nature of breathing. We present here a method where epithelial lung cells are integrated into a system, the captive bubble surfactometer, which allows the cyclical compression and expansion of the surfactant film at the air-liquid interface, thus modeling the dynamics of breathing. We found that cellular uptake of deposited gold nanoparticles was significantly increased under the dynamic (breathing) conditions of compression and expansion as compared to static conditions. The method could be very useful for studying nanoparticle-alveolar lung cell interactions under breathing conditions for applications in nanomedicine and toxicology.

  10. Numerical Modeling of the Photothermal Processing for Bubble Forming around Nanowire in a Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Chaari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate computation of the temperature is an important factor in determining the shape of a bubble around a nanowire immersed in a liquid. The study of the physical phenomenon consists in solving a photothermic coupled problem between light and nanowire. The numerical multiphysic model is used to study the variations of the temperature and the shape of the created bubble by illumination of the nanowire. The optimization process, including an adaptive remeshing scheme, is used to solve the problem through a finite element method. The study of the shape evolution of the bubble is made taking into account the physical and geometrical parameters of the nanowire. The relation between the sizes and shapes of the bubble and nanowire is deduced.

  11. A combined three-dimensional in vitro-in silico approach to modelling bubble dynamics in decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C; Stride, E; Cheema, U; Ovenden, N

    2017-12-01

    The growth of bubbles within the body is widely believed to be the cause of decompression sickness (DCS). Dive computer algorithms that aim to prevent DCS by mathematically modelling bubble dynamics and tissue gas kinetics are challenging to validate. This is due to lack of understanding regarding the mechanism(s) leading from bubble formation to DCS. In this work, a biomimetic in vitro tissue phantom and a three-dimensional computational model, comprising a hyperelastic strain-energy density function to model tissue elasticity, were combined to investigate key areas of bubble dynamics. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the diffusion coefficient was the most influential material parameter. Comparison of computational and experimental data revealed the bubble surface's diffusion coefficient to be 30 times smaller than that in the bulk tissue and dependent on the bubble's surface area. The initial size, size distribution and proximity of bubbles within the tissue phantom were also shown to influence their subsequent dynamics highlighting the importance of modelling bubble nucleation and bubble-bubble interactions in order to develop more accurate dive algorithms. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  13. Clarifications to questions and criticisms on the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette financial bubble model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier; Woodard, Ryan; Yan, Wanfeng; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2013-10-01

    The Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles with finite-time singular crash hazard rates has been developed to describe the dynamics of financial bubbles and crashes. It has been applied successfully to a large variety of financial bubbles in many different markets. Having been developed over a decade ago, the JLS model has been studied, analyzed, used and criticized by several researchers. Much of this discussion is helpful for advancing the research. However, several serious misconceptions seem to be present within this literature both on theoretical and empirical aspects. Several of these problems stem from the fast evolution of the literature on the JLS model and related works. In the hope of removing possible misunderstanding and of catalyzing useful future developments, we summarize these common questions and criticisms concerning the JLS model and synthesize the current state of the art and existing best practice.

  14. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model: Chemisorption of CO2 into NaOH solution, numerical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Henket, R.L.B.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes simulations that were performed with an Euler–Lagrange model that takes into account mass transfer and chemical reaction reported by Darmana et al. (2005. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model.

  15. Polarimetric Scattering Model for Methane Bubbles Trapped in the Ice of Sub-Artic Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kahachi, Noora; Papathanassiou, Kostas

    2012-01-01

    In this work we propose a model for the polarimetric backscattering of shallow sub-arctic lakes, which are frozen usually up to two meters depth during winter. The model takes into account the inhomogeneities in the ice layer introduced mainly by CH4 bubbles trapped in the lake ice. The model is validated against experimental data acquired by ALOS-PalSAR.

  16. New JLS-Factor Model versus the Standard JLS Model: A Case Study on Chinese Stock Bubbles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zongyi Hu; Chao Li

    2017-01-01

    ... (including the interest rate and deposit reserve rate) and the historical volatilities of targeted and US equity indices into the original model, which is a flexible tool to detect bubbles and predict regime changes in financial markets...

  17. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas

  18. Economic Growth with Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Martin

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a stylized model of economic growth with bubbles. This model views asset price bubbles as a market-generated device to moderate the effects of frictions in financial markets, improving the allocation of investments and raising the capital stock and welfare. It shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, bubbles can arise even if all investments in the economy are dynamically efficient.

  19. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  20. Bubbles, Banks, and Financial Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Aoki; Kalin Nikolov

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks two main questions: (1) What makes some asset price bubbles more costly for the real economy than others? and (2) When do costly bubbles occur? We construct a model of rational bubbles under credit frictions and show that when bubbles held by banks burst this is followed by a costly financial crisis. In contrast, bubbles held by ordinary savers have relatively muted effects. Banks tend to invest in bubbles when financial liberalisation decreases their profitability.

  1. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, R.K.; Halvorsen, B.M. [Telemark University College, Kjolnes ring 56, P.O. Box 203, 3901 Porsgrunn (Norway); Pfeifer, C. [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Gussing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2). The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  2. Bubble spreading during the boiling crisis: modelling and experimenting in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Garrabos, Y; Lecoutre, C; Chatain, D

    2016-01-01

    Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid carrier. We discuss the boiling crisis, a transition between two regimes of boiling: nucleate and film boiling. The boiling crisis results in a sharp decrease in the heat transfer rate, which can cause a major accident in industrial heat exchangers. In this communication, we present a physical model of the boiling crisis based on the vapor recoil effect. Under the action of the vapor recoil the gas bubbles begin to spread over the heater thus forming a germ for the vapor film. The vapor recoil force not only causes its spreading, it also creates a strong adhesion to the heater that prevents the bubble departure, thus favoring the further spreading. Near the liquid-gas critical point, the bubble growth is very slow and allows the kinetics of the bubble spreading to be observed. Since the surface tension is very small in this regime, only microgravity conditions can preserve a convex bubble shape. In the experiments both in the Mir spa...

  3. Computer modeling movement of biomass in the bioreactors with bubbling mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschev, L. A.; Suslov, D. Yu; Alifanova, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Recently in the Russian Federation there is an observation of the development of biogas technologies which are used in organic waste conversion of agricultural enterprises, consequently improving the ecological environment. To intensify the process and effective outstanding performance of the acquisition of biogas the application of systems of mixing of bubbling is used. In the case of bubbling mixing of biomass in the bioreactor two-phase portions consisting of biomass and bubbles of gas are formed. The bioreactor computer model with bubble pipeline has been made in a vertical spiral form forming a cone type turned upside down. With the help of computing program of OpenFVM-Flow, an evaluation experiment was conducted to determine the key technological parameters of process of bubbling mixing and to get a visual picture of biomass flows distribution in the bioreactor. For the experimental bioreactor the following equation of V=190 l, speed level, the biomass circulation, and the time of a single cycle of uax =0,029 m/s; QC =0,00087 m3/s, Δtbm .=159 s. In future, we plan to conduct a series of theoretical and experimental researches into the mixing frequency influence on the biogas acquisition process effectiveness.

  4. Optimal Portfolio Selection in Ex Ante Stock Price Bubble and Furthermore Bubble Burst Scenario from Dhaka Stock Exchange with Relevance to Sharpe’s Single Index Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Bin Kamal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at constructing an optimal portfolio by applying Sharpe’s single index model of capital asset pricing in different scenarios, one is ex ante stock price bubble scenario and stock price bubble and bubble burst is second scenario. Here we considered beginning of year 2010 as rise of stock price bubble in Dhaka Stock Exchange. Hence period from 2005 -2009 is considered as ex ante stock price bubble period. Using DSI (All share price index in Dhaka Stock Exchange as market index and considering daily indices for the March 2005 to December 2009 period, the proposed method formulates a unique cut off point (cut off rate of return and selects stocks having excess of their expected return over risk-free rate of return surpassing this cut-off point. Here, risk free rate considered to be 8.5% per annum (Treasury bill rate in 2009. Percentage of an investment in each of the selected stocks is then decided on the basis of respective weights assigned to each stock depending on respective ‘β’ value, stock movement variance representing unsystematic risk, return on stock and risk free return vis-à-vis the cut off rate of return. Interestingly, most of the stocks selected turned out to be bank stocks. Again we went for single index model applied to same stocks those made to the optimum portfolio in ex ante stock price bubble scenario considering data for the period of January 2010 to June 2012. We found that all stocks failed to make the pass Single Index Model criteria i.e. excess return over beta must be higher than the risk free rate. Here for the period of 2010 to 2012, the risk free rate considered to be 11.5 % per annum (Treasury bill rate during 2012.

  5. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yasuoka, K.

    2012-02-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  6. Effect of a bubble nucleation model on cavitating flow structure in rarefaction wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N.; Schmidt, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper explains research examining processes accompanying underwater explosions near the free surface. Particular attention is paid to the effect of heterogeneous nucleation on cavitating flow induced by underwater explosions near the free surface. Variation of the size spectrum of produced bubbles and influence of this process on flow structure are studied. The cavitating liquid is considered as a two-phase bubbly medium described in the framework of the Euler-Lagrange approach treating the carrier phase (liquid) as a continuum and the dispersed phase (bubbles) as a set of test particles. More detailed descriptions of a mathematical model, numerical method, and algorithm validation are observed in the authors' previous paper [see, Petrov and Schmidt (Exp Thermal Fluid Sci 60:367-373, 2015)].

  7. A discrete trinomial model for the birth and death of stock financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Persio, Luca; Guida, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    The present work proposes a novel way to model the dynamic of financial bubbles. In particular we exploit the so called trinomial tree technique, which is mainly inspired by the typical market order book (MOB) structure. According to the typical MOB rules, we exploit a bottom-up approach to derive the relevant generator process for the financial quantities characterizing the market we are considering. Our proposal pays attention in considering the real world changes in probability levels characterizing the bid-ask preferences, focusing the attention on the market movements. In particular, we show that financial bubbles are originated by these movements which also act amplify their growth.

  8. Real-Time Measurements and Modelling on Dynamic Behaviour of SonoVue Bubbles Based on Light Scattering Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Juan; Guan F., J.; Matula J., T.; Crum A., L.; Wei, Rongjue

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of SonoVue microbubbles, a new generation ultrasound contrast agent, is investigated in real time with light scattering method. Highly diluted SonoVue microbubbles are injected into a diluted gel made of xanthan gum and water. The responses of individual SonoVue bubbles to driven ultrasound pulses are measured. Both linear and nonlinear bubble oscillations are observed and the results suggest that SonoVue microbubbles can generate strong nonlinear responses. By fitting the experimental data of individual bubble responses with Sarkar's model, the shell coating parameter of the bubbles and dilatational viscosity is estimated to be 7.0 nm.s.Pa.

  9. Dynamics of micro-bubble sonication inside a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2013-01-10

    A model for sonicated micro-bubble oscillations inside a phantom vessel is proposed. The model is not a variant of conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation and is obtained from reduced Navier-Stokes equations. The model relates the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics with geometric and acoustic parameters in a consistent manner. It predicts micro-bubble oscillation dynamics as well as micro-bubble fragmentation when compared to the experimental data. For large micro-bubble radius to vessel diameter ratios, predictions are damped, suggesting breakdown of inherent modeling assumptions for these cases. Micro-bubble response with acoustic parameters is consistent with experiments and provides physical insight to the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics.

  10. Vertical rise velocity of equatorial plasma bubbles estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) observations and HIRB model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Ajith, K. K.; Yokoyama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-06-01

    The vertical rise velocity (Vr) and maximum altitude (Hm) of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were estimated using the two-dimensional fan sector maps of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), Kototabang, during May 2010 to April 2013. A total of 86 EPBs were observed out of which 68 were postsunset EPBs and remaining 18 EPBs were observed around midnight hours. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller ( 26-128 m/s) compared to those observed in postsunset hours ( 45-265 m/s). Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The three-dimensional numerical high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model. The smaller vertical rise velocities (Vr) and lower maximum altitudes (Hm) of EPBs during midnight hours are discussed in terms of weak polarization electric fields within the bubble due to weaker background electric fields and reduced background ion density levels.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryEquatorial plasma bubbles are plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. The radio waves passing through these irregular density structures undergo severe degradation/scintillation that could cause severe disruption of satellite-based communication and augmentation systems such as GPS navigation. These bubbles develop at geomagnetic equator, grow vertically, and elongate along the field lines to latitudes away from the equator. The knowledge on bubble rise velocities and their maximum attainable

  11. The Importance of Correct Modeling of Bubble Size and Condensation in Prediction of Sub-Cooled Boiling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the updating of the sub-cooled boiling model used in CFD codes with the more recent and better sub-models. The improved sub-models include: Hibiki and Ishii [1] correlation for nucleation site density, Kocamustafaogullari [2] correlation for bubble departure diameter and the S-gamma model of Lo and Rao [3] for bubble size distribution in the flow. The new model has been tested against measured data from Debora [4] and Bartolomei [5]. The results show that improvement in the bubble size prediction has the most significant impact on the accuracy of the model.

  12. Numerical Modelling of a Fast Pyrolysis Process in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalifar, S.; Ghiji, M.; Abbassi, R.; Garaniya, V.; Hawboldt, K.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the Eulerian-Granular approach is applied to simulate a fast pyrolysis bubbling fluidized bed reactor. Fast pyrolysis converts biomass to bio-products through thermochemical conversion in absence of oxygen. The aim of this study is to employ a numerical framework for simulation of the fast pyrolysis process and extend this to more complex reactor geometries. The framework first needs to be validated and this was accomplished by modelling a lab-scale pyrolysis fluidized bed reactor in 2-D and comparing with published data. A multi-phase CFD model has been employed to obtain clearer insights into the physical phenomena associated with flow dynamics and heat transfer, and by extension the impact on reaction rates. Biomass thermally decomposes to solid, condensable and non-condensable and therefore a multi-fluid model is used. A simplified reaction model is sued where the many components are grouped into a solid reacting phase, condensable/non-condensable phase, and non-reacting solid phase (the heat carrier). The biomass decomposition is simplified to four reaction mechanisms based on the thermal decomposition of cellulose. A time-splitting method is used for coupling of multi-fluid model and reaction rates. A good agreement is witnessed in the products yield between the CFD simulation and the experiment.

  13. Sphaleron and critical bubble in the scale invariant two Higgs doublet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Fuyuto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the electroweak phase transition and the critical bubble in the scale invariant two Higgs doublet model in the light of recent LHC data. Moreover, the sphaleron decoupling condition is newly evaluated in this model. The analysis is done by using the resummed finite-temperature one-loop effective potential. It is found that the 125 GeV Higgs boson inevitably leads to the strong first-order electroweak phase transition, and the strength of which is always large enough to satisfy the sphaleron decoupling condition, vN/TN>1.2, where TN denotes a nucleation temperature and vN is the Higgs vacuum expectation value at TN. In this model, even if the Higgs boson couplings to gauge bosons and fermions are similar to the standard model values, the signal strength of the Higgs decay to two photons is reduced by 10% and the triple Higgs boson coupling is enhanced by 82% compared to the standard model prediction.

  14. Stochastic resonance as a model for financial market crashes and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, A.; Hołyst, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    A bistable model of a financial market is considered, aimed at modelling financial crashes and bubbles, based on the Ising model with thermal-bath dynamics and long-range interactions, subject to a weak external information-carrying signal and noise. In the ordered phase, opposite stable orientations of magnetization correspond to the growing and declining market before and after the crash or bubble, and jumps of magnetization direction correspond to crashes and bubbles. It is shown that the influence of an information-carrying signal, assumed to be too weak to induce magnetization jumps, can be enhanced by the external noise via the effect of stochastic resonance. It is argued that in real stock markets the arrival of a piece of information, considered a posteriori to be the cause for a crash or bubble, can be enhanced in a similar way, thus leading to price return whose value is unexpectedly large in comparison with relatively weak importance of this piece of information.

  15. A genetic algorithm-based optimization model for pool boiling heat transfer on horizontal rod heaters at isolated bubble regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi Fazel, S. Ali

    2017-09-01

    A new optimized model which can predict the heat transfer in the nucleate boiling at isolated bubble regime is proposed for pool boiling on a horizontal rod heater. This model is developed based on the results of direct observations of the physical boiling phenomena. Boiling heat flux, wall temperature, bubble departing diameter, bubble generation frequency and bubble nucleation site density have been experimentally measured. Water and ethanol have been used as two different boiling fluids. Heating surface was made by several metals and various degrees of roughness. The mentioned model considers various mechanisms such as latent heat transfer due to micro-layer evaporation, transient conduction due to thermal boundary layer reformation, natural convection, heat transfer due to the sliding bubbles and bubble super-heating. The fractional contributions of individual mentioned heat transfer mechanisms have been calculated by genetic algorithm. The results show that at wall temperature difference more that about 3 K, bubble sliding transient conduction, non-sliding transient conduction, micro-layer evaporation, natural convection, radial forced convection and bubble super-heating have higher to lower fractional contributions respectively. The performance of the new optimized model has been verified by comparison of the existing experimental data.

  16. Two-phase mixture in a reactor with a TPJ gas distributor: The statistical model of bubble population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindur, K.; Pawelczyk, R. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    Statistical description is presented of the population of bubbles produced in a two-phase mixture in a reactor using a novel TPJ (Two Perpendicular Jets) gas distributor. The analysis performed supports the idea that it is the lognormal distribution which should be assumed as a statistical model of the population of bubble diameters.

  17. Leverage bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  18. Analytic model for electromagnetic fields in the bubble regime of plasma wakefield in non-uniform plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, A. A.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Thomas, J.; Pukhov, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on a model of plasma wakefield in the strongly nonlinear (bubble) regime, we develop a lowest-order perturbation theory for the components of electromagnetic fields inside and outside the bubble using the assumption of small thickness of the electron sheath on the boundary of the bubble. Unlike previous models, we derive simple explicit expressions for the components of electromagnetic fields not only in the vicinity of the center of the bubble, but in the whole volume of the bubble (including the areas of driving or accelerated bunches) as well as outside it. Moreover, we apply the results to the case of radially non-uniform plasma and, in particular, to plasma with a hollow channel. The obtained results are verified with 3D particle-in-cell simulations which show a good correspondence to our model.

  19. A hierarchy of simple hyperbolic two-fluid models for bubbly flows

    CERN Document Server

    Drui, Florence; Kokh, Samuel; Massot, Marc

    2016-01-01

    With the objective of modeling both separate and disperse two-phase flows, we use in this paper a methodology for deriving two-fluid models that do not assume any flow topology. This methodology is based on a variational principle and on entropy dissipation requirement. Some of the models that are such derived and studied are already known in the contexts of the description of separate-or disperse-phase flows. However, we here propose an arrangement of these models into a hierarchy based on their links through relaxation parameters. Moreover, the models are shown to be compatible with the description of a monodisperse bubbly flow and, within this frame, the relaxation parameters can be identified. This identification is finally verified and discussed through comparisons with experimental measures of sound dispersion and with dispersion relations of a reference model for bubbly media.

  20. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  1. Speculative bubbles and crashes in stock markets: an interacting-agent model of speculative activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizoji, Taisei

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we present an interacting-agent model of speculative activity explaining bubbles and crashes in stock markets. We describe stock markets through an infinite-range Ising model to formulate the tendency of traders getting influenced by the investment attitude of other traders. Bubbles and crashes are understood and described qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of the classical phase transitions. When the interactions among traders become stronger and reach some critical values, a second-order phase transition and critical behavior can be observed, and a bull market phase and a bear market phase appear. When the system stays at the bull market phase, speculative bubbles occur in the stock market. For a certain range of the investment environment (the external field), multistability and hysteresis phenomena are observed. When the investment environment reaches some critical values, the rapid changes (the first-order phase transitions) in the distribution of investment attitude are caused. The phase transition from a bull market phase to a bear market phase is considered as a stock market crash. Furthermore, we estimate the parameters of the model using the actual financial data. As an example of large crashes we analyze Japan crisis (the bubble and the subsequent crash in the Japanese stock market in 1987-1992), and show that the good quality of the fits, as well as the consistency of the parameter values are obtained from Japan crisis. The results of the empirical study demonstrate that Japan crisis can be explained quite naturally by the model that bubbles and crashes have their origin in the collective crowd behavior of many interacting agents.

  2. Enriching particles on a bubble through drainage: Measuring and modeling the concentration of microbial particles in a bubble film at rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. L. Walls

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of microbes and other particulates is frequently enriched in the droplets produced by bursting bubbles. As a bubble rises to the ocean surface, particulates in the bulk liquid can be transported to the sea surface microlayer by attaching to the bubble’s interface. When the bubble eventually ruptures, a fraction of these particulates is often ejected into the surroundings in film droplets with a particulate concentration that is higher than in the liquid from which they formed. The precise mechanisms responsible for this enrichment are unclear, yet such enrichment at the ocean surface influences important exchange processes with the atmosphere. Here we provide evidence that drainage, coupled with scavenging, is responsible for the enrichment. By simultaneously recording the drainage and rupture effects with high-speed and standard photography, we directly measured the particulate concentrations in the thin film of a bubble cap at the moment before it ruptures. We observed that the enrichment factor strongly depends on the film thickness at rupture, and developed a physical model, based on scavenging and drainage, that is consistent with our observations. We have also demonstrated that this model is quantitatively consistent with prior observations of film drop enrichment, indicating its potential for a broader range of applications in the study of the sea surface microlayer and related phenomena.

  3. Numerical Modelling and Simulation of Chemical Reactions in a Nano-Pulse Discharged Bubble for Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuchen; Satoshi, Uehara; Hidemasa, Takana; Hideya, Nishiyama

    2016-09-01

    A zero-dimensional model to simulate a nano-pulse-discharged bubble in water was developed. The model consists of gas and liquid phases corresponding to the inside and outside of the bubble, respectively. The diffusions of chemical species from the gas to the liquid phase through the bubble interface was also investigated. The initial gas is Ar, but includes a little H2O and O2 in the bubble. The time evolution of the OH concentration in the liquid phase was mainly investigated as an important species for water treatment. It was shown that OH was generated in the bubble and then diffused into the liquid. With the application of a continuous nano-pulse discharge, more OH radicals were generated as the frequency increased at a low voltage for a given power consumption. supported partially by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI (No. 26249015)

  4. Bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Vallée, Nicolas; Bourdon, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have highlighted that bubble-induced platelet aggregation is a predictor index of decompression sickness (DCS) severity in animals and bubble formation after a single air dive in humans. The present study attempted to investigate plasmatic indexes of the coagulation system and platelet activation in our rat model of DCS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one experimental group with a hyperbaric exposure and one control group maintained at atmospheric pressure. Rats were compressed to 1,000 kPa (90 m saltwater) for 45 min while breathing air. The onset of death time and DCS symptoms were recorded during a 30-min observed period after rats had surfaced. Plasmatic indexes were platelet factor 4 (PF4) for platelet activation, soluble glycoprotein V (sGPV) for thrombin generation, and thrombin-antithrombin complexes for the coagulation system. Blood samples for a platelet count and markers were taken 3 wk before the experimental protocol and within the 30 min after rats had surfaced. We confirmed a correlation between the percent fall in platelet count and DCS severity. Plasmatic levels of sGPV and PF4 were significantly increased after the hyperbaric exposure, with no change in the control group. The present study confirms platelet consumption as a potential index for evaluating decompression stress and DCS severity. The results point to the participation of thrombin generation in the coagulation cascade and platelet activation in bubble-induced platelet aggregation. In our animal model of DCS, the results cannot prejudge the mechanisms of platelet activation between bubble-induced vessel wall injury and bubble-blood component interactions.

  5. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  6. Modeling nanoparticle–alveolar epithelial cell interactions under breathing conditions using captive bubble surfactometry

    OpenAIRE

    Schürch, David; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Clift, Martin J D; Raemy, David; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Gehr, Peter; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Many advances have been made in recent years in cell culture models of the epithelial barrier of the lung from simple monolayers to complex 3-D systems employing different cell types. However, the vast majority of these models still present a static air–liquid interface which is unrealistic given the dynamic nature of breathing. We present here a method where epithelial lung cells are integrated into a system, the captive bubble surfactometer, which allows the cyclical compression and expansi...

  7. Mixed Causal-Noncausal AR Processes and the Modelling of Explosive Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Sébastien; Zakoian, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Noncausal autoregressive models with heavy-tailed errors generate locally explosive processes and therefore provide a natural framework for modelling bubbles in economic and financial time series. We investigate the probability properties of mixed causal-noncausal autoregressive processes, assuming the errors follow a stable non-Gaussian distribution. We show that the tails of the conditional distribution are lighter than those of the errors, and we emphasize the presence of ARCH effects and ...

  8. Modeling of Multisize Bubbly Flow and Application to the Simulation of Boiling Flows with the Neptune_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Morel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modeling of boiling multisize bubbly flows and its application to the simulation of the DEBORA experiment. We follow the method proposed originally by Kamp, assuming a given mathematical expression for the bubble diameter pdf. The original model is completed by the addition of some new terms for vapor compressibility and phase change. The liquid-to-interface heat transfer term, which essentially determines the bubbles condensation rate in the DEBORA experiment, is also modeled with care. First numerical results realized with the Neptune_CFD code are presented and discussed.

  9. A measurement model for real estate bubble size based on the panel data analysis: An empirical case study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fengyun; Liu, Deqiang; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong; Wang, Deqing

    2017-01-01

    Employing the fundamental value of real estate determined by the economic fundamentals, a measurement model for real estate bubble size is established based on the panel data analysis. Using this model, real estate bubble sizes in various regions in Japan in the late 1980s and in recent China are examined. Two panel models for Japan provide results, which are consistent with the reality in the 1980s where a commercial land price bubble appeared in most area and was much larger than that of re...

  10. Statistical correlations and risk analyses techniques for a diving dual phase bubble model and data bank using massively parallel supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienke, B R; O'Leary, T R

    2008-05-01

    Linking model and data, we detail the LANL diving reduced gradient bubble model (RGBM), dynamical principles, and correlation with data in the LANL Data Bank. Table, profile, and meter risks are obtained from likelihood analysis and quoted for air, nitrox, helitrox no-decompression time limits, repetitive dive tables, and selected mixed gas and repetitive profiles. Application analyses include the EXPLORER decompression meter algorithm, NAUI tables, University of Wisconsin Seafood Diver tables, comparative NAUI, PADI, Oceanic NDLs and repetitive dives, comparative nitrogen and helium mixed gas risks, USS Perry deep rebreather (RB) exploration dive,world record open circuit (OC) dive, and Woodville Karst Plain Project (WKPP) extreme cave exploration profiles. The algorithm has seen extensive and utilitarian application in mixed gas diving, both in recreational and technical sectors, and forms the bases forreleased tables and decompression meters used by scientific, commercial, and research divers. The LANL Data Bank is described, and the methods used to deduce risk are detailed. Risk functions for dissolved gas and bubbles are summarized. Parameters that can be used to estimate profile risk are tallied. To fit data, a modified Levenberg-Marquardt routine is employed with L2 error norm. Appendices sketch the numerical methods, and list reports from field testing for (real) mixed gas diving. A Monte Carlo-like sampling scheme for fast numerical analysis of the data is also detailed, as a coupled variance reduction technique and additional check on the canonical approach to estimating diving risk. The method suggests alternatives to the canonical approach. This work represents a first time correlation effort linking a dynamical bubble model with deep stop data. Supercomputing resources are requisite to connect model and data in application.

  11. A measurement model for real estate bubble size based on the panel data analysis: An empirical case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengyun; Liu, Deqiang; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong; Wang, Deqing

    2017-01-01

    Employing the fundamental value of real estate determined by the economic fundamentals, a measurement model for real estate bubble size is established based on the panel data analysis. Using this model, real estate bubble sizes in various regions in Japan in the late 1980s and in recent China are examined. Two panel models for Japan provide results, which are consistent with the reality in the 1980s where a commercial land price bubble appeared in most area and was much larger than that of residential land. This provides evidence of the reliability of our model, overcoming the limit of existing literature with this method. The same models for housing prices in China at both the provincial and city levels show that contrary to the concern of serious housing price bubble in China, over-valuing in recent China is much smaller than that in 1980s Japan. PMID:28273141

  12. A measurement model for real estate bubble size based on the panel data analysis: An empirical case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyun Liu

    Full Text Available Employing the fundamental value of real estate determined by the economic fundamentals, a measurement model for real estate bubble size is established based on the panel data analysis. Using this model, real estate bubble sizes in various regions in Japan in the late 1980s and in recent China are examined. Two panel models for Japan provide results, which are consistent with the reality in the 1980s where a commercial land price bubble appeared in most area and was much larger than that of residential land. This provides evidence of the reliability of our model, overcoming the limit of existing literature with this method. The same models for housing prices in China at both the provincial and city levels show that contrary to the concern of serious housing price bubble in China, over-valuing in recent China is much smaller than that in 1980s Japan.

  13. A measurement model for real estate bubble size based on the panel data analysis: An empirical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengyun; Liu, Deqiang; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong; Wang, Deqing

    2017-01-01

    Employing the fundamental value of real estate determined by the economic fundamentals, a measurement model for real estate bubble size is established based on the panel data analysis. Using this model, real estate bubble sizes in various regions in Japan in the late 1980s and in recent China are examined. Two panel models for Japan provide results, which are consistent with the reality in the 1980s where a commercial land price bubble appeared in most area and was much larger than that of residential land. This provides evidence of the reliability of our model, overcoming the limit of existing literature with this method. The same models for housing prices in China at both the provincial and city levels show that contrary to the concern of serious housing price bubble in China, over-valuing in recent China is much smaller than that in 1980s Japan.

  14. A Generalized turbulent dispersion model for bubbly flow numerical simulation in NEPTUNE-CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviéville, Jérôme, E-mail: Jerome-marcel.lavieville@edf.fr; Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Guingo, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guingo@edf.fr; Baudry, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.baudry@edf.fr; Mimouni, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    The NEPTUNE-CFD code, based upon an Eulerian multi-fluid model, is developed within the framework of the NEPTUNE project, financially supported by EDF (Electricité de France), CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) and AREVA-NP. NEPTUNE-CFD is mainly focused on Nuclear Safety applications involving two-phase water-steam flows, like two-phase Pressurized Shock (PTS) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB). Many of these applications involve bubbly flows, particularly, for application to flows in PWR fuel assemblies, including studies related to DNB. Considering a very usual model for interfacial forces acting on bubbles, including drag, virtual mass and lift forces, the turbulent dispersion force is often added to moderate the lift effect in orthogonal directions to the main flow and get the right dispersion shape. This paper presents a formal derivation of this force, considering on the one hand, the fluctuating part of drag and virtual mass, and on the other hand, Turbulent Pressure derivation obtained by comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bubbles motion. An extension of the Tchen’s theory is used to express the turbulent kinetic energy of bubbles and the two-fluid turbulent covariance tensor in terms of liquid turbulent velocities and time scale. The model obtained by this way, called Generalized Turbulent Dispersion Model (GTD), does not require any user parameter. The model is validated against Liu & Bankoff air-water experiment, Arizona State University (ASU) experiment, DEBORA experiment and Texas A&M University (TAMU) boiling flow experiments.

  15. Acoustic emission noise from sodium vapour bubble collapsing: detection, interpretation, modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentico, G.; Pacilio, V.; Papalia, B.; Taglienti, S.; Tosi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium vapour bubble collapsing is detected by means of piezoelectric accelorometers coupled to the test section via short waveguides. The output analog signal is processed by transforming it into a time series of pulses through the setting of an amplitude threshold and the shaping of a standard pulse (denominated 'event') every time the signal crosses that border. The number of events is counted in adjacent and equal time duration samples and the waiting time distribution between contiguous events is measured. Up to the moment, six kinetic properties have been found for the mentioned time series. They help in setting a stochastic model in which the subministration of energy into a liquid sodium medium induces the formation of vapour bubbles and their consequent collapsing delivers acoustic pulses. Finally, a simulation procedure is carried out: a Polya's urn model is adopted for simulating event sequences with a priori established requisites.

  16. Comparing Active Vision Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  17. Comparing active vision models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  18. Comparative analysis of the effects of hubble-bubble (Sheesha) and cigarette smoking on respiratory and metabolic parameters in hubble-bubble and cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutairi, Sana S; Shihab-Eldeen, Aida A; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun A; Anwar, Alia Aisha

    2006-07-01

    Hazard of smoking tobacco is believed to be minimized by smoking hubble-bubble (HB) instead of cigarettes. Our aims were to (i) develop an assay for estimating nicotine and cotinine; and (ii) evaluate the effect of smoking on respiratory and metabolic parameters in cigarette and HB smokers. Urine samples were collected from 152 volunteer smokers (75 cigarette and 77 HB) as well as from 16 healthy controls. We optimized an HPLC method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine. Subjects were asked to complete a chronic respiratory symptoms questionnaire and to undergo spirometry. Fasting blood samples were collected for the determination of their lipid profile. The intra-assay coefficients of variation for nicotine and cotinine were 16.6% and 6.6%, respectively. The mean of cotinine in cigarette smokers (1321.4 ng/mL) was significantly (P = 0.008) higher than the mean cotinine (677.6 ng/mL) in HB smokers. The mean nicotine level in cigarette smokers (1487.3 ng/mL) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher than the mean nicotine (440.5 ng/mL) in HB smoker. The urinary cotinine and nicotine levels of the control subjects were lower than the detection levels of the assay. The mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower in cigarette smokers (0.99 mmol/L) compared with HB smoker smokers (1.02 mmol/L) but this was not significant (P = 0.28). Spirometric values were comparable among the three groups but the chronic respiratory symptoms in the smoking groups appeared at an earlier age in the HB smokers compared with the cigarettes smokers (P < 0.05). Smoking HB does not reduce the risk of tobacco exposure and it's potentially harmful metabolites on health.

  19. A Nonlinear Super-Exponential Rational Model of Speculative Financial Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Andersen, J. V.

    Keeping a basic tenet of economic theory, rational expectations, we model the nonlinear positive feedback between agents in the stock market as an interplay between nonlinearity and multiplicative noise. The derived hyperbolic stochastic finite-time singularity formula transforms a Gaussian white noise into a rich time series possessing all the stylized facts of empirical prices, as well as accelerated speculative bubbles preceding crashes. We use the formula to invert the two years of price history prior to the recent crash on the Nasdaq (April 2000) and prior to the crash in the Hong Kong market associated with the Asian crisis in early 1994. These complex price dynamics are captured using only one exponent controlling the explosion, the variance and mean of the underlying random walk. This offers a new and powerful detection tool of speculative bubbles and herding behavior.

  20. A Study of Drag Force in Isothermal Bubbly Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Li

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Driven by the extensive demands of simulating highly concentrated gas bubbly flows in many engineering fields, numerical studies have been performed to investigate the neighbouring effect of a swarm of bubbles on the interfacial drag forces. In this study, a novel drag coefficient correlation (Simonnet et al., 2007 in terms of local void fraction coupled with the population balance model based on average bubble number density (ABND has been implemented and compared with Ishii-Zuber densely distributed fluid particles drag model. The predicted local radial distributions of three primitive variables: gas void fraction, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and gas velocity, are validated against the experimental data of Hibiki et al. (2001. In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results are achieved by both drag force models. With additional consideration for closely packed bubbles, the latest coefficient model by Simonnet et al. (2007 shows considerably better performance in capturing the reduction of drag forces incurred by neighbouring bubbles.

  1. Tracking of Bubble Trajectories in Vertical Pipes in Bubbly Flow Regime by Coupling Lagrangian, Eulerian and 3D Random Walks Models: Validation with Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Muñoz-Cobo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A set of air-water experiments has been performed under isothermal upward concurrent flow conditions, in a vertical column. The interfacial velocity, the bubble interfacial area and the void fraction distributions have been measured. Numerical simulation of these experiments were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code which tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles, with an Eulerian one. In the Eulerian solver the velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS. The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate transport equations were simultaneously solved by using the k, epsilon model in a (r,z grid by the finite volume method and the SIMPLER algorithm. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian calculations were performed in parallel and an iterative self-consistent method was developed. The turbulence induced by the bubbles is an important issue considered in this paper, in order to obtain good predictions of the void fraction distribution and the interfacial velocity at different gas and liquid flow conditions. The Eulerian Code was upgraded from an axisymmetric 2D code to a 3D code in order to improve the turbulence solution. The results of the 3D CFD code have been tested and show a good agreement with the experimental results. In this paper special attention is given to the coupling between the different models.

  2. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy....

  3. Evidence of speculative bubbles on the BOVESPA: an application of the Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Bergmann de Queiroz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The existence of bubbles in asset prices is a matter of great importance to governments and investors due to possible serious effects they may have on economies. In the case of shares, the presence of a price bubble can be seen by comparing prices and dividends in the long run. This study aimed to assess the occurrence of price bubbles in the Brazilian stock market, by comparing the IBOVESPA as price index and an index of dividends, built based on the methodology of IBOVESPA. The bubble was considered a unobserved state vector in a state-space model and was estimated using the Kalman filter. The results were compared with the standard present value model and intrinsic bubbles model (Froot e Obstfeld, 1991. Although the model establishes the presence of bubbles, the intrinsic bubbles model (Froot e Obstfeld, 1991 showed similar results with greater accuracy.

  4. MODELING OF DIESEL- COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUBBLY FLOW UNDER INFLUENCING OF A MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASANAIN A. ABDULWAHHAB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of a single compressed natural gas bubble in diesel flow with effecting magnetic flux is presented in this paper. The three dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to solve the Diesel and compressed natural gas laminar two phase flow in horizontal pipe. The simulation was carried out using COMSOL Multiphysic software version 4.4, Level-Set method. The interface between the gaseous and liquid phases was described as the zero level set of a smooth function. The results showed that compressed natural gas bubble under magnetic field grow up vertically to have bigger elliptical shape in the Diesel phase, doubling in diameter before it breaks away in two parts of 0.2 and 0.8 tesla. Also, it has been noted that the compressed natural gas bubble velocity is decreasing as the magnetic field is strengthening. The numerical procedure has been validated by comparing the computational results with experimental results reported in the literature where a good agreement was achieved.

  5. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  6. A MODEL TO ESTIMATE VOLUME CHANGE DUE TO RADIOLYTIC GAS BUBBLES AND THERMAL EXPANSION IN SOLUTION REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. SOUTO; A HEGER

    2001-02-01

    Aqueous homogeneous solution reactors have been proposed for the production of medical isotopes. However, the reactivity effects of fuel solution volume change, due to formation of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, have to be mitigated to allow steady-state operation of solution reactors. The results of the free run experiments analyzed indicate that the proposed model to estimate the void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors can accurately describe the observed behavior during the experiments. This void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and fuel solution thermal expansion can then be used in the investigation of reactivity effects in fissile solutions. In addition, these experiments confirm that the radiolytic gas bubbles are formed at a higher temperature than the fuel solution temperature. These experiments also indicate that the mole-weighted average for the radiolytic gas bubbles in uranyl fluoride solutions is about 1 {micro}m. Finally, it should be noted that another model, currently under development, would simulate the power behavior during the transient given the initial fuel solution level and density. The model is based on Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP computer code [Briesmeister, 1997] to obtain the reactor reactivity as a function of the fuel solution density, which, in turn, changes due to thermal expansion and radiolytic gas bubble formation.

  7. Modeling the film condensate fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the bubble membrane radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauley, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Thornborrow, J.O. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1992-01-01

    An analytical model of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of the condensate within the rotating Bubble Membrane Radiator is developed. The steady-state, three-dimensional heat transfer and flow equations were reduced to a set of third-order ordinary differential equations by employing similarity transformation techniques. These equations are then solved for the radial, axial, and angular flow distributions in the film condensate. Pressure, temperature, heat transfer, film thickness and mass flow rate distributions are also calculated. The analytical model is the basis of the SCRABBLE code which is used both as a zero-g design tool and a ground-test bed analyzer.

  8. The dynamics of underwater bubbles near deformable boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Charles Dean

    Bubble hydrodynamic simulations including re-entrant jet impact and penetration are performed using domain partitioning methods along with traditional boundary element techniques. By combining the new multi-subdomain scheme with the boundary conditions for jet impact and penetration presented by Zhang, Duncan and Chahine (1), continuous simulations of the jet impact and penetration process are achieved. The strategy is verified through comparisons with theoretical and numerical potential flow problems, and proves to be more stable than existing jet impact and penetration models (1). The fluid model is used to study bubble-bubble interactions and bubble-structure interaction phenomena. The fluid model is coupled to a nonlinear finite element code through fully nonlinear coupling equations. For the first time, stable fluid-structure interaction calculations with jet impact are performed. The method is used to simulate the interaction between a small explosion bubble and aluminum plates of different thicknesses. The results are compared with experimental results (2, 3), and the predicted bubble motions prior to and during jet penetration are in agreement with the measurements. In the experiments, secondary cavities form on the surface of the thinnest plate. The secondary cavitation is not rigorously modeled in the numerical scheme but reasonable agreement between predicted and measured plate strain was achieved. The simulations help identify the role of secondary cavitation in the interaction process. The multi-subdomain fluid model is also used to simulate the interaction between two explosion bubbles generated with a time delay between the two explosive detonations. The approach is verified through direct comparisons with experimental results (4, 5). The numerical model shows that when the time delay between the two detonations is small, the inertia of the fluid around each bubble is comparable, so the bubbles act as images of each other. For larger time delays

  9. Lithotripter shock wave interaction with a bubble near various biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, S. W.; Klaseboer, E.; Szeri, A. J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Following previous work on the dynamics of an oscillating bubble near a bio-material (Ohl et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6313-36) and the interaction of a bubble with a shockwave (Klaseboer et al 2007 J. Fluid Mech. 593 33-56), the present work concerns the interaction of a gas bubble with a traveling shock wave (such as from a lithotripter) in the vicinity of bio-materials such as fat, skin, muscle, cornea, cartilage, and bone. The bubble is situated in water (to represent a water-like biofluid). The bubble collapses are not spherically symmetric, but tend to feature a high speed jet. A few simulations are performed and compared with available experimental observations from Sankin and Zhong (2006 Phys. Rev. E 74 046304). The collapses of cavitation bubbles (created by laser in the experiment) near an elastic membrane when hit by a lithotripter shock wave are correctly captured by the simulation. This is followed by a more systematic study of the effects involved concerning shockwave bubble biomaterial interactions. If a subsequent rarefaction wave hits the collapsed bubble, it will re-expand to a very large size straining the bio-materials nearby before collapsing once again. It is noted that, for hard bio-material like bone, reflection of the shock wave at the bone—water interface can affect the bubble dynamics. Also the initial size of the bubble has a significant effect. Large bubbles (˜1 mm) will split into smaller bubbles, while small bubbles collapse with a high speed jet in the travel direction of the shock wave. The numerical model offers a computationally efficient way of understanding the complex phenomena involving the interplay of a bubble, a shock wave, and a nearby bio-material.

  10. Well-posedness and convergence of cfd two-fluid model for bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidheeswaran, Avinash

    The current research is focused on developing a well-posed multidimensional CFD two-fluid model (TFM) for bubbly flows. Two-phase flows exhibit a wide range of local flow instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, plume and jet instabilities. They arise due to the density difference and/or the relative velocity between the two phases. A physically correct TFM is essential to model these instabilities. However, this is not the case with the TFMs in numerical codes, which can be shown to have complex eigenvalues due to incompleteness and hence are ill-posed as initial value problems. A common approach to regularize an incomplete TFM is to add artificial physics or numerically by using a coarse grid or first order methods. However, it eliminates the local physical instabilities along with the undesired high frequency oscillations resulting from the ill-posedness. Thus, the TFM loses the capability to predict the inherent local dynamics of the two-phase flow. The alternative approach followed in the current study is to introduce appropriate physical mechanisms that make the TFM well-posed. First a well-posed 1-D TFM for vertical bubbly flows is analyzed with characteristics, and dispersion analysis. When an incomplete TFM is used, it results in high frequency oscillations in the solution. It is demonstrated through the travelling void wave problem that, by adding the missing short wavelength physics to the numerical TFM, this can be removed by making the model well-posed. To extend the limit of well-posedness beyond the well-known TFM of Pauchon and Banerjee [1], the mechanism of collision is considered, and it is shown by characteristics analysis that the TFM then becomes well-posed for all void fractions of practical interest. The aforementioned ideas are then extended to CFD TFM. The travelling void wave problem is again used to demonstrate that by adding appropriate physics, the problem of ill-posedness is resolved. Furthermore, issues pertaining to

  11. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic optimization of neural network and fuzzy logic for oil bubble point pressure modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar, Mohammad [Islamic Azad University, Kharg (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholami, Amin [Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, Mojtaba [Islamic Azad University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Bubble point pressure is a critical pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) property of reservoir fluid, which plays an important role in almost all tasks involved in reservoir and production engineering. We developed two sophisticated models to estimate bubble point pressure from gas specific gravity, oil gravity, solution gas oil ratio, and reservoir temperature. Neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system are powerful tools for extracting the underlying dependency of a set of input/output data. However, the mentioned tools are in danger of sticking in local minima. The present study went further by optimizing fuzzy logic and neural network models using the genetic algorithm in charge of eliminating the risk of being exposed to local minima. This strategy is capable of significantly improving the accuracy of both neural network and fuzzy logic models. The proposed methodology was successfully applied to a dataset of 153 PVT data points. Results showed that the genetic algorithm can serve the neural network and neuro-fuzzy models from local minima trapping, which might occur through back-propagation algorithm.

  13. Bubble coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orvalho, Sandra; Ruzicka, Marek C.; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to present new experimental data on the effect of the bubble approach velocity and liquid viscosity on pairwise bubble coalescence. Measurements were performed to investigate the dynamics of bubble coalescence under well-defined laboratory conditions. Air and pure

  14. Liquid-bubble Interaction under Surf Zone Breaking Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, M.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-bubble interaction, especially in complex two-phase bubbly flow under breaking waves, is still poorly understood. Derakhti and Kirby (2014a,b) have recently studied bubble entrainment and turbulence modulation by dispersed bubbles under isolated unsteady breaking waves along with extensive model verifications and convergence tests. In this presentation, we continue this examination with attention turned to the simulation of periodic surf zone breaking waves. In addition, the relative importance of preferential accumulation of dispersed bubbles in coherent vortex cores is investigated. Heavier-than-liquid particles, i.e. sediment, tend to accumulate in regions of high strain rate and avoid regions of intense vorticity. In contrast, lighter-than-liquid particles such as bubbles tend to congregate in vortical regions. We perform a three dimensional (3D) large-eddy simulation (LES) using a Navier-Stokes solver extended to incorporate entrained bubble populations, using an Eulerian-Eulerian formulation for the polydisperse bubble phase. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used for free surface tracking. The model accounts for momentum exchange between dispersed bubbles and liquid phase as well as bubble-induced dissipation. We investigate the formation and evolution of breaking-induced turbulent coherent structures (BTCS) under both plunging and spilling periodic breaking waves as well as BTCS's role on the intermittent 3D distributions of bubble void fraction in the surf zone. We particularly examine the correlation between bubble void fractions and Q-criterion values to quantify this interaction. Also, the vertical transport of dispersed bubbles by downburst type coherent structures in the transition region is compared to that by obliquely descending eddies. All the results are summarized at different zones from outer to inner surf zone.

  15. Mechanics of Bubbles in Sludges and Slurries Modeling Studies of Particulate Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip A. Gauglitz; Guillermo Terrones; Susan J. Muller; Morton M. Denn; William R. Rossen

    2002-01-07

    The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks that are known to retain and release bubbles composed of flammable gases. Characterizing and understanding the behavior of these bubbles is important for the safety issues associated with the flammable gases for both ongoing waste storage and future waste-retrieval operations. The retained bubbles are known to respond to small barometric pressure changes, though in a complex manner with unusual hysteresis occurring in some tanks in the relationship between bubble volume and pressure, or V-P hysteresis. With careful analysis, information on the volume of retained gas and the interactions of the waste and the bubbles can be determined.

  16. Pharmacological intervention against bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Vallée, Nicolas; Ignatescu, Mihaela; Bourdon, Lionel

    2011-03-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) with alterations in coagulation system and formation of platelet thrombi occurs when a subject is subjected to a reduction in environmental pressure. Blood platelet consumption after decompression is clearly linked to bubble formation in humans and offers an index for evaluating DCS severity in animal models. Previous studies highlighted a predominant involvement of platelet activation and thrombin generation in bubble-induced platelet aggregation (BIPA). To study the mechanism of the BIPA in DCS, we examined the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), heparin (Hep), and clopidogrel (Clo), with anti-thrombotic dose pretreatment in a rat model of DCS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 208) were randomly assigned to one experimental group treated before the hyperbaric exposure and decompression protocol either with ASA (3×100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), n = 30), Clo (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), n = 60), Hep (500 IU/kg, n = 30), or to untreated group (n = 49). Rats were first compressed to 1,000 kPa (90 msw) for 45 min and then decompressed to surface in 38 min. In a control experiment, rats were treated with ASA (n = 13), Clo (n = 13), or Hep (n = 13) and maintained at atmospheric pressure for an equivalent period of time. Onset of DCS symptoms and death were recorded during a 60-min observation period after surfacing. DCS evaluation included pulmonary and neurological signs. Blood samples for platelet count (PC) were taken 30 min before hyperbaric exposure and 30 min after surfacing. Clo reduces the DCS mortality risk (mortality rate: 3/60 with Clo, 15/30 with ASA, 21/30 with Hep, and 35/49 in the untreated group) and DCS severity (neurological DCS incidence: 9/60 with Clo, 6/30 with ASA, 5/30 with Hep, and 12/49 in the untreated group). Clo reduced fall in platelet count and BIPA (-4,5% with Clo, -19.5% with ASA, -19,9% with Hep, and -29,6% in the untreated group). ASA, which inhibits the thromboxane A2 pathway, and Hep, which inhibits thrombin

  17. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, F.J. [NIS-6: Advanced Nuclear Technology, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [ESA-EA: Engineering Sciences and Application, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  18. Understanding the bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    that are identified to exist between the Internet and housing market bubbles: uncertainty and sentiments. The iteration between uncertainty and sentiments leads to the emergence of the third commonality: residue. The residue is the difference between the actors’ overall sentiment about exaggerated future prospects......Understanding how and why bubbles occur as well as whether these could be anticipated, managed, or even prevented is equally important as to know how to recover from them. To address these questions, a model of bubble emergence is put forward. The model builds on two fundamental commonalities...... of a new venture and intended outcomes of that new venture; the higher the residue, the higher the likelihood of the bubble emergence; as residue increases, the likelihood of bubble burst increases. One question that arises is whether one can manage the hype, hence the residue. In this, it is maintained...

  19. Comparing plasma bubble occurrence rates at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes during high and low solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xiong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the multi-year data base (2001–2009 of CHAMP Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP data and GRACE K-Band Ranging (KBR1B data, typical features of ionospheric plasma irregularities are studied at the altitudes of CHAMP (300–400 km and GRACE (~500 km. The phenomena we are focusing on are the equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs. Similar seasonal/longitudinal (S/L distributions of EPB have been found at both CHAMP and GRACE altitudes during solar active and quiet years. Peak EPB occurrence rates, defined as number of events within an S/L bin divided by the number of passes over that bin, decrease from the high and moderate solar flux period (2001–2005 to the low solar flux period (2005–2009 from 80% to 60% and 60% to 40% at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes, respectively. On average the occurrence rate increases linearly with solar flux at about the same rate at CHAMP and GRACE. For high flux levels (P10.7>200 non-linear increases are observed at GRACE. The occurrence rate increases rapidly after 19:00 local time (LT during high solar flux periods. Around solar minimum rates increase more gently and peak around 22:00 LT. The highest occurrence rates are encountered at latitudes around 10° north and south of the dip equator. Results from the two altitudes support the notion that EPBs form regions of depleted plasma along geomagnetic fluxtubes. It is shown for the first time that in regions of high occurrence rates EPBs are associated with fluxtubes reaching greater apex heights than those in regions of low rates.

  20. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  1. Revised numerical model for F{sub 2} bubble breakdown in molten flibe and its economics in the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, K., E-mail: kelvin.seto@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model of the breakdown for a fluorine bubble due to break-up and chemical reactions with dissolved UF{sub 4} and PuF{sub 4} in the molten salt reactor (MSR) volatilization process was revised. The updated model utilized a more realistic, 1.0 cm F{sub 2} bubble to study the breakdown process in the idealized MSR fuel purification vessel. Although more accurate reaction interface and F{sub 2} reactivity values were used, chemical reactions were still found to be the primary cause of bubble breakdown. The importance of efficiency in F{sub 2} usage in the purification process on the economic and safety point of view was discussed. (author)

  2. Curvature driven motion of a bubble in a toroidal Hele-Shaw cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; Cox, S J; Schröder-Turk, G E

    2017-08-06

    We investigate the equilibrium properties of a single area-minimizing bubble trapped between two narrowly separated parallel curved plates. We begin with the case of a bubble trapped between concentric spherical plates. We develop a model which shows that the surface energy of the bubble is lower when confined between spherical plates than between flat plates. We confirm our findings by comparing against Surface Evolver simulations. We then derive a simple model for a bubble between arbitrarily curved parallel plates. The energy is found to be higher when the local Gaussian curvature of the plates is negative and lower when the curvature is positive. To check the validity of the model, we consider a bubble trapped between concentric tori. In the toroidal case, we find that the sensitivity of the bubble's energy to the local curvature acts as a geometric potential capable of driving bubbles from regions with negative to positive curvature.

  3. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  4. Numerical Study on Mass Transfer of a Vapor Bubble Rising in Very High Viscous Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kunugi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on a bubble rising behavior in a molten glass because it is important to improve the efficiency of removal of bubbles from the molten glass. On the other hand, it is expected that some gas species which exists in a bubble are transferred into the molten glass through the bubble interface, i.e., the mass transfer, subsequently, it may cause a bubble contraction in the molten glass. In this paper, in order to understand the bubble rising behavior with its contraction caused by the mass transfer through the bubble interface in the very high viscous fluid such as the molten glass, a bubble contraction model has been developed. The direct numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multi-interface Advection and Reconstruction Solver coupled with the mass transfer equation and the bubble contraction model regarding the mass transfer from the rising bubble in very high viscous fluid have been performed. Here, the working fluids were water vapor as the gas species and the molten glass as the very high viscous fluid. Also, the jump conditions at the bubble interface for the mass transfer were examined. Furthermore, the influence of the bubble contraction for the bubble rising compared to that in the water as a normal viscous fluid was investigated. From the result of the numerical simulations, it was found that the bubble rising behavior was strongly affected not only by the viscosity of the working fluid but also by the bubble contraction due to the mass transfer through the bubble interface.

  5. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  6. Vapour bubble growth and detachment at the wall of shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhar, G.; Riboux, G.; Colin, C. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2009-05-15

    N-pentane micro-bubbles are created on a small heated film flushed-mounted at the lower wall of a horizontal channel. The bubble growth and detachment in the shear flow are filmed with a high-speed video camera. The time evolutions of the bubble radius and bubble centre position are measured from image processing. The growth rate is determined and compared to models of the literature. The experimental results are also used to estimate the different forces acting on the bubble during its growth and after its detachment. (orig.)

  7. No-Bubble Condition: Model-free Tests in Housing Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Giglio; Matteo Maggiori; Johannes Stroebel

    2014-01-01

    We test for the existence of housing bubbles associated with a failure of the transversality condition that requires the present value of payments occurring infinitely far in the future to be zero. The most prominent such bubble is the classic rational bubble. We study housing markets in the U.K. and Singapore, where residential property ownership takes the form of either leaseholds or freeholds. Leaseholds are finitematurity, pre-paid, and tradable ownership contracts with maturities often e...

  8. Issues for Achieving an Experimental Model Concerning Bubble Deck Concrete Slab with Spherical Gaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergiu Călin; Ciprian Asăvoaie; N. Florea

    2010-01-01

    After realizing numerous constructions in the world, which use Bubble Deck concrete slabs with spherical gaps, valuable information were gathered, allowing a rigorous processing and systematization...

  9. Stratification of bubbly horizontal flows: modeling and experimental validation; Stratification des ecoulements a bulles horizontaux: modelisation et validation experimentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottin, M.

    2010-12-17

    Hot films and optical probes enabled the acquisition of measurements in bubbly flows at 5, 20 and 40 diameters from the inlet of the vein on the METERO facility which test section is a horizontal circular pipe of 100 mm inner diameter. The distribution of the different phases, the existence of coalescence and sedimentation mechanisms, the influence of the liquid and gas flow rates, the radial and axial evolutions are analyzed thanks to fast camera videos and numerous and varied experimental results (void fraction, bubbles sizes, interfacial area, mean and fluctuating velocities and turbulent kinetic energy of the liquid phase). Some models, based on the idea that the flow reaches an equilibrium state sufficiently far from the inlet of the pipe, were developed to simulate mean interfacial area and turbulent kinetic energy transports in bubbly flows. (author)

  10. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  11. Modeling Bubble Flow and Current Density Distribution in an Alkaline Electrolysis Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandra S. Jupudi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bubbles on the current density distribution over the electrodes of an alkaline electrolyzer cell is studied using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. Model includes Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow methodology to model the multiphase flow of Hydrogen and Oxygen with water and the behavior of each phase is accounted for using first principle. Hydrogen/Oxygen evolution, flow field and current density distribution are incorporated in the model to account for the complicated physics involved in the process. Fluent 6.2 is used to solve two-phase flow and electrochemistry is incorporated using UDF (User Defined Function feature of Fluent. Model is validated with mesh refinement study and by comparison with experimental measurements. Model is found to replicate the effect of cell voltage and inter-electrode gap (distance between the electrodes on current density accurately. Further, model is found to capture the existence of optimum cell height. The validated model is expected to be a very useful tool in the design and optimization of alkaline electrolyzer cells.

  12. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  13. Identifying bubble collapse in a hydrothermal system using hiddden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benitez, M.C.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Chouet, Bernard A.

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in July 2003 and lasting through September 2003, the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park exhibited an unusual increase in ground temperature and hydrothermal activity. Using hidden Markov model theory, we identify over five million high-frequency (>15 Hz) seismic events observed at a temporary seismic station deployed in the basin in response to the increase in hydrothermal activity. The source of these seismic events is constrained to within ~100 m of the station, and produced ~3500–5500 events per hour with mean durations of ~0.35–0.45 s. The seismic event rate, air temperature, hydrologic temperatures, and surficial water flow of the geyser basin exhibited a marked diurnal pattern that was closely associated with solar thermal radiance. We interpret the source of the seismicity to be due to the collapse of small steam bubbles in the hydrothermal system, with the rate of collapse being controlled by surficial temperatures and daytime evaporation rates.

  14. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN A PILOT-SCALE OZONE BUBBLE-DIFFUSER CONTACTOR - II: MODEL VALIDATION AND APPLICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ADR model developed in Part I of this study was successfully validated with experimenta data obtained for the inactivation of C. parvum and C. muris oocysts with a pilot-scale ozone-bubble diffuser contactor operated with treated Ohio River water. Kinetic parameters, required...

  15. Influence of drag closures and inlet conditions on bubble dynamics and flow behavior inside a bubble column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Asad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hydrodynamics of a bubble column is investigated numerically using the discrete bubble model, which tracks the dispersed bubbles individually in a liquid column. The discrete bubble model is combined with the volume of fluid approach to account for a proper free surface boundary condition at the liquid–gas interface. This improves describing the backflow region, which takes place close to the wall region. The numerical simulation is conducted by means of the open source computational fluid dynamics library OpenFOAM®. In order to validate the numerical model, experimental results of a bubble column are used. The numerical prediction shows an overall good agreement compared to the experimental data. The effect of injection conditions and the influence of the drag closures on bubble dynamics are investigated in the current paper. Here, the significant effect of injection boundary conditions on bubble dynamics and flow velocity in the studied cavity is revealed. Moreover, the impact of the choice of the drag closure on the liquid velocity field and on bubble behavior is indicated by comparing three drag closures derived from former studies.

  16. Bubble dynamics in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Andreas [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Metzler, Ralf [NORDITA-Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2003-09-12

    The formation of local denaturation zones (bubbles) in double-stranded DNA is an important example of conformational changes of biological macromolecules. We study the dynamics of bubble formation in terms of a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density to find a bubble of size n base pairs at time t, on the basis of the free energy in the Poland-Scheraga model. Characteristic bubble closing and opening times can be determined from the corresponding first passage time problem, and are sensitive to the specific parameters entering the model. A multistate unzipping model with constant rates recently applied to DNA breathing dynamics (Altan-Bonnet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 138101) emerges as a limiting case. (letter to the editor)

  17. Bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we provide a unifying framework for a set of seemingly disparate models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies in financial markets. Markets operate by balancing intrinsic levels of risk and return. This seemingly simple observation is commonly over-looked by academics and practitioners alike. Our model shares its origins in statistical physics with others. However, under our approach, changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. This structure leads to an improved physical and econometric model. We develop models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies. The list of empirical applications is both interesting and topical and includes real-estate bubbles and the on-going Eurozone crisis. We close by comparing the results of our model with purely qualitative findings from the finance literature.

  18. Numerical Study of Bubble Area Evolution During Acoustic Droplet Vaporization-Enhanced HIFU Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X; Brian Fowlkes, J

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has the potential to shorten treatment time of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) while minimizing the possible effects of microbubbles along the propagation path. Distribution of the bubbles formed from the droplets during the treatment is the major factor shaping the therapeutic region. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the bubble area evolution during this treatment. Using a linear acoustic equation to describe the ultrasound field, a threshold range was defined that determines the amount of bubbles vaporized in the treated area. Acoustic parameters, such as sound speed, acoustic attenuation coefficient, and density, were treated as a function of the bubble size distribution and the gas void fraction, which were related to the vaporized bubbles in the medium. An effective pressure factor was proposed to account for the influence of the existing bubbles on the vaporization of the nearby droplets. The factor was obtained by fitting one experimental result and was then used to calculate bubble clouds in other experimental cases. Comparing the simulation results to these other experiments validated the model. The dynamic change of the pressure and the bubble distribution after exposure to over 20 pulses of HIFU are obtained. It is found that the bubble area grows from a grainlike shape to a "tadpole," with comparable dimensions and shape to those observed in experiments. The process was highly dynamic with the shape of the bubble area changing with successive HIFU pulses and the focal pressure. The model was further used to predict the shape of the bubble region triggered by HIFU when a bubble wall pre-exists. The results showed that the bubble wall helps prevent droplet vaporization on the distal side of the wall and forms a particularly shaped region with bubbles. This simulation model has predictive potential that could be beneficial in applications, such as cancer treatment, by parametrically studying conditions

  19. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  20. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Improvement of ore recovery efficiency in a flotation column cell using ultra-sonic enhanced bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, L. O.; Royer, J. J.; Filippova, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    The ore process flotation technique is enhanced by using external ultra-sonic waves. Compared to the classical flotation method, the application of ultrasounds to flotation fluids generates micro-bubbles by hydrodynamic cavitation. Flotation performances increase was modelled as a result of increased probabilities of the particle-bubble attachment and reduced detachment probability under sonication. A simplified analytical Navier-Stokes model is used to predict the effect of ultrasonic waves on bubble behavior. If the theory is verified by experimentation, it predicts that the ultrasonic waves would create cavitation micro-bubbles, smaller than the flotation bubble added by the gas sparger. This effect leads to increasing the number of small bubbles in the liquid which promote particle-bubble attachment through coalescence between bubbles and micro-bubbles. The decrease in the radius of the flotation bubbles under external vibration forces has an additional effect by enhancing the bubble-particle collision. Preliminary results performed on a potash ore seem to confirm the theory.

  2. A comparative study of water-steam distillation with water-bubble distillation techniques to increase the quality of patchouli essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Noor; Yandi, Nefri; Hermawati, Julianto, Tatang Shabur

    2017-03-01

    A comparative study of the quality of patchouli oil using Water-Steam Distillation (WSD) and Water Bubble Distillation (WBD) techniques has been studied. The raw materials were Patchouli plants from Samigaluh village, Kulon Progo district, Yogyakarta. This study is aimed to compare two distillation techniques in order to find out the optimal distillation technique to increase the content of patchouli alcohol (patchoulol) and the quality of patchouli oil. Pretreatment such as withering, drying, size reduction and light fermentation were intended to increase the yield. One kilogramm of patchouli was moisturized with 500 mL of aquadest. The light fermentation process was carried out for 20 hours in a dark container. Fermented patchouli was extracted for 6 hours using Water-Steam and Water Bubble Distillation techniques. Physical and chemical properties test of patchouli oil were performed using SNI standard No. SNI-06-2385-2006 and the chemical composition of patchouli oil was analysed by GC-MS. As the results, the higher yield oil is obtained using Water-Steam Distillation, i.e. 5.9% versus 2.4%. Spesific gravity, refractive index and acid number of patchouli oil in Water-Steam Distillation results did not meet the SNI standard, i.e. 0.991; 1.623 and 13.19, while the Water Bubble Distillation met the standard, i.e. 0.955; 1.510 and 6.61. The patchoulol content using Water Bubble Distillation technique is 61.53%, significant higher than those using Water-Steam Distillation, i.e. 38.24%. Thus, Water Bubble Distillation promises a potential technique to increase the content of patchoulol in the patchouli oil.

  3. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  4. Comparing root architectural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  5. Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Log Periodic Power Laws for Bubble Modelling but Were Afraid to Ask

    OpenAIRE

    Fantazzini, Dean; Geraskin, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Sornette et al. (1996), Sornette and Johansen (1997), Johansen et al. (2000) and Sornette (2003a) proposed that, prior to crashes, the mean function of a stock index price time series is characterized by a power law decorated with log-periodic oscillations, leading to a critical point that describes the beginning of the market crash. This paper reviews the original Log-Periodic Power Law (LPPL) model for financial bubble modelling, and discusses early criticism and recent generalizations prop...

  6. Electron acceleration in the bubble regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Oliver

    2014-02-03

    The bubble regime of laser-wakefield acceleration has been studied over the recent years as an important alternative to classical accelerators. Several models and theories have been published, in particular a theory which provides scaling laws for acceleration parameters such as energy gain and acceleration length. This thesis deals with numerical simulations within the bubble regime, their comparison to these scaling laws and data obtained from experiments, as well as some specific phenomenona. With a comparison of the scaling laws with numerical results a parameter scan was able to show a large parameter space in which simulation and theory agree. An investigation of the limits of this parameter space revealed boundaries to other regimes, especially at very high (a{sub 0} > 100) and very low laser amplitudes (a{sub 0} < 4). Comparing simulation data with data from experiments concerning laser pulse development and electron energies, it was found that experimental results can be adequately reproduced using the Virtual-Laser-Plasma-Laboratory code. In collaboration with the Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena synchrotron radiation emitted from the inside of the bubble was investigated. A simulation of the movement of the electrons inside the bubble together with time dependent histograms of the emitted radiation helped to prove that the majority of radiation created during a bubble acceleration originates from the inside of the bubble. This radiation can be used to diagnose the amplitude of oscillation of the trapped electrons. During a further study it was proven that the polarisation of synchrotron radiation from a bubble contains information about the exact oscillation direction. This oscillation was successfully controlled by using either a laser pulse with a tilted pulse front or an asymmetric laser pulse. First results of ongoing studies concerning injecting electrons into an existing bubble and a scheme called

  7. Spherical Solutions of an Underwater Explosion Bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the 1D explosion bubble flow field out to the first bubble minimum is examined in detail using four different models. The most detailed is based on the Euler equations and accounts for the internal bubble fluid motion, while the simplest links a potential water solution to a stationary, Isentropic bubble model. Comparison of the different models with experimental data provides insight into the influence of compressibility and internal bubble dynamics on the behavior of the explosion bubble.

  8. Effect of PEO coating on bubble behavior within a polycarbonate microchannel array: A model for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblyn, Matthew; Truszkowska, Agnieszka; Mohammadi, Mahshid; Heintz, Keely; McGuire, Joseph; Sharp, Kendra; Jovanovic, Goran

    2016-07-01

    Obstruction of fluid flow by stationary bubbles in a microchannel hemodialyzer decreases filtration performance and increases damage to blood cells through flow maldistribution. A polyethylene oxide (PEO)-polybutadiene (PB)-polyethylene oxide surface modification, previously shown to reduce protein fouling and water/air contact angle in polycarbonate microchannel hemodialyzers, can improve microchannel wettability and may reduce bubble stagnation by lessening the resistive forces that compete with fluid flow. In this study, the effect of the PEO-PB-PEO coating on bubble retention in a microchannel array was investigated. Polycarbonate microchannel surfaces were coated with PEO-PB-PEO triblock polymer via radiolytic grafting. Channel obstruction was measured for coated and uncoated microchannels after injecting a short stream of air bubbles into the device under average nominal water velocities of 0.9 to 7.2 cm/s in the channels. The presence of the PEO coating reduced obstruction of microchannels by stationary bubbles within the range of 1.8 to 3.6 cm/s, average nominal velocity. Numerical simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann method indicate that beneficial effects may be due to the maintenance of a lubricating, thin liquid film around the bubble. The determined effective range of the PEO coating for bubble management serves as an important design constraint. These findings serve to validate the multiutility of the PEO-PB-PEO coating (bubble lubrication, biocompatibility, and therapeutic loading). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 941-948, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variations in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  10. Modeling and simulation of the bubble-induced flow in wine fermentation vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed flow pattern analyses regarding wine fermentations conducted without mechanical agitation are limited to lab-scale investigations, as industrial size measurements are expensive and difficult to realize. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods can offer an alternative and more flexible approach to gain insight into such bubble induced fluid flows. Therefore, the aim of this study was to transfer the findings of existing research onto a CFD model capable of capturing the three- dimensional flow pattern in industrial scale wine fermentation vessels. First results were obtained by using an extended version of the OpenFOAM® (v.2.2.x solver multiphaseEulerFoam for modeling the gas-liquid two phase system. With parameters from the most vigorous phase of wine fermentation a fully developed, unsteady flow regime could be established after approx. 120 s of real time. Thereby the groundwork for further evaluations of e.g. mixing efficiency or cooling equipment optimizations with CFD methods is laid.

  11. Observations and modeling of magnetized plasma jets and bubbles launched into a transverse B-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward B., IV; van der Holst, Bart; Rogers, Barrett N.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-10-01

    Hot, dense, plasma structures launched from a coaxial plasma gun on the HelCat dual-source plasma device at the University of New Mexico drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the chamber's background magnetic field providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, shocks, as well as CME-like dynamics possibly relevant to the solar corona. Vector magnetic field data from an eleven-tipped B-dot rake probe and images from an ultra-fast camera will be presented in comparison with ongoing MHD modeling using the 3-D MHD BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid (AMR) that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets and is uniquely suited for flux-rope expansion modeling. Recent experiments show a possible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability that appears asymmetrically at the interface between launched spheromaks (bubbles) and their entraining background magnetic field. Efforts to understand this instability using in situ measurements, new chamber boundary conditions, and ultra-fast camera data will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  13. Bubble diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  14. The bursting of housing bubble as jamming phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Iwamura, Mitsuru; Umeno Saito, Yukiko; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing on transaction volume incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation on highway by comparing data taken from the U.S. housing market. Our result suggests that transaction volume could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  15. The effect of coupling on bubble fragmentation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerski, Helen; Deane, Grant B

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of bubble populations is important in a wide range of situations, including industrial processes, medical applications, and ocean science. Passive acoustical techniques can be used to track changes in the population, since each bubble formation or fragmentation event is likely to produce sound. This sound potentially contains a wealth of information about the fragmentation process and the products, but to fully exploit these data it is necessary to understand the physical processes that determine its characteristics. The focus of this paper is binary fragmentation, when turbulence causes one bubble to split into two. Specifically, the effect that bubble-bubble coupling has on the sound produced is examined. A numerical simulation of the acoustical excitation of fragmenting bubbles is used to generate model acoustic signals, which are compared with experimental data. A frequency range with a suppressed acoustic output which is observed in the experimental data can be explained when coupling is taken into account. In addition, although the driving mechanism of neck collapse is always consistent with the data for the larger bubble of the newly formed pair, a different mechanism must be driving the smaller bubble in some situations.

  16. Study on characteristics of single cavitation bubble considering condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam under ultrasonic vibration honing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linzheng; Zhu, Xijing; Wang, Lujie; Guo, Ce

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration honing technology is an effective means for materials difficult to machine, where cavitation occurs in grinding fluid under the action of ultrasound. To investigate the changes of single cavitation bubble characteristics in the grinding area and how honing parameters influence bubble characteristics, a dynamic model of single cavitation bubble in the ultrasonic vibration honing grinding area was established. The model was based on the bubble dynamics and considered the condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam and honing processing environment. The change rules of bubble radius, temperature, pressure and number of kerosene steam molecules inside the bubble were numerically simulated in the process of bubble moving. The results show that the condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam can help to explain the changes of temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Compared with ultrasonic vibration, the amplitude of bubble radius is greatly suppressed in the ultrasonic honing environment. However, the rate of movement of the bubble is faster. Meanwhile, the minimum values of pressure and temperature are larger, and the number of kerosene steam molecules is less. By studying the effect of honing factors on the movement of the cavitation bubble, it is found that honing pressure has a greater influence on bubble evolution characteristics, while rotation speed of honing head has a minor effect and the reciprocating speed of honing head has little impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. On the Inception of Financial Representative Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to formalize the inception of representative bubbles giving the condition under which they may arise. We will find that representative bubbles may start at any time, depending on the definition of a behavioral component. This result is at odds with the theory of classic rational bubbles, which are those models that rely on the fulfillment of the transversality condition by which a bubble in a financial asset can arise just at its first trade. This means that a classic rational bubble (differently from our model cannot follow a cycle since if a bubble exists, it will burst by definition and never arise again.

  18. Investigation on the ability of an ultrasound bubble detector to deliver size measurements of gaseous bubbles in fluid lines by using a glass bead model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitschberger, S; Henseler, A; Krasenbrink, B; Oedekoven, B; Mottaghy, K

    2001-01-01

    Detectors based on ultrasonic principles are today's state of the art devices to detect gaseous bubbles that may be present in extracorporeal circuits (ECC) for various reasons. Referring to theoretical considerations and other studies, it also seems possible to use this technology to measure the size of detected bubbles, thus offering the chance to evaluate their potential hazardous effect if introduced into a patient's circulation. Based on these considerations, a commercially available ultrasound bubble detector has been developed by Hatteland Instrumentering, Norway, to deliver bubble size measurements by means of supplementary software. This device consists of an ultrasound sensor that can be clamped onto the ECC tubing, and the necessary electronic equipment to amplify and rectify the received signals. It is supplemented by software that processes these signals and presents them as specific data. On the basis of our knowledge and experience with bubble detection by ultrasound technology, we believe it is particularly difficult to meet all the requirements for size measurements, especially if these are to be achieved by using a mathematical procedure rather than exact devices. Therefore, we tried to evaluate the quality of the offered bubble detector in measuring bubble sizes. After establishing a standardized test stand, including a roller pump and a temperature sensor, we performed several sets of experiments using the manufacturers software and a program specifically designed at our department for this purpose. The first set revealed that the manufacturer's recommended calibration material did not meet essential requirements as established by other authors. Having solved that problem, we could actually demonstrate that the ultrasonic field, as generated by the bubble detector, has been correctly calculated by the manufacturer. Simply, it is a field having the strongest reflecting region in the center, subsequently losing strength toward the ECC tubing

  19. Filter Bubble vs. Preference Bubble

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Hanna-Stiina; Soliman, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön aiheena oli internetin personointi ja siitä aiheutuva filter bubble –ilmiö. Tarkoituksena oli tutkia kuluttajien suhtautumista ilmiöön, jota Suomessa ei vielä tunnisteta laajasti. Suhtautuminen haluttiin tuoda esiin vastakkainasettelun avulla. Filter bubble –näkökulma edusti tässä työssä ilmiön negatiivista suhtautumistapaa ja preference bubble –näkökulma positiivista. Opinnäytetyö oli tietopaketti yrityksille Filter bubble –ilmiön ominaisuuksista sekä sen käyttäytymisestä...

  20. Identifying bubble collapse in a hydrothermal system using hidden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.B.; Benitez, M.C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Chouet, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in July 2003 and lasting through September 2003, the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park exhibited an unusual increase in ground temperature and hydrothermal activity. Using hidden Markov model theory, we identify over five million high-frequency (>15Hz) seismic events observed at a temporary seismic station deployed in the basin in response to the increase in hydrothermal activity. The source of these seismic events is constrained to within ???100 m of the station, and produced ???3500-5500 events per hour with mean durations of ???0.35-0.45s. The seismic event rate, air temperature, hydrologic temperatures, and surficial water flow of the geyser basin exhibited a marked diurnal pattern that was closely associated with solar thermal radiance. We interpret the source of the seismicity to be due to the collapse of small steam bubbles in the hydrothermal system, with the rate of collapse being controlled by surficial temperatures and daytime evaporation rates. copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Computational modeling of stress transient and bubble evolution in short-pulse laser irradiated melanosome particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.; Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Lin, C.P.; Kelly, M.W.

    1997-03-04

    Objective is to study retinal injury by subnanosecond laser pulses absorbed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The absorption centers in the RPE cell are melanosomes of order 1 {mu}m radius. Each melanosome includes many melanin particles of 10-15 nm radius, which are the local absorbers of the laser light and generate a discrete structure of hot spots. This work use the hydrodynamic code LATIS (LAser-TISsue interaction modeling) and a water equation of state to first simulate the small melanin particle of 15 nm responsible for initiating the hot spot and the pressure field. A average melanosome of 1 {mu}m scale is next simulated. Supersonic shocks and fast vapor bubbles are generated in both cases: the melanin scale and the melanosome scale. The hot spot induces a shock wave pressure than with a uniform deposition of laser energy. It is found that an absorption coefficient of 6000 -8000 cm{sup -1} can explain the enhanced shock wave emitted by the melanosome. An experimental and theoretical effort should be considered to identify the mechanism for generating shock wave enhancement.

  2. Issues for Achieving an Experimental Model Concerning Bubble Deck Concrete Slab with Spherical Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Călin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After realizing numerous constructions in the world, which use Bubble Deck concrete slabs with spherical gaps, valuable information were gathered, allowing a rigorous processing and systematization, with the purpose of realizing an experimental and documentary study. The paper presents some experimental programs which refer to concrete slabs with spherical gaps, existing in similar execution and loading conditions as those from a real construction; this implies the realization of a monolithic slab element at a scale of 1:1, which will be subjected to static gravitational loadings in order to determine the deformation (deflection, cracking and failing characteristics. The resultant conclusions will be used in defining the failing mechanisms, very useful in the formulation of an adequate mathematical model. The research proposed in the project offers an answer to the major objectives of the development of calculus methods and existent prescriptions of the concrete slabs with spherical gaps. The realization of the proposed objectives involves documentation activities, theoretical study, collaboration with different other partners, gathering and processing of the results obtained in laboratory and even in situ.

  3. An alternative possibility to equatorial plasma bubble forecasting through mathematical modeling and Digisonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousasantos, J.; Kherani, E. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs), or large-scale plasma depleted regions, are one of the subjects of great interest in space weather research since such phenomena have been extensively reported to cause strong degrading effects on transionospheric radio propagation at low latitudes, especially over the Brazilian region, where satellite communication interruptions by the EPBs have been, frequently, registered. One of the most difficult tasks for this field of scientific research is the forecasting of such plasma-depleted structures. This forecasting capability would be of significant help for users of positioning/navigation systems operating in the low-latitude/equatorial region all over the world. Recently, some efforts have been made trying to assess and improve the capability of predicting the EPB events. The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative approach to EPB prediction by means of the use of mathematical numerical simulation associated with ionospheric vertical drift, obtained through Digisonde data, focusing on telling beforehand whether ionospheric plasma instability processes will evolve or not into EPB structures. Modulations in the ionospheric vertical motion induced by gravity waves prior to the prereversal enhancement occurrence were used as input in the numerical model. A comparison between the numerical results and the observed EPB phenomena through CCD all-sky image data reveals a considerable coherence and supports the hypothesis of a capability of short-term forecasting.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  5. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  6. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  7. Does monetary policy generate asset price bubbles ?

    OpenAIRE

    Blot, Christophe; Hubert, Paul; Labondance, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    This paper empirically assesses the effect of monetary policy on asset price bubbles and aims to disentangle the competing predictions of theoretical bubble models. First, we take advantage of the model averaging feature of Principal Component Analysis to estimate bubble indicators, for the stock, bond and housing markets in the United States and Euro area, based on the structural, econometric and statistical approaches proposed in the literature to measure bubbles. Second, we ...

  8. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  9. CFD Model for Pneumatic Mixing with Bubble Chains: Application to Glass Melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY 4 (2015), s. 344-361 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble chain * viscous liquid * flow simulation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  10. Interaction of two cavitation bubbles in a tube and its effects on heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Cai, Jun; Tao, Yuequn; Huai, Xiulan

    2017-02-01

    When two cavitation bubbles exist in a confined space, the interaction between the bubbles significantly affects the characteristics of bubble dynamic behaviors. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) model is established to study the growth and collapse of two cavitation bubbles in a heated tube and its effects on heat transfer. The liquid and gas phases throughout the calculation domain are solved by a set of Navier-Stokes equations. It is assumed that the gas inside the bubble is compressible vapor, and the surrounding liquid is incompressible water. The mass transfer between two phases is ignored. The calculated bubble profiles were compared to the available experimental data, and a good agreement has been achieved. Then, the relationship among the bubble motion, flow field and pressure distributions was analyzed. On this basis, the effects of bubble interaction on the heat transfer between the wall surface and sounding liquid were discussed. It is found that heat transfer in the centre wall region is enhanced owing to the vortex flow and micro-jet induced by the bubble contraction and collapse. In contrast, the highest surface temperature appears in the surrounding region, which is mainly attributed to the thermal resistance induced by the bubble. The present study is helpful to understand the heat transfer phenomenon with cavitation in the liquid.

  11. Numerical Study on Bubble Behaviour and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Subcooled Pool Boiling Based on Non-Empirical Boiling and Condensation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the transient three-dimensional numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multi-interface Advection and Reconstruction Solver with the non-empirical boiling and condensation model have been conducted for isolated boiling bubble behaviour in a subcooled pool. The effects of the wettability on the heating surface for the subcooled bubble departure behaviour were investigated. The numerical results showed in very good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, resulting from the wall heat flux evaluation, it was found that the wall heat flux near the contact line at the bottom of the bubble just before the bubble departing from the heating surface increases with increases of the degree of subcooling.

  12. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-06

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  13. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  14. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  15. Issues for Achieving an Experimental Model Concerning Bubble Deck Concrete Slab with Spherical Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Sergiu Călin; Ciprian Asăvoaie; N. FLOREA

    2010-01-01

    After realizing numerous constructions in the world, which use Bubble Deck concrete slabs with spherical gaps, valuable information were gathered, allowing a rigorous processing and systematization, with the purpose of realizing an experimental and documentary study. The paper presents some experimental programs which refer to concrete slabs with spherical gaps, existing in similar execution and loading conditions as those from a real construction; this implies the realization of a monolit...

  16. Droplet and bubble nucleation modeled by density gradient theory – cubic equation of state versus saft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some preliminary results of the density gradient theory (GT combined with two different equations of state (EoS: the classical cubic equation by van der Waals and a recent approach based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT, namely its perturbed-chain (PC modification. The results showed that the cubic EoS predicted for a given surface tension the density profile with a noticeable defect. Bulk densities predicted by the cubic EoS differed as much as by 100 % from the reference data. On the other hand, the PC-SAFT EoS provided accurate results for density profile and both bulk densities in the large range of temperatures. It has been shown that PC-SAFT is a promising tool for accurate modeling of nucleation using the GT. Besides the basic case of a planar phase interface, the spherical interface was analyzed to model a critical cluster occurring either for nucleation of droplets (condensation or bubbles (boiling, cavitation. However, the general solution for the spherical interface will require some more attention due to its numerical difficulty.

  17. Effect of grain morphology on gas bubble swelling in UMo fuels – A 3D microstructure dependent Booth model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.; Joshi, Vineet

    2016-11-01

    A three dimensional microstructure dependent swelling model is developed for studying the fission gas swelling kinetics in irradiated nuclear fuels. The model is extended from the Booth model [1] in order to investigate the effect of heterogeneous microstructures on gas bubble swelling kinetics. As an application of the model, the effect of grain morphology, fission gas diffusivity, and spatial dependent fission rate on swelling kinetics are simulated in UMo fuels. It is found that the decrease of grain size, the increase of grain aspect ratio for the grain having the same volume, and the increase of fission gas diffusivity (fission rate) cause the increase of swelling kinetics. Other heterogeneities such as second phases and spatial dependent thermodynamic properties including diffusivity of fission gas, sink and source strength of defects could be naturally integrated into the model to enhance the model capability.

  18. Effect of grain morphology on gas bubble swelling in UMo fuels – A 3D microstructure dependent Booth model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang, E-mail: shenyang.hu@pnnl.gov; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.; Joshi, Vineet

    2016-11-15

    A three dimensional microstructure dependent swelling model is developed for studying the fission gas swelling kinetics in irradiated nuclear fuels. The model is extended from the Booth model [1] in order to investigate the effect of heterogeneous microstructures on gas bubble swelling kinetics. As an application of the model, the effect of grain morphology, fission gas diffusivity, and spatially dependent fission rate on swelling kinetics are simulated in UMo fuels. It is found that the decrease of grain size, the increase of grain aspect ratio for the grain having the same volume, and the increase of fission gas diffusivity (fission rate) cause the increase of swelling kinetics. Other heterogeneities such as second phases and spatially dependent thermodynamic properties including diffusivity of fission gas, sink and source strength of defects could be naturally integrated into the model to enhance the model capability.

  19. Experimental and numerical study on bubble-sphere interaction near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Zhang, A. M.; Han, R.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2017-09-01

    This study is concerned with the interaction between a violently oscillating bubble and a movable sphere with comparable size near a rigid wall, which is an essential physical phenomenon in many applications such as cavitation, underwater explosion, ultrasonic cleaning, and biomedical treatment. Experiments are performed in a cubic water tank, and the underwater electric discharge technique (580 V DC) is employed to generate a bubble that is initiated between a rigid wall and a sphere in an axisymmetric configuration. The bubble-sphere interactions are captured using a high-speed camera operating at 52 000 frames/s. A classification of the bubble-sphere interaction is proposed, i.e., "weak," "intermediate," and "strong" interactions, identified with three distinct bubble shapes at the maximum volume moment. In the numerical simulations, the boundary integral method and the auxiliary function method are combined to establish a full coupling model that decouples the mutual dependence between the force and the sphere motion. The main features of bubble dynamics in different experiments are well reproduced by our numerical model. Meanwhile, the pressure and velocity fields are also provided for clarifying the associated mechanisms. The effects of two dimensionless standoff parameters, namely, γs (defined as ds/Rm, where ds is the minimum distance between the initial bubble center and the sphere surface and Rm is the maximum bubble radius) and γw (defined as dw/Rm, where dw is the distance between the initial bubble center and the rigid wall), are also discussed.

  20. Development and validation of models for bubble coalescence and breakup. Final report; Entwicklung und Validierung von Modellen fuer Blasenkoaleszenz und -zerfall. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y.; Lucas, D.

    2013-02-15

    A new generalized model for bubble coalescence and breakup has been developed. It is based on physical considerations and takes into account various mechanisms that can lead to bubble coalescence and breakup. First, in a detailed literature review, the available models were compiled and analyzed. It turned out that many of them show a contradictory behaviour. None of these models allows the prediction of the evolution of bubble size distributions along a pipe flow for a wide range of combinations of flow rates of the gas and the liquid phase. The new model has been extensively studied in a simplified Test-Solver. Although this does not cover all details of a developing flow along the pipe, it allows - in contrast to a CFD code - to conduct a large number of variational calculations to investigate the influence of individual sizes and models. Coalescence and breakup cannot be considered separately from other phenomena and models that reflect these phenomena. There are close interactions with the turbulence of the liquid phase and the momentum exchange between phases. Since the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is a direct input parameter for the new model, the turbulence modelling has been studied very carefully. To validate the model, a special experimental series for air-water flows was used, conducted at the TOPFLOW facility in an 8-meter long DN200 pipe. The data are characterized by high quality and were produced within the TOPFLOW-II project. The test series aims to provide a basis for the work presented here. Predicting the evolution of the bubble size distribution along the pipe could be improved significantly in comparison to the previous standard models for bubble coalescence and breakup implemented in CFX. However some quantitative discrepancies remain. The full model equations as well as an implementation as ''User-FORTRAN'' in CFX are available and can be used for further work on the simulation of poly-disperse bubbly

  1. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F

    2004-03-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  2. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  3. Effect of Slotted Anode on Gas Bubble Behaviors in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meijia; Li, Baokuan; Li, Linmin; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Jianping; Wang, Yaowu; Cheung, Sherman C. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the aluminum reduction cells, gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of the anode which eventually reduces the effective current contact area and the system efficiency. To encourage the removal of gas bubbles, slotted anode has been proposed and increasingly adopted by some industrial aluminum reduction cells. Nonetheless, the exact gas bubble removal mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. A three-dimensional (3D) transient, multiphase flow mathematical model coupled with magnetohydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the effect of slotted anode on the gas bubble movement. The Eulerian volume of fluid approach is applied to track the electrolyte (bath)-molten aluminum (metal) interface. Meanwhile, the Lagrangian discrete particle model is employed to handle the dynamics of gas bubbles with considerations of the buoyancy force, drag force, virtual mass force, and pressure gradient force. The gas bubble coalescence process is also taken into account based on the O'Rourke's algorithm. The two-way coupling between discrete bubbles and fluids is achieved by the inter-phase momentum exchange. Numerical predictions are validated against the anode current variation in an industrial test. Comparing the results using slotted anode with the traditional one, the time-averaged gas bubble removal rate increases from 36 to 63 pct; confirming that the slotted anode provides more escaping ways and shortens the trajectories for gas bubbles. Furthermore, the slotted anode also reduces gas bubble's residence time and the probability of coalescence. Moreover, the bubble layer thickness in aluminum cell with slotted anode is reduced about 3.5 mm (17.4 pct), so the resistance can be cut down for the sake of energy saving and the metal surface fluctuation amplitude is significantly reduced for the stable operation due to the slighter perturbation with smaller bubbles.

  4. Effect of Slotted Anode on Gas Bubble Behaviors in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meijia; Li, Baokuan; Li, Linmin; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Jianping; Wang, Yaowu; Cheung, Sherman C. P.

    2017-08-01

    In the aluminum reduction cells, gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of the anode which eventually reduces the effective current contact area and the system efficiency. To encourage the removal of gas bubbles, slotted anode has been proposed and increasingly adopted by some industrial aluminum reduction cells. Nonetheless, the exact gas bubble removal mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. A three-dimensional (3D) transient, multiphase flow mathematical model coupled with magnetohydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the effect of slotted anode on the gas bubble movement. The Eulerian volume of fluid approach is applied to track the electrolyte (bath)-molten aluminum (metal) interface. Meanwhile, the Lagrangian discrete particle model is employed to handle the dynamics of gas bubbles with considerations of the buoyancy force, drag force, virtual mass force, and pressure gradient force. The gas bubble coalescence process is also taken into account based on the O'Rourke's algorithm. The two-way coupling between discrete bubbles and fluids is achieved by the inter-phase momentum exchange. Numerical predictions are validated against the anode current variation in an industrial test. Comparing the results using slotted anode with the traditional one, the time-averaged gas bubble removal rate increases from 36 to 63 pct; confirming that the slotted anode provides more escaping ways and shortens the trajectories for gas bubbles. Furthermore, the slotted anode also reduces gas bubble's residence time and the probability of coalescence. Moreover, the bubble layer thickness in aluminum cell with slotted anode is reduced about 3.5 mm (17.4 pct), so the resistance can be cut down for the sake of energy saving and the metal surface fluctuation amplitude is significantly reduced for the stable operation due to the slighter perturbation with smaller bubbles.

  5. Approach to universality in axisymmetric bubble pinch-off

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, S.; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Roger M.

    2009-01-01

    The pinch-off of an axisymmetric air bubble surrounded by an inviscid fluid is compared in four physical realizations: (i) cavity collapse in the wake of an impacting disk, (ii) gas bubbles injected through a small orifice, (iii) bubble rupture in a straining flow, and (iv) a bubble with an

  6. IMPLEMENTATION OF SERIAL AND PARALLEL BUBBLE SORT ON FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Marhaendro Jati Purnomo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sorting is common process in computational world. Its utilization are on many fields from research to industry. There are many sorting algorithm in nowadays. One of the simplest yet powerful is bubble sort. In this study, bubble sort is implemented on FPGA. The implementation was taken on serial and parallel approach. Serial and parallel bubble sort then compared by means of its memory, execution time, and utility which comprises slices and LUTs. The experiments show that serial bubble sort required smaller memory as well as utility compared to parallel bubble sort. Meanwhile, parallel bubble sort performed faster than serial bubble sort

  7. A boundary element model of the transport of a semi-infinite bubble through a microvessel bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Andres J.; Eshpuniyani, Brijesh; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for selective occlusion of blood flow to tumors, we examined the transport of a pressure-driven semi-infinite bubble through a liquid-filled bifurcating channel. Homogeneity of bubble splitting as the bubble passes through a vessel bifurcation affects the degree to which the vascular network near the tumor can be uniformly occluded. The homogeneity of bubble splitting was found to increase with bubble driving pressure and to decrease with increased bifurcation angle. Viscous losses at the bifurcation were observed to affect the bubble speed significantly. The potential for oscillating bubble interfaces to induce flow recirculation and impart high stresses on the vessel endothelium was also observed. PMID:20661320

  8. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumerov, N. A., E-mail: gumerov@umiacs.umd.edu [Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Akhatov, I. S. [Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Ohl, C.-D. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Sametov, S. P. [Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Khazimullin, M. V. [Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa 450054 (Russian Federation); Gonzalez-Avila, S. R. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-03-28

    Experiments with water–air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ∼100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ∼30 μm in diameter can be “pushed” away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  9. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  10. A physically based framework for modeling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely sensed chlorophyll a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semilabile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecules. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll a and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  11. A Randomized Trial Comparing Efficacy of Bubble and Ventilator Derived Nasal CPAP in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates with Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sheetal; Maria, Arti; Roy, Mahesh K; Verma, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) has an established role in the care of Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) babies with respiratory distress. Bubble CPAP (BCPAP) is a cheap alternative for countries where resources are limited. However, data comparing efficacy of BCPAP with conventional ventilator derived (VCPAP) is limited. To compare CPAP failure rates between BCPAP and VCPAP among VLBW, with moderate respiratory distress. Secondary objectives were to compare the rates of Intraventricular Haemorrhage (IVH), pulmonary air leaks and deaths between the two groups and determine the predictors of CPAP failure. VLBW babies with moderate respiratory distress (Silverman Anderson score 4-7), born or admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) within 28 days of life were randomized to receive either BCPAP (n=34) or VCPAP (n=34). CPAP failure rate in both the groups was compared. The baseline characteristics were similar in both the groups. Five out of 34 (14.70%) babies in BCPAP group and 11 out of 34 (32.35%) in VCPAP failed CPAP (p=0.08). IVH (BCPAP group 24% and VCPAP group 9%, p= 0.10) and mortality (BCPAP group 6% and VCPAP group 9%, p=0.642) were comparable in both the groups. Factors such as gestational age <30 weeks, weight <1000 grams, Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS), shock, pulmonary haemorrhage, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) and multi-organ dysfunction were significantly associated with CPAP failure in our study. The CPAP failure rates in VLBW babies with moderate respiratory distress were found to be similar whether bubble CPAP or ventilator CPAP was used. There was no difference in complication rates of IVH or mortality with either method of CPAP.

  12. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sivachenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum (bgm and double bubble (dbb genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD, a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivo is causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6 (encoding a very-long-chain ACS, a human homolog of bgm and dbb.

  13. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, Anna; Gordon, Hannah B; Kimball, Suzanne S; Gavin, Erin J; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-04-01

    Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum(bgm) and double bubble(dbb) genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivois causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6(encoding a very-long-chain ACS), a human homolog of bgm and dbb. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. A Semi-Analytic Model of a Buoyant Flame Bubble Propagation During the Deflagration Phase of a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumper, Kevin; Fisher, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are astronomical events in which a white dwarf, the cold remnant of a star that has exhausted its hydrogen fuel, detonates and briefly produces an explosion brighter than most galaxies. Many researchers think that they could occur as the white dwarf approaches a critical mass of 1.4 solar masses by accreting matter from a companion main sequence star, a scenario that is referred to as the single-degenerate channel. Assuming such a progenitor, we construct a semi-analytic model of the propagation of a flame bubble ignited at a single off-center point within the white dwarf. The bubble then rises under the influences of buoyancy and drag, burning the surrounding fuel material in a process called deflagration. We contrast the behavior of the deflagration phase in the presence of a physically high Reynolds number regime with the low Reynolds number regimes inherent to three-dimensional simulations, which are a consequence of numerical viscosity. Our work may help validate three-dimensional deflagration results over a range of initial conditions.

  15. One-equation sub-grid scale (SGS) modelling for Euler-Euler large eddy simulation (EELES) of dispersed bubbly flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niceno, B.; Dhotre, M.T.; Deen, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we have presented a one-equation model for sub-grid scale (SGS) kinetic energy and applied it for an Euler-Euler large eddy simulation (EELES) of a bubble column reactor. The one-equation model for SGS kinetic energy shows improved predictions over the state-of-the-art dynamic

  16. Reconstruction of elongated bubbles fusing the information from multiple optical probes through a Bayesian inference technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Shubhankar; Das, Prasanta Kr., E-mail: pkd@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Roy Chaudhuri, Partha [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2016-07-15

    In this communication, a novel optical technique has been proposed for the reconstruction of the shape of a Taylor bubble using measurements from multiple arrays of optical sensors. The deviation of an optical beam passing through the bubble depends on the contour of bubble surface. A theoretical model of the deviation of a beam during the traverse of a Taylor bubble through it has been developed. Using this model and the time history of the deviation captured by the sensor array, the bubble shape has been reconstructed. The reconstruction has been performed using an inverse algorithm based on Bayesian inference technique and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. The reconstructed nose shape has been compared with the true shape, extracted through image processing of high speed images. Finally, an error analysis has been performed to pinpoint the sources of the errors.

  17. From rational bubbles to crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μbubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μmodel and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  18. Collective bubble oscillations as a component of surf infrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph; Garcés, Milton; Fee, David; Pawlak, Geno

    2008-05-01

    Plunging surf is a known generator of infrasound, though the mechanisms have not been clearly identified. A model based on collective bubble oscillations created by demise of the initially entrained air pocket is examined. Computed spectra are compared to infrasound data from the island of Kauai during periods of medium, large, and extreme surf. Model results suggest that bubble oscillations generated by plunging waves are plausible generators of infrasound, and that dynamic bubble plume evolution on a temporal scale comparable to the breaking wave period may contribute to the broad spectral lobe of dominant infrasonic energy observed in measured data. Application of an inverse model has potential to characterize breaking wave size distributions, energy, and temporal changes in seafloor morphology based on remotely sensed infrasound.

  19. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Gang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF. The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs, especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction.

  20. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Liang, Lei; Liu, Nan; Tong, Rongxin; Liu, Xiaobo; Bian, Ce

    2016-12-14

    A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF). The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF) that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs), especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz) UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction.

  1. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Liang, Lei; Liu, Nan; Tong, Rongxin; Liu, Xiaobo; Bian, Ce

    2016-01-01

    A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF). The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF) that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs), especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz) UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction. PMID:27983639

  2. Turbulent Bubbly Flow in a Vertical Pipe Computed By an Eddy-Resolving Reynolds Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    al. (2010) DNS Khoury et al. (2012) ur + ut + uz + IS-RSM RSM Figure 5: u+i for ReD = 12500 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 u i+ r...R Turbulent pipe flow ReD = 25000 Exp. Hosokawa et al. (2010) DNS Wu et al. (2012) ur + ut + uz + IS-RSM RSM Figure 6: u+i for ReD = 25000 ForReD...0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 u i+ r/R Turbulent bubbly pipe flow at ReD = 25000 Exp. Hosokawa et al. (2010) ur + ut + uz + RSM

  3. V&V Of CFD Modeling Of The Argonne Bubble Experiment: FY15 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, Nathaniel C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Basavarajappa, Manjunath [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-09-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of the fission product Mo 99, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of an electron-beam irradiated, experimental-scale bubble chamber have been conducted in order to aid in interpretation of existing experimental results, provide additional insights into the physical phenomena, and develop predictive thermal hydraulic capabilities that can be applied to full-scale target solution vessels. Toward that end, a custom hybrid Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase solver was developed, and simulations have been performed on high-resolution meshes. Good agreement between experiments and simulations has been achieved, especially with respect to the prediction of the maximum temperature of the uranyl sulfate solution in the experimental vessel. These positive results suggest that the simulation methodology that has been developed will prove to be suitable to assist in the development of full-scale production hardware.

  4. A quantitative review of the transition salt concentration for inhibiting bubble coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzi, Mahshid; Howes, Tony; Nguyen, Anh V

    2015-08-01

    Some salts have been proven to inhibit bubble coalescence above a certain concentration called the transition concentration. The transition concentration of salts has been investigated and determined by using different techniques. Different mechanisms have also been proposed to explain the stabilizing effect of salts on bubble coalescence. However, as yet there is no consensus on a mechanism which can explain the stabilizing effect of all inhibiting salts. This paper critically reviews the experimental techniques and mechanisms for the coalescence of bubbles in saline solutions. The transition concentrations of NaCl, as the most popularly used salt, determined by using different techniques such as bubble swarm, bubble pairs, and thin liquid film micro-interferometry were analyzed and compared. For a consistent comparison, the concept of TC95 was defined as a salt concentration at which the "percentage coalescence" of bubbles reduces by 95% relative to the highest (100% in pure water) and lowest (in high-salt concentration) levels. The results show a linear relationship between the TC95 of NaCl and the reciprocal of the square root of the bubble radius. This relationship holds despite different experimental techniques, salt purities and bubble approach speeds, and highlights the importance of the bubble size in bubble coalescence. The available theoretical models for inhibiting effect of salts have also been reviewed. The failure of these models in predicting the salt transition concentration commands further theoretical development for a better understanding of bubble coalescence in salt solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Asset Bubbles, Endogenous Growth, and Financial Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Tomohiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of bubbles in an infinitely-lived agent model of endogenous growth with financial frictions and heterogeneous agents. We provide a complete characterization on the relationship between financial frictions and the existence of bubbles. Our model predicts that if the degree of pledgeability is sufficiently high or sufficiently low, bubbles can not exist. They can only arise at an intermediate degree. This suggests that improving the financial market condition mig...

  6. Study of the Dynamics of a Condensing Bubble Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is used to discretize the governing equations for a steam bubble inside a tube filled with water. The bubbles are kept at higher temperature compared to its boiling point while the liquid is kept subcooled. Heat transfer is allowed to take place between the two phases by virtue of which the bubble will condense. Three separate probability distribution functions are used in LBM to handle continuity, momentum and energy equations separately. The interface is considered to be diffused within a narrow zone and it has been modeled using convective Cahn-Hillard equation. Combined diffused interface-LBM framework is adapted accordingly to handle complex interface separating two phases having high density ratio. Developed model is validated with respect to established correlations for instantaneous equivalent radius of a spherical condensing bubble. Numerical snapshots of the simulation depict that the bubble volume decreases faster for higher degree of superheat. The degrees of superheat are varied over a wide range to note its effect on bubble shape and size. Effect of initial volume of the bubble on the condensation rate is also studied. It has been observed that for a fixed degree of superheat, the condensation rate is not exactly proportional to its volume. Due to the variation in interfacial configuration for different sized bubbles, condensation rate changes drastically. Influence of gravity on the rate of condensation is also studied using the developed methodology.

  7. Forces on aligned rising spherical bubbles at low-to-moderate Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Muñoz, J.; Baz-Rodríguez, S.; Salinas-Rodríguez, E.; Castellanos-Sahagún, E.; Puebla, H.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic of a pair of equal-sized spherical gas bubbles rising in vertical line within a Newtonian liquid at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers (Re ≤ 50) is studied. The dynamic momentum balance includes buoyancy, quasi-steady, and unsteady (history) drag, as well as inertial and added-mass body acceleration forces acting on the trailing bubble. This equation has been obtained under the following assumptions: (i) the bubble interaction occurs through the steady non-uniform wake induced by the leading bubble and (ii) the flow structure behind the leading bubble is known, so that proper expressions for the trailing bubble hydrodynamic force and its rising velocity can be derived. We propose an approximate analytical model for predicting the hydrodynamic force and the rise velocity of the trailing bubble. For this aim, we first use the well-known asymptotic far wake velocity solution (AWVS) for an axisymmetric body complementing it with an adequate drag expression. Then, the AWVS is modified via a Galilean transformation by introducing an artificial origin whose position is determined by fitting numerical data of known velocity profiles. Comparisons between the proposed models predictions with those reported experimental and numerical data for dimensionless distance between bubbles s/d in the interval 2 ≤ s/d ≤ 12.5 are presented. The results show that the added-mass body acceleration and the history forces are negligible compared to the other considered forces.

  8. Fama on bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an irrational bubble. However, he has never publicly expressed his opinion on rational bubbles. This is peculiar since such bubbles build naturally from the rational efficient markets paradigm that Fama strongly adheres to. On......, there is evidence of an explosive component in stock market valuation ratios, consistent with a rational bubble........ On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable. However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability. On data samples that include the 1990s...

  9. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Zhao, Xiong-Tao; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced "catapult effect", which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ˜ 5μm to ˜500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s) and a low diameter (˜5 % of the maximum bubble diameter) over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9) for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  10. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  11. Effervescence in champagne and sparkling wines: From bubble bursting to droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séon, T.; Liger-Belair, G.

    2017-01-01

    When a bubble reaches an air-liquid interface, it ruptures, projecting a multitude of tiny droplets in the air. Across the oceans, an estimated 1018 to 1020 bubbles burst every second, and form the so called sea spray, a major player in earth's climate system. At a smaller scale, in a glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall, rise towards the surface and burst, giving birth to a particular aerosol that holds a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in simple liquids, we depict each step of this effervescence, from bubble bursting to drop evaporation. In particular, we propose simple scaling laws for the jet velocity and the top drop size. We unravel experimentally the intricate roles of bubble shape, capillary waves, gravity, and liquid properties in the jet dynamics and the drop detachment. We demonstrate how damping action of viscosity produces faster and smaller droplets and more generally how liquid properties enable to control the bubble bursting aerosol characteristics. In this context, the particular case of Champagne wine aerosol is studied in details and the key features of this aerosol are identified. We demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. Conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of aerosol characteristics and flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue of the sparkling wine industry.

  12. Bubbles and foams in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerre, Axel; Miralles, Vincent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2014-09-28

    Microfluidics offers great tools to produce highly-controlled dispersions of gas into liquid, from isolated bubbles to organized microfoams. Potential technological applications are manifold, from novel materials to scaffolds for tissue engineering or enhanced oil recovery. More fundamentally, microfluidics makes it possible to investigate the physics of complex systems such as foams at scales where the capillary forces become dominant, in model experiments involving few well-controlled parameters. In this context, this review does not have the ambition to detail in a comprehensive manner all the techniques and applications involving bubbles and foams in microfluidics. Rather, it focuses on particular consequences of working at the microscale, under confinement, and hopes to provide insight into the physics of such systems. The first part of this work focuses on bubbles, and more precisely on (i) bubble generation, where the confinement can suppress capillary instabilities while inertial effects may play a role, and (ii) bubble dynamics, paying special attention to the lubrication film between bubble and wall and the influence of confinement. The second part addresses the formation and dynamics of microfoams, emphasizing structural differences from macroscopic foams and the influence of the confinement.

  13. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  14. Perturbations of the magnetic induction in a bubbly liquid metal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichou, Rafael; Tordjeman, Philippe; Bergez, Wladimir; Zamansky, Remi; Paumel, Kevin

    2017-11-01

    The presence of bubbles in liquid metal flow subject to AC magnetic field modifies the distribution of eddy currents in the fluid. This situation is encountered in metallurgy and nuclear industry for Sodium Fast Reactors. We will show that the perturbation of the eddy currents can be measured by an Eddy Current Flowmeter coupled with a lock-in amplifier. The experiments point out that the demodulated signal allows to detect the presence of a single bubble in the flow. The signal is sensitive both to the diameter and the relative position of the bubble. Then, we will present a model of a potential perturbation of the current density caused by a bubble and the distortion of the magnetic field. The eddy current distribution is calculated from the induction equation. This model is derived from a potential flow around a spherical particle. The total vector potential is the sum of the vector potential in the liquid metal flow without bubbles and the perturbated vector potential due to the presence of a bubble. The model is then compared to the experimental measurements realized with the eddy current flow meter for various bubble diameters in galinstan. The very good agreement between model and experiments validates the relevance of the perturbative approach.

  15. Stable bubble oscillations beyond Blake's critical threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Ferenc

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium radius of a single spherical bubble containing both non-condensable gas and vapor is determined by the mechanical balance at the bubble interface. This expression highlights the fact that decreasing the ambient pressure below the so called Blake's critical threshold, the bubble has no equilibrium state at all. In the last decade many authors have tried to find evidence for the existence of stable bubble oscillation under harmonic forcing in this regime, that is, they have tried to stabilize the bubble motion applying ultrasonic radiation on the bubble. The available numerical results provide only partial proof for the existence as they are usually based on linearized or weakly nonlinear (higher order approximation) bubble models. Here, based on numerical techniques of the modern nonlinear and bifurcation theory, the existence of stable bubble motion has been proven without any restrictions in nonlinearities. Although the model, applied in this paper, is the rather simple Rayleigh-Plesset equation, the presented technique can be extended to more complex bubble models easily. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  17. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, Ralf [Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, James Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); Ambjoernsson, Tobias [Chemistry Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hanke, Andreas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas, 80 Fort Brown, Brownsville (United States); Fogedby, Hans C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Arhus, Ny Munkegade, 8000 Arhus C (Denmark)], E-mail: metz@ph.tum.de

    2009-01-21

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation bubbles and selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins.

  18. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  19. Fama on Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    2016-01-01

    . However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability, and return predictability of the kind documented by Fama does not rule out rational bubbles. On data samples that include the 1990s, there is evidence of an explosive......While Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an “irrational bubble,” he has never publicly expressed his opinion on “rational bubbles.” On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable...

  20. Bubble statistics and positioning in superhelically stressed DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Daniel; Zubair, Asif; Everaers, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    We present a general framework to study the thermodynamic denaturation of double-stranded DNA under superhelical stress. We report calculations of position- and size-dependent opening probabilities for bubbles along the sequence. Our results are obtained from transfer-matrix solutions of the Zimm-Bragg model for unconstrained DNA and of a self-consistent linearization of the Benham model for superhelical DNA. The numerical efficiency of our method allows for the analysis of entire genomes and of random sequences of corresponding length (10(6)-10(9) base pairs). We show that, at physiological conditions, opening in superhelical DNA is strongly cooperative with average bubble sizes of 10(2)-10(3) base pairs (bp), and orders of magnitude higher than in unconstrained DNA. In heterogeneous sequences, the mean degree of base-pair opening is self-averaging, while bubble localization and statistics are dominated by sequence disorder. Compared to random sequences with identical GC-content, genomic DNA has a significantly increased probability to open large bubbles under superhelical stress. These bubbles are frequently located directly upstream of transcription start sites.

  1. Bubble aspect ratio in dense bubbly flows: experimental studies in low Morton-number systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besagni, G.; Inzoli, F.; Ziegenhein, T.; Hessenkemper, H.; Lucas, D.

    2017-11-01

    Almost every modelling approach of bubbly flows includes assumptions concerning the bubble shape. Such assumptions are usually made based on single bubble experiments in quiescent flows, which is far away from the flow field observed in large-scale multiphase facilities. Considering low Morton-numbers and the highly deformable interface at medium and large Eötvös-numbers, the evaluation of the bubble shape in such systems under real flow conditions is highly desirable. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the bubble shape (in terms of aspect ratio), at low Morton-numbers, in different bubble column setups and a pipe flow setup under different operating conditions. The bubble shape in the bubble column experiments were obtained with cameras at Politecnico di Milano and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR) whereas the shapes in the pipe flows were measured by the ultrafast electron beam X-ray tomography system (ROFEX) at HZDR. In the bubble column experiments almost the same shape is observed; conversely, the shape in the pipe flows distinctly depends on the flow conditions. In conclusion, in bubble columns the assumption of a constant shape regardless of the flow conditions is valid whereas in pipe flows the turbulence and shear rates can be strong enough to deform distinctly the bubbles.

  2. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  3. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: Validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, Jose L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, Sergio [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Essa, Mohamed Ali Abd El Aziz [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, Santos [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have simulated bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling a Lagrangian model to an Eulerian one, and to a 3D random walk model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of experiments in a vertical column with isothermal co-current two phase flow have been performed and used to validate the previous model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the influence of the turbulence induced by the bubbles on the results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of experimental and computed results has been performed for different boundary conditions. - Abstract: A set of two phase flow experiments for different conditions ranging from bubbly flow to cap/slug flow have been performed under isothermal concurrent upward air-water flow conditions in a vertical column of 3 m height. Special attention in these experiments was devoted to the transition from bubbly to cap/slug flow. The interfacial velocity of the bubbles and the void fraction distribution was obtained using 2 and 4 sensors conductivity probes. Numerical simulations of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code with an Eulerian one. The first one tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates (r, {phi}, z) inside the fluid field under the action of the following forces: buoyancy, drag, lift, wall lubrication. Also we have incorporated a 3D stochastic differential equation model to account for the random motion of the individual bubbles in the turbulent velocity field of the carrier liquid. Also we have considered the deformations undergone by the bubbles when they touch the walls of the pipe and are compressed until they rebound. The velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS). The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate {epsilon} transport equations

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  6. Soap Bubbles and Crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    volume work summarizing his decades of research into soap bubbles and related phe- nomena due to surface tension. He gave the rules governing the geometry of bubbles, without any proof. It is a remarkable achievement as these experiments.

  7. Soap Bubbles and Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Shellie-helane; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces questions and activities involving soap bubbles which provide students with experiences in prediction and logic. Examines commonly held false conceptions related to the shapes that bubbles take and provides correct explanations for the phenomenon. (ML)

  8. Numerical modeling of the transport to an intravascular bubble in a tube with a soluble/insoluble surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S; Zhang, Jie; Eckmann, David M

    2006-09-01

    Using a newly developed algorithm in conjunction with the front tracking scheme, we have evaluated the transport associated with a deformable bubble moving in a tube in the presence of a soluble or an insoluble surfactant. Such evaluations are useful to the understanding of gas embolism--a common syndrome for decompression sickness. Decompression sickness may be encountered in performing extravehicular activity during space exploration. The numerical evaluations indicate that as the location of the adsorptive interface gets closer to the vessel wall, the surfactant amount on the wall gets depleted. The implication is that the process by which a bubble occluding a vessel dislodges may depend both on the strength of the diffusivity of the surfactant and the adsorption process. More detailed study is needed to clarify this observation. The numerical results evaluated include Marangoni flow, which causes a bubble to propel out of its initial static location, and bubble motion in Poiseuille flow. The presence of a soluble/insoluble surfactant slows down the bubble motion. For identical surface concentrations of the surfactant, the effect of the presence of a soluble surfactant is more severe on the retardation of the bubble motion than that of an insoluble surfactant.

  9. Effect of ultrasound on dynamics characteristic of the cavitation bubble in grinding fluids during honing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ce; Zhu, Xijing

    2018-03-01

    The effect of ultrasound on generating and controlling the cavitation bubble of the grinding fluid during ultrasonic vibration honing was investigated. The grinding fluid on the surface of the honing stone was measured by utilizing the digital microscope VHX-600ESO. Based on analyzing the cavitation mechanism of the grinding fluid, the bubble dynamics model under conventional honing (CH) and ultrasonic vibration honing (UVH) was established respectively. Difference of dynamic behaviors of the bubble between the cases in UVH and CH was compared respectively, and the effects of acoustic amplitude and ultrasonic frequency on the bubble dynamics were simulated numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method with variable step size adaptive control. Finally, the cavitation intensity of grinding fluids under ultrasound was measured quantitatively using acoustimeter. The results showed that the grinding fluid subjected to ultrasound can generate many bubbles and further forms numerous groups of araneose cavitation bubbles on the surface of the honing stone. The oscillation of the bubble under UVH is more intense than the case under CH, and the maximum velocity of the bubble wall under UVH is higher two magnitudes than the case under CH. For lower acoustic amplitude, the dynamic behaviors of the bubble under UVH are similar to that case under CH. As increasing acoustic amplitude, the cavitation intensity of the bubble is growing increased. Honing pressure has an inhabitation effect on cavitation effect of the grinding fluid. The perfect performance of cavitation of the grinding fluid can be obtained when the device of UVH is in the resonance. However, the cavitation intensity of the grinding fluid can be growing weakened with increasing ultrasonic frequency, when the device of UVH is in the off-resonance. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and numerical analysis, which provides a method for exploring applications of the cavitation effect in

  10. Conservation of bubble size distribution during gas reactive absorption in bubble column reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L.C. LAGE

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of the bubble size distribution function was applied to the reactive absorption of carbon dioxide in a bubble column reactor. The model developed was solved by the method of characteristics and by a Monte Carlo method. Simulations were carried out using simplified models for the liquid phase and for the gas-liquid mass transfer. Predictions of gas holdup and outlet gas composition showed that the concept of a mean bubble diameter is not applicable when the bubble size distribution is reasonably polydispersed. In these cases, the mass mean velocity and the numerical mean velocity of the bubbles are very different. Therefore, quantification of the polydispersion of bubbles was shown to be essential to gas-phase hydrodynamics modeling.

  11. Mechanical interaction between gas bubbles and micro-crystals in magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Florian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Bredemeyer, Stefan; Arellano, Santiago; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of volcanic gas emissions from low viscosity magmas is controlled by many factors. The buoyancy driven ascent of gas bubbles in the volcanic conduit is one of them. During the ascent the bubbles may collide with micro-crystals, slide along the crystal faces, and finally leave the crystal at the crystal tip. We investigate the mechanical consequences of this interaction in a static volume of magma assuming constant pressure, temperature and chemical composition and neglecting thermodynamic processes between bubbles and crystals. Explicitly, we focus on tabular crystals whose extensions are about one order of magnitude larger than the bubbles. The mechanical interaction changes the motion of both the bubbles and the crystals. The buoyancy force of the bubbles results in a torque on the crystal which ultimately orients the long axis of the crystal to the vertical direction. On the other hand, bubbles change their ascent path and velocity if they slide along a crystal face. This change in the bubble motion may have two opposing impacts on the magnitude of volcanic emissions: First, the reduced ascent velocity results in a bubble accumulation and thus enhanced bubble coalescence rate in the proximity of crystals. Second, the crystals align the bubbles in rise channels starting at the crystal tips while no bubbles access the magma volume immediately located above the crystal cross section, which we call "crystal shadow". Now, volatile degassing from supersaturated magma is a diffusive short-distance process which accelerate in the proximity of pre-existing gas bubbles. We thus infer that the orientation of the crystals influences the bulk volatile degassing rate and thus the volcanic gas emission rate due to the crystal shadow. The mechanical model suggests that all crystals get erected by the bubble-induced torque within time periods in the order of weeks to months. This has to be compared to the crystal nucleation rate in order to obtain a steady state

  12. Comparing mental model assessment technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Göğüş, Aytaç; Gogus, Aytac

    2010-01-01

    Practical measurement and assessment of mental models is not a simple task. There is a lack of assessment tools that can directly and accurately evaluate mental models. This proposed research study on evaluation of mental models uses a set of Web-based assessment tools called HIMATT (Highly Integrated Model Assessment Technology and Tools) developed by an international researcher group to address the need for automated tools. Subjects in this study uses DEEP (Dynamic Evaluation of Enhanced Pr...

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation of Single Bubble Growth under High-Pressure Pool Boiling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Murallidharan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Component-scale modeling of boiling is predominantly based on the Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach. Within this framework, wall boiling is accounted for via the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI model and, within this model, the bubble is characterized using three main parameters: departure diameter (D, nucleation site density (N, and departure frequency (f. Typically, the magnitudes of these three parameters are obtained from empirical correlations. However, in recent years, efforts have been directed toward mechanistic modeling of the boiling process. Of the three parameters mentioned above, the departure diameter (D is least affected by the intrinsic uncertainties of the nucleate boiling process. This feature, along with its prominence within the RPI boiling model, has made it the primary candidate for mechanistic modeling ventures. Mechanistic modeling of D is mostly carried out through solving of force balance equations on the bubble. Forces incorporated in these equations are formulated as functions of the radius of the bubble and have been developed for, and applied to, low-pressure conditions only. Conversely, for high-pressure conditions, no mechanistic information is available regarding the growth rates of bubbles and the forces acting on them. In this study, we use direct numerical simulation coupled with an interface tracking method to simulate bubble growth under high (up to 45 bar pressure, to obtain the kind of mechanistic information required for an RPI-type approach. In this study, we compare the resulting bubble growth rate curves with predictions made with existing experimental data.

  14. Soap Films and Bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen

    1986-01-01

    Develops and explains a format for a workshop which focuses on soap films and bubbles. The plan consists of: a discussion to uncover what children know about bubbles; explanations of the demonstration equipment; the presentation itself; the assembly of the workshop kit; and time to play with the bubbles. (ML)

  15. Generating Soap Bubbles by Blowing on Soap Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2016-02-19

    Making soap bubbles by blowing air on a soap film is an enjoyable activity, yet a poorly understood phenomenon. Working either with circular bubble wands or long-lived vertical soap films having an adjustable steady state thickness, we investigate the formation of such bubbles when a gas is blown through a nozzle onto a film. We vary film size, nozzle radius, space between the film and nozzle, and gas density, and we measure the gas velocity threshold above which bubbles are formed. The response is sensitive to containment, i.e., the ratio between film and jet sizes, and dissipation in the turbulent gas jet, which is a function of the distance from the film to the nozzle. We rationalize the observed four different regimes by comparing the dynamic pressure exerted by the jet on the film and the Laplace pressure needed to create the curved surface of a bubble. This simple model allows us to account for the interplay between hydrodynamic, physicochemical, and geometrical factors.

  16. Generating Soap Bubbles by Blowing on Soap Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Making soap bubbles by blowing air on a soap film is an enjoyable activity, yet a poorly understood phenomenon. Working either with circular bubble wands or long-lived vertical soap films having an adjustable steady state thickness, we investigate the formation of such bubbles when a gas is blown through a nozzle onto a film. We vary film size, nozzle radius, space between the film and nozzle, and gas density, and we measure the gas velocity threshold above which bubbles are formed. The response is sensitive to containment, i.e., the ratio between film and jet sizes, and dissipation in the turbulent gas jet, which is a function of the distance from the film to the nozzle. We rationalize the observed four different regimes by comparing the dynamic pressure exerted by the jet on the film and the Laplace pressure needed to create the curved surface of a bubble. This simple model allows us to account for the interplay between hydrodynamic, physicochemical, and geometrical factors.

  17. Simulations of Bubble Motion in an Oscillating Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynik, A. M.; Romero, L. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    Finite-element simulations are used to investigate the motion of a gas bubble in a liquid undergoing vertical vibration. The effect of bubble compressibility is studied by comparing "compressible" bubbles that obey the ideal gas law with "incompressible" bubbles that are taken to have constant volume. Compressible bubbles exhibit a net downward motion away from the free surface that does not exist for incompressible bubbles. Net (rectified) velocities are extracted from the simulations and compared with theoretical predictions. The dependence of the rectified velocity on ambient gas pressure, bubble diameter, and bubble depth are in agreement with the theory. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. A Model of the Bubble Break-up in a Turbulent Flow; Modelizacion de la rotura de una Burbuja en un Flujo Turbulento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayod, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, J.; Martinez Bazan, C.

    2005-07-01

    In this report, a simplified model of the break-up of an air bubble in a turbulent water flow is proposed and analyzed numerically. According to Hinze's theory, and our experimental observations, the external flow field is assumed asymmetric and irrotational for away from the bubble. furthermore the turbulent flow-field is modelled by an asymmetric hyperbolic flow-field and the evolution of the air-water interface is calculated by the levels-set method for a wide range of Reynolds and Weber numbers. Therefore, the break-up times are obtained for super-critical weber numbers and different Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the break-up times are obtained for super-critical Weber and Reynolds numbers allows the comparison of the numeric with our experimental results. Other possible break-up mechanisms for subcritical Weber number, i. e. the break-up by resonance, are also considered. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. Large eddy simulations of laminar separation bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Francois

    The flow over blades and airfoils at moderate angles of attack and Reynolds numbers ranging from ten thousand to a few hundred thousands undergoes separation due to the adverse pressure gradient generated by surface curvature. In many cases, the separated shear layer then transitions to turbulence and reattaches, closing off a recirculation region -- the laminar separation bubble. To avoid body-fitted mesh generation problems and numerical issues, an equivalent problem for flow over a flat plate is formulated by imposing boundary conditions that lead to a pressure distribution and Reynolds number that are similar to those on airfoils. Spalart & Strelet (2000) tested a number of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models for a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate. Although results with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model were encouraging, none of the turbulence models tested reliably recovered time-averaged direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The purpose of this work is to assess whether large eddy simulation (LES) can more accurately and reliably recover DNS results using drastically reduced resolution -- on the order of 1% of DNS resolution which is commonly achievable for LES of turbulent channel flows. LES of a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate are performed using a compressible sixth-order finite-difference code and two incompressible pseudo-spectral Navier-Stokes solvers at resolutions corresponding to approximately 3% and 1% of the chosen DNS benchmark by Spalart & Strelet (2000). The finite-difference solver is found to be dissipative due to the use of a stability-enhancing filter. Its numerical dissipation is quantified and found to be comparable to the average eddy viscosity of the dynamic Smagorinsky model, making it difficult to separate the effects of filtering versus those of explicit subgrid-scale modeling. The negligible numerical dissipation of the pseudo-spectral solvers allows an unambiguous

  20. Bubble rearrangements dynamics in foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Merrer, Marie; Costa, Severine; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Hoehler, Reinhard

    2011-11-01

    Liquid foams are jammed dispersions of gas bubbles in a surfactant solution. Their structure evolves with time because surface tension drives a diffusive gas exchange between neighboring bubbles. This coarsening leads to a build-up of stresses which are relaxed upon local intermittent bubble rearrangements. These events govern the slow viscoelastic foam response, and similar bubble rearrangements are the elementary processes of plastic flow. Thus, the rearrangement duration is a key parameter describing how the microstructure dynamics control the macroscopic rheological response. We probe the duration of coarsening-induced rearrangements in 3D foams using a multiple light scattering technique (time resolved Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy) as a function of the surfactant chemistry and the liquid fraction. As the foam becomes wetter, the confinement pressure of the packing goes to zero and the contacts between bubbles vanish. For mobile interfaces, we find that the rearrangements slow down as the jamming point is approached. These findings are compared to scaling laws which reveal an analogy between rearrangements dynamics in foams and granular suspensions.

  1. Surfactants as bubble surface modifiers in the flotation of algae: dissolved air flotation that utilizes a chemically modified bubble surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rita K; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into the use of bubbles modified with surfactants in dissolved air flotation (DAF). Bubble modification was investigated by dosing surfactants of varying character into the saturator of a DAF unit in turn. The cell removal efficiency only improved when using a cationic surfactant where optimum removal of Microcystis aeruginosa cells was obtained when using 0.0022-0.004 mequiv L(-1) surfactant. However, the magnitude of the removal differed according to the hydrophobicity of the surfactant. Typically, the more efficiently the surfactant adsorbed at the bubble interface, the better the removal efficiency. When the dose to saturator ratio was kept constant and the recycle ratio varied, the removal efficiency improved with increasing recycle ratio, reaching a maximum removal efficiency of 87% for M. aeruginosa. This value was comparable with that predicted by a theoretical model. The bubble collection efficiency of a maximum of two cells per bubble was constant irrespective of the influent cell number or recycle ratio. Treatment of additional species in this way revealed a relationship between increasing size and both increasing removal efficiency and decreasing surfactant dose, which is supported by theoretical relationships.

  2. Calibrating optical bubble size by the displaced-mass method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Leeuw, G. de; Kunz, G.; Cohen, L.H.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble sizing by optical means is very common, but requires calibration by non-optical means. This is particularly important since apparent bubble size increases with decreasing threshold intensity. A calibration experiment was conducted comparing the displaced water mass from captured bubbles with

  3. Cavitation bubble dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterborn, W; Ohl, C D

    1997-04-01

    The dynamics of cavitation bubbles on water is investigated for bubbles produced optically and acoustically. Single bubble dynamics is studied with laser produced bubbles and high speed photography with framing rates up to 20.8 million frames per second. Examples for jet formation and shock wave emission are given. Acoustic cavitation is produced in water in the interior of piezoelectric cylinders of different sizes (up to 12 cm inner diameter). The filementary structure composed of bubbles is investigated and their light emission (sonoluminescence) studied for various driving strengths.

  4. Effect of bubble deformability on the vertical channel bubbly flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the fluid dynamics video: "Effect of bubble deformability on the vertical channel bubbly flow". The effect of bubble deformability on the flow rate of bubbly upflow in a turbulent vertical channel is examined using direct numerical simulations. A series of simulations with bubbles of decreasing deformability reveals a sharp transition from a flow with deformable bubbles uniformly distributed in the middle of the channel to a flow with nearly spherical bubbles with a wal...

  5. Modeling and Control Perspectives of Two-Phase Fluid Systems - with Applications to Bubble Columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djordjevic, S.

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress in the chemical industry is now forcing engineers and physicists to get to deal with control-oriented modeling of material properties on microscopic scale inside reactors in order to build more efficient chemical plants. The control-oriented modeling provides a new way of

  6. The life and death of film bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, S.; Villermaux, E.; Bourouiba, L.

    2017-11-01

    Following its burst, the fragmentation of a large bubble (film bubble) at the air-water interface can release hundreds of micrometer-sized film-drops in the air we breathe. This mechanism of droplet formation is one of the most prominent sources of sea spray. Indoor or outdoor, pathogens from contaminated water are transported by these droplets and have also been linked to respiratory infection. The lifetime and thickness of bubbles govern the number and size of the droplets they produce. Despite these important implications, little is known about the factors influencing the life and death of surface film bubbles. In particular, the fundamental physical mechanisms linking bubble aging, thinning, and lifetime remain poorly understood. To address this gap, we present the results of an extensive investigation of the aging of film-drop-producing bubbles in various ambient air, water composition, and temperature conditions. We present and validate a generalized physical picture and model of bubble cap thickness evolution. The model and physical picture are linked to the lifetime of bubbles via a series of cap rupture mechanisms of increasing efficiency.

  7. Neural basis of economic bubble behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, A; Onozaki, T; Mizuno, T; Asamizuya, T; Ueno, K; Cheng, K; Iriki, A

    2014-04-18

    Throughout human history, economic bubbles have formed and burst. As a bubble grows, microeconomic behavior ceases to be constrained by realistic predictions. This contradicts the basic assumption of economics that agents have rational expectations. To examine the neural basis of behavior during bubbles, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants traded shares in a virtual stock exchange with two non-bubble stocks and one bubble stock. The price was largely deflected from the fair price in one of the non-bubble stocks, but not in the other. Their fair prices were specified. The price of the bubble stock showed a large increase and battering, as based on a real stock-market bust. The imaging results revealed modulation of the brain circuits that regulate trade behavior under different market conditions. The premotor cortex was activated only under a market condition in which the price was largely deflected from the fair price specified. During the bubble, brain regions associated with the cognitive processing that supports order decisions were identified. The asset preference that might bias the decision was associated with the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The activity of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was correlated with the score of future time perspective, which would bias the estimation of future price. These regions were deemed to form a distinctive network during the bubble. A functional connectivity analysis showed that the connectivity between the DLPFC and the IPL was predominant compared with other connectivities only during the bubble. These findings indicate that uncertain and unstable market conditions changed brain modes in traders. These brain mechanisms might lead to a loss of control caused by wishful thinking, and to microeconomic bubbles that expand, on the macroscopic scale, toward bust. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Rise of an argon bubble in liquid steel in the presence of a transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K.; Kumar, P.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2016-09-01

    The rise of gaseous bubbles in viscous liquids is a fundamental problem in fluid physics, and it is also a common phenomenon in many industrial applications such as materials processing, food processing, and fusion reactor cooling. In this work, the motion of a single argon gas bubble rising in quiescent liquid steel under an external magnetic field is studied numerically using a Volume-of-Fluid method. To mitigate spurious velocities normally generated during numerical simulation of multiphase flows with large density differences, an improved algorithm for surface tension modeling, originally proposed by Wang and Tong ["Deformation and oscillations of a single gas bubble rising in a narrow vertical tube," Int. J. Therm. Sci. 47, 221-228 (2008)] is implemented, validated and used in the present computations. The governing equations are integrated by a second-order space and time accurate numerical scheme, and implemented on multiple Graphics Processing Units with high parallel efficiency. The motion and terminal velocities of the rising bubble under different magnetic fields are compared and a reduction in rise velocity is seen in cases with the magnetic field applied. The shape deformation and the path of the bubble are discussed. An elongation of the bubble along the field direction is seen, and the physics behind these phenomena is discussed. The wake structures behind the bubble are visualized and effects of the magnetic field on the wake structures are presented. A modified drag coefficient is obtained to include the additional resistance force caused by adding a transverse magnetic field.

  9. Effects of microgravity on Marangoni convection and growth characteristic of a single bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Pan, Liang-ming; Xu, Jian-jun

    2014-07-01

    Based on previous experiments and the volume of fluid (VOF) multiphase model, the growth characteristics of a single bubble have been numerically investigated in a rectangular pool (10×10×25 mm3) under microgravity. The transport of mass and energy during phase change was realized by source terms of the mass and energy equations through user-defined functions (UDF). Under microgravity, the results show that the temperature and the streamline field distribution around the bubble are significantly changed as compared to the ones of terrestrial conditions. The temperature profile at the two-phase interface is no longer a uniform distribution, and the Marangoni flows are more obvious at the two-phase interface. The effects of gravity on the detachment of the bubble are significant: the bubble does not immediately detach from the heating wall under microgravity conditions. The surface tension gradient caused by the Marangoni effect is more significant at lower microgravity. Bubble growth is more complex under microgravity conditions than normal gravity conditions, and it is related to the magnitude of the microgravity: the lower the microgravity, the higher the bubble growth rate. Furthermore, under microgravity, the bubble diameter changes differently, and the fluctuation amplitude of the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing microgravity.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study on chemical reactions and species diffusion by a nano-pulse discharged bubble for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuchen; Uehara, Satoshi; Takana, Hidemasa; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2018-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes using hydroxyl radicals (ṡOH) generated inside bubbles in water has drawn widely interest for the high oxidation potential of OH radical to decompose persistent organic pollutants such as dioxins and humic acid for water purification. In this study, a two-dimensional diffusion model for a nano-pulse discharged bubble in water is established. Based on the experimental results of streamer propagation inside a bubble, the diffusion processes around the bubble interface and reactions of chemical species in liquids are simulated. The simulation results show that OH radicals can diffuse only several micrometers away from the bubble interface in water. Furthermore, the optimal operating voltage and frequency conditions for OH generation is obtained by comparing the OH concentration in water obtained from numerical simulation with that measured by spectroscopy in experiment.

  11. Assessments of Bubble Dynamics Model and Influential Parameters in Microbubble Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skudarnov, P. V; Lin, C. X

    2006-01-01

    .... The effects of mixture density variation, free stream turbulence intensity, free stream velocity, and surface roughness on the microbubble drag reduction were studied using a single phase model based...

  12. A fractional Fourier transform analysis of a bubble excited by an ultrasonic chirp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Euan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2011-11-01

    The fractional Fourier transform is proposed here as a model based, signal processing technique for determining the size of a bubble in a fluid. The bubble is insonified with an ultrasonic chirp and the radiated pressure field is recorded. This experimental bubble response is then compared with a series of theoretical model responses to identify the most accurate match between experiment and theory which allows the correct bubble size to be identified. The fractional Fourier transform is used to produce a more detailed description of each response, and two-dimensional cross correlation is then employed to identify the similarities between the experimental response and each theoretical response. In this paper the experimental bubble response is simulated by adding various levels of noise to the theoretical model output. The method is compared to the standard technique of using time-domain cross correlation. The proposed method is shown to be far more robust at correctly sizing the bubble and can cope with much lower signal to noise ratios.

  13. Optimization of the bubble radius in a moving single bubble sonoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirheydari, Mona; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa, E-mail: sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, 11365-91, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-01

    A complete study of the hydrodynamic force on a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in N-methylformamide is presented in this work. All forces exerted, trajectory, interior temperature and gas pressure are discussed. The maximum values of the calculated components of the hydrodynamic force for three different radii at the same driving pressure were compared, while the optimum bubble radius was determined. The maximum value of the buoyancy force appears at the start of bubble collapse, earlier than the other forces whose maximum values appear at the moment of bubble collapse. We verified that for radii larger than the optimum radius, the temperature peak value decreases.

  14. Bubble mobility in mud and magmatic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Aaron; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The rheology of particle-laden fluids with a yield stress, such as mud or crystal-rich magmas, controls the mobility of bubbles, both the size needed to overcome the yield stress and their rise speed. We experimentally measured the velocities of bubbles and rigid spheres in mud sampled from the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes adjacent to the Salton Sea, Southern California. Combined with previous measurements in the polymer gel Carbopol, we obtained an empirical model for the drag coefficient and bounded the conditions under which bubbles overcome the yield stress. Yield stresses typical of mud and basaltic magmas with sub-mm particles can immobilize millimeter to centimeter sized bubbles. At Stromboli volcano, Italy, a vertical yield stress gradient in the shallow conduit may immobilize bubbles with diameter ≲ 1 cm and hinder slug coalescence.

  15. Numerical derivation of the drag force coefficient in bubble swarms using a Front Tracking model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, W.; Roghair, I.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersed gas-liquid flows are often encountered in the chemical process industry. Large scale models which describe the overall behavior of these flows use closure relations to account for the interactions between the phases, such as the drag, lift and virtual mass forces. The closure relations for

  16. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  17. Bubble Movement on Inclined Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibar, Ali; Ozbay, Ridvan; Sarshar, Mohammad Amin; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2017-10-31

    The movement of a single air bubble on an inclined hydrophobic surface submerged in water, including both the upward- and downward-facing sides of the surface, was investigated. A planar Teflon sheet with an apparent contact angle of a sessile water droplet of 106° was used as a hydrophobic surface. The volume of a bubble and the inclination angle of a Teflon sheet varied in the ranges 5-40 μL and 0-45°, respectively. The effects of the bubble volume on the adhesion and dynamics of the bubble were studied experimentally on the facing-up and facing-down surfaces of the submerged hydrophobic Teflon sheet, respectively, and compared. The result shows that the sliding angle has an inverse relationship with the bubble volume for both the upward- and downward-facing surfaces. However, at the same given volume, the bubble on the downward-facing surface spreads over a larger area of the hydrophobic surface than the upward-facing surface due to the greater hydrostatic pressure acting on the bubble on the downward-facing surface. This makes the lateral adhesion force of the bubble greater and requires a larger inclination angle to result in sliding.

  18. Characterization of intergranular fission gas bubbles in U-Mo fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Rest, J.; Shevlyakov, G. V.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SSCR RIAR

    2008-04-14

    plates were also performed and compared with the calculated quantities. Bubble density per unit grain boundary surface area was calculated by using the density per unit grain boundary length data. These data were used as input for mechanistic modeling described in section 4. Volumetric bubble density was calculated by using density per unit grain boundary surface area. Based on these data, bubble volumetric fraction was calculated. Bubble volume fraction was also calculated by using the density per unit cross section area. Bubble volume fraction was also directly measured for some plates. These three results are comparable although the direct measurement data are slightly larger than the others. Bubble volume fraction increased as a function of burnup, reaching {approx}2% of fuel volume at 3 x 10{sup 21} f/cm{sup 3}. Fission gas bubble swelling is minor compared to that of solid fission product swelling.

  19. Multiphase flow analysis using population balance modeling bubbles, drops and particles

    CERN Document Server

    Yeoh, Guan Heng; Tu, Jiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Written by leading multiphase flow and CFD experts, this book enables engineers and researchers to understand the use of PBM and CFD frameworks. Population balance approaches can now be used in conjunction with CFD, effectively driving more efficient and effective multiphase flow processes. Engineers familiar with standard CFD software, including ANSYS-CFX and ANSYS-Fluent, will be able to use the tools and approaches presented in this book in the effective research, modeling and control of multiphase flow problems. Builds a complete understanding of the theory behind the

  20. Unsteady compressible two-fluid flow model for interface capturing. On the dynamics of a shock-bubble interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kreeft (Jasper)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractMulti-fluid flows are found in many applications in engineering and physics. Examples of these flows from engineering are water-air flows in ship hydrodynamics, exhaust-air flows behind rockets, gas-petrolea flows in upstream pipes of oil rigs, air-fuel bubble interaction flows in

  1. Comparation of Models for Datamining

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriš, Ondrej

    2007-01-01

    S prudkým rozvojem informačních technologií neustále stoupá i množství vyprodukovaných dat a narůstá potřeba je rychle a efektivně zpracovávat za účelem odhalení skrytých znalostí obsažených v datech. Tahle práce se zabývá procesem dolování dat z databází, jeho jednotlivými fázemi, různými metodami pro dolování v datech a jejich porovnáním. Podrobně je analyzován model regrese, neuronové sítě a rozhodovacího stromu.V práci je též představen jeden z předních nástrojů pro dolování SAS Enterpri...

  2. Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-07-31

    A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

  3. Unified model of plasma formation, bubble generation and shock wave emission in water for fs to ns laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Paltauf, Günther; Zhang, Zhenxi; Vogel, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    We developed modeling tools for optical breakdown events in water that span various phases reaching from breakdown initiation via solvated electron generation, through laser induced-plasma formation and temperature evolution in the focal spot to the later phases of cavitation bubble dynamics and shock wave emission and applied them to a large parameter space of pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies. The rate equation model considers the interplay of linear absorption, photoionization, avalanche ionization and recombination, traces thermalization and temperature evolution during the laser pulse, and portrays the role of thermal ionization that becomes relevant for T > 3000 K. Modeling of free-electron generation includes recent insights on breakdown initiation in water via multiphoton excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state at Eini = 6.6 eV followed by up-conversion into the conduction band level that is located at 9.5 eV. The ability of tracing the temperature evolution enabled us to link the model of laser-induced plasma formation with a hydrodynamic model of plasma-induced pressure evolution and phase transitions that, in turn, traces bubble generation and dynamics as well as shock wave emission. This way, the amount of nonlinear energy deposition in transparent dielectrics and the resulting material modifications can be assessed as a function of incident laser energy. The unified model of plasma formation and bubble dynamics yields an excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of investigated pulse durations (femtosecond to nanosecond), wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulse energies.

  4. Planar Soap Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Rick

    1998-01-01

    The generalized soap bubble problem seeks the least perimeter way to enclose and separate n given volumes in R^m. We study the possible configurations for perimeter minimizing bubble complexes enclosing more than two regions. We prove that perimeter minimizing planar bubble complexes with equal pressure regions and without empty chambers must have connected regions. As a consequence, we show that the least perimeter planar graph that...

  5. Magnetic bubble materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giess, E A

    1980-05-23

    Physicists, materials scientists, and engineers combined to bring solid-state bubble devices into the computer memory and recording marketplace. Devices with smaller bubbles are being developed for increased data capacity and lower cost. Epitaxial garnet films made by isothermal dipping in molten solutions helped put the technology in place and will probably satisfy the material needs of future devices with bubbles scaled down from 2 to 0.5 micrometer in size.

  6. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  7. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  8. Sparse inversion for water bubble removal and spectral enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangkang; Gan, Shuwei; Qu, Shan; Zu, Shaohuan

    2015-06-01

    The simple waveform coming from a bubble-free airgun source can significantly simplify the determination and control of the processed wavelet phase function, and thus it will improve stratigraphic reliability of the seismic data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for simultaneous water bubble removal and spectral enhancement by frequency-wavenumber domain sparse inversion. We use the concept of target source, comparable to the well-known airgun source. The target source is a single-lobe bubble-free airgun source. We formulate an estimation problem in order to invert the seismic data that is acquired as if using the target source. As the basic idea of the approach is by convolution and deconvolution, there will exist random noise in the time-space domain because of the stability factor. We propose to iteratively remove the random noise while doing deconvolution by constraining using frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain thresholding. Compared with the traditional wiener filtering, the proposed approach can obtain a nearly perfect result, without the extra added noise and artifacts. We use one linear-event synthetic data and the more realistic Marmousi model to demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach. The results show that our approach can successfully remove water bubbles and fill in the spectrum notches.

  9. Numerical simulation of single bubble boiling behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of a single bubble boiling process are studied with numerical modeling. The mass, momentum, energy and level set equations are solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The bubble boiling dynamics, the transient pressure field, velocity field and temperature field in time are analyzed, and reasonable results are obtained. The numeral model is validated by the empirical equation of Fritz and could be used for various applications.

  10. Experimental evaluation of lesion prediction modelling in the presence of cavitation bubbles: intended for high-intensity focused ultrasound prostate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, L; Chavrier, F; Gignoux, B; Pichardo, S; Chesnais, S; Chapelon, J Y

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) lesion prediction modelling was evaluated for a truncated spherical transducer designed for prostate cancer treatment The modelling adapted the bio heat transfer equation (BHTE) to take into account the activity of cavitation bubbles generated during HIFU exposure. This modelling was used to predict the lesions produced by three different transducer geometries: fixed-focus, concentric-ring and 1.5D phased-array. Lesions were predicted for different ultrasound exposure conditions close to those used in prostate cancer treatment. Twenty-one in vitro and nine in vitro experiments were performed on pig liver to validate the accuracy of the predictions. A good match was found between the predicted and experimental lesion shapes. Lesion dimensions (maximum depth and length, area at the centre of the lesion or central surface area) were measured on experimental and predicted lesions. The central surface area was predicted by the model with a range of error of 0.15-6.5% for in vitro tests and 0.97-9% in vivo. For comparison, BHTE without bubbles had a range of error of 0.4-55.5% (in vitro) and 9-25.5% (in vivo). The model should be accurate enough to predict HIFU lesions under ultrasound exposure conditions used in prostate cancer treatment.

  11. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jie, E-mail: shijie@hrbeu.edu.cn; Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo [Acoustic Science and Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei [College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  12. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration......, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments...

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Particles-Bubbles Collisions Kernel in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan E. Fayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles and bubbles suspended in homogeneous isotropic turbulence are tracked and their collisions frequency is determined as a function of particle Stokes number. The carrier phase velocity fluctuations are determined by Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS. The effects of the dispersed phases on the carrier phase are neglected. Particles and bubbles of sizes on the order of Kolmogorov length scale are treated as point masses. In addition to Stokes drag, the pressure gradient in the carrier phase and added-mass forces are also included. Equations of motion of dispersed phases are integrated simultaneously with the equations of the carrier phase using the same time stepping scheme. The collision model used here allows overlap of particles and bubbles. Simulations for three turbulence Reynolds numbers ReΛ = 57, 77, and 96 have been performed. Collisions kernel, radial relative velocity, and radial distribution function found by DNS are compared to theoretical models over a range of particle Stokes number. Comparisons are made with Zaichik et al. [22] model, which is applicable to heavy particles, and Zaichik et al. [23] model which is valid for an arbitrary Stokes number. Zaichik et al. [23] is essentially a model for the radial relative velocity, and for the purpose of computing the collision kernel, it assumes the radial distribution function to be one. In general, good agreement between DNS and Zaichik et al. models is obtained for radial relative velocity for both particle-particle and particle-bubble collisions. The DNS results show that around Stokes number of unity particles of the same group undergo expected preferential concentration while particles and bubbles are segregated. The segregation behavior of particles and bubbles leads to a radial distribution function that is less than one. Existing theoretical models do not account for effects of this segregation behavior of particles and bubbles on the radial distribution function.

  14. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  15. Single bubble sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence occurs when an acoustically trapped and periodically driven gas bubble collapses so strongly that the energy focusing at collapse leads to light emission. Detailed experiments have demonstrated the unique properties of this system: the spectrum of the emitted light

  16. Bubbles in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  17. Step-Wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-21

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubble jets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10-4. For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19 nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10 and 12.5 v %), and the tube diameter (0.45, 0.47, and 0.50 cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity versus bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10-7. This step-wise velocity increase versus the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. To elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g. the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  18. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, J.B. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  19. Diffusion of dissolved CO2 in water propagating from a cylindrical bubble in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-López, Pablo; van Elburg, Benjamin; Parrales, Miguel A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier

    2017-06-01

    The dissolution of a gas bubble in a confined geometry is a problem of interest in technological applications such as microfluidics or carbon sequestration, as well as in many natural flows of interest in geophysics. While the dissolution of spherical or sessile bubbles has received considerable attention in the literature, the case of a two-dimensional bubble in a Hele-Shaw cell, which constitutes perhaps the simplest possible confined configuration, has been comparatively less studied. Here, we use planar laser-induced fluorescence to experimentally investigate the diffusion-driven transport of dissolved CO2 that propagates from a cylindrical mm-sized bubble in air-saturated water confined in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We observe that the radial trajectory of an isoconcentration front, rf(t ) , evolves in time as approximately rf-R0∝√{t } , where R0 denotes the initial bubble radius. We then characterize the unsteady CO2 concentration field via two simple analytical models, which are then validated against a numerical simulation. The first model treats the bubble as an instantaneous line source of CO2, whereas the second assumes a constant interfacial concentration. Finally, we provide an analogous Epstein-Plesset equation with the intent of predicting the dissolution rate of a cylindrical bubble.

  20. Mapping coalescence of micron-sized drops and bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2017-02-01

    Emulsion formulation, solvent extraction and multiphase microfluidics are all examples of processes that require precise control of drop or bubble collision stability. We use a previously validated numerical model to map the exact conditions under which micron-sized drops or bubbles undergo coalescence in the presence of colloidal forces and hydrodynamic effects relevant to Brownian motion and low Reynolds number flows. We demonstrate that detailed understanding of how the equilibrium surface forces vary with film thickness can be applied to make accurate predictions of the outcome of a drop or bubble collision when hydrodynamic effects are negligible. In addition, we illuminate the parameter space (i.e. interaction velocity, drop deformation, interfacial tension, etc.) at which hydrodynamic effects can stabilise collisions that are unstable at equilibrium. Further, we determine conditions for which drop or bubble collisions become unstable upon separation, caused by negative hydrodynamic pressure in the film. Lastly, we show that scaling analyses are not applicable for constant force collisions where the approach timescale is comparable to the coalescence timescale, and demonstrate that initial conditions under these circumstances cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging Based on Bubble Region Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of ultrasound contrast agent imaging (USCAI based on plane waves has recently attracted increasing attention. A series of USCAI techniques have been developed to improve the imaging quality. Most of the existing methods enhance the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR using the time-frequency spectrum differences between the tissue and ultrasound contrast agent (UCA region. In this paper, a new USCAI method based on bubble region detection was proposed, in which the frequency difference as well as the dissimilarity of tissue and UCA in the spatial domain was taken into account. A bubble wavelet based on the Doinikov model was firstly constructed. Bubble wavelet transformation (BWT was then applied to strengthen the UCA region and weaken the tissue region. The bubble region was thereafter detected by using the combination of eigenvalue and eigenspace-based coherence factor (ESBCF. The phantom and rabbit in vivo experiment results suggested that our method was capable of suppressing the background interference and strengthening the information of UCA. For the phantom experiment, the imaging CTR was improved by 10.1 dB compared with plane wave imaging based on delay-and-sum (DAS and by 4.2 dB over imaging based on BWT on average. Furthermore, for the rabbit kidney experiment, the corresponding improvements were 18.0 dB and 3.4 dB, respectively.

  2. Predawn plasma bubble cluster observed in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watthanasangmechai, Kornyanat; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Saito, Akinori; Tsunoda, Roland; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Supnithi, Pornchai; Ishii, Mamoru; Yatini, Clara

    2016-06-01

    Predawn plasma bubble was detected as deep plasma depletion by GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) network and in situ measurement onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F15 (DMSPF15) satellite and was confirmed by sparse GPS network in Southeast Asia. In addition to the deep depletion, the GPS network revealed the coexisting submesoscale irregularities. A deep depletion is regarded as a primary bubble. Submesoscale irregularities are regarded as secondary bubbles. Primary bubble and secondary bubbles appeared together as a cluster with zonal wavelength of 50 km. An altitude of secondary bubbles happened to be lower than that of the primary bubble in the same cluster. The observed pattern of plasma bubble cluster is consistent with the simulation result of the recent high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model. This event is only a single event out of 76 satellite passes at nighttime during 3-25 March 2012 that significantly shows plasma depletion at plasma bubble wall. The inside structure of the primary bubble was clearly revealed from the in situ density data of DMSPF15 satellite and the ground-based GRBR total electron content.

  3. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs.

  4. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    . The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model......The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years......, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid...

  5. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    expanded beam of a Q-switched laser pulse at wavelength of λ=532 nm and with pulse duration of ∼4 ns is focused at the center of a water tank using an aberration minimized lens design. Single cavitation bubbles are initiated via optical breakdown at this location which coincides with the position of which the shock wave is focused. The energy of the shock wave source has been altered in 8 steps. The pressure pulse amplitude of the impinging shock wave measured at the distance of about 1.8 mm above the focus location range from 24.4 MPa to 108.1 MPa. The lithotripter shock wave impact time is varied in three steps which provides the possibility of investigation of the bubble dynamics in both cases of collapsing and expanding cavities at the moment of the shock wave impingement. After the shock wave impact, the bubble spherical symmetry is broken and a liquid jet develops in the original direction of the shock propagation. The speed of the jet is increasing with the shock wave energy. Due to the energy transfer from the shock wave to the bubble, the forced cavity implosion is more violent in comparison to free oscillation. The pressure pulse amplitude released from the forced bubble collapse is amplified and the collapse time is reduced. These effects are discussed in chapter 5. Generally, when the bubble is collapsing at the time of the shock impact, the forced cavity collapse is more violent with a resultant of more pressure enhancement compared to the expanding bubbles at the moment of the shock arrival. The maximum pressure enhancement and reduction of bubble collapse time occur when the time interval between the moments of the shock impact and bubble collapse approaches the pulse duration of the compression part of the shock wave profile (i.e. ∼1 μs). For each specific shock wave arrival time, increasing the shock intensity leads to the fact that the bubble collapse takes place earlier relative to the moment of the shock impact and having more collapse pressure

  6. Fearless versus fearful speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J. V.; Sornette, D.

    2004-06-01

    Using a recently introduced rational expectation model of bubbles, based on the interplay between stochasticity and positive feedbacks of prices on returns and volatility, we develop a new methodology to test how this model classifies nine time series that have been previously considered as bubbles ending in crashes. The model predicts the existence of two anomalous behaviors occurring simultaneously: (i) super-exponential price growth and (ii) volatility growth, that we refer to as the “fearful singular bubble” regime. Out of the nine time series, we find that five pass our tests and can be characterized as “fearful singular bubbles”. The four other cases are the information technology Nasdaq bubble and three bubbles of the Hang Seng index ending in crashes in 1987, 1994 and 1997. According to our analysis, these four bubbles have developed with essentially no significant increase of their volatility. This paper thus proposes that speculative bubbles ending in crashes form two groups hitherto unrecognized, namely those accompanied by increasing volatility (reflecting increasing risk perception) and those without change of volatility (reflecting an absence of risk perception).

  7. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Sophia

    compared to the traditional corona or dielectric barrier discharges. These conditions make the experimental evidence presented in this work valuable for the advancement of modeling and the theoretical understanding of the discharge in bubbles in water.

  8. Test and evaluation of bubble memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahm, E.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of a test program which has shown that well-constructed bubble memories can operate reliably over long periods of time and at low error rates. Even the relatively high error rate of one memory during burn-in can be considered acceptable if compared with tape recorder standards. No wear-out mechanism or aging could be detected. Bubble memories are now considered suitable for long-duration space missions and certainly are suitable for many military and commercial applications. It must be recognized, however, that bubble memories are complex devices and not yet fully understood. While the particular memory tested may never find practical applications, it nevertheless has provided insight into performance characteristics considered typical of bubble memories.

  9. Comparing Task Models for User Interface Design

    OpenAIRE

    Limbourg, Quentin; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Many task models, task analysis methods, and supporting tools have been introduced in the literature and are widely used in practice. With this comes need to understand their scopes and their differences. This chapter provides a thorough review of selected, significant task models along with their method and supporting tools. For this purpose, a meta-model of each task model is expressed as an Entity-Relationship-Attribute schema (ERA) and discussed. This leads to a comparative analysis of ta...

  10. On the shape of giant soap bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Reyssat, Etienne; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2017-03-07

    We study the effect of gravity on giant soap bubbles and show that it becomes dominant above the critical size [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the mean thickness of the soap film and [Formula: see text] is the capillary length ([Formula: see text] stands for vapor-liquid surface tension, and [Formula: see text] stands for the liquid density). We first show experimentally that large soap bubbles do not retain a spherical shape but flatten when increasing their size. A theoretical model is then developed to account for this effect, predicting the shape based on mechanical equilibrium. In stark contrast to liquid drops, we show that there is no mechanical limit of the height of giant bubble shapes. In practice, the physicochemical constraints imposed by surfactant molecules limit the access to this large asymptotic domain. However, by an exact analogy, it is shown how the giant bubble shapes can be realized by large inflatable structures.

  11. Dye visualization near a three-dimensional stagnation point: application to the vortex breakdown bubble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Thompson, M. C.; Hourigan, K.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical model, based on the Fokker-Planck equation, is constructed of the dye visualization expected near a three-dimensional stagnation point in a swirling fluid flow. The model is found to predict dye traces that oscillate in density and position in the meridional plane in which swirling...... flows are typically visualized. Predictions based on the model are made for the steady vortex breakdown bubble in a torsionally driven cylinder and compared with computational fluid dynamics predictions and experimental observations. Previous experimental observations using tracer visualization...... techniques have suggested that even for low-Reynolds-number flows, the steady vortex breakdown bubble in a torsionally driven cylinder is not axisymmetric and has an inflow/outflow asymmetry at its tail. Recent numerical and theoretical studies show that the asymmetry of the vortex breakdown bubble...

  12. Bubble impacts with microcantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Longmire, Ellen; Ali, Mubassar; Mantell, Susan

    2006-11-01

    In the current study, we investigate bubbles in laminar channel flows impacting microcantilever obstacles. Static and resonating cantilevers instrumented with integrated strain gages are mounted perpendicular to the mean flow in a vertically-oriented channel with thickness 2mm, span 10mm, and length 585 mm. Steady, fully-developed upward flows with channel Reynolds numbers based on mean fluid velocity and hydraulic diameter of 0-2500 are considered. Bubbles of diameter 200-1000μm are introduced upstream of the test section, and impacts are observed using a microscope equipped with a high frame rate camera. Observations are made along the length of cantilevers backlit with white light. Strain gage signals are monitored and correlated to impact events. The effect of obstacles on bubble motion and deformation as well as the effect of bubble impacts on the cantilever will be discussed. The flow studies are part of a larger research program examining reliability and performance of vibrating microbeams.

  13. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  14. Is it Worth Comparing Different Bankruptcy Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Dolejšová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the performance of small enterprises in the Zlín and Olomouc Regions. These enterprises were assessed using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model, the Zmijewski model and the Springate model. The batch selected for this analysis included 16 enterprises from the Zlín Region and 16 enterprises from the Olomouc Region. Financial statements subjected to the analysis are from 2006 and 2010. The statistical data analysis was performed using the one-sample z-test for proportions and the paired t-test. The outcomes of the evaluation run using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model and the Springate model revealed the enterprises to be financially sound, but the Zmijewski model identified them as being insolvent. The one-sample z-test for proportions confirmed that at least 80% of these enterprises show a sound financial condition. A comparison of all models has emphasized the substantial difference produced by the Zmijewski model. The paired t-test showed that the financial performance of small enterprises had remained the same during the years involved. It is recommended that small enterprises assess their financial performance using two different bankruptcy models. They may wish to combine the Zmijewski model with any bankruptcy model (the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model or the Springate model to ensure a proper method of analysis.

  15. Effects of mass transfer on damping mechanisms of vapor bubbles oscillating in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuning; Gao, Yuhang; Guo, Zhongyu; Du, Xiaoze

    2018-01-01

    The damping mechanisms play an important role in the behavior of vapor bubbles. In the present paper, effects of mass transfer on the damping mechanisms of oscillating vapor bubbles in liquids are investigated within a wide range of parameter zone (e.g. in terms of frequency and bubble Péclet number). Results of the vapor bubbles are also compared with those of the gas bubbles. Our findings reveal that the damping mechanisms of vapor bubbles are significantly affected by the mass transfer especially in the regions with small and medium bubble Péclet number. Comparing with the gas bubbles, the contributions of the mass-transfer damping mechanism for the vapor bubble case are quite significant, being the dominant damping mechanism in a wide region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A bubble detection system for propellant filling pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wen; Zong, Guanghua; Bi, Shusheng

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a bubble detection system based on the ultrasound transmission method, mainly for probing high-speed bubbles in the satellite propellant filling pipeline. First, three common ultrasonic detection methods are compared and the ultrasound transmission method is used in this paper. Then, the ultrasound beam in a vertical pipe is investigated, suggesting that the width of the beam used for detection is usually smaller than the internal diameter of the pipe, which means that when bubbles move close to the pipe wall, they may escape from being detected. A special device is designed to solve this problem. It can generate the spiral flow to force all the bubbles to ascend along the central line of the pipe. In the end, experiments are implemented to evaluate the performance of this system. Bubbles of five different sizes are generated and detected. Experiment results show that the sizes and quantity of bubbles can be estimated by this system. Also, the bubbles of different radii can be distinguished from each other. The numerical relationship between the ultrasound attenuation and the bubble radius is acquired and it can be utilized for estimating the unknown bubble size and measuring the total bubble volume.

  17. Sonoluminescence and dynamics of cavitation bubble populations in sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Andrea; Holsteyns, Frank; Cairós, Carlos; Mettin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The detailed link of liquid phase sonochemical reactions and bubble dynamics is still not sufficiently known. To further clarify this issue, we image sonoluminescence and bubble oscillations, translations, and shapes in an acoustic cavitation setup at 23kHz in sulfuric acid with dissolved sodium sulfate and xenon gas saturation. The colour of sonoluminescence varies in a way that emissions from excited non-volatile sodium atoms are prominently observed far from the acoustic horn emitter ("red region"), while such emissions are nearly absent close to the horn tip ("blue region"). High-speed images reveal the dynamics of distinct bubble populations that can partly be linked to the different emission regions. In particular, we see smaller strongly collapsing spherical bubbles within the blue region, while larger bubbles with a liquid jet during collapse dominate the red region. The jetting is induced by the fast bubble translation, which is a consequence of acoustic (Bjerknes) forces in the ultrasonic field. Numerical simulations with a spherical single bubble model reproduce quantitatively the volume oscillations and fast translation of the sodium emitting bubbles. Additionally, their intermittent stopping is explained by multistability in a hysteretic parameter range. The findings confirm the assumption that bubble deformations are responsible for pronounced sodium sonoluminescence. Notably the observed translation induced jetting appears to serve as efficient mixing mechanism of liquid into the heated gas phase of collapsing bubbles, thus potentially promoting liquid phase sonochemistry in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    concentrations than the impurity, it adsorbs to the bubble much faster than the impurity when the bubble is formed, and thereby prevents the impurity from adsorbing onto the surface. In addition the rapid kinetic exchange and high bulk concentration maintain a saturated surface with a uniform surface concentrations. This prevents retarding surface tension gradients and keeps the velocity high. In our first report last year, we detailed experimental results which verified the theory of remobilization in ground based experiments in which the steady velocity of rising bubbles was measured in a continuous phase consisting of a glycerol/water mixture containing a polyethylene glycol surfactant C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)6OH). In our report this year, we detail our efforts to describe theoretically the remobilization observed. We construct a model in which a bubble rises steadily by buoyancy in a continuous (Newtonian) viscous fluid containing surfactant with a uniform far field bulk concentration. We account for the effects of inertia as well as viscosity in the flow in the continuous phase caused by the bubble motion (order one Reynolds number), and we assume that the bubble shape remains spherical (viscous and inertial forces are smaller than capillary forces, i e. small Weber and capillary numbers). The surfactant distribution is calculated by solving the mass transfer equations including convection and diffusion in the bulk, and finite kinetic exchange the bulk and the surface. Convective effects dominate diffusive mass transfer in the bulk of the liquid (high Peclet numbers) except in a thin boundary layer near the surface. A finite volume method is used to numerically solve the hydrodynamic and mass transfer equations on a staggered grid which accounts specifically for the thin boundary layer. We present the results of the nondimensional drag as a function of the bulk concentration of surfactant for different rates of kinetic exchange, from which we develop criteria for the

  19. Demonstrating the Importance of Bubbles and Viscosity on Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The behavior of bubbles (exsolved volatile from magma) and viscosity of magma are important parameters that influence volcanic eruptions. Exsolved volatiles increase the volume of magma and reduce its density so that magma has sufficient volume and buoyancy force to erupt. Volatiles exsolve through nucleation and growth by diffusion and bubbles can expand as pressure is reduced. The time scale of diffusion depends on the viscosity of surrounding magma, and the expansion time scale of a bubble is also depends on the viscosity of magma. These control the time scale for volume change. If bubbles segregate from magma and collapse, the magma might not able to expand sufficiently to erupt violently. Whether a bubble can segregate from the liquid part of magma is also depends on viscosity of magma. In this poster, I introduce a straightforward demonstration to show the importance of bubbles and viscosity of magma on volcanic eruptions. To make bubbles, I use baking soda (NaHCO3) and citric acid. Reaction between them generates carbon dioxide (CO2) to make bubbles. I make citric acid solution gel by using agar at the bottom of a transparent glass and pour baking soda disolved corn syrup on top of the agar. This situation is a model of basally heated magma chamber. When water disolved magma (baking soda disolved corn syrup) receives sufficient heat (citric acid) bubbles are generated. I can change viscosity of corn syrup by varying the concentration of water. This demonstration shows how viscosity controls the time scale of volume change of bubbly magma and the distribution of bubbles in the fluid. In addition it helps to understand the important physical processes in volcanic eruption: bubble nucleation, diffusion grows, expansion, and bubble driving convection. I will perform a live demonstration at the site of the poster.

  20. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  1. Measuring online social bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Nikolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media have become a prevalent channel to access information, spread ideas, and influence opinions. However, it has been suggested that social and algorithmic filtering may cause exposure to less diverse points of view. Here we quantitatively measure this kind of social bias at the collective level by mining a massive datasets of web clicks. Our analysis shows that collectively, people access information from a significantly narrower spectrum of sources through social media and email, compared to a search baseline. The significance of this finding for individual exposure is revealed by investigating the relationship between the diversity of information sources experienced by users at both the collective and individual levels in two datasets where individual users can be analyzed—Twitter posts and search logs. There is a strong correlation between collective and individual diversity, supporting the notion that when we use social media we find ourselves inside “social bubbles.” Our results could lead to a deeper understanding of how technology biases our exposure to new information.

  2. Moving with bubbles: a review of the interactions between bubbles and the microorganisms that surround them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Peter L L; Bird, James C; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2014-12-01

    Bubbles are ubiquitous in biological environments, emerging during the complex dynamics of waves breaking in the open oceans or being intentionally formed in bioreactors. From formation, through motion, until death, bubbles play a critical role in the oxygenation and mixing of natural and artificial ecosystems. However, their life is also greatly influenced by the environments in which they emerge. This interaction between bubbles and microorganisms is a subtle affair in which surface tension plays a critical role. Indeed, it shapes the role of bubbles in mixing or oxygenating microorganisms, but also determines how microorganisms affect every stage of the bubble's life. In this review, we guide the reader through the life of a bubble from birth to death, with particular attention to the microorganism-bubble interaction as viewed through the lens of fluid dynamics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. An apparatus to measure electrical charge of bubble swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, S; Jin, L; Mirnezami, M; Finch, J A

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to characterize bubble charge by measuring the swarm potential of gas bubbles. The technique allows in-process measurement of all system variables associated with bubble surface electrical charge: swarm potential, solution conductivity, gas holdup, pH and bubble size distribution. The method was validated by comparing with literature iso-electric point (iep) values. Bubble swarm potential was measured as a function of concentration and pH for a series of non-ionic surfactant frothers, ionic surfactant collectors and multivalent metal ions. Results showed good agreement with established theory and prior experimental findings. The setup is a step towards measurement of charge on flotation size range of bubble swarms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The equilibrium shape of bubbles on curved interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Poe, Daniel; Walls, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The equilibrium shape for a bubble resting at a free surface depends on a balance of hydrostatic and capillary forces, with the smallest bubbles approximating a sphere and a hemisphere for the largest. This shape has been shown to be important to several processes ranging from gas transfer across the thin film cap to the production of jet droplets. Past works calculating the equilibrium shape assume that the interface is flat. However, there are instances where the curvature of the boundary may be comparable to the bubble itself. For example, a bubble bursting on the surface of a rain droplet. Here we relax the assumption of a flat interface and extend the classic bubble shape calculations to account for a curved interface boundary. An understanding of the extent of this deformation and the precise equilibrium bubble shape is important to applications in fields ranging from air-sea exchange to combustion dynamics. We acknowledge financial support from NSF Grant No. 1351466.

  5. Bubble nucleation from micro-crevices in a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, T. F.; Bauer, J.; Ludwig, G.; Fernandez Rivas, D.; Pelz, P. F.

    2018-01-01

    The formation of gas bubbles at gas cavities located in walls bounding the flow occurs in many technical applications, but is usually hard to observe. Even though, the presence of a fluid flow undoubtedly affects the formation of bubbles, there are very few studies that take this fact into account. In the present paper new experimental results on bubble formation (diffusion-driven nucleation) from surface nuclei in a shear flow are presented. The observed gas-filled cavities are micrometre-sized blind holes etched in silicon substrates. We measure the frequency of bubble generation (nucleation rate), the size of the detaching bubbles and analyse the growth of the surface nuclei. The experimental findings support an extended understanding of bubble formation as a self-excited cyclic process and can serve as validation data for analytical and numerical models.

  6. Bubble migration in a rotating, liquid-filled sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, P.; Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.

    1982-01-01

    Results and analysis of ground-based experiments performed to aid in designing experiments on the behavior of bubbles in a rotating liquid body on board the Shuttle in free fall are presented. Spherical shells filled with silicone oil containing a small gas bubble were spun and filmed by high speed motion picture photography. The rotation of the shell and the trajectory of the bubble motion were recorded and the film was exposed to a motion analyzer connected to a keypunch. The analyzer measured Cartesian coordinates as well as angle, frame number, and rotation rate. Optical correction equations were employed to determine the apparent bubble trajectory relative to an inertial frame of reference. An analytical model for the bubble motion was defined, yielding predictions of velocity and position at different times. Rotation of the fluid container is concluded to aid in centering the bubbles.

  7. Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ulrich; Karlson, Kristian Bernt; Holm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general decomposi......In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general...... decomposition method that is unaffected by the rescaling or attenuation bias that arise in cross-model comparisons in nonlinear models. It recovers the degree to which a control variable, Z, mediates or explains the relationship between X and a latent outcome variable, Y*, underlying the nonlinear probability...

  8. Comparative Study of Bancruptcy Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isye Arieshanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Early indication of bancruptcy is important for a company. If companies aware of  potency of their bancruptcy, they can take a preventive action to anticipate the bancruptcy. In order to detect the potency of a bancruptcy, a company can utilize a a model of bancruptcy prediction. The prediction model can be built using a machine learning methods. However, the choice of machine learning methods should be performed carefully. Because the suitability of a model depends on the problem specifically. Therefore, in this paper we perform a comparative study of several machine leaning methods for bancruptcy prediction. According to the comparative study, the performance of several models that based on machine learning methods (k-NN, fuzzy k-NN, SVM, Bagging Nearest Neighbour SVM, Multilayer Perceptron(MLP, Hybrid of MLP + Multiple Linear Regression, it can be showed that fuzzy k-NN method achieve the best performance with accuracy 77.5%

  9. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  10. Comparative biology of cystic fibrosis animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John T; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are critical for dissecting mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapies. In the context of cystic fibrosis (CF), mouse models have been the dominant species by which to study CF disease processes in vivo for the past two decades. Although much has been learned through these CF mouse models, limitations in the ability of this species to recapitulate spontaneous lung disease and several other organ abnormalities seen in CF humans have created a need for additional species on which to study CF. To this end, pig and ferret CF models have been generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and are currently being characterized. These new larger animal models have phenotypes that appear to closely resemble human CF disease seen in newborns, and efforts to characterize their adult phenotypes are ongoing. This chapter will review current knowledge about comparative lung cell biology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biology among mice, pigs, and ferrets that has implications for CF disease modeling in these species. We will focus on methods used to compare the biology and function of CFTR between these species and their relevance to phenotypes seen in the animal models. These cross-species comparisons and the development of both the pig and the ferret CF models may help elucidate pathophysiologic mechanisms of CF lung disease and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  11. A Bubble Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars. The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  12. Bubble motion measurements during foam drainage and coarsening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurdev, G; Saint-Jalmes, A; Langevin, D

    2006-08-15

    We have studied bubble motion within a column of foam allowed to undergo free drainage. We have measured bubble motion upward with time and as a function of their initial positions. Depending on the gas used, which sets the coarsening and drainage rates, different bubble upward motion types have been identified (constant speed, acceleration or deceleration) and explained in relation with liquid downward flows. The proofs of the consistency between bubble upward motion and liquid downward flow are obtained both by comparing the bubble motion curves to the liquid drainage ones, and by comparing the time variations of the liquid fraction extracted from bubble motion to direct liquid fraction measurements by electrical conductimetry. The agreement between bubble position tracking and electrical conductivity shows in particular that it is possible to determine the drainage regime from such simple bubble motion measurements. This work also allowed us to demonstrate a special case of foam coarsening and expansion, occurring when the foam gas is less soluble than the outside one, caused by diffusion of this external gas into the foam. All these results allow us to build a picture of drainage and coarsening seen from the bubble point of view.

  13. Microscopic Spin Model for the STOCK Market with Attractor Bubbling on Regular and Small-World Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, A.

    A multi-agent spin model for changes of prices in the stock market based on the Ising-like cellular automaton with interactions between traders randomly varying in time is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The structure of interactions has topology of a small-world network obtained from regular two-dimensional square lattices with various coordination numbers by randomly cutting and rewiring edges. Simulations of the model on regular lattices do not yield time series of logarithmic price returns with statistical properties comparable with the empirical ones. In contrast, in the case of networks with a certain degree of randomness for a wide range of parameters the time series of the logarithmic price returns exhibit intermittent bursting typical of volatility clustering. Also the tails of distributions of returns obey a power scaling law with exponents comparable to those obtained from the empirical data.

  14. Modelling of microalgal growth and lipid production in Dunaliella tertiolecta using nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizer medium in sintered disk chromatographic glass bubble column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anup; Guria, Chandan; Chitres, G; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Pathak, A K

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model involving NPK-10:26:26 fertilizer, NaCl, NaHCO3, light and temperature operating variables for Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation is formulated to predict microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity. Proposed model includes Monod/Andrews kinetics for the absorption of essential nutrients into algae-biomass and Droop model involving internal nutrient cell quota for microalgae growth, assuming algae-biomass is composed of sugar, functional-pool and neutral-lipid. Biokinetic model parameters are determined by minimizing the residual-sum-of-square-errors between experimental and computed microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity using genetic algorithm. Developed model is validated with the experiments of Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation using air-agitated sintered-disk chromatographic glass-bubble column and the effects of operating variables on microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity is investigated. Finally, parametric sensitivity analysis is carried out to know the sensitivity of model parameters on the obtained results in the input parameter space. Proposed model may be helpful in scale-up studies and implementation of model-based control strategy in large-scale algal cultivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical simulation of bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling under velocity and temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahreini, Mohammad, E-mail: m.bahreini1990@gmail.com; Ramiar, Abas, E-mail: aramiar@nit.ac.ir; Ranjbar, Ali Akbar, E-mail: ranjbar@nit.ac.ir

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Condensing bubble is numerically investigated using VOF model in OpenFOAM package. • Bubble mass reduces as it goes through condensation and achieves higher velocities. • At a certain time the slope of changing bubble diameter with time, varies suddenly. • Larger bubbles experience more lateral migration to higher velocity regions. • Bubbles migrate back to a lower velocity region for higher liquid subcooling rates. - Abstract: In this paper, numerical simulation of the bubble condensation in the subcooled boiling flow is performed. The interface between two-phase is tracked via the volume of fluid (VOF) method with continuous surface force (CSF) model, implemented in the open source OpenFOAM CFD package. In order to simulate the condensing bubble with the OpenFOAM code, the original energy equation and mass transfer model for phase change have been modified and a new solver is developed. The Newtonian flow is solved using the finite volume scheme based on the pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) algorithm. Comparison of the simulation results with previous experimental data revealed that the model predicted well the behavior of the actual condensing bubble. The bubble lifetime is almost proportional to bubble initial size and is prolonged by increasing the system pressure. In addition, the initial bubble size, subcooling of liquid and velocity gradient play an important role in the bubble deformation behavior. Velocity gradient makes the bubble move to the higher velocity region and the subcooling rate makes it to move back to the lower velocity region.

  16. Rational speculative bubbles: A critical view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radonjić Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of rational bubbles, the bubble is present whenever asset prices progressively diverge from their fundamental value, which occurs because agents expect that asset prices will continue to grow exponentially (self-fulfilling prophecies far in the future and consistently, which promises the realization of ever larger capital gains. In our opinion, the basic shortcoming of this theory refers to the assumption that all market agents are perfectly informed and rational and, accordingly, form homogeneous expectations. The model does not explain decision-making processes or expectation formation, nor does it detect potential psychological and institutional factors that might significantly influence decision making processes and market participants’ reactions to news. Since assumptions of the model critically determine its validity, we conclude that comprehensiveness of the rational bubble model is, to put it mildly, limited.

  17. Egalitarianism among Bubbles in Porous Media: An Ostwald Ripening Derived Anticoarsening Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Bonnecaze, Roger; Balhoff, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    We show that smaller gas bubbles grow at the expense of larger bubbles and all bubbles approach the same surface curvature after long times in porous media. This anticoarsening effect is contrary to typical Ostwald ripening and leads to uniformly sized bubbles in a homogeneous medium. Evolution dynamics of bubble populations were measured, and mathematical models were developed that fit the experimental data well. Ostwald ripening is shown to be the driving mechanism in this anticoarsening phenomenon; however, the relationship between surface curvature and bubble size determined by the pore-throat geometric confinement reverses the ripening direction.

  18. Bubble nuclei; Noyaux Bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoll, F. [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1998-07-22

    For nuclei with very high electrical charge, the Coulomb field is expected to drive the protons away from the centre to the surface of the nucleus. Such a nucleus would be no more compact but look like a bubble. The goal of this work is to confirm this idea. We are interested in only the ground state of spherical nuclei. We use the Skyrme potential with the Sly4 parametrization to calculate the mean-field Hamiltonian. Paring correlations are described by a surface-active delta paring interaction. In its ground state the nucleus {sup A=900} X{sub Z=274} is shown to be a bubble. Another stable state is found with a little higher energy: it is also a bubble. (author) 11 refs., 18 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  20. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-07-01

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium-10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, the molecular dynamics (MD) method is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the MD simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe [1] is employed. Initial gas bubbles with a low Xe concentration (underpressured) are generated in a body-centered cubic (bcc) U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atoms are sequentially added into the bubbles one by one, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that an overpressured gas bubble emits partial dislocations with a Burgers vector along the direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Meanwhile, dislocation loop punch out was not observed. The overpressured bubble also induces an anisotropic stress field. A tensile stress was found along directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in bcc U10Mo fuels.

  1. Light generated bubble for microparticle propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Ido; Niv, Avi

    2017-06-06

    Light activated motion of micron-sized particles with effective forces in the range of micro-Newtons is hereby proposed and demonstrated. Our investigation shows that this exceptional amount of force results from accumulation of light-generated heat by a micron-sized particle that translates into motion due to a phase transition in the nearby water. High-speed imagery indicates the role of bubble expansion and later collapse in this event. Comparing observations with known models reveals a dynamic behavior controlled by polytropic trapped vapor and the inertia of the surrounding liquid. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by realization of disordered optical media with binary light-activated switching from opacity to high transparency.

  2. Bubble growth in a narrow horizontal space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutz, Benoit; Goulet, Remi [CETHIL, UMR5008, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon1 (France); Passos, Julio Cesar [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. LABSOLAR

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an axis-symmetric two-phase flow model describing the growth of a single bubble squeezed between a horizontal heated upward-facing disc and an insulating surface placed parallel to the heated surface. Heat transfers at the liquid-vapour interfaces are predicted by the kinetic limit of vaporisation. The depths of the liquid films deposed on the surfaces (heated surface and confinement space) are determined using the Moriyama and Inoue correlation (1996). Transient heat transfers within the heated wall are taken into account. The model is applied to pentane bubble growth. The influence of the gap size, the initial temperature of the system, the thermal effusivity of the heated wall and the kinetic limit of vaporisation are studied. The results show that the expansion of the bubbles strongly depends on the gap size and can be affected by the effusivity of the material. Mechanical inertia effects are mainly dominant at the beginning of the bubble expansion. Pressure drop induced by viscous effects have to be taken into account for high capillary numbers. Heat transfers at the meniscus are negligible except at the early stages of the bubble growth. (author)

  3. Influence of the bubble-bubble interaction on destruction of encapsulated microbubbles under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Lee, Judy; Tuziuti, Toru; Towata, Atsuya; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Iida, Yasuo

    2009-09-01

    Influence of the bubble-bubble interaction on the pulsation of encapsulated microbubbles has been studied by numerical simulations under the condition of the experiment reported by Chang et al. [IEEE Trans. Ultrason Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 48, 161 (2001)]. It has been shown that the natural (resonance) frequency of a microbubble decreases considerably as the microbubble concentration increases to relatively high concentrations. At some concentration, the natural frequency may coincide with the driving frequency. Microbubble pulsation becomes milder as the microbubble concentration increases except at around the resonance condition due to the stronger bubble-bubble interaction. This may be one of the reasons why the threshold of acoustic pressure for destruction of an encapsulated microbubble increases as the microbubble concentration increases. A theoretical model for destruction has been proposed.

  4. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  5. Migration of clean and contaminated bubbles near a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Takemura, Fumio

    2003-11-01

    The lateral migration of air bubbles rising near a vertical wall in both tap water and low-viscosity silicone oil is studied experimentally over a range of Reynolds number (Re) from 10 to 100. Bubbles rising in water behave as rigid spheres and are repelled from the wall whatever Re, owing to the interaction between the defect flow in their wake and the wall. For such bubbles, the lateral force is correctly predicted by a generalization of the Vasseur & Cox's expression, provided a suitable rescaling taking into account the strength of the vorticity at the bubble surface is introduced. Bubbles rising in silicone oil are hydrodynamically clean and are also repelled from the wall for Re less than 35. In contrast they migrate towards the wall at higher Re, due to the Bernoulli effect predicted by potential flow theory. Knowing the strength of the irrotational dipole associated with the bubble and that of the vorticity at its surface as a function of Re, a unified model predicting the sign reversal of the lateral force is obtained by combining linearly the wake-induced effect and the irrotational mechanism. When bubbles rise very close to the wall, a lubrication effect takes place in the gap, resulting in a repulsive force for small separations. This effect makes the sign of the lateral force acting on high-Re clean bubbles change very close to the wall, which result in the bounce of the bubbles.

  6. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  7. Root Causes of the Housing Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizoji, Taisei

    In this chapter we investigate root causes of the recent US housing bubble which has been caused a serious downturn in US economic growth since autumn of 2008. We propose a simple model of housing markets in order to indicate the possible determinants of recent housing prices. Utilizing the model, we verify a number of hypotheses which have been proposed in the recent literature on the housing bubbles. We suggest that the main causes of the housing bubble from 2000 to 2006 are (1) non-elastic housing supply in the metropolitan areas, and (2) declines in the mortgage loan rate and the housing premium by the massive mortgage credit expansion. We also suggest that these factors were strongly influenced by policies that governments and the Federal Reserve Board performed.

  8. A new source of radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-28

    Mar 28, 2017 ... In this article, by considering single-bubble sonoluminescence and based on the hydrochemical model and thermal bremsstrahlung approach, for the first time two different origins of light have numerically been studied to describe the Ar bubble radiation in water at the moment of collapse: (a) radiation.

  9. A new source of radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, by considering single-bubble sonoluminescence and based on the hydrochemical model and thermal bremsstrahlung approach, for the first time two different origins of light havenumerically been studied to describe the Ar bubble radiation in water at the moment of collapse: (a) radiation from the Ar gas inside ...

  10. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  11. Intraalveolar bubbles and bubble films: III. Vulnerability and preservation in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelli, E M; Mautone, A J; Chinoy, M R; Defouw, D O; Clutario, B C

    1997-08-01

    , bubbles and films re-formed immediately with reinflation. (3) Topography of fixed bubbles and films was retained after air drying. The dry polygonal configuration reverted to spherical-oval either in saline solution or in 50% ethanol, whereas vulnerability to upgraded ethanol concentrations was unchanged. (4) Normal topography and shape appeared to be retained during quick freezing and after thawing. (5) Intraalveolar and intraductal bubbles and films were preserved and photographed in sections from tissue prepared by the double-impregnation procedure; they were not seen either when bubble formation had been blocked (double-impregnation procedure) or when preembedding in agar had been omitted. (1) Whether or not fixed in glutaraldehyde or formaldehyde, preservation of intraalveolar and intraductal bubbles and films is not to be expected in tissue prepared by conventional histopreparative procedures, whereas product artifacts may be expected from bubble rupture in situ. (2) Degassing cannot be recommended for studies of alveolar structure-function interrelations because all natural bubbles are disrupted in the process, and bubble re-formation may not parallel their "natural history" in vivo. (3) Compared with glutaraldehyde or formaldehyde fixation, air drying offers no added protection against the untoward effects of conventional processing. (4) Quick-frozen tissue is equally at risk. (5) A new double-impregnation procedure does preserve bubbles and films during processing, sectioning, and staining.

  12. Dynamics of Magnetized Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of dense magnetized plasma, either collimated with mainly azimuthal B-field (jet) or toroidal with closed B-field (bubble), in a background plasma occurs in a number of solar and astrophysical cases. Such cases include coronal mass ejections moving in the background solar wind and extragalactic radio lobes expanding into the extragalactic medium. Understanding the detailed MHD behavior is crucial for correctly modeling these events. In order to further the understanding of such systems, we are investigating the injection of dense magnetized jets and bubbles into a lower density background magnetized plasma using a coaxial plasma gun and a background helicon or cathode plasma. In both jet and bubble cases, the MHD dynamics are found to be very different when launched into background plasma or magnetic field, as compared to vacuum. In the jet case, it is found that the inherent kink instability is stabilized by velocity shear developed due to added magnetic tension from the background field. In the bubble case, rather than directly relaxing to a minimum energy Taylor state (spheromak) as in vacuum, there is an expansion asymmetry and the bubble becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable on one side. Recent results will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  13. Effects of Swirl Bubble Injection on Mass Transfer and Hydrodynamics for Bubbly Flow Reactors: A Concept Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi Ahmad Salam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble flow reactors (BFR are commonly used for various industrial processes in the field of oil and gas production, pharmaceutical industries, biochemical and environmental engineering etc. The operation and performance of these reactors rely heavily on a range of hydrodynamic parameters; prominent among them are geometric configurations including gas injection geometry, operating conditions, mass transfer etc. A huge body of literature is available to describe the optimum design and performance of bubbly flow reactors with conventional bubble injection. Attempts were made to modify gas injection for improved efficiency of BFR’s. However, here instead of modifying the geometry of the gas injection, an attempt has been made to generate swirl bubbles for gaining larger mass transfer between gas and liquid. Here an exceptionally well thought strategies have been used in our numerical simulations towards the design of swirl injection mechanism, whose paramount aspect is to inhibit the rotary liquid motion but facilitates the swirl movement for bubbles in nearly stationary liquid. Our comprehension here is that the swirl motion can strongly affect the performance of bubbly reactor by identifying the changes in hydrodynamic parameters as compared to the conventional bubbly flows. In order to achieve this bubbly flow, an experimental setup has been designed as well as computational fluid dynamic (CFD code was used with to highlight a provision of swirl bubble injection by rotating the sparger plate.

  14. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  15. Methane Bubble Size Distributions, Flux, and Dissolution in a Freshwater Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Kyle B; Hemond, Harold F

    2017-12-05

    The majority of methane produced in many anoxic sediments is released via ebullition. These bubbles are subject to dissolution as they rise, and dissolution rates are strongly influenced by bubble size. Current understanding of natural methane bubble size distributions is limited by the difficulty in measuring bubble sizes over wide spatial or temporal scales. Our custom optical bubble size sensors recorded bubble sizes and release timing at 8 locations in Upper Mystic Lake, MA continuously for 3 months. Bubble size distributions were spatially heterogeneous even over relatively small areas experiencing similar flux, suggesting that localized sediment conditions are important to controlling bubble size. There was no change in bubble size distributions over the 3 month sampling period, but mean bubble size was positively correlated with daily ebullition flux. Bubble data was used to verify the performance of a widely used bubble dissolution model, and the model was then used to estimate that bubble dissolution accounts for approximately 10% of methane accumulated in the hypolimnion during summer stratification, and at most 15% of the diffusive air-water-methane flux from the epilimnion.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Coalescence and Break-Up in Multinozzle Jet Ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanesh Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing the jet ejector optimally is a challenging task and has a great impact on industrial applications. Three different sets of nozzles (namely, 1, 3, and 5 inside the jet ejector are compared in this study by using numerical simulations. More precisely, dynamics of bubble coalescence and breakup in the multinozzle jet ejectors are studied by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The population balance approach is used for the gas phase such that different bubble size groups are included in CFD and the number densities of each of them are predicted in CFD simulations. Here, commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent 14.0 is used. The realizable k-ε turbulence model is used in CFD code in three-dimensional computational domains. It is clear that Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS models have their limitations, but on the other hand, turbulence modeling is not the key issue in this study and we can assume that the RANS models can predict turbulence of the carrying phase accurately enough. In order to validate our numerical predictions, results of one, three, and five nozzles are compared to laboratory experiments data for Cl2-NaOH system. Predicted gas volume fractions, bubble size distributions, and resulting number densities of the different bubble size groups as well as the interfacial area concentrations are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  18. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  19. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  20. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Task Modeling Notations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    paper a comparative analysis of selected models involving multiple users in an interaction is provided in order to identify concepts which are underexplored in today's multi-user interaction task modeling. This comparative analysis is based on three families of criteria: information criteria, conceptual coverage, and expressiveness. Merging the meta-models of the selected models enables to come up with a broader meta-model that could be instantiated in most situations involving multi-user interaction, like workflow information systems, CSCW.

  2. Bubble properties of heterogeneous bubbly flow in a square bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, W.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on the measurements of bubble properties in heterogeneous bubbly flows in a square bubble column. A four-point optical fibre probe was used for this purpose. The accuracy and intrusive effect of the optical probe was investigated first. The results show that the optical

  3. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened

  4. Bubbling controlled by needle movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejrazka, Jiri; Fujasova, Maria; Stanovsky, Petr; Ruzicka, Marek C; Drahos, JirI [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vejrazka@icpf.cas.cz

    2008-07-30

    A device for 'on-demand' production of bubbles is presented. The device is based on a movable needle, through which air is injected. Bubbling is controlled by a rapid needle movement, which induces the bubble detachment. Conditions for proper function of the device include the restriction on the flow rate through the needle, sufficient needle pressure drop and adequate needle acceleration. Functionality of the device is demonstrated. Bubbling from a stationary needle is also discussed and a scaling for bubble size is proposed for the case of short needles, to which a constant flow rate is imposed through tubes of a finite volume.

  5. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  6. Dynamics of gas bubble growth in oil-refrigerant mixtures under isothermal decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Joao Paulo; Barbosa Junior, Jader R.; Prata, Alvaro T. [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], Emails: jpdias@polo.ufsc.br, jrb@polo.ufsc.br, prata@polo.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a numerical model to predict the growth of gaseous refrigerant bubbles in oil-refrigerant mixtures with high contents of oil subjected to isothermal decompression. The model considers an Elementary Cell (EC) in which a spherical bubble is surrounded by a concentric and spherical liquid layer containing a limited amount of dissolved liquid refrigerant. The pressure reduction in the EC generates a concentration gradient at the bubble interface and the refrigerant is transported to the bubble by molecular diffusion. After a sufficiently long period of time, the concentration gradient in the liquid layer and the bubble internal pressure reach equilibrium and the bubble stops growing, having attained its stable radius. The equations of momentum and chemical species conservation for the liquid layer, and the mass balance at the bubble interface are solved via a coupled finite difference procedure to determine the bubble internal pressure, the refrigerant radial concentration distribution and the bubble growth rate. Numerical results obtained for a mixture of ISO VG10 ester oil and refrigerant HFC-134a showed that bubble growth dynamics depends on model parameters like the initial bubble radius, initial refrigerant concentration in the liquid layer, decompression rate and EC temperature. Despite its simplicity, the model showed to be a potential tool to predict bubble growth and foaming which may result from important phenomena occurring inside refrigeration compressors such as lubrication of sliding parts and refrigerant degassing from the oil stored in oil sump during compressor start-up. (author)

  7. Acoustic measurement of bubble size in an inkjet printhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeurissen, Roger; van der Bos, Arjan; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; de Jong, Jos; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-11-01

    The volume of a bubble in a piezoinkjet printhead is measured acoustically. The method is based on a numerical model of the investigated system. The piezo not only drives the system but it is also used as a sensor by measuring the current it generates. The numerical model is used to predict this current for a given bubble volume. The inverse problem is to infer the bubble volume from an experimentally obtained piezocurrent. By solving this inverse problem, the size and position of the bubble can thus be measured acoustically. The method is experimentally validated with an inkjet printhead that is augmented with a glass connection channel, through which the bubble was observed optically, while at the same time the piezocurrent was measured. The results from the acoustical measurement method correspond closely to the results from the optical measurement.

  8. Behavior of gas seep bubbles below the hydrate stability zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Jun, I.; Hutschenreuter, K.; Socolofsky, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; Lavery, A.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Seewald, J.

    2016-02-01

    Two research cruises (GISR G07 and G08) have been carried out during 2014-2015 to study the behavior of natural gas seep plumes escaping on the seafloor below the hydrate stability zone at MC 118 and GC 600 in the Gulf of Mexico. Quantitative image measurements suggest both temporal and spatial variation of the bubble size and gas flow rate. Hydrate formation on the natural gas seep bubbles was a very fast process in the deep sea environment (890 and 1200 m depth), where the measured methane concentration in water close to the source was also saturated. The measured rise velocities of the bubbles differed significantly from the predicted terminal velocities using empirical equations in Clift et al. (1978). The measured bubble characteristics (size distribution and flow rate) were provided as input to a bubble dissolution model, which accounts for the effect of hydrate on the mass transfer coefficient. The model shows results consistent with the measurements.

  9. Effects of fluid viscosity on a moving sonoluminescing bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Mirheydari, Mona; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa

    2011-08-01

    Based on the quasi-adiabatic model, the parameters of the bubble interior for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in water, adiponitrile, and N-methylformamide are calculated for various fluid viscosities. By using a complete form of the hydrodynamic force, the bubble trajectory is calculated for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence (m-SBSL). It is found that as the fluid viscosity increases, the unique circular path changes to an ellipsoidal and then linear form and along this incrementally increase of viscosity the light intensity increases. By using the Bremsstrahlung model to describe the bubble radiation, gradual increase of the viscosity results in brighter emissions. It is found that in fluids with higher viscosity the light intensity decreases as time passes.

  10. Comparative modelling of cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Stewart B; Baxter, Carol A; Sutcliffe, Michael J

    2002-03-31

    The superfamily of enzymes known as the cytochromes P450 (P450s) comprises a wide-ranging class of proteins with diverse functions. They are known, amongst other things, to be involved in the hormonal regulation of metabolism and reproduction, as well as having a major clinical significance through their association with diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hepatitis. Knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein gives insight into its function. The 3D structures of P450s are therefore of considerable scientific interest. A number of high-resolution structures of P450s have been determined by X-ray crystallography and studies of these structures have provided valuable insights into the mechanism of these enzymes. Only one of these structures is mammalian and as yet there is no structural information on human P450s in the public domain. Until such a structure is solved it is necessary to employ alternative methods to gain structural insight into how human P450s perform their biological function. Here we report on the use of comparative modelling to predict the structure of human P450s based on knowledge of their amino acid sequences plus the 3D structures of other (not human) P450s. As an illustrative example of these techniques we have modelled the structure of P450 2C5 using five bacterial P450 structures as templates. We examine the importance of selecting suitable templates, obtaining a good amino acid sequence alignment, and evaluating the models generated. To improve the quality of the models an iterative cycle of sequence alignment, model building, and model evaluation is employed. The result is a model with excellent stereochemistry, good amino acid side chain environment properties, and a Calpha trace similar to the crystal structure.

  11. The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    distributions were also created by suspending micro- bubbles in a 1% solution of Xanthan gum. The advantage of the latter technique is the bubble ...The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures Ronald A. Roy Department of Aerospace and Mechanical...leading to predictive models, of the broader aspects of linear and nonlinear sound scattering and transmission in bubbly mixtures pertinent to the

  12. A derivation of the stable cavitation threshold accounting for bubble-bubble interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédra, Matthieu; Cornu, Corentin; Inserra, Claude

    2017-09-01

    The subharmonic emission of sound coming from the nonlinear response of a bubble population is the most used indicator for stable cavitation. When driven at twice their resonance frequency, bubbles can exhibit subharmonic spherical oscillations if the acoustic pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold value. Although various theoretical derivations exist for the subharmonic emission by free or coated bubbles, they all rest on the single bubble model. In this paper, we propose an analytical expression of the subharmonic threshold for interacting bubbles in a homogeneous, monodisperse cloud. This theory predicts a shift of the subharmonic resonance frequency and a decrease of the corresponding pressure threshold due to the interactions. For a given sonication frequency, these results show that an optimal value of the interaction strength (i.e. the number density of bubbles) can be found for which the subharmonic threshold is minimum, which is consistent with recently published experiments conducted on ultrasound contrast agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of spectral reflectance and BRDF of the bubble layer in the upper ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lanxin; Wang, Fuqiang; Wang, Chengan; Wang, Chengchao; Tan, Jianyu

    2015-09-21

    The presence of bubbles can significantly change the radiative properties of seawater and these changes will affect remote sensing and underwater target detection. In this work, the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance characteristics of the bubble layer in the upper ocean are investigated using the Monte Carlo method. The Hall-Novarini (HN) bubble population model, which considers the effect of wind speed and depth on the bubble size distribution, is used. The scattering coefficients and the scattering phase functions of bubbles in seawater are calculated using Mie theory, and the inherent optical properties of seawater for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm are related to chlorophyll concentration (Chl). The effects of bubble coating, Chl, and bubble number density on the spectral reflectance of the bubble layer are studied. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the bubble layer for both normal and oblique incidence is also investigated. The results show that bubble populations in clear waters under high wind speed conditions significantly influence the reflection characteristics of the bubble layer. Furthermore, the contribution of bubble populations to the reflection characteristics is mainly due to the strong backscattering of bubbles that are coated with an organic film.

  15. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-04-15

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium–10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble growth and superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, molecular dynamics is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the molecular dynamics simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe (Smirnova et al. 2013) is employed. Initial gas bubbles with low Xe concentration are generated in a U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atom atoms are continuously added into the bubbles, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that the gas bubble growth is accompanied by partial dislocation emission, which results in a star-shaped dislocation structure and an anisotropic stress field. The emitted partial dislocations have a Burgers vector along the <111> direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Dislocation loop punch-out was not observed. A tensile stress was found along <110> directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in body-centered cubic U10Mo fuels.

  16. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  17. Effects of bovine serum albumin on a single cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Assouar, Badreddine; Chen, Weizhong

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics and sonoluminescence (SL) of a single cavitation bubble in bovine serum albumin (BSA) aqueous solutions have been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A phase-locked integral imaging has been used to record the bubble pulsation evolutions. The results show that, under the optimum driving condition, the endurable driving pressure, maximum radius, radius compression ratio and SL intensity of the cavitation bubble increase correspondingly with the increase of BSA concentrations within the critical micelle concentration, which indicates that the addition of BSA increases the power capability of the cavitation bubble. In addition, BSA molecules dampen the interfacial motion, and especially the rebounds of the bubble after its collapse. BSA molecules modify the dilatational viscosity and elasticity of the bubble wall. A viscoelastic interfacial rheological model that mainly emphasizes on the description of the bubble wall has been introduced and modified to theoretically explain the measured bubble dynamics. A good consensus between the experimental observation and model calculation has been achieved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  19. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure–time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  20. Study of laminar separation bubble on low Reynolds number operating airfoils: RANS modelling by means of an high-accuracy solver and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellini, A.; D'Alessandro, V.; Di Benedetto, D.; Montelpare, S.; Ricci, R.

    2014-04-01

    This work is devoted to the Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) simulation of laminar separation bubble (LSB) on low Reynolds number operating airfoils. This phenomenon is of large interest in several fields, such as wind energy, and it is characterised by slow recirculating flow at an almost constant pressure. Presently Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, due to their limited computational requests, are the more efficient and feasible CFD simulation tool for complex engineering applications involving LSBs. However adopting RANS methods for LSB prediction is very challenging since widely used models assume a fully turbulent regime. For this reason several transitional models for RANS equations based on further Partial Differential Equations (PDE) have been recently introduced in literature. Nevertheless in some cases they show questionable results. In this work RANS equations and the standard Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model are used to deal with LSB problems obtaining promising results. This innovative result is related to: (i) a particular behaviour of the SA equation; (ii) a particular implementation of SA equation; (iii) the use of a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested on different airfoils at several angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. Numerical results were verified with both experimental measurements performed at the open circuit subsonic wind tunnel of Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM) and literature data.

  1. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  2. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble

  3. Effects of surface orientation on lifetime of near-surface nanoscale He bubble in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiechao; Fu, Baoqin; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing

    2017-02-01

    In multiscale modeling of the morphological evolution of plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, the knowledge of the timescales of the involved physical processes is important. In the present study, a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations was developed to extract the lifetime of helium bubbles near tungsten surfaces. It was found that the lifetime of a helium bubble can be described by the Arrhenius equation. However, the lifetime of a helium bubble depends on the thickness of tungsten film above the helium bubble in the substrate and the bubble size. The influence of surface orientations on the lifetime of helium bubbles was also observed, and the performance of helium bubbles on the (1 1 1) surface is very different from on the (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces. The role of the helium bubble lifetime in other simulation techniques, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory, is discussed.

  4. Effects of surface orientation on lifetime of near-surface nanoscale He bubble in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jiechao; Fu, Baoqin; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing, E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    In multiscale modeling of the morphological evolution of plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, the knowledge of the timescales of the involved physical processes is important. In the present study, a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations was developed to extract the lifetime of helium bubbles near tungsten surfaces. It was found that the lifetime of a helium bubble can be described by the Arrhenius equation. However, the lifetime of a helium bubble depends on the thickness of tungsten film above the helium bubble in the substrate and the bubble size. The influence of surface orientations on the lifetime of helium bubbles was also observed, and the performance of helium bubbles on the (1 1 1) surface is very different from on the (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces. The role of the helium bubble lifetime in other simulation techniques, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory, is discussed.

  5. Laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Sibai, Abla; Oubari, Dima; Ashkar, Jihad; Fuleihan, Nabil

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers. A total of 42 subjects with history of hubble-bubble smoking were recruited for this study. A corresponding group with a history of cigarette smoking and controls were matched. All subjects underwent laryngeal video-endostroboscopic evaluation and acoustic analysis. In the hubble-bubble smoking group, 61.9% were males. The average age was 30.02 +/- 9.48 years and the average number of years of smoking was 8.09 +/- 6.45 years. Three subjects had dysphonia at the time of examination. The incidence of benign lesions of the vocal folds in the hubble-bubble group was 21.5%, with edema being the most common at 16.7% followed by cyst at 4.8%. The incidence of laryngeal findings was significantly higher in the hubble-bubble group compared to controls. In the cigarette-smoking group, the most common finding was vocal fold cyst in 14.8% followed by polyps in 7.4%, and edema, sulcus vocalis and granuloma. These findings were not significantly different from the hubble-bubble group except for the thick mucus, which was significantly higher in the latter. There were no significant changes in any of the acoustic parameters between hubble-bubble smokers and controls except for the VTI and MPT, which were significantly lower in the hubble-bubble group. In comparison with the cigarette-smoking group, hubble-bubble smokers had significantly higher Fundamental frequency and habitual pitch (p value 0.042 and 0.008, respectively). The laryngeal findings in hubble-bubble smokers are comparable to cigarette smokers. These laryngeal findings are not translated acoustically, as all the acoustic parameters are within normal range compared to controls.

  6. Comparison of numerical simulations and laboratory studies of shock waves and cavitation bubble growth produced by optical breakdown in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vogel, A. [Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck GmbH (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    In numerical calculations of idealized bubble dynamics test problems, Los Alamos computational tools perform well. A realistic equation of state must be used and geometrical features must be carefully modeled to simulate experiments accurately. In this work, we compare numerical simulations taking these features into account with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and of the bubble wall as a function of time in the laser optical breakdown of water produced by 30-ps 1-mJ Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  7. Dissolution enhancement and mathematical modeling of removal of residual trichloroethene in sands by ozonation during flushing with micro-nano-bubble solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Menghau; Teng, Chun-Hao; Yang, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-07-01

    Soil flushing using micro-nano-sized bubbles (MNB) in water as the flushing solution was tested in laboratory sand columns for the cleanup of residual trichloroethene (TCE) non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). Experiments considering flushing with MNB as well as ozone MNB (OZMNB) in water to treat soils contaminated with residual TCE liquid were conducted to examine effects of ozone on dissolution enhancement. The degrees of residual TCE saturation in soils, ranging from 0.44% to 7.6%, were tested. During flushings, aqueous TCE concentrations at the column exit were monitored and TCE masses remained in the columns after flushing were determined. Experimental results between runs with MNB and OZMNB in water revealed that dissolution enhancement was dependent on residual saturation conditions, and the maximum enhancement was around 9%. Governing equations consisting of three coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) were developed to model the system, and high-order finite difference (HOFD) method was employed to solve these PDEs. From mathematical modeling of reactive mass transfer under low residual saturation conditions (0.44% and 1.9%), experimental data were simulated and important controlling mechanisms were identified. It was concluded that a specific parameter pertinent to NAPL-water interfacial area in the Sherwood number had to be modified to satisfactorily describe the dissolution of TCE in the presence of MNB in water.

  8. Response surface methodology and artificial neural network modeling of reactive red 33 decolorization by O3/UV in a bubble column reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Behin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural network (ANN were used to predict the decolorization efficiency of Reactive Red 33 (RR 33 by applying the O3/UV process in a bubble column reactor. The effects of four independent variables including time (20-60 min, superficial gas velocity (0.06-0.18 cm/s, initial concentration of dye (50-150 ppm, and pH (3-11 were investigated using a 3-level 4-factor central composite experimental design. This design was utilized to train a feed-forward multilayered perceptron artificial neural network with a back-propagation algorithm. A comparison between the models’ results and experimental data gave high correlation coefficients and showed that the two models were able to predict Reactive Red 33 removal by employing the O3/UV process. Considering the results of the yield of dye removal and the response surface-generated model, the optimum conditions for dye removal were found to be a retention time of 59.87 min, a superficial gas velocity of 0.18 cm/s, an initial concentration of 96.33 ppm, and a pH of 7.99.

  9. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  10. Universe unveiled the cosmos in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2015-01-01

    The bubbles were swirling all around me, massaging my body. As I luxuriated in this fantastic bath, I gasped realizing that those bubbles carried with them miniature galaxies bringing the entire Cosmos into my bathtub... Alfie is back. And so are George and other characters from the author’s previous book Einstein’s Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath. While the present book, Universe Unveiled - The Cosmos in My Bubble Bath, is completely independent, its storyline can be considered a sequel to the previous one. The scientific content spanning ancient world models to the most recent mysteries of cosmology is presented in an entirely nontechnical and descriptive style through the discussions between Alfie, the enlightened learner, and George, professor of astrophysics. Fantasies, based on these discussions that cover the scientific facts, are created by the magical bubble baths taken by Alfie. Universe Unveiled blends accurate science with philosophy, drama, humour, and fantasy to create an exciting co...

  11. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broučková Zuzana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple „kitchen” experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  12. Quantum Subcritical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, T.; Morikawa, M.; Shiromizu, T.

    1996-08-01

    We quantize subcritical bubbles which are formed in the weakly first order phase transition. We find that the typical size of the thermal fluctuation reduces in quantum-statistical physics. We estimate the typical size and the amplitude of thermal fluctuations near the critical temperature in the electroweak phase transition using a quantum statistical average. Furthermore, based on our study, we discuss implications for the dynamics of phase transitions.

  13. Popping the filter bubble

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Katie; Cronin, G; Welch, L

    2017-01-01

    So-called “fake news” is everywhere and is having a major impact on daily life from politics to education. The rapid growth of information and the numbers of people who can create it means that we need more sophisticated tools to process the news we receive. Join us to learn about different methods you can use to be your own fact checker and pop your filter bubble.

  14. BubbleDeck

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2013-01-01

    Conventional horizontal concrete slabs are heavy that limit their spans. Enhancement of span results in addition of beams that increases the cost of the structure. Thus, there is a need for a technology that will help in increasing the span by reducing weight of the span. BubbleDeck is a revolutionary construction method that virtually eliminates concrete from the middle of a floor slab between columns that does not perform any structural function, thereby dramatically reducing structural dea...

  15. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  16. Experimental study of electric discharge propagation in gas bubbles in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jessica; Gershman, Sophia

    2013-10-01

    The studies of pulsed electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids continue to generate interest by their practical applications to the water treatment as well their theoretical significance for the understanding of the discharge propagation along liquid surfaces. Computational models suggest that the discharge path depends on the ratio of the dielectric constant of the liquid and the gas. This study investigates the formation and propagation of the discharge inside a gas bubble in water and glycerin (dielectric constants of approximately 80 and 41, respectively, at 20 C). The discharge is generated by a 1 μs pulse of 10-15 kV applied between a needle electrode piercing the bubble wall and a disk electrode submerged in the liquid. Time-resolved 5-10 ns exposure ICCD images are used to compare the discharge path in Ar, O2, and air bubbles in the two liquid dielectrics. 10 nm bandpass filters are used to image the behavior of various excited species, ex. Ar +, OH. Experimental results are compared to the previous modeling results.

  17. Analysis of bubble plume spacing produced by regular breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaksopa, J.; Haller, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The breaking wave process in the ocean is a significant mechanism for energy dissipation, splash, and entrainment of air. The relationship between breaking waves and bubble plume characteristics is still a mystery because of the complexity of the breaking wave mechanism. This study takes a unique approach to quantitatively analyze bubble plumes produced by regular breaking waves. Various previous studies have investigated the formation and the characteristics of bubble plumes using either field observations, laboratory experiments, or numerical modeling However, in most observational work the plume characteristics have been studied from the underneath the water surface. In addition, though numerical simulations are able to include much of the important physics, the computational costs are high and bubble plume events are only simulated for short times. Hence, bubble plume evolution and generation throughout the surf zone is not yet computationally feasible. In the present work we take a unique approach to analyzing bubble plumes. These data may be of use for model/data comparisons as numerical simulations become more tractable. The remotely sensed video data from freshwater breaking waves in the OSU Large Wave Flume (Catalan and Haller, 2008) are analyzed. The data set contains six different regular wave conditions and the video intensity data are used to estimate the spacing of plume events (wavenumber spectrum), to calculate the spectral width (i.e. the range of plume spacing), and to relate these with the wave conditions. The video intensity data capture the evolution of the wave passage over a fixed bed arranged in a bar-trough morphology. Bright regions represent the moving path or trajectory coincident with bubble plume of each wave. It also shows the bubble foam were generated and released from wave crest shown in the form of bubble tails with almost regular spacing for each wave. The bubble tails show that most bubbles did not move along with wave. For the

  18. Stable small bubble clusters in two-dimensional foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Kuo, Chin-Chang; See, Nathaniel; O'Hern, Corey; Dennin, Michael

    2017-06-21

    Key features of the mechanical response of amorphous particulate materials, such as foams, emulsions, and granular media, to applied stress are determined by the frequency and size of particle rearrangements that occur as the system transitions from one mechanically stable state to another. This work describes coordinated experimental and computational studies of bubble rafts, which are quasi-two dimensional systems of bubbles confined to the air-water interface. We focus on small mechanically stable clusters of four, five, six, and seven bubbles with two different sizes with diameter ratio σL/σS ≃ 1.4. Focusing on small bubble clusters, which can be viewed as subsystems of a larger system, allows us to investigate the full ensemble of clusters that form, measure the respective frequencies with which the clusters occur, and determine the form of the bubble-bubble interactions. We emphasize several important results. First, for clusters with N > 5 bubbles, we find using discrete element simulations that short-range attractive interactions between bubbles give rise to a larger ensemble of distinct mechanically stable clusters compared to that generated by long-range attractive interactions. The additional clusters in systems with short-range attractions possess larger gaps between pairs of neighboring bubbles on the periphery of the clusters. The ensemble of bubble clusters observed in experiments is similar to the ensemble of clusters with long-range attractive interactions. We also compare the frequency with which each cluster occurs in simulations and experiments. We find that the cluster frequencies are extremely sensitive to the protocol used to generate them and only weakly correlated to the energy of the clusters.

  19. On near-tail bubble penetration into geosynchronous altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-S.; Lee, D.-Y.; Ohtani, S.; Park, M.-Y.; Ahn, B.-H.

    2012-07-01

    Dipolarization of the magnetic field at the near-Earth tail is usually associated with the local reduction of pV5/3 compared to that of the background, where p is the plasma pressure and V is the volume of the unit magnetic flux tube. This can be interpreted as a bubble, which can propagate earthward by the interchange process. How deep such a bubble can penetrate earthward, and what is the critical factor are critical questions that need to be answered. In this paper, we examine these issues by comparing near-tail observations by inner probes of THEMIS with geosynchronous magnetic observations by GOES. We identified a number of bubble events associated with near-tail dipolarization, which we call “tail bubble,” and checked geosynchronous disturbances. We find a statistical trend that geosynchronous disturbance is more likely to occur when associated with (or when hit by) an earthward moving tail bubble with a more-depleted pV5/3. We estimated the background pV5/3 profile statistically and used it to determine expected equilibrium (or stop) positions for earthward moving bubbles where the bubble's pV5/3 is equal to that of the background. Statistically, we find that the equilibrium position is more inward for tail bubbles with a lower pV5/3, for which the probability of causing geosynchronous disturbance is higher. For example, the probability of a tail bubble being associated with geosynchronous disturbance is 75% if the bubble's equilibrium position is explanation.

  20. Multi-dimensional modeling of gas-liquid two-phase flows. Application to the simulation of ascending bubble flows in vertical ducts; Modelisation multidimensionnelle des ecoulements diphasiques gaz-liquide. Application a la simulation des ecoulements a bulles ascendants en conduite verticale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, Ch

    1997-10-31

    The aim of this thesis is the 3-D modeling and numerical simulation of liquid/gas (water/vapor or water/air) two-phase flows in cooling circuits of nuclear power plants during normal and accidental situations. The development of a multidimensional dual-fluid model encounters two problems: the statistical effects of turbulence and the interface mass, momentum and energy transfers. The models developed in this study were introduced in the 3-D module of the CATHARE code developed by the CEA and the results were compared to experimental results available in the literature. The first chapter describes the equations of the local dual-fluid model for the 3-D description of two-phase flows. Closing relations adapted to dispersed flows with isothermal bubbles and without phase transformation are proposed and focus on the momentum transfer at the interfaces. The theoretical study of turbulence in the liquid phase of a bubble flow is modelled in chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with the voluminal interface area used in the interface mass, momentum and energy transfers, and chapters 4 and 5 concern the application of the developed models to concrete situations. Chapter 4 describes in details the 3-D module of the CATHARE code while chapter 5 gives a comparison of numerical results obtained using the CATHARE code with other experimental results obtained at EdF. (J.S.) 109 refs.

  1. Ab initio calculation of the potential bubble nucleus 34Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Somà, V.; Lecluse, S.; Barbieri, C.; Navrátil, P.

    2017-03-01

    Background: The possibility that an unconventional depletion (referred to as a "bubble") occurs in the center of the charge density distribution of certain nuclei due to a purely quantum mechanical effect has attracted theoretical and experimental attention in recent years. Based on a mean-field rationale, a correlation between the occurrence of such a semibubble and an anomalously weak splitting between low angular-momentum spin-orbit partners has been further conjectured. Energy density functional and valence-space shell model calculations have been performed to identify and characterize the best candidates, among which 34Si appears as a particularly interesting case. While the experimental determination of the charge density distribution of the unstable 34Si is currently out of reach, (d ,p ) experiments on this nucleus have been performed recently to test the correlation between the presence of a bubble and an anomalously weak 1 /2--3 /2- splitting in the spectrum of 35Si as compared to 37S. Purpose: We study the potential bubble structure of 34Si on the basis of the state-of-the-art ab initio self-consistent Green's function many-body method. Methods: We perform the first ab initio calculations of 34Si and 36S. In addition to binding energies, the first observables of interest are the charge density distribution and the charge root-mean-square radius for which experimental data exist in 36S. The next observable of interest is the low-lying spectroscopy of 35Si and 37S obtained from (d ,p ) experiments along with the spectroscopy of 33Al and 35P obtained from knock-out experiments. The interpretation in terms of the evolution of the underlying shell structure is also provided. The study is repeated using several chiral effective field theory Hamiltonians as a way to test the robustness of the results with respect to input internucleon interactions. The convergence of the results with respect to the truncation of the many-body expansion, i.e., with respect to

  2. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry: I. Theory of the Behavior of Bubbles Trapped in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, Seung I.(PEMEX REFINACION); Gauglitz, Phillip A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rossen, William R.(UNKNOWN)

    2000-12-01

    Bubbles trapped within the slurry at the bottom of waste tanks at the Hanford Site expand and contract in response to ambient pressure changes. These bubbles contain hydrogen and other flammable gases that can pose a safety hazard. Determining the effective compressibility of bubbles in the slurry could allow one to make improved estimates of the quantity of gas trapped in the slurry from changes in slurry volume with ambient pressure changes. Numerical calculations based on a one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model show that the effective compressibility of a population of bubbles shows hysteresis with pressure increase and decrease. This hysteresis is caused by the unsteady, impulsive movements of interfaces from pore throat to throat during a pressure decrease and from pore body to body during a pressure increase. Snap-off may occur during these jumps but does not significantly alter the effective compressibility of the population of bubbles.

  3. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  4. In Search of the Big Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  5. A Comparative Study of Three Methodologies for Modeling Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, L.; Rhee, M.; Tung, C.; ZibiBailly, J.; LeBalleur, J. C.; Blaise, D.; Rouzaud, O.

    2002-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been an increased reliance on the use of computational fluid dynamics methods for modeling rotors in high speed forward flight. Computational methods are being developed for modeling the shock induced loads on the advancing side, first-principles based modeling of the trailing wake evolution, and for retreating blade stall. The retreating blade dynamic stall problem has received particular attention, because the large variations in lift and pitching moments encountered in dynamic stall can lead to blade vibrations and pitch link fatigue. Restricting to aerodynamics, the numerical prediction of dynamic stall is still a complex and challenging CFD problem, that, even in two dimensions at low speed, gathers the major difficulties of aerodynamics, such as the grid resolution requirements for the viscous phenomena at leading-edge bubbles or in mixing-layers, the bias of the numerical viscosity, and the major difficulties of the physical modeling, such as the turbulence models, the transition models, whose both determinant influences, already present in static maximal-lift or stall computations, are emphasized by the dynamic aspect of the phenomena.

  6. Rheological properties of suspensions of bubbles in a yield stress fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloue, Lucie; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Chateau, Xavier; Pitois, Olivier; Goyon, Julie

    2013-11-01

    We study the macroscopic response under shear of suspensions of bubbles in yield stress fluids. Model suspensions are prepared by mixing a monodisperse foam with a concentrated oil in water emulsion, both having the same continuous phase of a surfactant solution. The interstitial concentrated emulsion behaves as a solid viscoelastic material below a critical stress, and as a shear-thinning fluid above this yield stress. We measure the change in the macroscopic response (elastic modulus, yield stress, non-linear viscosity) due to the addition of bubbles to the fluid. We find that for a given emulsion, the elastic modulus is a decreasing function of the gas volume fraction ϕ, this decrease being all the sharper as the bubbles are big. We also observe that the yield stress of most studied materials is not modified by the presence of bubbles, whereas the non-linear viscosity during flow increases with ϕ. We show that those apparently contradictory changes in the behaviour are ruled by the deformability of the bubbles in the fluid. To quantify this effect, we introduce capillary numbers which compare the stresses exerted on a bubble during a measurement to the stresses due to surface tension. We thus compute an elastic capillary number in the solid regime, a plastic capillary number at the yield stress and a viscous capillary number during flow. Those numbers are very different in the solid and in the liquid regimes, explaining why the elastic, plastic and viscous properties do not follow the same evolution. Our results are quantitatively well predicted by a micromechanical approach.

  7. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  8. On the accuracy of the void fraction measurements using optical probes in bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Juliá, J.; Harteveld, Wouter K.; Mudde, Robert F.; Van den Akker, Harrie E. A.

    2005-03-01

    The accuracy of the measurement of the void fraction in bubbly flows using an optical probe is investigated. Experiments were performed in tap water with ellipsoidal-shaped air bubbles with equivalent diameters and velocities in the range of 2.8-5.2 mm and 0.22-0.28 m/s. Comparison of charge coupled devices (CCD) images of dynamic bubble piercing events with optical probe signals shows that for piercing in the area around the bubble side, the so-called low-level criterion gives the best agreement with the actual gas-liquid transition for the undisturbed bubble. In addition, residence time underestimation due to a partial blinding effect is observed in the outer regions of the bubble. Residence times of the probe inside the bubble are obtained from the probe signal and from CCD images of the undisturbed bubble. These are compared to study the relevance of various probe-bubble interaction effects. The crawling effect is found to play an important role. For perpendicular piercing, the experiment shows that in the central area of the bubble deceleration effects induced by the probe lead to local overestimation of residence times. In the outer region of the bubble, large-scale deformation leads to local underestimation of residence times. The larger cross-sectional area associated with the underestimation leads to a net underestimation of the total bubble volume. For nonperpendicular piercing, the probe inclination is found to generate an additional drifting effect, creating an additional source of underestimation.

  9. Optical monitoring of bubble size and shape in a pulsating bubble surfactometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seurynck, Shannon L; Brown, Nathan J; Wu, Cindy W; Germino, Kevin W; Kohlmeir, Ellen K; Ingenito, Edward P; Glucksberg, Matthew R; Barron, Annelise E; Johnson, Mark

    2005-08-01

    The pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) is often used for in vitro characterization of exogenous lung surfactant replacements and lung surfactant components. However, the commercially available PBS is not able to dynamically track bubble size and shape. The PBS therefore does not account for bubble growth or elliptical bubble shape that frequently occur during device use. More importantly, the oscillatory volume changes of the pulsating bubble are different than those assumed by the software of the commercial unit. This leads to errors in both surface area and surface tension measurements. We have modified a commercial PBS through the addition of an image-acquisition system, allowing real-time determination of bubble size and shape and hence the accurate tracking of surface area and surface tension. Compression-expansion loops obtained with the commercially available PBS software were compared with those provided by the image-analysis system for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, Infasurf, and Tanaka lipids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyloleoylphosphatidyl-glycerol-palmitic acid, 68:22:9) at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml and at frequencies of 1 and 20 cycles/min. Whereas minimum surface tension as determined by the image-analysis system is similar to that measured by the commercially available software, the maximum surface tension and the shapes of the interfacial area-surface tension loops are quite different. Differences are attributable to bubble drift, nonsinusoidal volume changes, and variable volume excursions seen with the modified system but neglected by the original system. Image analysis reveals that the extent of loop hysteresis is greatly overestimated by the commercial device and that an apparent, rapid increase in surface tension upon film expansion seen in PBS loops is not observed with the image-analysis system. The modified PBS system reveals new dynamic characteristics of lung surfactant preparations that have not previously been

  10. Bubble dynamics inside an outgassing hydrogel confined in a Hele-Shaw cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudin, Florence; Noblin, Xavier; Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Médéric; Raufaste, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental study of bubble dynamics in a non-Newtonian fluid subjected to a pressure decrease. The fluid is a hydrogel, composed of water and a synthetic clay, prepared and sandwiched between two glass plates in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The rheological properties of the material can be tuned by the clay concentration. As the imposed pressure decreases, the gas initially dissolved in the hydrogel triggers bubble formation. Different stages of the process are observed: bubble nucleation, growth, interaction, and creation of domains by bubble contact or coalescence. Initially bubble behave independently. They are trapped and advected by the mean deformation of the hydrogel, and the bubble growth is mainly driven by the diffusion of the dissolved gas through the hydrogel and its outgassing at the reactive-advected hydrogel-bubble interface. In this regime, the rheology of the fluid does not play a significant role on the bubble growth. A model is proposed and gives a simple scaling that relates the bubble growth rate and the imposed pressure. Carbon dioxide is shown to be the gas at play, and the hydrogel is degassing at the millimeter scale as a water solution does at a smaller scale. Later, bubbles are not independent anymore. The growth rate decreases, and the morphology becomes more anisotropic as bubbles interact because they are separated by a distance smaller than the individual stress field extension. Our measurements show that the interaction distance scales with the bubbles' size.

  11. Bubble reconstruction method for wire-mesh sensors measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukin, Roman V.

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm is presented for post-processing of void fraction measurements with wire-mesh sensors, particularly for identifying and reconstructing bubble surfaces in a two-phase flow. This method is a combination of the bubble recognition algorithm presented in Prasser (Nuclear Eng Des 237(15):1608, 2007) and Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm developed in Kazhdan et al. (Poisson surface reconstruction. In: Proceedings of the fourth eurographics symposium on geometry processing 7, 2006). To verify the proposed technique, a comparison was done of the reconstructed individual bubble shapes with those obtained numerically in Sato and Ničeno (Int J Numer Methods Fluids 70(4):441, 2012). Using the difference between reconstructed and referenced bubble shapes, the accuracy of the proposed algorithm was estimated. At the next step, the algorithm was applied to void fraction measurements performed in Ylönen (High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle (Diss., Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule ETH Zürich, Nr. 20961, 2013) by means of wire-mesh sensors in a rod bundle geometry. The reconstructed bubble shape yields bubble surface area and volume, hence its Sauter diameter d_{32} as well. Sauter diameter is proved to be more suitable for bubbles size characterization compared to volumetric diameter d_{30}, proved capable to capture the bi-disperse bubble size distribution in the flow. The effect of a spacer grid was studied as well: For the given spacer grid and considered flow rates, bubble size frequency distribution is obtained almost at the same position for all cases, approximately at d_{32} = 3.5 mm. This finding can be related to the specific geometry of the spacer grid or the air injection device applied in the experiments, or even to more fundamental properties of the bubble breakup and coagulation processes. In addition, an application of the new algorithm for reconstruction of a large air-water interface in a tube bundle is

  12. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  13. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  14. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    using deep field Hubble observations, Castellano and collaborators found an additional 6 galaxies in the same region as the first two, also at a redshift of z~7!The authors believe these galaxies provide a simple explanation of the ionized bubble: each of these faint, normal galaxies produced a small ionized bubble. The overlap of these many small bubbles provided the larger ionized region from which the light of the two originally discovered galaxies was able to escape.How normal is this clustering of galaxies found by Castellano and collaborators? The team demonstrates via cosmological modeling that the number density of galaxies in this region is a factor of 34 greater than would be expected at this distance in a random pointing of the same size.These results greatly support the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts in the universe were formed in regions with significant galaxy overdensities. The discovery of this deep-field collection of galaxies strongly suggests that reionization was driven by faint, normal star-forming galaxies in a clumpy process.CitationM. Castellano et al 2016 ApJ 818 L3. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/818/1/L3

  15. Conceptual design of a 10 to the 8th power bit magnetic bubble domain mass storage unit and fabrication, test and delivery of a feasibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The conceptual design of a highly reliable 10 to the 8th power-bit bubble domain memory for the space program is described. The memory has random access to blocks of closed-loop shift registers, and utilizes self-contained bubble domain chips with on-chip decoding. Trade-off studies show that the highest reliability and lowest power dissipation is obtained when the memory is organized on a bit-per-chip basis. The final design has 800 bits/register, 128 registers/chip, 16 chips/plane, and 112 planes, of which only seven are activated at a time. A word has 64 data bits +32 checkbits, used in a 16-adjacent code to provide correction of any combination of errors in one plane. 100 KHz maximum rotational frequency keeps power low (equal to or less than, 25 watts) and also allows asynchronous operation. Data rate is 6.4 megabits/sec, access time is 200 msec to an 800-word block and an additional 4 msec (average) to a word. The fabrication and operation are also described for a 64-bit bubble domain memory chip designed to test the concept of on-chip magnetic decoding. Access to one of the chip's four shift registers for the read, write, and clear functions is by means of bubble domain decoders utilizing the interaction between a conductor line and a bubble.

  16. The stability of the dome of a liquid bubble rising in a dense liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygin, R. I.; Kascheev, A. D.; Kudryavtsev, A. Yu; Meshkov, E. E.; Novikova, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    The results of experiments researching the stability of the dome of a large water bubble rising in a salt solution are presented. The experiments demonstrate the suppression of the Rayleigh–Taylor instability on the dome of the rising bubble with the Atwood number being A ≪ 1. The intensive development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability on the lateral surface of the bubble is observed as it rises. The stability of the dome of the rising bubble is explained by the action of an accelerated shear flow of water over the bubble surface. The results of computational modeling of the problem by the STAR-CCM + program are presented.

  17. Hydrodynamic interaction on large-Reynolds-number aligned bubbles: Drag effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Munoz, J., E-mail: jrm@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Soria, A. [Departamento de IPH, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gama-Goicochea, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > The hydrodynamic interaction of a pair aligned equal-sized bubbles is analyzed. > The leading bubble wake decreases the drag on the trailing bubble. > A new semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble's drag is presented. > The equilibrium distance between bubbles is predicted. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic interaction of two equal-sized spherical gas bubbles rising along a vertical line with a Reynolds number (Re) between 50 and 200 is analyzed. An approach to estimate the trailing bubble drag based on the search of a proper reference fluid velocity is proposed. Our main result is a new, simple semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble drag. Additionally, the equilibrium separation distance between bubbles is predicted. The proposed models agree quantitatively up to small distances between bubbles, with reported data for 50 {<=} Re {<=} 200. The relative average error for the trailing bubble drag, Er, is found to be in the range 1.1 {<=} Er {<=} 1.7, i.e., it is of the same order of the analytical predictions in the literature.

  18. Analysis of the real estate market in Las Vegas: Bubble, seasonal patterns, and prediction of the CSW indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2008-01-01

    We analyze 27 house price indices of Las Vegas from June 1983 to March 2005, corresponding to 27 different zip codes. These analyses confirm the existence of a real estate bubble, defined as a price acceleration faster than exponential, which is found, however, to be confined to a rather limited time interval in the recent past from approximately 2003 to mid-2004 and has progressively transformed into a more normal growth rate comparable to pre-bubble levels in 2005. There has been no bubble till 2002 except for a medium-sized surge in 1990. In addition, we have identified a strong yearly periodicity which provides a good potential for fine-tuned prediction from month to month. A monthly monitoring using a model that we have developed could confirm, by testing the intra-year structure, if indeed the market has returned to “normal” or if more turbulence is expected ahead. We predict the evolution of the indices one year ahead, which is validated with new data up to September 2006. The present analysis demonstrates the existence of very significant variations at the local scale, in the sense that the bubble in Las Vegas seems to have preceded the more global USA bubble and has ended approximately two years earlier (mid-2004 for Las Vegas compared with mid-2006 for the whole of the USA).

  19. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-04

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  20. Luminescence of transient single cavitation bubbles in non-aqueous liquids produced by the modified tube-arrest method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Mei; Ying, Chong-Fu; Li, Chao

    2005-05-01

    Large transient single bubbles of effective diameters in centimetres were generated by the modified tube-arrest method in 7 nonaqueous liquids besides water and in glycerin-water mixtures. During collapse, nearly all these bubbles gave off light emissions of various intensities, which in 6 liquids were correlated with the saturation vapour pressure and viscosity of the respective liquid. Bubbles in ethylene glycol and propylene glycol did not follow this rule, but those in the former liquid showed some unusual regularity in luminescence variation and the bubbles in both the liquids were particularly bright. The luminous properties of the transient single bubble are compared with those of the usual stable single bubble.

  1. Na emission and bubble instability in single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pak-Kon; Takumori, Keisuke; Lee, Hyang-Bok

    2017-09-01

    Na emission in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) was observed from 0.1mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution containing a dissolved noble gas at a low acoustic pressure, at which a continuous spectral component was negligible. High-speed shadowgraph movies were captured at a frame rate of 30,000fps, which indicated that bubble dancing is responsible for the Na emission. The measured bubble path length was well correlated with the Na intensity. The disintegration of a daughter bubble followed by immediate coalescence was frequently observed, which may have been the cause of the bubble dancing. A comparison of the Na spectra obtained in SBSL and multibubble SL showed that the conditions under which Na emission is generated are twofold. A narrow component was observed in the Na spectrum in SBSL, while narrow and broad components were observed in MBSL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of anisotropy from finite light travel time on detecting ionized bubbles in redshifted 21-cm maps

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Suman; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy

    2010-01-01

    The detection of ionized bubbles around quasars in redshifted 21-cm maps is possibly one of the most direct future probes of reionization. We consider two models for the growth of spherical ionized bubbles to study the apparent shapes of the bubbles in redshifted 21-cm maps, taking into account the finite light travel time (FLTT) across the bubble. We find that the FLTT, whose effect is particularly pronounced for large bubbles, causes the bubble's image to continue to grow well after it's ac...

  3. Development and implementation of a model of permeation of tritium in the presence of bubbles of helium to tritigenic wraps of liquid metal wraps; Desarrollo e implementacion de un modelo de permeacion de tritio en presencia de burbujas de helio para envolturas tritigenicas de metal liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batet, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    In the channels of liquid metal (ML) regenerating sheaths of a fusion reactor, the possibility of bubbles of helium is not remote. Bubbles adhering to the wall of the ML channels would affect heat transfer and the permeation of tritium. Detailed analysis has been conducted (fine mesh), using OpenFOAM, from the environment of a bubble attached to the wall and has developed a model for permeation of tritium through a partially covered with bubbles of helium surface of contact Ml-solid. The model developed has implemented as wall function in OpenFOAM, has validated and has been applied to a case study, using a relatively thick mesh. The developed model substantially reduces the need for computing on the detailed calculation power.

  4. Testing for Explosive Bubbles in the Presence of Autocorrelated Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Montes Schütte, Erik Christian

    autocorrelated innovations. We also find that these improvements in size come at a relatively low cost for the power of the tests. Finally, we apply the bootstrap tests on the housing market of OECD countries, and generally find less strong evidence of bubbles compared to existing evidence.......We analyze an empirically important issue with the recursive right-tailed unit root tests for bubbles in asset prices. First, we show that serially correlated innovations, which is a feature that is present in most financial series used to test for bubbles, can lead to severe size distortions when...

  5. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME EXISTING KINETIC MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of highest values of R2, first proposed model accounted for 46.7%, Pseudo second-order kinetics model 40% while Elovich, Webber-Morris and second proposed kinetic models accounted for 6.7% respectively of the total results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by five selected microorganisms. But based ...

  6. Inertia and chiral edge modes of a Skyrmion magnetic bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhfudz, Imam; Krüger, Benjamin; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2012-11-21

    The dynamics of a vortex in a thin-film ferromagnet resembles the motion of a charged massless particle in a uniform magnetic field. Similar dynamics is expected for other magnetic textures with a nonzero Skyrmion number. However, recent numerical simulations reveal that Skyrmion magnetic bubbles show significant deviations from this model. We show that a Skyrmion bubble possesses inertia and derive its mass from the standard theory of a thin-film ferromagnet. In addition to center-of-mass motion, other low energy modes are waves on the edge of the bubble traveling with different speeds in opposite directions.

  7. Dynamics of Subcritical Bubbles in First Order Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, T.; Morikawa, M.; Yokoyama, J.

    1995-11-01

    We derivate the Langevin and the Fokker-Planck equations for the radius of O(3)-symmetric subcritical bubbles as a phenomenological model to treat thermal fluctuation. The effect of thermal noise on subcritical bubbles is examined. We find that the fluctuation-dissipation relation holds and that in the high temperature phase the system settles down rapidly to the thermal equilibrium state even if it was in a nonequilibrium state initially. We then estimate the typical size of subcritical bubbles as well as the amplitude of fluctuations on that scale. We also discuss their implication to the electroweak phase transition.

  8. Bubble interaction dynamics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A

    2007-02-01

    Two models of interacting bubble dynamics are presented, a coupled system of second-order differential equations based on Lagrangian mechanics, and a first-order system based on Hamiltonian mechanics. Both account for pulsation and translation of an arbitrary number of spherical bubbles. For large numbers of interacting bubbles, numerical solution of the Hamiltonian equations provides greater stability. The presence of external acoustic sources is taken into account explicitly in the derivation of both sets of equations. In addition to the acoustic pressure and its gradient, it is found that the particle velocity associated with external sources appears in the dynamical equations.

  9. Simulations of bubble-wall collision and bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Sohrab; Mehrabian, Hadi; Zenit, Roberto; Feng, James J.

    2012-11-01

    The collision of a rising bubble with a hydrophilic upper wall is studied numerically using an axisymmetric phase-field model. Prior experiments show bubble bouncing or adhesion depending on its incoming velocity. Using experimental parameters, our computation reproduces these different behaviors, including bubble breakup, arrest, and rebound. In particular, dimples are observed on both the fore and aft sides. We further investigate the scaling of the coefficient of restitution and the critical condition delineating arrest from rebound. The latter is plotted as a phase diagram in terms of the Ohnesorge and Weber numbers. We acknowledge financial support from NSERC.

  10. Testing for rational bubbles in a co-explosive vector autoregression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Nielsen, Bent

    We derive the parameter restrictions that a standard equity market model implies for a bivariate vector autoregression for stock prices and dividends, and we show how to test these restrictions using likelihood ratio tests. The restrictions, which imply that stock returns are unpredictable......, are derived both for a model without bubbles and for a model with a rational bubble. In both cases we show how the restrictions can be tested through standard chi-squared inference. The analysis for the no-bubble case is done within the traditional Johansen model for I(1) variables, while the bubble model...

  11. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Colonius, Tim

    2009-06-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined.

  12. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.; Arora, M.; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the

  13. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-D. Ohl (Claus-Dieter); M. Arora (Manish); R. Ikink (Roy); N. de Jong (Nico); M. Versluis (Michel); M. Delius (Michael); D. Lohse (Detlef)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads

  14. Bubble size distribution of foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Engelsen, C.W.; den Engelsen, C.W.; Isarin, J.C.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus; Groot Wassink, J.; Groot Wassink, J.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure based upon image analysis has been adopted to study the influence of several physical parameters on bubble size in foam. A procedure has been described to account for the distribution of bubble size. Foam was generated in a rotor-stator mixer. In the present research, the nature of the

  15. Hadron bubbles in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troitskii, M.A.; Khodel' , V.A.

    1983-08-25

    Nonlinear effects in the interaction of hadrons with a nucleus are analyzed. It is shown that K/sup +/ mesons form bubbles in nuclear matter which are similar to electron bubbles in liquid helium. Charged pions produced in collisions of heavy relativistic ions may collect and form droplets approx.5--7 Fm in size containing approx.10/sup 2/ particles.

  16. Mr. Bubble Gum: "Not Now!"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    PreS-Gr 2-- Mr. Bubble Gum is a Level 3 book, the most difficult in this series. In four short stories of varying lengths, an older brother tells about his younger brother Eli, who "sticks to me like bubble gum...

  17. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  18. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  19. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state

  20. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well...

  1. Study on the bubble transport mechanism in an acoustic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic B; Lowe, Michael; Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use of bubbles in applications such as surface chemistry, drug delivery, and ultrasonic cleaning etc. has been enormously popular in the past two decades. It has been recognized that acoustically-driven bubbles can be used to disturb the flow field near a boundary in order to accelerate physical or chemical reactions on the surface. The interactions between bubbles and a surface have been studied experimentally and analytically. However, most of the investigations focused on violently oscillating bubbles (also known as cavitation bubble), less attention has been given to understand the interactions between moderately oscillating bubbles and a boundary. Moreover, cavitation bubbles were normally generated in situ by a high intensity laser beam, little experimental work has been carried out to study the translational trajectory of a moderately oscillating bubble in an acoustic field and subsequent interactions with the surface. This paper describes the design of an ultrasonic test cell and explores the mechanism of bubble manipulation within the test cell. The test cell consists of a transducer, a liquid medium and a glass backing plate. The acoustic field within the multi-layered stack was designed in such a way that it was effectively one dimensional. This was then successfully simulated by a one dimensional network model. The model can accurately predict the impedance of the test cell as well as the mode shape (distribution of particle velocity and stress/pressure field) within the whole assembly. The mode shape of the stack was designed so that bubbles can be pushed from their injection point onto a backing glass plate. Bubble radial oscillation was simulated by a modified Keller-Miksis equation and bubble translational motion was derived from an equation obtained by applying Newton's second law to a bubble in a liquid medium. Results indicated that the bubble trajectory depends on the acoustic pressure amplitude and initial bubble size: an increase of

  2. Bubble removal and sand dissolution in an electrically heated glass melting channel with defined melt flow examined by mathematical modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, L.; Kocourková, P.; Jebavá, Marcela; Cincibusová, P.; Němec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 456, JAN 15 (2017), s. 101-113 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilization * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2016

  3. Local inflammation, dissemination and coalescence of lesions are key for the progression towards active tuberculosis: the bubble model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ePrats

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB infection towards active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions.Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response.The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by oscillations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed.These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress towards active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the

  4. Size distribution of air bubbles entering the brain during cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M L Chung

    Full Text Available Thousands of air bubbles enter the cerebral circulation during cardiac surgery, but whether high numbers of bubbles explain post-operative cognitive decline is currently controversial. This study estimates the size distribution of air bubbles and volume of air entering the cerebral arteries intra-operatively based on analysis of transcranial Doppler ultrasound data.Transcranial Doppler ultrasound recordings from ten patients undergoing heart surgery were analysed for the presence of embolic signals. The backscattered intensity of each embolic signal was modelled based on ultrasound scattering theory to provide an estimate of bubble diameter. The impact of showers of bubbles on cerebral blood-flow was then investigated using patient-specific Monte-Carlo simulations to model the accumulation and clearance of bubbles within a model vasculature.Analysis of Doppler ultrasound recordings revealed a minimum of 371 and maximum of 6476 bubbles entering the middle cerebral artery territories during surgery. This was estimated to correspond to a total volume of air ranging between 0.003 and 0.12 mL. Based on analysis of a total of 18667 embolic signals, the median diameter of bubbles entering the cerebral arteries was 33 μm (IQR: 18 to 69 μm. Although bubble diameters ranged from ~5 μm to 3.5 mm, the majority (85% were less than 100 μm. Numerous small bubbles detected during cardiopulmonary bypass were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation to be benign. However, during weaning from bypass, showers containing large macro-bubbles were observed, which were estimated to transiently affect up to 2.2% of arterioles.Detailed analysis of Doppler ultrasound data can be used to provide an estimate of bubble diameter, total volume of air, and the likely impact of embolic showers on cerebral blood flow. Although bubbles are alarmingly numerous during surgery, our simulations suggest that the majority of bubbles are too small to be harmful.

  5. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  6. Growing bubbles rising in line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Harper

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over many years the author and others have given theories for bubbles rising in line in a liquid. Theory has usually suggested that the bubbles will tend towards a stable distance apart, but experiments have often showed them pairing off and sometimes coalescing. However, existing theory seems not to deal adequately with the case of bubbles growing as they rise, which they do if the liquid is boiling, or is a supersaturated solution of a gas, or simply because the pressure decreases with height. That omission is now addressed, for spherical bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers. As the flow is then nearly irrotational, Lagrange's equations can be used with Rayleigh's dissipation function. The theory also works for bubbles shrinking as they rise because they dissolve.

  7. A Coupled Economic and Physical Model of Coastal Adaptation and Abandonment: Are human occupied coastlines a bubble waiting to burst?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.; Keeler, A.

    2011-12-01

    Policy discussions of adaptation by coastal residents to increasing rates of sea level rise and changing frequency of damaging storms have focused on community land use planning processes. This view neglects the role that market dynamics and climate change expectations play in the way coastal communities choose among risk mitigation options and manage land use decisions in an environment of escalating risks. We use a model coupling physical coastal processes with an agent-based model of behavior in real estate and mitigation markets to examine the interplay of climate-driven coastal hazards, collective mitigation decisions, and individual beliefs. The physical component model simulates barrier island processes that respond to both storms and slow scale dynamics associated with sea level rise. The economic component model is an agent-based model of economic behavior where agents are rational economic actors working off different assessments of future climate-driven events. Agents differentially update their beliefs based on a) how much emphasis they give to observed coastal changes and b) how much weight they give to scientific predictions. In essence, agents differ along a spectrum of how much they believe that the past is the best guide to the future and how quickly they react to new information. We use the coupled model to explore three questions of interest to coastal policy. First, how do the interplay of costal processes, beliefs, and mitigation choices affect the level and stability of real estate prices? Second, how does this interplay affect the incentives for community investments in shoreline protection? Third, how do expectations and reactions to observed events, as well as mitigation investments, affect the built environment in circumstances when climate risks reach very high levels? This last question relates to a key aspect of climate change adaptation on the coast - when does mitigation give way to abandonment as an optimal adaptation strategy

  8. Comparative Study of Bancruptcy Prediction Models

    OpenAIRE

    Isye Arieshanti; Yudhi Purwananto; Ariestia Ramadhani; Mohamat Ulin Nuha; Nurissaidah Ulinnuha

    2013-01-01

    Early indication of bancruptcy is important for a company. If companies aware of  potency of their bancruptcy, they can take a preventive action to anticipate the bancruptcy. In order to detect the potency of a bancruptcy, a company can utilize a a model of bancruptcy prediction. The prediction model can be built using a machine learning methods. However, the choice of machine learning methods should be performed carefully. Because the suitability of a model depends on the problem specificall...

  9. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, M C; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10(13) emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  10. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  11. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vanhille

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs.

  12. Shock-induced bubble collapse in a vessel: Implications for vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In shockwave lithotripsy, shocks are repeatedly focused on kidney stones so to break them. The process leads to cavitation in tissue, which leads to hemorrhage. We hypothesize that shock-induced collapse (SIC) of preexisting bubbles is a potential mechanism for vascular injury. We study it numerically with an idealized problem consisting of the three-dimensional SIC of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column embedded in gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue simulant and can be treated as a fluid due to fast time scales and small spatial scales of collapse. We thus model the problem as a compressible multicomponent flow and simulate it with a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method. The method is high-order, conservative and non-oscillatory. Fifth-order WENO is used for spatial reconstruction and an HLLC Riemann solver upwinds the fluxes. A third-order TVD-RK scheme evolves the solution. We evaluate the potential for injury in SIC for a range of pressures, bubble and vessel sizes, and tissue properties. We assess the potential for injury by comparing the finite strains in tissue, obtained by particle tracking, to ultimate strains from experiments. We conclude that SIC may contribute to vascular rupture and discuss the smallest bubble sizes needed for injury. This research was supported by NIH Grant No. 2PO1DK043881 and utilized XSEDE, which is supported by NSF Grant No. OCI-1053575.

  13. Volume-of-fluid simulations of bubble dynamics in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Klaasen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Mahulkar, Amit; Heynderickx, Geraldine; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Blanpain, Bart; Verhaeghe, Frederik

    2016-05-01

    Bubbles in confined geometries serve an important role for industrial operations involving bubble-liquid interactions. However, high Reynolds number bubble dynamics in confined flows are still not well understood due to experimental challenges. In the present paper, combined experimental and numerical methods are used to provide a comprehensive insight into these dynamics. The bubble behaviour in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is investigated experimentally with a fully wetting liquid for a variety of gap thicknesses. A numerical model is developed using the volume of fluid method coupled with a continuum surface force model and a wall friction model. The developed model successfully simulates the dynamics of a bubble under the present experimental conditions and shows good agreement between experimental and simulation results. It is found that with an increased spacing between the cell walls, the bubble shape changes from oblate ellipsoid and spherical-cap to more complicated shapes, while the bubble path changes from only rectilinear to a combination of oscillating and rectilinear; the bubble drag coefficient decreases and this results in a higher bubble velocity caused by a lower pressure exerted on the bubble; the wake boundary and wake length evolve gradually accompanied by vortex formation and shedding.

  14. A Study of Three Dimensional Bubble Velocities at Co-current Gas-liquid Vertical Upward Bubbly Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntoro, Hadiyan Yusuf; Deendarlianto,

    2015-01-01

    Recently, experimental series of co-current gas-liquid upward bubbly flows in a 6 m-height and 54.8 mm i.d. vertical titanium pipe had been conducted at the TOPFLOW thermal hydraulic test facility, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany. The experiments were initially performed to develop a high quality database of two-phase flows as well as to validate new CFD models. An ultrafast dual-layer electron beam X-ray tomography, named ROFEX, was used as measurement system with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The gathered cross sectional grey value image results from the tomography scanning were reconstructed, segmented and evaluated to acquire gas bubble parameters for instance bubble position, size and holdup. To assign the correct paired bubbles from both measurement layers, a bubble pair algorithm was implemented on the basis of the highest probability values of bubbles in position, volume and velocity. Hereinafter, the individual characteristics of bubbles were calculated include instantaneous th...

  15. Bubble pump: scalable strategy for in-plane liquid routing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskooei, Ali; Günther, Axel

    2015-07-07

    We present an on-chip liquid routing technique intended for application in well-based microfluidic systems that require long-term active pumping at low to medium flowrates. Our technique requires only one fluidic feature layer, one pneumatic control line and does not rely on flexible membranes and mechanical or moving parts. The presented bubble pump is therefore compatible with both elastomeric and rigid substrate materials and the associated scalable manufacturing processes. Directed liquid flow was achieved in a microchannel by an in-series configuration of two previously described "bubble gates", i.e., by gas-bubble enabled miniature gate valves. Only one time-dependent pressure signal is required and initiates at the upstream (active) bubble gate a reciprocating bubble motion. Applied at the downstream (passive) gate a time-constant gas pressure level is applied. In its rest state, the passive gate remains closed and only temporarily opens while the liquid pressure rises due to the active gate's reciprocating bubble motion. We have designed, fabricated and consistently operated our bubble pump with a variety of working liquids for >72 hours. Flow rates of 0-5.5 μl min(-1), were obtained and depended on the selected geometric dimensions, working fluids and actuation frequencies. The maximum operational pressure was 2.9 kPa-9.1 kPa and depended on the interfacial tension of the working fluids. Attainable flow rates compared favorably with those of available micropumps. We achieved flow rate enhancements of 30-100% by operating two bubble pumps in tandem and demonstrated scalability of the concept in a multi-well format with 12 individually and uniformly perfused microchannels (variation in flow rate bubble pump may provide active flow control for analytical and point-of-care diagnostic devices, as well as for microfluidic cells culture and organ-on-chip platforms.

  16. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations.

  17. Comparing models of offensive cyber operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grant, T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available -)scientific literature. Seven models were found that were sufficiently well described for formalisation using the Structured Analysis and Design Technique (SADT) notation (Marca & McGowen, 1988). Analysis shows that the seven models assume penetration of the target... be found in (Marca & McGowen, 1988). 3.2 Example SADT analysis The value of SADT formalisation can be demonstrated by its application step by step to the Colarik and Janczewski (2008) model. Colarik and Janczewski describe the first phase as follows (p...

  18. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and laser doppler anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L. [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia, Inst. de Ingenieria Energetica, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, S. [Univ. Jaume I, Dept. of Mechnical Engineering and Construction, Castellon (Spain); Abd El Aziz Essa, M. [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia, Inst. de Ingenieria Energetica, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    A set of air-water experiments have been performed under isothermal upward concurrent flow in a vertical column. The interfacial velocity, interfacial area of the bubbles and the void fraction distributions was obtained. Numerical validation of these results for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code which tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles, with an Eulerian one. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian calculations were performed in parallel and iterative self-consistent method was developed. The bubbles-induced turbulence is an important issue considered, to obtain good predictions of experimental results. (author)

  19. Empirical fractal geometry analysis of some speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelico, Francisco O.; Proto, Araceli N.

    2012-11-01

    Empirical evidence of a multifractal signature during increasing of a financial bubble leading to a crash is presented. The April 2000 crash in the NASDAQ composite index and a time series from the discrete Chakrabarti-Stinchcombe model for earthquakes are analyzed using a geometric approach and some common patterns are identified. These patterns can be related the geometry of the rising period of a financial bubbles with the non-concave entropy problem.

  20. The bubble legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  1. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  2. Bayesian Analysis of Bubbles in Asset Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Fulop

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new model where the dynamic structure of the asset price, after the fundamental value is removed, is subject to two different regimes. One regime reflects the normal period where the asset price divided by the dividend is assumed to follow a mean-reverting process around a stochastic long run mean. The second regime reflects the bubble period with explosive behavior. Stochastic switches between two regimes and non-constant probabilities of exit from the bubble regime are both allowed. A Bayesian learning approach is employed to jointly estimate the latent states and the model parameters in real time. An important feature of our Bayesian method is that we are able to deal with parameter uncertainty and at the same time, to learn about the states and the parameters sequentially, allowing for real time model analysis. This feature is particularly useful for market surveillance. Analysis using simulated data reveals that our method has good power properties for detecting bubbles. Empirical analysis using price-dividend ratios of S&P500 highlights the advantages of our method.

  3. Bubble velocity, diameter, and void fraction measurements in a multiphase flow using fiber optic reflectometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ho-Joon; Chang, Kuang-An; Su, Chin B; Chen, Chi-Yueh

    2008-12-01

    A fiber optic reflectometer (FOR) technique featuring a single fiber probe is investigated for its feasibility of measuring the bubble velocity, diameter, and void fraction in a multiphase flow. The method is based on the interference of the scattered signal from the bubble surface with the Fresnel reflection signal from the tip of the optical fiber. Void fraction is obtained with a high accuracy if an appropriate correction is applied to compensate the underestimated measurement value. Velocity information is accurately obtained from the reflected signals before the fiber tip touches the bubble surface so that several factors affecting the traditional dual-tip probes such as blinding, crawling, and drifting effects due to the interaction between the probe and bubbles can be prevented. The coherent signals reflected from both the front and rear ends of a bubble can provide velocity information. Deceleration of rising bubbles and particles due to the presence of the fiber probe is observed when they are very close to the fiber tip. With the residence time obtained, the bubble chord length can be determined by analyzing the coherent signal for velocity determination before the deceleration starts. The bubble diameters are directly obtained from analyzing the signals of the bubbles that contain velocity information. The chord lengths of these bubbles measured by FOR represent the bubble diameters when the bubble shape is spherical or represent the minor axes when the bubble shape is ellipsoidal. The velocity and size of bubbles obtained from the FOR measurements are compared with those obtained simultaneously using a high speed camera.

  4. Bubble size distribution and inner surface in a bubble flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žitek, P.; Valenta, V.

    2017-09-01

    This paper follows the reports [4] and gives instructions on how to theoretically determine the bubble size and its distribution using the distribution function of Nukiyama-Tanasawa with friction factors.

  5. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  6. New evidence on the first financial bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehen, R.G.P.; Goetzmann, W.; Rouwenhorst, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Bubble, South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Windhandel of 1720 together represent the world's first global financial bubble. We hand-collect cross-sectional price data and investor account data from 1720 to test theories about market bubbles. Our tests suggest that innovation was a key

  7. A Model for Comparing Free Cloud Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Radu LIXANDROIU; Catalin MAICAN

    2014-01-01

    VMware, VirtualBox, Virtual PC and other popular desktop virtualization applications are used only by a few users of IT techniques. This article attempts to make a comparison model for choosing the best cloud platform. Many virtualization applications such as VMware (VMware Player), Oracle VirtualBox and Microsoft Virtual PC are free for home users. The main goal of the virtualization software is that it allows users to run multiple operating systems simultane-ously on one virtual environment...

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Toxicity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    personnel by their casualty status (no effects/ miosis , casualty, fatality) as well as by These three toxicity models only consider the external...GB dosages for which an individual was expected to experience no effects/ miosis (casualty category #1), become a casualty requiring medical...Limit (mg-min./m3) Category Description 1 0.00 3.09 No effect/ miosis 2 3.09 28.54 Casualty 3 28.54 >28.54 Fatality Table 4. Dosage Ranges

  9. The log-linear return approximation, bubbles, and predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Tanggaard, Carsten

    We study in detail the log-linear return approximation introduced by Campbell and Shiller (1988a). First, we derive an upper bound for the mean approximation error, given stationarity of the log dividendprice ratio. Next, we simulate various rational bubbles which have explosive conditional...... expectation, and we investigate the magnitude of the approximation error in those cases. We find that surprisingly the Campbell-Shiller approximation is very accurate even in the presence of large explosive bubbles. Only in very large samples do we find evidence that bubbles generate large approximation...... errors. Finally,we show that a bubble model in which expected returns are constant can explain the predictability of stock returns from the dividend-price ratio that many previous studies have documented....

  10. The Log-Linear Return Approximation, Bubbles, and Predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Tanggaard, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    We study in detail the log-linear return approximation introduced by Campbell and Shiller (1988a). First, we derive an upper bound for the mean approximation error, given stationarity of the log dividend-price ratio. Next, we simulate various rational bubbles which have explosive conditional...... expectation, and we investigate the magnitude of the approximation error in those cases. We …nd that surprisingly the Campbell-Shiller approximation is very accurate even in the presence of large explosive bubbles. Only in very large samples do we …nd evidence that bubbles generate large approximation errors....... Finally, we show that a bubble model in which expected returns are constant can explain the predictability of stock returns from the dividend-price ratio that many previous studies have documented....

  11. ANALYSIS OF PRICE BUBBLES ON THE CZECH REAL ESTATE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevorgyan Kristine

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This thesis deals with the issue of price bubbles on the Czech real estate market. The theoretical part explains the price bubble in terms of behavioural finance, and describes the relationship between monetary policy and asset prices from the perspective of the Austrian school and representatives of traditional economics. In the empirical part, it presents ways of identifying bubbles on the property market using relative indicators and econometric models. By means of econometric methods, this thesis analyses specific factors that influence housing prices in the Czech Republic. It puts a particular emphasis on the impact of interest rates on asset prices, because low inflation and expansionary monetary policy can create conditions for the formation of price bubbles.

  12. Collision of counterpropagating laser-excited wake bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. G.; Yang, L.; Zhou, C. T.; Yu, M. Y.; Ying, H. P.; Wang, X. G.

    2014-06-01

    The collision of wake bubbles behind two counterpropagating laser pulses in rarefied plasma is investigated using particle-in-cell simulation. Special attention is paid to the highly nonlinear dynamics of the electrons in the interaction region. It is found that, as the two bubbles approach each other and collide, the electrons in the interaction region first oscillate in a periodic fashion, forming a quasistationary dense electron density ripple with fairly regular spatial structure. At longer times, the electron motion becomes chaotic, and the density grating is gradually smeared. The electrons escape in the transverse direction, and eventually the two bubbles merge to form a single one. The transition of the electron motion from regular to chaotic is confirmed by analytical modeling using test electrons moving in counterpropagating planar electromagnetic waves. The findings shed light on the dynamics of wake-bubble collisions and the complex behavior induced by multiple laser pulses in plasmas.

  13. Motion of liquid plugs between vapor bubbles in capillary tubes: a comparison between fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Rémi; Ayel, Vincent; Mehta, Balkrishna; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves; Khandekar, Sameer

    2017-11-01

    Pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are now well-known devices in which liquid/vapor slug flow oscillates in a capillary tube wound between hot and cold sources. In this context, this paper focuses on the motion of the liquid plug, trapped between vapor bubbles, moving in capillary tubes, to try to better understand the thermo-physical phenomena involved in such devices. This study is divided into three parts. In the first part, an experimental study presents the evolution of the vapor pressure during the evaporation process of a liquid thin film deposited from a liquid plug flowing in a heated capillary tube: it is found that the behavior of the generated and removed vapor can be very different, according to the thermophysical properties of the fluids. In the second part, a transient model allows to compare, in terms of pressure and duration, the motion of a constant-length liquid plug trapped between two bubbles subjected to a constant difference of vapor pressure: the results highlight that the performances of the four fluids are also very different. Finally, a third model that can be considered as an improvement of the second one, is also presented: here, the liquid slug is surrounded by two vapor bubbles, one subjected to evaporation, the pressure in both bubbles is now a result of the calculation. This model still allows comparing the behaviors of the fluid. Even if our models are quite far from a complete model of a real PHP, results do indicate towards the applicability of different fluids as suitable working fluids for PHPs, particularly in terms of the flow instabilities which they generate.

  14. A Study of Bubble and Slug Gas-Liquid Flow in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the two-phase flow dynamics is obvious.As the gravity level is reduced,there is a new balance between inertial and interfacial forces, altering the behavior of the flow. In bubbly flow,the absence of drift velocity leads to spherical-shaped bubbles with a rectilinear trajectory.Slug flow is a succession of long bubbles and liquid slug carrying a few bubbles. There is no flow reversal in the thin liquid film as the long bubble and liquid slug pass over the film. Although the flow structure seems to be simpler than in normal gravity conditions,the models developed for the prediction of flow behavior in normal gravity and extended to reduced gravity flow are unable to predict the flow behavior correctly.An additional benefit of conducting studies in microgravity flows is that these studies aide the development of understanding for normal gravity flow behavior by removing the effects of buoyancy on the shape of the interface and density driven shear flows between the gas and the liquid phases. The proposal calls to study specifically the following: 1) The dynamics of isolated bubbles in microgravity liquid flows will be analyzed: Both the dynamics of spherical isolated bubbles and their dispersion by turbulence, their interaction with the pipe wall,the behavior of the bubbles in accelerated or decelerated flows,and the dynamics of isolated cylindrical bubbles, their deformation in accelerated/decelerated flows (in converging or diverging channels), and bubble/bubble interaction. Experiments will consist of the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimeters (LDV) to study single spherical bubble and single and two cylindrical bubble behavior with respect to their influence on the turbulence of the surrounding liquid and on the wall 2) The dynamics of bubbly and slug flow in microgravity will be analyzed especially for the role of the coalescence in the transition from bubbly to slug flow (effect of fluid properties and

  15. High-speed visualization and radiated pressure measurement of a laser-induced gas bubble in glycerin-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takehiro; Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherical gaseous bubble created by focusing a nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm into a large volume of glycerin-water solutions. Free oscillation of the bubble and shock wave emission from the bubble dynamics are recorded by a high-speed camera together with a pulse laser stroboscope; concurrently, pressure radiated from the oscillating bubble is measured by a hydrophone. The bubble achieves a mechanical equilibrium after free oscillation is damped out; the equilibrium state stays for a while, unlike vapor bubbles. We speculate that the bubble content is mainly gases originally dissolved in the liquid (i.e., air). The bubble dynamics we observed are compared to Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations that account for diffusive effects; the (unknown) initial pressure just after laser focusing is tuned to obtain agreement between the experiment and the calculation. Moreover, viscous effects on the shock propagation are examined with the aid of compressible Navier-Stokes simulation.

  16. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J. [Meizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany); Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  17. A Model for Comparing Free Cloud Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu LIXANDROIU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VMware, VirtualBox, Virtual PC and other popular desktop virtualization applications are used only by a few users of IT techniques. This article attempts to make a comparison model for choosing the best cloud platform. Many virtualization applications such as VMware (VMware Player, Oracle VirtualBox and Microsoft Virtual PC are free for home users. The main goal of the virtualization software is that it allows users to run multiple operating systems simultane-ously on one virtual environment, using one computer desktop.

  18. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  19. Influence of changing the diameter of the bubble generator bottle and expiratory limb on bubble CPAP: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Shan; Lee, Chuen-Ming; Yuh, Yeong-Seng; Hua, Yi-Ming

    2012-12-01

    The noisy component of bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is thought to contribute to breathing efficiency and lung volume recruitment, mainly because of stochastic resonance. The magnitude and frequency of the superimposed noise are vital to this process. We wanted to evaluate the in vitro effect of changing various parameters of the bubble CPAP circuit regarding the magnitude and frequency of pressure oscillations transmitted to the lung model. In a bubble CPAP lung model, we immersed different sizes (3.0∼12.5 mm) of the expiratory limb of the CPAP circuit into different depths under water (2.0∼10.0 cm) and used various diameters (2.9∼9.0 cm) of bubble generator bottles. We also varied the compliance of the model lung. We measured the changes in mean, magnitude, and frequency of pressure oscillations transmitted to the lung model at three different flow rates (namely 4, 8, and 12L/minute). Increasing the size and submergence depth of the expiratory limb of a CPAP circuit and decreasing the diameter of the bubble generator bottle intensified the magnitude but diminished the frequency of noise transmitted to the lung model. Decreasing compliance of the lung model intensified both the magnitude and frequency content of pressure oscillations in the model lung. The size and submergence depth of an expiratory limb of a CPAP circuit, the diameter of the bubble generator bottle, and the compliance of the model lung all influence the magnitude and frequency of the transmitted pressure waveform. Therefore, these factors may affect lung volume recruitment and breathing efficiency in bubble CPAP. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.