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Sample records for bubble distribution acoustic

  1. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  2. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 μm and the step size was 0.3 μm. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size

  3. Oscillating bubble concentration and its size distribution using acoustic emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvaru, Balasubrahmanyam; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2009-01-01

    New method has been proposed for the estimation of size and number density distribution of oscillating bubbles in a sonochemical reactor using acoustic emission spectra measurements. Bubble size distribution has been determined using Minnaert's equation [M. Minnaert, On musical air bubbles and sound of running water, Philanthr. Mag. 16 (1933) 235], i.e., size of oscillating bubble is inversely related to the frequency of its volume oscillations. Decomposition of the pressure signal measured by the hydrophone in frequency domain of FFT spectrum and then inverse FFT reconstruction of the signal at each frequency level has been carried out to get the information about each of the bubble/cavity oscillation event. The number mean radius of the bubble size is calculated to be in the range of 50-80 microm and it was not found to vary much with the spatial distribution of acoustic field strength of the ultrasound processor used in the work. However, the number density of the oscillating bubbles and the nature of the distribution were found to vary in different horizontal planes away from the driving transducer surface in the ultrasonic bath. A separate set of experiments on erosion assessment studies were carried out using a thin aluminium foil, revealing a phenomena of active region of oscillating bubbles at antinodal points of the stationary waves, identical to the information provided by the acoustic emission spectra at the same location in the ultrasonic bath.

  4. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  5. An in vitro study of the correlation between bubble distribution, acoustic emission, and cell damage by contrast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stanley; Fowlkes, J Brian; Miller, Douglas L

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influences of total exposure duration and pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution on contrast-mediated cell damage. Murine macrophage cells were grown as monolayers on thin polyester sheets. Contrast agent microbubbles were attached to these cells by incubation. Focused ultrasound exposures (P(r) = 2 MPa) were implemented at a frequency of 2.25 MHz with 46 cycle pulses and pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 1 kHz, 500 Hz, 100 Hz, and 10 Hz in a degassed water bath at 10 or 100 pulses. A 1 MHz receive transducer measured the scattered signal. The frequency spectrum was normalized to a control spectrum from linear scatterers. Photomicrographs were captured before, during, and after exposure at a frame rate of 2000 fps and a pixel resolution of 960 x 720. Results clearly show that cell death is increased, up to 60%, by increasing total exposure duration from 0 ms to 100 ms. There was an increasing difference in cell damage between a 10-pulse exposure and a 100-pulse exposure with increasing PRF. The greatest change in damage occurred at 1000 Hz PRF with a 53% increase between 10-pulse and 100-pulse exposures. For each pulse from 0 to 10, an overlay of the 2 mum bubble count with corresponding emission shows consistent behavior in its pulse-to-pulse changes, indicating a correlation between acoustic emission, bubble distribution, and cell damage.

  6. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumerov, N. A., E-mail: gumerov@umiacs.umd.edu [Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Akhatov, I. S. [Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Ohl, C.-D. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Sametov, S. P. [Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Khazimullin, M. V. [Center for Micro- and Nanoscale Dynamics of Dispersed Systems, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450076 (Russian Federation); Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa 450054 (Russian Federation); Gonzalez-Avila, S. R. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-03-28

    Experiments with water–air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ∼100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ∼30 μm in diameter can be “pushed” away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  7. Vapor Bubbles in Flow and Acoustic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Hao, Yue; Sadhal, S.S

    2002-01-01

    A review of several aspects of the interaction of bubbles with acoustic and flow fields is presented. The focus of the paper is on bubbles in hot liquids, in which the bubble contains mostly vapor, with little or no permanent gas. The topics covered include the effect of translation on condensation

  8. Orbital trajectory of an acoustic bubble in a cylindrical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjouy, Cyril; Labelle, Pauline; Gilles, Bruno; Bera, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic cavitation-induced microbubbles in a cylindrical resonator filled with water tend to concentrate into ring patterns due to the cylindrical geometry of the system. The shape of these ring patterns is directly linked to the Bjerknes force distribution in the resonator. Experimental observations showed that cavitation bubbles located in the vicinity of this ring may exhibit a spiraling behavior around the pressure nodal line. This spiraling phenomenon is numerically studied, the conditions for which a single cavitation bubble follows an orbital trajectory are established, and the influences of the acoustic pressure amplitude and the initial bubble radius are investigated.

  9. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  10. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  11. Size distribution estimation of cavitation bubble cloud via bubbles dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposed an acoustic technique to estimate size distribution of a cavitation bubble cloud induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) based on the dissolution of bubble cloud trapped by a wide beam of low acoustic pressure, after the acoustic exposure of FUS is turned off. Dissolution of cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with degassed saline or saturated saline has been respectively studied to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of FUS on size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  12. Bubble size distribution of foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Engelsen, C.W.; den Engelsen, C.W.; Isarin, J.C.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus; Groot Wassink, J.; Groot Wassink, J.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure based upon image analysis has been adopted to study the influence of several physical parameters on bubble size in foam. A procedure has been described to account for the distribution of bubble size. Foam was generated in a rotor-stator mixer. In the present research, the nature of the

  13. Numerical Study of Bubble Area Evolution During Acoustic Droplet Vaporization-Enhanced HIFU Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X; Brian Fowlkes, J

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has the potential to shorten treatment time of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) while minimizing the possible effects of microbubbles along the propagation path. Distribution of the bubbles formed from the droplets during the treatment is the major factor shaping the therapeutic region. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the bubble area evolution during this treatment. Using a linear acoustic equation to describe the ultrasound field, a threshold range was defined that determines the amount of bubbles vaporized in the treated area. Acoustic parameters, such as sound speed, acoustic attenuation coefficient, and density, were treated as a function of the bubble size distribution and the gas void fraction, which were related to the vaporized bubbles in the medium. An effective pressure factor was proposed to account for the influence of the existing bubbles on the vaporization of the nearby droplets. The factor was obtained by fitting one experimental result and was then used to calculate bubble clouds in other experimental cases. Comparing the simulation results to these other experiments validated the model. The dynamic change of the pressure and the bubble distribution after exposure to over 20 pulses of HIFU are obtained. It is found that the bubble area grows from a grainlike shape to a "tadpole," with comparable dimensions and shape to those observed in experiments. The process was highly dynamic with the shape of the bubble area changing with successive HIFU pulses and the focal pressure. The model was further used to predict the shape of the bubble region triggered by HIFU when a bubble wall pre-exists. The results showed that the bubble wall helps prevent droplet vaporization on the distal side of the wall and forms a particularly shaped region with bubbles. This simulation model has predictive potential that could be beneficial in applications, such as cancer treatment, by parametrically studying conditions

  14. Bubble size distribution and inner surface in a bubble flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žitek, P.; Valenta, V.

    2017-09-01

    This paper follows the reports [4] and gives instructions on how to theoretically determine the bubble size and its distribution using the distribution function of Nukiyama-Tanasawa with friction factors.

  15. Study on the bubble transport mechanism in an acoustic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic B; Lowe, Michael; Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use of bubbles in applications such as surface chemistry, drug delivery, and ultrasonic cleaning etc. has been enormously popular in the past two decades. It has been recognized that acoustically-driven bubbles can be used to disturb the flow field near a boundary in order to accelerate physical or chemical reactions on the surface. The interactions between bubbles and a surface have been studied experimentally and analytically. However, most of the investigations focused on violently oscillating bubbles (also known as cavitation bubble), less attention has been given to understand the interactions between moderately oscillating bubbles and a boundary. Moreover, cavitation bubbles were normally generated in situ by a high intensity laser beam, little experimental work has been carried out to study the translational trajectory of a moderately oscillating bubble in an acoustic field and subsequent interactions with the surface. This paper describes the design of an ultrasonic test cell and explores the mechanism of bubble manipulation within the test cell. The test cell consists of a transducer, a liquid medium and a glass backing plate. The acoustic field within the multi-layered stack was designed in such a way that it was effectively one dimensional. This was then successfully simulated by a one dimensional network model. The model can accurately predict the impedance of the test cell as well as the mode shape (distribution of particle velocity and stress/pressure field) within the whole assembly. The mode shape of the stack was designed so that bubbles can be pushed from their injection point onto a backing glass plate. Bubble radial oscillation was simulated by a modified Keller-Miksis equation and bubble translational motion was derived from an equation obtained by applying Newton's second law to a bubble in a liquid medium. Results indicated that the bubble trajectory depends on the acoustic pressure amplitude and initial bubble size: an increase of

  16. Acoustic measurement of bubble size in an inkjet printhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeurissen, Roger; van der Bos, Arjan; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; de Jong, Jos; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-11-01

    The volume of a bubble in a piezoinkjet printhead is measured acoustically. The method is based on a numerical model of the investigated system. The piezo not only drives the system but it is also used as a sensor by measuring the current it generates. The numerical model is used to predict this current for a given bubble volume. The inverse problem is to infer the bubble volume from an experimentally obtained piezocurrent. By solving this inverse problem, the size and position of the bubble can thus be measured acoustically. The method is experimentally validated with an inkjet printhead that is augmented with a glass connection channel, through which the bubble was observed optically, while at the same time the piezocurrent was measured. The results from the acoustical measurement method correspond closely to the results from the optical measurement.

  17. The effect of coupling on bubble fragmentation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerski, Helen; Deane, Grant B

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of bubble populations is important in a wide range of situations, including industrial processes, medical applications, and ocean science. Passive acoustical techniques can be used to track changes in the population, since each bubble formation or fragmentation event is likely to produce sound. This sound potentially contains a wealth of information about the fragmentation process and the products, but to fully exploit these data it is necessary to understand the physical processes that determine its characteristics. The focus of this paper is binary fragmentation, when turbulence causes one bubble to split into two. Specifically, the effect that bubble-bubble coupling has on the sound produced is examined. A numerical simulation of the acoustical excitation of fragmenting bubbles is used to generate model acoustic signals, which are compared with experimental data. A frequency range with a suppressed acoustic output which is observed in the experimental data can be explained when coupling is taken into account. In addition, although the driving mechanism of neck collapse is always consistent with the data for the larger bubble of the newly formed pair, a different mechanism must be driving the smaller bubble in some situations.

  18. Bubble Size Distributions in Coastal Seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    Bubble size distributions have been measured with an optical system that is based on imaging of a small sample volume with a CCD camera system, and processing of the images to obtain the size of individual bubbles in the diameter range from 30 to lOOO^m. This bubble measuring system is deployed from

  19. Dynamics of magnetic bubbles in acoustic and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2009-01-16

    We report on shelled bubbles that can be manipulated with magnetic fields. The magnetic shell consists of self-assembled magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic susceptibility of the bubbles is proportional to the surface area, chi_{b}=(9+/-3x10;{-6} m)r;{2} where r is the radius. Magnetic bubbles are compressible in moderate acoustic fields. A bubble with a radius of 121 mum oscillates in resonance in a sound field of 27 kHz with a peak-to-peak radial amplitude of 1.7 mum. The bubble oscillations induce a microstreaming flow with a toroidal vortex at the upper pole of the bubble. Further findings are the longevity of the magnetic bubbles and the ease of manipulation with standard magnets.

  20. Laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Sibai, Abla; Oubari, Dima; Ashkar, Jihad; Fuleihan, Nabil

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers. A total of 42 subjects with history of hubble-bubble smoking were recruited for this study. A corresponding group with a history of cigarette smoking and controls were matched. All subjects underwent laryngeal video-endostroboscopic evaluation and acoustic analysis. In the hubble-bubble smoking group, 61.9% were males. The average age was 30.02 +/- 9.48 years and the average number of years of smoking was 8.09 +/- 6.45 years. Three subjects had dysphonia at the time of examination. The incidence of benign lesions of the vocal folds in the hubble-bubble group was 21.5%, with edema being the most common at 16.7% followed by cyst at 4.8%. The incidence of laryngeal findings was significantly higher in the hubble-bubble group compared to controls. In the cigarette-smoking group, the most common finding was vocal fold cyst in 14.8% followed by polyps in 7.4%, and edema, sulcus vocalis and granuloma. These findings were not significantly different from the hubble-bubble group except for the thick mucus, which was significantly higher in the latter. There were no significant changes in any of the acoustic parameters between hubble-bubble smokers and controls except for the VTI and MPT, which were significantly lower in the hubble-bubble group. In comparison with the cigarette-smoking group, hubble-bubble smokers had significantly higher Fundamental frequency and habitual pitch (p value 0.042 and 0.008, respectively). The laryngeal findings in hubble-bubble smokers are comparable to cigarette smokers. These laryngeal findings are not translated acoustically, as all the acoustic parameters are within normal range compared to controls.

  1. Acoustic power dependences of sonoluminescence and bubble dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Bok; Choi, Pak-Kon

    2014-11-01

    The decreasing effect of sonoluminescence (SL) in water at high acoustic powers was investigated in relation to bubble dynamics and acoustic emission spectra. The intensity of SL was measured in the power range of 1-18W at 83.8kHz for open-end (free liquid surface and film-covered surface) and fixed-end boundaries of sound fields. The power dependence of the SL intensity showed a maximum and then decrease to zero for all the boundaries. Similar results were obtained for sonochemiluminescence in luminol solution. The power dependence of the SL intensity was strongly correlated with the bubble dynamics captured by high-speed photography at 64kfps. In the low-power range where the SL intensity increases, bubble streamers were observed and the population of streaming bubbles increased with the power. At powers after SL maximum occurred, bubble clusters came into existence. Upon complete SL reduction, only bubble clusters were observed. The subharmonic in the acoustic emission spectra increased markedly in the region where bubble clusters were observed. Nonspherical oscillations of clustering bubbles may make a major contribution to the subharmonic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical simulations of three-dimensional nonlinear acoustic waves in bubbly liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional simulations of nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves through bubbly liquids, which represent the continuity of our previous works included in the numerical tool SNOW-BL. The behavior of three-dimensional nonlinear acoustic waves in bubbly liquids is analyzed by means of numerical predictions. Nonlinearity, attenuation, and dispersion due to the presence of bubbles in the liquid are taken into account. The numerical solution to the differential problem is obtained by means of a finite-difference scheme. The simulations we present here consider a homogeneous distribution of bubbles in the liquid. Results compare high and low-amplitude waves to detect the nonlinear effects of the bubbles. Results are shown for radiation and enclosure problems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Deconvolution of acoustically detected bubble-collapse shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Song, Jae Hee; Johnston, Keith; Prentice, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The shock wave emitted by the collapse of a laser-induced bubble is detected at propagation distances of 30, 40and50mm, using a PVdF needle hydrophone, with a non-flat end-of-cable frequency response, calibrated for magnitude and phase, from 125kHz to 20MHz. High-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 5×106 frames per second, 10nstemporal resolution and 256 frames per sequence, records the bubble deflation from maximum to minimum radius, the collapse and shock wave generation, and the subsequent rebound in unprecedented detail, for a single sequence of an individual bubble. The Gilmore equation for bubble oscillation is solved according to the resolved bubble collapse, and simulated shock wave profiles deduced from the acoustic emissions, for comparison to the hydrophone recordings. The effects of single-frequency calibration, magnitude-only and full waveform deconvolution of the experimental data are presented, in both time and frequency domains. Magnitude-only deconvolution increases the peak pressure amplitude of the measured shock wave by approximately 9%, from single-frequency calibration, with full waveform deconvolution increasing it by a further 3%. Full waveform deconvolution generates a shock wave profile that is in agreement with the simulated profile, filtered according to the calibration bandwidth. Implications for the detection and monitoring of acoustic cavitation, where the role of periodic bubble collapse shock waves has recently been realised, are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acoustic measurement of bubble size in an inkjet printhead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.; van der Bos, J.A.; van der Bos, Arjan; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Wijshoff, H.; de Jong, J.; de Jong, Jos; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    The volume of a bubble in a piezoinkjet printhead is measured acoustically. The method is based on a numerical model of the investigated system. The piezo not only drives the system but it is also used as a sensor by measuring the current it generates. The numerical model is used to predict this

  6. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Yang, K.; Cui, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2011-01-01

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustic, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency (7.44 MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5 MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40 µs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d = 0.75. The maximum mean radius of the

  7. Comment on "Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, É; Ollivier, F; Antkowiak, A; Wunenburger, R

    2015-03-01

    We have reproduced the experiment of acoustic monitoring of spontaneous popping of single soap bubbles standing in air reported by Ding et al. [2aaPhys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007)]. By using a single microphone and two different signal acquisition systems recording in parallel the signal at the microphone output, among them the system used by Ding et al., we have experimentally evidenced that the acoustic precursors of bubble popping events detected by Ding et al. actually result from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. No acoustic precursor of popping could be evidenced with the microphone used in these experiments, whose sensitivity is 1VPa-1 and frequency range is 500 Hz-100 kHz.

  8. Giant frequency down-conversion of the dancing acoustic bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P. A.; Keswani, M.; Jenkins, N.; Tang, C.; Runge, K.

    2016-11-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally the existence of a giant frequency down-conversion of the translational oscillatory motion of individual submillimeter acoustic bubbles in water in the presence of a high frequency (500 kHz) ultrasonic standing wave. The frequency of the translational oscillations (~170 Hz) is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the driving acoustic wave. We elucidate the mechanism of this very slow oscillation with an analytical model leading to an equation of translational motion of a bubble taking the form of Mathieu’s equation. This equation illuminates the origin of the giant down conversion in frequency as arising from an unstable equilibrium. We also show that bubbles that form chains along the direction of the acoustic standing wave due to radiation interaction forces exhibit also translation oscillations that form a spectral band. This band extends approximately from 130 Hz up to nearly 370 Hz, a frequency range that is still at least three orders of magnitude lower than the frequency of the driving acoustic wave.

  9. Synthesis of Phase-shift Nanoemulsions with Narrow Size Distributions for Acoustic Droplet Vaporization and Bubble-enhanced Ultrasound-mediated Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Peng; Burgess, Mark T.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is used clinically to thermally ablate tumors. To enhance localized heating and improve thermal ablation in tumors, lipid-coated perfluorocarbon droplets have been developed which can be vaporized by HIFU. The vasculature in many tumors is abnormally leaky due to their rapid growth, and nanoparticles are able to penetrate the fenestrations and passively accumulate within tumors. Thus, controlling the size of the droplets can result in better accumulation within tumors. In this report, the preparation of stable droplets in a phase-shift nanoemulsion (PSNE) with a narrow size distribution is described. PSNE were synthesized by sonicating a lipid solution in the presence of liquid perfluorocarbon. A narrow size distribution was obtained by extruding the PSNE multiple times using filters with pore sizes of 100 or 200 nm. The size distribution was measured over a 7-day period using dynamic light scattering. Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing PSNE were prepared for in vitro experiments. PSNE droplets in the hydrogels were vaporized with ultrasound and the resulting bubbles enhanced localized heating. Vaporized PSNE enables more rapid heating and also reduces the ultrasound intensity needed for thermal ablation. Thus, PSNE is expected to enhance thermal ablation in tumors, potentially improving therapeutic outcomes of HIFU-mediated thermal ablation treatments. PMID:23007836

  10. Bubble Size Distributions on the North Atlantic and North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Cohen, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    Bubble size distributions were measured at open sea with optical bubble measuring systems(BMS)deployed from buoys at depths from 0.4 to l.5m. The BMS measures the bubbles in a small sample volume that is monitored with a video camera. The images are analyzed to obtain bubble size distributions in

  11. Experimental investigation of conical bubble structure and acoustic flow structure in ultrasonic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojian; Huang, Biao; Wang, Guoyu; Zhang, Mindi

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transient conical bubble structure (CBS) and acoustic flow structure in ultrasonic field. In the experiment, the high-speed video and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques are used to measure the acoustic cavitation patterns, as well as the flow velocity and vorticity fields. Results are presented for a high power ultrasound with a frequency of 18kHz, and the range of the input power is from 50W to 250W. The results of the experiment show the input power significantly affects the structures of CBS, with the increase of input power, the cavity region of CBS and the velocity of bubbles increase evidently. For the transient motion of bubbles on radiating surface, two different types could be classified, namely the formation, aggregation and coalescence of cavitation bubbles, and the aggregation, shrink, expansion and collapse of bubble cluster. Furthermore, the thickness of turbulent boundary layer near the sonotrode region is found to be much thicker, and the turbulent intensities are much higher for relatively higher input power. The vorticity distribution is prominently affected by the spatial position and input power. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  13. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental

  14. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the gas bubble motion in an acoustic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojian; Xing, Tianyu; Huang, Biao; Li, Qiuhe; Yang, Yifei

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply the combined experimental and theoretical method to investigate the various behaviors of gas bubbles in an acoustic field. In the experiments, high-speed video and ultrasonic processor are used to capture the transient evolution of gas bubble patterns, as well as velocity profiles. In the theoretical analysis, the theories of primary and secondary Bjerknes forces and buoyancy force are introduced to accurately demonstrate the variations of bubble volume and motion. Results are presented for gas bubbles with the radius of 1.4mm under an acoustic field with a frequency of 18kHz, for three cases, namely single bubble rising in a quiescent liquid, acoustic single bubble oscillation and two bubbles coalescence conditions. The results show that the fragments around the single gas bubble presents the periodical behaviors, namely, splitting, attraction, and secondary splitting motion. The centroid of the single gas bubble almost oscillates without motion upwards or downwards, because of the equilibrium of the primary Bjerknes force caused by acoustic waves and the effect of the buoyancy force. For the two coalescing bubbles, the resultant of buoyancy, primary and secondary Bjerknes forces acting on two bubbles are same in magnitude, but in opposite direction, which indicates that two gas bubbles attract each other and and coalesce into one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 2-D steering and propelling of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian; Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2016-06-21

    This paper describes bi-directional (linear and rotational) propelling and 2-D steering of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers that are achieved in a centimeter-scale pool (beyond chip level scale). The core structure of a microswimmer is a microtube with one end open in which a gaseous bubble is trapped. The swimmer is propelled by microstreaming flows that are generated when the trapped bubble is oscillated by an external acoustic wave. The bubble oscillation and thus propelling force are highly dependent on the frequency of the acoustic wave and the bubble length. This dependence is experimentally studied by measuring the resonance behaviors of the testing pool and bubble using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and by evaluating the generated streaming flows. The key idea in the present 2-D steering is to utilize this dependence. Multiple bubbles with different lengths are mounted on a single microswimmer with a variety of arrangements. By controlling the frequency of the acoustic wave, only frequency-matched bubbles can strongly oscillate and generate strong propulsion. By arranging multiple bubbles of different lengths in parallel but with their openings opposite and switching the frequency of the acoustic wave, bi-directionally linear propelling motions are successfully achieved. The propelling forces are calculated by a CFD analysis using the Ansys Fluent® package. For bi-directional rotations, a similar method but with diagonal arrangement of bubbles on a rectangular swimmer is also applied. The rotation can be easily reversed when the frequency of the acoustic wave is switched. For 2-D steering, short bubbles are aligned perpendicular to long bubbles. It is successfully demonstrated that the microswimmer navigates through a T-junction channel under full control with and without carrying a payload. During the navigation, the frequency is the main control input to select and resonate targeted bubbles. All of these operations are achieved by a single

  17. Acoustic emission noise from sodium vapour bubble collapsing: detection, interpretation, modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentico, G.; Pacilio, V.; Papalia, B.; Taglienti, S.; Tosi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium vapour bubble collapsing is detected by means of piezoelectric accelorometers coupled to the test section via short waveguides. The output analog signal is processed by transforming it into a time series of pulses through the setting of an amplitude threshold and the shaping of a standard pulse (denominated 'event') every time the signal crosses that border. The number of events is counted in adjacent and equal time duration samples and the waiting time distribution between contiguous events is measured. Up to the moment, six kinetic properties have been found for the mentioned time series. They help in setting a stochastic model in which the subministration of energy into a liquid sodium medium induces the formation of vapour bubbles and their consequent collapsing delivers acoustic pulses. Finally, a simulation procedure is carried out: a Polya's urn model is adopted for simulating event sequences with a priori established requisites.

  18. Conservation of bubble size distribution during gas reactive absorption in bubble column reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L.C. LAGE

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of the bubble size distribution function was applied to the reactive absorption of carbon dioxide in a bubble column reactor. The model developed was solved by the method of characteristics and by a Monte Carlo method. Simulations were carried out using simplified models for the liquid phase and for the gas-liquid mass transfer. Predictions of gas holdup and outlet gas composition showed that the concept of a mean bubble diameter is not applicable when the bubble size distribution is reasonably polydispersed. In these cases, the mass mean velocity and the numerical mean velocity of the bubbles are very different. Therefore, quantification of the polydispersion of bubbles was shown to be essential to gas-phase hydrodynamics modeling.

  19. Acoustic levitation of soap bubbles in air: Beyond the half-wavelength limit of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-03-01

    We report on the behavior of levitated soap bubbles in a single-axis acoustic field. For a single bubble, its surface in the polar regions is under compression, but in the equatorial region, it is under suction. Levitation becomes unstable when the height of the bubble approaches half the wavelength of the sound wave because horizontal fluctuations lead to a negative recovery force and a negative levitation force. Vertically stacked double bubbles notably can be stable under levitation if their total vertical length is ˜5λ/6, significantly beyond λ/2 in consequence of the formation of a toroidal high-pressure region around the waist of the two bubbles. Our results provide a deeper insight into the stability of acoustic levitation and the coupling between bubbles and sound field.

  20. An acoustic levitation technique for the study of nonlinear oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. A.; Crum, L. A.

    1983-08-01

    A technique of acoustic levitation was developed for the study of individual gas bubbles in a liquid. Isopropyl alcohol and a mixture of glycerine and water (33-1/3% glycerine by volume) were the two liquids used in this research. Bubbles were levitated near the acoustic pressure antinode of an acoustic wave in the range of 20-22 kHz. Measurements were made of the levitation number as a function of the normalized radius of the bubbles. The levitation number is the ratio of the hydrostatic pressure gradient to the acoustic pressure gradient. These values were then compared to a nonlinear theory. Results were very much in agreement except for the region near the n=2 harmonic. An explanation for the discrepancy between theory and experiment appears to lie in the polytropic exponent associated with the gas in the interior of the bubble.

  1. A Demonstration of Underwater Bubble Capture by the Fundamental Acoustic Mode in Spherical Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Umaporn KONTHARAK; Sorasak DANWORAPHONG

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific demonstrations have become a crucial part of scientific learning. Acoustic waves are normally demonstrated in air via Kundt’s tube, but a physical demonstration for underwater acoustic waves is still lacking. In this paper, we address one of the aspects by demonstrating a way to acoustically-trap gas bubbles in a spherical, water-filled flask resonating at its first fundamental mode. The theory of acoustic waves in a spherical geometry, particularly the fundamental mode, ...

  2. Acoustic streaming produced by a cylindrical bubble undergoing volume and translational oscillations in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for acoustic streaming generated by a cylindrical bubble confined in a fluid channel between two planar elastic walls. The bubble is assumed to undergo volume and translational oscillations. The volume oscillation is caused by an imposed acoustic pressure field and generates the bulk scattered wave in the fluid gap and Lamb-type surface waves propagating along the fluid-wall interfaces. The translational oscillation is induced by the velocity field of an external sound source such as another bubble or an oscillatory fluid flow. The acoustic streaming is assumed to result from the interaction of the volume and the translational modes of the bubble oscillations. The general solutions for the linear equations of fluid motion and the equations of acoustic streaming are calculated with no restrictions on the ratio between the viscous penetration depth and the bubble size. Approximate solutions for the limit of low viscosity are provided as well. Simulations of streamline patterns show that the geometry of the streaming resembles flows generated by a source dipole, while the vortex orientation is governed by the driving frequency, bubble size, and the distance of the bubble from the source of translational excitation. Experimental verification of the developed theory is performed using data for streaming generated by bubble pairs.

  3. Shape oscillation of bubbles in the acoustic field

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Keishi; Ueno, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    The authors introduce dynamics of multiple air bubbles exposed to ultrasonic wave while ascending in water in the present fluid dynamics video. The authors pay attention to the shape oscillation and the transition from the volume to the shape oscillations of the bubble. Correlation between the bubble size and the mechanism of the excitation of the shape oscillation is introduced.

  4. Interaction acoustic waves with a layered structure containing layer of bubbly liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubaidullin Damir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a theoretical study of the effect of a bubble layer on the propagation of acoustic waves through a thin three-layered barrier at various angles of incidence are presented. The barrier consists of a layer of gel with polydisperse air bubbles bounded by layers of polycarbonate. It is shown that the presence of polydisperse air bubbles in the gel layer significantly changes the transmission and reflection of the acoustic signal when it interacts with such an obstacle for frequencies close to the resonant frequency of natural oscillations of the bubbles. The frequency range is identified where the angle of incidence has little effect on the reflection and transmission coefficients of acoustic waves.

  5. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Ainslie, M.A.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main nonplatform-related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modelling

  6. The behavior of acoustic bubbles in aqueous solutions containing soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronson, Rohan; Tchea, Michelle F; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Grieser, Franz

    2012-11-26

    The effects of the water-soluble polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) intensity generated in aqueous solutions exposed to ultrasound at the two ultrasound frequencies of 20 and 363 kHz have been examined. In both cases, the presence of PVP, at concentrations of up to 2 g/100 mL, was found to enhance the MBSL intensity emitted from the solutions. On the basis of the intensity behavior of the SL observed from aqueous solutions containing PVP/surfactant and PVP/alcohol mixtures, it is suggested that PVP enhances MBSL by increasing the number of active bubbles in the system by hindering bubble-bubble coalescence processes and probably also by changing the structure of the bubble "clouds" formed at the acoustic antinodes in solution. The influence of PVP on bubble-bubble coalescence rates was also measured to support the interpretation of the MBSL emission experiments.

  7. Nonlinear activity of acoustically driven gas bubble near a rigid boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimov, Alexey [Pacific Oceanological Institute, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    The presence of a boundary can produce considerable changes in the oscillation amplitude of the bubble and its scattered echo. The present study fills a gap in the literature, in that it is concerned theoretically with the bubble activity at relatively small distances from the rigid boundary. It was shown that the bi-spherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the dynamics of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. As applications, time reversal technique for gas leakage detection and radiation forces that are induced by an acoustic wave on a constrained bubble were analyzed.

  8. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vanhille

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs.

  9. [Characterization of bubble size distribution in ES-DAF unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-tai; Zuo, Hua; Li, Jiu-yi; Fan, Zheng-hong; Luan, Zhao-kun

    2004-01-01

    ES-DAF unit was introduced and studied in this paper. Without a costly air saturator, ES-DAF consists of an ejector and a static mixer between the pressure side and suction side of the recycle rotary pump. The bubble size distribution in this novel unit was studied by using a CCD imagination through a microscope. The bubble size decreased with the increase of cycle ratio or the decrease of superficial air-water ratio. These results suggest that smaller bubbles would be formed when the initial number of nucleation sites increase by enhancing the turbulence intensity in the saturation system. The bubble size distribution became lower and wider with the increase of saturation pressure because of more frequent bubble collision and coalescence.

  10. Transient effects in the translation of bubbles insonated with acoustic pulses of finite duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igualada-Villodre, Elena; Medina-Palomo, Ana; Vega-Martínez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier

    2018-02-01

    The translation of a bubble under the action of an acoustic forcing finds applications in fields ranging from drug delivery to sonoluminesce. This phenomenon has been widely studied for cases where the amplitude of the forcing remains constant over time. However, in many practical applications, the duration of the forcing is not long enough for the bubble to attain a constant translational velocity, mainly due to the effect of the history force. Here, we develop a formulation, valid in the limit of very viscous flow and small-amplitude acoustic forcing, that allows us to describe the transient dynamics of bubbles driven by acoustic pulses consisting of a finite number of cycles. We also present an asymptotic solution to this theory for the case of a finite-duration sinusoidal pressure pulse. This solution takes into account both the history integral term and the transient period that the bubble needs to achieve steady radial oscillations, being the former dominant during most of the acceleration process. Moreover, by introducing some additional assumptions, we derive a simplified formula that describes fairly well the time evolution of the bubble velocity. Using this solution we show that the convergence to the steady translational velocity, given by the so-called Bjerknes force, occurs rather slowly, namely as $\\tau^{-1/2}$, which explains the slow convergence of the bubble velocity and stresses the importance of taking into account the history force.

  11. Transient subharmonic and ultraharmonic acoustic emission during dissolution of free gas bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Masotti, Leonardo

    2005-06-01

    This work concerns the study of free gas bubble behavior, a basic step in contrast agent study. In order to improve the understanding of microbubble-ultrasound interaction, we propose an acoustic dynamic observation of microbubble behavior performed by a high frame-rate acquiring and processing system. Results from ultrasonic observations of free gas microbubbles are discussed and compared with theoretical simulation. Peculiar radio frequency (RF) echo signals back-propagated from bubbles during dissolution up to their destruction are shown and their behavior is discussed. In particular, the different orders of subharmonic emissions related to changes in bubble sizes during dissolution were observed.

  12. Nano-scale bubble thermonuclear fusion in acoustically cavitated deuterated liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert I Nigmatulin [6 K. Marx st., Ufa, 450000 (Russian Federation); Richard T Lahey Jr [Rensellaer Polytechnic Institute, Center for Multiphase Research 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590 (United States); Rusi Taleyarkhan [Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been experimentally shown (Taleyarkhan, West, Cho, Lahey, Nigmatulin, Block, 2002, 2004) that neutron emission and tritium formation may occur in deuterated acetone (D-acetone C{sub 3}DO{sub 6}) under acoustic cavitation conditions. Intensity of the fast neutron (2.45 MeV) emission and tritium nucleus production is {approx} 4 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. This suggests ultrahigh compression of matter produced inside bubbles during their collapse. In the paper a systematic theoretical analysis of the vapor bubble growth and subsequent implosion in intense acoustic fields in D-acetone is presented. The goal is to describe and explain the experimental observations of thermonuclear fusion for collapsing cavitation bubble in D-acetone. The dynamics of bubbles formed during maximum rarefaction in the liquid is numerically studied on the basis of the developed models of a single bubble and bubble clusters. It is supposed that during their growth the bubbles coagulate and form a few bigger bubbles, which then collapse under the action of additional pressure pulses produced in the liquid through the intensification of acoustic waves within the cluster. A shock wave is shown to be formed inside the bubble during the latter's rapid contraction. Focusing of this shock wave in the bubble center initiates dissociation and ionization, violent increases in density (10{sup 4} kg m{sup 3}), pressure (10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} bar) and temperature (2 x 10{sup 8} K), high enough to produce nuclear fusion reactions. The bubble looks like micro-hydrogen bomb. The diameter of the neutron emission zone is about 100 nm. The highest neutron emission is recorded at about 10-20 nm from the bubble center. It is found out that the intensity of bubble implosion and the number of neutron emitted increase with variations in nucleation phase, positive half-wave amplitude, liquid temperature and also with the involvement of coagulation mechanisms within the cluster

  13. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉ G. SIMÃO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert’s period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium.

  14. Optical observations of acoustical radiation force effects on individual air bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palanchon, Peggy; Tortoli, Piero; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, N.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with contrast agent microbubbles have demonstrated that ultrasound (US) can significantly influence the movement of microbubbles. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the acoustic radiation force on individual air bubbles using high-speed photography. We emphasize

  15. Acoustic emission associated with the bursting of a gas bubble at the free surface of a non-Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoux, T.; Vidal, V.; Melo, F.; Géminard, J.-C.

    2008-05-01

    We report experimental measurements of the acoustic emission associated with the bursting of a gas bubble at the free surface of a non-Newtonian fluid. On account of the viscoelastic properties of the fluid, the bubble is generally elongated. The associated frequency and duration of the acoustic signal are discussed with regard to the shape of the bubble and successfully accounted for by a simple linear model. The acoustic energy exhibits a high sensitivity to the dynamics of the thin film bursting, which demonstrates that, in practice, it is barely possible to deduce from the acoustic measurements the total amount of energy released by the event. Our experimental findings provide clues for the understanding of the signals from either volcanoes or foams, where one observes respectively, the bursting of giant bubbles at the free surface of lava and bubble bursting avalanches.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Scatter from Subsurface Bubble Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-18

    Ellinthorpe, 1989. [6] Serge Baldy. Bubbles in the close vicinity of breaking waves: Statistical character- istics of the generation and dispersion...and J. Vlieger. Light scattering by a sphere on a substrate. Physica. 137(A):209-242, 1986. [13] R. H. Lang . Electromagnetic backscattering from a

  17. Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    A goal of our ongoing research stream is to develop a multidisciplinary metatheory of bubbles. In this viewpoint paper we put forward a typology of bubbles by comparing four types of assets – entertainment, commodities, financial securities (stocks), and housing properties – where bubbles could a...

  18. Steady streaming created by a bunch of acoustically excited bubbles in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    Thanks to the non-linearity of Navier-Stokes equation, objects vibrating with high-amplitude in a fluid can produce a steady flow called streaming. For sufficiently high amplitudes and/or frequencies of vibration, this phenomenon holds in microfluidic systems despite usually low Reynolds number flows. We present here the steady streaming produced by acoustically excited bubbles in such conditions: thanks to a coupling mechanism, a cluster of bubbles can produce long-range and fast steady flows. This is due to the apparition of a translational mode in addition to a pulsating mode. The present experimental study evidence of a rich variety of flows produced by this system in agreement with the theory developed by F. Mekki-Berrada et al published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics in 2016. In particular, we observed interesting patterns, with closed recirculations around bubbles in which a portion of the fluid remains trapped. Since this exclusion zones may persist even under incoming flow and as long as the acoustical excitation is present, they may prove useful for the contactless trapping of chemical compounds, allowing to switch solvent or bring new reactants. More generally, this study shows the ability of acoustically driven bubbles to create high velocity flows at microscale. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant Agreement Bubbleboost no. 614655.

  19. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  20. Investigation on Effect of Gravity Level on Bubble Distribution and Liquid Turbulence Modification for Horizontal Channel Bubbly Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M. J.; Wei, J. J.; Yu, B.

    2017-08-01

    Bubbly flows in the horizontal channel or pipe are often seen in industrial engineering fields, so it is very necessary to fully understand hydrodynamics of horizontal bubbly flows so as to improve industrial efficiency and to design an efficient bubbly system. In this paper, in order to fully understand mechanisms of phase distribution and liquid-phase turbulence modulation in the horizontal channel bubbly flow, the influence of gravity level on both of them were investigated in detail with the developed Euler-Lagrange two-way coupling method. For the present investigation, the buoyance on bubbles in both sides of the channel always points to the corresponding wall in order to study the liquid-phase turbulence modulation by bubbles under the symmetric physical condition. The present investigation shows that the gravity level has the important influence on the wall-normal distribution of bubbles and the liquid-phase turbulence modulation; the higher the gravity level is, the more bubbles can overcome the wall-normal resistance to accumulate near the wall, and the more obvious the liquid-phase turbulence modulation is. It is also discovered that interphase forces on the bubbles are various along the wall-normal direction, which leads to the fact that the bubble located in different wall-normal places has a different wall-normal velocity.

  1. Effect of dissolved gases in water on acoustic cavitation and bubble growth rate in 0.83 MHz megasonic of interest to wafer cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong-Kyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the cavitation intensity of gases dissolved in water, including H2, N2, and Ar, have been established in studies of acoustic bubble growth rates under ultrasonic fields. Variations in the acoustic properties of dissolved gases in water affect the cavitation intensity at a high frequency (0.83 MHz) due to changes in the rectified diffusion and bubble coalescence rate. It has been proposed that acoustic bubble growth rates rapidly increase when water contains a gas, such as hydrogen faster single bubble growth due to rectified diffusion, and a higher rate of coalescence under Bjerknes forces. The change of acoustic bubble growth rate in rectified diffusion has an effect on the damping constant and diffusivity of gas at the acoustic bubble and liquid interface. It has been suggested that the coalescence reaction of bubbles under Bjerknes forces is a reaction determined by the compressibility and density of dissolved gas in water associated with sound velocity and density in acoustic bubbles. High acoustic bubble growth rates also contribute to enhanced cavitation effects in terms of dissolved gas in water. On the other hand, when Ar gas dissolves into water under ultrasound field, cavitation behavior was reduced remarkably due to its lower acoustic bubble growth rate. It is shown that change of cavitation intensity in various dissolved gases were verified through cleaning experiments in the single type of cleaning tool such as particle removal and pattern damage based on numerically calculated acoustic bubble growth rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Passive acoustic derived bubble flux and applications to natural gas seepage in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada and Coal Oil Point, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culling, D.; Leifer, I.; Dallimore, S.; Alcala, K.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is a prominent greenhouse gas that escapes naturally from thermogenic reservoirs as seepage from marine and lacustrine biogenic sources as bubble ebullition. Geologic methane emissions are critically important contributors to the global methane budget however, few quantitative flux measurements are available for shallow waters. This gap in knowledge is critical as in these settings gas can easily transit as bubbles through the water column and directly influence global atmospheric budgets. Video and active acoustic (sonar) measurements of bubble flux have spatial limitations requiring predictable bubble emission location. Passive acoustics are less affected by these limitations, in addition, they can provide data in water too shallow for effective sonar bubble observations. Lab tests were undertaken to quantify the acoustic signature of bubbles formed in non-cohesive sediments. specifically focusing on mechanisms that complicate interpretation of acoustic data. Lab tests then were compared to field data to provide measurement calibration/validation. The principles behind the acoustic analysis method are based on the Minnaert equation, which relates a bubble radius and acoustic frequency. Bubble size and the resultant acoustic frequency from known flows and capillary tube diameters are well documented; however changing sediment pathways adds to the complexity of bubble formation and the resultant bubble acoustic signal. These complex signals were investigated in a lab tank with a thick, cohesive fine-grained sediment bed, through which bubbles produced by a syringe pump migrated to the sediment-water interface. Then, the resultant bubbles were diverted into clear water and measured from high speed, high definition video, while the acoustic signature of bubble formation was recorded concurrently by a hydrophone. Bubble formation is influenced by currents, which shifts the acoustical signal towards a higher frequency with a more complex pattern than the

  3. An Acoustic Levitation Technique for the Study of Nonlinear Oscillations of Gas Bubbles in Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-15

    a small bubble. On occasion, a hypodermic needle was used. The introduction of objects into the liquid required care to avoid disturbing the fluid...pressure gradient to the acoustic pressure gradient. These values’were then compared to a nonlinear theory . Results were very much * I in agreement except...for the region near the’ n=2 harmonic. An explanation -- for the discrepancy between theory and experiment appears to lie in the polytropic exponent

  4. Simultaneous observation of cavitation bubbles generated in biological tissue by high-speed optical and acoustic imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kai; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles are useful for enhancing the heating effect in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Many studies were conducted to investigate the behavior of such bubbles in tissue-mimicking materials, such as a transparent gel phantom; however, the detailed behavior in tissue was still unclear owing to the difficulty in optical observation. In this study, a new biological phantom was developed to observe cavitation bubbles generated in an optically shallow area of tissue. Two imaging methods, high-speed photography using light scattering and high-speed ultrasonic imaging, were used for detecting the behavior of the bubbles simultaneously. The results agreed well with each other for the area of bubble formation and the temporal change in the region of bubbles, suggesting that both methods are useful for visualizing the bubbles.

  5. Reply to "Comment on `Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping' "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junqi

    2015-03-01

    We reported on the sound pressure generated by aqueous foam bursts in our paper [Ding et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.041601]. Blanc et al., [Phys. Rev. E 91, 036401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.036401] found that sound from one of three mechanisms of bubble burst (the prepopping) actually results from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. We examined the same hardware used in our paper and found that the frequency range is not the cause of the artifact. The prepopping sound was a result from a built-in finite impulse response filter of analog-to-digital converters in the Brüel & Kjær data acquisition system.

  6. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble

  7. Validation of simulations of an underwater acoustic communication channel characterized by wind-generated surface waves and bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainlie, M.A.; Gerdes, F.; Schäfke, A.; Özkan Sertlekc, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows that it is possible to simulate realistic shallow-water acoustic communication channels using available acoustic propagation models. Key factor is the incorporation of realistic time-dependent sea surface conditions, including both waves and bubbles due to wind.

  8. A review of recent theoretical investigations on acoustic cavitation bubbles and their implications on detection of cavitation in pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    Detection of cavitation in pumps is one of the essential topics in hydraulic machinery research and has been intensively investigated for several decades. In the literature, a technique based on analysis of acoustic signals generated by cavitation bubbles in the pumps has been proposed to detect cavitation activities especially incipient cavitation. In present paper, recent theoretical investigations by the author and his collaborators on acoustic cavitation bubbles (e.g. damping mechanisms, heat and mass transfer) together with their associated acoustical signals have been briefly reviewed to advance above technique.

  9. Bubble Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  10. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and

  11. Interfacial Dynamics of Condensing Vapor Bubbles in an Ultrasonic Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boziuk, Thomas; Smith, Marc; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of vapor condensation in quiescent subcooled liquid using ultrasonic actuation is investigated experimentally. The vapor bubbles are formed by direct injection from a pressurized steam reservoir through nozzles of varying characteristic diameters, and are advected within an acoustic field of programmable intensity. While kHz-range acoustic actuation typically couples to capillary instability of the vapor-liquid interface, ultrasonic (MHz-range) actuation leads to the formation of a liquid spout that penetrates into the vapor bubble and significantly increases its surface area and therefore condensation rate. Focusing of the ultrasonic beam along the spout leads to ejection of small-scale droplets from that are propelled towards the vapor liquid interface and result in localized acceleration of the condensation. High-speed video of Schlieren images is used to investigate the effects of the ultrasonic actuation on the thermal boundary layer on the liquid side of the vapor-liquid interface and its effect on the condensation rate, and the liquid motion during condensation is investigated using high-magnification PIV measurements. High-speed image processing is used to assess the effect of the actuation on the dynamics and temporal variation in characteristic scale (and condensation rate) of the vapor bubbles.

  12. Methane Bubble Size Distributions, Flux, and Dissolution in a Freshwater Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Kyle B; Hemond, Harold F

    2017-12-05

    The majority of methane produced in many anoxic sediments is released via ebullition. These bubbles are subject to dissolution as they rise, and dissolution rates are strongly influenced by bubble size. Current understanding of natural methane bubble size distributions is limited by the difficulty in measuring bubble sizes over wide spatial or temporal scales. Our custom optical bubble size sensors recorded bubble sizes and release timing at 8 locations in Upper Mystic Lake, MA continuously for 3 months. Bubble size distributions were spatially heterogeneous even over relatively small areas experiencing similar flux, suggesting that localized sediment conditions are important to controlling bubble size. There was no change in bubble size distributions over the 3 month sampling period, but mean bubble size was positively correlated with daily ebullition flux. Bubble data was used to verify the performance of a widely used bubble dissolution model, and the model was then used to estimate that bubble dissolution accounts for approximately 10% of methane accumulated in the hypolimnion during summer stratification, and at most 15% of the diffusive air-water-methane flux from the epilimnion.

  13. Experiments with nano-scaled helium bubbles in water subjected to standing acoustic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancelos, Silvina, E-mail: silvina.cancelos@upr.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR 00681 (United States); Villamizar, Gabriel; Saavedra-Ruiz, Andres; Garcia-Rodriguez, William; Filoni, Pablo T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR 00681 (United States); Marin, Carlos [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Cavitation activity increases with the presence of helium nanobubbles in water. • The antinode region of the standing acoustic field gets depleted of nanobubbles. • Nanobubbles behave as solid particles when subjected to a standing acoustic field. - Abstract: Understanding the stability of gas filled bubbles dispersed in water, and the features that due to their presence must been taken into account in multiphase flow research, is amongst the most recent and relevant issue in a number of technological, physical and biological fields. Cavitation experiments were designed and conducted using one high-Q acoustic resonator that is able to oscillate at very well controlled conditions, allowing for the characterization of the effect that helium nanobubbles dispersed in water have on the cavitation activity. An increase in the inertial cavitation activity that correlates directly to the presence of the nanobubbles at the antinode was found. The results seem to indicate that the nanobubbles grow under tension to collapse under the compression phase. By other side, they behave as rigid entities under the influence of standing acoustic fields, moving away from the antinode region.

  14. Distributed acoustic sensing with Michelson interferometer demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan; Peng, Gangding; Wang, Hongzhong

    2017-09-01

    The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has been extensively studied and widely used. A distributed acoustic sensing system based on the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation was designed and tested. The system could directly obtain the phase, amplitude, frequency response, and location information of sound wave at the same time and measurement at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously. Experiments showed that the system successfully measured the acoustic signals with a phase-pressure sensitivity about-148 dB (re rad/μPa) and frequency response ripple less than 1.5 dB. The further field experiment showed that the system could measure signals at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously.

  15. Length and bursting of separation bubbles: A physical interpretation. [of pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A physical interpretation of the observed form of the pressure distribution beneath a two-dimensional separation bubble which modified the external inviscid pressure distribution only locally is given in terms of boundary layer concepts. A simple method for estimating along a mean streamline entrained into the underside of a growing shear layer through the transition region is discussed, and predictions of bubble bursting conditions and a lower bound on the bubble length are compared with experiment.

  16. Optical and Acoustic Observations of Bubble Adhered to Piezoelectric Transducer under Ultrasound Field: Pressure Signal Caused by Bubble Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Shintaro; Yoshida, Kenji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2008-05-01

    In order to clarify the mechanical effects caused by micro-bubbles in liquids, the detailed behavior of a single bubble adhered to a solid surface was observed optically using an ultra high-speed video camera (maximum recording rate: 1,000,000 frames/s). Making use of a thin piezoelectric transducer on the solid surface, the pressure signal caused by the bubble behavior was simultaneously observed. In addition, the influence of the initial bubble radius R0 on mechanical effects was investigated. It was confirmed that a micro-jet was generated from the center of the bubble, which was followed by a counter-jet, in the range of R0/Rres≈0.65-1.10 (Rres: the resonance radius of the free bubble). An impulsive positive pressure to the surface was also observed synchronously with the momentary increase of bubble volume acceleration. Moreover, it was found that the strength of the impulsive pressure was connected to the peak value of volume acceleration. The pressure amplitude showed a maximum value when R0/Rres was approximately 0.9.

  17. Size distribution of air bubbles entering the brain during cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M L Chung

    Full Text Available Thousands of air bubbles enter the cerebral circulation during cardiac surgery, but whether high numbers of bubbles explain post-operative cognitive decline is currently controversial. This study estimates the size distribution of air bubbles and volume of air entering the cerebral arteries intra-operatively based on analysis of transcranial Doppler ultrasound data.Transcranial Doppler ultrasound recordings from ten patients undergoing heart surgery were analysed for the presence of embolic signals. The backscattered intensity of each embolic signal was modelled based on ultrasound scattering theory to provide an estimate of bubble diameter. The impact of showers of bubbles on cerebral blood-flow was then investigated using patient-specific Monte-Carlo simulations to model the accumulation and clearance of bubbles within a model vasculature.Analysis of Doppler ultrasound recordings revealed a minimum of 371 and maximum of 6476 bubbles entering the middle cerebral artery territories during surgery. This was estimated to correspond to a total volume of air ranging between 0.003 and 0.12 mL. Based on analysis of a total of 18667 embolic signals, the median diameter of bubbles entering the cerebral arteries was 33 μm (IQR: 18 to 69 μm. Although bubble diameters ranged from ~5 μm to 3.5 mm, the majority (85% were less than 100 μm. Numerous small bubbles detected during cardiopulmonary bypass were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation to be benign. However, during weaning from bypass, showers containing large macro-bubbles were observed, which were estimated to transiently affect up to 2.2% of arterioles.Detailed analysis of Doppler ultrasound data can be used to provide an estimate of bubble diameter, total volume of air, and the likely impact of embolic showers on cerebral blood flow. Although bubbles are alarmingly numerous during surgery, our simulations suggest that the majority of bubbles are too small to be harmful.

  18. Analysis of the effect of impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on Al 1060.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linzheng; Zhu, Xijing

    2017-05-01

    The bubble collapse near a wall will generate strong micro-jet in a liquid environment under ultrasonic field. To explore the effect of the impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on an aluminum 1060 sheet, the cavitation threshold formula and micro-jet velocity formula were first proposed. Then the Johnson-Cook rate correlation material constitutive model was considered, and a three-dimensional fluid-solid coupling model of micro-jet impact on a wall was established and analyzed. Finally, to validate the model, ultrasonic cavitation test and inversion analysis based on the theory of spherical indentation test were conducted. The results show that cavitation occurs significantly in the liquid under ultrasonic field, as the applied ultrasonic pressure amplitude is much larger than liquid cavitation threshold. Micro pits appear on the material surface under the impact of micro-jet. Pit depth is determined by both micro-jet velocity and micro-jet diameter, and increases with their increase. Pit diameter is mainly related to the micro-jet diameter and dp/dj≈0.95-1.2, while pit's diameter-to-depth ratio is mainly negatively correlated with the micro-jet velocity. Wall pressure distribution is mostly symmetric and its maximum appears on the edge of micro-jet impingement. Obviously, the greater the micro-jet velocity is, the greater the wall pressure is. Micro pits formed after the impact of micro-jet on aluminum 1060 surface were assessed by ultrasonic cavitation test. Inversion analysis results indicate that equivalent stress, equivalent strain of the pit and impact strength, and velocity of the micro-jet are closely related with pit's diameter-to-depth ratio. For the pit's diameter-to-depth ratio of 16-68, the corresponding micro-jet velocity calculated is 310-370m/s. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement of bubble size distribution in protein foam fractionation column using capillary probe with photoelectric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, L; Ding, Y; Prokop, A; Tanner, R D

    2001-01-01

    Bubble size is a key variable for predicting the ability to separate and concentrate proteins in a foam fractionation process. It is used to characterize not only the bubble-specific interfacial area but also coalescence of bubbles in the foam phase. This article describes the development of a photoelectric method for measuring the bubble size distribution in both bubble and foam columns for concentrating proteins. The method uses a vacuum to withdraw a stream of gas-liquid dispersion from the bubble or foam column through a capillary tube with a funnel-shaped inlet. The resulting sample bubble cylinders are detected, and their lengths are calculated by using two pairs of infrared photoelectric sensors that are connected with a high-speed data acquisition system controlled by a microcomputer. The bubble size distributions in the bubble column 12 and 1 cm below the interface and in the foam phase 1 cm above the interface are obtained in a continuous foam fractionation process for concentrating ovalbumin. The effects of certain operating conditions such as the feed protein concentration, superficial gas velocity, liquid flow rate, and solution pH are investigated. The results may prove to be helpful in understanding the mechanisms controlling the foam fractionation of proteins.

  20. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  1. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Near resonant bubble acoustic cross-section corrections, including examples from oceanography, volcanology, and biomedical ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2009-11-01

    The scattering cross-section sigma(s) of a gas bubble of equilibrium radius R(0) in liquid can be written in the form sigma(s)=4piR(0) (2)[(omega(1) (2)omega(2)-1)(2)+delta(2)], where omega is the excitation frequency, omega(1) is the resonance frequency, and delta is a frequency-dependent dimensionless damping coefficient. A persistent discrepancy in the frequency dependence of the contribution to delta from radiation damping, denoted delta(rad), is identified and resolved, as follows. Wildt's [Physics of Sound in the Sea (Washington, DC, 1946), Chap. 28] pioneering derivation predicts a linear dependence of delta(rad) on frequency, a result which Medwin [Ultrasonics 15, 7-13 (1977)] reproduces using a different method. Weston [Underwater Acoustics, NATO Advanced Study Institute Series Vol. II, 55-88 (1967)], using ostensibly the same method as Wildt, predicts the opposite relationship, i.e., that delta(rad) is inversely proportional to frequency. Weston's version of the derivation of the scattering cross-section is shown here to be the correct one, thus resolving the discrepancy. Further, a correction to Weston's model is derived that amounts to a shift in the resonance frequency. A new, corrected, expression for the extinction cross-section is also derived. The magnitudes of the corrections are illustrated using examples from oceanography, volcanology, planetary acoustics, neutron spallation, and biomedical ultrasound. The corrections become significant when the bulk modulus of the gas is not negligible relative to that of the surrounding liquid.

  3. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nonaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume.

  4. Statistical analysis of bubble and crystal size distributions: Formulations and procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Tsentalovich, Evgeni P.

    2007-07-01

    Bubble and crystal size distributions have previously been described only by either exponential or power law functions. Within this limited framework, it has not been possible to characterize size distributions in a fully quantitative manner. We have developed an analytical and computational formulation with which to characterize and study crystal and bubble size distributions (BSD). This formulation demonstrates that all distributions known to date belong to the logarithmic family of statistical distributions. Four functions within the logarithmic family are best suited to natural bubbles and crystals (log normal, logistic, Weibull, and exponential). This characterization is supported by the fact that the power law function widely used for crystal and bubble size analysis is not a statistical distribution function, but rather represents an approximation of the upper regions (larger bubbles/crystals) of the logistic distribution, whose sizes are much larger than the mode. The coefficients for each of the four logarithmic functions can be derived by 1) best fit exceedance function of the logarithmic distribution, and 2) best fit of the linear transformation of the distribution probability density. A close match of the coefficients derived by the above two methods can be used as an indicator of correct function fitting (choice of initial values). Function fitting by exceedance curves leads to the most accurate statistical results, but has certain strict limitations, including 1) a requirement to rescale the base distribution function; 2) a higher failure rate for function fitting than that for distribution density; 3) uncertainty in observational data error estimates; and 4) unsuitability for visual interpretation. The most productive approach to visualization and interpretation of size distributions is through linear transformation of logarithmic distributions on the basis of probability densities. This also makes it possible to 1) clearly discern bimodal

  5. Advancement of magma fragmentation by inhomogeneous bubble distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, M; Ichihara, M; Maruyama, S; Kurokawa, N; Aoki, Y; Okumura, S; Uesugi, K

    2017-12-01

    Decompression times reported in previous studies suggest that thoroughly brittle fragmentation is unlikely in actual explosive volcanic eruptions. What occurs in practice is brittle-like fragmentation, which is defined as the solid-like fracture of a material whose bulk rheological properties are close to those of a fluid. Through laboratory experiments and numerical simulation, the link between the inhomogeneous structure of bubbles and the development of cracks that may lead to brittle-like fragmentation was clearly demonstrated here. A rapid decompression test was conducted to simulate the fragmentation of a specimen whose pore morphology was revealed by X-ray microtomography. The dynamic response during decompression was observed by high-speed photography. Large variation was observed in the responses of the specimens even among specimens with equal bulk rheological properties. The stress fields of the specimens under decompression computed by finite element analysis shows that the presence of satellite bubbles beneath a large bubble induced the stress concentration. On the basis of the obtained results, a new mechanism for brittle-like fragmentation is proposed. In the proposed scenario, the second nucleation of bubbles near the fragmentation surface is an essential process for the advancement of fragmentation in an upward magma flow in a volcanic conduit.

  6. High-speed imaging of an ultrasound-driven bubble in contact with a wall: ``Narcissus'' effect and resolved acoustic streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-08-01

    We report microscopic observations of the primary flow oscillation of an acoustically driven bubble in contact with a wall, captured with the ultra high-speed camera Brandaris 128 (Chin et al. 2003). The driving frequency is up to 200 kHz, and the imaging frequency is up to 25 MHz. The details of the bubble motion during an ultrasound cycle are thus resolved, showing a combination of two modes of oscillations: a radius oscillation and a translation oscillation, perpendicular to the wall. This motion is interpreted using the theory of acoustic images to account for the presence of the wall. We conclude that the bubble is subjected to a periodic succession of attractive and repulsive forces, exerted by its own image. Fast-framing recordings of a tracer particle embedded in the liquid around the particle are performed. They fully resolve the acoustic streaming flow induced by the bubble oscillations. This non-linear secondary flow appears as a tiny drift of the particle position cycle after cycle, on top of the primary back and forth oscillation. The high oscillation frequency accounts for a fast average particle velocity, with characteristic timescales in the millisecond range at the lengthscale of the bubble. The features of the bubble motion being resolved, we can apply the acoustic streaming theory near a wall, which provides predictions in agreement with the observed streaming velocity.

  7. Distribution of Acoustic Power Spectra for an Isolated Helicopter Fuselage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusyumov A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The broadband aerodynamic noise can be studied, assuming isotropic flow, turbulence and decay. Proudman’s approach allows practical calculations of noise based on CFD solutions of RANS or URANS equations at the stage of post processing and analysis of the solution. Another aspect is the broadband acoustic spectrum and the distribution of acoustic power over a range of frequencies. The acoustic energy spectrum distribution in isotropic turbulence is non monotonic and has a maximum at a certain value of Strouhal number. In the present work the value of acoustic power peak frequency is determined using a prescribed form of acoustic energy spectrum distribution presented in papers by S. Sarkar and M. Y. Hussaini and by G. M. Lilley. CFD modelling of the flow around isolated helicopter fuselage model was considered using the HMB CFD code and the RANS equations.

  8. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, and acoustics of exponential growth of the vapor bubbles at saturated boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeev, B. M.; Volkova, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The results of earlier performed work are summarized. Formulae for the absolute values of the following variables: the radius of the vapour bubble, the velocity and acceleration of its growth, the specific and total heat flux through the interphase surface of the bubble, the liquid overheating and the heat transfer coefficient, sound pressure in one- and three-dimensional cases are presented. On their basis, the relationship between the relative values of the pairs of these variables because of time elimination is derived.

  10. Numerical study of acoustically driven bubble cloud dynamics near a rigid wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingsen; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of a bubble cloud excited by a sinusoidal pressure field near a rigid wall is studied using a novel Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow model. The effects of key parameters such as the amplitude and frequency of the excitation pressure, the cloud and bubble sizes, the void fraction, and the initial standoff distance on the bubbles' collective behavior and the resulting pressure loads on the nearby wall are investigated. The study shows that nonlinear bubble cloud dynamics becomes more pronounced and results in higher pressure loading at the wall as the excitation pressure amplitude increases. The strongest collective bubble behavior occurs at a preferred resonance frequency. At this resonance frequency, pressure peaks orders of magnitudes higher than the excitation pressure result from the bubble interaction when the amplitude of the pressure excitation is high. The numerically obtained resonance frequency is significantly different from the reported natural frequency of a spherical cloud derived from linear theory, which assumes small amplitude oscillations in an unbounded medium. At high amplitudes of the excitation, the resonance frequency decreases almost linearly with the ratio of excitation pressure amplitude to ambient pressure until the ratio is larger than one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cumulative distribution functions associated with bubble-nucleation processes in cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    Bubble-nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones liquid are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Waiting time, which is the lifetime of a superheated liquid, is determined for several system sizes, and the apparent finite-size effect of the nucleation rate is observed. From the cumulative distribution function of the nucleation events, the bubble-nucleation process is found to be not a simple Poisson process but a Poisson process with an additional relaxation time. The parameters of the exponential distribution associated with the process are determined by taking the relaxation time into account, and the apparent finite-size effect is removed. These results imply that the use of the arithmetic mean of the waiting time until a bubble grows to the critical size leads to an incorrect estimation of the nucleation rate. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  12. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  13. Using Lorentz forces to control the distribution of bubbles in a vertical tube filled with liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitkam, S.; Tschisgale, S.; Krull, B.; Wetzel, T.; Baake, E.; Fröhlich, J.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, a method to increase the residence time of bubbles in tubes or pipes filled with liquid metal is investigated. Imposing a horizontal electric current and a perpendicular horizontal magnetic field generates an upward-directed Lorentz force. This force can counteract gravity and cause floating of bubbles. Even with homogeneous electric fields these float in the mean but fluctuate randomly within the swarm due to mutual interactions. In the present case the cylindrical shape of the container furthermore creates inhomogeneous electric currents and an inhomogeneous force distribution resulting in a macroscopic convection pattern stirring the bubbles and further homogenising the spatial distribution of the bubbles.

  14. Measurement of bubble size distributions in vesiculated rocks with implications for quantitative estimation of eruption processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toramaru, Atsushi

    1990-10-01

    This paper outlines methods for determining a bubble size distribution (BSD) and the moments of the BSD function in vesiculated clasts produced by volcanic eruptions. It reports the results of applications of the methods to 11 natural samples and discusses the implications for quantitative estimates of eruption processes. The analysis is based on a quantitative morphological (stereological) method for 2-dimensional imaging of cross-sections of samples. One method determines, with some assumptions, the complete shape of the BSD function from the chord lengths cut by bubbles. The other determines the 1st, 2nd and 3rd moments of distribution functions by measurement of the number of bubbles per unit area, the surface area per unit volume, and the volume fraction of bubbles. Comparison of procedures and results of these two distinct methods shows that the latter yields rather more reliable results than the former, though the results coincide in absolute and relative magnitudes. Results of the analysis for vesiculated rocks from eleven subPlinian to Plinian eruptions show some interesting systematic correlations both between moments of the BSD and between a moment and the eruption column height or the SiO 2 content of magma. These correlations are successfully interpreted in terms of the nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in ascending magmas. This suggests that bubble coalescence does not predominate in sub-Plinian to Plinian explosive eruptions. The moment-moment correlations put constraints on the style of the nucleation and growth process of bubbles. The scaling argument suggests that a single nucleation event and subsequent growth with any kind of bubble interaction under continuous depressurization, which leads to an intermediate growth law between the diffusional growth ( R m ∝ t {2}/{3}) at a constant depressurization rate and the Ostwald ripening ( R m ∝ t {1}/{3}) under a constant pressure, where Rm and t are the mean radius of bubble and the

  15. The significance of multiple scattering in bubble measurements near the sea surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø; Bjørnø, Irina K.

    1996-01-01

    The acoustic interactions between gas bubbles in bubble plumes formed near the sea surface may significantly change the propagation and attenuation conditions for acoustical signals in the sea. The scattering properties of the bubble plumes have been studied extensively since Foldy's formulation...... of the theory for isotropic scattering by randomly distributed scatterers. This theory, modified later by others [K. W. Commander and A. Prosperetti, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 732–746 (1989)] fails in the vicinity of individual bubble resonances and for high concentrations of bubbles in the population. A recent...... of bubble plume qualities. Available, but still unconfirmed, experimental data show the significance of multiple scattering in bubble plumes having void fractions >~0.22%. This paper forms an attempt to illuminate and solve the proximity threshold question, forming the basis for the significance...

  16. Measure the spatial distribution of corneal elasticity by combining femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and acoustic radiation force elasticity microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Xin; Hu, Mingyong

    2017-08-01

    The unique spatial distribution of corneal elasticity is shown by the nonhomogeneous structure of the cornea. It is critical to understanding how biomechanics control corneal stability and refraction and one way to do this job is non-invasive measurement of this distribution. Femtosecond laser pulses have the ability to induce optical breakdown and produced cavitation in the anterior and posterior cornea. A confocal ultrasonic transducer applied 6.5 ms acoustic radiation forcechirp bursts to the bubble at 1.5 MHz while monitoring bubble position using pulse-echoes at 20 MHz. The laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) were measured in the anterior and posterior cornea with the plasmas that induced by the same femtosecond laser to see whether the laser induced plasmas signals will show relationship to Young's modulus.

  17. Cavitation bubble dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterborn, W; Ohl, C D

    1997-04-01

    The dynamics of cavitation bubbles on water is investigated for bubbles produced optically and acoustically. Single bubble dynamics is studied with laser produced bubbles and high speed photography with framing rates up to 20.8 million frames per second. Examples for jet formation and shock wave emission are given. Acoustic cavitation is produced in water in the interior of piezoelectric cylinders of different sizes (up to 12 cm inner diameter). The filementary structure composed of bubbles is investigated and their light emission (sonoluminescence) studied for various driving strengths.

  18. Gas Bubble Dynamics under Mechanical Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Elbing, Brian

    2017-11-01

    The scientific community has a limited understanding of the bubble dynamics under mechanical oscillations due to over simplification of Navier-Stockes equation by neglecting the shear stress tensor and not accounting for body forces when calculating the acoustic radiation force. The current work experimental investigates bubble dynamics under mechanical vibration and resulting acoustic field by measuring the bubble size and velocity using high-speed imaging. The experimental setup consists of a custom-designed shaker table, cast acrylic bubble column, compressed air injection manifold and an optical imaging system. The mechanical vibrations resulted in accelerations between 0.25 to 10 times gravitational acceleration corresponding to frequency and amplitude range of 8 - 22Hz and 1 - 10mm respectively. Throughout testing the void fraction was limited to bubble size is larger than resonance size and smaller than acoustic wavelength. The amplitude of acoustic pressure wave was estimated using the definition of Bjerknes force in combination with Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Physical behavior of the system was capture and classified. Bubble size, velocity as well as size and spatial distribution will be presented.

  19. Bubble diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  20. Evaluation of stability and size distribution of sunflower oil-coated micro bubbles for localized drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filho WalterDuartedeAraujo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micro bubbles were initially introduced as contrast agents for ultrasound examinations as they are able to modify the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging, thus improving the assessment of clinical information on human tissue. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of using these bubbles as drug carriers in localized delivery. In micro fluidics devices for generation of micro bubbles, the bubbles are formed at interface of liquid gas through a strangulation process. A device that uses these features can produce micro bubbles with small size dispersion in a single step. Methods A T-junction micro fluidic device constructed using 3D prototyping was made for the production of mono dispersed micro bubbles. These micro bubbles use sunflower oil as a lipid layer. Stability studies for micro bubbles with diameters different generated from a liquid phase of the same viscosity were conducted to evaluate whether micro bubbles can be used as drug carriers. The biocompatibility of coating layer, the ability to withstand environmental pressure variations combined with echogenicity, are key factors that they can safely play the role of drug transporters. Results The normal distribution curve with small dispersion of the diameter of bubbles validates the process of generating micro bubbles with low value of variation coefficient, i.e., 0.381 at 1.90%. The results also showed the feasibility of using sunflower oil as the lipid matrix with stable population of bubbles over 217 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 313.04 μm and 121 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 73.74 μm, considering bubbles with air as gaseous phase. Conclusion The results indicate that the micro fluidic device designed can be used for producing micro bubbles with low variation coefficient using sunflower oil as a coating of micro bubbles. These carriers were stable for periods of time that are long enough for clinical

  1. Evaluation of stability and size distribution of sunflower oil-coated micro bubbles for localized drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Walter Duarte de Araujo; Schneider, Fábio Kurt; Morales, Rigoberto E M

    2012-09-20

    Micro bubbles were initially introduced as contrast agents for ultrasound examinations as they are able to modify the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging, thus improving the assessment of clinical information on human tissue. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of using these bubbles as drug carriers in localized delivery. In micro fluidics devices for generation of micro bubbles, the bubbles are formed at interface of liquid gas through a strangulation process. A device that uses these features can produce micro bubbles with small size dispersion in a single step. A T-junction micro fluidic device constructed using 3D prototyping was made for the production of mono dispersed micro bubbles. These micro bubbles use sunflower oil as a lipid layer. Stability studies for micro bubbles with diameters different generated from a liquid phase of the same viscosity were conducted to evaluate whether micro bubbles can be used as drug carriers. The biocompatibility of coating layer, the ability to withstand environmental pressure variations combined with echogenicity, are key factors that they can safely play the role of drug transporters. The normal distribution curve with small dispersion of the diameter of bubbles validates the process of generating micro bubbles with low value of variation coefficient, i.e., 0.381 at 1.90%. The results also showed the feasibility of using sunflower oil as the lipid matrix with stable population of bubbles over 217 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 313.04 μm and 121 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 73.74 μm, considering bubbles with air as gaseous phase. The results indicate that the micro fluidic device designed can be used for producing micro bubbles with low variation coefficient using sunflower oil as a coating of micro bubbles. These carriers were stable for periods of time that are long enough for clinical applications even when regular air is used as the gas phase. Improved

  2. Conversion of Chord Length Data into Bubble Size Distribution: Generation of Chord Length Data and the Methodology Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, Hoang Nhan; Euh, D. J.; Song, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, B. J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Bubble size and its distribution play an important role in thermal hydrodynamic processes in multiphase flow systems. By using the conductivity or optical probe techniques, the size and distribution of bubbles can only be inferred indirectly from a measured chord length data (CLD). Some methods are proposed to convert a CLD into the bubble size distribution (BSD), and they can be classified into parametric, semi-parametric and non-parametric. Most of methods are derived from the following relation of the conditional probability functions that are established under the geometric constraints: P(y) = {infinity}{integral}0 P(R) P(y|R) dR where P(R) is PDF of bubbles of all sizes R pierced by a probe, and P(y|R) is PDF of chord length y corresponding to bubbles of a specified size R. These methods are limited to flows of bubbles having symmetric shapes, i.e. spherical, ellipsoidal, or capspherical. Although the methods were developed from a common relation, there are no physical bases as well as the lack of experimental data to validate them. In this work, the CLD is generated for comparing different conversion methods. The range of bubble size is determined by the Hinze's theory. The CLDs are applied to numerical backward transforms (NBT), analytical backward transform (ABT), and analytical semi-parametric method using Parzen window estimator (ParzenES) to obtain the BSD. A comparison for the obtained results is performed

  3. Investigation of liquid phase axial dispersion in Taylor bubble flow by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin J.H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow occurs in small diameter channels in which gas bubbles are separated by slugs of pure liquid. This type of flow regime is well suited for solid catalyzed gas-liquid reactors in which the reaction efficiency is a strong function of axial dispersion in the regions of pure liquid. This paper presents an experimental study of liquid phase axial dispersion in a Taylor bubble flow developed in a horizontal tube using high speed photography and radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD analysis. A parametric dependence of axial dispersion on average volume fraction of gas phase was also investigated by varying the relative volumetric flow rates of the two phases. 137mBa produced from a 137Cs/137mBa radionuclide generator was used as radiotracer and measurements were made using the NaI(Tl scintillation detectors. Validation of 137mBa in the form of barium chloride as aqueous phase radiotracer was also carried out. Axial Dispersion Model (ADM was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system and the results of the experiment are presented. It was observed that the system is characterized by very high values of Peclet Number (Pe∼102 which reveals an approaching plug type flow. The experimental and model estimated values of mean residence times were observed in agreement with each other.

  4. Investigation of liquid phase axial dispersion in Taylor bubble flow by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, I. R.; Iqbal, W.; Din, G. U.; Mehdi, S.; Khan, I. H.; Inayat, M. H.; Jin, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    A gas-liquid Taylor bubble flow occurs in small diameter channels in which gas bubbles are separated by slugs of pure liquid. This type of flow regime is well suited for solid catalyzed gas-liquid reactors in which the reaction efficiency is a strong function of axial dispersion in the regions of pure liquid. This paper presents an experimental study of liquid phase axial dispersion in a Taylor bubble flow developed in a horizontal tube using high speed photography and radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. A parametric dependence of axial dispersion on average volume fraction of gas phase was also investigated by varying the relative volumetric flow rates of the two phases. 137mBa produced from a 137Cs/137mBa radionuclide generator was used as radiotracer and measurements were made using the NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. Validation of 137mBa in the form of barium chloride as aqueous phase radiotracer was also carried out. Axial Dispersion Model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system and the results of the experiment are presented. It was observed that the system is characterized by very high values of Peclet Number (Pe˜102) which reveals an approaching plug type flow. The experimental and model estimated values of mean residence times were observed in agreement with each other.

  5. The concentration distribution around a growing gas bubble in a bio tissue under the effect of suction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadein, S A

    2014-07-01

    The concentration distribution around a growing nitrogen gas bubble in the blood and other bio tissues of divers who ascend to surface too quickly is obtained by Mohammadein and Mohamed model (2010) for variant and constant ambient pressure through the decompression process. In this paper, the growing of gas bubbles and concentration distribution under the effect of suction process are studied as a modification of Mohammadein and Mohamed model (zero suction). The growth of gas bubble is affected by ascent rate, tissue diffusivity, initial concentration difference, surface tension and void fraction. Mohammadein and Mohamed model (2010) is obtained as a special case from the present model. Results showed that, the suction process activates the systemic blood circulation and delay the growth of gas bubbles in the bio tissues to avoid the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Distributed acoustic cues for caller identity in macaque vocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Doyle, Alex M; Mullarkey, Matthew P; Mishkin, Mortimer; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Individual primates can be identified by the sound of their voice. Macaques have demonstrated an ability to discern conspecific identity from a harmonically structured 'coo' call. Voice recognition presumably requires the integrated perception of multiple acoustic features. However, it is unclear how this is achieved, given considerable variability across utterances. Specifically, the extent to which information about caller identity is distributed across multiple features remains elusive. We examined these issues by recording and analysing a large sample of calls from eight macaques. Single acoustic features, including fundamental frequency, duration and Weiner entropy, were informative but unreliable for the statistical classification of caller identity. A combination of multiple features, however, allowed for highly accurate caller identification. A regularized classifier that learned to identify callers from the modulation power spectrum of calls found that specific regions of spectral-temporal modulation were informative for caller identification. These ranges are related to acoustic features such as the call's fundamental frequency and FM sweep direction. We further found that the low-frequency spectrotemporal modulation component contained an indexical cue of the caller body size. Thus, cues for caller identity are distributed across identifiable spectrotemporal components corresponding to laryngeal and supralaryngeal components of vocalizations, and the integration of those cues can enable highly reliable caller identification. Our results demonstrate a clear acoustic basis by which individual macaque vocalizations can be recognized.

  7. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V; Allen, John S

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin, Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell's oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell's shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus K{A} , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency f{K} approximately 1/2pi square root[K{A}(rhoa;{3})] , where a is the cell's radius and rho is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency f{K} is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency f{K} however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers).

  9. Effect of bubble deformability on the vertical channel bubbly flow

    OpenAIRE

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the fluid dynamics video: "Effect of bubble deformability on the vertical channel bubbly flow". The effect of bubble deformability on the flow rate of bubbly upflow in a turbulent vertical channel is examined using direct numerical simulations. A series of simulations with bubbles of decreasing deformability reveals a sharp transition from a flow with deformable bubbles uniformly distributed in the middle of the channel to a flow with nearly spherical bubbles with a wal...

  10. Measurement of bubble size distribution in a gas-liquid foam using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Li, Xueliang; Gladden, Lynn F

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, previously used for measuring droplet size distributions in emulsions, has been used to measure bubble size distributions in a non-overflowing pneumatic gas-liquid foam that has been created by sparging propane into an aqueous solution of 1.5g/l (5.20mM) SDS. The bubble size distributions measured were reproducible and approximated a Weibull distribution. However, the bubble size distributions did not materially change with position at which they were measured within the froth. An analysis of foam coarsening due to Ostwald ripening in a non-overflowing foam indicates that, for the experimental conditions employed, one would not expect this to be a significant effect. It is therefore apparent that the eventual collapse of the foam is due to bubble bursting (or surface coalescence) rather than Ostwald ripening. This surface coalescence occurs because of evaporation from the free surface of the foam. An analytical solution for the liquid fraction profile for a certain class of non-overflowing pneumatic foam is given, and a mean bubble size that is appropriate for drainage calculations is suggested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Single bubble sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence occurs when an acoustically trapped and periodically driven gas bubble collapses so strongly that the energy focusing at collapse leads to light emission. Detailed experiments have demonstrated the unique properties of this system: the spectrum of the emitted light

  12. Modelling of the Bubble Size Distribution in an Aerated Stirred Tank: Theoretical and Numerical Comparison of Different Breakup Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kálal Zbyněk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this study is the mathematical modelling of bubble size distributions in an aerated stirred tank using the population balance method. The air-water system consisted of a fully baffled vessel with a diameter of 0.29 m, which was equipped with a six-bladed Rushton turbine. The secondary phase was introduced through a ring sparger situated under the impeller. Calculations were performed with the CFD software CFX 14.5. The turbulent quantities were predicted using the standard k-ε turbulence model. Coalescence and breakup of bubbles were modelled using the MUSIG method with 24 bubble size groups. For the bubble size distribution modelling, the breakup model by Luo and Svendsen (1996 typically has been used in the past. However, this breakup model was thoroughly reviewed and its practical applicability was questioned. Therefore, three different breakup models by Martínez-Bazán et al. (1999a, b, Lehr et al. (2002 and Alopaeus et al. (2002 were implemented in the CFD solver and applied to the system. The resulting Sauter mean diameters and local bubble size distributions were compared with experimental data.

  13. Sensitivity of free radicals production in acoustically driven bubble to the ultrasonic frequency and nature of dissolved gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Central events of ultrasonic action are the bubbles of cavitation that can be considered as powered microreactors within which high-energy chemistry occurs. This work presents the results of a comprehensive numerical assessment of frequency and saturating gases effects on single bubble sonochemistry. Computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring inside a bubble oscillating in liquid water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies (213-1100kHz) under different saturating gases (O2, air, N2 and H2). For O2 and H2 bubbles, reactions mechanism consisting in 25 reversible chemical reactions were proposed for studying the internal bubble-chemistry whereas 73 reversible reactions were taken into account for air and N2 bubbles. The numerical simulations have indicated that radicals such as OH, H, HO2 and O are created in the bubble during the strong collapse. In all cases, hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidant created in the bubble. The production rate of the oxidants decreases as the driving ultrasonic frequency increases. The production rate of OH radical followed the order O2>air>N2>H2 and the order becomes more remarkable at higher ultrasonic frequencies. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on single bubble sonochemistry was attributed to its significant impact on the cavitation process whereas the effects of gases were attributed to the nature of the chemistry produced in the bubble at the strong collapse. It was concluded that, in addition to the gas solubility, the nature of the internal bubble chemistry is another parameter of a paramount importance that controls the overall sonochemical activity in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  15. Optical verification and in-vitro characterization of two commercially available acoustic bubble counters for cardiopulmonary bypass systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Tim; Stehouwer, Marco C; de Somer, Filip M J J; de Mol, Bastian A; Versluis, Michel

    2017-08-01

    Gaseous microemboli (GME) introduced during cardiac surgery are considered as a potential source of morbidity, which has driven the development of the first bubble counters. Two new generation bubble counters, introduced in the early 2000s, claim correct sizing and counting of GME. This in-vitro study aims to validate the accuracy of two bubble counters using monodisperse bubbles in a highly controlled setting at low GME concentrations. Monodisperse GME with a radius of 43 µm were produced in a microfluidic chip. Directly after their formation, they were injected one-by-one into the BCC200 and the EDAC sensors. GME size and count, measured with the bubble counters, were optically verified using high-speed imaging. During best-case scenarios or low GME concentrations of GME with a size of 43 µm in radius in an in-vitro setup, the BCC200 overestimates GME size by a factor of 2 to 3 while the EDAC underestimates the average GME size by at least a factor of two. The BCC200 overestimates the GME concentration by approximately 20% while the EDAC overestimates the concentration by nearly one order of magnitude. Nevertheless, the calculated total GME volume is only over-predicted by a factor 2 since the EDAC underestimates the actual GME size. For the BCC200, the total GME volume was over-predicted by 25 times due to the over-estimation of GME size. The measured errors in the absolute sizing/counting of GME do not imply that all results obtained using the bubble counters are insignificant or invalid. A relative change in bubble size or bubble concentration can accurately be measured. However, care must be taken in the interpretation of the results and their absolute values. Moreover, the devices cannot be used interchangeably when reporting GME activity. Nevertheless, both devices can be used to study the relative air removal characteristics of CPB components or for the quantitative monitoring of GME production during CPB interventions.

  16. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  17. Modeling Bubble Flow and Current Density Distribution in an Alkaline Electrolysis Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandra S. Jupudi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bubbles on the current density distribution over the electrodes of an alkaline electrolyzer cell is studied using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. Model includes Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow methodology to model the multiphase flow of Hydrogen and Oxygen with water and the behavior of each phase is accounted for using first principle. Hydrogen/Oxygen evolution, flow field and current density distribution are incorporated in the model to account for the complicated physics involved in the process. Fluent 6.2 is used to solve two-phase flow and electrochemistry is incorporated using UDF (User Defined Function feature of Fluent. Model is validated with mesh refinement study and by comparison with experimental measurements. Model is found to replicate the effect of cell voltage and inter-electrode gap (distance between the electrodes on current density accurately. Further, model is found to capture the existence of optimum cell height. The validated model is expected to be a very useful tool in the design and optimization of alkaline electrolyzer cells.

  18. Assessment of effective thermal conductivity in U–Mo metallic fuels with distributed gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Casella, Andrew M.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-07-15

    This work presents a numerical method to assess the relative impact of various microstructural features including grain sizes, nanometer scale intragranular gas bubbles, and larger intergranular gas bubbles in irradiated U–Mo metallic fuels on the effective thermal conductivity. A phase-field model was employed to construct a three-dimensional polycrystalline U–Mo fuel alloy with a given crystal morphology and gas bubble microstructures. An effective thermal conductivity “concept” was taken to capture the effect of polycrystalline structures and gas bubble microstructures with significant size differences on the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of inhomogeneous materials was calculated by solving the heat transport equation. The obtained results are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements made on irradiated U–Mo fuel samples containing similar microstructural features. The developed method can be used to predict the thermal conductivity degradation in operating nuclear fuels if the evolution of microstructures is known during operation of the fuel.

  19. Sonar gas flux estimation by bubble insonification: application to methane bubble flux from seep areas in the outer Laptev Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Chernykh, Denis; Shakhova, Natalia; Semiletov, Igor

    2017-06-01

    Sonar surveys provide an effective mechanism for mapping seabed methane flux emissions, with Arctic submerged permafrost seepage having great potential to significantly affect climate. We created in situ engineered bubble plumes from 40 m depth with fluxes spanning 0.019 to 1.1 L s-1 to derive the in situ calibration curve (Q(σ)). These nonlinear curves related flux (Q) to sonar return (σ) for a multibeam echosounder (MBES) and a single-beam echosounder (SBES) for a range of depths. The analysis demonstrated significant multiple bubble acoustic scattering - precluding the use of a theoretical approach to derive Q(σ) from the product of the bubble σ(r) and the bubble size distribution where r is bubble radius. The bubble plume σ occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(σ)) with respect to Q found Ψ(σ) for weak σ well described by a power law that likely correlated with small-bubble dispersion and was strongly depth dependent. Ψ(σ) for strong σ was largely depth independent, consistent with bubble plume behavior where large bubbles in a plume remain in a focused core. Ψ(σ) was bimodal for all but the weakest plumes. Q(σ) was applied to sonar observations of natural arctic Laptev Sea seepage after accounting for volumetric change with numerical bubble plume simulations. Simulations addressed different depths and gases between calibration and seep plumes. Total mass fluxes (Qm) were 5.56, 42.73, and 4.88 mmol s-1 for MBES data with good to reasonable agreement (4-37 %) between the SBES and MBES systems. The seepage flux occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(Q)) was bimodal, with weak Ψ(Q) in each seep area well described by a power law, suggesting primarily minor bubble plumes. The seepage-mapped spatial patterns suggested subsurface geologic control attributing methane fluxes to the current state of subsea permafrost.

  20. Distributions of crystals and gas bubbles in reservoir ice during growth period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the dominant factors of the physical properties of ice in ice thermodynamics and mechanics, in-situ observations of ice growth and decay processes were carried out. Two samplings were conducted in the fast and steady ice growth stages. Ice pieces were used to observe ice crystals and gas bubbles in ice, and to measure the ice density. Vertical profiles of the type and size of ice crystals, shape and size of gas bubbles, and gas bubble content, as well as the ice density, were obtained. The results show that the upper layer of the ice pieces is granular ice and the lower layer is columnar ice; the average crystal size increases with the ice depth and remains steady in the fast and steady ice growth stages; the shape of gas bubbles in the upper layer of ice pieces is spherical with higher total content, and the shape in the middle and lower layers is cylinder with lower total content; the gas bubble size and content vary with the ice growth stage; and the ice density decreases with the increase of the gas bubble content.

  1. Application of analyzer based X-ray imaging technique for detection of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles from a physical therapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Babyn, Paul; Chapman, Dean

    2015-10-19

    The observation of ultrasound generated cavitation bubbles deep in tissue is very difficult. The development of an imaging method capable of investigating cavitation bubbles in tissue would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. Among the previous imaging modalities capable of detecting cavitation bubbles in vivo, the acoustic detection technique has the positive aspect of in vivo application. However the size of the initial cavitation bubble and the amplitude of the ultrasound that produced the cavitation bubbles, affect the timing and amplitude of the cavitation bubbles' emissions. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles, driven by 0.8835 MHz therapeutic ultrasound system at output power of 14 Watt, was studied in water using a synchrotron X-ray imaging technique, Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI). The cavitation bubble distribution was investigated by repeated application of the ultrasound and imaging the water tank. The spatial frequency of the cavitation bubble pattern was evaluated by Fourier analysis. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at four different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The pattern of cavitation bubbles in water was detected by synchrotron X-ray ABI. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles driven by the therapeutic ultrasound system was observed using ABI X-ray imaging technique. It was observed that the cavitation bubbles appeared in a periodic pattern. The calculated distance between intervals revealed that the distance of frequent cavitation lines (intervals) is one-half of the acoustic wave length consistent with standing waves. This set of experiments demonstrates the utility of synchrotron ABI for visualizing cavitation bubbles formed in water by clinical ultrasound systems working at high frequency and output powers as low as a therapeutic system.

  2. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distributions of crystals and gas bubbles in reservoir ice during winter growth period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun LI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the dominant factors of ice physical properties for ice thermodynamics and mechanics, in-situ observations of ice growth and decay processes were carried out. Two samplings were done, in the stages of fast ice growth and steady ice growth. These ice samples were used to observe ice crystals and gas bubbles in ice, and to measure ice density. Vertical profiles of the ice crystal type, ice crystal size, gas bubble shape and size, gas bubble content, as well as ice density were ontained. The results reveal that the upper part of the samples is granular ice and the lower part is columnar ice, the average grain size increases along ice depth and keeps steady within fast and steady ice growth stages; the shape of gas bubbles in ice upper layer is spherical with higher total content, and the shape in the middle and lower layers is cylinder with lower total content; the gas bubble size and content are active along with the ice growth stage; ice density decreases with the gas content increasing.

  4. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-06

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  5. Adaptive and Collaborative Exploitation of 3 Dimensional Environmental Acoustics in Distributed Undersea Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Dimensional Environmental Acoustics in Distributed Undersea Networks PI: Henrik Schmidt Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue...and understanding the spatial diversity of strongly 3D acoustic environments, including both signal and noise. SA core objective is to identify...adaptive waypoint behaviors required by this approach, with validation through field experiments of opportunity. APPROACH The fundamental approach of

  6. Pitch and TDOA-Based Localization of Acoustic Sources with Distributed Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Weiss; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a method for acoustic source localization using distributed microphone arrays based on time-differences of arrival (TDOAs) is presented. The TDOAs are used to estimate the location of an acoustic source using a recently proposed method, based on a 4D parameter space defined by the ...

  7. Comparative Study between Acoustic Emission Analysis and Immersion Bubble-Metric Technique, TGA and TD-GC/MS in View of the Characterization of Granular Activated Carbons Used in Rum Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Crespo Sariol

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and acoustic emission analysis and sound patterns recognition techniques were applied for the characterization of granular activated carbon (GAC. A new and improved methodology has been developed to characterize the exhaustion degree of GAC used in rum production: (1 based on the acoustic emission analysis of the sound produced by water flooded on GAC; and (2 based on the microscopic analysis of bubbles formed by immersion into glycerol. Acoustic measurements are made in a specific set-up, bubble detection and analysis is performed using dedicated software developed in MATLAB® for circular shape pattern detection based on the Hough transform. Both have been correlated with data of GAC characteristics based on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC/MS. Eight samples of GAC used in the rum production, obtained at different depths within the fixed-bed filter, have been evaluated. Good correlations are found between the immersion “bubble-metric” technique and the acoustic measurement data from the original signal processed by Band-Pass (BP filtering at 1.3 kHz and weight loss amounts of adsorbed compounds on the GAC. The found relationship gives the possibility to determine the exhaustion degree of GAC applying these methods and to evaluate high-porosity materials.

  8. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  9. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; von Deimling, Jens Schneider; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-12-05

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information.

  10. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  11. Nonperturbing measurements of spatially distributed underwater acoustic fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Andy R; Petzing, Jon N; Tyrer, John R

    2004-01-01

    Localized changes in the density of water induced by the presence of an acoustic field cause perturbations in the localized refractive index. This relationship has given rise to a number of nonperturbing optical metrology techniques for recording measurement parameters from underwater acoustic fields. A method that has been recently developed involves the use of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) targeted at a fixed, nonvibrating, plate through an underwater acoustic field. Measurements of the rate of change of optical pathlength along a line section enable the identification of the temporal and frequency characteristics of the acoustic wave front. This approach has been extended through the use of a scanning LDV, which facilitates the measurement of a range of spatially distributed parameters. A mathematical model is presented that relates the distribution of pressure amplitude and phase in a planar wave front with the rate of change of optical pathlength measured by the LDV along a specifically orientated laser line section. Measurements of a 1 MHz acoustic tone burst generated by a focused transducer are described and the results presented. Graphical depictions of the acoustic power and phase distribution recorded by the LDV are shown, together with images representing time history during the acoustic wave propagation.

  12. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J. [Meizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany); Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  13. Acoustic Estimates of Distribution and Biomass of Different Acoustic Scattering Types Between the New England Shelf Break and Slope Waters

    KAUST Repository

    McLaren, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Due to their great ecological significance, mesopelagic fishes are attracting a wider audience on account of the large biomass they represent. Data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) provided the opportunity to explore an unknown region of the North-West Atlantic, adjacent to one of the most productive fisheries in the world. Acoustic data collected during the cruise required the identification of acoustically distinct scattering types to make inferences on the migrations, distributions and biomass of mesopelagic scattering layers. Six scattering types were identified by the proposed method in our data and traces their migrations and distributions in the top 200m of the water column. This method was able to detect and trace the movements of three scattering types to 1000m depth, two of which can be further subdivided. This process of identification enabled the development of three physically-derived target-strength models adapted to traceable acoustic scattering types for the analysis of biomass and length distribution to 1000m depth. The abundance and distribution of acoustic targets varied closely in relation to varying physical environments associated with a warm core ring in the New England continental Shelf break region. The continental shelf break produces biomass density estimates that are twice as high as the warm core ring and the surrounding continental slope waters are an order of magnitude lower than either estimate. Biomass associated with distinct layers is assessed and any benefits brought about by upwelling at the edge of the warm core ring are shown not to result in higher abundance of deepwater species. Finally, asymmetric diurnal migrations in shelf break waters contrasts markedly with the symmetry of migrating layers within the warm ring, both in structure and density estimates, supporting a theory of predatorial and nutritional constraints to migrating pelagic species.

  14. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jie, E-mail: shijie@hrbeu.edu.cn; Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo [Acoustic Science and Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei [College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  15. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  16. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy....

  17. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened

  18. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Vicente; López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations.

  19. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Palacios

    Full Text Available Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus. These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations.

  20. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  1. Passive acoustic measurement of bedload grain size distribution using self-generated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Teodor; Geay, Thomas; Gervaise, Cédric; Belleudy, Philippe; Zanker, Sebastien

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring sediment transport processes in rivers is of particular interest to engineers and scientists to assess the stability of rivers and hydraulic structures. Various methods for sediment transport process description were proposed using conventional or surrogate measurement techniques. This paper addresses the topic of the passive acoustic monitoring of bedload transport in rivers and especially the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution from self-generated noise. It discusses the feasibility of linking the acoustic signal spectrum shape to bedload grain sizes involved in elastic impacts with the river bed treated as a massive slab. Bedload grain size distribution is estimated by a regularized algebraic inversion scheme fed with the power spectrum density of river noise estimated from one hydrophone. The inversion methodology relies upon a physical model that predicts the acoustic field generated by the collision between rigid bodies. Here we proposed an analytic model of the acoustic energy spectrum generated by the impacts between a sphere and a slab. The proposed model computes the power spectral density of bedload noise using a linear system of analytic energy spectra weighted by the grain size distribution. The algebraic system of equations is then solved by least square optimization and solution regularization methods. The result of inversion leads directly to the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution. The inversion method was applied to real acoustic data from passive acoustics experiments realized on the Isère River, in France. The inversion of in situ measured spectra reveals good estimations of grain size distribution, fairly close to what was estimated by physical sampling instruments. These results illustrate the potential of the hydrophone technique to be used as a standalone method that could ensure high spatial and temporal resolution measurements for sediment transport in rivers.

  2. Vertical distribution of giant jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai using acoustics and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghun; Lee, Kyounghoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Lee, Hyungbeen; Hwang, Kangseok

    2016-03-01

    Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, which are believed to complete their development in the East China Sea, have started migrating into the Yellow Sea in recent years. We obtained biomass estimates of this species in the Yellow Sea using bottom trawl fishing gear and sighting surveys over a 5-year period. These methods are effective for obtaining N. nomurai jellyfish density estimates and information about the community distribution near the bottom or surface of the sea. To verify the vertical distributions of giant jellyfish between, we used hydroacoustic equipment, including an optical stereo camera system attached to a towed sledge and an echo counting method with scientific echosounder system. Acoustic and optical data were collected while the vessel moved at 3 knots, from which the distribution and density of N. nomurai jellyfish were analyzed. Subsequently, the camera system was towed from a 7 m mean depth to sea level, with the detection range of the acoustic system extending from an 8 m depth to the bottom surface. The optical and acoustic methods indicated the presence of vertical distribution of 0.113 (inds/m3) and 0.064 (inds/m3), respectively. However, the vertical distribution indicated that around 93% of individuals occurred at a depth range of 10-40 m; thus, a 2.4-fold greater density was estimated by acoustic echo counting compared to the optical method.

  3. Bubble coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orvalho, Sandra; Ruzicka, Marek C.; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to present new experimental data on the effect of the bubble approach velocity and liquid viscosity on pairwise bubble coalescence. Measurements were performed to investigate the dynamics of bubble coalescence under well-defined laboratory conditions. Air and pure

  4. Relaxation of Distributed Data Aggregation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    2 3.1 Gossip algorithms for distributed averaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.2 Distributed particle filtering...algorithm that had direct access to all of the measurements. We use gossip algorithms (discussed in Section 3.1) to diffuse information across the...2 3.1 Gossip algorithms for distributed averaging We begin by discussing gossip algorithms, which we use to synchronize and spread infor- mation

  5. Na emission and bubble instability in single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pak-Kon; Takumori, Keisuke; Lee, Hyang-Bok

    2017-09-01

    Na emission in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) was observed from 0.1mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution containing a dissolved noble gas at a low acoustic pressure, at which a continuous spectral component was negligible. High-speed shadowgraph movies were captured at a frame rate of 30,000fps, which indicated that bubble dancing is responsible for the Na emission. The measured bubble path length was well correlated with the Na intensity. The disintegration of a daughter bubble followed by immediate coalescence was frequently observed, which may have been the cause of the bubble dancing. A comparison of the Na spectra obtained in SBSL and multibubble SL showed that the conditions under which Na emission is generated are twofold. A narrow component was observed in the Na spectrum in SBSL, while narrow and broad components were observed in MBSL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental study on 2-D acoustic characteristics and hydrate distribution in sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Qingtao; Hu, Gaowei; Ye, Yuguang; Liu, Changling; Li, Chengfeng; Wang, Jiasheng

    2017-11-01

    An experimental system was developed to measure the acoustic velocity of hydrate-bearing sands and to infer their 2-D velocity structure and hydrate content during hydrate formation. For this purpose, sands of two different grain sizes were chosen and arranged in alternating layers in a pressure vessel before saturating them with a solution of dissolved methane gas in a sodium dodecyl sulphate solution. During cooling and subsequent hydrate formation, acoustic velocities were measured with ultrasonic probes along the vessel wall. Hydrate formation was measured by time domain reflectometry. A straight ray-tracing method and an iterative algorithm based on the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique algorithm were used to perform forward modelling and inversion of the ultrasonic tomography. The tomography results were used to obtain acoustic velocity profile distribution images of hydrate formation in loose sediments. The results show that the acoustic velocity in each layer increases rapidly when the hydrate saturation is less than 20 per cent. In contrast, the acoustic velocity increases slowly when the hydrate saturation is greater than 20 per cent. The effective medium theory was used to describe the changes of velocities with hydrate saturation. The empirical formula of P and S-wave velocity in hydrate-bearing sediments as well as the correlation between the wave velocity ratio and the hydrate saturation are also obtained. In the first stage of hydrate formation, the acoustic velocity is larger in the coarse sediment than in the fine sediment. At the end of hydrate formation, the acoustic velocities in different layers differ little and the hydrates are nearly homogeneously distributed in the reservoir. The 2-D velocity structure and inferred hydrate distribution indicate that in the longitudinal direction, the hydrate preferentially forms close to the gas source, thus the acoustic velocity is large in this area. In the transverse direction, the hydrate

  7. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broučková Zuzana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple „kitchen” experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  8. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication - YIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal...concern that ambient ocean sound levels are increasing and could impact signal detection of important acoustic signals being used by animals for...to address the following project objectives: 1. Determine the major sources (or drivers) of variation in low frequency ambient sound levels on a

  9. Condition monitoring of industrial infrastructures using distributed fibre optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, Konstantin; Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Eisermann, René; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-04-01

    Distributed fibre optic acoustic sensing (DAS) can serve as an excellent tool for real-time condition monitoring of a variety of industrial and civil infrastructures. In this paper, we portray a subset of our current research activities investigating the usability of DAS based on coherent optical time-domain reflectometry (C-OTDR) for innovative and demanding condition monitoring applications. Specifically, our application-oriented research presented here aims at acoustic and vibrational condition monitoring of pipelines and piping systems, of rollers in industrial heavy-duty conveyor belt systems and of extensive submarine power cable installations, respectively.

  10. Using Acoustics to Determine Eelgrass Bed Distribution and to Assess the Seasonal Variation of Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoki, Shiori; Shao, Huamei; Morita, Yuka; Minami, Kenji; Shoji, Jun; Hori, Masakazu; Miyashita, Kazushi

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass beds are an important source of primary production in coastal ecosystems. Understanding seasonal variation in the abundance and distribution of eelgrass is important for conservation, and the objectives of this study were to 1) monitor seasonal variation in eelgrass beds using an acoustic monitoring method (Quantitative echo sounder) and 2) broadly quantify the carbon circulation function. We obtained acoustic data of eelgrass beds in coastal areas north and east of Ikunojima Island. Surveys were conducted nine times over the 3-year period from 2011 to 2013 in order to monitor seasonal variation. Acoustic data were obtained and used to estimate the spatial distribution of eelgrass by geostatistical methods. To determine supporting services, we determined carbon sink and carbon fixation by eelgrass beds using data from the National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea (2011). The height and distribution of eelgrass beds were at a maximum in May and at a minimum in November of each year. Distribution trends were different between the north and east areas. Supporting services showed the same patterns throughout the year. The area of distribution was considered to be coincident with the life history of eelgrass. Distribution differed by area and changed yearly due to the effects of bottom characteristics and wind direction. Quantifying the supporting services of eelgrass beds was shown to be useful for managing the conservation of coastal ecosystems.

  11. Electron acoustic solitary waves with non-thermal distribution of electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Singh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron-acoustic solitary waves are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-thermally distributed electrons, fluid cold electrons and ions. The Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique is used to carry out the analysis. The presence of non-thermal electrons modifies the parametric region where electron acoustic solitons can exist. For parameters representative of auroral zone field lines, the electron acoustic solitons do not exist when either α > 0.225 or Tc/Th > 0.142, where α is the fractional non-thermal electron density, and Tc (Th represents the temperature of cold (hot electrons. Further, for these parameters, the simple model predicts negatively charged potential structures. Inclusion of an electron beam in the model may provide the positive potential solitary structures.

  12. Sonar gas flux estimation by bubble insonification: application to methane bubble flux from seep areas in the outer Laptev Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Leifer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonar surveys provide an effective mechanism for mapping seabed methane flux emissions, with Arctic submerged permafrost seepage having great potential to significantly affect climate. We created in situ engineered bubble plumes from 40 m depth with fluxes spanning 0.019 to 1.1 L s−1 to derive the in situ calibration curve (Q(σ. These nonlinear curves related flux (Q to sonar return (σ for a multibeam echosounder (MBES and a single-beam echosounder (SBES for a range of depths. The analysis demonstrated significant multiple bubble acoustic scattering – precluding the use of a theoretical approach to derive Q(σ from the product of the bubble σ(r and the bubble size distribution where r is bubble radius. The bubble plume σ occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(σ with respect to Q found Ψ(σ for weak σ well described by a power law that likely correlated with small-bubble dispersion and was strongly depth dependent. Ψ(σ for strong σ was largely depth independent, consistent with bubble plume behavior where large bubbles in a plume remain in a focused core. Ψ(σ was bimodal for all but the weakest plumes. Q(σ was applied to sonar observations of natural arctic Laptev Sea seepage after accounting for volumetric change with numerical bubble plume simulations. Simulations addressed different depths and gases between calibration and seep plumes. Total mass fluxes (Qm were 5.56, 42.73, and 4.88 mmol s−1 for MBES data with good to reasonable agreement (4–37 % between the SBES and MBES systems. The seepage flux occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(Q was bimodal, with weak Ψ(Q in each seep area well described by a power law, suggesting primarily minor bubble plumes. The seepage-mapped spatial patterns suggested subsurface geologic control attributing methane fluxes to the current state of subsea permafrost.

  13. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  14. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  15. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Noack, J.; Vogel, A. [Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  16. Effect of dust size distribution on ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas with different dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Yang, Yang; Yan, Qiang [Northwest Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering (China); Wang, Xiao-Yun [Lanzhou Jiao Tong University, Department of Mathematics and Physics (China); Duan, Wen-Shan, E-mail: duanws@126.com [Northwest Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering (China)

    2017-02-15

    Theoretical studies are carried out for ion acoustic solitons in multicomponent nonuniform plasma considering the dust size distribution. The Korteweg−de Vries equation for ion acoustic solitons is given by using the reductive perturbation technique. Two special dust size distributions are considered. The dependences of the width and amplitude of solitons on dust size parameters are shown. It is found that the properties of a solitary wave depend on the shape of the size distribution function of dust grains.

  17. Calculation of an axial temperature distribution using the reflection coefficient of an acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2015-10-01

    This work verifies the idea that in principle it is possible to reconstruct axial temperature distribution of fluid employing reflection or transmission of acoustic waves. It is assumed that the fluid is dissipationless and its density and speed of sound vary along the wave propagation direction because of the fluid temperature distribution. A numerical algorithm is proposed allowing for calculation of the temperature distribution on the basis of known frequency characteristics of reflection coefficient modulus. Functionality of the algorithm is illustrated on a few examples, its properties are discussed.

  18. Asymmetric transmission of acoustic waves in a layer thickness distribution gradient structure using metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-San Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research presents an innovative asymmetric transmission design using alternate layers of water and metamaterial with complex mass density. The directional transmission behavior of acoustic waves is observed numerically inside the composite structure with gradient layer thickness distribution and the rectifying performance of the present design is evaluated. The layer thickness distributions with arithmetic and geometric gradients are considered and the effect of gradient thickness on asymmetric wave propagation is systematically investigated using finite element simulation. The numerical results indicate that the maximum pressure density and transmission through the proposed structure are significantly influenced by the wave propagation direction over a wide range of audible frequencies. Tailoring the thickness of the layered structure enables the manipulation of asymmetric wave propagation within the desired frequency range. In conclusion, the proposed design offers a new possibility for developing directional-dependent acoustic devices.

  19. Acoustic Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-15

    In about 1850, Berthelot began to measure the tensile strength of water and found it to be on the order of 6 50 bars (maximum) . (Note, in this... Berthelot was able to calculate a tensile strength. Many other measurements of the tensile strength of water through these static means have been made...liquid to remove such sub- 4 stances. Berthelot was able to estimate the tensile strength of water to be in the range of 30 -50 bars. Briggs 9 and

  20. Intensification of ultrasonic-assisted crude oil demulsification based on acoustic field distribution data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Matheus F; Enders, Michele S P; Pereira, Leticia S F; Mesko, Marcia F; Flores, Erico M M; Bizzi, Cezar A

    2017-04-02

    Water removal is an essential step during crude oil production due to several problems such as increased transportation costs and high corrosion rate due to dissolved salts. Indirect low frequency ultrasonic energy (US), using baths, has been recently proposed as an effective alternative for crude oil demulsification. However, the reactor position during sonication and its influence on the demulsification efficiency for crude oil has not been evaluated. In this sense, the aim of this study was to develop an automated system based on an open source hardware for mapping the acoustic field distribution in an US bath operating at 35kHz using a hydrophone. Data acquired with this system provided information to evaluate the demulsification efficiency in the different positions of the US bath and correlate it with the acoustic intensity distribution. The automated 3D-mapping system revealed a higher acoustic intensity in the regions immediately above the transducers (ca. 0.6Wcm(-2)), while the other regions presented a relatively lower intensity (ca. 0.1Wcm(-2)). Experimental data demonstrated that reactors positioned in the most intense acoustic regions provided a much higher efficiency of demulsification in comparison with the ones positioned in the less intense acoustic field regions. Demulsification efficiency up to 93% was obtained with 15min of sonication (100% amplitude) using few amount of chemical demulsifier. Hence, this work demonstrated that the information acquired with the developed mapping system could be used for inducing a higher efficiency of demulsification only by finding the more suitable position of reactor in the US bath, which certainly will help development of appropriate reactors design when looking for such approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  2. Spatial distribution of macroalgae along the shores of Kongsfjorden (West Spitsbergen using acoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruss Aleksandra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of macroalgal beds is a crucial component for the description of fjord ecosystems. Direct, biological sampling is still the most popular investigation technique but acoustic methods are becoming increasingly recognized as a very efficient tool for the assessment of benthic communities. In 2007 we carried out the first acoustic survey of the littoral areas in Kongsfjorden. A 2.68 km2 area comprised within a 12.40 km2 euphotic zone was mapped along the fjord’s coast using single- and multi-beam echosounders. The singlebeam echosounder (SBES proved to be a very efficient and reliable tool for macroalgae detection in Arctic conditions. The multibeam echosounder (MBES was very useful in extending the SBES survey range, even though it’s ability in discriminating benthic communities was limited. The final result of our investigation is a map of the macroalgae distribution around the fjord, showing 39% macroalgae coverage (1.09 km2 of investigated area between isobaths -0.70 m and -30 m. Zonation analysis showed that most of the studied macroalgae areas occur up to 15 m depth (93%. These results were confirmed by biological sampling and observation in key areas. The potential of acoustic imaging of macrophytes, and a proposed methodology for the processing of acoustic data, are presented in this paper along with preliminary studies on the acoustic reflectivity of macroalgae, also highlighting differences among species. These results can be applied to future monitoring of the evolution of kelp beds in different areas of the Arctic, and in the rest of the world.

  3. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well...

  4. Moving single bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troia, A; Ripa, D Madonna; Spagnolo, R

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of sonoluminescence still presents some unsolved aspects. Recently [Y.T. Didenko, K. Suslick, Molecular Emission during Single Bubble Sonoluminescence, Nature 407 (2000) 877-879.], it was found that a single cavitating air bubble in polar aprotic liquids (including formamide and adiponitrile) can produce very strong sonoluminescence while undergoing macroscopic translation movements in the resonator, a condition known as moving single bubble sonoluminescing (MSBSL). Here we describe some experiments conducted in aqueous solutions of phosphoric and sulphuric acid. In these liquid media, it is possible to reproduce MSBSL and luminescence is emitted even if a trapped bubble is subjected to a strong shape instability, named in the literature "jittering phase". When a moving and luminescing bubble was present and the acoustic pressure gradually increased, we observed the generation of a discrete lattice of trapped bubbles. The bubbles in the lattice emit very intense light flashes and can change their position while maintaining the overall spatial distribution in time. Some preliminary results, obtained from Mie-scattering and measurements of relative light intensity, are reported.

  5. Effect of wind-generated bubbles on fixed range acoustic attenuation in shallow water at 1-4 kHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Long-range acoustic propagation in isothermal conditions is considered, involving multiple reflections from the sea surface. If the sea is calm there is almost perfect reflection and hence little loss of acoustic energy or coherence. The effect of wind is to increase propagation loss due to rough

  6. Shelf-Scale Mapping of Fish Distribution Using Active and Passive Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Carrie C.

    Fish sound production has been associated with courtship and spawning behavior. Acoustic recordings of fish sounds can be used to identify distribution and behavior. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) can record large amounts of acoustic data in a specific area for days to years. These data can be collected in remote locations under potentially unsafe seas throughout a 24-hour period providing datasets unattainable using observer-based methods. However, the instruments must withstand the caustic ocean environment and be retrieved to obtain the recorded data. This can prove difficult due to the risk of PAMs being lost, stolen or damaged, especially in highly active areas. In addition, point-source sound recordings are only one aspect of fish biogeography. Passive acoustic platforms that produce low self-generated noise, have high retrieval rates, and are equipped with a suite of environmental sensors are needed to relate patterns in fish sound production to concurrently collected oceanographic conditions on large, synoptic scales. The association of sound with reproduction further invokes the need for such non-invasive, near-real time datasets that can be used to enhance current management methods limited by survey bias, inaccurate fisher reports, and extensive delays between fisheries data collection and population assessment. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio) exhibit the distinctive behavior of digging holes and producing a unique sound during courtship. These behaviors can be used to identify red grouper distribution and potential spawning habitat over large spatial scales. The goal of this research was to provide a greater understanding of the temporal and spatial distribution of red grouper sound production and holes on the central West Florida Shelf (WFS) using active sonar and passive acoustic recorders. The technology demonstrated here establishes the necessary methods to map shelf-scale fish sound production. The results of this work could aid resource

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  9. Aeration and bubble measurements of coastal breaking waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Nobuhito [Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kakuno, Shohachi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: mori@oceanwave.jp

    2008-07-30

    The air entrainment process of surf zone waves is studied experimentally to understand as a first step of two-phase characteristics of surf zone breaking waves. A set of laboratory experiments of free surface elevation, water velocity, void fraction and bubble distribution is conducted simultaneously for regular gravity wave breaking on a plane slope. The in situ data are collected by using a measurement array of wave gages, a dual-tip resistivity void fraction probe and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. Two-dimensional projected bubble size measurements are conduced by the high speed camera with imaging technique. The experimental data show a linear relationship between the void fraction and turbulent intensity. In addition, the bubble size distributions are proportional to the bubble size to the power of -1 and -3.4 independent of the distance from breaking point and water depth. The length scale separating two power laws is the Hinze scale which corresponds to the wave energy dissipation scale. This result will be important for modeling and implication for the study of surf zone dynamics.

  10. The Effect of Fabric Position to the Distribution of Acoustic Pressure Field in Ultrasonic Bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, B. O.; Özdemir, A. O.; Tonay, Ö.; Şener, M.; Perinçek, S.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the use of ultrasonic energy in textile wet processes at industrial-scale is limited. It is largely due to the lack of understanding about design, operational and performance characteristics of the ultrasonic bath, suitable for textile treatments. In the context of this study, the effect of fabric position, as one of the design parameter, to the distribution of acoustic pressure field in ultrasonic bath was investigated. The ultrasonic bath in the size 20×30 cm2 with one transducer at frequency 40 kHz was used in experiments. The cotton fabric with 1 mm thickness was moved along vertical and horizontal directions of the ultrasonic bath. The acoustic field and cavitation volume density in the bath is analyzed by COMSOL Multiphysic. The cavitation volume density is calculated by comparing the pressure points in the bath with cavitation threshold pressure. Consequently, it was found that the position of the textile material in the ultrasonic bath is one of the most important factors to achieve the uniform and maximum acoustic cavitation field. So, it should be taken into consideration during the design of industrial-scale ultrasonic bath used in textile wet processes.

  11. Filter Bubble vs. Preference Bubble

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Hanna-Stiina; Soliman, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön aiheena oli internetin personointi ja siitä aiheutuva filter bubble –ilmiö. Tarkoituksena oli tutkia kuluttajien suhtautumista ilmiöön, jota Suomessa ei vielä tunnisteta laajasti. Suhtautuminen haluttiin tuoda esiin vastakkainasettelun avulla. Filter bubble –näkökulma edusti tässä työssä ilmiön negatiivista suhtautumistapaa ja preference bubble –näkökulma positiivista. Opinnäytetyö oli tietopaketti yrityksille Filter bubble –ilmiön ominaisuuksista sekä sen käyttäytymisestä...

  12. Capillary meniscus dynamometry - Method for determining the surface tension of drops and bubbles with isotropic and anisotropic surface stress distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Stanimirova, R.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Marinova, K.G.; Alexandrov, N.A.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Blijdenstein, T.B.J.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The stresses acting in interfacial adsorption layers with surface shear elasticity are, in general, anisotropic and non-uniform. If a pendant drop or buoyant bubble is covered with such elastic layer, the components of surface tension acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", σs

  13. High-Frequency Pulsed-Electro-Acoustic (PEA) Measurements for Mapping Charge Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kristina; Pearson, Lee; Dennison, J. R.; Doyle, Timothy; Hartley, Kent

    2012-10-01

    High-frequency pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements are a non-destructive method used to investigate internal charge distributions in dielectric materials. This presentation discusses the theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments and shows results of PEA measurements. PEA experiments involve a thin dielectric positioned between two conducting electrodes. A voltage signal on the two electrodes generates an electric field across the dielectric, which stimulates embedded charge and creates a pressure wave that propagates within the capacitor. A coupled acoustic sensor then measures the ensuing pressure pulse response. Spatial distributions of the charge profile are obtained from the resultant pressure waveform. Gaussian filters and other signal processing methods are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in this waveform. Estimates of the charge distribution inside the dielectric are extracted from this analysis. Our ultimate objective is to develop high resolution PEA methods to investigate in vacuo charge deposition in thin film polymeric, ceramic, or glass dielectric materials using medium to high energy (approximately 103 to 107 eV) electron beams.

  14. Localizing Near and Far Field Acoustic Sources with Distributed Microhone Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Weiss; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of acoustic source localization using distributed microphone arrays. Time differences of arrival (TDOAs) are estimated using a recently proposed method based on joint direction of arrival (DOA) and range estimation. The TDOAs are used to estimate the location...... on joint DOA and pitch estimation, using synthesized harmonic signals with varying source position. Results show a decrease in the error of the estimated position when joint DOA and range estimation is used for TDOA estimation, compared to the GCC-PHAT and joint DOA and pitch methods....

  15. Determination of unsteady heat release distribution from acoustic pressure measurements: a reformulation of the inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, P Bala; Sujith, R I; Ramakrishna, M

    2003-08-01

    An integral method is developed to solve the inverse problem of determining the oscillatory heat release distribution from the knowledge of the acoustic pressure field within a combustor. Unlike earlier approaches, in which the problem is formulated in terms of Fredholm integral equation, the inverse problem is reformulated in terms of Volterra integral equation. This reformulation, valid for low Mach numbers (M2 Volterra integral equation is solved using both direct numerical method and implicit least-squares method. The results show that the implicit least-squares method is superior to the direct numerical method and yields accurate determination of heat release at all frequencies.

  16. Resonant Scattering of Acoustic Phonons by Randomly Distributed Two-Level Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayanuma, Yosuke; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1985-07-01

    A Green function formalism is developed for the resonant scattering of acoustic phonons by randomly distributed two-level systems. The randomness is treated by the coherent potential approximation. The theory reproduces the Jacobsen-Stevens dispersion law in the dense limit of the concentration of the two-level system and the results obtained so far by the average t-matrix approximation in the dilute limit. The gradual change of the character of the resonantly scattered phonons as the concentration is varied is investigated through the calculation of various quantities such as the phonon density of states, the neutron scattering cross sections and the sound velocity.

  17. Implementation of distributed feedback fiber laser sensor for acoustic measurements in hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Yan, Aidong; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Lu, Guanyi; Bunger, Andrew P.; Miller, Gary A.; Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser strain sensor was implemented to measure acoustic emission induced by the hydraulic fracturing process. A study of practical sensor mounting configurations and their characteristics was carried out to find a practical solution. Combining the suitable mounting configuration and ultrahigh strain sensitivity of the DFB fiber laser, the evolution of the hydraulic fracturing process was well monitored. This study shows that fiber lasers can be useful alternatives to piezoelectric sensors in the field of hydraulic fracturing for gas and oil extraction.

  18. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  19. Achile : a system based on parallel-distributed processes for speaker-independent acoustic-phonetic decoding and word recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Ghio, Alain

    1997-01-01

    The aim of Speech Recognition is to identify with machines what a speaker is saying. This process can recognise sounds (acoustic-phonetic decoding), words (isolated-words recognition) or sentences. Engineers can build such a system only for a specified user or for different speakers. ACHILE is a system based on parallel-distributed processes for speaker-independent acoustic-phonetic decoding and words recognition. This is a speaker-independent isolated-words recognition system without learnin...

  20. Pressure waves in a supersaturated bubbly magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzon, I.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Navon, O.; Chouet, B.

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction of acoustic pressure waves with an expanding bubbly magma. The expansion of magma is the result of bubble growth during or following magma decompression and leads to two competing processes that affect pressure waves. On the one hand, growth in vesicularity leads to increased damping and decreased wave amplitudes, and on the other hand, a decrease in the effective bulk modulus of the bubbly mixture reduces wave velocity, which in turn, reduces damping and may lead to wave amplification. The additional acoustic energy originates from the chemical energy released during bubble growth. We examine this phenomenon analytically to identify conditions under which amplification of pressure waves is possible. These conditions are further examined numerically to shed light on the frequency and phase dependencies in relation to the interaction of waves and growing bubbles. Amplification is possible at low frequencies and when the growth rate of bubbles reaches an optimum value for which the wave velocity decreases sufficiently to overcome the increased damping of the vesicular material. We examine two amplification phase-dependent effects: (1) a tensile-phase effect in which the inserted wave adds to the process of bubble growth, utilizing the energy associated with the gas overpressure in the bubble and therefore converting a large proportion of this energy into additional acoustic energy, and (2) a compressive-phase effect in which the pressure wave works against the growing bubbles and a large amount of its acoustic energy is dissipated during the first cycle, but later enough energy is gained to amplify the second cycle. These two effects provide additional new possible mechanisms for the amplification phase seen in Long-Period (LP) and Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic signals originating in magma-filled cracks.

  1. Dynamics of micro-bubble sonication inside a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2013-01-10

    A model for sonicated micro-bubble oscillations inside a phantom vessel is proposed. The model is not a variant of conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation and is obtained from reduced Navier-Stokes equations. The model relates the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics with geometric and acoustic parameters in a consistent manner. It predicts micro-bubble oscillation dynamics as well as micro-bubble fragmentation when compared to the experimental data. For large micro-bubble radius to vessel diameter ratios, predictions are damped, suggesting breakdown of inherent modeling assumptions for these cases. Micro-bubble response with acoustic parameters is consistent with experiments and provides physical insight to the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics.

  2. Distribution, abundance and acoustic properties of Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) in the Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Richard L.; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Gauthier, Stéphane; Pinkerton, Matt; Hanchet, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) is a key link between plankton and the community of top predators in the shelf waters of the Ross Sea. In spite of their abundance and important role in Antarctic food chains, very little is known of many ecological and biological aspects of this species. A combined trawl and acoustic survey of silverfish was carried out on the western Ross Sea shelf during the New Zealand International Polar Year Census of Antarctic Marine Life research voyage on R.V. Tangaroa in February-March 2008. Multi-frequency acoustic data (12, 38, 70, and 120 kHz) allowed discrimination of silverfish marks from those of krill and other associated species. Mark identification was achieved using targeted midwater trawls. Additional midwater and demersal trawls were carried out at randomly selected locations over the shelf as part of the core biodiversity survey. Silverfish were widely distributed over the Ross Sea shelf. Adult silverfish tended to form layers at 100-400 m depth and were sometimes present close to the bottom, where they were frequently caught in demersal trawls shallower than 500 m. A weak layer at about 80 m depth was associated with juvenile silverfish of 50-80 mm standard length. Acoustic backscatter strength from both silverfish and krill marks increased with increasing frequency (i.e., was highest at 120 kHz), which is characteristic of species without an air-filled swimbladder. Acoustic target strengths (TS) for silverfish at 12, 18, 38, 70, and 120 kHz were estimated from anatomically detailed scattering models based on computed tomography (CT) scans of frozen specimens. The relationship between TS and fish length at 38 kHz was sensitive to estimates of density and sound speed contrast within the fish, especially for small specimens (less than 110 mm SL). Our best estimate of the acoustic biomass of silverfish in the study area was 592 000 t (95% confidence interval 326 000-866 000 t). However, the biomass of juvenile

  3. Acoustic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U. [Drittes Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Akhatov, I. [Department of Continuous Media Mechanics, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450074 (Russia)

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Effects of argon sparging rate, ultrasonic power, and frequency on multibubble sonoluminescence spectra and bubble dynamics in NaCl aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairós, Carlos; Schneider, Julia; Pflieger, Rachel; Mettin, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The sonoluminescence spectra from acoustic cavitation in aqueous NaCl solutions are systematically studied in a large range of ultrasonic frequencies under variation of electrical power and argon sparging. At the same time, bubble dynamics are analysed by high-speed imaging. Sodium line and continuum emission are evaluated for acoustic driving at 34.5, 90, 150, 365, and 945kHz in the same reactor vessel. The results show that the ratio of sodium line to continuum emission can be shifted by the experimental parameters: an increase in the argon flow increases the ratio, while an increase in power leads to a decrease. At 945kHz, the sodium line is drastically reduced, while the continuum stays at elevated level. Bubble observations reveal a remarkable effect of argon in terms of bubble distribution and stability: larger bubbles of non-spherical shapes form and eject small daughter bubbles which in turn populate the whole liquid. As a consequence, the bubble interactions (splitting, merging) appear enhanced which supports a link between non-spherical bubble dynamics and sodium line emission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Leverage bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  6. Reconstruction method for inversion problems in an acoustic tomography based temperature distribution measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Liu, Shi; Tong, Guowei

    2017-11-01

    In industrial areas, temperature distribution information provides a powerful data support for improving system efficiency, reducing pollutant emission, ensuring safety operation, etc. As a noninvasive measurement technology, acoustic tomography (AT) has been widely used to measure temperature distribution where the efficiency of the reconstruction algorithm is crucial for the reliability of the measurement results. Different from traditional reconstruction techniques, in this paper a two-phase reconstruction method is proposed to ameliorate the reconstruction accuracy (RA). In the first phase, the measurement domain is discretized by a coarse square grid to reduce the number of unknown variables to mitigate the ill-posed nature of the AT inverse problem. By taking into consideration the inaccuracy of the measured time-of-flight data, a new cost function is constructed to improve the robustness of the estimation, and a grey wolf optimizer is used to solve the proposed cost function to obtain the temperature distribution on the coarse grid. In the second phase, the Adaboost.RT based BP neural network algorithm is developed for predicting the temperature distribution on the refined grid in accordance with the temperature distribution data estimated in the first phase. Numerical simulations and experiment measurement results validate the superiority of the proposed reconstruction algorithm in improving the robustness and RA.

  7. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers using distributed point source method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarzade, M; Kundu, T; Liebeaux, N; Placko, D; Mobadersani, F

    2010-05-01

    In spite of many advances in analytical and numerical modeling techniques for solving different engineering problems, an efficient solution technique for wave propagation modeling of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) system is still missing. Distributed point source method (DPSM) is a newly developed semi-analytical technique developed since 2000 by Placko and Kundu (2007) [12] that is very powerful and straightforward for solving various engineering problems, including acoustic and electromagnetic modeling problems. In this study DPSM has been employed to model the Lorentz type EMAT with a meander line and flat spiral type coil. The problem of wave propagation has been solved and eddy currents and Lorentz forces have been calculated. The displacement field has been obtained as well. While modeling the Lorentz force the effect of dynamic magnetic field has been considered that most current analyses ignore. Results from this analysis have been compared with the finite element method (FEM) based predictions. It should be noted that with the current state of knowledge this problem can be solved only by FEM. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Grain size distributions and their effects on auto-acoustic compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of geophysical and geomorphological processes depend on the response of granular mixtures to shear stress. For example, if shear sliding in a fault zone causes gouge to compact or dilate, this has implications on our understanding of earthquake nucleation and propagation. The behavior of granular flows has previously been found to be strongly dependent on shear rate. At relatively slow shear velocities, a granular flow will support stresses elastically through force chains in what is recognized as the 'quasi-static' regime. At relatively high shear velocities, it will support stresses by transferring momentum in higher velocity grain collisions in the 'grain-inertial' regime, which results in dilation of the flow. Recent experiments conducted using a commercial torsional rheometer found that at intermediate shear velocities, force chain collapse in angular sand samples produced sound waves capable of vibrating the shear zone enough to cause compaction. To expand on the characterization of this newly identified rheological regime, the 'auto-acoustic' regime, we used the same experimental set up to observe how volumetric and acoustic response to shear stress changes with grain size mean and range. Stepped velocity ramp experiments were conducted first on five separate grain size bins, and then on various mixtures of these grain sizes. As expected, larger grain sizes entered the mass-dependent grain-inertial regime at lower shear velocities than smaller grain sizes. Interestingly, smaller grain sizes exhibited more pronounced compaction at slower velocities resulting from the auto-acoustic regime, and the largest grain sizes showed no compaction, implying a grain size threshold for auto-acoustic compaction. In mixtures of different grain size bins, the response of the flow to intermediate shear velocities was consistent with the response of the smallest grain size bin included in the mixture, while the response of the flow to high shear velocities was most

  9. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  10. Using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and acoustic radiation force elasticity microscope to measure the spatial distribution of corneal elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Xin; Fan, Zhongwei; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Corneal biomechanics plays an important role in determining the eye's structural integrity, optical power and the overall quality of vision. It also plays an increasingly recognized role in corneal transplant and refractive surgery, affecting the predictability, quality and stability of final visual outcome [1]. A critical limitation to increasing our understanding of how corneal biomechanics controls corneal stability and refraction is the lack of non-invasive technologies that microscopically measure local biomechanical properties, such as corneal elasticity within the 3D space. Bubble based acoustic radiation force elastic microscopy (ARFEM) introduce the opportunity to measure the inhomogeneous elastic properties of the cornea by the movement of a micron size cavitation bubble generated by a low energy femtosecond laser pulse [2, 3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) also known as laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) or laser spark spectrometry (LSS) is an atomic emission spectroscopy [4]. The LIBS principle of operation is quite simple, although the physical processes involved in the laser matter interaction are complex and still not completely understood. In one sentence for description, the laser pulses are focused down to a target so as to generate plasma that vaporizes a small amount of material which the emitted spectrum is measured to analysis the elements of the target.

  11. Sonoluminescence and dynamics of cavitation bubble populations in sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Andrea; Holsteyns, Frank; Cairós, Carlos; Mettin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The detailed link of liquid phase sonochemical reactions and bubble dynamics is still not sufficiently known. To further clarify this issue, we image sonoluminescence and bubble oscillations, translations, and shapes in an acoustic cavitation setup at 23kHz in sulfuric acid with dissolved sodium sulfate and xenon gas saturation. The colour of sonoluminescence varies in a way that emissions from excited non-volatile sodium atoms are prominently observed far from the acoustic horn emitter ("red region"), while such emissions are nearly absent close to the horn tip ("blue region"). High-speed images reveal the dynamics of distinct bubble populations that can partly be linked to the different emission regions. In particular, we see smaller strongly collapsing spherical bubbles within the blue region, while larger bubbles with a liquid jet during collapse dominate the red region. The jetting is induced by the fast bubble translation, which is a consequence of acoustic (Bjerknes) forces in the ultrasonic field. Numerical simulations with a spherical single bubble model reproduce quantitatively the volume oscillations and fast translation of the sodium emitting bubbles. Additionally, their intermittent stopping is explained by multistability in a hysteretic parameter range. The findings confirm the assumption that bubble deformations are responsible for pronounced sodium sonoluminescence. Notably the observed translation induced jetting appears to serve as efficient mixing mechanism of liquid into the heated gas phase of collapsing bubbles, thus potentially promoting liquid phase sonochemistry in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acoustic cavitation mechanism: a nonlinear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2012-03-01

    During acoustic cavitation process, bubbles appear when acoustic pressure reaches a threshold value in the liquid. The ultrasonic field is then submitted to the action of the bubbles. In this paper we develop a model to analyze the cavitation phenomenon in one-dimensional standing waves, based on the nonlinear code SNOW-BL. Bubbles are produced where the minimum rarefaction pressure peak exceeds the cavitation threshold. We show that cavitation bubbles appear at high amplitude and drastically affect (dissipation, dispersion, and nonlinearity) the ultrasonic field. This paper constitutes the first work that associates the nonlinear ultrasonic field to a bubble generation process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  14. Interacting bubble clouds and their sonochemical production

    CERN Document Server

    Stricker, Laura; Rivas, David Fernandez; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Acoustically driven air pockets trapped in artificial crevices on a sur- face can emit bubbles which organize in (interacting) bubble clusters. With increasing driving power Fernandez Rivas et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2010] observed three different behaviors: clusters close to the very pits out of which they had been created, clusters pointing toward each other, and merging clusters. The latter behavior is highly undesired for technological purposes as it is associated with a reduction of the radical production and an enhancement of the erosion of the reactor walls. The dependence on the control parameters such as the distance of the pits and the conditions for cluster-merging are examined. The underlying mechanism, governed by the secondary Bjerknes forces, turns out to be strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the bubble oscillations and not directly by the number of nucleated bubbles. The Bjerknes forces are found to dampen the bubble oscillations, thus reducing the radical production. Therefore, th...

  15. Modulated ion acoustic waves in a plasma with Cairns-Gurevich distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Zedan, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The amplitude modulation of ion acoustic envelope solitary waves in the presence of Cairns-Gurevich distributed electrons has been investigated. Using a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation has been derived. The modulational instability (MI) and its dependence on the system physical parameters and the combined effects of trapped and nonthermal electrons have been analyzed. It is found that the MI maximum growth rate increases (decreases) as the nonthermality (trapping) parameter increases. The present results could be applicable in explaining the basic features of localized electrostatic disturbance in space observations such as the solar energetic particle flows in interplanetary space and the energetic particle events in the Earth's magnetosphere and also in the laser plasma interaction.

  16. Electron-acoustic waves in a plasma with a κ-deformed Kaniadakis electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougam, Leila Ait; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effects of the κ-deformed Kaniadakis electron distribution on small amplitude electron-acoustic double-layers (EADLs). The deformed mean kinetic energy of the electrons is computed to narrow the values of the deformation parameter κ that underpins Kaniadakis entropy. It is shown that the Kaniadakis entropy effect is to higher the critical Mach number beyond which EADLs are admitted. An increase of |κ| leads to a decrease of the critical value of the density ratio beyond which the EADLs cease to exist. This alternative generalization may contribute to the ongoing investigations involving generalized entropies in the context of plasma physics. One can also devise an experimental approach to constrain what κ is in a given experiment or natural phenomenon.

  17. Acoustical estimation of fish distribution and abundance in two Spitsbergen fjords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Szczucka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, the Arctic region has been subjected to rapid climate change stemming from global warming. The advance of Atlantic waters to high latitudes is notable. The increased abundance of fish, such as cod (Gadus morhua and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus, has been reported near the western coast of Spitsbergen and entering fjords together with Atlantic waters. This study used multifrequency acoustics to measure fish distribution and abundance in 2013–2014 in two Arctic fjords, the colder Hornsund, which is typically of Arctic character, and the warmer Kongsfjorden, which is more of Atlantic character. The study revealed a bimodal fish size distribution with larger fish in the deep parts of fjords, and smaller fish distributed in more shallow waters. An evident increase in the abundance of large fish, most probably Atlantic cod, was observed in Hornsund and especially in Kongsfjorden in 2014 in comparison to 2013. The intense inflow of Atlantic water on the shelf in 2014 is suggested as the explanation for this phenomenon.

  18. Liter-scale production of uniform gas bubbles via parallelization of flow-focusing generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heon-Ho; Yadavali, Sagar; Issadore, David; Lee, Daeyeon

    2017-07-25

    Microscale gas bubbles have demonstrated enormous utility as versatile templates for the synthesis of functional materials in medicine, ultra-lightweight materials and acoustic metamaterials. In many of these applications, high uniformity of the size of the gas bubbles is critical to achieve the desired properties and functionality. While microfluidics have been used with success to create gas bubbles that have a uniformity not achievable using conventional methods, the inherently low volumetric flow rate of microfluidics has limited its use in most applications. Parallelization of liquid droplet generators, in which many droplet generators are incorporated onto a single chip, has shown great promise for the large scale production of monodisperse liquid emulsion droplets. However, the scale-up of monodisperse gas bubbles using such an approach has remained a challenge because of possible coupling between parallel bubbles generators and feedback effects from the downstream channels. In this report, we systematically investigate the effect of factors such as viscosity of the continuous phase, capillary number, and gas pressure as well as the channel uniformity on the size distribution of gas bubbles in a parallelized microfluidic device. We show that, by optimizing the flow conditions, a device with 400 parallel flow focusing generators on a footprint of 5 × 5 cm(2) can be used to generate gas bubbles with a coefficient of variation of less than 5% at a production rate of approximately 1 L h(-1). Our results suggest that the optimization of flow conditions using a device with a small number (e.g., 8) of parallel FFGs can facilitate large-scale bubble production.

  19. Bubbles Outside the Plume During the LUMINY Wind-Wave Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Leifer, I.

    2002-01-01

    Since many bubble-mediated processes are size dependent, it is often necessary to characterize the bubble distribution over the full size spectrum. For example, in regards to bubble-mediated gas transfer, small bubbles are important for insoluble gases like helium, while large bubbles are important

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns in acoustic presence and distribution of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia in the Weddell Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Clark, CW; Hagen, W.; Spiesecke, Stefanie; Zitterbart, Daniel; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Distribution and movement patterns of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia at large temporal and spatial scales are still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to explore spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Antarctic blue whales in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, using passive acoustic monitoring data. Multi-year data were collected between 2008 and 2013 by 11 recorders deployed in the Weddell Sea and along the Greenwich meridian. Antarctic blue ...

  1. Design and Analyses of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles for Distributed Propulsion Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2016-01-01

    A series of three convergent, round-to-rectangular high aspect ratio (HAR) nozzles were designed for acoustic testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). The HAR nozzles had exit area aspect ratios of 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1. The nozzles were designed to mimic a distributed propulsion system array with a slot nozzle. The nozzle designs were screened using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations. In addition to meeting the geometric constraints required for testing in the NATR, the HAR nozzles were designed to be free of flow features that would produce unwanted noise (e.g., flow separations) and to have uniform flow at the nozzle exit. Multiple methods were used to generate HAR nozzle designs. The final HAR nozzle designs were generated in segments using a computer code that parameterized each segment. RANS screening simulations showed that intermediate nozzle designs suffered flow separation, a normal shockwave at the nozzle exit (caused by an aerodynamic throat produced by boundary layer growth), and non-uniform flow at the nozzle exit. The RANS simulations showed that the final HAR nozzle designs were free of flow separations, but were not entirely successful at producing a fully uniform flow at the nozzle exit. The final designs suffered a pair of counter-rotating vortices along the outboard walls of the nozzle. The 16:1 aspect ratio HAR nozzle had the least uniform flow at the exit plane; the 8:1 aspect ratio HAR nozzles had a fairly uniform flow at the nozzle exit plane.

  2. Acoustic and manual measurements of methane ebullition in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, R. K.; Palace, M. W.; Lennartz, J. M.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Ewing, S. A.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Controls on the magnitude and frequency of methane (CH4) release through ebullition (bubbling) in water saturated ecosystems such as bogs, fens and lakes are important to both the atmospheric and ecosystems science community. In order to understand the response of these ecosystems to future climate forcing, we need to systematically monitor ebullition from these ecosystems over many seasons and across a multitude of landscape morphologies. We have developed and field tested an inexpensive array of sampling/monitoring instruments to identify the frequency and magnitude of bubbling events which allows us to correlate bubble data with potential drivers such as changes in hydrostatic pressure, wind and temperature. The instrument consists of a nested, inverted funnel design with a hydrophone for detecting bubbles that rise through the peat. The design offers a way to sample the gas collected in the funnels to determine the concentration of CH4. Laboratory calibration of the instrument resulted in an equation that relates frequency of bubbles hitting the hydrophone with bubble volume. Audio data was recorded continuously using a digital audio recorder attached to two ebullition sensors and could be deployed remotely for up to 20 days. Time, fundamental frequency, and estimated bubble size were determined using MATLAB code. Manual bubble flux measurements were also made for comparison to the acoustically sensed ebullition. Instruments were deployed in summers 2011-2013 at a temperate fen (Sallie's Fen, NH, USA) and a subarctic mire (Stordalen, Abisko, Sweden). We also recorded ebullition at two locations in subarctic Alaska (APEX Research Site, Fairbanks, AK and Innoko National Wildlife Refuge) during summer 2011. Ebullition was observed at all sites with highest daily rates in fen versus bog sites. Observed distributions of bubble events correlate with published models of ebullition based on peat density.

  3. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical distribution models for monitoring acoustic emission (AE) energy of abrasive particle impacts on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droubi, M. G.; Reuben, R. L.; White, G.

    2012-07-01

    The estimation of energy dissipated during multiple particle impact is a key aspect in evaluating the abrasive potential of particle-laden streams. This paper reports the results of systematic acoustic emission measurements in which a particle laden airflow was directed at a target plate. The impingement conditions were chosen to limit the amount of overlap of particle arrival events in order to develop a model of the stream as the cumulation of individual particle arrival events. To this end, some limited experiments were done with individual particles. The probability distribution of particle impact energy was obtained for a range of particle sizes and impact velocities. Two methods of time series processing were investigated to isolate the individual particle arrivals from the background noise and from particle noise associated with contact of the particles with the target after their first arrival. For the conditions where it was possible to resolve individual impacts, the probability distribution of particle arrival AE energy was determined by the best-fit lognormal probability distribution function. The mean and variance of this function was then correlated with the known nominal mass and impact speed to give a semi-quantitative assessment of particle impact energy. A pulse shape function was devised for the target plate by inspection of the records, backed up by pencil lead tests and this, coupled with the energy distribution functions allowed the records to be simulated knowing the arrival rate and the nominal mass and velocity of the particles. A comparison of the AE energy between the recorded and simulated records showed that the principle of accumulating individual particle impact signatures could be applied to records even when the individual impacts could not be resolved.

  5. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  6. From rational bubbles to crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μbubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μmodel and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  7. Combustion of Biosolids in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed, Part 1: Main Ash-Forming Elements and Ash Distribution with a Focus on Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Nils; Grimm, Alejandro; Ohman, Marcus; Boström, Dan

    2014-02-20

    This is the first in a series of three papers describing combustion of biosolids in a 5-kW bubbling fluidized bed, the ash chemistry, and possible application of the ash produced as a fertilizing agent. This part of the study aims to clarify whether the distribution of main ash forming elements from biosolids can be changed by modifying the fuel matrix, the crystalline compounds of which can be identified in the raw materials and what role the total composition may play for which compounds are formed during combustion. The biosolids were subjected to low-temperature ashing to investigate which crystalline compounds that were present in the raw materials. Combustion experiments of two different types of biosolids were conducted in a 5-kW benchscale bubbling fluidized bed at two different bed temperatures and with two different additives. The additives were chosen to investigate whether the addition of alkali (K 2 CO 3 ) and alkaline-earth metal (CaCO 3 ) would affect the speciation of phosphorus, so the molar ratios targeted in modified fuels were P:K = 1:1 and P:K:Ca = 1:1:1, respectively. After combustion the ash fractions were collected, the ash distribution was determined and the ash fractions were analyzed with regards to elemental composition (ICP-AES and SEM-EDS) and part of the bed ash was also analyzed qualitatively using XRD. There was no evidence of zeolites in the unmodified fuels, based on low-temperature ashing. During combustion, the biosolid pellets formed large bed ash particles, ash pellets, which contained most of the total ash content (54%-95% (w/w)). This ash fraction contained most of the phosphorus found in the ash and the only phosphate that was identified was a whitlockite, Ca 9 (K,Mg,Fe)(PO 4 ) 7 , for all fuels and fuel mixtures. With the addition of potassium, cristobalite (SiO 2 ) could no longer be identified via X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the bed ash particles and leucite (KAlSi 2 O 6 ) was formed. Most of the alkaline-earth metals

  8. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent.

  9. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caruso

    Full Text Available The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea. The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment, was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991 and of Growcott (2011 were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males and specimens longer than 14 m (old males seemed to be absent.

  10. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  11. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  12. In-Line Acoustic Device Inspection of Leakage in Water Distribution Pipes Based on Wavelet and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally permanent acoustic sensors leak detection techniques have been proven to be very effective in water distribution pipes. However, these methods need long distance deployment and proper position of sensors and cannot be implemented on underground pipelines. An inline-inspection acoustic device is developed which consists of acoustic sensors. The device will travel by the flow of water through the pipes which record all noise events and detect small leaks. However, it records all the noise events regarding background noises, but the time domain noisy acoustic signal cannot manifest complete features such as the leak flow rate which does not distinguish the leak signal and environmental disturbance. This paper presents an algorithm structure with the modularity of wavelet and neural network, which combines the capability of wavelet transform analyzing leakage signals and classification capability of artificial neural networks. This study validates that the time domain is not evident to the complete features regarding noisy leak signals and significance of selection of mother wavelet to extract the noise event features in water distribution pipes. The simulation consequences have shown that an appropriate mother wavelet has been selected and localized to extract the features of the signal with leak noise and background noise, and by neural network implementation, the method improves the classification performance of extracted features.

  13. A comparison of acoustic and observed sediment classifications as predictor variables for modelling biotope distributions in Galway Bay, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Jack P. J.; Kennedy, Robert; Ren, Lei; Nash, Stephen; Hartnett, Michael; Brown, Colin

    2017-10-01

    The INFOMAR (Integrated Mapping For the Sustainable Development of Ireland's Marine Resource) initiative has acoustically mapped and classified a significant proportion of Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), and is likely to be an important tool in Ireland's efforts to meet the criteria of the MSFD. In this study, open source and relic data were used in combination with new grab survey data to model EUNIS level 4 biotope distributions in Galway Bay, Ireland. The correct prediction rates of two artificial neural networks (ANNs) were compared to assess the effectiveness of acoustic sediment classifications versus sediments that were visually classified by an expert in the field as predictor variables. To test for autocorrelation between predictor variables the RELATE routine with Spearman rank correlation method was used. Optimal models were derived by iteratively removing predictor variables and comparing the correct prediction rates of each model. The models with the highest correct prediction rates were chosen as optimal. The optimal models each used a combination of salinity (binary; 0 = polyhaline and 1 = euhaline), proximity to reef (binary; 0 = within 50 m and 1 = outside 50 m), depth (continuous; metres) and a sediment descriptor (acoustic or observed) as predictor variables. As the status of benthic habitats is required to be assessed under the MSFD the Ecological Status (ES) of the subtidal sediments of Galway Bay was also assessed using the Infaunal Quality Index. The ANN that used observed sediment classes as predictor variables could correctly predict the distribution of biotopes 67% of the time, compared to 63% for the ANN using acoustic sediment classes. Acoustic sediment ANN predictions were affected by local sediment heterogeneity, and the lack of a mixed sediment class. The all-round poor performance of ANNs is likely to be a result of the temporally variable and sparsely distributed data within the study area.

  14. Bubble interaction dynamics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A

    2007-02-01

    Two models of interacting bubble dynamics are presented, a coupled system of second-order differential equations based on Lagrangian mechanics, and a first-order system based on Hamiltonian mechanics. Both account for pulsation and translation of an arbitrary number of spherical bubbles. For large numbers of interacting bubbles, numerical solution of the Hamiltonian equations provides greater stability. The presence of external acoustic sources is taken into account explicitly in the derivation of both sets of equations. In addition to the acoustic pressure and its gradient, it is found that the particle velocity associated with external sources appears in the dynamical equations.

  15. Novel cable coupling technique for improved shallow distributed acoustic sensor VSPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Jonathan D.; Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Mondanos, Michael J.; Chalari, Athena

    2017-03-01

    Vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) collected using fiber optic distributed acoustic sensors (DAS) are becoming increasingly common; yet, ensuring good cable coupling with the borehole wall remains a persistent challenge. Traditional cable deployment techniques used in the petroleum industry are either not possible or do not provide data of sufficient quality for shallow applications. Additionally, no direct field comparison of coupling techniques in the same borehole exists to determine the impacts of poor coupling on DAS VSP data quality. This paper addresses these issues by: (1) presenting a novel cable coupling solution using a removable and relatively inexpensive FLUTe™ flexible borehole liner; and (2) presenting field examples of DAS VSPs under different coupling conditions. The proposed coupling technique is analogous to a fully cemented deployment in that the cable is continuously coupled directly to the formation. Field experiments conducted to assess and validate the technique demonstrate a marked improvement in VSP data quality when the cable is coupled with a flexible borehole liner. Without the liner, seismic profiles are dominated by a high-amplitude cable wave and the p-wave arrival is not observed; however, with cable coupling provided by a borehole liner inflated using hydrostatic pressure, the cable wave is suppressed and clear p-wave arrivals are visible. Additional tests examining the influence of fiber optic cable structure on seismic responses demonstrate that tight buffered fibers are more sensitive to dynamic strain than loose tube fibers making them potentially better suited for certain DAS applications.

  16. Compressing Sensing Based Source Localization for Controlled Acoustic Signals Using Distributed Microphone Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the accuracy of sound source localization in noisy and reverberant environments, this paper proposes an adaptive sound source localization method based on distributed microphone arrays. Since sound sources lie at a few points in the discrete spatial domain, our method can exploit this inherent sparsity to convert the localization problem into a sparse recovery problem based on the compressive sensing (CS theory. In this method, a two-step discrete cosine transform- (DCT- based feature extraction approach is utilized to cover both short-time and long-time properties of acoustic signals and reduce the dimensions of the sparse model. In addition, an online dictionary learning (DL method is used to adjust the dictionary for matching the changes of audio signals, and then the sparse solution could better represent location estimations. Moreover, we propose an improved block-sparse reconstruction algorithm using approximate l0 norm minimization to enhance reconstruction performance for sparse signals in low signal-noise ratio (SNR conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by simulation results and experimental results where substantial improvement for localization performance can be obtained in the noisy and reverberant conditions.

  17. Acoustic Emission Source Location Using a Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser Rosette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location.

  18. Acoustic emission source location using a distributed feedback fiber laser rosette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-10-17

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location.

  19. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed.

  20. Effects of internal mass distribution and its isolation on the acoustic characteristics of a submerged hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Herwig; Kinns, Roger; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    The primary aim of machinery isolation in marine vessels is to isolate structural vibration of the onboard machinery from the hull and to reduce far-field radiation of underwater noise. A substantial proportion of the total submarine mass is on flexible mounts that isolate supported masses from the hull at frequencies above the mounting system resonant frequency. This reduces the dynamically effective mass of the hull and affects the signature of the marine vessel due to propeller excitation. A fully coupled finite element/boundary element (FE/BE) model has been developed to investigate the effect of mass distribution and isolation in a submerged hull. The finite element model of the structure includes internal structures to represent the machinery and other flexibly mounted components. Changes in the radiated sound power demonstrate the effect of machinery isolation on the acoustic signature of the submerged hull due to the external propeller forces. Results are also presented to show how the arrangement of flexible mounts for a large internal structure can influence the radiation due to machinery forces.

  1. Distributed acoustic and vibration sensing via optical fractional Fourier transform reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Lihi; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-02-23

    Distributed acoustic sensing has been traditionally implemented using optical reflectometry. Here we describe an alternative to the common interrogation approaches. According to the new method the frequency of the source is varied sinusoidally with time. For a sufficiently high scan frequency there is a position along the fiber,  z(0), for which the roundtrip time is half the scan period. Back-reflections from this point will generate a linear chirp at the receiver output. The Fractional Fourier Transform (FrFT) is used to analyze the receiver output and yields the reflection profile at z(0) and its vicinity. The method, which enables high spatial resolution at long distances with high scan rates, is demonstrated by detecting deliberate perturbations in the Rayleigh backscatter profile at the end of a 20km fiber with a scanning frequency of ~2.5kHz. The spatial resolution at this range and scan-rate is characterized by a measurement of the backscatter profile from a FBG's-array and is found to be ~2.8m.

  2. How to specify and measure sensitivity in Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2017-04-01

    In Rayleigh-scattering-based Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fiber is transformed into an array of thousands of 'virtual microphones'. This approach has gained tremendous popularity in recent years and is one of the most successful examples of a fiber-optic sensing method which made its way from the academia to the market. Despite the great amount of work done in this field, sensitivity, which is ones of the most critical parameters of any sensing technique, was rarely investigated in this context. In particular, little attention was given to its random characteristics. Without careful consideration of the random aspects of DAS, any attempt to specify its sensitivity or to compare between different DAS modalities is of limited value. Recently we introduced a new statistical parameter which defines DAS sensitivity and enables comparison between the performances of different DAS systems. In this paper we generalize the previous parameter and give a broader, simple and intuitive definition to DAS sensitivity. An important attribute of these parameters is that they can be easily extracted from the static backscatter profile of the sensing fiber. In the paper we derive the relation between DAS sensitivity and the static backscatter profile and present an experimental verification of this relation.

  3. Fluctuation dynamics and 1/ f spectra characterizing the acoustic cavitation of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokov, V. N.; Reshetnikov, A. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Koverda, V. P.

    2007-04-01

    The dynamics of acoustic cavitation in water and glycerin is studied experimentally. The power spectra and distribution functions of fluctuations are determined. In transient regimes, bubble structures in the form of fractal clusters are formed near the ultrasonic radiator. The power spectra have the form 1/ f, and the distribution functions of local fluctuations differ from the Gaussian ones and exhibit the scale invariance property.

  4. Bat Acoustic Survey Report for ORNL: Bat Species Distribution on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, Kitty [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giffen, Neil R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Haines, Angelina [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guge, B. J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Evans, James W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes results of a three-year acoustic survey of bat species on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The survey was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division and ORNL Facilities and Operations Directorate, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s ORR wildlife manager, a student from Tennessee Technological University, and a technician contracted through Excel Corp. One hundred and twenty-six sites were surveyed reservation-wide using Wildlife Acoustics SM2+ Acoustic Bat Detectors.

  5. Methods for measuring acoustic power of an ultrasonic neurosurgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub; Stimac, Tihomir; Paladino, Josip; Oresković, Darko; Jurjević, Ivana; Klarica, Marijan

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of the acoustic power in high-energy ultrasonic devices is complex due to occurrence of the strong cavitation in front of the sonotrode tip. In our research we used three methods for characterization of our new ultrasonic probe for neuroendoscopic procedures. The first method is based on the electromechanical characterization of the device measuring the displacement of the sonotrode tip and input electrical impedance around excitation frequency with different amounts of the applied electrical power The second method is based on measuring the spatial pressure magnitude distribution of an ultrasound surgical device produced in an anechoic tank. The acoustic reciprocity principle is used to determinate the derived acoustic power of equivalent ultrasound sources at frequency components present in the spectrum of radiated ultrasonic waves. The third method is based on measuring the total absorbed acoustic power in the restricted volume of water using the calorimetric method. In the electromechanical characterization, calculated electroacoustic efficiency factor from equivalent electrical circuits is between 40-60%, the same as one obtained measuring the derived acoustic power in an anechoic tank when there is no cavitation. When cavitation activity is present in the front of the sonotrode tip the bubble cloud has a significant influence on the derived acoustic power and decreases electroacoustic efficiency. The measured output acoustic power using calorimetric method is greater then derived acoustic power, due to a large amount of heat energy released in the cavitation process.

  6. Fama on bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an irrational bubble. However, he has never publicly expressed his opinion on rational bubbles. This is peculiar since such bubbles build naturally from the rational efficient markets paradigm that Fama strongly adheres to. On......, there is evidence of an explosive component in stock market valuation ratios, consistent with a rational bubble........ On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable. However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability. On data samples that include the 1990s...

  7. Evolution of acoustically vaporized microdroplets in gas embolotherapy

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic vaporization dynamics of a superheated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) microdroplet inside a microtube and the resulting bubble evolution is investigated in the present work. This work is motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique that is intended to treat cancers by infarcting tumors using gas bubbles. A combined theoretical and computational approach is utilized and compared with the experiments to understand the evolution process and to estimate the resulting stress distribution associated with vaporization event. The transient bubble growth is first studied by ultra-high speed imaging and then theoretical and computational modeling is used to predict the entire bubble evolution process. The evolution process consists of three regimes: an initial linear rapid spherical growth followed by a linear compressed oval shaped growth and finally a slow asymptotic nonlinear spherical bubble growth. Although the droplets are small compared to the tube diameter, the bubble evolution is influenced by the tube wall. The final bubble radius is found to scale linearly with the initial droplet radius and is approximately five times the initial droplet radius. A short pressure pulse with amplitude almost twice as that of ambient conditions is observed. The width of this pressure pulse increases with increasing droplet size whereas the amplitude is weakly dependent. Although the rise in shear stress along the tube wall is found to be under peak physiological limits, the shear stress amplitude is found to be more prominently influenced by the initial droplet size. The role of viscous dissipation along the tube wall and ambient bulk fluid pressure is found to be significant in bubble evolution dynamics. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  8. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between...... the theoretical absorption coefficient and the reverberation room measurement. The angle-weighted absorption coefficient, together with the size correction, agrees satisfactorily with the measured absorption data by the reverberation chamber method. At high frequencies and for large samples, the averaged...

  9. Ultrasound acoustic energy for microbubble manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari-Nejad, Marjan; Elnahhas, Ahmed; Jung, Sunghwan; Shahab, Shima

    2017-04-01

    Many bio-medical applications entail the problems of spatially manipulating of bubbles by means of acoustic radiation. The examples are ultrasonic noninvasive-targeted drug delivery and therapeutic applications. This paper investigates the nonlinear coupling between radial pulsations, axisymmetric modes of shape oscillations and translational motion of a single spherical gas bubble in a host liquid, when it is subjected to an acoustic pressure wave field. A mathematical model is developed to account for both small and large amplitudes of bubble oscillations. The coupled system dynamics under various conditions is studied. Specifically, oscillating behaviors of a bubble (e.g. the amplitudes and instability of oscillations) undergoing resonance and off-resonance excitation in low- and high- intensity acoustic fields are studied. Instability of the shape modes of a bubble, which is contributing to form the translational instability, known as dancing motion, is analyzed. Dynamic responses of the bubble exposed to low- and high-intensity acoustic excitation are compared in terms of translational motion and surface shape of the bubble. Acoustic streaming effects caused by radial pulsations of the bubble in the surrounding liquid domain are also reported.

  10. Fama on Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    2016-01-01

    . However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability, and return predictability of the kind documented by Fama does not rule out rational bubbles. On data samples that include the 1990s, there is evidence of an explosive......While Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an “irrational bubble,” he has never publicly expressed his opinion on “rational bubbles.” On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable...

  11. Heard Island and McDonald Islands Acoustic Plumes: Split-beam Echo sounder and Deep Tow Camera Observations of Gas Seeps on the Central Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Spain, E. A.; Coffin, M. F.; Whittaker, J. M.; Fox, J. M.; Bowie, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Heard and McDonald islands (HIMI) are two active volcanic edifices on the Central Kerguelen Plateau. Scientists aboard the Heard Earth-Ocean-Biosphere Interactions voyage in early 2016 explored how this volcanic activity manifests itself near HIMI. Using Simrad EK60 split-beam echo sounder and deep tow camera data from RV Investigator, we recorded the distribution of seafloor emissions, providing the first direct evidence of seabed discharge around HIMI, mapping >244 acoustic plume signals. Northeast of Heard, three distinct plume clusters are associated with bubbles (towed camera) and the largest directly overlies a sub-seafloor opaque zone (sub-bottom profiler) with >140 zones observed within 6.5 km. Large temperature anomalies did not characterize any of the acoustic plumes where temperature data were recorded. We therefore suggest that these plumes are cold methane seeps. Acoustic properties - mean volume backscattering and target strength - and morphology - height, width, depth to surface - of plumes around McDonald resembled those northeast of Heard, also suggesting gas bubbles. We observed no bubbles on extremely limited towed camera data around McDonald; however, visibility was poor. The acoustic response of the plumes at different frequencies (120 kHz vs. 18 kHz), a technique used to classify water column scatterers, differed between HIMI, suggestiing dissimilar target size (bubble radii) distributions. Environmental context and temporal characteristics of the plumes differed between HIMI. Heard plumes were concentrated on flat, sediment rich plains, whereas around McDonald plumes emanated from sea knolls and mounds with hard volcanic seafloor. The Heard plumes were consistent temporally, while the McDonald plumes varied temporally possibly related to tides or subsurface processes. Our data and analyses suggest that HIMI acoustic plumes were likely caused by gas bubbles; however, the bubbles may originate from two or more distinct processes.

  12. Distributed Remote Vector Gaussian Source Coding for Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2014-01-01

    encoding multiple sources. We focus on the case where node measurements are in form of noisy linearly mixed combinations of the sources and the acoustic channel mixing matrices are invertible. For this problem, we derive the rate-distortion function for vector Gaussian sources and under covariance......In this paper, we consider the problem of remote vector Gaussian source coding for a wireless acoustic sensor network. Each node receives messages from multiple nodes in the network and decodes these messages using its own measurement of the sound field as side information. The node’s measurement...

  13. Bubble Dynamics in a Two-Phase Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Chahine, Georges

    2010-01-01

    The spherical dynamics of a bubble in a compressible liquid has been studied extensively since the early work of Gilmore. Numerical codes to study the behavior, including when large non-spherical deformations are involved, have since been developed and have been shown to be accurate. The situation is however different and common knowledge less advanced when the compressibility of the medium surrounding the bubble is provided mainly by the presence of a bubbly mixture. In one of the present works being carried out at DYNAFLOW, INC., the dynamics of a primary relatively large bubble in a water mixture including very fine bubbles is being investigated experimentally and the results are being provided to several parallel on-going analytical and numerical approaches. The main/primary bubble is produced by an underwater spark discharge from two concentric electrodes placed in the bubbly medium, which is generated using electrolysis. A grid of thin perpendicular wires is used to generate bubble distributions of vary...

  14. Influence of the bubble-bubble interaction on destruction of encapsulated microbubbles under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Lee, Judy; Tuziuti, Toru; Towata, Atsuya; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Iida, Yasuo

    2009-09-01

    Influence of the bubble-bubble interaction on the pulsation of encapsulated microbubbles has been studied by numerical simulations under the condition of the experiment reported by Chang et al. [IEEE Trans. Ultrason Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 48, 161 (2001)]. It has been shown that the natural (resonance) frequency of a microbubble decreases considerably as the microbubble concentration increases to relatively high concentrations. At some concentration, the natural frequency may coincide with the driving frequency. Microbubble pulsation becomes milder as the microbubble concentration increases except at around the resonance condition due to the stronger bubble-bubble interaction. This may be one of the reasons why the threshold of acoustic pressure for destruction of an encapsulated microbubble increases as the microbubble concentration increases. A theoretical model for destruction has been proposed.

  15. Soap Bubbles and Crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    volume work summarizing his decades of research into soap bubbles and related phe- nomena due to surface tension. He gave the rules governing the geometry of bubbles, without any proof. It is a remarkable achievement as these experiments.

  16. Soap Bubbles and Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Shellie-helane; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces questions and activities involving soap bubbles which provide students with experiences in prediction and logic. Examines commonly held false conceptions related to the shapes that bubbles take and provides correct explanations for the phenomenon. (ML)

  17. OptaSense distributed acoustic and seismic sensing using COTS fiber optic cables for infrastructure protection and counter terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-06-01

    The OptaSense® Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) technology can turn any cable with single-mode optical fiber into a very large and densely sampled acoustic/seismic sensor array—covering up to a 50 km aperture per system with "virtual" sensor separations as small as 1 meter on the unmodified cable. The system uses Rayleigh scattering from the imperfections in the fiber to return the optical signals measuring local fiber strain from seismic or air and water acoustic signals. The scalable system architecture can provide border monitoring and high-security perimeter and linear asset protection for a variety of industries—from nuclear facilities to oil and gas pipelines. This paper presents various application architectures and system performance examples for detection, localization, and classification of personnel footsteps, vehicles, digging and tunneling, gunshots, aircraft, and earthquakes. The DAS technology can provide a costeffective alternative to unattended ground sensors and geophone arrays, and a complement or alternative to imaging and radar sensors in many applications. The transduction, signal processing, and operator control and display technology will be described, and performance examples will be given from research and development testing and from operational systems on pipelines, critical infrastructure perimeters, railroads, and roadways. Potential new applications will be discussed that can take advantage of existing fiber-optic telecommunications infrastructure as "the sensor"—leading to low-cost and high-coverage systems.

  18. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Ser. 395: 201-222. Collins, M (1993). A split-step Pade solution for the parabolic equation method , J. Acoustical Soc. ofAm. 93: 1736-1742. Lawrence...2009 2011 2013 2009 2011 2013 2002 2004 2006 2009 2002 2004 2006 2009 2002 2004 2006 2009 2011 lAl J B) Atlantic

  19. Air bubble migration is a random event post embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confino, E; Zhang, J; Risquez, F

    2007-06-01

    Air bubble location following embryo transfer (ET) is the presumable placement spot of embryos. The purpose of this study was to document endometrial air bubble position and migration following embryo transfer. Multicenter prospective case study. Eighty-eight embryo transfers were performed under abdominal ultrasound guidance in two countries by two authors. A single or double air bubble was loaded with the embryos using a soft, coaxial, end opened catheters. The embryos were slowly injected 10-20 mm from the fundus. Air bubble position was recorded immediately, 30 minutes later and when the patient stood up. Bubble marker location analysis revealed a random distribution without visible gravity effect when the patients stood up. The bubble markers demonstrated splitting, moving in all directions and dispersion. Air bubbles move and split frequently post ET with the patient in the horizontal position, suggestive of active uterine contractions. Bubble migration analysis supports a rather random movement of the bubbles and possibly the embryos. Standing up changed somewhat bubble configuration and distribution in the uterine cavity. Gravity related bubble motion was uncommon, suggesting that horizontal rest post ET may not be necessary. This report challenges the common belief that a very accurate ultrasound guided embryo placement is mandatory. The very random bubble movement observed in this two-center study suggests that a large "window" of embryo placement maybe present.

  20. Radiolysis of NaCl at high and low temperatures: development of size distribution of bubbles and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkin, A A [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Sugonyako, A V [Solid State Physics Laboratory, University of Groningen, 4 Nijenborgh 9747 AG Groningen, The (Netherlands); Vainshtein, D I [Solid State Physics Laboratory, University of Groningen, 4 Nijenborgh 9747 AG Groningen, The (Netherlands); Hartog, H W den [Solid State Physics Laboratory, University of Groningen, 4 Nijenborgh 9747 AG Groningen, The (Netherlands)

    2006-06-21

    New experimental results are presented on low temperature irradiation (18 deg, C) of rock-salt samples which had been exposed to initial doses up to 320 GRad at 100 deg, C. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows that the latent heat of melting (LHM) of sodium colloids decreases during subsequent low-temperature irradiation, whereas the stored energy (SE) increases slowly, indicating that the process of radiolysis continues. The decrease of the LHM is due to dissolution of large colloids, because the intensities of the melting peaks decrease during the second stage irradiation at low temperature. The model is formulated to describe the nucleation kinetics and the evolution of the size distribution of chlorine precipitates and sodium colloids in NaCl under high dose irradiation. It is shown that the mechanism of dissolution of large Na colloids during low temperature irradiation can be related to melting of sodium colloids.

  1. Vertical distribution, composition and migratory patterns of acoustic scattering layers in the Canary Islands

    KAUST Repository

    Ariza, A.

    2016-01-21

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) facilitates biogeochemical exchanges between shallow waters and the deep ocean. An effective way of monitoring the migrant biota is by acoustic observations although the interpretation of the scattering layers poses challenges. Here we combine results from acoustic observations at 18 and 38 kHz with limited net sampling in order to unveil the origin of acoustic phenomena around the Canary Islands, subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. Trawling data revealed a high diversity of fishes, decapods and cephalopods (152 species), although few dominant species likely were responsible for most of the sound scattering in the region. We identified four different acoustic scattering layers in the mesopelagic realm: (1) at 400–500 m depth, a swimbladder resonance phenomenon at 18 kHz produced by gas-bearing migrant fish such as Vinciguerria spp. and Lobianchia dofleini, (2) at 500–600 m depth, a dense 38 kHz layer resulting primarily from the gas-bearing and non-migrant fish Cyclothone braueri, and to a lesser extent, from fluid-like migrant fauna also inhabiting these depths, (3) between 600 and 800 m depth, a weak signal at both 18 and 38 kHz ascribed either to migrant fish or decapods, and (4) below 800 m depth, a weak non-migrant layer at 18 kHz which was not sampled. All the dielly migrating layers reached the epipelagic zone at night, with the shorter-range migrations moving at 4.6 ± 2.6 cm s − 1 and the long-range ones at 11.5 ± 3.8 cm s − 1. This work reduces uncertainties interpreting standard frequencies in mesopelagic studies, while enhances the potential of acoustics for future research and monitoring of the deep pelagic fauna in the Canary Islands.

  2. Economic Growth with Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Martin

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a stylized model of economic growth with bubbles. This model views asset price bubbles as a market-generated device to moderate the effects of frictions in financial markets, improving the allocation of investments and raising the capital stock and welfare. It shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, bubbles can arise even if all investments in the economy are dynamically efficient.

  3. Soap Films and Bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen

    1986-01-01

    Develops and explains a format for a workshop which focuses on soap films and bubbles. The plan consists of: a discussion to uncover what children know about bubbles; explanations of the demonstration equipment; the presentation itself; the assembly of the workshop kit; and time to play with the bubbles. (ML)

  4. Radical production inside an acoustically driven microbubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stricker, L.; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The chemical production of radicals inside acoustically driven bubbles is determined by the local temperature inside the bubbles and by their composition at collapse. By means of a previously validated ordinary differential equations (ODE) model [L. Stricker, A. Prosperetti, D. Lohse, Validation of

  5. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 μs. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 μm) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial

  6. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication - YIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    various species of marine mammals, physical events, and anthropogenic sources such as seismic array signals, allowing for development of automated...shipping, animal vocalizations, and seismic airguns making this a “transitional” band. The 85-105 Hz band was selected as representative of the dominant...computed using a custom script written in MATLAB . Temporal (Ht) and spectral (Hf) acoustic entropies were computed and then multiplied to obtain the

  7. Lightweight Filter Architecture for Energy Efficient Mobile Vehicle Localization Based on a Distributed Acoustic Sensor Network

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-01-01

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving v...

  8. YIP Expansion: Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    analysis of trends and shifts in characteristics of specific sources contributing to the soundscape over time. The primary sources of interest are baleen... soundscape . Many of the target acoustic signal categories have been well characterized allowing for development of automated spectrogram correlation...to determine the extent and range over which each class of sources contributes to the regional soundscape . Estimates of signal detection range will

  9. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  10. Test ventilation with smoke, bubbles, and balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, P.L.; Cucchiara, A.L.; McAtee, J.L.; Gonzales, M.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of smoke, bubbles, and helium-filled balloons was videotaped to demonstrate the mixing of air in the plutonium chemistry laboratories, a plutonium facility. The air-distribution patterns, as indicated by each method, were compared. Helium-filled balloons proved more useful than bubbles or smoke in the visualization of airflow patterns. The replay of various segments of the videotape proved useful in evaluating the different techniques and in identifying airflow trends responsible for air mixing. 6 refs.

  11. Lightweight filter architecture for energy efficient mobile vehicle localization based on a distributed acoustic sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-08-23

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving vehicle and reject the signal from motionless automobiles around the WSN node. A cascade structure between analog envelope detector and digital exponential smoothing filter presents the velocity vector-sensitive output with low analog circuit and digital computation complexity. The optimal parameters in the exponential smoothing filter are obtained by analytical and mathematical methods for maximum variation over the vehicle speed. For stationary targets, the derived simulation based on the acoustic field parameters demonstrates that the system significantly reduces the communication requirements with low complexity and can be expected to extend the operation time considerably.

  12. A derivation of the stable cavitation threshold accounting for bubble-bubble interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédra, Matthieu; Cornu, Corentin; Inserra, Claude

    2017-09-01

    The subharmonic emission of sound coming from the nonlinear response of a bubble population is the most used indicator for stable cavitation. When driven at twice their resonance frequency, bubbles can exhibit subharmonic spherical oscillations if the acoustic pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold value. Although various theoretical derivations exist for the subharmonic emission by free or coated bubbles, they all rest on the single bubble model. In this paper, we propose an analytical expression of the subharmonic threshold for interacting bubbles in a homogeneous, monodisperse cloud. This theory predicts a shift of the subharmonic resonance frequency and a decrease of the corresponding pressure threshold due to the interactions. For a given sonication frequency, these results show that an optimal value of the interaction strength (i.e. the number density of bubbles) can be found for which the subharmonic threshold is minimum, which is consistent with recently published experiments conducted on ultrasound contrast agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sonoluminescence and acoustic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pak-Kon

    2017-07-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) is light emission under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions of a cavitating bubble under intense ultrasound in liquid. In this review, the fundamentals of the interactions between the sound field and the bubble, and between bubbles are explained. Experimental results on high-speed shadowgraphy of bubble dynamics and multibubble SL are shown, demonstrating that the SL intensity is closely related to the bubble dynamics. SL studies of alkali-metal atom (Na and K) emission are summarized. The spectral measurements in solutions with different noble-gas dissolutions and in surfactant solutions, and the results of spatiotemporal separation of SL distribution strongly suggested that the site of alkali-metal atom emission is the gas phase inside bubbles. The spectral studies indicated that alkali-metal atom lines are composed of two kinds of lines: a component that is broadened and shifted from the original D lines arises from van der Waals molecules formed between alkali-metal atoms and noble-gas atoms under extreme conditions at bubble collapse. The other spectral component exhibiting no broadening and no shift was suggested to originate from higher temperature bubbles than those producing the broadened component.

  14. A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Dmitrii N; Tanner, Gregor

    2011-09-01

    Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behavior due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems that are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modeled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations that can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Calado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs. The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  16. An intelligent sensor array distributed system for vibration analysis and acoustic noise characterization of a linear switched reluctance actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  17. Detonation wave phenomena in bubbled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülhan, A.; Beylich, A. E.

    1990-07-01

    Shock wave propagation was investigated in two phase media consisting of diluted glycerin (85%) and reactive gas bubbles. To understand these complex phenomena, we first performed a numerical analysis and experimental studies of single bubbles containing a reactive gas-mixture. For the two-phase mixtures, a needle matrix bubble-generator enabled us to produce a homogeneous bubble distribution with a size dispersion less than 5%. The void fraction β0 was varied over one order of magnitude, β0=0.2-2%. It was found that there exists a critical value of shock strength above which bubble explosion starts. Once a bubble explodes, it stimulates the adjacent bubbles to explode due to emission of a blast wave; this process is followed by a series of similar events. A steady detonationlike wave propagates as a precurser with a constant velocity which is much higher than that of the first wave. To study the structure of the detonation wave the measured pressured profiles were averaged by superimposing 50 shots.

  18. Capillary meniscus dynamometry—method for determining the surface tension of drops and bubbles with isotropic and anisotropic surface stress distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Alexandrov, Nikola A; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-02-15

    The stresses acting in interfacial adsorption layers with surface shear elasticity are, in general, anisotropic and non-uniform. If a pendant drop or buoyant bubble is covered with such elastic layer, the components of surface tension acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", σ(s) and σ(φ), can be different and, then, the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) is inapplicable. Here, a method for determining σ(s) and σ(φ) is developed for axisymmetric menisci. This method, called 'capillary meniscus dynamometry' (CMD), is based on processing data for the digitized drop/bubble profile and capillary pressure. The principle of the CMD procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of DSA. Applying the tangential and normal surface stress balance equations, σ(s) and σ(φ) are determined in each interfacial point without using any rheological model. The computational procedure is fast and could be used in real time, during a given process. The method is applied to determine σ(s) and σ(φ) for bubbles and drops formed on the tip of a capillary immersed in solutions of the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Upon a surface compression, meridional wrinkles appear on the bubble surface below the bubble "equator", where the azimuthal tension σ(φ) takes negative values. The CMD method allows one to determine the local tensions acting in anisotropic interfacial layers (films, membranes), like those formed from proteins, polymers, asphaltenes and phospholipids. The CMD is applicable also to fluid interfaces (e.g. surfactant solutions), for which it gives the same surface tension as the conventional methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Planar Soap Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Rick

    1998-01-01

    The generalized soap bubble problem seeks the least perimeter way to enclose and separate n given volumes in R^m. We study the possible configurations for perimeter minimizing bubble complexes enclosing more than two regions. We prove that perimeter minimizing planar bubble complexes with equal pressure regions and without empty chambers must have connected regions. As a consequence, we show that the least perimeter planar graph that...

  20. Magnetic bubble materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giess, E A

    1980-05-23

    Physicists, materials scientists, and engineers combined to bring solid-state bubble devices into the computer memory and recording marketplace. Devices with smaller bubbles are being developed for increased data capacity and lower cost. Epitaxial garnet films made by isothermal dipping in molten solutions helped put the technology in place and will probably satisfy the material needs of future devices with bubbles scaled down from 2 to 0.5 micrometer in size.

  1. Ultrasound measurements of cavitation bubble radius for femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglyamov, Salavat R; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Bourgeois, Frederic; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2008-06-15

    A recently developed ultrasound technique is evaluated by measuring the behavior of a cavitation bubble that is induced in water by a femtosecond laser pulse. The passive acoustic emission during optical breakdown is used to estimate the location of the cavitation bubble's origin. In turn, the position of the bubble wall is defined based on the active ultrasonic pulse-echo signal. The results suggest that the developed ultrasound technique can be used for quantitative measurements of femtosecond laser-induced microbubbles.

  2. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  4. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled

  5. Finger evolution of a gas bubble driven by atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-12-01

    We report the generation and evolution of a finger-shaped bubble in liquid by dielectric discharge setup. The spherical gas bubble is deformed into a finger-shaped bubble after the ignition of plasma. The presence of the filamentary discharge in the bubble not only provides the local heating to the bubble, it also changes the distribution of the electric field in the bubble and the bubble mutually provides the pathway to the discharge. The reduced surface tension on the liquid-gas interface due to the rise of temperature by plasma heating and the nonuniform electric field caused by the presence of filamentary discharge might induce the concave-shaped bubble. We also observe the formation of the quasi-two-dimensional bubble, which is generated from the bubble and attached on one side of the electrodes. It is found that the discharge induces the growth of the periodic fluctuations in the thin layer of gas.

  6. Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves in electronegative plasmas with electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebache, Siham; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-10-01

    The problem of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs), which accompany electronegative plasmas having positive ions, negative ions, and nonextensive electrons is addressed. The energy integral equation with a new Sagdeev potential is analyzed to examine the existence regions of the IASWs. Different types of electronegative plasmas inspired from the experimental studies of Ichiki et al. (2001) are discussed. Our results show that in such plasmas IASWs, the amplitude and nature of which depend sensitively on the mass and density ratio of the positive and negative ions as well as the q-nonextensive parameter, can exist. Interestingly, one finds that our plasma model supports the coexistence of smooth rarefactive and spiky compressive IASWs. Our results complement and provide new insights on previously published findings on this problem.

  7. Dust ion acoustic solitary structures in presence of nonthermally distributed electrons and positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Ashesh; Das, K P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the recent work of Paul & Bandyopadhyay [Astrophys. Space Sci. 361, 172(2016)] on the existence of different dust ion acoustic solitary structures in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged static dust grains, adiabatic warm ions, nonthermal electrons and isothermal positrons in a more generalized form by considering nonthermal positrons instead of isothermal positrons. The present system supports both positive and negative potential double layers, coexistence of solitary waves of both polarities and positive potential supersolitons. The qualitative and the quantitative changes in existence domains of different solitary structures which occur for the presence of nonthermal positrons have been presented in comparison with the results of Paul & Bandyopadhyay [Astrophys. Space Sci. 361, 172(2016)]. The formation of supersoliton structures and their limitations have been analyzed with the help of phase portraits of the dynamical sy...

  8. Dust ion acoustic freak waves in a plasma with two temperature electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Manpreet; Shalini; Saini, N. S.

    2018-02-01

    We present an investigation for the nonlinear dust ion acoustic wave modulation in a plasma composed of charged dust grains, two temperature (cold and hot) nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the multiscale reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The critical wave number, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. The influence of plasma background nonextensivity on the growth rate of modulational instability is discussed. The modulated wavepackets in the form of either bright or dark type envelope solitons may exist. Formation of rogue waves from bright envelope solitons is also discussed. The investigation indicates that the structural characteristics of these envelope excitations (width, amplitude) are significantly affected by nonextensivity, dust concentration, cold electron-ion density ratio and temperature ratio.

  9. A Study of Drag Force in Isothermal Bubbly Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Li

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Driven by the extensive demands of simulating highly concentrated gas bubbly flows in many engineering fields, numerical studies have been performed to investigate the neighbouring effect of a swarm of bubbles on the interfacial drag forces. In this study, a novel drag coefficient correlation (Simonnet et al., 2007 in terms of local void fraction coupled with the population balance model based on average bubble number density (ABND has been implemented and compared with Ishii-Zuber densely distributed fluid particles drag model. The predicted local radial distributions of three primitive variables: gas void fraction, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and gas velocity, are validated against the experimental data of Hibiki et al. (2001. In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results are achieved by both drag force models. With additional consideration for closely packed bubbles, the latest coefficient model by Simonnet et al. (2007 shows considerably better performance in capturing the reduction of drag forces incurred by neighbouring bubbles.

  10. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  11. Bubbles, Banks, and Financial Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Aoki; Kalin Nikolov

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks two main questions: (1) What makes some asset price bubbles more costly for the real economy than others? and (2) When do costly bubbles occur? We construct a model of rational bubbles under credit frictions and show that when bubbles held by banks burst this is followed by a costly financial crisis. In contrast, bubbles held by ordinary savers have relatively muted effects. Banks tend to invest in bubbles when financial liberalisation decreases their profitability.

  12. Modelling the distribution of hard seabed using calibrated multibeam acoustic backscatter data in a tropical, macrotidal embayment: Darwin Harbour, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwabessy, P. Justy W.; Tran, Maggie; Picard, Kim; Brooke, Brendan P.; Huang, Zhi; Smit, Neil; Williams, David K.; Nicholas, William A.; Nichol, Scott L.; Atkinson, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Spatial information on the distribution of seabed substrate types in high use coastal areas is essential to support their effective management and environmental monitoring. For Darwin Harbour, a rapidly developing port in northern Australia, the distribution of hard substrate is poorly documented but known to influence the location and composition of important benthic biological communities (corals, sponges). In this study, we use angular backscatter response curves to model the distribution of hard seabed in the subtidal areas of Darwin Harbour. The angular backscatter response curve data were extracted from multibeam sonar data and analysed against backscatter intensity for sites observed from seabed video to be representative of "hard" seabed. Data from these sites were consolidated into an "average curve", which became a reference curve that was in turn compared to all other angular backscatter response curves using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit. The output was used to generate interpolated spatial predictions of the probability of hard seabed (p-hard) and derived hard seabed parameters for the mapped area of Darwin Harbour. The results agree well with the ground truth data with an overall classification accuracy of 75% and an area under curve measure of 0.79, and with modelled bed shear stress for the Harbour. Limitations of this technique are discussed with attention to discrepancies between the video and acoustic results, such as in areas where sediment forms a veneer over hard substrate.

  13. Probability distribution for energy of saturated broadband ocean acoustic transmission: results from Gulf of Maine 2006 experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duong; Andrews, Mark; Ratilal, Purnima

    2012-12-01

    The probability distribution of ocean-acoustic broadband signal energy after saturated multipath propagation is derived using coherence theory. The frequency components obtained from Fourier decomposition of a broadband signal are each assumed to be fully saturated with energy spectral density that obey the exponential distribution with 5.6 dB standard deviation and unity scintillation index. When the signal bandwidth and measurement time are larger than the correlation bandwidth and correlation time, respectively, of its energy spectral density components, the broadband signal energy obtained by integrating the energy spectral density across the signal bandwidth then follows the Gamma distribution with a standard deviation smaller than 5.6 dB and a scintillation index less than unity. The theory is verified with broadband transmissions in the Gulf of Maine shallow water waveguide in the 300 to 1200 Hz frequency range. The standard deviations of received broadband signal energies range from 2.7 to 4.6 dB for effective bandwidths up to 42 Hz, while the standard deviations of individual energy spectral density components are roughly 5.6 dB. The energy spectral density correlation bandwidths of the received broadband signals are found to be larger for signals with higher center frequencies and are roughly 10% of each center frequency.

  14. Bubbles in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  15. Understanding the bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    that are identified to exist between the Internet and housing market bubbles: uncertainty and sentiments. The iteration between uncertainty and sentiments leads to the emergence of the third commonality: residue. The residue is the difference between the actors’ overall sentiment about exaggerated future prospects......Understanding how and why bubbles occur as well as whether these could be anticipated, managed, or even prevented is equally important as to know how to recover from them. To address these questions, a model of bubble emergence is put forward. The model builds on two fundamental commonalities...... of a new venture and intended outcomes of that new venture; the higher the residue, the higher the likelihood of the bubble emergence; as residue increases, the likelihood of bubble burst increases. One question that arises is whether one can manage the hype, hence the residue. In this, it is maintained...

  16. Electron-acoustic rogue waves in a plasma with Tribeche–Tsallis–Cairns distributed electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriche, Abderrzak [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Plasma Physics Group (PPG), University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Plasma Physics Group (PPG), University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Algerian Academy of Sciences and Technologies, Algiers (Algeria)

    2017-01-15

    The problem of electron-acoustic (EA) rogue waves in a plasma consisting of fluid cold electrons, nonthermal nonextensive electrons and stationary ions, is addressed. A standard multiple scale method has been carried out to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation. The coefficients of dispersion and nonlinearity depend on the nonextensive and nonthermal parameters. The EA wave stability is analyzed. Interestingly, it is found that the wave number threshold, above which the EA wave modulational instability (MI) sets in, increases as the nonextensive parameter increases. As the nonthermal character of the electrons increases, the MI occurs at large wavelength. Moreover, it is shown that as the nonextensive parameter increases, the EA rogue wave pulse grows while its width is narrowed. The amplitude of the EA rogue wave decreases with an increase of the number of energetic electrons. In the absence of nonthermal electrons, the nonextensive effects are more perceptible and more noticeable. In view of the crucial importance of rogue waves, our results can contribute to the understanding of localized electrostatic envelope excitations and underlying physical processes, that may occur in space as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  17. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to ...

  18. INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN ACOUSTIC TRAITS AND BODY SIZE, AND NEW DISTRIBUTIONAL RECORDS FOR PSEUDOPALUDICOLA GIARETTAI CARVALHO, 2012 (ANURA, LEPTODACTYLIDAE, LEIUPERINAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS CONGENERIC DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO RIBEIRO DE CARVALHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide an updated diagnosis for Pseudopaludicola giarettai based on the morphometric and acoustic variation observed with the assessment of new populations, plus an expansion of its distribution range. Our results support that all acoustic variation observed might be attributed to intraspecific variation. The variation in body size and dorsal stripe patterns observed for Pseudopaludicola giarettai reinforces that the distinctive whistling advertisement call pattern is the most reliable evidence line to diagnose it from its congeners, whereas morphological (robust body, glandular dorsum and morphometric (body size features vary considerably within and among populations so that they should no longer be employed as diagnostic features of Pseudopaludicola giarettai.

  19. Electron acoustic waves and parametric instabilities in a 4-component relativistic quantum plasma with Thomas-Fermi distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikramullah, Ahmad, Rashid; Sharif, Saqib; Khattak, Fida Younus

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of Circularly Polarized Electro-Magnetic (CPEM) waves with a 4-component relativistic quantum plasma is studied. The plasma constituents are: relativistic-degenerate electrons and positrons, dynamic degenerate ions, and Thomas-Fermi distributed electrons in the background. We have employed the Klein-Gordon equations for the electrons as well as for the positrons, while the ions are represented by the Schrödinger equation. The Maxwell and Poisson equations are used for electromagnetic waves. Three modes are observed: one of the modes is associated with the electron acoustic wave, a second mode at frequencies greater than the electron acoustic wave mode could be associated with the positrons, and the third one at the lowest frequencies could be associated with the ions. Furthermore, Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), Modulational, and Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) instabilities are studied. It is observed that the growth rates of both the SRS and SBS instabilities decrease with increase in the quantum parameter of the plasma. It is also observed that the scattering spectra in both the SRS and SBS get restricted to very small wavenumber regions. It is shown that for low amplitude CPEM wave interaction with the quantum plasma, the positron concentration has no effect on the SRS and SBS spectra. In the case of large amplitude CPEM wave interaction, however, one observes spectral changes with varying positron concentrations. An increase in the positron concentration also enhances the scattering instability growth rates. Moreover, the growth rate first increases and then decreases with increasing intensity of the CPEM wave, indicating an optimum value of the CPEM wave intensity for the growth of these scattering instabilities. The modulational instability also shows dependence on the quantum parameter as well as on the positron concentration.

  20. Ion-acoustic dressed solitary structures in two component plasma with Tsallis-nonthermal velocity distribution of electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Parveen; Gill, Tarsem Singh; Bains, Amandeep Singh; Kaur, Harvinder

    2017-12-01

    The present investigation deals with the study of small amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic dressed solitary structures in two component plasma model consisting of cold positive ions and electrons. The electrons are assumed as featuring hybrid q-nonextensive nonthermal distribution also known as Cairns-Tsallis velocity distribution. In the lowest order of potential, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to the well known Korteweg-de Vries ( KdV) equation. By including the contribution of higher order potential, an inhomogeneous KdV-type nonliner equation results that contains fifth order dispersion. The numerical values of the parameters like nonthermal (α) and nonextensive ( q) are according to the range suggested by Williams et al. (Phys Rev E 88:023103, 2013). The finite value of nonthermal parameter results into the formation of rarefactive type solitary structures. A comparison of amplitudes of higher order correction, dressed and KdV solitons has been presented pictorially. The combined effect of nonextensive parameter q and nontermal parameter on the soliton dynamics has also been studied and the results are shown in the form of two and three dimensional profiles.

  1. Radical production inside an acoustically driven microbubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Laura; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The chemical production of radicals inside acoustically driven bubbles is determined by the local temperature inside the bubbles and by their composition at collapse. By means of a previously validated ordinary differential equations (ODE) model [L. Stricker, A. Prosperetti, D. Lohse, Validation of an approximate model for the thermal behavior in acoustically driven bubbles, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130 (5) (2011) 3243-3251], based on boundary layer assumption for mass and heat transport, we study the influence of different parameters on the radical production. We perform different simulations by changing the driving frequency and pressure, the temperature of the surrounding liquid and the composition of the gas inside the bubbles. In agreement with the experimental conditions of new generation sonochemical reactors, where the bubbles undergo transient cavitation oscillations [D. F. Rivas, L. Stricker, A. Zijlstra, H. Gardeniers, D. Lohse, A. Prosperetti, Ultrasound artificially nucleated bubbles and their sonochemical radical production, Ultrason. Sonochem. 20 (1) (2013) 510-524], we mainly concentrate on the initial chemical transient and we suggest optimal working ranges for technological applications. The importance of the chemical composition at collapse is reflected in the model, including the role of entrapped water vapor. We in particular study the exothermal reactions taking place in H2 and O2 mixtures. At the exact stoichiometric mixture 2:1 the highest internal bubble temperatures are achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using an Impedance Tube and Continued Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using Impedance Tube and Acoustic Resonator Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    T.F. Argo IV, P.S. Wilson, and V. Palan , "Measurement of the resonance frequency of single bubbles using a laser Doppler vibrometer," J...P.S. Wilson, and V. Palan , "Measurement of the resonance frequency of single bubbles using a laser Doppler vibrometer," The Journal of the Acoustical

  3. Dust-acoustic solitons in quantum plasma with kappa-distributed ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The comparison of the existence domain for higher and lower values of shows that suprathermality results in propagation of solitons with lower values of Mach number, and the quantum effects, lead to a higher values of Mach number. The existence domain of solitons for nondegenerate -distributed electrons is ...

  4. An apparatus to measure electrical charge of bubble swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, S; Jin, L; Mirnezami, M; Finch, J A

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to characterize bubble charge by measuring the swarm potential of gas bubbles. The technique allows in-process measurement of all system variables associated with bubble surface electrical charge: swarm potential, solution conductivity, gas holdup, pH and bubble size distribution. The method was validated by comparing with literature iso-electric point (iep) values. Bubble swarm potential was measured as a function of concentration and pH for a series of non-ionic surfactant frothers, ionic surfactant collectors and multivalent metal ions. Results showed good agreement with established theory and prior experimental findings. The setup is a step towards measurement of charge on flotation size range of bubble swarms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of the resonance frequency of single bubbles using a laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argo, Theodore F; Wilson, Preston S; Palan, Vikrant

    2008-06-01

    The behavior of bubbles confined in tubes and channels is important in medical and industrial applications. In these small spaces, traditional means of experimentally observing bubble dynamics are often impossible or significantly perturb the system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) requires a narrow (<1 mm diameter) line-of-sight access for the beam and illumination of the bubble does not perturb its dynamics. LDV measurements of the resonance frequency of a bubble suspended in a small tank are presented to illustrate the utility of this measurement technique. The precision of the technique is similar to the precision of traditional acoustic techniques.

  6. Microscopic bubble behaviour in suppression pool during wetwell venting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablackaite, G.; Nagasaka, H.; Kikura, H.

    2017-10-01

    During a severe accident PCV failure should be avoided and fission products inside PCV should be confined as much as possible. In order to minimize FPs release, Wetwell venting is conducted by releasing steam-non-condensable gas mixture carrying FPs from the Drywell to Suppression Pool. Steam is condensed by subcooled water in the pool, and most of FPs are retained into water. The removal of FP in the water pool is referred to as “Pool Scrubbing effect”. Hydrodynamic parameters of bubbles have impact on pool scrubbing effect. However, there is only few data available to evaluate quantitatively the bubble behaviour under depressurization and/or thermal stratification conditions. Series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of temperature distribution, non-condensable gas content and pressure in the Wetwell on bubble behaviour. Bubbles were visualized using High Speed Camera and adopting shadowgraphy technique. Applying Particle Tracking Velocimetry, bubble velocity and size distribution were obtained from recorded images. Experimental results show that with increasing suppression pool temperature, bubbles reaching the pool surface decreased in size and traveling velocity became slower. In pressurized wetwell, bubble behaviour was similar to that in the heated up suppression pool case, although bubble parameters were similar to the low temperature case. Higher air content induced water surface movement and bubbles were smaller due to break up.

  7. Liquid-bubble Interaction under Surf Zone Breaking Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, M.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-bubble interaction, especially in complex two-phase bubbly flow under breaking waves, is still poorly understood. Derakhti and Kirby (2014a,b) have recently studied bubble entrainment and turbulence modulation by dispersed bubbles under isolated unsteady breaking waves along with extensive model verifications and convergence tests. In this presentation, we continue this examination with attention turned to the simulation of periodic surf zone breaking waves. In addition, the relative importance of preferential accumulation of dispersed bubbles in coherent vortex cores is investigated. Heavier-than-liquid particles, i.e. sediment, tend to accumulate in regions of high strain rate and avoid regions of intense vorticity. In contrast, lighter-than-liquid particles such as bubbles tend to congregate in vortical regions. We perform a three dimensional (3D) large-eddy simulation (LES) using a Navier-Stokes solver extended to incorporate entrained bubble populations, using an Eulerian-Eulerian formulation for the polydisperse bubble phase. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used for free surface tracking. The model accounts for momentum exchange between dispersed bubbles and liquid phase as well as bubble-induced dissipation. We investigate the formation and evolution of breaking-induced turbulent coherent structures (BTCS) under both plunging and spilling periodic breaking waves as well as BTCS's role on the intermittent 3D distributions of bubble void fraction in the surf zone. We particularly examine the correlation between bubble void fractions and Q-criterion values to quantify this interaction. Also, the vertical transport of dispersed bubbles by downburst type coherent structures in the transition region is compared to that by obliquely descending eddies. All the results are summarized at different zones from outer to inner surf zone.

  8. Demonstrating the Importance of Bubbles and Viscosity on Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The behavior of bubbles (exsolved volatile from magma) and viscosity of magma are important parameters that influence volcanic eruptions. Exsolved volatiles increase the volume of magma and reduce its density so that magma has sufficient volume and buoyancy force to erupt. Volatiles exsolve through nucleation and growth by diffusion and bubbles can expand as pressure is reduced. The time scale of diffusion depends on the viscosity of surrounding magma, and the expansion time scale of a bubble is also depends on the viscosity of magma. These control the time scale for volume change. If bubbles segregate from magma and collapse, the magma might not able to expand sufficiently to erupt violently. Whether a bubble can segregate from the liquid part of magma is also depends on viscosity of magma. In this poster, I introduce a straightforward demonstration to show the importance of bubbles and viscosity of magma on volcanic eruptions. To make bubbles, I use baking soda (NaHCO3) and citric acid. Reaction between them generates carbon dioxide (CO2) to make bubbles. I make citric acid solution gel by using agar at the bottom of a transparent glass and pour baking soda disolved corn syrup on top of the agar. This situation is a model of basally heated magma chamber. When water disolved magma (baking soda disolved corn syrup) receives sufficient heat (citric acid) bubbles are generated. I can change viscosity of corn syrup by varying the concentration of water. This demonstration shows how viscosity controls the time scale of volume change of bubbly magma and the distribution of bubbles in the fluid. In addition it helps to understand the important physical processes in volcanic eruption: bubble nucleation, diffusion grows, expansion, and bubble driving convection. I will perform a live demonstration at the site of the poster.

  9. Experiment and modeling of translational dynamics of an oscillating bubble cluster in a stationary sound field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Naohiro; Ando, Keita; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    Translational motion of an oscillating bubble cluster under sound irradiation is studied experimentally and is modeled in the framework of the classical approach of Bjerknes. An experimental technique is proposed to observe bubble cluster formation and its translational dynamics interacting with wall boundaries due to the secondary Bjerknes force. The translational motion observed in the experiment is modeled by extending the classical theory of Bjerknes on a single bubble; a bubble cluster is treated as a single bubble. The extended Bjerknes theory is shown to allow us to predict the overall trajectory of the cluster translating toward a wall of finite acoustic impedance by tuning acoustic energy loss at the wall. The drag force turns out to be unimportant for the translation of a millimeter-sized cluster that we observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model describing the mass and momentum exchange in bubble columns is proposed that is based on the observations that the gas distribution in a bubble column is not uniform across the column and that as a consequence large liquid...

  11. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  12. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    seismic airgun pulses or passing ships. Environmental predictor variables were eight-day SST and [Chl] assessed from the standard NASA satellite...standard deviations away from the mean. Collinearity was evaluated using the collintest function in the MATLAB ® Econometrics toolbox. Collinearity was...environment mostly related to seismic signals (both natural and man-made) and ship passages. The distribution of all variables were checked by

  13. Distributed measurement of acoustic vibration location with frequency multiplexed phase-OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Daisuke; Toge, Kunihiro; Manabe, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    All-fiber distributed vibration sensing is attracting attention in relation to structural health monitoring because it is cost effective, offers high coverage of the monitored area and can detect various structural problems. And in particular the demand for high-speed vibration sensing operating at more than 10 kHz has increased because high frequency vibration indicates high energy and severe trouble in the monitored object. Optical fiber vibration sensing with phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (phase-OTDR) has long been studied because it can be used for distributed vibration sensing in optical fiber. However, pulse reflectometry such as OTDR cannot measure high-frequency vibration whose cycle is shorter than the repetition time of the OTDR. That is, the maximum detectable frequency depends on fiber length. In this paper, we describe a vibration sensing technique with frequency-multiplexed OTDR that can detect the entire distribution of a high-frequency vibration thus allowing us to locate a high-speed vibration point. We can measure the position, frequency and dynamic change of a high-frequency vibration whose cycle is shorter than the repetition time. Both frequency and position are visualized simultaneously for a 5-km fiber with an 80-kHz frequency response and a 20-m spatial resolution.

  14. Perturbation of a radially oscillating single-bubble by a micron-sized object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Quiroz, W; Baillon, F; Louisnard, O; Boyer, B; Espitalier, F

    2017-03-01

    A single bubble oscillating in a levitation cell is acoustically monitored by a piezo-ceramics microphone glued on the cell external wall. The correlation of the filtered signal recorded over distant cycles on one hand, and its harmonic content on the other hand, are shown to carry rich information on the bubble stability and existence. For example, the harmonic content of the signal is shown to increase drastically once air is fully dissociated in the bubble, and the resulting pure argon bubble enters into the upper branch of the sonoluminescence regime. As a consequence, the bubble disappearance can be unambiguously detected by a net drop in the harmonic content. On the other hand, we perturb a stable sonoluminescing bubble by approaching a micron-sized fiber. The bubble remains unperturbed until the fiber tip is approached within a critical distance, below which the bubble becomes unstable and disappears. This distance can be easily measured by image treatment, and is shown to scale roughly with 3-4 times the bubble maximal radius. The bubble disappearance is well detected by the drop of the microphone harmonic content, but several thousands of periods after the bubble actually disappeared. The delay is attributed to the slow extinction of higher modes of the levitation cell, excited by the bubble oscillation. The acoustic detection method should however allow the early detection and imaging of non-predictable perturbations of the bubble by foreign micron-sized objects, such as crystals or droplets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical study on the influence of entrapped air bubbles on the time-dependent pore pressure distribution in soils due to external changes in water level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausweger Georg M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical geotechnical engineering soils below the groundwater table are usually regarded as a two-phase medium, consisting of solids and water. The pore water is assumed to be incompressible. However, under certain conditions soils below the groundwater table may exhibit a liquid phase consisting of water and air. The air occurs in form of entrapped air bubbles and dissolved air. Such conditions are named quasi-saturated and the assumption of incompressibility is no longer justified. In addition the entrapped air bubbles influence the hydraulic conductivity of soils. These effects are usually neglected in standard problems of geotechnical engineering. However, sometimes it is required to include the pore fluid compressibility when modelling the hydraulic behaviour of soils in order to be able to explain certain phenomena observed in the field. This is for example true for fast fluctuating water levels in reservoirs. In order to study these phenomena, numerical investigations on the influence of the pore fluid compressibility on the pore water pressure changes in a soil layer beneath a reservoir with fast fluctuating water levels were performed. Preliminary results of this study are presented and it could be shown that numerical analysis and field data are in good agreement.

  16. Bubble impacts with microcantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Longmire, Ellen; Ali, Mubassar; Mantell, Susan

    2006-11-01

    In the current study, we investigate bubbles in laminar channel flows impacting microcantilever obstacles. Static and resonating cantilevers instrumented with integrated strain gages are mounted perpendicular to the mean flow in a vertically-oriented channel with thickness 2mm, span 10mm, and length 585 mm. Steady, fully-developed upward flows with channel Reynolds numbers based on mean fluid velocity and hydraulic diameter of 0-2500 are considered. Bubbles of diameter 200-1000μm are introduced upstream of the test section, and impacts are observed using a microscope equipped with a high frame rate camera. Observations are made along the length of cantilevers backlit with white light. Strain gage signals are monitored and correlated to impact events. The effect of obstacles on bubble motion and deformation as well as the effect of bubble impacts on the cantilever will be discussed. The flow studies are part of a larger research program examining reliability and performance of vibrating microbeams.

  17. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  18. Bubble dynamics in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Andreas [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Metzler, Ralf [NORDITA-Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2003-09-12

    The formation of local denaturation zones (bubbles) in double-stranded DNA is an important example of conformational changes of biological macromolecules. We study the dynamics of bubble formation in terms of a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density to find a bubble of size n base pairs at time t, on the basis of the free energy in the Poland-Scheraga model. Characteristic bubble closing and opening times can be determined from the corresponding first passage time problem, and are sensitive to the specific parameters entering the model. A multistate unzipping model with constant rates recently applied to DNA breathing dynamics (Altan-Bonnet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 138101) emerges as a limiting case. (letter to the editor)

  19. Shock wave emission upon spherical bubble collapse during cavitation-induced megasonic surface cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsier, V; Proost, J

    2008-04-01

    When a gas bubble in a liquid interacts with an acoustic wave near a solid surface, the bubble first expands and then collapses. In this paper, a mathematical framework combining the Gilmore model and the method of characteristics is presented to model the shock wave emitted at the end of the bubble collapse. It allows to describe the liquid velocity at the shock front as a function of the radial distance to the bubble center in the case of spherical bubble collapse. Numerical calculations of the liquid velocity at the shock front have shown that this velocity increases with the acoustic amplitude and goes through a maximum as a function of the initial bubble radius. Calculations for different gas state equations inside the bubble show that the Van der Waals law predicts a slightly higher liquid velocity at the shock front than when considering a perfect gas law. Finally, decreasing the value of the surface tension at the bubble/liquid interface results in an increase of the liquid velocity at the shock front. Our calculations indicate that the strength of the shock waves emitted upon spherical bubble collapse can cause delamination of typical device structures used in microelectronics.

  20. Estimation of gassy sediment parameters using acoustical methods, Lake Kinneret, North of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzhansky, Ernst; Katsnelson, Boris; Katsman, Regina; Lunkov, Andrey; Ostrovsky, Ilia

    2017-04-01

    Shallow gassy aquatic sediments, abundantly found in Israel and worldwide, are a source of major concern for their contribution to destabilization of coastal and marine infrastructure, ecological balance, air pollutions, and global warming. The purpose of current research is to characterize gassy sediments in the Lake Kinneret using acoustical methods. Method of measurements uses connection between properties of the sound signal passing through or scattered from the bubble aggregation in bottom layer and parameters of sediment. This non-invasive, cost-effective method of acoustic characterization of gassy sediment will allow a rapid remote scanning over large areas of bottom sediments. This, in turn, will permit a better understanding of methane gas distribution in upper sediment layer that can be used in monitoring of ecological balance of the region. Preliminary analysis of acoustical data shows a good correlation with filed measurements of organic matter concentration in shallow sediments of Lake Kinneret.

  1. Small amplitude ion acoustic solitons in a weakly magnetized plasma with anisotropic ion pressure and kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, S.; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-03-01

    The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for nonlinear electrostatic waves in a weakly magnetized plasma in the presence of anisotropic ion pressure and superthermal electrons. The anisotropic ion pressure is defined using Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) while a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution is assumed for the non-thermal electrons. The standard reductive perturbation method (RPM) is employed to derive the two dimensional ZK equation for the dynamics of obliquely propagating low frequency ion acoustic wave. The influence of spectral index (kappa) of non-thermal electron on the soliton is discussed in the presence of anisotropic ion pressure in plasmas. It is found that ion pressure anisotropy and superthermality of electrons affect both the width and amplitude of the solitary waves. On the other hand the magnetic field is found to alter the dispersive property of the plasma only, and hence the width of the solitons is affected while the amplitude of the solitary waves is independent of external magnetic field. The numerical results are also presented for illustrations.

  2. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki, E-mail: takahira@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki, E-mail: oga@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Naoto, E-mail: su101064@edu.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Moe [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai-shi, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  3. Examination of single-substance multiphase material distribution in a cylindrical container using acoustic wavenumber spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, John R.; Koskelo, Elise Anne C.; O'Dowd, Niall M.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2017-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a steady-state scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system for the identification of transition areas between solid, liquid, and gaseous substances in an enclosed container. This technique images lateral surface velocity under the excitation of a single-frequency ultrasonic tone, produced by a piezoelectric actuator. Differences in measured spatial wavenumber at discrete measurement points of a surface scan can be used to detect the boundaries between solid, liquid and gaseous regions of material. We used the LDV system to compare the relative distributions of solid wax, liquid wax, and air in a cylindrical container based on local changes in wavenumber. Through the same methodology, we were able to distinguish the transition between solid and liquid epoxy in a container. Finally, by repeatedly scanning the container during a phase-changing reaction within the container, we established that the system can be used to monitor reactions as they progress.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of spectral reflectance and BRDF of the bubble layer in the upper ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lanxin; Wang, Fuqiang; Wang, Chengan; Wang, Chengchao; Tan, Jianyu

    2015-09-21

    The presence of bubbles can significantly change the radiative properties of seawater and these changes will affect remote sensing and underwater target detection. In this work, the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance characteristics of the bubble layer in the upper ocean are investigated using the Monte Carlo method. The Hall-Novarini (HN) bubble population model, which considers the effect of wind speed and depth on the bubble size distribution, is used. The scattering coefficients and the scattering phase functions of bubbles in seawater are calculated using Mie theory, and the inherent optical properties of seawater for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm are related to chlorophyll concentration (Chl). The effects of bubble coating, Chl, and bubble number density on the spectral reflectance of the bubble layer are studied. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the bubble layer for both normal and oblique incidence is also investigated. The results show that bubble populations in clear waters under high wind speed conditions significantly influence the reflection characteristics of the bubble layer. Furthermore, the contribution of bubble populations to the reflection characteristics is mainly due to the strong backscattering of bubbles that are coated with an organic film.

  5. Effects of surfactant on bubble hydrodynamic behavior under flotation-related conditions in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Zhu, Tingting; Liu, Yanyan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Huanran

    2012-01-01

    Bubble behavior is fundamental to the performance of froth flotation operations used in wastewater treatment processes. To fully understand and characterize bubble behavior under flotation-related conditions in wastewater, the high-speed photographic method has been employed to examine the motion of single bubbles and size distribution of bubble swarms with intermediate sizes ranging from 1 to 4 mm in the presence of surfactants in a laboratory scale flotation column. Both distilled water and synthetic municipal wastewater have been used to make solutions as well as two types of common surfactants. The instantaneous bubble motion has been recorded by a high speed camera. Subsequently, bubble trajectory, dimensions, velocity and distribution have been determined from the recorded frames using the image analysis software. The experimental results show that the addition of surfactant into wastewater has similar effects on bubble hydrodynamic behavior as in pure water (e.g., improving trajectory stabilization, dampening bubble deformation, slowing down terminal velocity, reducing bubble size and increasing the specific surface area of bubble swarm) due to the Marangoni effect. However, it is interesting to note that surfactant effects on single bubble hydrodynamics in wastewater are slightly stronger than those in pure water while surfactant effects on size parameters of bubble swarms in wastewater are significantly stronger than those in pure water. This finding suggests that besides surfactant, inorganic salts present in synthetic wastewater have an important influence on bubble dispersion.

  6. The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    distributions were also created by suspending micro- bubbles in a 1% solution of Xanthan gum. The advantage of the latter technique is the bubble ...The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures Ronald A. Roy Department of Aerospace and Mechanical...leading to predictive models, of the broader aspects of linear and nonlinear sound scattering and transmission in bubbly mixtures pertinent to the

  7. Surface tension and quasi-emulsion of cavitation bubble cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lixin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Gang; Xu, Weilin; Lin, Weijun; Wu, Pengfei; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Yan, Jiuchun

    2017-03-01

    A quasi-emulsion phenomenon of cavitation structure in a thin liquid layer (the thin liquid layer is trapped between a radiating surface and a hard reflector) is investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The transformation from cloud-in-water (c/w) emulsion to water-in-cloud (w/c) emulsion is related to the increase of cavitation bubble cloud. The acoustic field in the thin liquid layer is analyzed. It is found that the liquid region has higher acoustic pressure than the cloud region. The bubbles are pushed from liquid region to cloud region by the primary Bjerknes forces. The rate of change of CSF increased with the increase of CSF. The cavitation bubbles on the surface of cavitation cloud are attracted by the cavitation bubbles inside the cloud due to secondary Bjerknes forces. The existence of surface tension on the interface of liquid region and cloud region is proved. The formation mechanism of disc-shaped liquid region and cloud region are analysed by surface tension and incompressibility of cavitation bubble cloud. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Frictional Drag Reduction by Bubbles in Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yuichi; Oiwa, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yasushi

    2006-11-01

    Frictional drag reduction provided with small bubbles is investigated experimentally using a Couette-Taylor flow system, i.e. shear flow between concentric cylinders. Torque and bubble behavior are measured up to Re=4500 when air bubbles are injected constantly and rise through the cells. Silicone oil is used for avoiding uncertain interfacial property of bubbles as well as for keeping nearly mono-sized bubbles. We assess the effect of drag reduction with two types of evaluation factors, i.e. sensitivity and power gain. The sensitivity exceeds unity at Redrag is reduced more than the drop of mixture density. This originates from accumulation of bubbles into the rotating inner cylinder, which is little affected by turbulence. The power gain, which is defined by drag reduction power per bubble injection power, takes the highest value of O(10) at higher Re numbers around 2500. The image processing measurement finds this reason to be disappearance of azimuthal waves when the organized bubbles distribution transits from toroidal to spiral modes. Moreover, the axial spacing of bubble clouds expands during the transition, enforcing the reduction of momentum exchange.

  9. Spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in water and glycerin-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, D. Felipe; Atchley, Anthony A.; Lewia, S. D.; Carlson, J. T.; Maruyama, X. K.; Moran, Michael; Sweider, Darren

    1996-07-01

    A single gas bubble, acoustically levitated in a standing-wave field and oscillating under the action of that field, can emit pulses of blue-white light with duration less than 50 ps. Measurements of the spectrum of this picosecond sonoluminescence with a scanning monochrometer are reported for air bubbles levitated in water and in glycerin-water mixtures. While the spectrum has been reported previously by others for air bubbles in water, the spectrum for air bubbles in water-glycerin mixtures has not. Expected emission lines from glycerin were conspicuously absent, suggesting a different mechanism for light production in single-bubble sonoluminescence. Other conclusions are the spectrum for air bubbles in water is consistent with that previously reported, the radiated energy decreases as the glycerin concentration increases, and the peak of the spectrum appears to shift to longer wavelengths for the water-glycerin mixtures.

  10. Measurement of the impuslive force generated by colapsing bubble close to a solid boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Patrik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental results of the acoustical and optical study of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid boundary in water. The bubble was generated by discharge of low-voltage capacitor into a couple of wires closing a simple circuit. Different distances from the solid wall and different maximum bubble radii were studied. The bubble radius was studied using time-resolved photography and by PVDF film sensor glued on the solid boundary. The illumination was provided by high-power led diode. Synchronization of the system was provided by pulse generator connected to an oscilloscope. The impact power of the bubble to the wall was estimated from the time-resolved photography of the bubble and from the PVDF film sensor signal. The PVDF film sensor calibration was performed by a pendulum test to estimate the impact force.

  11. Oscillating bubbles: a versatile tool for lab on a chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali; Yu, Gan; Reilly-Collette, Marina; Heiman, Garrett; Xu, Jie

    2012-11-07

    With the fast development of acoustic and multiphase microfluidics in recent years, oscillating bubbles have drawn more-and-more attention due to their great potential in various Lab on a Chip (LOC) applications. Many innovative bubble-based devices have been explored in the past decade. In this article, we first briefly summarize current understanding of the physics of oscillating bubbles, and then critically summarize recent advancements, including some of our original work, on the applications of oscillating bubbles in microfluidic devices. We intend to highlight the advantages of using oscillating bubbles along with the challenges that accompany them. We believe that these emerging studies on microfluidic oscillating bubbles will be revolutionary to the development of next-generation LOC technologies.

  12. A biophysical vascular bubble model for devising decompression procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    Vascular bubble models, which present a realistic biophysical approach, hold great promise for devising suitable diver decompression procedures. Nanobubbles were found to nucleate on a flat hydrophobic surface, expanding to form bubbles after decompression. Such active hydrophobic spots (AHS) were formed from lung surfactants on the luminal aspect of ovine blood vessels. Many of the phenomena observed in these bubbling vessels correlated with those known to occur in diving. On the basis of our previous studies, which proposed a new model for the formation of arterial bubbles, we now suggest the biophysical model presented herein. There are two phases of bubble expansion after decompression. The first is an extended initiation phase, during which nanobubbles are transformed into gas micronuclei and begin to expand. The second, shorter phase is one of simple diffusion-driven growth, the inert gas tension in the blood remaining almost constant during bubble expansion. Detachment of the bubble occurs when its buoyancy exceeds the intermembrane force. Three mechanisms underlying the appearance of arterial bubbles should be considered: patent foramen ovale, intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses, and the evolution of bubbles in the distal arteries with preference for the spinal cord. Other parameters that may be quantified include age, acclimation, distribution of bubble volume, AHS, individual sensitivity, and frequency of bubble formation. We believe that the vascular bubble model we propose adheres more closely to proven physiological processes. Its predictability may therefore be higher than other models, with appropriate adjustments for decompression illness (DCI) data. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  13. On the maximum drawdown during speculative bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundo, Giulia; Navarra, Mauro

    2007-08-01

    A taxonomy of large financial crashes proposed in the literature locates the burst of speculative bubbles due to endogenous causes in the framework of extreme stock market crashes, defined as falls of market prices that are outlier with respect to the bulk of drawdown price movement distribution. This paper goes on deeper in the analysis providing a further characterization of the rising part of such selected bubbles through the examination of drawdown and maximum drawdown movement of indices prices. The analysis of drawdown duration is also performed and it is the core of the risk measure estimated here.

  14. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  16. Power Laws in Real Estate Prices during Bubble Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takaaki; Mizuno, Takayuki; Shimizu, Chihiro; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    How can we detect real estate bubbles? In this paper, we propose making use of information on the cross-sectional dispersion of real estate prices. During bubble periods, prices tend to go up considerably for some properties, but less so for others, so that price inequality across properties increases. In other words, a key characteristic of real estate bubbles is not the rapid price hike itself but a rise in price dispersion. Given this, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether developments in the dispersion in real estate prices can be used to detect bubbles in property markets as they arise, using data from Japan and the U.S. First, we show that the land price distribution in Tokyo had a power-law tail during the bubble period in the late 1980s, while it was very close to a lognormal before and after the bubble period. Second, in the U.S. data we find that the tail of the house price distribution tends to be heavier in those states which experienced a housing bubble. We also provide evidence suggesting that the power-law tail observed during bubble periods arises due to the lack of price arbitrage across regions.

  17. A Bubble Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars. The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  18. Quantifying Methane Flux from a Prominent Seafloor Crater with Water Column Imagery Filtering and Bubble Quantification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Doolittle, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas flux from the seafloor to atmosphere is an important variable for global carbon cycle and climate models, yet is poorly constrained. Methodologies used to estimate seafloor gas flux commonly employ a combination of acoustic and optical techniques. These techniques often use hull-mounted multibeam echosounders (MBES) to quickly ensonify large volumes of the water column for acoustic backscatter anomalies indicative of gas bubble plumes. Detection of these water column anomalies with a MBES provides information on the lateral distribution of the plumes, the midwater dimensions of the plumes, and their positions on the seafloor. Seafloor plume locations are targeted for visual investigations using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to determine bubble emission rates, venting behaviors, bubble sizes, and ascent velocities. Once these variables are measured in-situ, an extrapolation of gas flux is made over the survey area using the number of remotely-mapped flares. This methodology was applied to a geophysical survey conducted in 2013 over a large seafloor crater that developed in response to an oil well blowout in 1983 offshore Papua New Guinea. The site was investigated by multibeam and sidescan mapping, sub-bottom profiling, 2-D high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection, and ROV video and coring operations. Numerous water column plumes were detected in the data suggesting vigorously active vents within and near the seafloor crater (Figure 1). This study uses dual-frequency MBES datasets (Reson 7125, 200/400 kHz) and ROV video imagery of the active hydrocarbon seeps to estimate total gas flux from the crater. Plumes of bubbles were extracted from the water column data using threshold filtering techniques. Analysis of video images of the seep emission sites within the crater provided estimates on bubble size, expulsion frequency, and ascent velocity. The average gas flux characteristics made from ROV video observations is extrapolated over the number

  19. Acoustic distribution of discriminated micronektonic organisms from a bi-frequency processing : the case study of eastern Kerguelen oceanic waters

    OpenAIRE

    Behagle, Nolwenn; Cotte, C.; Lebourges Dhaussy, Anne; Roudaut, Gildas; Duhamel, G.; BREHMER, Patrice; Josse, Erwan; Cherel, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its ecological importance, micronekton remains one of the least investigated components of the open-ocean ecosystems. Our main goal was to characterize micronektonic organisms using bi-frequency acoustic data (38 and 120 kHz) by calibrating an algorithm tool that discriminates groups of scatterers in the top 300 m of the productive oceanic zone east of Kerguelen Islands (Indian sector of the Southern Ocean). The bi-frequency algorithm was calibrated from acoustic properties of mono-sp...

  20. Acoustic distribution of discriminated micronektonic organisms from a bi-frequency processing: the case study of eastern Kerguelen oceanic waters

    OpenAIRE

    Béhagle, Nolwenn; Cotté, Cédric; Lebourges-Dhaussy, Anne; Roudaut, Gildas; Duhamel, Guy; BREHMER, Patrice; Josse, Erwan; Cherel, Yves

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Despite its ecological importance, micronekton remains one of the least investigated components of the open-ocean ecosystems. Our main goal was to characterize micronektonic organisms using bi-frequency acoustic data (38 and 120 kHz) by calibrating an algorithm tool that discriminates groups of scatterers in the top 300 m of the productive oceanic zone east of Kerguelen Islands (Indian sector of the Southern Ocean). The bi-frequency algorithm was calibrated from acoust...

  1. Bubble nuclei; Noyaux Bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoll, F. [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1998-07-22

    For nuclei with very high electrical charge, the Coulomb field is expected to drive the protons away from the centre to the surface of the nucleus. Such a nucleus would be no more compact but look like a bubble. The goal of this work is to confirm this idea. We are interested in only the ground state of spherical nuclei. We use the Skyrme potential with the Sly4 parametrization to calculate the mean-field Hamiltonian. Paring correlations are described by a surface-active delta paring interaction. In its ground state the nucleus {sup A=900} X{sub Z=274} is shown to be a bubble. Another stable state is found with a little higher energy: it is also a bubble. (author) 11 refs., 18 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1-10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200-400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  3. Effect of ultrasound on dynamics characteristic of the cavitation bubble in grinding fluids during honing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ce; Zhu, Xijing

    2018-03-01

    The effect of ultrasound on generating and controlling the cavitation bubble of the grinding fluid during ultrasonic vibration honing was investigated. The grinding fluid on the surface of the honing stone was measured by utilizing the digital microscope VHX-600ESO. Based on analyzing the cavitation mechanism of the grinding fluid, the bubble dynamics model under conventional honing (CH) and ultrasonic vibration honing (UVH) was established respectively. Difference of dynamic behaviors of the bubble between the cases in UVH and CH was compared respectively, and the effects of acoustic amplitude and ultrasonic frequency on the bubble dynamics were simulated numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method with variable step size adaptive control. Finally, the cavitation intensity of grinding fluids under ultrasound was measured quantitatively using acoustimeter. The results showed that the grinding fluid subjected to ultrasound can generate many bubbles and further forms numerous groups of araneose cavitation bubbles on the surface of the honing stone. The oscillation of the bubble under UVH is more intense than the case under CH, and the maximum velocity of the bubble wall under UVH is higher two magnitudes than the case under CH. For lower acoustic amplitude, the dynamic behaviors of the bubble under UVH are similar to that case under CH. As increasing acoustic amplitude, the cavitation intensity of the bubble is growing increased. Honing pressure has an inhabitation effect on cavitation effect of the grinding fluid. The perfect performance of cavitation of the grinding fluid can be obtained when the device of UVH is in the resonance. However, the cavitation intensity of the grinding fluid can be growing weakened with increasing ultrasonic frequency, when the device of UVH is in the off-resonance. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and numerical analysis, which provides a method for exploring applications of the cavitation effect in

  4. High frequency acoustic propagation under variable sea surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senne, Joseph

    This dissertation examines the effects of rough sea surfaces and sub-surface bubbles on high frequency acoustic transmissions. Owing to the strong attenuation of electromagnetic waves in seawater, acoustic waves are used in the underwater realm much in the same way that electromagnetic waves are used in the atmosphere. The transmission and reception of acoustic waves in the underwater environment is important for a variety of fields including navigation, ocean observation, and real-time communications. Rough sea surfaces and sub-surface bubbles alter the acoustic signals that are received not only in the near-surface water column, but also at depth. This dissertation demonstrates that surface roughness and sub-surface bubbles notably affect acoustic transmissions with frequency ranges typical of underwater communications systems (10-50 kHz). The influence of rough surfaces on acoustic transmissions is determined by modeling forward propagation subject to sea surface dynamics that vary with time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds. A time-evolving rough sea surface model is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time-varying acoustic fields. Linear surface waves are generated from surface wave spectra, and evolved in time using a Runge-Kutta integration technique. This evolving, range-dependent surface information is combined with other environmental parameters and fed into the acoustic model, giving an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea surfaces by molding them into the boundary conditions for calculations of the near-surface acoustic field. The influence of sub-surface bubbles on acoustic transmissions is determined by modeling the population of bubbles near the surface and using those populations to approximate the effective changes in sound speed and attenuation. Both range-dependent and range-independent bubble models are

  5. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  6. Influence of movement regime of stick-slip process on the size distribution of accompanying acoustic emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcharashvili, Teimuraz; Chelidze, Tamaz; Zhukova, Natalia; Mepharidze, Ekaterine; Sborshchikov, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Many scientific works on dynamics of earthquake generation are devoted to qualitative and quantitative reproduction of behavior of seismic faults. Number of theoretical, numerical or physical models are already designed for this purpose. Main assumption of these works is that the correct model must be capable to reproduce power law type relation for event sizes with magnitudes greater than or equal to a some threshold value, similar to Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law for the size distribution of earthquakes. To model behavior of a seismic faults in laboratory conditions spring-block experimental systems are often used. They enable to generate stick-slip movement, intermittent behavior occurring when two solids in contact slide relative to each other driven at a constant velocity. Wide interest to such spring-block models is caused by the fact that stick-slip is recognized as a basic process underlying earthquakes generation along pre-existing faults. It is worth to mention, that in stick slip experiments reproduction of power law, in slip events size distribution, with b values close or equal to the one found for natural seismicity is possible. Stick-slip process observed in these experimental models is accompanied by a transient elastic waves propagation generated during the rapid release of stress energy in spring-block system. Oscillations of stress energy can be detected as a characteristic acoustic emission (AE). Accompanying stick slip AE is the subject of intense investigation, but many aspects of this process are still unclear. In the present research we aimed to investigate dynamics of stick slip AE in order to find whether its distributional properties obey power law. Experiments have been carried out on spring-block system consisting of fixed and sliding plates of roughly finished basalt samples. The sliding block was driven with a constant velocity. Experiments have been carried out for five different stiffness of pulling spring. Thus five different regimes

  7. Luminescence induced by spherically focused acoustic pulses in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G. N.

    2005-06-01

    The determination of the phase of the bubble oscillation at the instant of light emission, which is a key issue for understanding the origin of cavitation luminescence of liquids, is discussed. The observation of luminescence in the course of the nucleation and growth of a bubble up to its collapse is performed in a bipolar wave consisting of a compression phase followed by a rarefaction phase in the regime of a two-fraction bubble cluster formation. The space-time distributions of the luminescence intensity and pressure and the dynamics of the cluster in water and a glycerin solution are investigated at the early stage of cavitation. A correlation between the maximal density of light flashes and the positive pressure pulses in the field of superposition of the initial and secondary cavitation compression waves is revealed. It is shown that the spherical focusing of acoustic pulses both away from the boundaries of the liquid and near its free surface makes it possible to compare the luminescence intensities for different rates of the pressure decrease.

  8. Bubble clustering in a glass of stout beer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsubo, Fumiya; Watamura, Tomoaki; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu

    2017-11-01

    To clarify why the texture in stout beer poured into a pint glass descends, we investigated local time development of the void fraction and velocity of bubbles. The propagation of the number density distribution, i.e. the texture, appearing near the inclined wall is observed. We visualized individual advective bubbles near the inclined wall by microscope and measured the local void fraction using brightness of images while the velocity of bubbles by means of Particle Tracking Velocimetry. As the result of measurements, we found the local void fraction and the bubbles advection velocity increase and decrease repeatedly with a time delay. We conclude the texture pattern is composed of fluid blobs which contain less bubbles; extruding and suction flows respectively toward and from the interior of the container form respectively in front and back of the blobs.

  9. Behavior of gas seep bubbles below the hydrate stability zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Jun, I.; Hutschenreuter, K.; Socolofsky, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; Lavery, A.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Seewald, J.

    2016-02-01

    Two research cruises (GISR G07 and G08) have been carried out during 2014-2015 to study the behavior of natural gas seep plumes escaping on the seafloor below the hydrate stability zone at MC 118 and GC 600 in the Gulf of Mexico. Quantitative image measurements suggest both temporal and spatial variation of the bubble size and gas flow rate. Hydrate formation on the natural gas seep bubbles was a very fast process in the deep sea environment (890 and 1200 m depth), where the measured methane concentration in water close to the source was also saturated. The measured rise velocities of the bubbles differed significantly from the predicted terminal velocities using empirical equations in Clift et al. (1978). The measured bubble characteristics (size distribution and flow rate) were provided as input to a bubble dissolution model, which accounts for the effect of hydrate on the mass transfer coefficient. The model shows results consistent with the measurements.

  10. Acoustic survey for marine mammal occurrence and distribution off East Antarctica (30-80°E) in January-February 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedamke, Jason; Robinson, Sarah M.

    2010-05-01

    A large scale, systematic, acoustic survey for whales and seals in eastern Antarctic waters was conducted in January-February 2006. During the BROKE-West survey of Southern Ocean waters between 30 and 80° E longitude, an acoustic survey was conducted to complement a traditional visual survey for marine mammal occurrence and distribution. As part of the survey, 145 DIFAR sonobuoys were deployed every 30' of latitude on north-south transects, and prior to CTD stations on the initial east-west transect. Underwater sound was analyzed for 70 minute samples from each sonobuoy. Blue whales were the most commonly recorded species, identified at 55 of the sonobuoy deployment sites. Other species recorded include: sperm (46 sites), fin (14), humpback (2), and sei (3) whales, and leopard (11) and Ross (17) seals. Large numbers of blue and sperm whales, and all Ross seals were detected on the westernmost two transects, which were the only transects of the survey with relatively extensive sea ice remaining off the continental shelf. Large numbers of blue whales were also detected in the more eastern waters of the survey off the Prydz Bay region, while two detections of pygmy blue whales represent the farthest south these whales have been recorded. Of the relatively few fin whale detections, most occurred in more northerly waters. Fin whale vocalizations from this region were distinctly different than those recorded elsewhere around Antarctica suggesting acoustic recordings may be useful to delineate regional or stock boundaries of this species. Previously undescribed sounds were attributed to Ross seals. Acoustic detections of these and leopard seal sounds indicate these animals venture further from their traditionally described distributions, with vocalizing leopard seals occurring much further north than might be expected. Overall, the results of the sonobuoy survey provide a measure of each species' relative spatial distribution over the survey area based on acoustic

  11. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D; Chen, C J; Crisler, M; Cwiok, T; Dahl, C E; Grimsted, A; Gupta, J; Jin, M; Puig, R; Temples, D; Zhang, J

    2017-06-09

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a ^{252}Cf neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19±6  keV (1σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3×10^{-7} bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF_{3}I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  12. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D.; Chen, C. J.; Crisler, M.; Cwiok, T.; Dahl, C. E.; Grimsted, A.; Gupta, J.; Jin, M.; Puig, R.; Temples, D.; Zhang, J.

    2017-06-01

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a Cf 252 neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19 ±6 keV (1 σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3 ×10-7 bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF3 I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  13. Measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound surgical device in the linear and nonlinear operating modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub

    2009-06-01

    in loading medium appears, with strong cavitation activity produced hydrodynamically. The presence of harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics as a consequence of stable cavitation is evident in the averaged power spectral density. The cavitation noise with continuous frequency components is present as a consequence of transient cavitation. The averaged pressure magnitude at the frequency components of interest (discrete and continuous) in the field points is found by calculating average power spectral density of the recorded pressure waveform signal using the welch method. The frequency band of interest where average power spectral density is calculated is in the range from 15 Hz up to 120 kHz due to measurement system restrictions. The novelty in the approach is the application of the acoustic reciprocity principle on the nonlinear system (sonotrode tip and bubble cloud) to find necessary acoustic power of the equivalent acoustic source to produce the measured pressure magnitude in the field points at the frequency components of interest. In the nonlinear operating mode, the ROS model for the considered sonotrode tip is chosen due to the better agreement between measurement results and theoretical considerations. At higher excitation levels, it is shown that the averaged pressure magnitude spatial distribution of discrete frequency components, produced due to stable cavitation, can be fitted in the far field with the inverse distance law. The reduced electroacoustic efficiency factor, calculated at excitation frequency component as ratio of derived acoustic power with applied electrical power, is reduced from 40% in the linear to 3% in the strong nonlinear operating mode. The derived acoustic power at other frequency components (subharmonic, harmonic and ultraharmonic) is negligible in comparison with the derived acoustic power at excitation frequency. The sonotrode tip and loading medium are shown in the strong cavitation regime as the coupled nonlinear

  14. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  15. Bubble reconstruction method for wire-mesh sensors measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukin, Roman V.

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm is presented for post-processing of void fraction measurements with wire-mesh sensors, particularly for identifying and reconstructing bubble surfaces in a two-phase flow. This method is a combination of the bubble recognition algorithm presented in Prasser (Nuclear Eng Des 237(15):1608, 2007) and Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm developed in Kazhdan et al. (Poisson surface reconstruction. In: Proceedings of the fourth eurographics symposium on geometry processing 7, 2006). To verify the proposed technique, a comparison was done of the reconstructed individual bubble shapes with those obtained numerically in Sato and Ničeno (Int J Numer Methods Fluids 70(4):441, 2012). Using the difference between reconstructed and referenced bubble shapes, the accuracy of the proposed algorithm was estimated. At the next step, the algorithm was applied to void fraction measurements performed in Ylönen (High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle (Diss., Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule ETH Zürich, Nr. 20961, 2013) by means of wire-mesh sensors in a rod bundle geometry. The reconstructed bubble shape yields bubble surface area and volume, hence its Sauter diameter d_{32} as well. Sauter diameter is proved to be more suitable for bubbles size characterization compared to volumetric diameter d_{30}, proved capable to capture the bi-disperse bubble size distribution in the flow. The effect of a spacer grid was studied as well: For the given spacer grid and considered flow rates, bubble size frequency distribution is obtained almost at the same position for all cases, approximately at d_{32} = 3.5 mm. This finding can be related to the specific geometry of the spacer grid or the air injection device applied in the experiments, or even to more fundamental properties of the bubble breakup and coagulation processes. In addition, an application of the new algorithm for reconstruction of a large air-water interface in a tube bundle is

  16. Convection in a volcanic conduit recorded by bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Rebecca J.; Manga, Michael; Degruyter, Wim; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Swanson, Donald; Houghton, Bruce F.; Orr, Tim; Patrick, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Microtextures of juvenile pyroclasts from Kīlauea’s (Hawai‘i) early A.D. 2008 explosive activity record the velocity and depth of convection within the basaltic magma-filled conduit. We use X-ray microtomography (μXRT) to document the spatial distribution of bubbles. We find small bubbles (radii from 5 μm to 70 μm) in a halo surrounding larger millimeter-size bubbles. This suggests that dissolved water was enriched around the larger bubbles—the opposite of what is expected if bubbles grow as water diffuses into the bubble. Such volatile enrichment implies that the volatiles within the large bubbles were redissolving into the melt as they descended into the conduit by the downward motion of convecting magma within the lava lake. The thickness of the small bubble halo is ∼100–150 μm, consistent with water diffusing into the melt on time scales on the order of 103 s. Eruptions, triggered by rockfall, rapidly exposed this magma to lower pressures, and the haloes of melt with re-dissolved water became sufficiently supersaturated to cause nucleation of the population of smaller bubbles. The required supersaturation pressures are consistent with a depth of a few hundred meters and convection velocities of the order of 0.1 m s−1, similar to the circulation velocity observed on the surface of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake.

  17. Acoustic droplet vaporization is initiated by superharmonic focusing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; Vos, H.J.; de Jong, N.; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Acoustically sensitive emulsion droplets composed of a liquid perfluorocarbon have the potential to be a highly efficient system for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, or for tumor imaging. The physical mechanisms underlying the acoustic activation of these phase-change emulsions into a bubbly

  18. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  19. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  20. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  1. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  2. Dynamics and acoustics of a cavitating Venturi flow using a homogeneous air-propylene glycol mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, M.; Naude, J.; Mendez, F.; Godínez, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamics and acoustics generated in a cavitating Venturi tube are followed up as a function of the input power of a centrifugal pump. The pump of 5 hp with a modified impeller to produce uniform bubbly flow, pumps 70 liters of propylene glycol in a closed loop (with a water cooling system), in which the Venturi is arranged. The goal was to obtain correlations among acoustical emission, dynamics of the shock waves and the light emission from cavitation bubbles. The instrumentation includes: two piezoelectric transducers, a digital camera, a high-speed video camera, and photomultipliers. As results, we show the cavitation patterns as function of the pump power, and a graphical template of the distribution of the Venturi conditions as a function of the cavitation parameter. Our observations show for the first time the sudden formation of bubble clouds in the straight portion of the pipe after the diverging section of the Venturi. We assume that this is due to pre-existing of nuclei-cloud structures which suddenly grow up by the tensile tails of propagating shock waves (producing a sudden drop in pressure).

  3. The Onset of Resonance-Controlled Instability in Spherical Bubble Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Gaitan, D. Felipe

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble dynamics are investigated using acoustic techniques for isolation and manipulation. The goal of the investigations is to understand the dynamic origin of the various phenomena that bubbles exhibit: light emission, enhanced mass transport, chaotic and quasiperiodic oscillations, and translations. Once understood, acoustically manipulated bubbles can serve as platforms for materials effects on free surfaces, using surfactants to alter surface rheology and observing how that affects both dynamics and also mass transport. The effects of gravity on the problem will be shown to be significant. The first set of observations from 1g experimentation are presented. These observations are of the onset conditions for instability of the spherical shape of the bubble. For the size range 55-90 microns in diameter we observe instability governed by resonant mode coupling, which is significantly affected by the buoyant force and its effects.

  4. Dark Matter Search Results from the PICO-2L C3F8 Bubble Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; Ardid, M.; Asner, David M.; Baxter, D.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P. S.; Borsodi, H.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Clark, K.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C. E.; Daley, S.; Das, Madhusmita; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Felis, I.; Filgas, R.; Fines-Neuschild, M.; Girard, Francoise; Giroux, G.; Hai, M.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, O.; Jackson, C. M.; Jin, M.; Krauss, C. B.; Lafreniere, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mann, E.; Martin, J. P.; Maurya, D.; Mitra, Pitam; Neilson, R.; Noble, A. J.; Plante, A.; Podviianiuk, R. B.; Priya, S.; Robinson, A. E.; Ruschman, M.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Wells, J.; Wichoski, U.; Zacek, V.; Zhang, J.

    2015-06-12

    New data are reported from the operation of a 2-liter C3F8 bubble chamber in the 2100 meter deep SNOLAB underground laboratory, with a total exposure of 211.5 kg-days at four different recoil energy thresholds ranging from 3.2 keV to 8.1 keV. These data show that C3F8 provides excellent electron recoil and alpha rejection capabilities at very low thresholds, including the rst observation of a dependence of acoustic signal on alpha energy. Twelve single nuclear recoil event candidates were observed during the run. The candidate events exhibit timing characteristics that are not consistent with the hypothesis of a uniform time distribution, and no evidence for a dark matter signal is claimed. These data provide the most sensitive direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering to date, with signicant sensitivity at low WIMP masses for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering.

  5. Bubble properties of heterogeneous bubbly flow in a square bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, W.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on the measurements of bubble properties in heterogeneous bubbly flows in a square bubble column. A four-point optical fibre probe was used for this purpose. The accuracy and intrusive effect of the optical probe was investigated first. The results show that the optical

  6. Bubbling controlled by needle movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejrazka, Jiri; Fujasova, Maria; Stanovsky, Petr; Ruzicka, Marek C; Drahos, JirI [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vejrazka@icpf.cas.cz

    2008-07-30

    A device for 'on-demand' production of bubbles is presented. The device is based on a movable needle, through which air is injected. Bubbling is controlled by a rapid needle movement, which induces the bubble detachment. Conditions for proper function of the device include the restriction on the flow rate through the needle, sufficient needle pressure drop and adequate needle acceleration. Functionality of the device is demonstrated. Bubbling from a stationary needle is also discussed and a scaling for bubble size is proposed for the case of short needles, to which a constant flow rate is imposed through tubes of a finite volume.

  7. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  8. Chaotic gas bubble oscillations in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fernández, Javier

    2008-05-01

    Regular and chaotic radial oscillations of an acoustically driven gas bubble in a viscoelastic fluid have been theoretically analyzed. For parameter values usually found in diagnostic ultrasound period-doubling routes to chaos have been identified. Thresholds values of the external pressure amplitude for a first bifurcation in terms of the elasticity and the shear viscosity of the host fluid have also been evaluated. To cite this article: J. Jiménez-Fernández, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, A-L; Sibai, A; Mahfoud, L; Oubari, D; Ashkar, J; Fuleihan, N

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice. Prospective study. Eighteen non-dysphonic subjects (seven men and 11 women) with a history of hubble-bubble smoking and no history of cigarette smoking underwent acoustic analysis and laryngeal video-stroboscopic examination before and 30 minutes after hubble-bubble smoking. On laryngeal video-stroboscopy, none of the subjects had vocal fold erythema either before or after smoking. Five patients had mild vocal fold oedema both before and after smoking. After smoking, there was a slight increase in the number of subjects with thick mucus between the vocal folds (six, vs four before smoking) and with vocal fold vessel dilation (two, vs one before smoking). Acoustic analysis indicated a drop in habitual pitch, fundamental frequency and voice turbulence index after smoking, and an increase in noise-to-harmonics ratio. Even 30 minutes of hubble-bubble smoking can cause a drop in vocal pitch and an increase in laryngeal secretions and vocal fold vasodilation.

  10. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  11. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  12. Dynamics of gas bubble growth in oil-refrigerant mixtures under isothermal decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Joao Paulo; Barbosa Junior, Jader R.; Prata, Alvaro T. [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], Emails: jpdias@polo.ufsc.br, jrb@polo.ufsc.br, prata@polo.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a numerical model to predict the growth of gaseous refrigerant bubbles in oil-refrigerant mixtures with high contents of oil subjected to isothermal decompression. The model considers an Elementary Cell (EC) in which a spherical bubble is surrounded by a concentric and spherical liquid layer containing a limited amount of dissolved liquid refrigerant. The pressure reduction in the EC generates a concentration gradient at the bubble interface and the refrigerant is transported to the bubble by molecular diffusion. After a sufficiently long period of time, the concentration gradient in the liquid layer and the bubble internal pressure reach equilibrium and the bubble stops growing, having attained its stable radius. The equations of momentum and chemical species conservation for the liquid layer, and the mass balance at the bubble interface are solved via a coupled finite difference procedure to determine the bubble internal pressure, the refrigerant radial concentration distribution and the bubble growth rate. Numerical results obtained for a mixture of ISO VG10 ester oil and refrigerant HFC-134a showed that bubble growth dynamics depends on model parameters like the initial bubble radius, initial refrigerant concentration in the liquid layer, decompression rate and EC temperature. Despite its simplicity, the model showed to be a potential tool to predict bubble growth and foaming which may result from important phenomena occurring inside refrigeration compressors such as lubrication of sliding parts and refrigerant degassing from the oil stored in oil sump during compressor start-up. (author)

  13. Bubbles Are Departures from Equilibrium Housing Markets: Evidence from Singapore and Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Tay, Darrell Jiajie; Chou, Chung-I; Li, Sai-Ping; Tee, Shang You; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2016-01-01

    The housing prices in many Asian cities have grown rapidly since mid-2000s, leading to many reports of bubbles. However, such reports remain controversial as there is no widely accepted definition for a housing bubble. Previous studies have focused on indices, or assumed that home prices are lognomally distributed. Recently, Ohnishi et al. showed that the tail-end of the distribution of (Japan/Tokyo) becomes fatter during years where bubbles are suspected, but stop short of using this feature...

  14. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  16. [Particle size reduction using acoustic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Csilla; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné, Révész Piroska

    2014-01-01

    Different pharmaceutical technological processes have been used for modification of the physico-chemical and biopharmaceutical properties of drugs. Changes of crystal size, distribution and morphology can open up new, alternative administration routes, e.g. intranasally and the pulmonary route, where the particle size is a determining factor. A wet grinding method based on acoustic cavitation (the collapse of bubbles or voids formed by sound waves) is a novel possibility for modification of the properties of particles. During our work this wet grinding technique was studied. The effect of this method was investigated on particle size reduction. The samples were treated with extreme sonication parameters. The effect of the concentration of the polymer was examined on the particle size reduction. Meloxicam was chosen as a model crystalline drug because of its poor aqueous solubility. The structural characterization and the morphological analysis of the dried products were carried out by DSC, XRPD and SEM. It was found that the acoustic cavitation resulted in crystalline micronized product.

  17. Bubble and boundary layer behaviour in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Sattelmayer, Thomas [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The horizontal orientated test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and good optical access. Various optical observation techniques were applied to study the bubble behaviour and the characteristics of the fluid phase. The bubble behaviour was recorded by the high-speed cinematography and by a digital high resolution camera. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, the bubbles were automatically analysed and the bubble size, bubble lifetime, waiting time between two cycles were evaluated. Due to the huge number of observed bubbles a statistical analysis was performed and distribution functions were derived. Using a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm, the averaged axial phase boundary velocity profile could be extracted. In addition, the fluid phase velocity profile was characterised by means of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the single phase flow as well as under subcooled flow boiling conditions. The results indicate that the bubbles increase the flow resistance. The impact on the flow exceeds by far the bubbly region and it depends on the magnitude of the boiling activity. Finally, the ratio of the averaged phase boundary velocity and of the averaged fluid velocity was evaluated for the bubbly region. (authors)

  18. CFD – facilitated Prognosis of Bubble Bed Bioreactor Performance Based on Bubble Swarms Oscillation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vlaev, S. D.; Staykov, P.; Fialova, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bubble column reactors are widely used as gas-liquid and gas liquid-solid contactors in biotechnology applications. A basic issue in biotechnology is oxygen availability related to gas hold-up distribution, since aerobic bioprocessing depends on the dissolved oxygen substrate. The aim of this study is to analyze oxygen availability in bubble column bioreactors in terms of specific spatial and temporal gas-liquid flow. 3D CFD simulation is used to simulate the dispersed gas-liquid flow field o...

  19. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F

    2004-03-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  20. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...models and methods that explain observed material and acoustic properties of different physical types of shallow-ocean mud sediments. Other goals...are to assess prior data relating to the acoustic properties of mud and to provide guidance in the development and interpretation of experiments. A

  1. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  2. Soap-bubble Optimization of Gaits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Suresh; Hatton, Ross

    We present a geometric gait optimizer that applies Lie bracket theory to identify optimal cost-of-transport (displacement divided by effort) gaits. This optimizer builds on our previous work, where we have shown that for drag-dominated systems, the efficiency of a gait corresponds to a ratio between ``metric-weighted perimeter length of the cycle and the area integral of the Lie bracket it encloses. In this work, we encode this geometric insight into a variational gait optimizer. For a system with two shape variables, the dynamics of this optimizer are similar to the dynamics of a soap bubble, with the Lie bracket providing internal pressure which causes the boundary of the bubble to expand, the metric-weighted path length providing surface tension constraining the growth of the soap bubble, and a pace-balancing term corresponding to the concentration gradient that evenly distributes soap across the surface of the bubble. In systems with three shape variables, the dynamics are more akin to a windsock, capturing maximum flux through a loop. The variational form of the optimizer allows us to extend it to higher dimensional shape spaces beyond these physical analogies.

  3. Quantum Subcritical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, T.; Morikawa, M.; Shiromizu, T.

    1996-08-01

    We quantize subcritical bubbles which are formed in the weakly first order phase transition. We find that the typical size of the thermal fluctuation reduces in quantum-statistical physics. We estimate the typical size and the amplitude of thermal fluctuations near the critical temperature in the electroweak phase transition using a quantum statistical average. Furthermore, based on our study, we discuss implications for the dynamics of phase transitions.

  4. Popping the filter bubble

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Katie; Cronin, G; Welch, L

    2017-01-01

    So-called “fake news” is everywhere and is having a major impact on daily life from politics to education. The rapid growth of information and the numbers of people who can create it means that we need more sophisticated tools to process the news we receive. Join us to learn about different methods you can use to be your own fact checker and pop your filter bubble.

  5. BubbleDeck

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2013-01-01

    Conventional horizontal concrete slabs are heavy that limit their spans. Enhancement of span results in addition of beams that increases the cost of the structure. Thus, there is a need for a technology that will help in increasing the span by reducing weight of the span. BubbleDeck is a revolutionary construction method that virtually eliminates concrete from the middle of a floor slab between columns that does not perform any structural function, thereby dramatically reducing structural dea...

  6. Bubble nucleation dynamics in 3He/4He mixture by holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, M.; Abe, H.; Nomura, R.; Okuda, Y.

    2009-02-01

    We were able to nucleate a gas bubble in the diluted phase of 3He-4He mixture by a 1 ms width strong sound pulse. The nucleated bubble became large and detached from the bottom transducer and was pushed out to the bulk liquid by the acoustic wave pulse. The bubble then repeatedly expanded and contracted a few times and finally disappeared. The overall motion of the bubble was traced by a high speed camera with a time resolution of 1 ms. We are attempting to investigate the small density fluctuation around the bubble by incorporating holographic interferometry technology. The measurement was done at T=0.35 K for the phase separated mixture at saturated vapor pressure. An acoustic wave transducer was located at the bottom of the cell, so the bubble was nucleated in the dilute phase of the mixture. We resolved the density fluctuation as small as Δρ/ρ = 2 × 10-6 in the dilute phase with the sample width of 25 mm, which could not be obtained by other methods. It was found that there appeared a less dense region of —Δρ/ρ approx 1.46 × 10-3 just above the bubble. The bubble appeared just after the pulse was turned off, but this less dense region appeared prior to the emergence of the bulk bubble. It should be an important information about the bubble nucleation mechanism. This very high sensitivity of holographic interferometry with respect to the density fluctuation could be widely used in quantum liquid.

  7. Direct visualization of microalgae rupture by ultrasound-driven bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommella, Angelo; Harun, Irina; Pouliopoulos, Antonis; Choi, James J.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    Cell rupture induced by ultrasound is central to applications in biotechnology. For instance, cell disruption is required in the production of biofuels from microalgae (unicellular species of algae). Ultrasound-induced cavitation, bubble collapse and jetting are exploited to induce sufficiently large viscous stresses to cause rupture of the cell membranes. It has recently been shown that seeding the flow with bubbles that act as cavitation nuclei significantly reduces the energy cost for cell processing. However, a fundamental understanding of the conditions for rupture of microalgae in the complex flow fields generated by ultrasound-driven bubbles is currently lacking. We perform high-speed video microscopy to visualize the miscroscale details of the interaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , microalgae of about 10 μm in size, with ultrasound-driven microbubbles of 2-200 μm in diameter. We investigate the efficiency of cell rupture depending on ultrasound frequency and pressure amplitude (from 10 kPa up to 1 MPa), and the resulting bubble dynamics regimes. In particular we compare the efficiency of membrane rupture in the acoustic microstreaming flow induced by linear oscillations, with the case of violent bubble collapse and jetting. V.G. acknowledges partial support from the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG), Grant No. 618333.

  8. The Next Milestone: A Multicarrier Acoustic MODEM With Channel- and Network-Adaptivity for Underwater Autonomous Distributed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    practical multicarrier modem prototype. We have proposed an effective method to mitigate the non-uniform Doppler effect of underwater channels, Report...comparisons on an OFDM design for Doppler spread channels,” in Proc. of MTS/IEEE OCEANS Conference, Bremen, Germany, May 11-14, 2009 [published]. 8...Ball, L. Freitag, and P. Willett, “An OFDM design for underwater acoustic channels with Doppler spread,” in Proc. of the 13th DSP Workshop, Marco

  9. Experimental study of the effect of bubbles, drops and particles on the product distribution for a mixing sensitive, parallel-consecutive reaction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Antink, R.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Versteeg, Geert

    1999-01-01

    For stirred multiphase reactors the effect of a dispersed (gas, liquid or solid) phase on the product distribution for a mixing sensitive reaction was tested. Turbulence modification due to the presence of dispersed-phase particles has been reported frequently in literature, but the extent of the

  10. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  11. Homogeneous swarm of high-Reynolds-number bubbles rising within a thin gap. Part 1: Bubble dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bouche, Emmanuella; Roig, Véronique; Risso, Frédéric; Billet, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The spatial distribution, the velocity statistics and the dispersion of the gas phase have been investigated experimentally in a homogeneous swarm of bubbles confined within a thin gap. In the considered flow regime, the bubbles rise on oscillatory paths while keeping a constant shape. They are followed by unstable wakes which are strongly attenuated due to wall friction. According to the direction that is considered, the physical mechanisms are totally different. In the vertical direction, t...

  12. In Search of the Big Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  13. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book chapt......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology.......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  14. Artificial neural network for bubbles pattern recognition on the images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletaev, I. E.; Pervunin, K. S.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Two-phase bubble flows have been used in many technological and energy processes as processing oil, chemical and nuclear reactors. This explains large interest to experimental and numerical studies of such flows last several decades. Exploiting of optical diagnostics for analysis of the bubble flows allows researchers obtaining of instantaneous velocity fields and gaseous phase distribution with the high spatial resolution non-intrusively. Behavior of light rays exhibits an intricate manner when they cross interphase boundaries of gaseous bubbles hence the identification of the bubbles images is a complicated problem. This work presents a method of bubbles images identification based on a modern technology of deep learning called convolutional neural networks (CNN). Neural networks are able to determine overlapping, blurred, and non-spherical bubble images. They can increase accuracy of the bubble image recognition, reduce the number of outliers, lower data processing time, and significantly decrease the number of settings for the identification in comparison with standard recognition methods developed before. In addition, usage of GPUs speeds up the learning process of CNN owning to the modern adaptive subgradient optimization techniques.

  15. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  16. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  17. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  18. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  19. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  20. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  1. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Air bubble effect during alloy cooling in shielding blocks radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, A; Gelosa, S; Frigerio, M; Monti, A F

    1998-10-01

    Shaped fields are widely used in radiotherapy to protect critical organs and to avoid unnecessary normal tissue irradiation. The most common system for photon beam shaping consists in a low melting point alloy. We studied the air bubbles which can occur during alloy cooling with both new and remelted alloys and when different cooling techniques are chosen. Forty cone samples (18 of remelted alloy and 22 of new alloy) were prepared to evaluate the frequence of air bubble recurrence, with reproducible geometric sizes (height = 70 mm, major base surface diameter = 60 mm, minor base surface diameter = 40 mm). Air bubble sizes and dose inhomogeneity were evaluated by reproducing 60Co radiograph of each sample (two orthogonal projections: 6 x 7 cm). The samples were cooled at a constant temperature, following three different modalities: high (25 degrees C), medium (5 degrees C), low (-20 degrees C) temperature. Owing to the small geometrical magnification, air bubble sizes were determined by measuring their surface on samples lateral projections, taking into account the sight detectable bubble edges. Up to 300 mm2 lateral surface bubbles are always present in all castings. Casting inhomogeneities can produce a film-density inhomogeneity ranging from 9% to 40%. The spatial distribution of bubbles seems to be random. Bubble recurrence is independent of both the metal alloy (repeatedly used castings) and the different block cooling modalities. The effect of air bubbles on the shielded areas dose inhomogeneity is generally of no relevant importance. However, these inhomogeneities can produce hot spots which must be taken into accurate consideration only in the particular treatments where critical small size organ dose sparing represents a basic issue (i.e. the shielding of eye lens).

  3. Experimental technique for observing free oscillation of a spherical gas bubble in highly viscous liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takehiro; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    An experimental technique is developed to observe free oscillations of a spherical gas bubble in highly viscous liquids. It is demonstrated that focusing a nanosecond laser pulse of wavelength 532 nm and energy up to 1.5 mJ leads to the formation of a spherical gaseous bubble, not a vaporous bubble (quickly condensed back to the liquid), whose equilibrium radius is up to 200 microns in glycerin saturated with gases at room temperature. The subsequent free oscillations of the spherical gas bubble is visualized using a high-speed camera. Since the oscillation periods are short enough to ignore bubble translation under gravity and mass transfer out of the bubble, the observed bubble dynamics can be compared to nonlinear and linearized Reyleigh-Plesset-type calculations that account for heat conduction and acoustic radiation as well as the liquid viscosity. In this presentation, we report on the measurements with varying the viscosity and comparisons to the theory to quantify damping mechanisms in the bubble dynamics.

  4. The role of trapped bubbles in kidney stone detection with the color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Kreider, Wayne; Breshock, Michael; Williams, James C., Jr.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    The color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact, which highlights kidney stones with rapidly changing color, has the potential to improve stone detection; however, its inconsistent appearance has limited its clinical utility. Recently, it was proposed stable crevice bubbles on the kidney stone surface cause twinkling; however, the hypothesis is not fully accepted because the bubbles have not been directly observed. In this paper, the micron or submicron-sized bubbles predicted by the crevice bubble hypothesis are enlarged in kidney stones of five primary compositions by exposure to acoustic rarefaction pulses or hypobaric static pressures in order to simultaneously capture their appearance by high-speed photography and ultrasound imaging. On filming stones that twinkle, consecutive rarefaction pulses from a lithotripter caused some bubbles to reproducibly grow from specific locations on the stone surface, suggesting the presence of pre-existing crevice bubbles. Hyperbaric and hypobaric static pressures were found to modify the twinkling artifact; however, the simple expectation that hyperbaric exposures reduce and hypobaric pressures increase twinkling by shrinking and enlarging bubbles, respectively, largely held for rough-surfaced stones but was inadequate for smoother stones. Twinkling was found to increase or decrease in response to elevated static pressure on smooth stones, perhaps because of the compression of internal voids. These results support the crevice bubble hypothesis of twinkling and suggest the kidney stone crevices that give rise to the twinkling phenomenon may be internal as well as external.

  5. The role of trapped bubbles in kidney stone detection with the color doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Kreider, Wayne; Breshock, Michael; Williams, James C; Bailey, Michael R

    2017-11-13

    The color Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifact, which highlights kidney stones with rapidly changing color, has the potential to improve stone detection; however, its inconsistent appearance has limited its clinical utility. Recently, it was proposed stable crevice bubbles on the kidney stone surface cause twinkling; however, the hypothesis is not fully accepted because the bubbles have not been directly observed. In this paper, the micron or submicron-sized bubbles predicted by the crevice bubble hypothesis are enlarged in kidney stones of five primary compositions by exposure to acoustic rarefaction pulses or hypobaric static pressures in order to simultaneously capture their appearance by high-speed photography and ultrasound imaging. On filming stones that twinkle, consecutive rarefaction pulses from a lithotripter caused some bubbles to reproducibly grow from specific locations on the stone surface, suggesting the presence of pre-existing crevice bubbles. Hyperbaric and hypobaric static pressures were found to modify the twinkling artifact; however, the simple expectation that hyperbaric exposures reduce and hypobaric pressures increase twinkling by shrinking and enlarging bubbles, respectively, largely held for rough-surfaced stones but was inadequate for smoother stones. Twinkling was found to increase or decrease in response to elevated static pressure on smooth stones, perhaps because of the compression of internal voids. These results support the crevice bubble hypothesis of twinkling and suggest the kidney stone crevices that give rise to the twinkling phenomenon may be internal as well as external. © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  6. Modeling fish egg production and spatial distribution from acoustic data: a step forward into the analysis of recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ospina-Álvarez

    Full Text Available To date, there are numerous transport simulation studies demonstrating the relevance of the hydrodynamics for the advection, dispersion and recruitment of early stages of marine organisms. However, the lack of data has conditioned the use of realistic locations for the model setup and configuration in transport studies. This work (I demonstrates the key role played by the use of the realistic initial position of the eggs of small pelagic fishes in the analysis of late-larval recruitment in coastal nursery areas and (II provides a general solution for deriving future egg positions and abundances from adult biomass obtained from acoustic surveys and available fecundity data. Using European anchovy in the NW Mediterranean as a case study, we first analyzed the impact of the initial location, timing, egg buoyancy and diel vertical migration of larvae on the potential late-larval recruitment to coastal areas. The results suggested that prior knowledge of the initial spawning grounds may substantially affect the estimates of potential recruitment. We then integrated biological and acoustics-derived data (the biomass and size structure, sex ratio, a weight-batch fecundity model, mean weight, number of fish and mean spawning to build a predictive model for interannual egg production. This model was satisfactorily contrasted with field data for two years obtained with the Daily Egg Production Method (DEPM. We discuss our results in the context of the fluctuations of European anchovy egg abundance from 2003 through 2010 in the NW Mediterranean and in terms of the potential applicability of the acoustics-based spatial predictive egg production model.

  7. Micro-bubble morphologies following drop impacts onto a pool surface

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-10-01

    When a drop impacts at low velocity onto a pool surface, a hemispheric air layer cushions and can delay direct contact. Herein we use ultra-high-speed video to study the rupture of this layer, to explain the resulting variety of observed distribution of bubbles. The size and distribution of micro-bubbles is determined by the number and location of the primary punctures. Isolated holes lead to the formation of bubble necklaces when the edges of two growing holes meet, whereas bubble nets are produced by regular shedding of micro-bubbles from a sawtooth edge instability. For the most viscous liquids the air film contracts more rapidly than the capillary-viscous velocity through repeated spontaneous ruptures of the edge. From the speed of hole opening and the total volume of micro-bubbles we conclude that the air sheet ruptures when its thickness approaches ?100.

  8. Controlled Acoustic Bass System (CABS) A Method to Achieve Uniform Sound Field Distribution at Low Frequencies in Rectangular Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    ), is introduced. The system utilizes front loudspeakers and extra loudspeakers on the opposite wall of the room processed to cancel out the rear-wall reflections, which effectively conveys a more uniform sound field. The system works in the time domain and presents good performance over the loudspeaker low......The sound field produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies in small- and medium-size rectangular listening rooms is highly nonuniform due to the multiple reflections and diffractions of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A new method, called controlled acoustic bass system (CABS...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  10. The living times of bubbles at the interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Benjamin; Bourouiba, Lydia; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    The lifetime of a water bubble at the surface of a pool prior to its burst remains an open question. It is known that the death of a bubble is initiated by the nucleation of a hole in its shell. However, the mechanisms governing the occurrence of such nucleation sites and prescribing the lifetime of bubbles remain unclear. Combining original visualizations, quantitative measurements of bubbles lifetimes and simple theoretical ideas, we report direct observations of the onset of the bursting process and rationalize the link between the rich interfacial events leading to the hole nucleation on the shell and the resulting robust bubble lifetimes distributions. These play a critical role in shaping the final size distribution of the droplets emitted. We will underline the consequences of the process in the sensible world, like air-sea water vapor exchanges. Bubbles bursting at the surface of water sources also allow for high levels of contamination and long-term exposure to a range of respiratory human pathogens and irritants indoors. Indeed, the droplets created by such bursts can contribute to the transfer of pathogens to the air, followed by their dispersal, thus bridging this subtle problem with unexpected new areas in health. Thanks to the financial support of the MISTI-FRANCE MIT program.

  11. [Preliminary Research on Bubble Characteristics of Ancient Glaze Using OCT Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Dong, Jun-qing; Li, Qing-hui; Guo, Mu-sen; Bu, Gong; Hu, Yong-qing

    2015-08-01

    The bubble is one of the most common feature in ancient glaze. The size and distribution of bubbles are closely associated with recipes of the raw materials for the body and glaze and the making process. To characterize the bubbles is essential for the study of ceramic production process, production places, times characteristics and so on. In order to explore the possibility of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technology to characterize the bubbles and the bubble distribution characteristic in glaze of ancient porcelain, sweep frequency OCT imaging system is used to detect five different types ancient porcelain chips. According to the two dimensional sectional images and three dimensional tomographic images of the transparent layer of glaze obtained by the OCT imaging system, the two dimensional sectional images characteristics and three dimensional slices characteristics of the bubbles in glaze are studied. The bubble characteristics in the glaze and its possible causes that gases in the body of the ceramic overflow to the glaze layer in the firing process are comprehensively analyzed. Meantime, the size of bubble is calculated according to the two dimensional sectional images based on pixel, and the result is compared with the traditional microscopic test result. The bubble size, two dimensional sectional characteristics and three dimensional tomographic image characteristics of opaque glaze are also studied. Experimental results show that the bubble characteristics in glaze of different ancient porcelain chips are obvious difference, the result of the bubble size calculated based on pixel coincides with the result of the bubble size observed by traditional microscope with ten times magnification, slices of the body near the body-glaze binding region based on OCT imaging technology three dimensional tomography can effectively reflect the bubble characteristics in glaze. The measurement of using OCT imaging technology to characterize bubble

  12. Specific and rapid effects of acoustic stimulation on the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b potassium channels in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumbos, J G; Polley, D B; Kaczmarek, L K

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies have demonstrated that total cellular levels of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits can change on a time scale of minutes in acute slices and cultured neurons, raising the possibility that rapid changes in the abundance of channel proteins contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in vivo. In order to investigate this possibility, we took advantage of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) sound localization circuit, which contains neurons that precisely phase-lock their action potentials to rapid temporal fluctuations in the acoustic waveform. Previous work has demonstrated that the ability of these neurons to follow high-frequency stimuli depends critically upon whether they express adequate amounts of the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1. To test the hypothesis that net amounts of Kv3.1 protein would be rapidly upregulated when animals are exposed to sounds that require high frequency firing for accurate encoding, we briefly exposed adult rats to acoustic environments that varied according to carrier frequency and amplitude modulation (AM) rate. Using an antibody directed at the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Kv3.1b (the adult splice isoform of Kv3.1), we found that total cellular levels of Kv3.1b protein-as well as the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b-labeled cells-was significantly altered following 30 min of exposure to rapidly modulated (400 Hz) sounds relative to slowly modulated (0-40 Hz, 60 Hz) sounds. These results provide direct evidence that net amounts of Kv3.1b protein can change on a time scale of minutes in response to stimulus-driven synaptic activity, permitting auditory neurons to actively adapt their complement of ion channels to changes in the acoustic environment. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bubble dynamics and sonoluminescence from helium or xenon in mercury and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Kato, Kazumi

    2012-09-01

    Numerical simulations of bubble pulsation and sonoluminescence (SL) have been performed for helium or xenon bubbles in mercury and water under the experimental conditions of Futakawa et al. [M. Futakawa, T. Naoe, and M. Kawai, in Nonlinear Acoustics-Fundamentals and Applications: 18th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics (ISNA 18), AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1022, edited by B. O. Enflo, C. M. Hedberg, and L. Kari (AIP, New York, 2008), p. 197]. The results of the numerical simulations have revealed that the bubble expansion is much larger in water than in mercury mainly because the density of water is one order of magnitude smaller than that of mercury. The SL intensity is higher in water than that in mercury although the maximum bubble temperature is lower. This is caused by the much larger amount of vapor inside a bubble as the saturated vapor pressure of water is four orders of magnitude larger than that of mercury at room temperature. The SL intensity from xenon is much larger than that from helium due both to lower ionization potential and higher bubble temperature due to lower thermal conductivity. The instantaneous SL power may be as large as 200 W from xenon in water. The maximum temperature inside a xenon bubble in mercury may be as high as about 80 000 K. It is suggested that the maximum pressure in mercury due to shock waves emitted from bubbles increases as the SL intensity increases, although they are not simply correlated in water because the amount of water vapor trapped inside a bubble influences the SL intensity in a complex way.

  14. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  15. The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures and Saturated Laboratory Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-30

    viscoelastic holding medium ( xanthan gum). This material has been used extensively for experiments in which bubbles distributions are “frozen” in...pipettes bulbs filled with bubbly xanthan gum; both targets were on the order of 1-cm in diameter. The cylindrical target was a 3-m long, 1.25-in inner...Linear Bubble Dynamics in a Viscoelastic Xanthan Gel, M.S. Thesis, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA

  16. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.; Arora, M.; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the

  17. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-D. Ohl (Claus-Dieter); M. Arora (Manish); R. Ikink (Roy); N. de Jong (Nico); M. Versluis (Michel); M. Delius (Michael); D. Lohse (Detlef)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads

  18. Hadron bubbles in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troitskii, M.A.; Khodel' , V.A.

    1983-08-25

    Nonlinear effects in the interaction of hadrons with a nucleus are analyzed. It is shown that K/sup +/ mesons form bubbles in nuclear matter which are similar to electron bubbles in liquid helium. Charged pions produced in collisions of heavy relativistic ions may collect and form droplets approx.5--7 Fm in size containing approx.10/sup 2/ particles.

  19. Mr. Bubble Gum: "Not Now!"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    PreS-Gr 2-- Mr. Bubble Gum is a Level 3 book, the most difficult in this series. In four short stories of varying lengths, an older brother tells about his younger brother Eli, who "sticks to me like bubble gum...

  20. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  1. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  2. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state

  3. Qualitative analysis of the positron-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with κ deformed Kaniadakis distributed electrons and hot positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Asit; Tamang, Jharna

    2017-08-01

    Qualitative analysis of the positron acoustic (PA) waves in a four-component plasma system consisting of static positive ions, mobile cold positron, and Kaniadakis distributed hot positrons and electrons is investigated. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation and the modified KdV equation are derived for the PA waves. Variations of the total energy of the conservative systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are presented. Applying numerical computations, effect of parameter (κ), number density ratio (μ1) of electrons to ions and number density (μ2) of hot positrons to ions, and speed (U) of the traveling wave are discussed on the positron acoustic solitary wave solutions of the KdV and mKdV equations. Furthermore, it is found that the parameter κ has no effect on the solitary wave solution of the KdV equation, whereas it has significant effect on the solitary wave solution of the modified KdV equation. Considering an external periodic perturbation, the perturbed dynamical systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are analyzed by employing three dimensional phase portrait analysis, time series analysis, and Poincare section. Chaotic motions of the perturbed PA waves occur through the quasiperiodic route to chaos.

  4. Growing bubbles rising in line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Harper

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over many years the author and others have given theories for bubbles rising in line in a liquid. Theory has usually suggested that the bubbles will tend towards a stable distance apart, but experiments have often showed them pairing off and sometimes coalescing. However, existing theory seems not to deal adequately with the case of bubbles growing as they rise, which they do if the liquid is boiling, or is a supersaturated solution of a gas, or simply because the pressure decreases with height. That omission is now addressed, for spherical bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers. As the flow is then nearly irrotational, Lagrange's equations can be used with Rayleigh's dissipation function. The theory also works for bubbles shrinking as they rise because they dissolve.

  5. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  6. A Study of Bubble and Slug Gas-Liquid Flow in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, J.

    2000-01-01

    surfactant), to identify clusters that promote coalescence and transition the void fraction distribution in bubbly and slug flow,to measure the wall friction in bubbly flow. These experiments will consist of multiple bubbles type flows and will utilize hot wire and film anemometers to measure liquid velocity and wall shear stress respectively and double fiber optic probes to measure bubble size and velocity as a function of tube radius and axial location.

  7. Effect of surfactants on inertial cavitation activity in a pulsed acoustic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Judy; Kentish, Sandra; Matula, Thomas J; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2005-09-08

    It has previously been reported that the addition of low concentrations of ionic surfactants enhances the steady-state sonoluminescence (SL) intensity relative to water (Ashokkumar; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 10845). In the current study, both sonoluminescence and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to examine the acoustic cavitation field generated at different acoustic pulse lengths in the presence of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). A decrease in the SL intensity was observed in the presence of low concentrations of SDS and short acoustic pulse lengths. Under these conditions, the inhibition of bubble coalescence by SDS leads to a population of smaller bubbles, which dissolve during the pulse "off time". As the concentration of surfactant was increased at this pulse length, an increase in the acoustic cavitation activity was observed. This increase is partly attributed to enhanced growth rate of the bubbles by rectified diffusion. Conversely, at long pulse lengths acoustic cavitation activity was enhanced at low SDS concentrations as a larger number of the smaller bubbles could survive the pulse "off time". The effect of reduced acoustic shielding and an increase in the "active" bubble population due to electrostatic repulsion between bubbles are also significant in this case. Finally, as the surfactant concentration was increased further, the effect of electrostatic induced impedance shielding or reclustering dominates, resulting in a decrease in the SL intensity.

  8. Simulation of the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure in sonochemical reactors with numerical methods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Ignacio; Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez, María Deseada; Díez-García, María Isabel; Bonete, Pedro; González-García, José

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods for the calculation of the acoustic field inside sonoreactors have rapidly emerged in the last 15 years. This paper summarizes some of the most important works on this topic presented in the past, along with the diverse numerical works that have been published since then, reviewing the state of the art from a qualitative point of view. In this sense, we illustrate and discuss some of the models recently developed by the scientific community to deal with some of the complex events that take place in a sonochemical reactor such as the vibration of the reactor walls and the nonlinear phenomena inherent to the presence of ultrasonic cavitation. In addition, we point out some of the upcoming challenges that must be addressed in order to develop a reliable tool for the proper designing of efficient sonoreactors and the scale-up of sonochemical processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  10. Probing He bubbles in naturally aged and annealed δ-Pu alloys using ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, J. R.; Hammons, J. A.; Willey, T. M.; Wall, M. A.; Ruddle, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Allen, P. G.; van Buuren, T.

    2018-01-01

    The self-irradiation of Pu alloys generates He that is trapped within the metal matrix in the form of He bubbles. The distribution of these He bubbles in δ-phase Pu-Ga alloys exhibits a peak near a radius of 0.7 nm, and this size is remarkably stable as function of time. When annealed, the He bubbles in δ-Pu alloys grow, coarsening the distribution. However, the magnitude of this coarsening is uncertain, as different experimental methods reveal bubbles that differ by at least one order of magnitude. Small-angle x-ray scattering results, which can probe a wide range of bubble sizes, imply only a mild coarsening of the He bubble distribution for an annealing treatment of 425 °C for 24 h, and analysis of the He bubble content suggests that He is actually lost from the bubbles with annealing.

  11. Investigating acoustic-induced deformations in a foam using multiple light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpelding, M; Guillermic, R M; Dollet, B; Saint-Jalmes, A; Crassous, J

    2010-08-01

    We have studied the effect of an external acoustic wave on bubble displacements inside an aqueous foam. The signature of the acoustic-induced bubble displacements is found using a multiple light scattering technique, and occurs as a modulation on the photon correlation curve. Measurements for various sound frequencies and amplitudes are compared to analytical predictions and numerical simulations. These comparisons finally allow us to elucidate the nontrivial acoustic displacement profile inside the foam; in particular, we find that the acoustic wave creates a localized shear in the vicinity of the solid walls holding the foam, as a consequence of inertial contributions. This study of how bubbles "dance" inside a foam as a response to sound turns out to provide new insights on foam acoustics and sound transmission into a foam, foam deformation at high frequencies, and analysis of light scattering data in samples undergoing nonhomogeneous deformations.

  12. VOF simulation on a large bubble in a linear shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo-Ram; Lee, Jae-Young [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Instability of flow around a body moving in a fluid can induce lift force acting on the body. One example of this phenomena is a bubble rising. Lift acting on a bubble effects on a void fraction distribution of a bubbly flow, which can be related to two phase flow in a nuclear reactor, bubble column reactor, and a flow around a ship. This leads researchers to use experimental or numerical methods. Study of Tomiyama et al.(2002) is the most well known experimental results on a bubble rising in a linear shear flow. They used water-glycerin mixture as a liquid and rotating belt to make linear shear flow, and measured lift coefficients. VOF simulations are conducted for investigation of lift acting on single bubble rising in a high Re linear shear flow. In spite of small amount of data and numerical error about spurious current near bubble interface, some insights can be obtained. First, a turbulence model generates large difference on C{sub L} of large Re bubble. Second, for lift acting on a large Re bubble in a linear shear flow, Re is better scale than E{sub oH} and C{sub L} is proportional to inverse of Re. Despite of some quantitative difference between results of experiment(Yang et al.(2013), Li et al.(2016)) and present numerical study, all results shows -7bubbles.

  13. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Senor, David J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Setyawan, Wahyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Zhijie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the for- mation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was devel- oped. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along $\\langle$110$\\rangle$ directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along $\\langle$110$\\rangle$ directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  14. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang, E-mail: shenyang.hu@pnnl.gov; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-15

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along 〈110〉 directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along 〈110〉 directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  15. Interaction of two cavitation bubbles in a tube and its effects on heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Cai, Jun; Tao, Yuequn; Huai, Xiulan

    2017-02-01

    When two cavitation bubbles exist in a confined space, the interaction between the bubbles significantly affects the characteristics of bubble dynamic behaviors. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) model is established to study the growth and collapse of two cavitation bubbles in a heated tube and its effects on heat transfer. The liquid and gas phases throughout the calculation domain are solved by a set of Navier-Stokes equations. It is assumed that the gas inside the bubble is compressible vapor, and the surrounding liquid is incompressible water. The mass transfer between two phases is ignored. The calculated bubble profiles were compared to the available experimental data, and a good agreement has been achieved. Then, the relationship among the bubble motion, flow field and pressure distributions was analyzed. On this basis, the effects of bubble interaction on the heat transfer between the wall surface and sounding liquid were discussed. It is found that heat transfer in the centre wall region is enhanced owing to the vortex flow and micro-jet induced by the bubble contraction and collapse. In contrast, the highest surface temperature appears in the surrounding region, which is mainly attributed to the thermal resistance induced by the bubble. The present study is helpful to understand the heat transfer phenomenon with cavitation in the liquid.

  16. The bubble legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  17. Cavitation and acoustic emission around laser-heated microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles P.; Kelly, Michael W.

    1998-06-01

    We studied transient cavitation bubble formation and acoustic emission around individual laser-heated microparticles using subnanosecond time-resolved microscopy. Microcavitation bubbles were observed as early as 0.5 ns after the particles were heated by a 30 ps laser pulse. The bubbles expanded to a few micrometers in size and collapsed on the time scale of 0.1-1 μsec. We discuss microcavitation as the origin of anomalously large photoacoustic effects and nonlinear optical responses observed in laser-heated colloidal suspensions, as well as a mechanism for cellular damage in biologic tissue containing pigment particles.

  18. ADSORPTION OF NANO-PARTICLES ON BUBBLE SURFACE IN NANO-PARTICLE SUSPENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buxuan Wang; Chunhui Li; Xiaofeng Peng

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of nano-particles on bubble surface is discussed for saturated boiling on thin wire of nano-particle suspensions. Owing to the decrease of surface tension for suspensions, the nano-particles tend to adsorb on the bubble surface to decrease the Gibbs free energy for stability, and meanwhile the velocity of nano-particles would be smaller than that of bubble growth. The long-range van der Waals force existing between "water particles" and nano-particles is considered the attractive force between the nano-particles and the bubble surface. Thus, the nano-particles would attach on the bubble surface if the particle-surface distance is smaller than its critical value. The distribution of nano-particles on the bubble surface and in the adjacent region is also investigated.

  19. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  20. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  1. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. New evidence on the first financial bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehen, R.G.P.; Goetzmann, W.; Rouwenhorst, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Bubble, South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Windhandel of 1720 together represent the world's first global financial bubble. We hand-collect cross-sectional price data and investor account data from 1720 to test theories about market bubbles. Our tests suggest that innovation was a key

  3. Bubble generation in a twisted and bent DNA-like model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Ulrik Vingaard; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The DNA molecule is modeled by a parabola embedded chain with long-range interactions between twisted base pair dipoles. A mechanism for bubble generation is presented and investigated in two different configurations. Using random normally distributed initial conditions to simulate thermal fluctu...... fluctuations, a relationship between bubble generation, twist and curvature is established. An analytical approach supports the numerical results....

  4. Studying bubble-induced methane emissions from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: the next step towards a quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, D.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.; Yusupov, V.; Salomatin, A.; Leifer, I.

    2015-12-01

    Destabilization of subsea permafrost results in increasing permeability for gaseous methane long preserved in seabed deposits within and beneath permafrost. This process manifests as extensive methane ebullition, driving significantly elevated methane aqueous concentrations - up to three orders higher than atmospheric equilibrium. In places, bubbles release as a vigorous flow that often reach the surface; on echograms, such bubble plums create specific flare-like images. To detect, map, monitor, and analyze bubble-induced methane fluxes, in summer 2011 and 2012, sonar data were gathered over extensive seep fields in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) in frame of International Siberian Shelf Study (ISSS). To measure the bubble screen backscattering strength, the acoustic sensors were calibrated using a target ("ideal" sphere) provided by the manufacturer (SIMRAD). To establish a relationship between the backscattering strength of bubbles releasing from the seafloor and methane flux rate, an in-situ calibration using engineered seeps was performed. To apportion fraction of bubbles reaching the sea surface and assess remaining gaseous content of bubbles, in winter 2011-2013, direct in-situ observations of bubbles, ascending from the seafloor, were performed using high-speed high-resolution video camera. Results of inter-calibration between engineered quantitative in-situ calibrations and qualitative calibration recommended by manufacturer were applied to evaluate bubble-induced methane fluxes observed in the ESAS in summer 2011 and 2012.

  5. Measuring and modeling the bubble population produced by an underwater explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Fred D; Lee Culver, R

    2011-11-01

    Underwater explosions have been studied intensively in the United States since 1941 [e.g., R. H. Cole, Underwater Explosions (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1945), pp. 3-13]. Research to date has primarily focused on the initial shock and subsequent pressure waves caused by the oscillations of the "gas-globe" resulting from charge detonation. These phenomena have relatively short timescales (typically less than 2 s). However, after the gas-globe rises through the water column and breaks the surface, there remains behind a cloud of bubbles and perhaps debris from the explosion container which has been markedly less studied. A recent experiment measured the spatial and temporal acoustic response of the bubble cloud resulting from a 13.6 kg PBXN-111 charge detonated at 15.2 m (50 ft) depth. A directional projector was used to propagate linear frequency-modulated (5-65 kHz) and 40 kHz tonal pulses through the bubble cloud. Two hydrophone arrays were positioned so as to measure the energy lost in propagating through the bubble cloud. Three methods have been utilized to invert measurements and estimate the bubble population. The bubble population estimates have been used to develop a model for the bubble population resulting from an underwater explosion.

  6. Ultrasound induced bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue fractionation induced by acoustic cavitation is desired for non-invasive tissue removal in histotripsy, while being a potential injury mechanism in other therapeutic ultrasound treatments such as lithotripsy. In this work, we investigate the formation of bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts to inform a class of damage models. Agar phantoms of different stiffness were subjected to a series of multi-cycle ultrasound bursts, using a burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) protocol, and simultaneously imaged at 200 frames per second (1 image per ultrasound burst). Some bubbles become visible in images ( 200 microns) due to the negative pressure ( 7.5 MPa) in the initial bursts, and the number of visible bubbles increases continuously during the subsequent bursts. A Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model, which accounts for viscoelastic confinement of agar gels, is developed. Material fatigue leading to eventual irreversible fracture-like failure in this model is proposed to explain the key observations. In addition to isolated, approximately spherical bubbles, long tunnel-like features are observed, which are seemingly lines of joined bubbles along a possible fracture or defect. The geometry of these tunnel-like features is quantified, and a physical explanation for tunnel formation is proposed in terms of bubble expansion and unstable collapse. This work was supported by NIH NIDDK Grant P01-DK043881.

  7. Sound propagation in a monodisperse bubble cloud: from the crystal to the glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, M; Hocquet, T; Leroy, V

    2010-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the propagation of a monochromatic pressure wave in an unbounded monodisperse bubbly liquid. We begin with the case of a regular bubble array--a bubble crystal--for which we derive a dispersion relation. In order to interpret the different branches of this relation, we introduce a formalism, the radiative picture, which is the adaptation to acoustics of the standard splitting of the electric field in an electrostatic and a radiative part in Coulomb gauge. In the case of an irregular or completely random array--a bubble glass--and at wavelengths large compared to the size of the bubble array spatial inhomogeneities, the difference between order and disorder is not felt by the pressure wave: a dispersion relation still holds, coinciding with that of a bubble crystal with the same bubble size and air volume fraction at the centre of its first Brillouin zone. This relation is discussed and compared to that obtained by Foldy in the framework of his multiscattering approach.

  8. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  9. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  10. Application of holography in jet acoustic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Source strength distribution on a jet boundary was obtained from measurements using the principle of acoustic holography. Measurements were conducted in an open field. Measurement of acoustic pressure on a cylindrical twodimensional contour located close to the vibrating jet boundary was used to obtain the acoustic ...

  11. The Housing Bubble Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Dean Baker

    2005-01-01

    This paper explains the basic facts about the current housing market. It lays out the evidence that the rise in housing prices constitutes a housing bubble - and explains what can be expected when it inevitably collapses.

  12. Magnetism. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y; Pearson, John E; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G E; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-17

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally "blow" magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Microstreaming from Sessile Semicylindrical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Guo, Lin; Wang, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Powerful steady streaming flows result from the ultrasonic driving of microbubbles, in particular when these bubbles have semicylindrical cross section and are positioned in contact with a microfluidic channel wall. We have used this streaming in experiment to develop novel methods for trapping and sorting of microparticles by size, as well as for micromixing. Theoretically, we arrive at an analytical description of the streaming flow field through an asymptotic computation that, for the first time, reconciles the boundary layers around the bubble and along the substrate wall, and also takes into account the oscillation modes of the bubble. This approach gives insight into changes in the streaming pattern with bubble size and driving frequency, including a reversal of the flow direction at high frequencies with potentially useful applications. Present address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri S &T.

  14. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for Vbubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  15. Bubbles and foams in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerre, Axel; Miralles, Vincent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2014-09-28

    Microfluidics offers great tools to produce highly-controlled dispersions of gas into liquid, from isolated bubbles to organized microfoams. Potential technological applications are manifold, from novel materials to scaffolds for tissue engineering or enhanced oil recovery. More fundamentally, microfluidics makes it possible to investigate the physics of complex systems such as foams at scales where the capillary forces become dominant, in model experiments involving few well-controlled parameters. In this context, this review does not have the ambition to detail in a comprehensive manner all the techniques and applications involving bubbles and foams in microfluidics. Rather, it focuses on particular consequences of working at the microscale, under confinement, and hopes to provide insight into the physics of such systems. The first part of this work focuses on bubbles, and more precisely on (i) bubble generation, where the confinement can suppress capillary instabilities while inertial effects may play a role, and (ii) bubble dynamics, paying special attention to the lubrication film between bubble and wall and the influence of confinement. The second part addresses the formation and dynamics of microfoams, emphasizing structural differences from macroscopic foams and the influence of the confinement.

  16. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  17. Comparing the effect of biosurfactant and chemical surfactant on bubble hydrodynamics in a flotation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanran; Yang, Jingjing; Lei, Shaomin; Wang, Xinbing

    2013-01-01

    Bubble hydrodynamics is fundamental to the performance of the flotation process widely used in the separation industry. To compare the effect of biosurfactants and chemical synthetic surfactants on bubble hydrodynamics in the flotation process, the motion of a single bubble and the size distribution of bubble swarms in various surfactants (rhamnolipid, tea saponin and Triton X-100) solutions were observed directly using a high-speed video camera in a laboratory scale flotation column. Bubble trajectory, dimensions, velocity and size distribution were then determined through image analysis. The results indicated that the addition of biosurfactants had the same significant effects on bubble motion and size distribution as chemosynthetic surfactants. The biosurfactant effect on bubble behavior was also found to depend on their type and concentration. In general, the effect of tea saponin was stronger than another biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) used in the present study. The present findings implied that some biosurfactants like tea saponin can replace chemosynthetic surfactants in controlling bubble behavior in flotation operation. This will contribute to promoting the use of green environmentally friendly flotation agents in the separation industry.

  18. Measuring online social bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Nikolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media have become a prevalent channel to access information, spread ideas, and influence opinions. However, it has been suggested that social and algorithmic filtering may cause exposure to less diverse points of view. Here we quantitatively measure this kind of social bias at the collective level by mining a massive datasets of web clicks. Our analysis shows that collectively, people access information from a significantly narrower spectrum of sources through social media and email, compared to a search baseline. The significance of this finding for individual exposure is revealed by investigating the relationship between the diversity of information sources experienced by users at both the collective and individual levels in two datasets where individual users can be analyzed—Twitter posts and search logs. There is a strong correlation between collective and individual diversity, supporting the notion that when we use social media we find ourselves inside “social bubbles.” Our results could lead to a deeper understanding of how technology biases our exposure to new information.

  19. A Experimental Investigation of Acoustic Cavitation in Gaseous Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Dario Felipe

    1990-01-01

    High amplitude radial pulsations of a single gas bubble in several glycerine and water mixtures have been observed in an acoustic stationary wave system at acoustic pressure amplitudes as high as 1.5 bars. Using a laser scattering technique, radius-time curves have been obtained experimentally which confirm the absence of surface waves. Measurements of the pulsation amplitude, the timing of the major bubble collapse, and the number of rebounds have been made and compared with the theory. From these data, calculations of the internal gas temperature and pressure during the collapse have been performed. Values of at least 2,000 K and 2,000 bars have been obtained using a sophisticated model of spherically symmetric bubble dynamics. Simultaneously, sonoluminescence (SL), a phenomenon discovered in 1933 and attributed today to the high temperatures and pressures generated during the collapse of the bubbles, were observed as short light pulses occurring once every acoustic period. The light emissions can be seen to originate at the geometric center of the bubble when observed through a microscope. Also, the simultaneity of the light emissions and the collapse of the bubble has been confirmed with the aid of a photomultiplier tube. This is the first recorded observation of SL generated by a single bubble. Comparisons of the measured quantities have been made to those predicted by several models. In addition, the implications of this research on the current understanding of cavitation related phenomena such as rectified diffusion, surface wave excitation and sonoluminescence will be discussed. Some possible future experiments are suggested which could further increase our understanding of cavitation bubble dynamics.

  20. New acoustic instrumentation for the SIMPLE superheated droplet detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felizardo, M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: felizardo@itn.pt; Martins, R.C. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, IST, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Ramos, A.R. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Morlat, T.; Girard, T.A.; Giuliani, F. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Marques, J.G. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2008-04-21

    Previous acoustic instrumentation of the SIMPLE detector has relied on the use of a low-cost piezoelectric transducer, which was generally unable to provide discrimination between true bubble nucleation events and ambiental sources of acoustic noise. The use of a high-quality electret microphone and adaptive electronics is shown to provide this capacity through reduced noise levels and distinct fast Fourier transforms of the event registration.

  1. Musical Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  2. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  4. Numerical Study of turbulent coherent structures and bubble entrainment under surfzone breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Kirby, James; Shi, Fengyan

    2011-11-01

    Wave breaking in the surf zone entrains large volumes of bubbles into the water column. These bubbles are involved in intense interactions with mean flow and turbulence, producing a complex two phase bubbly flow field. It is necessary to describe the dynamics of breaking waves as two-phase flow with air bubbles of appropriate size distribution. The present study employ a three- dimensional large eddy simulation coupled with a two-phase bubbly flow model to investigate the detailed interactions between coherent structures and bubble entrainment in a laboratory scale breaking wave. Our results show that the vortical structures under the wave front are characterized by counter-rotating vortices. These vortices are initially carried downward by the downbursts, and then subject to stretching and bending to form obliquely descending eddies. To study the effects of coherent structures on turbulence and momentum transport, we conduct a TKE budget analysis. It is found that the TKE and Reynolds stress transport are closely related to obliquely descending eddies behind wave crest. Using the two-phase bubbly flow model, we are able to simulate the bubble entrainment and transport after wave breaking. Our results support the conclusion that the obliquely descending eddies have great effects on bubble entrainment and downward dispersion.

  5. Studies of a novel sensor for assessing the spatial distribution of cavitation activity within ultrasonic cleaning vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Hodnett, Mark; Carroll, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes investigations of the spatial distribution of cavitation activity generated within an ultrasonic cleaning vessel, undertaken using a novel cavitation sensor concept. The new sensor monitors high frequency acoustic emissions (>1 MHz) generated by micron-sized bubbles driven into acoustic cavitation by the applied acoustic field. Novel design features of the sensor, including its hollow, cylindrical shape, provide the sensor with spatial resolution, enabling it to associate the megahertz acoustic emissions produced by the cavitating bubbles with specific regions of space within the vessel. The performance of the new sensor has been tested using a 40 kHz ultrasonic cleaner employing four transducers and operating at a nominal electrical power of 140 W under controlled conditions. The results demonstrate the ability of the sensors to identify 'hot-spots' and 'cold-spots' in cavitation activity within the vessel, and show good qualitative agreement with an assessment of the spatial distribution of cavitation determined through erosion monitoring of thin sheets of aluminium foil. The implications of the studies for the development of reliable methods of quantifying the performance of cleaning vessels are discussed in detail.

  6. Bubble dynamics and sonoluminescence from helium or xenon in mercury and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Kato, Kazumi

    2012-09-01

    Numerical simulations of bubble pulsation and sonoluminescence (SL) have been performed for helium or xenon bubbles in mercury and water under the experimental conditions of Futakawa [M. Futakawa, T. Naoe, and M. Kawai, in Nonlinear Acoustics—Fundamentals and Applications: 18th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics (ISNA 18), AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1022, edited by B. O. Enflo, C. M. Hedberg, and L. Kari (AIP, New York, 2008), p. 197]. The results of the numerical simulations have revealed that the bubble expansion is much larger in water than in mercury mainly because the density of water is one order of magnitude smaller than that of mercury. The SL intensity is higher in water than that in mercury although the maximum bubble temperature is lower. This is caused by the much larger amount of vapor inside a bubble as the saturated vapor pressure of water is four orders of magnitude larger than that of mercury at room temperature. The SL intensity from xenon is much larger than that from helium due both to lower ionization potential and higher bubble temperature due to lower thermal conductivity. The instantaneous SL power may be as large as 200 W from xenon in water. The maximum temperature inside a xenon bubble in mercury may be as high as about 80 000 K. It is suggested that the maximum pressure in mercury due to shock waves emitted from bubbles increases as the SL intensity increases, although they are not simply correlated in water because the amount of water vapor trapped inside a bubble influences the SL intensity in a complex way.

  7. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV in clinical applications of imaging, embolic therapy, and therapeutic delivery. ADV is a physical process in which the pressure waves of ultrasound induce a phase transition that causes superheated liquid nanodroplets to form gas bubbles. The bubbles provide ultrasonic imaging contrast and other functions. ADV of perfluoropentane was used extensively in imaging for preclinical trials in the 1990s, but its use declined rapidly with the advent of other imaging agents. In the last decade, ADV was proposed and explored for embolic occlusion therapy, drug delivery, aberration correction, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU sensitization. Vessel occlusion via ADV has been explored in rodents and dogs and may be approaching clinical use. ADV for drug delivery is still in preclinical stages with initial applications to treat tumors in mice. Other techniques are still in preclinical studies but have potential for clinical use in specialty applications. Overall, ADV has a bright future in clinical application because the small size of nanodroplets greatly reduces the rate of clearance compared to larger contrast agent bubbles and yet provides the advantages of ultrasonographic contrast, acoustic cavitation, and nontoxicity of conventional perfluorocarbon contrast agent bubbles.

  8. Technical Note: Detection of gas bubble leakage via correlation of water column multibeam images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider von Deimling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydroacoustic detection of natural gas release from the seafloor has been conducted in the past by using singlebeam echosounders. In contrast, modern multibeam swath mapping systems allow much wider coverage, higher resolution, and offer 3-D spatial correlation. Up to the present, the extremely high data rate hampers water column backscatter investigations and more sophisticated visualization and processing techniques are needed. Here, we present water column backscatter data acquired with a 50 kHz prototype multibeam system over a period of 75 seconds. Display types are of swath-images as well as of a "re-sorted" singlebeam presentation. Thus, individual and/or groups of gas bubbles rising from the 24 m deep seafloor clearly emerge in the acoustic images, making it possible to estimate rise velocities. A sophisticated processing scheme is introduced to identify those rising gas bubbles in the hydroacoustic data. We apply a cross-correlation technique adapted from particle imaging velocimetry (PIV to the acoustic backscatter images. Temporal and spatial drift patterns of the bubbles are assessed and are shown to match very well to measured and theoretical rise patterns. The application of this processing to our field data gives clear results with respect to unambiguous bubble detection and remote bubble rise velocimetry. The method can identify and exclude the main source of misinterpretations, i.e. fish-mediated echoes. Although image-based cross-correlation techniques are well known in the field of fluid mechanics for high resolution and non-inversive current flow field analysis, we present the first application of this technique as an acoustic bubble detector.

  9. Sediment distribution and dynamics inferred by integrated electromagnetic, optical and acoustic benthic profiling in the western Bay of Plenty (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, T.; von Dobeneck, T. F.; Müller, H.; Bryan, K. R.; de Lange, W. P.; Battershill, C.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2011, New Zealand experienced a marine pollution disaster after the MV RENA ran aground in the western Bay of Plenty. To estimate the transport and burial potential of contaminants, local sediment distribution and dynamics had to be assessed quickly. Our study made use of the benthic profiler NERIDIS III of the University of Bremen. 33 cross-shore profiles, each ca. 8 km long, have been surveyed. The main instrument is a controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) sensor, which is measuring the electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the seafloor. High-resolution, overlapping seafloor photos have been taken by a bow-mounted digital camera. An on-board CTD with turbidity sensor complete the sensor arrangement. From the EM data, porosity and magnetite concentrations have been calculated and interpolated. The resulting maps show specific zones of magnetite enrichment, higher concentrations are correlated to low porosity. Photos have been used along with acoustic backscatter measured by a sidescan sonar to sketch out a preliminary map of sediment facies. Based on this, sides for grab sampling were selected. By taking grain size and mineralogy into account, a detailed map of the regional lithofacies could be created. Local sediment dynamics have been inferred by the observation of bedforms, the turbidity of bottom water and lithofacies. The results show two anti-parallel longshore transport paths dependent on differing weather conditions and water depths. The longshore magnetite distribution indicates that the heavy mineral fraction is mainly affected by storm-induced sediment transport. Our study demonstrates how integrated benthic profiling adds to the interpretability of data obtained by established methods. By bridging the gap between area-covering, but indirect data from hydroacoustics and precise, but punctual data from samples, benthic profiling enables fast and detailed assessment of sediment distribution and dynamics on a large scale.

  10. A novel methodology to measure methane bubble sizes in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemond, H.; Delwiche, K.; Senft-Grupp, S.; Manganello, T.

    2014-12-01

    The fate of methane ebullition from lake sediments is dependent on initial bubble size. Rising bubbles are subject to dissolution, reducing the fraction of methane that ultimately enters the atmosphere while increasing concentrations of aqueous methane. Smaller bubbles not only rise more slowly, but dissolve more rapidly larger bubbles. Thus, understanding methane bubble size distributions in the water column is critical to predicting atmospheric methane emissions from ebullition. However, current methods of measuring methane bubble sizes in-situ are resource-intensive, typically requiring divers, video equipment, sonar, or hydroacoustic instruments. The complexity and cost of these techniques points to the strong need for a simple, autonomous device that can measure bubble size distributions and be deployed unattended over long periods of time. We describe a bubble sizing device that can be moored in the subsurface and can intercept and measure the size of bubbles as they rise. The instrument uses a novel optical measurement technique with infrared LEDs and IR-sensitive photodetectors combined with a custom-designed printed circuit board. An on-board microcomputer handles raw optical signals and stores the relevant information needed to calculate bubble volume. The electronics are housed within a pressure case fabricated from standard PVC fittings and are powered by size C alkaline batteries. The bill of materials cost is less than $200, allowing us to deploy multiple sensors at various locations within Upper Mystic Lake, MA. This novel device will provide information on how methane bubble sizes may vary both spatially and temporally. We present data from tests under controlled laboratory conditions and from deployments in Upper Mystic Lake.

  11. BUBBLE FORMATION EXPERIMENTS IN SNOW DENSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    イシイ, セイゴ; ナリタ, ヒデキ; マエノ, ノリカズ; Seigo, ISHII; Hideki, NARITA; Norikazu, MAENO

    1995-01-01

    Bubble formation experiments were conducted for snow composed of ice spheres 303μm in diameter at various temperatures and applied pressures. By measuring volumes of closed-off bubbles at various densities, the bubble formation density (ρ_f) and the bubble close-off density (ρ_c) were obtained. ρ_f, that is the density at which bubble formation begins, decreased with lowering temperature or pressure. On the other hand, ρ_c, that is the density at which bubble formation finishes, increased wit...

  12. Spherical Solutions of an Underwater Explosion Bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the 1D explosion bubble flow field out to the first bubble minimum is examined in detail using four different models. The most detailed is based on the Euler equations and accounts for the internal bubble fluid motion, while the simplest links a potential water solution to a stationary, Isentropic bubble model. Comparison of the different models with experimental data provides insight into the influence of compressibility and internal bubble dynamics on the behavior of the explosion bubble.

  13. On the Inception of Financial Representative Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to formalize the inception of representative bubbles giving the condition under which they may arise. We will find that representative bubbles may start at any time, depending on the definition of a behavioral component. This result is at odds with the theory of classic rational bubbles, which are those models that rely on the fulfillment of the transversality condition by which a bubble in a financial asset can arise just at its first trade. This means that a classic rational bubble (differently from our model cannot follow a cycle since if a bubble exists, it will burst by definition and never arise again.

  14. An experimental investigation of acoustic cavitation in gaseous liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Dario F.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    1990-11-01

    High amplitude radial pulsations of a single bubble in several glycerine and water mixtures were observed in an acoustic stationary wave system at acoustic pressure amplitudes on the order of 150 kPa at 21 to 25 kHz. Sonoluminescence, a phenomenon generally attributed to the high temperatures generated during the collapse of cavitation bubbles, was observed as short light pulses occurring once every acoustic period. These emissions could be seen to originate at the geometric center of the bubble when observed through a microscope. It was observed that the light emissions occurred simultaneously with the bubble collapse. Using a laser scattering technique, experimental radius-time curves were obtained which confirmed the absence of surface waves which are expected at pressure amplitudes above 100 kPa. From these radius-time curves, measurements of the pulsation amplitude, the timing of the major bubble collapse, and the number of rebounds were made and compared with several theories. The implications of this research on the current understanding of cavitation were discussed.

  15. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  16. The Time Evolution of Streamer Discharges in Single and Multiple Bubbles in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujovic, Selman; Groele, Joseph; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid water lies at the heart of a variety of revisited technological applications ranging from water treatment to wound healing. Plasma ignition and propagation in water, however, is poorly understood. It has been theorized that plasma streamer propagation takes place in microbubbles, namely streamer bubble hopping. In this work, discharge development in single and multiple bubble acoustic systems is investigated using high-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy. Optical filters allow for time resolved measurements of specific chemical species as well. Better understanding of these breakdown processes will guide the construction of an effective plasma water purifier. NSF CBET 1336375.

  17. Measurement and Analysis of Gas Bubbles Near a Reference Electrode in Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supathorn Phongikaroon; Steve Herrmann; Shelly Li; Michael Simpson

    2005-10-01

    Bubble size distributions (BSDs) near a reference electrode (RE) in aqueous glycerol solutions of an electrolyte NaCl have been investigated under various gas superficial velocities (U{sub S}). BSD and voltage reading of the solution were measured by using a high-speed digital camera and a pH/voltage meter, respectively. The results show that bubble size (b) increases with liquid viscosity ({mu}{sub c}) and U{sub S}. Self-similarity is seen and can be described by the log-normal form of the continuous number frequency distribution. The result shows that b controls the voltage reading in each solution. As b increases, the voltage increases because of gas bubbles interrupting their electrolyte paths in the solutions. An analysis of bubble rising velocity reveals that Stokes Law should be used cautiously to describe the system. The fundamental equation for bubble formation was developed via Newton's second law of motion and shown to be the function of three dimensionless groups--Weber number, Bond number, and Capillary number. After linking an electrochemical principle in the practical application, the result indicates that the critical bubble size is {approx}177 {micro}m. Further analysis suggests that there may be 3000 to 70,000 bubbles generated on the anode surface depending on the size of initial bubbles and provides the potential cause of the efficiency drop observed in the practical application.

  18. Bubble rearrangements dynamics in foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Merrer, Marie; Costa, Severine; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Hoehler, Reinhard

    2011-11-01

    Liquid foams are jammed dispersions of gas bubbles in a surfactant solution. Their structure evolves with time because surface tension drives a diffusive gas exchange between neighboring bubbles. This coarsening leads to a build-up of stresses which are relaxed upon local intermittent bubble rearrangements. These events govern the slow viscoelastic foam response, and similar bubble rearrangements are the elementary processes of plastic flow. Thus, the rearrangement duration is a key parameter describing how the microstructure dynamics control the macroscopic rheological response. We probe the duration of coarsening-induced rearrangements in 3D foams using a multiple light scattering technique (time resolved Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy) as a function of the surfactant chemistry and the liquid fraction. As the foam becomes wetter, the confinement pressure of the packing goes to zero and the contacts between bubbles vanish. For mobile interfaces, we find that the rearrangements slow down as the jamming point is approached. These findings are compared to scaling laws which reveal an analogy between rearrangements dynamics in foams and granular suspensions.

  19. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sheen S.; Apfelbaum, Evan P.; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L.; Zajac, Edward J.; Stark, David

    2014-01-01

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others’ decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  20. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sheen S; Apfelbaum, Evan P; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L; Zajac, Edward J; Stark, David

    2014-12-30

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others' decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity.

  1. Conformal grasping using feedback controlled bubble actuator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Wei; Stein, Richard; Mittal, Manoj; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an implementation of a bubble actuator array (BAA) based active robotic skin, a modular system, onto existing low cost robotic end-effectors or prosthetic hands for conformal grasping of objects. The active skin is comprised of pneumatically controlled polyurethane rubber bubbles with overlaid sensors for feedback control. Sensor feedback allows the BAA based robotic skin to conformally grasp an object with an explicit uniform force distribution. The bubble actuator array reported here is capable of applying up to 4N of force at each point of contact and tested for conformally grasping objects with a radius of curvature up to 57.15mm. Once integrated onto a two-finger gripper with one degree of freedom (DOF), the active skin was shown to reduce point of contact forces of up to 50% for grasped objects.

  2. Collective bubble oscillations as a component of surf infrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph; Garcés, Milton; Fee, David; Pawlak, Geno

    2008-05-01

    Plunging surf is a known generator of infrasound, though the mechanisms have not been clearly identified. A model based on collective bubble oscillations created by demise of the initially entrained air pocket is examined. Computed spectra are compared to infrasound data from the island of Kauai during periods of medium, large, and extreme surf. Model results suggest that bubble oscillations generated by plunging waves are plausible generators of infrasound, and that dynamic bubble plume evolution on a temporal scale comparable to the breaking wave period may contribute to the broad spectral lobe of dominant infrasonic energy observed in measured data. Application of an inverse model has potential to characterize breaking wave size distributions, energy, and temporal changes in seafloor morphology based on remotely sensed infrasound.

  3. Preliminary results on bubble detector as personal neutron dosemeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponraju, D; Krishnan, H; Viswanathan, S; Indira, R

    2011-03-01

    The bubble detector is demonstrated as one of the best suitable neutron detectors for neutron dose rate measurements in the presence of high-intense gamma fields. Immobilisation of a volatile liquid in a superheated state and achieving uniform distribution of tiny superheated droplets were a practical challenge. A compact and reusable bubble detector with high neutron sensitivity has been developed at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research by immobilising the superheated droplets in a suitable polymer matrix. Two types of bubble detectors have been successfully developed, one by incorporating isobutane for measuring fast neutron and another by incorporating Freon-12 for both fast and thermal neutron. The performance of the detector has been tested using 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source and the results are described.

  4. Microfluidic pinball made of quasi-2D microbubbles: on the collective dynamics of confined bubbles pulsating under ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki-Berrada, Flore; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The pulsation properties of air bubbles under ultrasound have received much attention since the development of sonoporation and contrast agents. Spherical bubbles are well known to induce streaming when excited by ultrasound. Here we study how the vibration of very confined bubbles pinned to pits (assuming a quasi-2D ``pancake'' shape) influences the streaming inside a microfluidic channel. For a single bubble, 20 to 70 μm in radius, we observe the well-known parametric instability, giving rise to a shape deformation, and sketch a phase diagram of existence of the surface modes. We also evidence very active out-of-plane fluid circulations located near the bubble that are correlated with the surface modes. In the case of a bubble pair, the interaction results in an additional bipolar surface mode. We demonstrate that a long-range multipolar recirculating flow occurs from a combination of phase-lagged vibration modes. Using a large triangular lattice of these microbubbles, we obtain a unique acoustic bubble ``pinball'' driving fluid and particles in complex paths, the constructive interference between vibration modes leading to the elaborate in-plane microstreaming vortices. This work gives a new insight in bubbles efficiency to trigger local and non-local mixing in laminar flows.

  5. Trapping and exclusion zones in complex streaming patterns around a large assembly of microfluidic bubbles under ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combriat, Thomas; Mekki-Berrada, Flore; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Pulsating bubbles have proved to be a versatile tool for trapping and sorting particles. In this article, we investigate the different streaming patterns that can be obtained with a group of bubbles in a confined geometry under ultrasound. In the presence of an external flow strong enough to oppose the streaming velocities but not drag the trapped bubbles, we observe either the appearance of exclusion zones near the bubbles or asymmetric streaming patterns that we interpret as the superposition of a two-dimensional (2D) streaming function and of a potential flow. When studying a lattice of several bubbles, we show that the streaming pattern can be accurately predicted by superimposing the contributions of every pair of bubbles present in the lattice, thus allowing one to predict the sizes and the shapes of exclusion zones created by a group of bubbles under acoustic excitation. We suggest that such systems could be used to enhance mixing at a small scale or to catch and release chemical species initially trapped in vortices created around bubble pairs.

  6. Acoustic surveys for juvenile anchovy in the Bay of Biscay: Abundance estimate as an indicator of the next year's recruitment and spatial distribution patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Boyra, Guillermo

    2013-08-16

    A series of acoustic surveys (JUVENA) began in 2003 targeting juvenile anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) in the Bay of Biscay. A specific methodology was designed for mapping and estimating juvenile abundance annually, four months after the spawning season. After eight years of the survey, a consistent picture of the spatial pattern of the juvenile anchovy has emerged. Juveniles show a vertical and horizontal distribution pattern that depends on size. The younger individuals are found isolated from other species in waters closer to the surface, mainly off the shelf within the mid-southern region of the bay. The largest juveniles are usually found deeper and closer to the shore in the company of adult anchovy and other pelagic species. In these eight years, the survey has covered a wide range of juvenile abundances, and the estimates show a significant positive relationship between the juvenile biomasses and the one-year-old recruits of the following year. This demonstrates that the JUVENA index provides an early indication of the strength of next year\\'s recruitment to the fishery and can therefore be used to improve the management advice for the fishery of this short-lived species. © 2013 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

  7. 3D electrostatic charge distribution on finitely thick busbars in micro-acoustic devices: combined regularization in the near- and far-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghai-Wadji, Alireza

    2015-06-01

    The original work for 3-D charge distributions in micro-acoustic devices has been manifestly extended to account for finitely thick busbars. The work has been initiated to create a platform for simulating the electric charge localization and field enhancement at the electrode/busbar gaps depending on the thickness of the metalization in submicrometer geometries. A recipe for the construction of relevant Green's functions has been provided. A universal function (UF) for setting up system matrices in the method-of-moments' implementations has been constructed. Universal functions (moments of Green's functions) are by construction highly smooth and easy to compute. This work also presents a comprehensive completion of earlier work. For the first time, the calculation of the UF for a 3-D problem has been presented in great detail, highlighting the underlying regularization techniques. It is shown that the singular Fourier-type integrals involved can be regularized simultaneously in the near- and far-field. The pinnacle of the work is the detailed demonstration of the property that Hadamard's finite part regularization naturally arises in the construction of UFs. Three lemmata facilitate the understanding of the underlying concepts.

  8. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean’s environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension–driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm3, elongational rates at least as large as ϵ˙=1.0×108 s−1 are generated in a fragmentation volume of ∼2×10−6 μL. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont. PMID:26504222

  9. Modelling of Break-up and Coalescence in Bubbly Two-Phase Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of gas-liquid two-phase flow with high superficial velocity in a vertical pipe were conducted with the use of the commercial software package STAR-CD 3.27. The change in bubble size due to breakup and coalescence was modelled by the Sγ model. The applicability and performance of the Sγ model in modelling of gasliquid bubbly flow were studied. The sensitivity of the Sγ model to the distribution moment γ, and the drainage mode were investigated. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data of Hibiki et al., (2001. Good agreement was achieved for axial velocities and void fraction for all tested cases. It was found in this work that the Sγ model is capable of predicting with reasonable accuracy the bubble size and its distribution even in high void fraction. Except in the near wall region, the simulated bubble size and therefore the interfacial area density fit well with the experiment measurements. It was observed that the predicted bubble size and interfacial area density obtained from both the S0 and S2 models are more or less the same, indicating that the numerical results are independent of the distribution moment γ. It was further found that, the drainage mode greatly affects the bubble size: an increase in mobility of the bubble surface enhances the coalescence and leads to an over-prediction of the bubble size in the pipe centre. The bubble size increases with the increase of the gas phase superficial velocity while the variation of the interfacial area density is smaller as it is a combined function of the bubble size and local gas hold-up.

  10. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  11. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    fundamental limits to the use of acoustic methods and signal processing imposed by ice and ocean processes in the new Arctic. The hope is that these...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  12. Effect of viscosity on bubble and pressure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Celliers, Peter M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1997-06-01

    The formation and evolution of acoustic waves and vapor bubbles as a result of laser irradiation have received considerable attention, particularly with respect to angioplasty, thrombolysis, and ophthalmic laser applications. Pressure waves and bubbles have been implicated in undesirable tissue damage yet they can be beneficially utilized while limiting their negative impact. Either planar or spherical pressure waves can be produced through manipulation of irradiation parameters and geometry. An OPO laser emitting approximately 5 ns pulses of visible radiation was delivered through an optical fiber to a cuvette containing dye dissolved in either water or glycerin. Absorption was varied by altering the dye concentration and wavelength of the OPO laser and the spot size was varied by employing multiple sizes of optical fiber. A nitrogen-pumped dye laser with a pulse duration of approximately 5 ns was used as an illumination source. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer technique enabled visualization and quantification of the pressure waves; bubble evolution was monitored with shadowgrams. A comparison was made between experimental and theoretical results for water and glycerin.

  13. Sound radiation of 3 MHz driven gas bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, S; Lohse, D; Zomack, M; Grossmann, Siegfried; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Zomack, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The sound radiation of 3 MHz acoustically driven air bubbles in liquid is analysed with respect to possible applications in second harmonic ultrasound diagnostics devices, which have recently come into clinical use. In the forcing pressure amplitude P_a = 1-10 atm and ambient radius R_0 = 0.5-5 \\mu m parameter domain a narrow regime around the resonance radius R_0 \\sim 1-1.5 \\mu m and relatively modest P_a \\sim 2-2.5 atm is identified in which optimal sound yield in the second harmonic is achieved while maintaining spherical stability of the bubble. For smaller P_a and larger R_0 hardly any sound is radiated; for larger P_a bubbles become unstable towards non-spherical shape oscillations of their surface. The computation of these instabilities is essential for the evaluation of the optimal parameter regime. A region of slightly smaller R_0 and P_a \\sim 1-3 atm is best suited to achieve large ratios of the second harmonic to the fundamental intensity. Spherical stability is guaranteed in the suggested regimes ...

  14. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  15. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  16. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in June 1969 at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Since then, more than 10,000 acoustic neuroma ... of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and a nursing staff. Specialists in neuroimaging join the team when ...

  18. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  19. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  20. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  1. Bubble nucleation in an explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, D.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a temperature close to the critical temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures spontaneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure

  2. Does monetary policy generate asset price bubbles ?

    OpenAIRE

    Blot, Christophe; Hubert, Paul; Labondance, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    This paper empirically assesses the effect of monetary policy on asset price bubbles and aims to disentangle the competing predictions of theoretical bubble models. First, we take advantage of the model averaging feature of Principal Component Analysis to estimate bubble indicators, for the stock, bond and housing markets in the United States and Euro area, based on the structural, econometric and statistical approaches proposed in the literature to measure bubbles. Second, we ...

  3. Bubble performance of a novel dissolved air flotation(DAF) unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-tai; Peng, Feng-xian; Wu, Xiao-qing; Luan, Zhao-kun

    2004-01-01

    ES-DAF, a novel DAF with low cost, high reliability and easy controllability, was studied. Without a costly air saturator, ES-DAF consists of an ejector and a static mixer between the pressure side and suction side of the recycle rotary pump. The bubble size distribution in this novel unit was studied in detail by using a newly developed CCD imagination through a microscope. Compared with M-DAF under the same saturation pressure, ES-DAF can produce smaller bubble size and higher bubble volume concentration, especially in lower pressure. In addition, the bubble size decreases with the increase of reflux ratio or decrease of superficial air-water ratio. These results suggested that smaller bubbles will be formed when the initial number of nucleation sites increases by enhancing the turbulence intensity in the saturation system.

  4. Blown Bubble Assembly of Graphene Oxide Patches for Transparent Electrodes in Carbon-Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiting; Yang, Yanbing; Li, Yitan; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Wenjing; Shi, Enzheng; Zou, Mingchu; Yang, Liusi; Yang, Xiangdong; Li, Yan; Cao, Anyuan

    2015-12-30

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have a strong tendency to aggregate, and their interfaces can impose limitations on the electrical conductivity, which would hinder practical applications. Here, we present a blown bubble film method to assemble GO sheets with a uniform distribution over a large area and further interconnect individual GO sheets by transforming the bubble film into graphitized carbon. A conventional polymer was used to facilitate the bubble blowing process and disperse GO sheets in the bubble. Then, the bubble film was annealed on a Cu substrate, resulting in a highly transparent reduced GO (RGO)-carbon hybrid structure consisting of RGO patches well adhered to the carbon film. We fabricated RGO-carbon/Si solar cells with power conversion efficiencies up to 6.42%, and the assembled RGO patches hybridized with carbon film can form an effective junction with Si, indicating potential applications in thin film electronic devices and photovoltaics.

  5. Numerical prediction of underwater noise reduction during offshore pile driving by a Small Bubble Curtain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göttsche, Klaus Marco; Juhl, Peter Møller; Steinhagen, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Small Bubble Curtains are an effective technique to reduce the underwater noise being emitted during offshore pile driving. In order to protect the marine fauna, noise reduction becomes even more important, since the increasing contribution of offshore wind energy leads to a rising number...... of offshore construction sites in order to cover the need for clean energy. Within the Bubble Curtain air bubbles are injected into the water surrounding the pile. When these are driven by the pressure wave being emitted from the pile, reflection, scattering and absorption effects occur. Within this paper......, a method is presented in order to predict the rate of noise attenuation achieved by a Small Bubble Curtain. For this purpose, the bubble distribution is determined with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The noise radiation during pile driving is simulated by Finite Element Analysis and an Effective Medium...

  6. Automated high-speed video analysis of the bubble dynamics in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Sattelmayer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and a very good optical access. For the optical observation of the bubble behaviour the high-speed cinematography is used. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, a huge number of bubble cycles could be analysed. The structure of the developed algorithms for the detection of the bubble diameter, the bubble lifetime, the lifetime after the detachment process and the waiting time between two bubble cycles is described. Subsequently, the results from using these automated procedures are presented. A remarkable novelty is the presentation of all results as distribution functions. This is of physical importance because the commonly applied spatial and temporal averaging leads to a loss of information and, moreover, to an unjustified deterministic view of the boiling process, which exhibits in reality a very wide spread of bubble sizes and characteristic times. The results show that the mass flux dominates the temporal bubble behaviour. An increase of the liquid mass flux reveals a strong decrease of the bubble life - and waiting time. In contrast, the variation of the heat flux has a much smaller impact. It is shown in addition that the investigation of the bubble history using automated algorithms delivers novel information with respect to the bubble lift-off probability. (Author)

  7. Eulerian simulations of bubble behaviour in a two-dimensional gas-solid bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Huilin; Liu Wentie; Zhao Guangbo; He Yurong [Harbin Institute of Technology (China). Dept. of Power Engineering; Li Feng [Jiangxi Boiler Co. Ltd., Nanchang (China)

    2002-07-01

    In the present study, the CFD model is based on a two-fluid model extended with the kinetic theory of granular flow. The simulation results of bubble diameter and bubble rise velocity are compared to the Darton equation and the Davidson model in a free bubbling fluidized bed. The predicted values are in reasonable agreement with the values from the Darton bubble size equation and the Davidson model for isolated bubbles. It is shown that the break-up and direct wall interaction effects influence the dynamic bubble behavior in the free bubbling fluidized beds. (author)

  8. Experimental study on gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow in a large square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haomin; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow exists in many industrial areas. Therefore, many experiments for gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow have been carried out in circular pipes for bubbly turbulent flow model. However, the cross-section of many flow passages are not the circular shape. Since the secondary flow of 2nd kind for single phase turbulent flow in a non-circular duct is well-known, the interaction between the secondary flow of 2nd kind and bubbles in gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow in the non-circular duct could play an important role. In this study, in order to validate gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow model in the non-circular duct, measurements were performed in a large square (136 mm × 136 mm) duct with duct length of 2.8m. The distributions of primary velocity, void fraction and turbulent Reynolds stresses were measured by a hot film probe. It is well-known that the primary velocity distribution of the bubbly flow in a circular pipe has a peak in the pipe center. In contrast, it was found that the primary velocity peaked near the corner of the square duct. In addition, primary velocity distribution changes under various flow conditions were discussed by measuring data of the void fraction and turbulent Reynolds stresses. Financially Supported by JSPS and G-COE Program(J-051).

  9. Behavior of a Large Bubble in a Horizontal Channel : 2nd Report, Large Bubble Penetrating into Running Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    坂口, 忠司; 小澤, 守; 浜口, 八朗; 福永, 毅

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of a large bubble penetrating into running liquid in a horizontal pipe has been studied experimentally. The flow regime of the large bubble is classified into the following three regimes : a steadily moving bubble regime, a transition regime and a stationary bubble regime. In the steadily moving bubble regime, the large bubble penetrates at constant velocity and the shape of the bubble nose does not change along the pipe. An analysis of the behavior of the large bubble has been c...

  10. On Collisionless Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Petersen, P.I.

    1973-01-01

    Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero.......Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero....

  11. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  12. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  13. Large eddy simulations of laminar separation bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Francois

    The flow over blades and airfoils at moderate angles of attack and Reynolds numbers ranging from ten thousand to a few hundred thousands undergoes separation due to the adverse pressure gradient generated by surface curvature. In many cases, the separated shear layer then transitions to turbulence and reattaches, closing off a recirculation region -- the laminar separation bubble. To avoid body-fitted mesh generation problems and numerical issues, an equivalent problem for flow over a flat plate is formulated by imposing boundary conditions that lead to a pressure distribution and Reynolds number that are similar to those on airfoils. Spalart & Strelet (2000) tested a number of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models for a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate. Although results with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model were encouraging, none of the turbulence models tested reliably recovered time-averaged direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The purpose of this work is to assess whether large eddy simulation (LES) can more accurately and reliably recover DNS results using drastically reduced resolution -- on the order of 1% of DNS resolution which is commonly achievable for LES of turbulent channel flows. LES of a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate are performed using a compressible sixth-order finite-difference code and two incompressible pseudo-spectral Navier-Stokes solvers at resolutions corresponding to approximately 3% and 1% of the chosen DNS benchmark by Spalart & Strelet (2000). The finite-difference solver is found to be dissipative due to the use of a stability-enhancing filter. Its numerical dissipation is quantified and found to be comparable to the average eddy viscosity of the dynamic Smagorinsky model, making it difficult to separate the effects of filtering versus those of explicit subgrid-scale modeling. The negligible numerical dissipation of the pseudo-spectral solvers allows an unambiguous

  14. Study of the Dynamics of a Condensing Bubble Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is used to discretize the governing equations for a steam bubble inside a tube filled with water. The bubbles are kept at higher temperature compared to its boiling point while the liquid is kept subcooled. Heat transfer is allowed to take place between the two phases by virtue of which the bubble will condense. Three separate probability distribution functions are used in LBM to handle continuity, momentum and energy equations separately. The interface is considered to be diffused within a narrow zone and it has been modeled using convective Cahn-Hillard equation. Combined diffused interface-LBM framework is adapted accordingly to handle complex interface separating two phases having high density ratio. Developed model is validated with respect to established correlations for instantaneous equivalent radius of a spherical condensing bubble. Numerical snapshots of the simulation depict that the bubble volume decreases faster for higher degree of superheat. The degrees of superheat are varied over a wide range to note its effect on bubble shape and size. Effect of initial volume of the bubble on the condensation rate is also studied. It has been observed that for a fixed degree of superheat, the condensation rate is not exactly proportional to its volume. Due to the variation in interfacial configuration for different sized bubbles, condensation rate changes drastically. Influence of gravity on the rate of condensation is also studied using the developed methodology.

  15. Affirmative Discrimination and the Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author discusses how affirmative action contributed to an unnatural rise in enrollments in college. In considering the higher education bubble, he makes the case that as the opposition to preferences continues to build, the momentum of this trend will only increase as funding shrinks. He offers some tentative answers to a series…

  16. The Coming Law School Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how forty years of politicized hiring in the law schools has left its destructive mark. The results are potentially catastrophic: Market forces and internal law school policies may be combining to produce a legal education bubble the likes of which the country has never seen. (Contains 11 footnotes.)

  17. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  18. Explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, D.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a very high temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures homogeneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles almost instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse and

  19. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  20. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.